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Sample records for adjacent bone tissue

  1. Craniofacial bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wan, Derrick C; Nacamuli, Randall P; Longaker, Michael T

    2006-04-01

    Repair and reconstruction of the craniofacial skeleton represents a significant biomedical burden, with thousands of procedures per-formed annually secondary to injuries and congenital malformations. Given the multitude of current approaches, the need for more effective strategies to repair these bone deficits is apparent. This article explores two major modalities for craniofacial bone tissue engineering: distraction osteogenesis and cellular based therapies. Current understanding of the guiding principles for each of these modalities is elaborated on along with the knowledge gained from clinical and investigative studies. By laying this foundation, future directions for craniofacial distraction and cell-based bone engineering have emerged with great promise for the advancement of clinical practice.

  2. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age.

  3. [Bone grafts using tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Delloye, C

    2001-01-01

    An overview of bone grafts and, in particular, the allografts is presented. The availability of bone allografts, has promoted their use at the expense of the autograft. However, the loss of the cellular activity in an allograft, makes them less performant than an autograft. The use of an allograft in a small size defect can be advocated provided that the implantation technique is stringent. In case of a large segmental bone defect, an allograft can be considered whereas an autograft is not anymore possible. A massive bone allograft allows an anatomical reconstruction and the preservation of strong tendon insertions. In tumor surgery, a bone allograft has become one of the best options to reshape the skeleton. To offset the poor remodeling of the massive bone allografts, and to improve the take of small size bone allografts, researches are presently carried on, using tissue engineering in order to recover a cellular population. The aim is to combine an acellular bone graft with the cells of the recipient. Cells are procured from the bone marrow. Stromal cells are isolated, cultured, so that they will grow with an osteoblastic phenotype. They can be used alone or in association with a bone graft. It is believed that tomorrow such cellular therapy will become a routine procedure.

  4. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  5. Brown adipose tissue and bone

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, M E; Enerbäck, S

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is capable of transforming chemically stored energy, in the form of triglycerides, into heat. Recent studies have shown that metabolically active BAT is present in a large proportion of adult humans, where its activity correlates with a favorable metabolic status. Hence, the tissue is now regarded as an interesting target for therapies against obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes, the hypothesis being that an induction of BAT would be beneficial for these disease states. Apart from the association between BAT activity and a healthier metabolic status, later studies have also shown a positive correlation between BAT volume and both bone cross-sectional area and bone mineral density, suggesting that BAT might stimulate bone anabolism. The aim of this review is to give the reader a brief overview of the BAT research field and to summarize and discuss recent findings regarding BAT being a potential player in bone metabolism. PMID:27152171

  6. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  7. The cytology of the dental follicle and adjacent alveolar bone during tooth eruption in the dog.

    PubMed

    Marks, S C; Cahill, D R; Wise, G E

    1983-11-01

    Previous studies from our laboratories have shown that premolar eruption in dogs depends upon the presence of the dental follicle and is independent of root or crown growth or attachment to the oral epithelium. The present study is an analysis of the cellular composition of the dental follicle and the cellular investment of the adjacent walls of the bony crypt before and during eruption of the third and fourth mandibular permanent premolars in young beagle dogs. Four premolar follicles and their adjacent bony crypts were examined at 2-week intervals over 12 weeks before and during eruption of these teeth. Tissues were removed, fixed, processed, and oriented so that each follicle and the adjacent crypt wall could be reproducibly examined in vertical and horizontal planes. Mononuclear cells with abundant cytoplasm, euchromatic nuclei, and prominent nucleoli were present in juxtavascular location in the coronal part of the dental follicle; and these cells increased in number immediately preceding and during tooth eruption in parallel with an increase in osteoclasts on the adjacent crypt wall. These data are interpreted to mean that the coronal part of the dental follicle may coordinate the alveolar bone resorption required for tooth eruption by attracting and directing to the crypt wall a population of mononuclear cells, which either become osteoclasts and/or direct osteoclastic activity during tooth eruption.

  8. Polymeric composites containing carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sahithi, Kolli; Swetha, Maddela; Ramasamy, Kumarasamy; Srinivasan, Narasimhan; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan

    2010-04-01

    Several natural and synthetic polymers are now available for bone tissue engineering applications but they may lack mechanical integrity. In recent years, there are reports emphasizing the importance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in supporting bone growth. CNTs possess exceptional mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties, facilitating their use as reinforcements or additives in various materials to improve the properties of the materials. Biomaterials containing polymers often are placed adjacent to bone. The use of CNTs is anticipated in these biomaterials applied to bone mainly to improve their overall mechanical properties and expected to act as scaffolds to promote and guide bone tissue regeneration. This review paper provides a current state of knowledge available examining the use of the polymeric composites containing CNTs for promoting bone growth.

  9. Tissue Microarray Analysis Applied to Bone Diagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Rafael Barrios; Silva, Maria Regina Regis; Alves, Maria Teresa Seixas; Evison, Martin Paul; Guimarães, Marco Aurelio; Francisco, Rafaella Arrabaca; Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato

    2017-01-01

    Taphonomic processes affecting bone post mortem are important in forensic, archaeological and palaeontological investigations. In this study, the application of tissue microarray (TMA) analysis to a sample of femoral bone specimens from 20 exhumed individuals of known period of burial and age at death is described. TMA allows multiplexing of subsamples, permitting standardized comparative analysis of adjacent sections in 3-D and of representative cross-sections of a large number of specimens. Standard hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and silver methenamine, and picrosirius red staining, and CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry were applied to TMA sections. Osteocyte and osteocyte lacuna counts, percent bone matrix loss, and fungal spheroid element counts could be measured and collagen fibre bundles observed in all specimens. Decalcification with 7% nitric acid proceeded more rapidly than with 0.5 M EDTA and may offer better preservation of histological and cellular structure. No endothelial cells could be detected using CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry. Correlation between osteocytes per lacuna and age at death may reflect reported age-related responses to microdamage. Methodological limitations and caveats, and results of the TMA analysis of post mortem diagenesis in bone are discussed, and implications for DNA survival and recovery considered. PMID:28051148

  10. EXPRESSION MECHANISM AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF NOB1 IN GASTRIC CANCER TISSUE AND ADJACENT NORMAL TISSUE.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W-P; Liu, X; Yang, Y; Liu, Y-F

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effect and relationship of NOB1 in the development of gastric cancer, based on an analysis of NOB1expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent tissue. Thirty gastric cancer tissue samples taken during surgery with complete pathological data and their related adjacent normal tissue were examined in this study. NOB1 protein expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Real-time PCR was used to detect NOB1 mRNA expression, which provided a basis on which to explore the clinical pathological characteristics for patients with gastric cancer. Results show that NOB1 protein in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue were diffusely expressed both in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The positive expression rate in gastric cancer tissue was 73%, higher than that in adjacent normal tissue (47%). Both the reference NAPDH and NOB1 amplification are reflected in the amplification curve in standard S-shape and the unimodal solubility curve which was not altered by non-specific amplification and primer dimer. NOB1 mRNA relative expression in cancer tissue was 4.899∓1.412. NOB1 expression had no direct relationship with the patients’ age, gender, tumor differentiation or infiltration degree, lymphatic metastasis, distant metastasis nor pTNM periodization, but was directly related to the size of the tumor. All the findings in this paper suggest that NOB1 can be one of the focuses for diagnosing and treating gastric cancer and that its protein expression is likely to increase with the growth of tumor, thus playing a great role in the incidence and development of gastric cancer.

  11. Tissue microenvironments within functional cortical subdivisions adjacent to focal stroke.

    PubMed

    Katsman, Diana; Zheng, Jian; Spinelli, Kateri; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2003-09-01

    Stroke produces a region of complete cell death and areas of partial damage, injury, and gliosis. The spatial relationship of these regions of damage to the infarct core and within spared neuronal circuits has not been identified. A model of cortical stroke was developed within functional subsets of the somatosensory cortex. Infarct size, regions of apoptosis, oxidative DNA damage, heat shock protein induction, and subtypes of reactive gliosis were precisely mapped with the somatosensory body map, quantified, and interrelated. Three tissue microenvironments were recognized: zones of partial ischemic damage, heat shock protein induction, and distributed gliosis. These three zones involved progressively more distant cortical regions, each larger than the infarct core. The zone of partial ischemic damage represents an overlap region of apoptotic cell death, oxidative DNA damage, loss of synaptic connections, and local reactive gliosis. The zone of distributed gliosis occupies distinct functional areas of the somatosensory cortex. The tissue reorganization induced by stroke is much larger than the stroke site itself. Adjacent tissue microenvironments are sites of distinct reactive cellular signaling and may serve as a link between the processes of acute cell death and delayed neuronal plasticity after focal stroke.

  12. Carbon nanotubes with high bone-tissue compatibility and bone-formation acceleration effects.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Narita, Nobuyo; Murakami, Narumichi; Nakamura, Isao; Nakamura, Koichi; Ishigaki, Norio; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Taruta, Seiichi; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Saito, Naoto

    2008-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used in various fields as composites with other substances or alone to develop highly functional materials. CNTs hold great interest with respect to biomaterials, particularly those to be positioned in contact with bone such as prostheses for arthroplasty, plates or screws for fracture fixation, drug delivery systems, and scaffolding for bone regeneration. Accordingly, bone-tissue compatibility of CNTs and CNT influence on bone formation are important issues, but the effects of CNTs on bone have not been delineated. Here, it is found that multi-walled CNTs adjoining bone induce little local inflammatory reaction, show high bone-tissue compatibility, permit bone repair, become integrated into new bone, and accelerate bone formation stimulated by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). This study provides an initial investigational basis for CNTs in biomaterials that are used adjacent to bone, including uses to promote bone regeneration. These findings should encourage development of clinical treatment modalities involving CNTs.

  13. Carbon Nanostructures in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Brian Lee; Naderi, Naghmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent advances in developing biocompatible materials for treating bone loss or defects have dramatically changed clinicians’ reconstructive armory. Current clinically available reconstructive options have certain advantages, but also several drawbacks that prevent them from gaining universal acceptance. A wide range of synthetic and natural biomaterials is being used to develop tissue-engineered bone. Many of these materials are currently in the clinical trial stage. Methods: A selective literature review was performed for carbon nanostructure composites in bone tissue engineering. Results: Incorporation of carbon nanostructures significantly improves the mechanical properties of various biomaterials to mimic that of natural bone. Recently, carbon-modified biomaterials for bone tissue engineering have been extensively investigated to potentially revolutionize biomaterials for bone regeneration. Conclusion: This review summarizes the chemical and biophysical properties of carbon nanostructures and discusses their functionality in bone tissue regeneration. PMID:28217212

  14. Bone Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Ami R.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Nukavarapu, Syam P.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has trended steeply upward and is expected to double by 2020, especially in populations where aging is coupled with increased obesity and poor physical activity. Engineered bone tissue has been viewed as a potential alternative to the conventional use of bone grafts, due to their limitless supply and no disease transmission. However, bone tissue engineering practices have not proceeded to clinical practice due to several limitations or challenges. Bone tissue engineering aims to induce new functional bone regeneration via the synergistic combination of biomaterials, cells, and factor therapy. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of bone tissue engineering, highlighting the current state of this field. Further, we review the recent advances of biomaterial and cell-based research, as well as approaches used to enhance bone regeneration. Specifically, we discuss widely investigated biomaterial scaffolds, micro- and nano-structural properties of these scaffolds, and the incorporation of biomimetic properties and/or growth factors. In addition, we examine various cellular approaches, including the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs), adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and their clinical application strengths and limitations. We conclude by overviewing the challenges that face the bone tissue engineering field, such as the lack of sufficient vascularization at the defect site, and the research aimed at functional bone tissue engineering. These challenges will drive future research in the field. PMID:23339648

  15. [Osteostimulating effect of bone xenograft on bone tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Balin, V N; Balin, D V; Iordanishvili, A K; Musikin, M I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of experimental case-control study performed in 28 dogs divided in 2 groups was to assess local tissue reactions on bone xenograft transplantation; dynamics of bone remodeling and formation at the site of bone defect wall contacting with bone xenograft; dynamics and mechanisms of xenograft remodeling. Transplantation of xenograft in conventional bone defects did not cause inflammatory of destructive reactions because of high biocompatibility of the material. At transplantation site active fibrous bone trabeculae formation filling the spaces between xenograft participles was observed. On the 90th day newly formed bone showed lammelar structure. Simultaneously from the 42d day the invasion of cell elements from recipient bed into the material was seen leading to xenograft resorption. The observed dynamics may be assessed as gradual substitution of xenograft with newly formed host bone structures.

  16. Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Holzwarth, Jeremy M.; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a highly interdisciplinary field that seeks to tackle the most challenging bone-related clinical issues. The major components of bone tissue engineering are the scaffold, cells, and growth factors. This review will focus on the scaffold and recent advancements in developing scaffolds that can mimic the natural extracellular matrix of bone. Specifically, these novel scaffolds mirror the nanofibrous collagen network that comprises the majority of the non-mineral portion of bone matrix. Using two main fabrication techniques, electrospinning and thermally-induced phase separation, and incorporating bone-like minerals, such as hydroxyapatite, composite nanofibrous scaffolds can improve cell adhesion, stem cell differentiation, and tissue formation. This review will cover the two main processing techniques and how they are being applied to fabricate scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. It will then cover how these scaffolds can enhance the osteogenic capabilities of a variety of cell types and survey the ability of the constructs to support the growth of clinically relevant bone tissue. PMID:21944829

  17. Vascularization in bone tissue engineering constructs

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E.; Stahl, Alexander M.; Shanjani, Yaser; Yang, Yunzhi

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization of large bone grafts is one of the main challenges of bone tissue engineering (BTE), and has held back the clinical translation of engineered bone constructs for two decades so far. The ultimate goal of vascularized BTE constructs is to provide a bone environment rich in functional vascular networks to achieve efficient osseointegration and accelerate restoration of function after implantation. To attain both structural and vascular integration of the grafts, a large number of biomaterials, cells, and biological cues have been evaluated. This review will present biological considerations for bone function restoration, contemporary approaches for clinical salvage of large bone defects and their limitations, state-of-the-art research on the development of vascularized bone constructs, and perspectives on evaluating and implementing novel BTE grafts in clinical practice. Success will depend on achieving full graft integration at multiple hierarchical levels, both between the individual graft components as well as between the implanted constructs and their surrounding host tissues. The paradigm of vascularized tissue constructs could not only revolutionize the progress of bone tissue engineering, but could also be readily applied to other fields in regenerative medicine for the development of new innovative vascularized tissue designs. PMID:25616591

  18. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  19. Remodelling of periodontal tissues adjacent to sites treated according to the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR).

    PubMed

    Brägger, U; Hämmerle, C H; Mombelli, A; Bürgin, W; Lang, N P

    1992-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the remodelling of alveolar bone adjacent to periodontal sites following therapy according to the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) using computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA), and to compare the radiographic results to traditional clinical parameters. As required for digital subtraction analyses, periodically reproducible radiographs were obtained using a modification of the Rinn System and individual acrylic bite blocks for periodical identical radiographs. Ideally, a digital subtraction image from a site where absolutely no change in density had occurred would show a perfect cancellation of the structures. An average grey level value of 128 (the middle of the digitizer grey level range set by software) would show up at each pixel. Areas with grey levels < 128 in the subtraction image would indicate loss in density and grey levels > 128 would indicate increase in density. Within the subtraction images, areas were defined using the cursor to draw "regions of interest" (ROI) projected on the bony defect exposed to GTR covering the crestal bone as well as the region of potential "bonefill". The mean, median, the standard deviation and range of the grey levels of pixels within a particular ROI were calculated. Similarly sized ROI were drawn in bone areas not exposed to the GTR procedure serving as controls. The differences in the mean grey levels of all pixels within a particular ROI between the baseline, 3 and 12 months images were calculated for documentation of gain or loss in density. From 14 patients, standardized radiographs were available from baseline, 3 months and 12 months postsurgically, depicting one infraosseous defect before and after treatment according to the principles of GTR. The densitometric changes observed in these defects were compared to the clinically assessed changes measured at the site with the deepest baseline pocket depth. A mean clinical attachment gain of 2.36 mm

  20. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshchenko, V. P. Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  1. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, V. P.; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  2. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering.

  3. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  4. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chiara, Gardin; Letizia, Ferroni; Lorenzo, Favero; Edoardo, Stellini; Diego, Stomaci; Stefano, Sivolella; Eriberto, Bressan; Barbara, Zavan

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering. PMID:22312283

  5. Prefabricated vascularized bone flap: a tissue transformation technique for bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alam, M I; Asahina, I; Seto, I; Oda, M; Enomoto, S

    2001-09-15

    In this study, an attempt was made to transform a muscle vascularized pedicle raised on host vessels into a vascularized bone flap, using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2). The purpose of this study was to produce new bone vascularized in nature to increase the survival rate of the subsequently grafted bone and to fabricate the newly formed bone into the desired shape. Silicone molds in the shape of a rat mandible were used to deliver rat bone matrix impregnated with or without rhBMP-2. A muscle pedicle the same size as the mold was raised on the saphenous vessels in the rat thigh and then sandwiched in the center of the silicone molds. The molds were sliced in half and each section was filled with rat bone matrix that was impregnated either with 25 microg of rhBMP-2 for the experimental group or with diluting material alone for the control group. The sandwiched flaps were then secured by tying them to the adjacent muscles and were harvested at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Three and six rats were used in the control and experimental groups at each time point, respectively. Bone formation was assessed in the ex vivo specimens by macroscopic, radiologic, and histologic evaluation. Macroscopically, the continuation of the vascular pedicle was clearly visible for both the control and experimental muscle flaps. However, no evidence of muscle-tissue transformation was observed in the control flaps, whereas all the flaps treated with rhBMP-2 produced new bone that replicated the shape of the mold exactly and had saphenous vessels supplying the newly formed bone. This study demonstrates that this experimental model has the potential to be therapeutically applied for effective bone reconstruction.

  6. Predicting bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in reduced bone width.

    PubMed

    Eser, Atilim; Tonuk, Ergin; Akca, Kivanc; Dard, Michel M; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-09-03

    The objective of this study was to predict time-dependent bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in patients with reduced bone width. The remodeling of bone around titanium tissue-level, and titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implants was studied under 100 N oblique load for one month by implementing the Stanford theory into three-dimensional finite element models. Maximum principal stress, minimum principal stress, and strain energy density in peri-implant bone and displacement in x- and y- axes of the implant were evaluated. Maximum and minimum principal stresses around tissue-level implant were higher than bone-level implants and both bone-level implants experienced comparable stresses. Total strain energy density in bone around titanium implants slightly decreased during the first two weeks of loading followed by a recovery, and the titanium-zirconium implant showed minor changes in the axial plane. Total strain energy density changes in the loading and contralateral sides were higher in tissue-level implant than other implants in the cortical bone at the horizontal plane. The displacement values of the implants were almost constant over time. Tissue-level implants were associated with higher stresses than bone-level implants. The time-dependent biomechanical outcome of titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implant was comparable to the titanium implant.

  7. Effects of radiotherapy on uveal melanomas and adjacent tissues

    PubMed Central

    Groenewald, C; Konstantinidis, L; Damato, B

    2013-01-01

    Most uveal melanomas are treated with radiotherapy. An adequate understanding of the effects of radiation on the tumour and the healthy ocular tissues is necessary. Ionizing radiation damages cell membranes, organelles, and DNA. Irradiated cells are lysed or undergo apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. These effects occur in tumour cells and vascular endothelial cells, resulting in tumour shrinkage, ischaemia, infarction, exudation, and fibrosis, which can cause exudative maculopathy, serous retinal detachment, rubeosis, and neovascular glaucoma (ie, ‘toxic tumour syndrome'). Such abnormalities must be distinguished from collateral damage to healthy ocular tissues that receive high doses of radiation, and these include radiation-induced retinopathy, optic neuropathy, choroidopathy, cataract, and scleral necrosis. Radiation retinopathy can be treated effectively with photodynamic therapy, anti-angiogenic agents, and intravitreal steroid injections. In some patients, optic neuropathy may improve with intravitreal steroids or anti-angiogenic agents. Neovascular glaucoma resolves with intra-cameral bevacizumab. Exudative retinal detachment can regress with intra-vitreal steroid injections. Cataract is treated in the usual manner. Scleral necrosis, if severe, may require grafting, possibly using a lamellar flap from the same eye. Depending on the bulk of the residual toxic tumour, treatment can consist of intra-vitreal steroids and/or anti-angiogenic agents, transpupillary thermotherapy or photodynamic therapy to the tumour, or surgical removal of the tumour by endo- or exo-resection. Measures aimed at preventing collateral damage include eccentric placement of ruthenium plaques or iodine seeds and delivery of a notched proton beam. The decision to treat a uveal melanoma with radiotherapy requires the ability to manage iatrogenic side effects and complications. PMID:23196647

  8. Microgravity Stress: Bone and Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Susan A; Martinez, Daniel A; Boudreaux, Ramon D; Mantri, Anita V

    2016-03-15

    The major alterations in bone and the dense connective tissues in humans and animals exposed to microgravity illustrate the dependency of these tissues' function on normal gravitational loading. Whether these alterations depend solely on the reduced mechanical loading of zero g or are compounded by fluid shifts, altered tissue blood flow, radiation exposure, and altered nutritional status is not yet well defined. Changes in the dense connective tissues and intervertebral disks are generally smaller in magnitude but occur more rapidly than those in mineralized bone with transitions to 0 g and during recovery once back to the loading provided by 1 g conditions. However, joint injuries are projected to occur much more often than the more catastrophic bone fracture during exploration class missions, so protecting the integrity of both tissues is important. This review focuses on the research performed over the last 20 years in humans and animals exposed to actual spaceflight, as well as on knowledge gained from pertinent ground-based models such as bed rest in humans and hindlimb unloading in rodents. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms for alterations in bone and connective tissues with exposure to microgravity, but intriguing questions remain to be solved, particularly with reference to biomedical risks associated with prolonged exploration missions.

  9. Bioactive scaffolds for bone and ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Vincenzo; Causa, Filippo; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2007-05-01

    Bone and ligament injuries present the greatest challenges in connective tissue regeneration. The design of materials for these applications lies at the forefront of material science and is the epitome of its current ambition. Indeed, its goal is to design and fabricate reproducible, bioactive and bioresorbable 3D scaffolds with tailored properties that are able to maintain their structure and integrity for predictable times, even under load-bearing conditions. Unfortunately, the mechanical properties of today's available porous scaffolds fall short of those exhibited by complex human tissues, such as bone and ligament. The manipulation of structural parameters in the design of scaffolds and their bioactivation, through the incorporation of soluble and insoluble signals capable of promoting cell activities, are discussed as possible strategies to improve the formation of new tissues both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the different approaches adopted to develop bioactive composite systems for use as temporary scaffolds for bone and anterior ligament regeneration.

  10. Imaging of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Terence P.; Motley, Matthew W.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Bhakta, Roshni; Boskey, Adele L.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a paradigm for quantitative molecular imaging of bone cell activity. We hypothesized the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of the osteoblast enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) using a small imaging molecule in combination with 19Flourine magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (19FMRSI). 6, 8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP), a fluorinated ALP substrate that is activatable to a fluorescent hydrolysis product was utilized as a prototype small imaging molecule. The molecular structure of DiFMUP includes two Fluorine atoms adjacent to a phosphate group allowing it and its hydrolysis product to be distinguished using 19Fluorine magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19FMRS) and 19FMRSI. ALP-mediated hydrolysis of DiFMUP was tested on osteoblastic cells and bone tissue, using serial measurements of fluorescence activity. Extracellular activation of DiFMUP on ALP-positive mouse bone precursor cells was observed. Concurringly, DiFMUP was also activated on bone derived from rat tibia. Marked inhibition of the cell and tissue activation of DiFMUP was detected after the addition of the ALP inhibitor levamisole. 19FMRS and 19FMRSI were applied for the non-invasive measurement of DiFMUP hydrolysis. 19FMRS revealed a two-peak spectrum representing DiFMUP with an associated chemical shift for the hydrolysis product. Activation of DiFMUP by ALP yielded a characteristic pharmacokinetic profile, which was quantifiable using non-localized 19FMRS and enabled the development of a pharmacokinetic model of ALP activity. Application of 19FMRSI facilitated anatomically accurate, non-invasive imaging of ALP concentration and activity in rat bone. Thus, 19FMRSI represents a promising approach for the quantitative imaging of bone cell activity during bone formation with potential for both preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:21799916

  11. Coexisiting adenoma and granuloma involving the right inferior parathyroid gland with adjacent ectopic thymic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mayank; Kandasamy, Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions, particularly granulomas, involving adenoma of the parathyroid gland are rare. Ectopic thymic tissue is commonly associated with the thyroid and/or parathyroid gland due to their close embryonic relationship. We report a rare case of coexisting adenoma and granuloma of the parathyroid gland with adjacent ectopic thymic tissue. PMID:24957592

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Jiajia; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiujun; Hu, Fen

    2015-05-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  14. Improved repair of bone defects with prevascularized tissue-engineered bones constructed in a perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Li, Ming; Liu, Pei-Lai; Zhang, Yuan-Kai; Lu, Jian-Xi; Li, Jian-Min

    2014-10-01

    Vascularization of tissue-engineered bones is critical to achieving satisfactory repair of bone defects. The authors investigated the use of prevascularized tissue-engineered bone for repairing bone defects. The new bone was greater in the prevascularized group than in the non-vascularized group, indicating that prevascularized tissue-engineered bone improves the repair of bone defects. [Orthopedics. 2014; 37(10):685-690.].

  15. Expression Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) in tumor adjacent normal breast tissue and breast tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Zárate, Alejandro; Harshfield, Benjamin J; Hu, Rong; Knoblauch, Nick; Beck, Andrew H; Hankinson, Susan E; Carey, Vincent; Tamimi, Rulla M; Hunter, David J; Quackenbush, John; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer, the majority of which are located in intergenic or intronic regions. To explore regulatory impacts of these variants we conducted expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analyses on tissue samples from 376 invasive postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) diagnosed from 1990-2004. Expression analysis was conducted on all formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (and on 264 adjacent normal samples) using the Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array. Significance and ranking of associations between tumor receptor status and expression variation was preserved between NHS FFPE and TCGA fresh-frozen sample sets (Spearman r = 0.85, p<10^-10 for 17 of the 21 Oncotype DX recurrence signature genes). At an FDR threshold of 10%, we identified 27 trans-eQTLs associated with expression variation in 217 distinct genes. SNP-gene associations can be explored using an open-source interactive browser distributed in a Bioconductor package. Using a new a procedure for testing hypotheses relating SNP content to expression patterns in gene sets, defined as molecular function pathways, we find that loci on 6q14 and 6q25 affect various gene sets and molecular pathways (FDR < 10%). Although the ultimate biological interpretation of the GWAS-identified variants remains to be uncovered, this study validates the utility of expression analysis of this FFPE expression set for more detailed integrative analyses.

  16. Expression Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) in tumor adjacent normal breast tissue and breast tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Zárate, Alejandro; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Hu, Rong; Knoblauch, Nick; Beck, Andrew H.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Carey, Vincent; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Hunter, David J.; Quackenbush, John; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer, the majority of which are located in intergenic or intronic regions. To explore regulatory impacts of these variants we conducted expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analyses on tissue samples from 376 invasive postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) diagnosed from 1990–2004. Expression analysis was conducted on all formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (and on 264 adjacent normal samples) using the Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array. Significance and ranking of associations between tumor receptor status and expression variation was preserved between NHS FFPE and TCGA fresh-frozen sample sets (Spearman r = 0.85, p<10^-10 for 17 of the 21 Oncotype DX recurrence signature genes). At an FDR threshold of 10%, we identified 27 trans-eQTLs associated with expression variation in 217 distinct genes. SNP-gene associations can be explored using an open-source interactive browser distributed in a Bioconductor package. Using a new a procedure for testing hypotheses relating SNP content to expression patterns in gene sets, defined as molecular function pathways, we find that loci on 6q14 and 6q25 affect various gene sets and molecular pathways (FDR < 10%). Although the ultimate biological interpretation of the GWAS-identified variants remains to be uncovered, this study validates the utility of expression analysis of this FFPE expression set for more detailed integrative analyses. PMID:28152060

  17. Effects of holmium:YAG laser on equine articular cartilage and subchondral bone adjacent to traumatic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael A.; Haugland, L. Mark; Bellamy, Janine; Johnson, Lanny L.; Rohrer, Michael D.; Walls, Robert C.; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of Ho:YAG laser energy on articular cartilage and subchondral bone adjacent to traumatically created cartilage lesions in a continuous weight-bearing model were investigated. The 2.1 micrometers wavelength was delivered in hand-controlled contact and near-contact hard tissue arthroscopic surgery in a saline medium. Bilateral arthroscopy was performed on normal antebrachiocarpal and intercarpal joints of four adult horses. One-hundred twenty traumatic lesions were created on three weight-bearing articular surfaces with a knife, curette, or a motorized burr. Depths of the lesions were partial and full thickness. Configurations of the lesions were lacerations, scrapes, and craters. Left limbs were used as controls. Right limb lesions were treated with various intensities of laser energy. Animals were sacrificed at intervals of 1, 3, and 8 weeks. Gross microscopic anatomy was documented, and tissue sections were subjected to blind review by a pathologist. Mankin grading for cellularity and proteoglycan content was used to qualitatively evaluate cartilage response. Cartilage adjacent to all lesions exposed to laser energy had better cellularity and proteoglycan content than corresponding controls by Mankin grading.

  18. [Reaction of bone tissue elements on synthetic bioresorbable materials based on lactic and glycolic acids].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, A A; Grigor'ian, A S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adverse effects of synthetic polymeric bioresorbable materials based on lactic and glycolic acids on the bone tissue. The study was carried-out on 40 Wister-line rats. Four types of bioresorbable polymeric materials were implanted: PolyLactide Glycolide Acid (PLGA), Poly-L-Lactide Acid (PLLA); Poly-96L/4D-Lactide Acid (96/4 PLDLA); Poly-70L/30D-Lactide Acid (70/30 PLDLA). The results showed connective tissue formation (fibrointegration) bordering bone adjacent to implanted materials. This proved the materials to cause pathogenic influence on the bone which mechanisms are described in the article.

  19. Screening of the residual normal ovarian tissue adjacent to orthotopic epithelial ovarian carcinomas in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G H; Wang, S T; Yao, M Z; Cai, J H; Chen, C Y; Yang, Z X; Hong, L; Yang, S Y

    2014-04-16

    The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility and methods of screening the residual normal ovarian tissue adjacent to orthotopic ovarian carcinomas in nude mice. Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR3) were subcutaneously implanted for a tumor source and ovarian orthotopic transplantation. The cancer tissue, proximal paraneoplastic tissue, middle paraneoplastic tissue, remote paraneoplastic tissue, and normal ovarian tissue were removed. CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 expression was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We obtained 35 paraneoplastic residual ovarian tissues with normal biopsies from 40 cases of an orthotopic epithelial ovarian carcinoma model (87.5%). CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 expression was lower in proximal paraneoplastic tissue than in cancer tissue (P < 0.05) and higher than in middle and remote paraneoplastic tissue (P < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the expression of these genes in middle and proximal paraneoplastic tissue as well as among residual normal ovarian tissues with different severity (P > 0.05). In ovarian tissues of 20 normal nude mice, the expression of CK- 7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 was negative. Overall, the expression levels of CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, TIMP-2, and other molecular markers showed a decreasing trend in the non-cancer tissue direction. The expression levels can be used as standards to screen residual normal ovarian tissue. We can obtain relatively safe normal ovarian tissues adjacent to epithelial ovarian cancer.

  20. Nanoscale hydroxyapatite particles for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongjian; Lee, Jaebeom

    2011-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) exhibits excellent biocompatibility with soft tissues such as skin, muscle and gums, making it an ideal candidate for orthopedic and dental implants or components of implants. Synthetic HAp has been widely used in repair of hard tissues, and common uses include bone repair, bone augmentation, as well as coating of implants or acting as fillers in bone or teeth. However, the low mechanical strength of normal HAp ceramics generally restricts its use to low load-bearing applications. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have reignited investigation of nanoscale HAp formation in order to clearly define the small-scale properties of HAp. It has been suggested that nano-HAp may be an ideal biomaterial due to its good biocompatibility and bone integration ability. HAp biomedical material development has benefited significantly from advancements in nanotechnology. This feature article looks afresh at nano-HAp particles, highlighting the importance of size, crystal morphology control, and composites with other inorganic particles for biomedical material development.

  1. Enhanced bioactive scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnik, Sonali

    Bone injuries are commonly termed as fractures and they vary in their severity and causes. If the fracture is severe and there is loss of bone, implant surgery is prescribed. The response to the implant depends on the patient's physiology and implant material. Sometimes, the compromised physiology and undesired implant reactions lead to post-surgical complications. [4, 5, 20, 28] Efforts have been directed towards the development of efficient implant materials to tackle the problem of post-surgical implant failure. [ 15, 19, 24, 28, 32]. The field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine involves the use of cells to form a new tissue on bio-absorbable or inert scaffolds. [2, 32] One of the applications of this field is to regenerate the damaged or lost bone by using stem cells or osteoprogenitor cells on scaffolds that can integrate in the host tissue without causing any harmful side effects. [2, 32] A variety of natural, synthetic materials and their combinations have been used to regenerate the damaged bone tissue. [2, 19, 30, 32, 43]. Growth factors have been supplied to progenitor cells to trigger a sequence of metabolic pathways leading to cellular proliferation, differentiation and to enhance their functionality. [56, 57] The challenge persists to supply these proteins, in the range of nano or even picograms, and in a sustained fashion over a period of time. A delivery system has yet to be developed that would mimic the body's inherent mechanism of delivering the growth factor molecules in the required amount to the target organ or tissue. Titanium is the most preferred metal for orthopedic and orthodontic implants. [28, 46, 48] Even though it has better osteogenic properties as compared to other metals and alloys, it still has drawbacks like poor integration into the surrounding host tissue leading to bone resorption and implant failure. [20, 28, 35] It also faces the problem of postsurgical infections that contributes to the implant failure. [26, 37

  2. Long-term effects of neonatal bone and joint infection on adjacent growth plates.

    PubMed

    Peters, W; Irving, J; Letts, M

    1992-01-01

    Review of children with physeal damage from neonatal infection other than the hip at Winnipeg Children's Hospital showed that six patients had residual growth interference from adjacent infection in the bone or joint. Several of the infections involved multiple joints, with growth plate arrest occurring in the distal femoral growth plate in four, in the proximal humerus in four, in the proximal femur in two, in the distal radius in one, and in the distal humerus in one. Although the initial infection was frequently believed to be successfully treated in the neonate, the clinical effect of these infections on the growth plate was not fully appreciated in five of the infants until the children reached a mean age of 9 years. Because growth abnormalities in physeal bars may not be clinically evident for several years after the initial infection has been treated, we recommend that children with bone and joint infections occurring in the first month of life be followed to skeletal maturity, observing the adjacent physis for late tethering.

  3. Drilling electrode for real-time measurement of electrical impedance in bone tissues.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Xue, Yuan; Zhang, Jianxun

    2014-03-01

    In order to prevent possible damages to soft tissues, reliable monitoring methods are required to provide valuable information on the condition of the bone being cut. This paper describes the design of an electrical impedance sensing drill developed to estimate the relative position between the drill and the bone being drilled. The two-electrode method is applied to continuously measure the electrical impedance during a drill feeding movement: two copper wire brushes are used to conduct electricity in the rotating drill and then the drill is one electrode; a needle is inserted into the soft tissues adjacent to the bone being drilled and acts as another electrode. Considering that the recorded electrical impedance is correlated with the insertion depth of the drill, we theoretically calculate the electrode-tissue contact impedance and prove that the rate of impedance change varies considerably when the drill bit crosses the boundary between two different bone tissues. Therefore, the rate of impedance change is used to determine whether the tip of the drill is located in one of cortical bone, cancellous bone, and cortical bone near a boundary with soft tissue. In vitro experiments in porcine thoracic spines were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the impedance sensing drill. The experimental results indicate that the drill, used with the proposed data-processing method, can provide accurate and reliable breakthrough detection in the bone-drilling process.

  4. Preclinical imaging in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Manuela; Boerman, Otto C; de Korte, Chris; Rijpkema, Mark; Heerschap, Arend; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank

    2014-12-01

    Since X-rays were discovered, in 1895, and since the first radiological image of a hand, bone tissue has been the subject of detailed medical imaging. However, advances in bone engineering, including the increased complexity of implant scaffolds, currently also underline the limits of X-ray imaging. Therefore, advanced follow-up imaging methods are pivotal to develop. The field of noninvasive, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging techniques (optical, ultrasound, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, etc.) offers a wide variety of tools that potentially could be considered as alternatives, or at least supportive, to the most commonly used X-ray computed tomography. Moreover, dedicated preclinical scanners have become available, with sensitivity and resolution even higher than clinical scanners, thus favoring a quick translation from preclinical to clinical applications. Furthermore, the armamentarium of bone-specific probes and contrast agents for each of this imaging modalities is constantly growing. This review focuses on such preclinical imaging tools, each with its respective strengths and weaknesses, used alone or in combination. Especially, multimodal imaging will dramatically contribute to improve the knowledge on bone healing regenerative processes.

  5. Biomimetic nanoclay scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambre, Avinash Harishchandra

    Tissue engineering offers a significant potential alternative to conventional methods for rectifying tissue defects by evoking natural regeneration process via interactions between cells and 3D porous scaffolds. Imparting adequate mechanical properties to biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is an important challenge and extends from molecular to macroscale. This work focuses on the use of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) to design polymer composite scaffolds having enhanced mechanical properties along with multiple interdependent properties. Materials design beginning at the molecular level was used in which Na-MMT clay was modified with three different unnatural amino acids and further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on improved bicompatibility with human osteoblasts (bone cells) and intermediate increase in d-spacing of MMT clay (shown by XRD), 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was further used to prepare biopolymer (chitosan-polygalacturonic acid complex) scaffolds. Osteoblast proliferation in biopolymer scaffolds containing 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was similar to biopolymer scaffolds containing hydroxyapatite (HAP). A novel process based on biomineralization in bone was designed to prepare 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay capable of imparting multiple properties to the scaffolds. Bone-like apatite was mineralized in modified clay and a novel nanoclay-HAP hybrid (in situ HAPclay) was obtained. FTIR spectroscopy indicated a molecular level organic-inorganic association between the intercalated 5-aminovaleric acid and mineralized HAP. Osteoblasts formed clusters on biopolymer composite films prepared with different weight percent compositions of in situ HAPclay. Human MSCs formed mineralized nodules on composite films and mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) in composite scaffolds without the use of osteogenic supplements. Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic polymer, was

  6. Vascularized Bone Tissue Engineering: Approaches for Potential Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lonnissa H.; Annabi, Nasim; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Bae, Hojae; Binan, Loïc; Park, Sangwon; Kang, Yunqing

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in bone tissue engineering (TE) in the past decade. However, classical bone TE strategies have been hampered mainly due to the lack of vascularization within the engineered bone constructs, resulting in poor implant survival and integration. In an effort toward clinical success of engineered constructs, new TE concepts have arisen to develop bone substitutes that potentially mimic native bone tissue structure and function. Large tissue replacements have failed in the past due to the slow penetration of the host vasculature, leading to necrosis at the central region of the engineered tissues. For this reason, multiple microscale strategies have been developed to induce and incorporate vascular networks within engineered bone constructs before implantation in order to achieve successful integration with the host tissue. Previous attempts to engineer vascularized bone tissue only focused on the effect of a single component among the three main components of TE (scaffold, cells, or signaling cues) and have only achieved limited success. However, with efforts to improve the engineered bone tissue substitutes, bone TE approaches have become more complex by combining multiple strategies simultaneously. The driving force behind combining various TE strategies is to produce bone replacements that more closely recapitulate human physiology. Here, we review and discuss the limitations of current bone TE approaches and possible strategies to improve vascularization in bone tissue substitutes. PMID:22765012

  7. Elastic properties of a porous titanium-bone tissue composite.

    PubMed

    Rubshtein, A P; Makarova, E B; Rinkevich, A B; Medvedeva, D S; Yakovenkova, L I; Vladimirov, A B

    2015-01-01

    The porous titanium implants were introduced into the condyles of tibias and femurs of sheep. New bone tissue fills the pore, and the porous titanium-new bone tissue composite is formed. The duration of composite formation was 4, 8, 24 and 52 weeks. The formed composites were extracted from the bone and subjected to a compression test. The Young's modulus was calculated using the measured stress-strain curve. The time dependence of the Young's modulus of the composite was obtained. After 4 weeks the new bone tissue that filled the pores does not affect the elastic properties of implants. After 24 and 52 weeks the Young's modulus increases by 21-34% and 62-136%, respectively. The numerical calculations of the elasticity of porous titanium-new bone tissue composite were conducted using a simple polydisperse model that is based on the consideration of heterogeneous structure as a continuous medium with spherical inclusions of different sizes. The kinetics of the change in the elasticity of the new bone tissue is presented via the intermediate characteristics, namely the relative ultimate tensile strength or proportion of mature bone tissue in the bone tissue. The calculated and experimentally measured values of the Young's modulus of the composite are in good agreement after 8 weeks of composite formation. The properties of the porous titanium-new bone tissue composites can only be predicted when data on the properties of new bone tissue are available after 8 weeks of contact between the implant and the native bone.

  8. Spatiotemporal morphometry of adjacent tissue layers with application to the study of sulcal formation

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, Francois; Glenn, Orit A.; Barkovich, A. James; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The process of brain growth involves the expansion of tissue at different rates at different points within the brain. As the layers within the developing brain evolve they can thicken or increase in area as the brain surface begins to fold. In this work we propose a new spatiotemporal formulation of tensor based volume morphometry that is derived in relation to tissue boundaries. This allows the study of the directional properties of tissue growth by separately characterizing the changes in area and thickness of the adjacent layers. The approach uses temporally weighted, local regression across a population of anatomies with different ages to model changes in components of the growth radial and tangential to the boundary between tissue layers. The formulation is applied to the study of sulcal formation from in-utero MR imaging of human fetal brain anatomy. Results show that the method detects differential growth of tissue layers adjacent to the cortical surface, particularly at sulcal locations, as early as 22 gestational weeks. PMID:21995063

  9. Expression of albumin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 in tumor tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shi-Min; Tan, Wei-Min; Deng, Wei-Xiong; Zhuang, Si-Min; Luo, Jian-Wei

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of albumin (ALB), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in tumor tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: Twenty-four HCC patients with cirrhosis who underwent hepatectomy were studied. ALB mRNA, IGF-1 mRNA, and IGFBP-3 mRNA in liver tissues (including tumor tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues) were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Liver Ki67 immunohistochemistry staining was studied. At the same time, 12 patients with cholelithiasis or liver angioma who underwent operation were segregated as normal control. RESULTS: In HCC patients with cirrhosis, hepatic ALB mRNA, IGF-1 mRNA, and IGFBP-3 mRNA of tumor tissues or adjacent non-tumor tissues were lower than the normal liver tissues, while in tumor tissues, hepatic ALB mRNA and IGFBP-3 mRNA were lower, hepatic IGF-1 mRNA was higher than in adjacent non-tumor tissues. Liver Ki67 labeling index (Ki67 LI) in tumor tissues or adjacent non-tumor tissues were higher than that in the normal liver tissues, while in tumor tissues it was higher than that in adjacent non-tumor tissues. CONCLUSION: Imbalance of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 may play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor development of liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:16015705

  10. Scaffolds based bone tissue engineering: the role of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Costa-Pinto, Ana Rita; Reis, Rui L; Neves, Nuno M

    2011-10-01

    As life expectancy increases, malfunction or loss of tissue caused by injury or disease leads to reduced quality of life in many patients at significant socioeconomic cost. Even though major progress has been made in the field of bone tissue engineering, present therapies, such as bone grafts, still have limitations. Current research on biodegradable polymers is emerging, combining these structures with osteogenic cells, as an alternative to autologous bone grafts. Different types of biodegradable materials have been proposed for the preparation of three-dimensional porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Among them, natural polymers are one of the most attractive options, mainly due to their similarities with extracellular matrix, chemical versatility, good biological performance, and inherent cellular interactions. In this review, special attention is given to chitosan as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering applications. An extensive literature survey was performed on the preparation of chitosan scaffolds and their in vitro biological performance as well as their potential to facilitate in vivo bone regeneration. The present review also aims to offer the reader a general overview of all components needed to engineer new bone tissue. It gives a brief background on bone biology, followed by an explanation of all components in bone tissue engineering, as well as describing different tissue engineering strategies. Moreover, also discussed are the typical models used to evaluate in vitro functionality of a tissue-engineered construct and in vivo models to assess the potential to regenerate bone tissue are discussed.

  11. Root length and alveolar bone level of impacted canines and adjacent teeth after orthodontic traction: a long-term evaluation

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Aldir Cordeiro; CAPISTRANO, Anderson; de ALMEIDA-PEDRIN, Renata Rodrigues; CARDOSO, Maurício de Almeida; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; CAPELOZZA, Leopoldino

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term effects of orthodontic traction on root length and alveolar bone level in impacted canines and adjacent teeth. Material and Methods Sample consisted of 16 patients (nine males and seven females), mean initial age 11 years and 8 months presenting with unilaterally maxillary impacted canines, palatally displaced, treated with the same surgical and orthodontic approach. Teeth from the impacted-canine side were assigned as Group I (GI), and contralateral teeth as control, Group II (GII). The mean age of patients at the end of orthodontic treatment was 14 years and 2 months and the mean post-treatment time was 5 years and 11 months. Both contralateral erupted maxillary canines and adjacent teeth served as control. Root length and alveolar bone level (buccal and palatal) were evaluated on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. The comparison of root length and alveolar bone level changes between groups were assessed by applying paired t-test, at a significance level of 5% (p<0.05). Results There were no statistically significant differences in root length and buccal and palatal bone levels of canines and adjacent teeth among groups. Conclusions Impacted canine treatment by closed-eruption technique associated with canine crown perforation, has a minimal effect on root length and buccal and palatal alveolar bone level in both canine and adjacent teeth, demonstrating that this treatment protocol has a good long-term prognosis. PMID:28198979

  12. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  13. The effect of devitalized trabecular bone on the formation of osteochondral tissue-engineered constructs

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eric G.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Bal, B. Sonny; Cook, James L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, evidence is presented demonstrating that devitalized trabecular bone has an inhibitory effect on in vitro chondral tissue development when used as a base material for the tissue-engineering of osteochondral constructs for cartilage repair. Chondrocyte-seeded agarose hydrogel constructs were cultured alone or attached to an underlying bony base in a chemically defined medium formulation that has been shown to yield engineered cartilaginous tissue with native Young's modulus (EY) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. By day 42 in culture the incorporation of a bony base significantly reduced these properties (EY = 87 ± 12 kPa, GAG = 1.9 ± 0.8%ww) compared to the gel-alone group (EY = 642 ± 97 kPa, GAG = 4.6 ± 1.4%ww). Similarly, the mechanical and biochemical properties of chondrocyte-seeded agarose constructs were inhibited when co-cultured adjacent to bone (unattached), suggesting that soluble factors rather than direct cell–bone interactions mediate the chondro-inhibitory bone effects. Altering the method of bone preparation, including demineralization, or the timing of bone introduction in co-culture did not ameliorate the effects. In contrast, osteochondral constructs with native cartilage properties (EY = 730 ± 65 kPa, GAG = 5.2 ± 0.9%ww) were achieved when a porous tantalum metal base material was adopted instead of bone. This work suggests that devitalized bone may not be a suitable substrate for long-term cultivation of osteochondral grafts. PMID:18718655

  14. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed.

  15. Vascularised endosteal bone tissue in armoured sauropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Cerda, Ignacio; Powell, Jaime

    2016-04-26

    The presence of well-vascularised, endosteal bone in the medullary region of long bones of nonavian dinosaurs has been invoked as being homologous to medullary bone, a specialised bone tissue formed during ovulation in birds. However, similar bone tissues can result as a pathological response in modern birds and in nonavian dinosaurs, and has also been reported in an immature nonavian dinosaur. Here we report on the occurrence of well-vascularised endosteally formed bone tissue in three skeletal elements of armoured titanosaur sauropods from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina: i) within the medullary cavity of a metatarsal, ii) inside a pneumatic cavity of a posterior caudal vertebra, iii) in intra-trabecular spaces in an osteoderm. We show that considering the criteria of location, origin (or development), and histology, these endosteally derived tissues in the saltasaurine titanosaurs could be described as either medullary bone or pathological bone. Furthermore, we show that similar endosteally formed well-vascularised bone tissue is fairly widely distributed among nondinosaurian Archosauriformes, and are not restricted to long bones, but can occur in the axial, and dermal skeleton. We propose that independent evidence is required to verify whether vascularised endosteal bone tissues in extinct archosaurs are pathological or reproductive in nature.

  16. Vascularised endosteal bone tissue in armoured sauropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Cerda, Ignacio; Powell, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The presence of well-vascularised, endosteal bone in the medullary region of long bones of nonavian dinosaurs has been invoked as being homologous to medullary bone, a specialised bone tissue formed during ovulation in birds. However, similar bone tissues can result as a pathological response in modern birds and in nonavian dinosaurs, and has also been reported in an immature nonavian dinosaur. Here we report on the occurrence of well-vascularised endosteally formed bone tissue in three skeletal elements of armoured titanosaur sauropods from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina: i) within the medullary cavity of a metatarsal, ii) inside a pneumatic cavity of a posterior caudal vertebra, iii) in intra-trabecular spaces in an osteoderm. We show that considering the criteria of location, origin (or development), and histology, these endosteally derived tissues in the saltasaurine titanosaurs could be described as either medullary bone or pathological bone. Furthermore, we show that similar endosteally formed well-vascularised bone tissue is fairly widely distributed among nondinosaurian Archosauriformes, and are not restricted to long bones, but can occur in the axial, and dermal skeleton. We propose that independent evidence is required to verify whether vascularised endosteal bone tissues in extinct archosaurs are pathological or reproductive in nature. PMID:27112710

  17. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells.

    PubMed

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues da Silva; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling.

  18. Natural Polymer-Cell Bioconstructs for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Titorencu, Irina; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Nemecz, Miruna; Jinga, Victor V

    2017-01-01

    The major goal of bone tissue engineering is to develop bioconstructs which substitute the functionality of damaged natural bone structures as much as possible if critical-sized defects occur. Scaffolds that mimic the structure and composition of bone tissue and cells play a pivotal role in bone tissue engineering applications. First, composition, properties and in vivo synthesis of bone tissue are presented for the understanding of bone formation. Second, potential sources of osteoprogenitor cells have been investigated for their capacity to induce bone repair and regeneration. Third, taking into account that the main property to qualify one scaffold as a future bioconstruct for bone tissue engineering is the biocompatibility, the assessments which prove it are reviewed in this paper. Forth, various types of natural polymer- based scaffolds consisting in proteins, polysaccharides, minerals, growth factors etc, are discussed, and interaction between scaffolds and cells which proved bone tissue engineering concept are highlighted. Finally, the future perspectives of natural polymer-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering are considered.

  19. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-02-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor.

  20. The Use of Adipose Tissue-Derived Progenitors in Bone Tissue Engineering - a Review

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Indranil; Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E.

    2016-01-01

    2500 years ago, Hippocrates realized that bone can heal without scaring. The natural healing potential of bone is, however, restricted to small defects. Extended bone defects caused by trauma or during tumor resections still pose a huge problem in orthopedics and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Bone tissue engineering strategies using stem cells, growth factors, and scaffolds could overcome the problems with the treatment of extended bone defects. In this review, we give a short overview on bone tissue engineering with emphasis on the use of adipose tissue-derived stem cells and small molecules. PMID:27781021

  1. Thermal stabilization of collagen molecules in bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Trebacz, Hanna; Wójtowicz, Krzysztof

    2005-12-30

    Differential thermal calorimetry (DSC) analysis of partially dehydrated bovine bone, demineralized bone and bovine tendon collagen was performed up to 300 degrees C to determine factors influencing stability of mineralized collagen in bone tissue. Two endothermal regions were recognized. The first, attributed to denaturation of collagen triple helix, was hydration dependent and had a peak at 155-165 degrees C in bone, 118-137 degrees C in tendon and 131-136 degrees C in demineralized bone. The second region extended from 245 to 290 degrees C in bone and from 200 to 280 degrees C in tendon and was connected with melting and decomposition of collagen. Differences in thermodynamic parameters between cortical and trabecular bone tissue were stated. Activation energy of collagen unfolding in native bone tissue increased with dehydration of the bone. From the results of the present study we conclude that dehydrated bone collagen is thermally very stable both in native and in demineralized bone. Presence of mineral additionally stabilizes bone tissue.

  2. Tissue Engineered Bone Grafts: Biological Requirements, Tissue Culture and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Mirjam; Grayson, Warren L.; Wan, Leo Q.; Marolt, Darja; Drobnic, Matej; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    The tremendous need for bone tissue in numerous clinical situations and the limited availability of suitable bone grafts are driving the development of tissue engineering approaches to bone repair. In order to engineer viable bone grafts, one needs to understand the mechanisms of native bone development and fracture healing, as these processes should ideally guide the selection of optimal conditions for tissue culture and implantation. Engineered bone grafts have been shown to have capacity for osteogenesis, osteoconduction, osteoinduction and osteointegration - functional connection between the host bone and the graft. Cells from various anatomical sources in conjunction with scaffolds and osteogenic factors have been shown to form bone tissue in vitro. The use of bioreactor systems to culture cells on scaffolds before implantation further improved the quality of the resulting bone grafts. Animal studies confirmed the capability of engineered grafts to form bone and integrate with the host tissues. However, the vascularization of bone remains one of the hurdles that need to be overcome if clinically sized, fully viable bone grafts are to be engineered and implanted. We discuss here the biological guidelines for tissue engineering of bone, the bioreactor cultivation of human mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional scaffolds, and the need for vascularization and functional integration of bone grafts following implantation. PMID:19075755

  3. Chitosan-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Levengood, Sheeny Lan; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Bone defects requiring grafts to promote healing are frequently occurring and costly problems in health care. Chitosan, a biodegradable, naturally occurring polymer, has drawn considerable attention in recent years as scaffolding material in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Chitosan is especially attractive as a bone scaffold material because it supports the attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells as well as formation of mineralized bone matrix. In this review, we discuss the fundamentals of bone tissue engineering and the unique properties of chitosan as a scaffolding material to treat bone defects for hard tissue regeneration. We present the common methods for fabrication and characterization of chitosan scaffolds, and discuss the influence of material preparation and addition of polymeric or ceramic components or biomolecules on chitosan scaffold properties such as mechanical strength, structural integrity, and functional bone regeneration. Finally, we highlight recent advances in development of chitosan-based scaffolds with enhanced bone regeneration capability. PMID:24999429

  4. VEGF expression in mesenchymal stem cells promotes bone formation of tissue-engineered bones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boling; Li, Xihai; Liang, Guiqing; Liu, Xianxiang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo vascularization and bone formation activity of tissue-engineered bone constructed using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The expression of VEGF165 in rat bone marrow MSCs was confirmed using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The MSCs were cultured together with nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (NHAC) to form tissue-engineered bone. Untransfected MSCs were used as controls. The mice were sacrificed, and the bone xenografts were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and quantified for the degree of vascularization and new bone formation. Based on our results, expression of the VEGF165 gene was detected using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry following transfection and 4 weeks of selection. The co-cultured NHAC- and VEGF-transfected MSCs had significantly higher alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity compared to the controls (P<0.05). In the mice that received the tissue-engineered bone xenografts, clumps of cartilage cells, irregular bone-like tissue and microvessels were observed. The growth of these structures progressed with time. In the control mice, however, only small amounts of bone-like and fibrotic tissue were observed. The differences between the control and experimental groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, VEGF165‑transfected bone marrow MSCs promotes vascularization of tissue-engineered bone and ectopic osteogenesis.

  5. Osteocyte density in aging subjects is enhanced in bone adjacent to remodeling haversian systems.

    PubMed

    Power, J; Loveridge, N; Rushton, N; Parker, M; Reeve, J

    2002-06-01

    The osteocyte is a candidate regulatory cell for bone remodeling. Previously, we demonstrated that there is a substantial (approximately 50%) loss of osteocytes from their lacunae in the cortex of the elderly femoral neck. Higher occupancy was evident in tissue exhibiting high remodeling and high porosity. The present study examines the distribution of osteocytes within individual osteonal systems at differing stages of the remodeling cycle. In 22 subjects, lacunar density, osteocyte density, and their quotient, the percent lacunar occupancy, was assessed up to a distance of 65 microm from the canal surface in six quiescent, resorbing, and forming osteons. In both forming (p = 0.024) and resorbing (p = 0.034) osteons, osteocyte densities were significantly higher in cases of hip fracture than controls. However, there were no significant between-group differences in lacunar occupancy. In both cases and controls, osteocyte density (p < 0.0001; mean difference +/-SEM: 157 +/- 34/mm2) and lacunar occupancy (p = 0.025; mean difference: 8.1 +/- 3.4%) were shown to be significantly higher in forming compared with quiescent osteons. Interestingly, resorbing systems also exhibited significantly elevated osteocyte density in both the fracture and the control group combined (mean difference 76 +/- 23/mm2; p = 0.003). Lacunar occupancy was also greater in resorbing compared with quiescent osteons (both groups combined: p = 0.022; mean difference: 5.7 +/- 2.3%). Elevated osteocyte density and lacunar occupancy in forming compared with quiescent systems was expected because of the likely effects of aging on quiescent osteons. However, the higher levels of these parameters in resorbing compared with quiescent systems was the opposite of what we expected and suggests that, in addition to their postulated mechanosensory role in the suppression of remodeling and bone loss, osteocytes might also contribute to processes initiating or maintaining bone resorption.

  6. In vitro simulation of pathological bone conditions to predict clinical outcome of bone tissue engineered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duong Thuy Thi

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, the geriatric population of ≥65 years of age will increase to 51.5 million in 2020; 40% of white women and 13% of white men will be at risk for fragility fractures or fractures sustained under normal stress and loading conditions due to bone disease, leading to hospitalization and surgical treatment. Fracture management strategies can be divided into pharmaceutical therapy, surgical intervention, and tissue regeneration for fracture prevention, fracture stabilization, and fracture site regeneration, respectively. However, these strategies fail to accommodate the pathological nature of fragility fractures, leading to unwanted side effects, implant failures, and non-unions. Compromised innate bone healing reactions of patients with bone diseases are exacerbated with protective bone therapy. Once these patients sustain a fracture, bone healing is a challenge, especially when fracture stabilization is unsuccessful. Traditional stabilizing screw and plate systems were designed with emphasis on bone mechanics rather than biology. Bone grafts are often used with fixation devices to provide skeletal continuity at the fracture gap. Current bone grafts include autologous bone tissue and donor bone tissue; however, the quality and quantity demanded by fragility fractures sustained by high-risk geriatric patients and patients with bone diseases are not met. Consequently, bone tissue engineering strategies are advancing towards functionalized bone substitutes to provide fracture reconstruction while effectively mediating bone healing in normal and diseased fracture environments. In order to target fragility fractures, fracture management strategies should be tailored to allow bone regeneration and fracture stabilization with bioactive bone substitutes designed for the pathological environment. The clinical outcome of these materials must be predictable within various disease environments. Initial development of a targeted

  7. Tissue-Engineered Autologous Grafts for Facial Bone Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Bernhard, Jonathan C.; Alfi, David M.; Yeager, Keith; Eton, Ryan E.; Bova, Jonathan; Shah, Forum; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Lopez, Mandi J.; Eisig, Sidney B.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Facial deformities require precise reconstruction of the appearance and function of the original tissue. The current standard of care—the use of bone harvested from another region in the body—has major limitations, including pain and comorbidities associated with surgery. We have engineered one of the most geometrically complex facial bones by using autologous stromal/stem cells, without bone morphogenic proteins, using native bovine bone matrix and a perfusion bioreactor for the growth and transport of living grafts. The ramus-condyle unit (RCU), the most eminent load-bearing bone in the skull, was reconstructed using an image-guided personalized approach in skeletally mature Yucatan minipigs (human-scale preclinical model). We used clinically approved decellularized bovine trabecular bone as a scaffolding material, and crafted it into an anatomically correct shape using image-guided micromilling, to fit the defect. Autologous adipose-derived stromal/stem cells were seeded into the scaffold and cultured in perfusion for 3 weeks in a specialized bioreactor to form immature bone tissue. Six months after implantation, the engineered grafts maintained their anatomical structure, integrated with native tissues, and generated greater volume of new bone and greater vascular infiltration than either non-seeded anatomical scaffolds or untreated defects. This translational study demonstrates feasibility of facial bone reconstruction using autologous, anatomically shaped, living grafts formed in vitro, and presents a platform for personalized bone tissue engineering. PMID:27306665

  8. Biofabrication and Bone Tissue Regeneration: Cell Source, Approaches, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Orciani, Monia; Fini, Milena; Di Primio, Roberto; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The growing occurrence of bone disorders and the increase in aging population have resulted in the need for more effective therapies to meet this request. Bone tissue engineering strategies, by combining biomaterials, cells, and signaling factors, are seen as alternatives to conventional bone grafts for repairing or rebuilding bone defects. Indeed, skeletal tissue engineering has not yet achieved full translation into clinical practice because of several challenges. Bone biofabrication by additive manufacturing techniques may represent a possible solution, with its intrinsic capability for accuracy, reproducibility, and customization of scaffolds as well as cell and signaling molecule delivery. This review examines the existing research in bone biofabrication and the appropriate cells and factors selection for successful bone regeneration as well as limitations affecting these approaches. Challenges that need to be tackled with the highest priority are the obtainment of appropriate vascularized scaffolds with an accurate spatiotemporal biochemical and mechanical stimuli release, in order to improve osseointegration as well as osteogenesis. PMID:28386538

  9. Biofabrication and Bone Tissue Regeneration: Cell Source, Approaches, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Orciani, Monia; Fini, Milena; Di Primio, Roberto; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The growing occurrence of bone disorders and the increase in aging population have resulted in the need for more effective therapies to meet this request. Bone tissue engineering strategies, by combining biomaterials, cells, and signaling factors, are seen as alternatives to conventional bone grafts for repairing or rebuilding bone defects. Indeed, skeletal tissue engineering has not yet achieved full translation into clinical practice because of several challenges. Bone biofabrication by additive manufacturing techniques may represent a possible solution, with its intrinsic capability for accuracy, reproducibility, and customization of scaffolds as well as cell and signaling molecule delivery. This review examines the existing research in bone biofabrication and the appropriate cells and factors selection for successful bone regeneration as well as limitations affecting these approaches. Challenges that need to be tackled with the highest priority are the obtainment of appropriate vascularized scaffolds with an accurate spatiotemporal biochemical and mechanical stimuli release, in order to improve osseointegration as well as osteogenesis.

  10. Bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: targeting pathological fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duong T; Burg, Karen J L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bone diseases have the highest risk of sustaining fractures and of suffering from nonunion bone healing due to tissue degeneration. Current fracture management strategies are limited in design and functionality and do not effectively promote bone healing within a diseased bone environment. Fracture management approaches include pharmaceutical therapy, surgical intervention, and tissue regeneration for fracture prevention, fracture stabilization, and fracture site regeneration, respectively. However, these strategies fail to accommodate the pathological nature of fragility fractures, leading to unwanted side effects, implant failures, and nonunions. To target fragility fractures, fracture management strategies should include bioactive bone substitutes designed for the pathological environment. However, the clinical outcome of these materials must be predictable within various disease environments. Initial development of a targeted treatment strategy should focus on simulating the physiological in vitro bone environment to predict clinical effectiveness of the engineered bone. An in vitro test system can facilitate reduction of implant failures and non-unions in fragility fractures.

  11. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  12. Multiscale modeling of bone tissue with surface and permeability control.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Coelho, Pedro; Rui Fernandes, Paulo; Carriço Rodrigues, Helder

    2011-01-11

    Natural biological materials usually present a hierarchical arrangement with various structural levels. The biomechanical behavior of the complex hierarchical structure of bone is investigated with models that address the various levels corresponding to different scales. Models that simulate the bone remodeling process concurrently at different scales are in development. We present a multiscale model for bone tissue adaptation that considers the two top levels, whole bone and trabecular architecture. The bone density distribution is calculated at the macroscale (whole bone) level, and the trabecular structure at the microscale level takes into account its mechanical properties as well as surface density and permeability. The bone remodeling process is thus formulated as a material distribution problem at both scales. At the local level, the biologically driven information of surface density and permeability characterizes the trabecular structure. The model is tested by a three-dimensional simulation of bone tissue adaptation for the human femur. The density distribution of the model shows good agreement with the actual bone density distribution. Permeability at the microstructural level assures interconnectivity of pores, which mimics the interconnectivity of trabecular bone essential for vascularization and transport of nutrients. The importance of this multiscale model relays on the flexibility to control the morphometric parameters that characterize the trabecular structure. Therefore, the presented model can be a valuable tool to define bone quality, to assist with diagnosis of osteoporosis, and to support the development of bone substitutes.

  13. [Scanning electron microscopy of heat-damaged bone tissue].

    PubMed

    Harsanyl, L

    1977-02-01

    Parts of diaphyses of bones were exposed to high temperature of 200-1300 degrees C. Damage to the bone tissue caused by the heat was investigated. The scanning electron microscopic picture seems to be characteristic of the temperature applied. When the bones heated to the high temperature of 700 degrees C characteristic changes appear on the periostal surface, higher temperatura on the other hand causes damage to the compact bone tissue and can be observed on the fracture-surface. Author stresses the importance of this technique in the legal medicine and anthropology.

  14. Bone mechanobiology, gravity and tissue engineering: effects and insights.

    PubMed

    Ruggiu, Alessandra; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2015-12-01

    Bone homeostasis strongly depends on fine tuned mechanosensitive regulation signals from environmental forces into biochemical responses. Similar to the ageing process, during spaceflights an altered mechanotransduction occurs as a result of the effects of bone unloading, eventually leading to loss of functional tissue. Although spaceflights represent the best environment to investigate near-zero gravity effects, there are major limitations for setting up experimental analysis. A more feasible approach to analyse the effects of reduced mechanostimulation on the bone is represented by the 'simulated microgravity' experiments based on: (1) in vitro studies, involving cell cultures studies and the use of bioreactors with tissue engineering approaches; (2) in vivo studies, based on animal models; and (3) direct analysis on human beings, as in the case of the bed rest tests. At present, advanced tissue engineering methods allow investigators to recreate bone microenvironment in vitro for mechanobiology studies. This group and others have generated tissue 'organoids' to mimic in vitro the in vivo bone environment and to study the alteration cells can go through when subjected to unloading. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the bone tissue response to mechanostimuli will help developing new strategies to prevent loss of tissue caused by altered mechanotransduction, as well as identifying new approaches for the treatment of diseases via drug testing. This review focuses on the effects of reduced gravity on bone mechanobiology by providing the up-to-date and state of the art on the available data by drawing a parallel with the suitable tissue engineering systems.

  15. A new biological approach to guided bone and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Marco; Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Maglione, Michele

    2013-04-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membranes used for guided bone and tissue regeneration. A patient with insufficient alveolar ridge width in aesthetic zone was enrolled. The patient's blood was centrifuged to obtain PRF membranes. Autogenous bone graft was mixed with bovine hydroxyapatite, PRF particles and applied to fill the defect. Five PRF membranes were placed over the bone mix. After 4 months a cone-beam CT was performed to evaluate bone regeneration. The use of PRF as cover membrane permitted a rapid epithelisation and represented an effective barrier versus epithelial cell penetration. After 4 months the site appeared precociously healed and the bone volume increased. This new approach represents a predictable method of augmenting deficient alveolar ridges. Guided bone regeneration with PRF showed limitation compared with guided bone regeneration using collagen membrane in terms of bone gain. The association of collagen membrane and PRF could be a good association.

  16. Alginate composites for bone tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Bhatnagar, Ira; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a complex and hierarchical tissue consisting of nano hydroxyapatite and collagen as major portion. Several attempts have been made to prepare the artificial bone so as to replace the autograft and allograft treatment. Tissue engineering is a promising approach to solve the several issues and is also useful in the construction of artificial bone with materials including polymer, ceramics, metals, cells and growth factors. Composites consisting of polymer-ceramics, best mimic the natural functions of bone. Alginate, an anionic polymer owing enormous biomedical applications, is gaining importance particularly in bone tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and gel forming properties. Several composites such as alginate-polymer (PLGA, PEG and chitosan), alginate-protein (collagen and gelatin), alginate-ceramic, alginate-bioglass, alginate-biosilica, alginate-bone morphogenetic protein-2 and RGD peptides composite have been investigated till date. These alginate composites show enhanced biochemical significance in terms of porosity, mechanical strength, cell adhesion, biocompatibility, cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase increase, excellent mineralization and osteogenic differentiation. Hence, alginate based composite biomaterials will be promising for bone tissue regeneration. This review will provide a broad overview of alginate preparation and its applications towards bone tissue engineering.

  17. Chitosan Composites for Bone Tissue Engineering—An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Bone contains considerable amounts of minerals and proteins. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] is one of the most stable forms of calcium phosphate and it occurs in bones as major component (60 to 65%), along with other materials including collagen, chondroitin sulfate, keratin sulfate and lipids. In recent years, significant progress has been made in organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction and the use of artificial protheses to treat the loss or failure of an organ or bone tissue. Chitosan has played a major role in bone tissue engineering over the last two decades, being a natural polymer obtained from chitin, which forms a major component of crustacean exoskeleton. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to chitosan composite materials and their applications in the field of bone tissue engineering due to its minimal foreign body reactions, an intrinsic antibacterial nature, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and the ability to be molded into various geometries and forms such as porous structures, suitable for cell ingrowth and osteoconduction. The composite of chitosan including hydroxyapatite is very popular because of the biodegradability and biocompatibility in nature. Recently, grafted chitosan natural polymer with carbon nanotubes has been incorporated to increase the mechanical strength of these composites. Chitosan composites are thus emerging as potential materials for artificial bone and bone regeneration in tissue engineering. Herein, the preparation, mechanical properties, chemical interactions and in vitro activity of chitosan composites for bone tissue engineering will be discussed. PMID:20948907

  18. Chitosan composites for bone tissue engineering--an overview.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-08-02

    Bone contains considerable amounts of minerals and proteins. Hydroxyapatite [Ca₁₀(PO₄)₆(OH)₂] is one of the most stable forms of calcium phosphate and it occurs in bones as major component (60 to 65%), along with other materials including collagen, chondroitin sulfate, keratin sulfate and lipids. In recent years, significant progress has been made in organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction and the use of artificial prostheses to treat the loss or failure of an organ or bone tissue. Chitosan has played a major role in bone tissue engineering over the last two decades, being a natural polymer obtained from chitin, which forms a major component of crustacean exoskeleton. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to chitosan composite materials and their applications in the field of bone tissue engineering due to its minimal foreign body reactions, an intrinsic antibacterial nature, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and the ability to be molded into various geometries and forms such as porous structures, suitable for cell ingrowth and osteoconduction. The composite of chitosan including hydroxyapatite is very popular because of the biodegradability and biocompatibility in nature. Recently, grafted chitosan natural polymer with carbon nanotubes has been incorporated to increase the mechanical strength of these composites. Chitosan composites are thus emerging as potential materials for artificial bone and bone regeneration in tissue engineering. Herein, the preparation, mechanical properties, chemical interactions and in vitro activity of chitosan composites for bone tissue engineering will be discussed.

  19. Bone tissue engineering scaffolding: computer-aided scaffolding techniques.

    PubMed

    Thavornyutikarn, Boonlom; Chantarapanich, Nattapon; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai; Thouas, George A; Chen, Qizhi

    Tissue engineering is essentially a technique for imitating nature. Natural tissues consist of three components: cells, signalling systems (e.g. growth factors) and extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM forms a scaffold for its cells. Hence, the engineered tissue construct is an artificial scaffold populated with living cells and signalling molecules. A huge effort has been invested in bone tissue engineering, in which a highly porous scaffold plays a critical role in guiding bone and vascular tissue growth and regeneration in three dimensions. In the last two decades, numerous scaffolding techniques have been developed to fabricate highly interconnective, porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. This review provides an update on the progress of foaming technology of biomaterials, with a special attention being focused on computer-aided manufacturing (Andrade et al. 2002) techniques. This article starts with a brief introduction of tissue engineering (Bone tissue engineering and scaffolds) and scaffolding materials (Biomaterials used in bone tissue engineering). After a brief reviews on conventional scaffolding techniques (Conventional scaffolding techniques), a number of CAM techniques are reviewed in great detail. For each technique, the structure and mechanical integrity of fabricated scaffolds are discussed in detail. Finally, the advantaged and disadvantage of these techniques are compared (Comparison of scaffolding techniques) and summarised (Summary).

  20. Variability and Anisotropy of Fracture Toughness of Cortical Bone Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Nordin, Norhaziqah; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    Bones form protective and load-bearing framework of the body. Therefore, their structural integrity is vital for the quality of life. Unfortunately, bones can only sustain a load until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Therefore, it is essential to study their mechanical and fracture behaviours in order to get an in-depth understanding of the origins of its fracture resistance that, in turn, can assist diagnosis and prevention of bone's trauma. This can be achieved by studying mechanical properties of bone, such as its fracture toughness. Generally, most of bone fractures occur for long bones that consist mostly of cortical bone. Therefore, in this study, only a cortical bone tissue was studied. Since this tissue has an anisotropic behaviour and possesses hierarchical and complex structure, in this paper, an experimental analysis for the fracture toughness of cortical bone tissue is presented in terms of J-integral. The data was obtained using single-edge-notch bending (SENB) cortical specimens of bone tested in a three-point bending setup. Variability of values of fracture toughness was investigated by testing specimens cut from different cortex positions of bovine femur called anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral. In addition, anisotropy ratios of fracture toughness were considered by examining specimens cut from three different orientations: longitudinal, transverse and radial. Moreover, in order to link cortical bone fracture mechanisms with its underlying microstructure, fracture surfaces of specimens from different cortices and along different orientations were studied. Experimental results of this study provide a clear understanding of both variability and anisotropy of cortical bone tissue with regard to its fracture toughness.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Gingival Tissue and Alveolar Bone during Alveolar Bone Healing*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Kwon, Joseph; Kook, Min-Suk; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun; Sohn, Sungoh; Jung, Seunggon; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is orchestrated by the surrounding supporting tissues and involves the build-up of osteogenic cells, which orchestrate remodeling/healing through the expression of numerous mediators and signaling molecules. Periodontal regeneration models have proven useful for studying the interaction and communication between alveolar bone and supporting soft tissue. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare proteins with altered expression in gingival soft tissue and alveolar bone following tooth extraction. For target identification and validation, hard and soft tissue were extracted from mini-pigs at the indicated times after tooth extraction. From triplicate experiments, 56 proteins in soft tissue and 27 proteins in alveolar bone were found to be differentially expressed before and after tooth extraction. The expression of 21 of those proteins was altered in both soft tissue and bone. Comparison of the activated networks in soft tissue and alveolar bone highlighted their distinct responsibilities in bone and tissue healing. Moreover, we found that there is crosstalk between identified proteins in soft tissue and alveolar bone with respect to cellular assembly, organization, and communication. Among these proteins, we examined in detail the expression patterns and associated networks of ATP5B and fibronectin 1. ATP5B is involved in nucleic acid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and neurological disease, and fibronectin 1 is involved in cellular assembly, organization, and maintenance. Collectively, our findings indicate that bone regeneration is accompanied by a profound interaction among networks regulating cellular resources, and they provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the healing of periodontal tissue after tooth extraction. PMID:23824910

  2. Importance of dual delivery systems for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farokhi, Mehdi; Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ou, Keng-Liang; Mao, Chuanbin; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2016-03-10

    Bone formation is a complex process that requires concerted function of multiple growth factors. For this, it is essential to design a delivery system with the ability to load multiple growth factors in order to mimic the natural microenvironment for bone tissue formation. However, the short half-lives of growth factors, their relatively large size, slow tissue penetration, and high toxicity suggest that conventional routes of administration are unlikely to be effective. Therefore, it seems that using multiple bioactive factors in different delivery systems can develop new strategies for improving bone tissue regeneration. Combination of these factors along with biomaterials that permit tunable release profiles would help to achieve truly spatiotemporal regulation during delivery. This review summarizes the various dual-control release systems that are used for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Pathologic bone tissues in a Turkey vulture and a nonavian dinosaur: implications for interpreting endosteal bone and radial fibrolamellar bone in fossil dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Chinsamy, Anusuya; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison

    2009-09-01

    We report on similar pathological bone microstructure in an extant turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and a nonavian dinosaur from Transylvania. Both these individuals exhibit distinctive periosteal reactive bone deposition accompanied by endosteal bone deposits in the medullary cavity. Our findings have direct implications on the two novel bone tissues recently described among nonavian dinosaurs, radial fibrolamellar bone tissue and medullary bone tissue. On the basis of the observed morphology of the periosteal reactive bone in the turkey vulture and the Transylvanian dinosaur, we propose that the radial fibrolamellar bone tissues observed in mature dinosaurs may have had a pathological origin. Our analysis also shows that on the basis of origin, location, and morphology, pathologically derived endosteal bone tissue can be similar to medullary bone tissues described in nonavian dinosaurs. As such, we caution the interpretation of all endosteally derived bone tissue as homologous to avian medullary bone.

  4. Mechanical unloading of bone in microgravity reduces mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blaber, E A; Dvorochkin, N; Torres, M L; Yousuf, R; Burns, B P; Globus, R K; Almeida, E A C

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical loading of mammalian tissues is a potent promoter of tissue growth and regeneration, whilst unloading in microgravity can cause reduced tissue regeneration, possibly through effects on stem cell tissue progenitors. To test the specific hypothesis that mechanical unloading alters differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell lineages, we studied cellular and molecular aspects of how bone marrow in the mouse proximal femur responds to unloading in microgravity. Trabecular and cortical endosteal bone surfaces in the femoral head underwent significant bone resorption in microgravity, enlarging the marrow cavity. Cells isolated from the femoral head marrow compartment showed significant down-regulation of gene expression markers for early mesenchymal and hematopoietic differentiation, including FUT1(-6.72), CSF2(-3.30), CD90(-3.33), PTPRC(-2.79), and GDF15(-2.45), but not stem cell markers, such as SOX2. At the cellular level, in situ histological analysis revealed decreased megakaryocyte numbers whilst erythrocytes were increased 2.33 fold. Furthermore, erythrocytes displayed elevated fucosylation and clustering adjacent to sinuses forming the marrow-blood barrier, possibly providing a mechanistic basis for explaining spaceflight anemia. Culture of isolated bone marrow cells immediately after microgravity exposure increased the marrow progenitor's potential for mesenchymal differentiation into in-vitro mineralized bone nodules, and hematopoietic differentiation into osteoclasts, suggesting an accumulation of undifferentiated progenitors during exposure to microgravity. These results support the idea that mechanical unloading of mammalian tissues in microgravity is a strong inhibitor of tissue growth and regeneration mechanisms, acting at the level of early mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

  5. Bone Tissue Scaffold Technologies Based on RP Adopted Droplet Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    poly (L- lactic acid ) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering via extrusion, Scripta Materialia, 2001, 45: 773-779. 12. Zhuo Xiong, Yongnian Yan, Shengguo... lactic acid ) and tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) was chosen to form bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The new computer aided manufacturing process can make...processing to form a variety of shapes and sizes. Biodegradable biomaterials, poly (L- lactic acid ) (PLLA), tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and their composites

  6. Bone tissue regeneration: the role of scaffold geometry.

    PubMed

    Zadpoor, Amir A

    2015-02-01

    The geometry of porous scaffolds that are used for bone tissue engineering and/or bone substitution has recently been shown to significantly influence the cellular response and the rate of bone tissue regeneration. Most importantly, it has been shown that the rate of tissue generation increases with curvature and is much larger on concave surfaces as compared to convex and planar surfaces. In this work, recent discoveries concerning the effects of geometrical features of porous scaffolds such as surface curvature, pore shape, and pore size on the cellular response and bone tissue regeneration process are reviewed. In addition to reviewing the recent experimental observations, we discuss the mechanisms through which geometry affects the bone tissue regeneration process. Of particular interest are the theoretical models that have been developed to explain the role of geometry in the bone tissue regeneration process. We then follow with a section on the implications of the observed phenomena for geometrical design of porous scaffolds including the application of predictive computational models in geometrical design of porous scaffolds. Moreover, some geometrical concepts in the design of porous scaffolds such as minimal surfaces and porous structures with geometrical gradients that have not been explored before are suggested for future studies. We especially focus on the porous scaffolds manufactured using additive manufacturing techniques where the geometry of the porous scaffolds could be precisely controlled. The paper concludes with a general discussion of the current state-of-the-art and recommendations for future research.

  7. Distinctive Head and Neck Bone and Soft Tissue Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Purgina, Bibianna; Lai, Chi K

    2017-03-01

    Benign and malignant primary bone and soft tissue lesions of the head and neck are rare. The uncommon nature of these tumors, combined with the complex anatomy of the head and neck, pose diagnostic challenges to pathologists. This article describes the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of selected bone and soft tissue tumors involving the head and neck region, including angiofibroma, glomangiopericytoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, chordoma, chondrosarcoma, and osteosarcoma. Emphasis is placed on key diagnostic pitfalls, differential diagnosis, and the importance of correlating clinical and radiographic information, particularly for tumors involving bone.

  8. Osteopontin: Relation between Adipose Tissue and Bone Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Vincenzo; Viggiano, Emanuela; Valenzano, Anna; Esposito, Teresa; Cibelli, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein mainly associated with bone metabolism and remodeling. Besides its physiological functions, OPN is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states, such as obesity and osteoporosis. Importantly, during the last decades obesity and osteoporosis have become among the main threats to health worldwide. Because OPN is a protein principally expressed in cells with multifaceted effects on bone morphogenesis and remodeling and because it seems to be one of the most overexpressed genes in the adipose tissue of the obese contributing to osteoporosis, this mini review will highlight recent insights about relation between adipose tissue and bone homeostasis. PMID:28194185

  9. Effect of Microgravity on Bone Tissue and Calcium Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA4 includes short reports concerning: (1) Human Bone Tissue Changes after Long-Term Space Flight: Phenomenology and Possible Mechanics; (2) Prediction of Femoral Neck Bone Mineral Density Change in Space; (3) Dietary Calcium in Space; (4) Calcium Metabolism During Extended-Duration Space Flight; (5) External Impact Loads on the Lower Extremity During Jumping in Simulated Microgravity and the Relationship to Internal Bone Strain; and (6) Bone Loss During Long Term Space Flight is Prevented by the Application of a Short Term Impulsive Mechanical Stimulus.

  10. Is Bone Tissue Really Affected by Swimming? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro; Gónzalez-Agüero, Alejandro; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A.; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Background Swimming, a sport practiced in hypogravity, has sometimes been associated with decreased bone mass. Aim This systematic review aims to summarize and update present knowledge about the effects of swimming on bone mass, structure and metabolism in order to ascertain the effects of this sport on bone tissue. Methods A literature search was conducted up to April 2013. A total of 64 studies focusing on swimmers bone mass, structure and metabolism met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Results It has been generally observed that swimmers present lower bone mineral density than athletes who practise high impact sports and similar values when compared to sedentary controls. However, swimmers have a higher bone turnover than controls resulting in a different structure which in turn results in higher resistance to fracture indexes. Nevertheless, swimming may become highly beneficial regarding bone mass in later stages of life. Conclusion Swimming does not seem to negatively affect bone mass, although it may not be one of the best sports to be practised in order to increase this parameter, due to the hypogravity and lack of impact characteristic of this sport. Most of the studies included in this review showed similar bone mineral density values in swimmers and sedentary controls. However, swimmers present a higher bone turnover than sedentary controls that may result in a stronger structure and consequently in a stronger bone. PMID:23950908

  11. Ultrasound elastography assessment of bone/soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Biren J.; Yang, Xu; Chaudhry, Anuj; Shafeeq Shajudeen, Peer; Nair, Sanjay P.; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of elastographic imaging techniques to assess the bone/soft tissue interface, a region that has not been previously investigated but may provide important information about fracture and bone healing. The performance of axial strain elastograms and axial shear strain elastograms at the bone/soft tissue interface was studied ex vivo on intact and fractured canine and ovine tibias. Selected ex vivo results were corroborated on intact sheep tibias in vivo. The elastography results were statistically analyzed using elastographic image quality tools. The results of this study demonstrate distinct patterns in the distribution of the normalized local axial strains and axial shear strains at the bone/soft tissue interface with respect to the background soft tissue. They also show that the relative strength and distribution of the elastographic parameters change in the presence of a fracture and depend on the degree of misalignment between the fracture fragments. Thus, elastographic imaging modalities might be used in the future to obtain information regarding the integrity of bones and to assess the severity of fractures, alignment of bone fragments as well as to follow bone healing.

  12. Nanoceramics on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    S, Sai Nievethitha; N, Subhapradha; D, Saravanan; N, Selvamurugan; Tsai, Wei-Bor; N, Srinivasan; R, Murugesan; A, Moorthi

    2017-05-01

    Bone, a highly dynamic connective tissue, consist of a bioorganic phase comprising osteogenic cells and proteins which lies over an inorganic phase predominantly made of CaPO4 (biological apatite). Injury to bone can be due to mechanical, metabolic or inflammatory agents also owing pathological conditions like fractures, osteomyelitis, osteolysis or cysts may arise in enameloid, chondroid, cementum, or chondroid bone which forms the intermediate tissues of the body. Bone tissue engineering (BTE) applies bioactive scaffolds, host cells and osteogenic signals for restoring damaged or diseased tissues. Various bioceramics used in BTE can be bioactive (like glass ceramics and hydroxyapatite bioactive glass), bioresorbable (like tricalcium phosphates) or bioinert (like zirconia and alumina). Limiting the size of these materials to nano-scale has resulted in a higher surface area to volume ratio thereby improving multi-functionality, solubility, surface catalytic activity, high heat and electrical conductivity. Nanoceramics have been found to induce osteoconduction, osteointegration, osteogenesis and osteoinduction. The present review aims at summarizing the interactions of nanoceramics and osteoblast/stem cells for promoting the proliferation and differentiation of the osteoblast cells by nanoceramics as superior bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering applications.

  13. Treatment of bone and soft tissue defects in infected nonunion.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, W; Suger, G; Kinzl, L

    1992-01-01

    In the treatment of infected pseudarthroses the general principles of osteitis treatment are applied. This includes radical excision of pseudarthrotic and infected bone tissue, and of diseased surrounding soft tissue. External fixation devices are the preferred method of stabilization of the bone. Based on the data of a retrospective study of 31 Papineau procedures, 65 local flap transfers, and 46 free flap transfers we found that the Papineau procedure works in minor bone and soft tissue defects. Unstable scar formation is a major disadvantage of this method. Local muscular flaps are indicated in the treatment of soft tissue defects in the proximal and medial portions of the lower leg. A prerequisite for free flap transfers is the availability of trained personnel and suitable technical equipment. The option is limited by the patient's vascular situation. This kind of tissue transfer seems to be superior to other methods. For the substitution of bone defects corticocancellous bone transplantation may be used. A promising alternative method to deal with extensive bone defects is osteogenesis produced by callus distraction.

  14. Effects of microgravity on rat bone, cartlage and connective tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S.

    1990-01-01

    The response to hypogravity by the skeletal system was originally thought to be the result of a reduction in weight bearing. Thus a reduced rate of new bone formation in the weight-bearing bones was accepted, when found, as an obvious result of hypogravity. However, data on non-weight-bearing tissues have begun to show that other physiological changes can be expected to occur to animals during spaceflight. This overview of the Cosmos 1887 data discusses these results as they pertain to individual bones or tissues because the response seems to depend on the architecture and metabolism of each tissue under study. Various effects were seen in different tissues from the rats flown on Cosmos 1887. The femur showed a reduced bone mineral content but only in the central region of the diaphysis. This same region in the tibia showed changes in the vascularity of bone as well as some osteocytic cell death. The humerus demonstrated reduced morphometric characteristics plus a decrease in mechanical stiffness. Bone mineral crystals did not mature normally as a result of flight, suggesting a defect in the matrix mineralization process. Note that these changes relate directly to the matrix portion of the bone or some function of bone which slowly responds to changes in the environment. However, most cellular functions of bone are rapid responders. The stimulation of osteoblast precursor cells, the osteoblast function in collagen synthesis, a change in the proliferation rate of cells in the epiphyseal growth plate, the synthesis and secretion of osteocalcin, and the movement of water into or out of tissues, are all processes which respond to environmental change. These rapidly responding events produced results from Cosmos 1887 which were frequently quite different from previous space flight data.

  15. Tissue Engineering Strategies for Promoting Vascularized Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Almubarak, Sarah; Nethercott, Hubert; Freeberg, Marie; Beaudon, Caroline; Jha, Amit; Jackson, Wesley; Marcucio, Ralph; Miclau, Theodore; Healy, Kevin; Bahney, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on current tissue engineering strategies for promoting vascularized bone regeneration. We review the role of angiogenic growth factors in promoting vascularized bone regeneration and discuss the different therapeutic strategies for controlled/sustained growth factor delivery. Next, we address the therapeutic uses of stem cells in vascularized bone regeneration. Specifically, this review addresses the concept of co-culture using osteogenic and vasculogenic stem cells, and how adipose derived stem cells compare to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in the promotion of angiogenesis. We conclude this review with a discussion of a novel approach to bone regeneration through a cartilage intermediate, and discuss why it has the potential to be more effective than traditional bone grafting methods. PMID:26608518

  16. Physiological bases of bone regeneration I. Histology and physiology of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tresguerres-Hernández-Gil, Isabel; Alobera-Gracia, Miguel Angel; del-Canto-Pingarrón, Mariano; Blanco-Jerez, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Bone is the only body tissue capable of regeneration, allowing the restitutio ad integrum following trauma. In the event of a fracture or bone graft, new bone is formed, which following the remodeling process is identical to the pre-existing. Bone is a dynamic tissue in constant formation and resorption. This balanced phenomena, known as the remodeling process, allows the renovation of 5-15% of the total bone mass per year under normal conditions. Bone remodeling consists of the resorption of a certain amount of bone by osteoclasts, likewise the formation of osteoid matrix by osteoblasts, and its subsequent mineralization. This phenomenon occurs in small areas of the cortical bone or the trabecular surface, called Basic Multicellular Units (BMU). Treatment in Traumatology, Orthopedics, Implantology, and Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, is based on the biologic principals of bone regeneration, in which cells, extracellular matrix, and osteoinductive signals are involved. The aim of this paper is to provide an up date on current knowledge on the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of bone regeneration, paying particular attention to the role played by the cells and proteins of the bone matrix.

  17. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João.; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario.

    2015-05-01

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  18. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  19. Interrelationship between bone substitution materials and skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Botzenhart, Ute; Gedrange, Tomasz; Gredes, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Bone density and quantity are primary conditions for the insertion and stability of dental implants. In cases of a lack of adequate maxillary or mandibulary bone, bone augmentation will be necessary. The use of synthetic bioactive bone substitution materials is of increasing importance as alternatives to autogenously bone grafts. It is well known that bone can influence muscle function and muscle function can influence bone structures. Muscles have a considerable potential of adaptation and muscle tissue surrounding an inserted implant or bone surrogate can integrate changes in mechanical load of the muscle and hereupon induce signaling cascades with protein synthesis and arrangement of the cytoskeleton. The Musculus latissimus dorsi is very often used for the analyses of the in vivo biocompatibility of newly designed biomaterials. Beside macroscopically and histologically examination, biocompatibility can be assessed by analyses of the biomaterial influence of gene expression. This review discusses changes in the fiber type distribution, myosin heavy chain isoform composition, histological appearance and vascularization of the skeletal muscle after implantation of bone substitution materials. Especially, the effects of bone surrogates should be described at the molecular-biological and cellular level.

  20. Silk fibroin membrane used for guided bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yurong; Guo, Junmao; Chen, Cen; Yao, Chenxue; Chung, Sung-Min; Yao, Juming; Lee, In-Seop; Kong, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    With the aim to develop a novel membrane with an appropriate mechanical property and degradation rate for guided bone tissue regeneration, lyophilized and densified silk fibroin membrane was fabricated and its mechanical behavior as well as biodegradation property were investigated. The osteoconductive potency of the silk fibroin membranes were evaluated in a defect rabbit calvarial model. Silk fibroin membrane showed the modulated biodegradable and mechanical properties via ethanol treatment with different concentration. The membrane could prevent soft tissue invasion from normal tissue healing, and the amounts of new bone and defect closure with silk fibroin membrane were similar to those of commercially available collagen membrane.

  1. Dimethyloxaloylglycine Improves Angiogenic Activity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in the Tissue-Engineered Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Chen, Song; Song, Wen-Qi; Gao, You-Shui; Guan, Jun-Jie; Wang, Yang; Sun, Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2014-01-01

    One of the big challenges in tissue engineering for treating large bone defects is to promote the angiogenesis of the tissue-engineered bone. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role in angiogenesis-osteogenesis coupling during bone regeneration, and can activate a broad array of angiogenic factors. Dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) can activate HIF-1α expression in cells at normal oxygen tension. In this study, we explored the effect of DMOG on the angiogenic activity of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in the tissue-engineered bone. The effect of different concentrations of DMOG on HIF-1a expression in BMSCs was detected with western blotting, and the mRNA expression and secretion of related angiogenic factors in DMOG-treated BMSCs were respectively analyzed using qRT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The tissue-engineered bone constructed with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and DMOG-treated BMSCs were implanted into the critical-sized calvarial defects to test the effectiveness of DMOG in improving the angiogenic activity of BMSCs in the tissue-engineered bone. The results showed DMOG significantly enhanced the mRNA expression and secretion of related angiogenic factors in BMSCs by activating the expression of HIF-1α. More newly formed blood vessels were observed in the group treated with β-TCP and DMOG-treated BMSCs than in other groups. And there were also more bone regeneration in the group treated with β-TCP and DMOG-treated BMSCs. Therefore, we believed DMOG could enhance the angiogenic activity of BMSCs by activating the expression of HIF-1α, thereby improve the angiogenesis of the tissue-engineered bone and its bone healing capacity. PMID:25013382

  2. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B.; García Aznar, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent–material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications. PMID:28306746

  3. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Berli, Marcelo; Borau, Carlos; Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B; García Aznar, José Manuel; Zioupos, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent-material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications.

  4. The effects of 3D bioactive glass scaffolds and BMP-2 on bone formation in rat femoral critical size defects and adjacent bones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai-Ching; Robu, Irina S; Patel, Rikin; Leu, Ming C; Velez, Mariano; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Reconstruction of critical size defects in the load-bearing area has long been a challenge in orthopaedics. In the past, we have demonstrated the feasibility of using a biodegradable load-sharing scaffold fabricated from poly(propylene fumarate)/tricalcium phosphate (PPF/TCP) loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) to successfully induce healing in those defects. However, there is limited osteoconduction observed with the PPF/TCP scaffold itself. For this reason, 13-93 bioactive glass scaffolds with local BMP-2 delivery were investigated in this study for inducing segmental defect repairs in a load-bearing region. Furthermore, a recent review on BMP-2 revealed greater risks in radiculitis, ectopic bone formation, osteolysis and poor global outcome in association with the use of BMP-2 for spinal fusion. We also evaluated the potential side effects of locally delivered BMP-2 on the structures of adjacent bones. Therefore, cylindrical 13-93 glass scaffolds were fabricated by indirect selective laser sintering with side holes on the cylinder filled with dicalcium phosphate dehydrate as a BMP-2 carrier. The scaffolds were implanted into critical size defects created in rat femurs with and without 10 μg of BMP-2. The x-ray and micro-CT results showed that a bridging callus was found as soon as three weeks and progressed gradually in the BMP group while minimal bone formation was observed in the control group. Degradation of the scaffolds was noted in both groups. Stiffness, peak load and energy to break of the BMP group were all higher than the control group. There was no statistical difference in bone mineral density, bone area and bone mineral content in the tibiae and contralateral femurs of the control and BMP groups. In conclusion, a 13-93 bioactive glass scaffold with local BMP-2 delivery has been demonstrated for its potential application in treating large bone defects.

  5. Tissue integration of the collagen-hydroxylapatite implant: histological examination in canine bone and surrounding tissues.

    PubMed

    Remacle, M; Marbaix, E; Mustin, V

    1991-01-01

    Using the dog as an animal model, we have tested an implant material composed of purified fibrillar collagen (PFC) and particulate hydroxylapatite (HA) in the mandible and in surrounding tissues. Bone and tissue samples were taken at 2, 4 and 6 months for histological study. After 2 months, the PFC was replaced by fibro-connective host tissues. After 4 months, some small areas of ossification were observed around the HA particles. After 6 months, the fibro-connective tissue was replaced by neo-formed bone in the mandible. PFC was found to increase the interfaces between the HA particles and the host tissues, permitting HA integration into the bone. The PFC/HA implant was also molded when moistened by blood or saline solution and then became mis-sharpen by local pressures exerted. These findings show that the implant should preferably be reserved for the restoration of bones not subjected to significant forces or local stresses.

  6. Tookad-mediated photodynamic effects on the prostate and its adjacent tissues: in vivo study in canine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Luck, David; Beckers, Jill; Blanc, Dominique; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad (pd-bacteriopheophorbide), was investigated as an alternative treatment modality for prostate cancer. Tookad photodynamic effects on the prostate and its adjacent tissues were evaluated in canine models. Interstitial prostate PDT was performed by irradiating individual lobes with a diode laser (763 nm) and 1-cm cylindrical diffuser fibers at various light doses to activate the IV administered photosensitizer Tookad (1 - 2 mg/kg). The sensitivity of the adjacent tissues to Tookad-PDT was determined by superficially irradiating the surfaces of the bladder, colon, abdominal muscle and pelvic plexus with a microlens fiber at various drug/light doses. PDT effect on the prostatic urethra was evaluated by transurethral irradiation. The prostate and adjacent tissues were harvested one-week after the treatment and subjected to histopathologic examination. At one-week post interstitial prostate PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. The bladder, colon, abdominal muscle and pelvic plexus, appeared to also be sensitive to Tookad-PDT at light dose levels greater than 40 Jcm2. Urethral mucosa appeared less sensitive to Tookad-PDT. In conclusion, Tookad-mediated PDT demonstrates very strong vascular effects and can provide an effective alternative for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Protection of the adjacent tissues should be taken into consideration in the total prostate ablation process due to their sensitivity to the Tookad-mediated PDT.

  7. Ready to Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone & Cartilage Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    The slides were then stained with the standard Haematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) Stain or Masson’s Trichrome Stain to distinguish connective tissues . The...plate successfully prevented adverse incidents. Hard histology was performed for the segmental defect dogs which showed connective tissue ingrowth...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0933 TITLE: Ready to Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone & Cartilage Trauma PRINCIPAL

  8. Lead in tissues of woodchucks fed crown vetch growing adjacent to a highway

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.W.; Ridgely, S.L.; Blue, J.T.; Bache, C.A.; Lisk, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Woodchucks (Marmota monax) were fed crown vetch (Coronilla varia) growing along a major highway that was harvested in 1979, before unleaded gas was widely used, and again in 1985. Crown vetch, harvested 300 m from the nearest road, was fed as the control. The crops were fed as 50% dry weight of the diet for 58 d. The concentrations of lead in the control, 1979 crop, and 1985 crop were, respectively, 0.74, 50.65, and 6.78 ppm dry weight. The average +/- SE) concentrations (ppm, dry weight) of lead found in the tissues of the control, 1979, and 1985 dietary-treatment animals were, respectively, kidney, 0.36 +/- 0.05, 5.78 +/- 0.72, and 0.79 +/- 0.09; liver, 0.09 +/- 0.01, 4.71 +/- 0.17, and 0.46 +/- 0.06; muscle, 0.07 +/- 0.01, 0.14 +/- 0.02, and 0.07 +/- 0.00; blood, 0.09 +/- 0.02, 2.17 +/- 0.13, and 0.31 +/- 0.05; and bone, 1.27 +/- 0.25, 47.52 +/- 7.05, and 3.71 +/- 0.65. No significant differences (p greater than 0.05) between dietary treatments were found in the general hematological analyses of the woodchucks. The ecological significance of these findings is discussed.

  9. Applications of carbon nanomaterials in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Pallela, Ramjee; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In the biomedical field, remarkable advancements have been made in artificial biomaterials for treating bone loss or defects. A variety of synthetic polymers, natural polymers and bioceramics are being used to develop artificial bones. Many natural and synthetic biomaterials, which are being investigated for their physiochemical role in vivo, are currently in the clinical trial stage. Carbon-based prostheses are promising materials that mimic the natural function of bone, e.g., mechanical strength. Recently, carbon-based bone materials, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene, have been widely investigated as potential solutions to several biomedical problems. This review summarizes the biophysicochemical and biomedical properties of carbon nanomaterials composed of polymer and ceramic structures and discusses their functionality in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Repeated freeze-thawing of bone tissue affects Raman bone quality measurements

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Kole, Matthew R.; Morris, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to probe fresh tissue is a key feature to biomedical Raman spectroscopy. However, it is unclear how Raman spectra of calcified tissues are affected by freezing. In this study, six transverse sections of femoral cortical bone were subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles and probed using a custom Raman microscope. Significant decreases were observed in the amide I and amide III bands starting after two freeze thaw cycles. Raman band intensities arising from proline residues of frozen tissue appeared consistent with fresh tissue after four cycles. Crystallinity values of bone mineral diminished slightly with freezing and were noticeable after only one freezing. Mineral carbonate levels did not deviate significantly with freezing and thawing. The authors recommend freezing and thawing bone tissue only once to maintain accurate results. PMID:21806253

  11. Donation FAQs (Bone and Tissue Allografts)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is there a difference between tissue and organ donation? In general, organ donors must be brain dead, which is defined ... very limited cases (approximately 20,000 per year), organ donation occurs when mechanical support (i.e., ventilators) can ...

  12. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail.

  13. A new biological approach to guided bone and tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Marco; Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Maglione, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membranes used for guided bone and tissue regeneration. A patient with insufficient alveolar ridge width in aesthetic zone was enrolled. The patient's blood was centrifuged to obtain PRF membranes. Autogenous bone graft was mixed with bovine hydroxyapatite, PRF particles and applied to fill the defect. Five PRF membranes were placed over the bone mix. After 4 months a cone-beam CT was performed to evaluate bone regeneration. The use of PRF as cover membrane permitted a rapid epithelisation and represented an effective barrier versus epithelial cell penetration. After 4 months the site appeared precociously healed and the bone volume increased. This new approach represents a predictable method of augmenting deficient alveolar ridges. Guided bone regeneration with PRF showed limitation compared with guided bone regeneration using collagen membrane in terms of bone gain. The association of collagen membrane and PRF could be a good association. PMID:23576648

  14. Challenges of bone tissue engineering in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Guerado, Enrique; Caso, Enrique

    2017-02-18

    Bone defects may impede normal biomechanics and the structural stability of bone as an organ. In many cases, the correction of bone defects requires extensive surgical intervention involving the use of bone-grafting techniques and other procedures in which healing is slow, there is a high risk of infection and considerable pain is provoked - with no guarantee of complete correction of the defect. Therefore, the search for surgical alternatives continues to present a major challenge in orthopaedic traumatology. The reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system, which was devised to avoid the problems that can arise with autograft harvesting from the iliac crest, consists of collecting the product of the femoral canal after reaming. The RIA technique improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, compared to bone marrow aspiration or cancellous bone harvesting from the iliac crest using a spoon. Another approach, the Masquelet technique, consists of reconstructing a long bone defect by means of an induced membrane grown onto an acrylic cement rod inserted to fill the defect; in a second surgical step, once the membrane is constituted, the cement rod is removed and cancellous autograft is used to fill the defect. Both in RIA and in the Masquelet technique, osteosynthesis is usually needed. Bone transportation by compression-distraction lengthening principles is commonly implemented for the treatment of large bone loss. However, complications are frequently encountered with these techniques. Among new techniques that have been proposed to address the problem of large bone loss, the application of stem cells in conjunction with tissue engineering techniques is very promising, as is the creation of personalised medicine (or precision medicine), in which molecular profiling technologies are used to tailor the therapeutic strategy, to ensure the right method is applied for the right person at the right time, after determining the predisposition to disease among

  15. Challenges of bone tissue engineering in orthopaedic patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerado, Enrique; Caso, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Bone defects may impede normal biomechanics and the structural stability of bone as an organ. In many cases, the correction of bone defects requires extensive surgical intervention involving the use of bone-grafting techniques and other procedures in which healing is slow, there is a high risk of infection and considerable pain is provoked - with no guarantee of complete correction of the defect. Therefore, the search for surgical alternatives continues to present a major challenge in orthopaedic traumatology. The reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system, which was devised to avoid the problems that can arise with autograft harvesting from the iliac crest, consists of collecting the product of the femoral canal after reaming. The RIA technique improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, compared to bone marrow aspiration or cancellous bone harvesting from the iliac crest using a spoon. Another approach, the Masquelet technique, consists of reconstructing a long bone defect by means of an induced membrane grown onto an acrylic cement rod inserted to fill the defect; in a second surgical step, once the membrane is constituted, the cement rod is removed and cancellous autograft is used to fill the defect. Both in RIA and in the Masquelet technique, osteosynthesis is usually needed. Bone transportation by compression-distraction lengthening principles is commonly implemented for the treatment of large bone loss. However, complications are frequently encountered with these techniques. Among new techniques that have been proposed to address the problem of large bone loss, the application of stem cells in conjunction with tissue engineering techniques is very promising, as is the creation of personalised medicine (or precision medicine), in which molecular profiling technologies are used to tailor the therapeutic strategy, to ensure the right method is applied for the right person at the right time, after determining the predisposition to disease among

  16. Design, Materials, and Mechanobiology of Biodegradable Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Marco A.; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A.; Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A.

    2015-01-01

    A review about design, manufacture, and mechanobiology of biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is given. First, fundamental aspects about bone tissue engineering and considerations related to scaffold design are established. Second, issues related to scaffold biomaterials and manufacturing processes are discussed. Finally, mechanobiology of bone tissue and computational models developed for simulating how bone healing occurs inside a scaffold are described. PMID:25883972

  17. Multiscale patterned transplantable stem cell patches for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jangho; Bae, Won-Gyu; Choung, Han-Wool; Lim, Ki Taek; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Khap-Yang; Jeon, Noo Li; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Stem cell-based therapy has been proposed as an enabling alternative not only for the treatment of diseases but also for the regeneration of tissues beyond complex surgical treatments or tissue transplantation. In this study, we approached a conceptual platform that can integrate stem cells into a multiscale patterned substrate for bone regeneration. Inspired by human bone tissue, we developed hierarchically micro- and nanopatterned transplantable patches as synthetic extracellular matrices by employing capillary force lithography in combination with a surface micro-wrinkling method using a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer. The multiscale patterned PLGA patches were highly flexible and showed higher tissue adhesion to the underlying tissue than did the single nanopatterned patches. In response to the anisotropically multiscale patterned topography, the adhesion and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were sensitively controlled. Furthermore, the stem cell patch composed of hMSCs and transplantable PLGA substrate promoted bone regeneration in vivo when both the micro- and nanotopography of the substrate surfaces were synergistically combined. Thus, our study concludes that multiscale patterned transplantable stem cell patches may have a great potential for bone regeneration as well as for various regenerative medicine approaches.

  18. Chitosan-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microsphere-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: in vitro degradation and in vivo bone regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Nukavarapu, Syam P; Deng, Meng; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Kofron, Michelle D; Doty, Stephen B; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Laurencin, Cato T

    2010-09-01

    Natural polymer chitosan and synthetic polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) have been investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. We have previously reported the fabrication and in vitro evaluation of a novel chitosan/PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffold for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications. In this study, the in vitro degradation characteristics of the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold and the in vivo bone formation capacity of the chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model were investigated. The chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed slower degradation than the PLAGA scaffold in vitro. Although chitosan/PLAGA scaffold showed a gradual decrease in compressive properties during the 12-week degradation period, the compressive strength and compressive modulus remained in the range of human trabecular bone. Chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds were able to guide bone formation in a rabbit ulnar critical-sized-defect model. Microcomputed tomography analysis demonstrated that successful bridging of the critical-sized defect on the sides both adjacent to and away from the radius occurred using chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds. Immobilization of heparin and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold surface promoted early bone formation as evidenced by complete bridging of the defect along the radius and significantly enhanced mechanical properties when compared to the chitosan/PLAGA scaffold. Furthermore, histological analysis suggested that chitosan/PLAGA-based scaffolds supported normal bone formation via intramembranous formation.

  19. Functional attachment of soft tissues to bone: development, healing, and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Helen H; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissues such as tendons or ligaments attach to bone across a multitissue interface with spatial gradients in composition, structure, and mechanical properties. These gradients minimize stress concentrations and mediate load transfer between the soft and hard tissues. Given the high incidence of tendon and ligament injuries and the lack of integrative solutions for their repair, interface regeneration remains a significant clinical challenge. This review begins with a description of the developmental processes and the resultant structure-function relationships that translate into the functional grading necessary for stress transfer between soft tissue and bone. It then discusses the interface healing response, with a focus on the influence of mechanical loading and the role of cell-cell interactions. The review continues with a description of current efforts in interface tissue engineering, highlighting key strategies for the regeneration of the soft tissue-to-bone interface, and concludes with a summary of challenges and future directions.

  20. Bone Tissue Engineering Challenges in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brandon T; Shum, Jonathan; Wong, Mark; Mikos, Antonios G; Young, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, there has been a substantial amount of innovation and research into tissue engineering and regenerative approaches for the craniofacial region. This highly complex area presents many unique challenges for tissue engineers. Recent research indicates that various forms of implantable biodegradable scaffolds may play a beneficial role in the clinical treatment of craniofacial pathological conditions. Additionally, the direct delivery of bioactive molecules may further increase de novo bone formation. While these strategies offer an exciting glimpse into potential future treatments, there are several challenges that still must be overcome. In this chapter, we will highlight both current surgical approaches for craniofacial reconstruction and recent advances within the field of bone tissue engineering. The clinical challenges and limitations of these strategies will help contextualize and inform future craniofacial tissue engineering strategies.

  1. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-05-21

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease.

  2. Bone tissue engineering and repair by gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Betz, Volker M; Betz, Oliver B; Harris, Mitchel B; Vrahas, Mark S; Evans, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Many clinical conditions require the stimulation of bone growth. The use of recombinant bone morphogenetic proteins does not provide a satisfying solution to these conditions due to delivery problems and high cost. Gene therapy has emerged as a very promising approach for bone repair that overcomes limitations of protein-based therapy. Several preclinical studies have shown that gene transfer technology has the ability to deliver osteogenic molecules to precise anatomical locations at therapeutic levels for sustained periods of time. Both in-vivo and ex-vivo transduction of cells can induce bone formation at ectopic and orthotopic sites. Genetic engineering of adult stem cells from various sources with osteogenic genes has led to enhanced fracture repair, spinal fusion and rapid healing of bone defects in animal models. This review describes current viral and non-viral gene therapy strategies for bone tissue engineering and repair including recent work from the author's laboratory. In addition, the article discusses the potential of gene-enhanced tissue engineering to enter widespread clinical use.

  3. Crestal bone changes on platform-switched implants and adjacent teeth when the tooth-implant distance is less than 1.5 mm.

    PubMed

    Vela, Xavier; Méndez, Víctor; Rodríguez, Xavier; Segalá, Maribel; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2012-04-01

    Because of the peri-implant bone resorption that occurs when a non-platform switched implant is exposed to the oral environment, it has been recommended to maintain 1.5 mm between the tooth and implant to preserve the bone adjacent to the teeth. Several studies have documented that platform-switched implants have less peri-implant bone resorption than matched implants. This retrospective radiographic analysis studied 70 platform-switched implants placed less than 1.5 mm from an adjacent tooth and with prostheses loaded for a minimum of 6 months. The mean distance between the implant and tooth was 0.99 mm (range, 0.20 to 1.49 mm); the mean horizontal and vertical bone resorption was 0.36 and 0.43 mm, respectively. The mean bone peak reduction was 0.37 mm. The results confirm that the use of platform-switched implants reduces bone resorption after two-piece implants have been uncovered and that it is possible to place this type of implant 1 mm from teeth while maintaining the bone level adjacent to them (the bone peak).

  4. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  5. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  6. Functionally deficient mesenchymal stem cells reside in the bone marrow niche with M2-macrophages and amyloid-β protein adjacent to loose total joint implants.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Bryan S; DeBoyace, Sean D; Parsons, Adrienne M; Policastro, Connor G; Ee, Jessica S S; Damron, Timothy S

    2015-05-01

    We sought to demonstrate whether there is a difference in the local mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) niche obtained from patients undergoing their first total joint replacement surgery versus those patients undergoing a revision surgery for an failing total joint implant. Bone marrow aspirates collected from patients undergoing revision total joint arthroplasty were observed to be less clonal and the expression of PDGFRα, CD51, ALCAM, endoglin, CXCL12, nestin, and nucleostemin were decreased. Revision MSC were also less able to commit to an osteoblast-lineage or an adipocyte-lineage. Further, in revision MSC, OPG, and IL6 expression were increased. Monocytes, derived from revision whole marrow aspirates, were less capable of differentiating into osteoclasts, the cells implicated in the pathologic degradation of bone. Osteoclasts were also not observed in tissue samples collected adjacent to the implants of revision patients; however, the alternatatively activated M2-macrophage phenotype was observed in parallel with pathologic accumulations of amyloid-β, τ-protien and 3-nitrotyrosine. Despite the limited numbers of patients examined, our data suggest that nucleostemin may be a useful functional marker for MSC while the observation of M2-macrophage infiltration around the implant lays the foundation for future investigation into a novel mechanism that we propose is associated with loose total joint implants.

  7. The effect of bone displacement operations on facial soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ali; Hisham, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    A novel biomechanical model for face soft tissue (skin, mucosa, and muscles) is introduced to investigate the effect of mandible and chin bone displacement on the overall appearance of the patient's face. Nonlinear FE analysis is applied to the model and the results obtained are used to help surgeons to decide the amount of displacement required.

  8. Neoplastic fever in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Matsubara, Takao; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The development of fever is a common complication in the clinical course of cancer. If all other potential causes of fever are excluded, the possibility of neoplastic fever should be considered. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of neoplastic fever in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 195 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma (111 men and 84 women; mean age, 55 years) were admitted to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Mie University Graduate School of Medicine (Tsu, Japan). Episodes of fever were observed in 58 patients (30%), of whom 11 (5.5%) had neoplastic fever (mean maximum temperature, 38.9°C). The causes of neoplastic fever were as follows: Primary tumor (n=3), local recurrence (n=1), metastasis (n=5), and local recurrence with metastasis (n=2). Of the 11 patients, 9 were treated with naproxen and 8 exhibited a complete response, with their temperature normalizing to <37.3°C within 24 h. The 2 patients who were not treated with naproxen underwent surgical tumor resection, which resulted in prompt and complete lysis of the fever. In conclusion, neoplastic fever occurred in 5.5% of the 195 patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas investigated herein. Naproxen may be effective for treating neoplastic fever in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcoma; however, radical tumor treatment may have to be considered to achieve permanent lysis of the fever. PMID:27900101

  9. Bone tissue engineering bioreactors: a role in the clinic?

    PubMed

    Salter, Erin; Goh, Brian; Hung, Ben; Hutton, Daphne; Ghone, Nalinkanth; Grayson, Warren L

    2012-02-01

    Tissue engineered bone grafts have the potential to be used to treat large bone defects due to congenital abnormalities, cancer resections, or traumatic incidents. Recent studies have shown that perfusion bioreactors can be used to generate grafts of clinically relevant sizes and shapes. Despite these scientific and technological successes, there is uncertainty regarding the translational utility of bioreactor-based approaches due to the perceived high costs associated with these procedures. In fact, experiences over the past two decades have demonstrated that the widespread application of cell-based therapies is heavily dependent on the commercial viability. In this article, we directly address the question of whether bioreactors used to create bone grafts have the potential to be implemented in clinical approaches to bone repair and regeneration. We provide a brief review of tissue engineering approaches to bone repair, clinical trials that have employed cell-based methods, and advances in bioreactor technologies over the past two decades. These analyses are combined to provide a perspective on what is missing from the scientific literature that would enable an objective baseline for weighing the benefit of extended in vitro cultivation of cells into functional bone grafts against the cost of additional cultivation. In our estimation, the cost of bioreactor-based bone grafts may range from $10,000 to $15,000, placing it within the range of other widely used cell-based therapies. Therefore, in situations where a clear advantage can be established for engineered grafts comprising patient-specific, autologous cells, engineered bone grafts may be a clinically feasible option.

  10. Tissue integrity, costs and time associated with different agents for histological bone preparation.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Adelino António Artur; Rafacho, Alex; Rivero, Elena Riet Correa; Mariano, Fernanda Viviane; Siqueira, Filipe Modolo; Gondak, Rogério Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    The selection of an appropriate demineralizing solution in pathology laboratories depends on several factors such as the preservation of cellularity, urgency of diagnostic and financial costs. The aim of this study was to test different decalcification bone procedures in order to establish the best value of these in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. Femurs were removed from 13 adult male Wistar rats to obtain 130 bone disks randomly divided into five groups that were demineralized in different concentrations of nitric acid (Group I); formic acid (Group II); acetic acid (Group III); EDTA, pH7.4 (Group IV) and Morsés solution (Group V). Serial, 3-μm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to calculate the percentage of osteocyte-occupied lacunae. The sections were also stained with Masson's trichrome in conjunction with picrosirius red under polarized light followed by a semi-quantitative analysis to verify the adjacent muscle-to-bone integrity and preservation of collagen fibres. The highest percentage of osteocyte-occupied lacunae was found with 10% acetic acid solution (95.64 ± 0.95%) and Group I (nitric acid) demanded the shorter time (0.8-5.7days). Of all solutions, 5% nitric acid incurred the lowest cost to achieve complete demineralization compared with other solutions (p < .001). Group IV (EDTA) had the highest integrity of muscle and collagen type I and III (P < 0.01). Demineralization with 10% acetic acid was the most effective at preserving bone tissue, while 5% EDTA was the best at maintaining collagen and adjacent muscle to bone. In conclusion, nitric acid at 5% showed the most efficient result as it balanced both time and cost as a demineralizing solution.

  11. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue

    PubMed Central

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm2) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO. PMID:26504639

  12. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue.

    PubMed

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-10-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm(2)) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO.

  13. Mathematical modeling in wound healing, bone regeneration and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Geris, Liesbet; Gerisch, Alf; Schugart, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    The processes of wound healing and bone regeneration and problems in tissue engineering have been an active area for mathematical modeling in the last decade. Here we review a selection of recent models which aim at deriving strategies for improved healing. In wound healing, the models have particularly focused on the inflammatory response in order to improve the healing of chronic wound. For bone regeneration, the mathematical models have been applied to design optimal and new treatment strategies for normal and specific cases of impaired fracture healing. For the field of tissue engineering, we focus on mathematical models that analyze the interplay between cells and their biochemical cues within the scaffold to ensure optimal nutrient transport and maximal tissue production. Finally, we briefly comment on numerical issues arising from simulations of these mathematical models.

  14. Dose equivalent near the bone-soft tissue interface from nuclear fragments produced by high-energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Poston, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    During manned space missions, high-energy nucleons of cosmic and solar origin collide with atomic nuclei of the human body and produce a broad linear energy transfer spectrum of secondary particles, called target fragments. These nuclear fragments are often more biologically harmful than the direct ionization of the incident nucleon. That these secondary particles increase tissue absorbed dose in regions adjacent to the bone-soft tissue interface was demonstrated in a previous publication. To assess radiological risks to tissue near the bone-soft tissue interface, a computer transport model for nuclear fragments produced by high energy nucleons was used in this study to calculate integral linear energy transfer spectra and dose equivalents resulting from nuclear collisions of 1-GeV protons transversing bone and red bone marrow. In terms of dose equivalent averaged over trabecular bone marrow, target fragments emitted from interactions in both tissues are predicted to be at least as important as the direct ionization of the primary protons-twice as important, if recently recommended radiation weighting factors and "worst-case" geometry are used. The use of conventional dosimetry (absorbed dose weighted by aa linear energy transfer-dependent quality factor) as an appropriate framework for predicting risk from low fluences of high-linear energy transfer target fragments is discussed.

  15. Combination of negative pressure wound therapy with open bone grafting for bone and soft tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Yu, Ai-Xi; Xia, Cheng-Yan; Li, Zong-Huan; Wang, Wei-Yang

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) combined with open bone graft (OBG; NPWT-OBG) for the treatment of bone and soft tissue defects with polluted wounds in an animal model. All rabbits with bone and soft tissue defects and polluted wounds were randomly divided into two groups, the experimental group (NPWT with bone graft) and the control group (OBG). The efficacy of the treatment was assessed by the wound conditions and healing time. Bacterial bioburdens and bony calluses were evaluated by bacteria counting and X-rays, respectively. Furthermore, granulation tissue samples from the wounds on days 0, 3, 7 and 14 of healing were evaluated for blood vessels and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Wounds in the experimental group tended to have a shorter healing time, healthier wound conditions, lower bacterial bioburden, improvement of the bony calluses and an increased blood supply compared with those in the control group. With NPWT, wound infection was effectively controlled. For wounds with osseous and soft tissue defects, NPWT combined with bone grafting was demonstrated to be more effective than an OBG.

  16. Immature muscular tissue differentiation into bone-like tissue by bone morphogenetic proteins in vitro, with ossification potential in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tatsuhide; Kobayashi, Syuichiro; Asakura, Masaki; Kawase, Mayu; Ueno, Atsuko; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Kawai, Tatsushi

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to induce bone formation from immature muscular tissue (IMT) in vitro, using bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) as a cytokine source and an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffold. In addition, cultured IMTs were implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to determine their in vivo ossification potential. BMPs, extracted from bovine cortical bones, were applied to embryonic SD rat IMT cultures, before 2 weeks culture on ePTFE scaffolds. Osteoblast-like cells and osteoid tissues were partially identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining 2 weeks after culture. Collagen type I (Col-I), osteopontin (OP), and osteocalcin (OC) were detected in the osteoid tissues by immunohistochemical staining. OC gene expression remained low, but OP and Col-I were upregulated during the culture period. In vivo implanted IMTs showed slight radiopacity 1 week after implantation and strong radiopacity 2 and 3 weeks after implantation. One week after implantation, migration of numerous capillaries was observed and ossification was detected after 2 weeks by histological observation. These results suggest that IMTs are able to differentiate into bone-like tissue in vitro, with an ossification potential after implantation in vivo.

  17. Quantitative polarized Raman spectroscopy in highly turbid bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D.; Wilson, Robert H.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pleshko, Nancy; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy allows measurement of molecular orientation and composition and is widely used in the study of polymer systems. Here, we extend the technique to the extraction of quantitative orientation information from bone tissue, which is optically thick and highly turbid. We discuss multiple scattering effects in tissue and show that repeated measurements using a series of objectives of differing numerical apertures can be employed to assess the contributions of sample turbidity and depth of field on polarized Raman measurements. A high numerical aperture objective minimizes the systematic errors introduced by multiple scattering. We test and validate the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy using wild-type and genetically modified (oim∕oim model of osteogenesis imperfecta) murine bones. Mineral orientation distribution functions show that mineral crystallites are not as well aligned (p<0.05) in oim∕oim bones (28±3 deg) compared to wild-type bones (22±3 deg), in agreement with small-angle X-ray scattering results. In wild-type mice, backbone carbonyl orientation is 76±2 deg and in oim∕oim mice, it is 72±4 deg (p>0.05). We provide evidence that simultaneous quantitative measurements of mineral and collagen orientations on intact bone specimens are possible using polarized Raman spectroscopy. PMID:20615030

  18. Quantitative polarized Raman spectroscopy in highly turbid bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D.; Wilson, Robert H.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pleshko, Nancy; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.

    2010-05-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy allows measurement of molecular orientation and composition and is widely used in the study of polymer systems. Here, we extend the technique to the extraction of quantitative orientation information from bone tissue, which is optically thick and highly turbid. We discuss multiple scattering effects in tissue and show that repeated measurements using a series of objectives of differing numerical apertures can be employed to assess the contributions of sample turbidity and depth of field on polarized Raman measurements. A high numerical aperture objective minimizes the systematic errors introduced by multiple scattering. We test and validate the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy using wild-type and genetically modified (oim/oim model of osteogenesis imperfecta) murine bones. Mineral orientation distribution functions show that mineral crystallites are not as well aligned (p<0.05) in oim/oim bones (28+/-3 deg) compared to wild-type bones (22+/-3 deg), in agreement with small-angle X-ray scattering results. In wild-type mice, backbone carbonyl orientation is 76+/-2 deg and in oim/oim mice, it is 72+/-4 deg (p>0.05). We provide evidence that simultaneous quantitative measurements of mineral and collagen orientations on intact bone specimens are possible using polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  19. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli.

  20. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Shahini, Aref; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Walker, Kenneth J; Eastman, Margaret A; Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Smith, Brenda J; Ricci, John L; Madihally, Sundar V; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(4-styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent microscope. Increasing the concentration of the conductive polymer in the scaffold enhanced the cell viability, indicating the improved microstructure of the scaffolds or boosted electrical signaling among cells. These results show that these conductive scaffolds are not only structurally more favorable for bone tissue engineering, but also can be a step forward in combining the tissue engineering techniques with the method of enhancing the bone healing by electrical stimuli. PMID:24399874

  1. Perspectives on the Role of Nanotechnology in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Eduardo; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Janice S.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This review surveys new developments in bone tissue engineering, specifically focusing on the promising role of nanotechnology and describes future avenues of research. Methods The review first reinforces the need to fabricate scaffolds with multi-dimensional hierarchies for improved mechanical integrity. Next, new advances to promote bioactivity by manipulating the nano-level internal surfaces of scaffolds are examined followed by an evaluation of techniques to using scaffolds as a vehicle for local drug delivery to promote bone regeneration/integration and methods of seeding cells into the scaffold. Results Through a review of the state of the field, critical questions are posed to guide future research towards producing materials and therapies to bring state-of-the-art technology to clinical settings. Significance The development of scaffolds for bone regeneration requires a material able to promote rapid bone formation while possessing sufficient strength to prevent fracture under physiological loads. Success in simultaneously achieving mechanical integrity and sufficient bioactivity with a single material has been limited. However, the use of new tools to manipulate and characterize matter down to the nano-scale may enable a new generation of bone scaffolds that will surpass the performance of autologous bone implants. PMID:22901861

  2. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  3. Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter mice label a subpopulation of mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Strecker, Sara; Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Assanah, Fayekah; Smith, Spenser; Maye, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Few gene markers selectively identify mesenchymal progenitor cells inside the bone marrow. We have investigated a cell population located in the mouse bone marrow labeled by Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter expression (CTGF-EGFP). Bone marrow flushed from CTGF reporter mice yielded an EGFP+ stromal cell population. Interestingly, the percentage of stromal cells retaining CTGF reporter expression decreased with age in vivo and was half the frequency in females compared to males. In culture, CTGF reporter expression and endogenous CTGF expression marked the same cell types as those labeled using Twist2-Cre and Osterix-Cre fate mapping approaches, which previously had been shown to identify mesenchymal progenitors in vitro. Consistent with this past work, sorted CTGF+ cells displayed an ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in vitro and into osteoblast, adipocyte, and stromal cell lineages after transplantation into a parietal bone defect. In vivo examination of CTGF reporter expression in bone tissue sections revealed that it marked cells highly localized to the trabecular bone region and was not expressed in the perichondrium or periosteum. Mesenchymal cells retaining high CTGF reporter expression were adjacent to, but distinct from mature osteoblasts lining bone surfaces and endothelial cells forming the vascular sinuses. Comparison of CTGF and Osterix reporter expression in bone tissue sections indicated an inverse correlation between the strength of CTGF expression and osteoblast maturation. Down-regulation of CTGF reporter expression also occurred during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Collectively, our studies indicate that CTGF reporter mice selectively identify a subpopulation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region.

  4. A Thermal Monitoring Sheet with Low Influence from Adjacent Waterbolus for Tissue Surface Thermometry during Clinical Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, K.; Maccarini, P.F.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a complete thermal analysis of a novel conformal surface thermometer design with directional sensitivity for real time temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatments of large superficial cancer. The thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) discussed in this paper consists of a two-dimensional array of fiberoptic sensors embedded between two layers of flexible, low loss and thermally conductive printed circuit board (PCB) film. Heat transfer across all interfaces from the tissue surface through multiple layers of insulating dielectrics surrounding the small buried temperature sensor and into an adjacent temperature regulated water coupling bolus was studied using 3D thermal simulation software. Theoretical analyses were carried out to identify the most effective differential TMS probe configuration possible with commercially available flexible PCB materials, and to compare their thermal responses with omni-directional probes commonly used in clinical hyperthermia. A TMS sensor design that employs 0.0508m Kapton MTB® and 0.2032 mm Kapton HN® flexible polyimide films is proposed for tissue surface thermometry with low influence from the adjacent waterbolus. Comparison of the thermal simulations with clinical probes indicate the new differential TMS probe design to outperform in terms of both transient response and steady state accuracy in selectively reading the tissue surface temperature, while decreasing the overall thermal barrier of the probe between the coupling waterbolus and tissue surface. PMID:18838365

  5. Osteoconductivity of modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramics for bone tissue augmentation and repair.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay-Ghosh, S; Faria, P E P; Johnson, A; Felipucci, D N B; Reaney, I M; Salata, L A; Brook, I M; Hatton, P V

    2010-09-01

    Modified fluorcanasite glasses were fabricated by either altering the molar ratios of Na(2)O and CaO or by adding P(2)O(5) to the parent stoichiometric glass compositions. Glasses were converted to glass-ceramics by a controlled two-stage heat treatment process. Rods (2 mm x 4 mm) were produced using the conventional lost-wax casting technique. Osteoconductive 45S5 bioglass was used as a reference material. Biocompatibility and osteoconductivity were investigated by implantation into healing defects (2 mm) in the midshaft of rabbit femora. Tissue response was investigated using conventional histology and scanning electron microscopy. Histological and histomorphometric evaluation of specimens after 12 weeks implantation showed significantly more bone contact with the surface of 45S5 bioglass implants when compared with other test materials. When the bone contact for each material was compared between experimental time points, the Glass-Ceramic 2 (CaO rich) group showed significant difference (p = 0.027) at 4 weeks, but no direct contact at 12 weeks. Histology and backscattered electron photomicrographs showed that modified fluorcanasite glass-ceramic implants had greater osteoconductivity than the parent stoichiometric composition. Of the new materials, fluorcanasite glass-ceramic implants modified by the addition of P(2)O(5) showed the greatest stimulation of new mineralized bone tissue formation adjacent to the implants after 4 and 12 weeks implantation.

  6. Remineralized Bone Matrix (RBM) as a Scaffold for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Soicher, Matthew A.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Stover, Susan M.; Leach, J. Kent; Yellowley, Clare E.; Griffiths, Leigh G.; Fyhrie, David P.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for improved biomaterials for use in treating non-healing bone defects. A number of natural and synthetic biomaterials have been used for the regeneration of bone tissue with mixed results. One approach is to modify native tissue via decellularization or other treatment for use as natural scaffolding for tissue repair. In this study, our goal was to improve on our previously published alternating solution immersion (ASI) method to fabricate a robust, biocompatible, and mechanically competent biomaterial from natural demineralized bone matrix (DBM). The improved method includes an antigen removal (AR) treatment step which improves mineralization and stiffness while removing unwanted proteins. The chemistry of the mineral in the remineralized bone matrix (RBM) was consistent with dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (brushite), a material used clinically in bone healing applications. Mass spectrometry identified proteins removed from the matrix with AR treatment to include α-2 HS-glycoprotein and osteopontin, non-collagenous proteins (NCPs) and known inhibitors of biomineralization. Additionally, the RBM supported the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vitro as well or better than other widely used biomaterials including DBM and PLG scaffolds. DNA content increased more than 10-fold on RBM compared to DBM and PLG; likewise, osteogenic gene expression was significantly increased after 1 and 2 weeks. We demonstrated that ASI remineralization has the capacity to fabricate mechanically stiff and biocompatible RBM, a suitable biomaterial for cell culture applications. PMID:24616346

  7. Development of porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramay, Hassna Rehman

    In bone tissue engineering, biodegradable scaffolds are used as a temporary biological and mechanical support for new tissue growth. A scaffold must have good biocompatibility, controllable degradation rate, and enough mechanical strength to support bone cell attachment, differentiation, and proliferation as it gradually degrades and finally is completely replaced by new bone tissues. Biological studies and clinical practices have established that a three-dimensional interconnected porous structure is necessary to allow cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation, and to provide pathways for biofluids. However, the mechanical strength of a material generally decreases as increasing porosity. The conflicting interests between biological and mechanical requirements thus pose a challenge in developing porous scaffolds for load-bearing bone tissue engineering. Two types of ceramic scaffolds, (1) Hydroxaypatite and (2) Hydroxaypatite/tricalcium phosphate, are prepared in this study utilizing a novel technique that combines the gel casting and polymer sponge methods. This technique provides better control over material microstructure and can produce scaffolds with enhanced mechanical toughness and strength. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds prepared by this technique have an open, uniform and interconnected porous structure (˜porosity = 76%) with compressive modulus of 7 GPa, comparable to that of cortical bone, and compressive strength of 5 MPa, comparable to that of cancellous bone. The second type of ceramic scaffold is a biphasic nano composite with tricalcium phosphate as the main matrix reinforced with hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-fibers. The porous scaffold attained a compressive strength of 9.6 MPa (˜porosity = 73%), comparable to the high-end value of cancellous bone. The toughness of the scaffold increased from 1.00 to 1.72 kN/m (˜porosity = 73%), as the addition of HA nano-fibers increased up to 5 wt.%. Polymer scaffolds are prepared using a solid

  8. Comparison of manual and automated cultures of bone marrow stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Asako; Ichimura, Masaki; Tone, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Masaru; Inoue, Minoru; Tojo, Arinobu; Kagami, Hideaki

    2015-11-01

    The development of an automated cell culture system would allow stable and economical cell processing for wider clinical applications in the field of regenerative medicine. However, it is crucial to determine whether the cells obtained by automated culture are comparable to those generated by manual culture. In the present study, we focused on the primary culture process of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) for bone tissue engineering and investigated the feasibility of its automation using a commercially available automated cell culture system in a clinical setting. A comparison of the harvested BMSCs from manual and automated cultures using clinically acceptable protocols showed no differences in cell yields, viabilities, surface marker expression profiles, and in vivo osteogenic abilities. Cells cultured with this system also did not show malignant transformation and the automated process was revealed to be safe in terms of microbial contamination. Taken together, the automated procedure described in this report provides an approach to clinical bone tissue engineering.

  9. Preparation of laponite bioceramics for potential bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanshun; Wang, Shige; Li, Kai; Ju, Yaping; Li, Jipeng; Zhang, Yongxing; Li, Jinhua; Liu, Xuanyong; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    We report a facile approach to preparing laponite (LAP) bioceramics via sintering LAP powder compacts for bone tissue engineering applications. The sintering behavior and mechanical properties of LAP compacts under different temperatures, heating rates, and soaking times were investigated. We show that LAP bioceramic with a smooth and porous surface can be formed at 800°C with a heating rate of 5°C/h for 6 h under air. The formed LAP bioceramic was systematically characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the LAP bioceramic possesses an excellent surface hydrophilicity and serum absorption capacity, and good cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility as demonstrated by resazurin reduction assay of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and hemolytic assay of pig red blood cells, respectively. The potential bone tissue engineering applicability of LAP bioceramic was explored by studying the surface mineralization behavior via soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), as well as the surface cellular response of rMSCs. Our results suggest that LAP bioceramic is able to induce hydroxyapatite deposition on its surface when soaked in SBF and rMSCs can proliferate well on the LAP bioceramic surface. Most strikingly, alkaline phosphatase activity together with alizarin red staining results reveal that the produced LAP bioceramic is able to induce osteoblast differentiation of rMSCs in growth medium without any inducing factors. Finally, in vivo animal implantation, acute systemic toxicity test and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-staining data demonstrate that the prepared LAP bioceramic displays an excellent biosafety and is able to heal the bone defect. Findings from this study suggest that the developed LAP bioceramic holds a great promise for treating bone defects in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications.

  11. Efficacy of Honeycomb TCP-induced Microenvironment on Bone Tissue Regeneration in Craniofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Satoko; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Ito, Satoshi; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Artificial bone materials that exhibit high biocompatibility have been developed and are being widely used for bone tissue regeneration. However, there are no biomaterials that are minimally invasive and safe. In a previous study, we succeeded in developing honeycomb β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) which has through-and-through holes and is able to mimic the bone microenvironment for bone tissue regeneration. In the present study, we investigated how the difference in hole-diameter of honeycomb β-TCP (hole-diameter: 75, 300, 500, and 1600 μm) influences bone tissue regeneration histologically. Its osteoconductivity was also evaluated by implantation into zygomatic bone defects in rats. The results showed that the maximum bone formation was observed on the β-TCP with hole-diameter 300μm, included bone marrow-like tissue and the pattern of bone tissue formation similar to host bone. Therefore, the results indicated that we could control bone tissue formation by creating a bone microenvironment provided by β-TCP. Also, in zygomatic bone defect model with honeycomb β-TCP, the result showed there was osseous union and the continuity was reproduced between the both edges of resected bone and β-TCP, which indicated the zygomatic bone reproduction fully succeeded. It is thus thought that honeycomb β-TCP may serve as an excellent biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration in the head, neck and face regions, expected in clinical applications. PMID:27279797

  12. Laminated electrospun nHA/PHB-composite scaffolds mimicking bone extracellular matrix for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuoyue; Song, Yue; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Wei; Cui, Jihong; Li, Hongmin; Chen, Fulin

    2017-03-01

    Electrospinning is an effective means to generate nano- to micro-scale polymer fibers resembling native extracellular matrix for tissue engineering. However, a major problem of electrospun materials is that limited pore size and porosity may prevent adequate cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In this study, we first prepared thin layers of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHA)/poly-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) via electrospinning. We then laminated the nHA/PHB thin layers to obtain a scaffold for cell seeding and bone tissue engineering. The results demonstrated that the laminated scaffold possessed optimized cell-loading capacity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibited better adherence, proliferation and osteogenic phenotypes on nHA/PHB scaffolds than on PHB scaffolds. Thereafter, we seeded MSCs onto nHA/PHB scaffolds to fabricate bone grafts. Histological observation showed osteoid tissue formation throughout the scaffold, with most of the scaffold absorbed in the specimens 2months after implantation, and blood vessels ingrowth into the graft could be observed in the graft. We concluded that electrospun and laminated nanoscaled biocomposite scaffolds hold great therapeutic potential for bone regeneration.

  13. Near-infrared optical coefficients of tumors and adjacent normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan G.

    2001-06-01

    The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tumours of the human breast, liver and kidney and their normal surrounding tissue have been measured in vitro for the near-infrared wavelengths between 600 and 1000 nm as well as 1064 nm. The Monte Carlo inversion technique (Simpson et al) was used to determine the optical coefficients of tissue samples from measurements of the diffuse transmittance and reflectance. The measurements of the diffusely transmitted and reflected intensities were performed using a single integrating sphere 'comparison' method. Four post-mortem samples of both liver adenocarcinoma and normal liver tissue were obtained from one subject and four samples of both tumour and normal kidney tissue were obtained from another subject. Four samples of both breast tumour and normal tissue were obtained from two patients. The scattering coefficient of tumours was found in each case to be significantly higher than that of nondiseased tissue. The absorption coefficient of tumours was generally much smaller than those of normal tissue. The scattering coefficient of tumours was 20% to 200% higher depending on the type of cancer and the wavelength, while the absorption coefficient of tumours was as much as twenty times smaller compared to normal tissue.

  14. Massive osteoradionecrosis of facial bones and soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Benlier, E; Alicioglu, B; Kocak, Z; Yurdakul-Sikar, E; Top, H

    2009-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is one of the most serious and uncommon complications in head and neck irradiation for cancer. It is defined as a combination of necrotic soft tissue and bone not being able to heal spontaneously, it demonstrates a general resistance to antibiotics and requires conservative surgical management. Even with modern radiation therapy, its incidence is highly unpredictable and varies between 4-30%. We report on a patient with a huge open cavitation in the cheek, communicating with the mouth and extending to contralateral periodontal gingival and temporal fossa. He had been treated with radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal cancer 5 years ago and presented with restriction of the opening of the mouth. Osteonecrosis complicated with osteomyelitis was evident in bilateral mandible and maxillary bones and the temporal bone. The ramus of the mandible and zygomatic arc were resected, subtotal maxillectomy was performed and the defect was repaired by a free double island flap from the scapular and parascapular osteocutaneous latissimus dorsi muscle flap supplied by subscapular artery. To our knowledge, this is the most extensive bone and soft tissue destruction due to radiation reported in the literature.

  15. Patterned silk film scaffolds for aligned lamellar bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Lee W.; Gil, Eun Seok; Park, Sang-Hyug; Mandal, Biman B.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Various porous biomaterial scaffolds have been utilized for bone tissue engineering; however, they are often limited in their ability to replicate the structural hierarchy and mechanics of native cortical bone. In this study, the alignment and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on patterned silk films (PF) was investigated as a bottom-up, biomimetic approach toward engineering cortical bone lamellae. Screening films cast with nine different micro and nano scale groove patterns showed that cellular alignment was mediated by an interplay between the width and depth of the patterns. MSCs were differentiated in osteogenic medium for four weeks on the PF that induced the highest degree of alignment, while flat films (FF) served as controls. Gene expression analysis and calcium quantification indicated that the PF supported osteogenic differentiation while also inducing robust lamellar alignment of cells and matrix deposition. A secondary alignment effect was noted on the PF where a new layer of aligned cells grew over the first layer, but rotated obliquely to the underlying pattern direction and first layer orientation. This layering and rotation of the aligned MSCs resembled the characteristic structural organization observed in native lamellar bone. The ability to control multilayered lamellar structural hierarchy from the interplay between a patterned 2D surface and cells suggests intriguing options for future biomaterial scaffolds designed to mimic native tissue structures. PMID:23070941

  16. Joint bleeding in factor VIII deficient mice causes an acute loss of trabecular bone and calcification of joint soft tissues which is prevented with aggressive factor replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Anthony G.; Sun, Junjiang; Hannah, William B.; Livingston, Eric W.; Heymann, Dominique; Bateman, Ted A.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While chronic degenerative arthropathy is the main morbidity of hemophilia, a very high prevalance of low bone density is also seen in men and boys with hemophilia. The current study investigates bone degradation in the knee joint of hemophilic mice resulting from hemarthrosis and the efficacy of aggressive treatment with factor VIII in the period surrounding injury to prevent bone pathology. Methods Skeletally mature factor VIII knock-out mice were subjected to knee joint hemorrhage induced by puncture of the left knee joint capsule. Mice received either intravenous Factor VIII treatment or placebo immediately prior to injury and at hours 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 after hemorrhage. Mice were euthanized two-weeks after injury and the joint morphology and loss of bone in the proximal tibia was assessed using microCT imaging. Results Quantitative microCT imaging of the knee joint found acute bone loss at the proximal tibia following injury including loss of trabecular bone volumetric density and bone mineral density, as well as trabecular connectivity density, number, and thickness. Unexpectedly, joint injury also resulted in calcification of the joint soft tissues including the tendons, ligaments, menisci, and cartilage. Treatment with factor VIII prevented this bone and soft tissue degeneration. Conclusion Knee joint hemorrhage resulted in acute changes of adjacent bone including loss of bone density and mineralization of joint soft tissues. The rapid calcification and loss of bone has implications for the initiation and progression of osteoarthritic degradation following joint bleeding. PMID:24712867

  17. The current state of bone and tissue banking in Australia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D A; Ilyas, I; Bryce, S L; Johnson, N

    1998-01-01

    The development of bone and tissue banking in Australia over the last decade is described and details of the administrative structure, donor and recipient testing protocols, allograft segment processing procedures, and internal audit safety arrangements are also provided. Demographic data concerning both the retrieval and dispersal of musculoskeletal allograft materials in Australia are also discussed. Current price schedules for a variety of allograft materials available in Australia are made available for international comparison.

  18. Functionalized mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for enhanced bone tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingdi; Zeng, Deliang; Li, Nan; Wen, Jin; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG), which possesses excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, has played an important role in bone tissue regeneration. However, it is difficult to prepare MBG scaffolds with high compressive strength for applications in bone regeneration; this difficulty has greatly hindered its development and use. To solve this problem, a simple powder processing technique has been successfully developed to fabricate a novel type of MBG scaffold (MBGS). Furthermore, amino or carboxylic groups could be successfully grafted onto MBGSs (denoted as N-MBGS and C-MBGS, respectively) through a post-grafting process. It was revealed that both MBGS and the functionalized MBGSs could significantly promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs. Due to its positively charged surface, N-MBGS presented the highest in vitro osteogenic capability of the three samples. Moreover, in vivo testing results demonstrated that N-MBGS could promote higher levels of bone regeneration compared with MBGS and C-MBGS. In addition to its surface characteristics, it is believed that the decreased degradation rate of N-MBGS plays a vital role in promoting bone regeneration. These findings indicate that MBGSs are promising materials with potential practical applications in bone regeneration, which can be successfully fabricated by combining a powder processing technique and post-grafting process. PMID:26763311

  19. Microscale Material Properties of Bone and the Mineralized Tissues of the Intervertebral Disc-Vertebral Body Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paietta, Rachel C.

    mineralized biological tissues and at the bone-cartilage interface plays an important mechanical role. Nanoindentation measurements in osteonal bone are affected by location within the lamellar structure, even though mineral volume fraction within a single osteon is relatively consistent compared to the differences observed between bone and calcified cartilage. While increasing mineral volume fraction contributes to increases in modulus in the calcified cartilage layer of the vertebral body-intervertebral disc interface, significant scatter remains. The collagenous matrix structure and type of collagen appear to have a significant influence on modulus as well. Collagen fibers of the disc mineralize adjacent to the bone of the vertebral body, and the persistence of this attachment zone from adolescence through senescence indicates that it likely serves a mechanical function. Fiber insertions into thick calcified cartilage regions likely create mechanically robust anchor points at the osteochondral interface.

  20. Bone transplantation and tissue engineering, part III: allografts, bone grafting and bone banking in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    During the 20th century, allograft implantation waned in popularity as a clinical activity. Reports appeared in the literature describing several small series of patients in whom bone was obtained from amputation specimens or recently deceased individuals. The concept of bone banking became a reality during and after World War II when the National Naval Tissue Bank was established in Bethesda and a number of small banks sprang up in hospitals throughout the world. Small fragments, either of cortical or medullary bone, from these banks were used heterotopically to augment spinal fusions, to implant into cyst cavities, or to serve as a scaffolding for repair of non- or delayed union of fractures of the long bones.

  1. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  2. Use of NASA Bioreactor in Engineering Tissue for Bone Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Pauline

    1998-01-01

    This study was proposed in search for a new alternative for bone replacement or repair. Because the systems commonly used in repair of bony defects form bone by going through a cartilaginous phase, implantation of a piece of cartilage could enhance the healing process by having a more advanced starting point. However, cartilage has seldom been used to replace bone due, in part, to the limitations in conventional culture systems that did not allow production of enough tissue for implants. The NASA-developed bioreactors known as STLV (Slow Turning Lateral Vessel) provide homogeneous distribution of cells, nutrients, and waste products, with less damaging turbulence and shear forces than conventional systems. Cultures under these conditions have higher growth rates, viability, and longevity, allowing larger "tissue-like" aggregates to form, thus opening the possibilities of producing enough tissue for implantation, along with the inherent advantages of in vitro manipulations. To assure large numbers of cells and to eliminate the use of timed embryos, we proposed to use an immortalized mouse limb bud cell line as the source of cells.

  3. Prospect of Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Azizeh-Mitra; James, Paul F.; Akbarzadeh, Rosa; Subramanian, Aswati; Flavin, Conor; Oudadesse, Hassane

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been the subject of many studies in recent years, ranging from basic science that looks into MSCs properties to studies that aim for developing bioengineered tissues and organs. Adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been the focus of most studies due to the inherent potential of these cells to differentiate into various cell types. Although, the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of cellular differentiation. These cells are another attractive stem cell source because of their ability to be reprogramed, allowing the generation of multiple cell types from a single cell. This paper briefly covers various types of stem cell sources that have been used for tissue engineering applications, with a focus on bone regeneration. Then, an overview of some recent studies making use of MSC-seeded 3D scaffold systems for bone tissue engineering has been presented. The emphasis has been placed on the reported scaffold properties that tend to improve MSCs adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation outcomes. PMID:26880976

  4. Presence of interleukin-4-producing cells for human bone regeneration after application of guided tissue regeneration membranes.

    PubMed

    Kabashima, H; Nagata, K

    2001-07-01

    To study the process of bone regeneration we examined three samples of periapical regenerative tissue obtained from two patients under a guided tissue regeneration treatment in endodontic surgery by the immunohistochemical and enzyme histochemical methods. The regenerative tissue consisted of a large number of fibroblast-like cells and a small number of mononuclear cells. Fibroblast-like cells stained positively for alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin, whereas mononuclear cells stained positively for CD4. Interleukin-4-producing cells could be detected in adjacent sections. However, interferon-y-producing cells could not be detected. These findings suggest that interleukin-4-producing cells may be one of the elements associated with success in the human bone regeneration process in vivo.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of First Annular Pulley and Adjacent Tissues Using High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Yang, Tai-Hua; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Su, Fong-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Due to a lack of appropriate image resolution, most ultrasound scanners are unable to sensitively discern the pulley tissues. To extensively investigate the properties of the A1 pulley system and the surrounding tissues for assessing trigger finger, a 30 MHz ultrasound system was implemented to perform in vitro experiments using the hypodermis, A1 pulley, and superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) dissected from cadavers. Ultrasound signals were acquired from both the transverse and sagittal planes of each tissue sample. The quantitative ultrasonic parameters, including sound speed, attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter (IB) and Nakagami parameter (m), were subsequently estimated to characterize the tissue properties. The results demonstrated that the acquired ultrasound images have high resolution and are able to sufficiently differentiate the variations of tissue textures. Moreover, the attenuation slope of the hypodermis is larger than those of the A1 pulley and SDFT. The IB of A1 pulley is about the same as that of the hypodermis, and is very different from SDFT. The m parameter of the A1 pulley is also very different from those of hypodermis and SDFT. This study demonstrated that high-frequency ultrasound images in conjunction with ultrasonic parameters are capable of characterizing the A1 pulley system and surrounding tissues. PMID:28067854

  6. The use of bone marrow stromal cells (bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) for alveolar bone tissue engineering: basic science to clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Hideaki; Agata, Hideki; Inoue, Minoru; Asahina, Izumi; Tojo, Arinobu; Yamashita, Naohide; Imai, Kohzoh

    2014-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising field of regenerative medicine in which cultured cells, scaffolds, and osteogenic inductive signals are used to regenerate bone. Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the most commonly used cell source for bone tissue engineering. Although it is known that cell culture and induction protocols significantly affect the in vivo bone forming ability of BMSCs, the responsible factors of clinical outcome are poorly understood. The results from recent studies using human BMSCs have shown that factors such as passage number and length of osteogenic induction significantly affect ectopic bone formation, although such differences hardly affected the alkaline phosphatase activity or gene expression of osteogenic markers. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor helped to maintain the in vivo osteogenic ability of BMSCs. Importantly, responsiveness of those factors should be tested under clinical circumstances to improve the bone tissue engineering further. In this review, clinical application of bone tissue engineering was reviewed with putative underlying mechanisms.

  7. The Treatment Efficacy of Bone Tissue Engineering Strategy for Repairing Segmental Bone Defects Under Osteoporotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen Xing; Chen, Cheng; Zhou, Quan; Wang, Xian Song; Zhou, Guangdong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Cao, Yilin; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2015-09-01

    The potential of increasing bone mass and preventing fractures in osteoporosis using stem cell therapy is currently an area of intense focus. However, there are very little data available regarding the postfracture bony defect healing efficacy under osteoporotic conditions. This study aims to investigate whether critical-sized segmental bone defects in a rabbit model of osteoporosis could be repaired using an allogenic stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) approach and to investigate the potential influence of osteoporosis on the treatment efficacy. Rabbit fetal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were harvested and expanded in vitro. Decalcified bone matrix (DBM) scaffolds were then seeded with allogenic fetal BMSCs and cultivated in osteogenic media to engineer BMSC/DBM constructs. Critical-sized radial defects were created in ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits and the defects were repaired either by insertion of BMSC/DBM constructs or by DBM scaffolds alone. Also, nonovariectomized age-matched (non-OVX) rabbits were served as control. At 3 months post-treatment under the osteoporotic condition (OVX rabbits), the BMSC/DBM constructs inserted within the defect generated significantly more bone tissue when compared to the DBM scaffold as demonstrated by the X-ray, microcomputed tomography, and histological analyses. In addition, when compared to a normal nonosteoporotic condition (age-matched non-OVX rabbits), the defect treatment efficacy was adversely affected by the osteoporotic condition with significantly less bone regeneration. This study demonstrated the potential of allogenic fetal BMSC-based TE strategy for repairing bone defects in an osteoporotic condition. However, the treatment efficacy could be considerably compromised in the OVX animals. Therefore, a more sophisticated strategy that addresses the complicated pathogenic conditions associated with osteoporosis is needed.

  8. Porous expandable device for attachment to bone tissue

    DOEpatents

    Rybicki, Edmund F.; Wheeler, Kenneth Ray; Hulbert, Lewis E.; Karagianes, Manuel Tom; Hassler, Craig R.

    1977-01-01

    A device for attaching to substantially solid living bone tissue, comprising a body member having an outer surface shaped to fit approximately into an empty space in the tissue and having pores into which the tissue can grow to strengthen the bond between the device and the tissue, and adjustable means for expanding the body member against the tissue to an extent such as to provide a compressive stress capable of maintaining a snug and stable fit and of enhancing the growth of the tissue into the pores in the body member. The expanding means is adjustable to provide a stress between the tissue and the body member in the range of about 150 to 750 psi, typically 150 to 350 psi. Typically the body member comprises an expandable cylindrical portion having at least one radial slit extending longitudinally from a first end to the vicinity of the opposite (second) end thereof, at least one radial slit extending longitudinally from the second end to the vicinity of the first end thereof, and a tapered cylindrical hole extending coaxially from a wider circular opening in the first end to a narrower circular opening communicating with the second end.

  9. Markers of fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Mai, Minh; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Vo, Phung; Butler, Kimberly S.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a field of genetically altered but histologically normal tissue extends 1 cm or more from the margins of human breast tumors. The extent, composition and biological significance of this field are only partially understood, but the molecular alterations in affected cells could provide mechanisms for limitless replicative capacity, genomic instability and a microenvironment that supports tumor initiation and progression. We demonstrate by microarray, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry a signature of differential gene expression that discriminates between patient-matched, tumor-adjacent histologically normal breast tissues located 1 cm and 5 cm from the margins of breast adenocarcinomas (TAHN-1 and TAHN-5, respectively). The signature includes genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, wound healing, fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts, which are mediators of wound healing and fibrosis, and intra-lobular fibroblasts expressing MMP2, SPARC, TGF-β3, which are inducers of EMT, were both prevalent in TAHN-1 tissues, sparse in TAHN-5 tissues, and absent in normal tissues from reduction mammoplasty. Accordingly, EMT markers S100A4 and vimentin were elevated in both luminal and myoepithelial cells, and EMT markers α-smooth muscle actin and SNAIL were elevated in luminal epithelial cells of TAHN-1 tissues. These results identify cellular processes that are differentially activated between TAHN-1 and TAHN-5 breast tissues, implicate myofibroblasts as likely mediators of these processes, provide evidence that EMT is occurring in histologically normal tissues within the affected field and identify candidate biomarkers to investigate whether or how field cancerization contributes to the development of primary or recurrent breast tumors. PMID:21105047

  10. Evaluation of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 and transforming growth factor-beta2 expression in bladder cancer tissue in comparison with healthy adjacent tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavinezhad, Ali; Yadegarazari, Reza; Mousavi-Bahar, Seyed Habibollah; Poorolajal, Jalal; Jafari, Mohammad; Amirzargar, Mohammad Ali; Effatpanah, Hosein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The fifth most common cancer is allocated to bladder cancer (BC) worldwide. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of BC invasion and metastasis to identify target therapeutic strategies will improve disease survival. So the aim of this study was to measure expression rate of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2) mRNA in tissue samples of patients with BC and its healthy adjacent tissue samples and their association with muscle invasion, size and grade of the tumor. Materials and Methods Tissue samples were collected from 35 newly diagnosed untreated patients with BC from 2013 to 2014. Total RNA was extracted from about 50-mg tissue samples using TRIzol reagent. TAKARA SYBR Premix EX Tag II was applied to determine the rate of mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To obtain final validation, PCR product of ZEB1 and TGF-β2 were sequenced. STATA 11 software was used to analyze the data. Results The expression level of ZEB1 in tumor samples was significantly more than of in healthy adjacent tissue samples. Up-regulation of TGF-β2 showed a strong association with muscle invasion (p=0.017). There was also demonstrated a relationship between over expression of ZEB1 with the tumor size (p=0.050). Conclusions It looks ZEB1 and TGF-β2 had a role in BC patients. In this study ZEB1 expression was higher in BC tissues than that of in healthy control tissues. There was demonstrated a markedly association between overexpression of TGF-β2 and muscle invasion. Therefore, they are supposed to be candidate as potential biomarkers for early detection and progression of BC. PMID:28261684

  11. First cosmic-ray images of bone and soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrdja, Dusan; Bikit, Istvan; Bikit, Kristina; Slivka, Jaroslav; Hansman, Jan; Oláh, László; Varga, Dezső

    2016-11-01

    More than 120 years after Roentgen's first X-ray image, the first cosmic-ray muon images of bone and soft tissue are created. The pictures, shown in the present paper, represent the first radiographies of structures of organic origin ever recorded by cosmic rays. This result is achieved by a uniquely designed, simple and versatile cosmic-ray muon-imaging system, which consists of four plastic scintillation detectors and a muon tracker. This system does not use scattering or absorption of muons in order to deduct image information, but takes advantage of the production rate of secondaries in the target materials, detected in coincidence with muons. The 2D image slices of cow femur bone are obtained at several depths along the bone axis, together with the corresponding 3D image. Real organic soft tissue, polymethyl methacrylate and water, never seen before by any other muon imaging techniques, are also registered in the images. Thus, similar imaging systems, placed around structures of organic or inorganic origin, can be used for tomographic imaging using only the omnipresent cosmic radiation.

  12. Permeability analysis of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dias, M R; Fernandes, P R; Guedes, J M; Hollister, S J

    2012-04-05

    Porous artificial bone substitutes, especially bone scaffolds coupled with osteobiologics, have been developed as an alternative to the traditional bone grafts. The bone scaffold should have a set of properties to provide mechanical support and simultaneously promote tissue regeneration. Among these properties, scaffold permeability is a determinant factor as it plays a major role in the ability for cells to penetrate the porous media and for nutrients to diffuse. Thus, the aim of this work is to characterize the permeability of the scaffold microstructure, using both computational and experimental methods. Computationally, permeability was estimated by homogenization methods applied to the problem of a fluid flow through a porous media. These homogenized permeability properties are compared with those obtained experimentally. For this purpose a simple experimental setup was used to test scaffolds built using Solid Free Form techniques. The obtained results show a linear correlation between the computational and the experimental permeability. Also, this study showed that permeability encompasses the influence of both porosity and pore size on mass transport, thus indicating its importance as a design parameter. This work indicates that the mathematical approach used to determine permeability may be useful as a scaffold design tool.

  13. Clinical evaluation of expanded mesh connective tissue graft in the treatment for multiple adjacent gingival recessions in the esthetic zone

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, M.; Shivakumar, B.; Meenapriya, B.; Anitha, V.; Ashwath, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple approaches have been used to replace lost, damaged or diseased gingival tissues. The connective tissue graft (CTG) procedure is the golden standard method for root coverage. Although multiple sites often need grafting, the palatal mucosa supplies only a limited area of grafting material. To overcome this limitation, expanded mesh graft provides a method whereby a graft can be stretched to cover a large area. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and the predictability of expanded mesh CTG (e-MCTG) in the treatment of adjacent multiple gingival recessions. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients aged 20–50 years contributed to 55 sites, each site falling into at least three adjacent Miller's Class 1 or Class 2 gingival recession. The CTG obtained from the palatal mucosa was expanded to cover the recipient bed, which was 1.5 times larger than the graft. Clinical measurements were recorded at baseline and 3 months, 12 months postoperatively. Results: A mean coverage of 1.96 mm ± 0.66 mm and 2.22 mm ± 0.68 mm was obtained at the end of 3rd and 12th month, respectively. Twelve months after surgery a statistically significant increase in CAL (2.2 mm ± 0.68 mm, P < 0.001) and increasing WKT (1.75 ± 0.78, P < 0.001) were obtained. In 80% of the treated sites, 100% root coverage was achieved (mean 93.5%). Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrated that multiple adjacent recessions were treated by using e-MCTG technique can be applied and highly predictable root coverage can be achieved. PMID:26321829

  14. Osteochondral repair using a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells and a hydroxyapatite-based artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Ando, Wataru; Nansai, Ryosuke; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A; Gobbi, Alberto; Kita, Keisuke; Horibe, Shuji; Shino, Konsei; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2014-09-01

    For an ideal osteochondral repair, it is important to facilitate zonal restoration of the subchondral bone and the cartilage, layer by layer. Specifically, restoration of the osteochondral junction and secure integration with adjacent cartilage could be considered key factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of a combined material comprising a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and a hydroxyapatite (HA) artificial bone using a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Osteochondral defects were created on the femoral groove of skeletally mature rabbits. The TEC and HA artificial bone were hybridized to develop a combined implant just before use, which was then implanted into defects (N=23). In the control group, HA alone was implanted (N=18). Histological evaluation and micro-indentation testing was performed for the evaluation of repair tissue. Normal knees were used as an additional control group for biomechanical testing (N=5). At hybridization, the TEC rapidly attached onto the surface of HA artificial bone block, which was implantable to osteochondral defects. Osteochondral defects treated with the combined implants exhibited more rapid subchondral bone repair coupled with the development of cartilaginous tissue with good tissue integration to the adjacent host cartilage when assessed at 6 months post implantation. Conversely, the control group exhibited delayed subchondral bone repair. In addition, the repair cartilaginous tissue in this group had poor integration to adjacent cartilage and contained clustered chondrocytes, suggesting an early osteoarthritis (OA)-like degenerative change at 6 months post implantation. Biomechanically, the osteochondral repair tissue treated with the combined implants at 6 months restored tissue stiffness, similar to normal osteochondral tissue. The combined implants significantly accelerated and improved osteochondral repair

  15. Enamel matrix derivative (emdogain) or subepithelial connective tissue graft for the treatment of adjacent multiple gingival recessions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Eylem Ayhan; Parlar, Ates

    2013-01-01

    One treatment approach for achieving healing by regeneration is the application of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) during periodontal surgery. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to compare the efficacy of EMD with a connective tissue graft (CTG) for the treatment of adjacent Miller Class l and II multiple gingival recessions. Twelve systemically healthy subjects with at least two Miller Class I or II multiple gingival recession defects affecting adjacent teeth on both sides of the mouth were enrolled. The surgical protocol was performed for both groups. The 56 recession defects were evaluated for recession depth (RD), recession width (RW), percentage of root coverage (PRC), height of keratinized tissue (HKT), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL). All measurements were repeated at 6 and 12 months. The mean PRC at the final evaluation was 89% ± 17% for the coronally advanced flap (CAF) + EMD group and 93% ± 17% for the CAF + CTG group. Both treatments resulted in statistically significant decreases in RD and RW and increases in HKT at 6 and 12 months. There was also a significant CAL gain for both groups. PD remained shallow over time. The results demonstrated that both procedures were successful in treating Miller Class I and II multiple gingival recessions; however, the greater results of the CAF + CTG group did not reach a statistically significant level.

  16. The prospective opportunities offered by magnetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: a review

    PubMed Central

    ORTOLANI, ALESSANDRO; BIANCHI, MICHELE; MOSCA, MASSIMILIANO; CARAVELLI, SILVIO; FUIANO, MARIO; MARCACCI, MAURILIO; RUSSO, ALESSANDRO

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic scaffolds are becoming increasingly attractive in tissue engineering, due to their ability to enhance bone tissue formation by attracting soluble factors, such as growth factors, hormones and polypeptides, directly to the implantation site, as well as their potential to improve the fixation and stability of the implant. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that the synergistic effects of magnetic scaffolds and magnetic fields can promote bone repair and regeneration. In this manuscript we review the recent innovations in bone tissue engineering that exploit magnetic biomaterials combined with static magnetic fields to enhance bone cell adhesion and proliferation, and thus bone tissue growth. PMID:28217659

  17. B-LINK: A hemicentin, plakin and integrin-dependent adhesion system that links tissues by connecting adjacent basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Keeley, Daniel P.; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; McClatchey, Shelly T. H.; Chi, Qiuyi; Hall, David H.; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Basement membrane (BM), a sheet-like form of extracellular matrix, surrounds most tissues. During organogenesis specific adhesions between adjoining tissues frequently occur, however their molecular basis is unclear. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we identify an adhesion system that connects the uterine and gonadal tissues through their juxtaposed BMs at the site of anchor cell (AC) invasion in C. elegans. We find that the extracellular matrix component hemicentin (HIM-4), found between BMs, forms punctate accumulations under the AC and controls BM linkage to promote rapid invasion. Through targeted screening we identify the integrin-binding cytolinker plakin (VAB-10A) and integrin (INA-1/PAT-3) as key BM-BM linkage regulators: VAB-10A localizes to the AC-BM interface and tethers hemicentin to the AC while integrin promotes hemicentin punctae formation. Together, plakin, integrin and hemicentin are founding components of a cell-directed adhesion system, which we name a B-LINK (Basement membrane-LINKage), that connects adjacent tissues through adjoining BMs. PMID:25443298

  18. Reconstruction of large mandibular bone and soft-tissue defect using bone transport distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Elsalanty, Mohammed E; Taher, Taher N; Zakhary, Ibrahim E; Al-Shahaat, Osama A; Refai, Mohammed; El-Mekkawi, Hatem A

    2007-11-01

    Reconstruction of large anterior mandibular defects is a challenging task. The condition can become even more complex if primary reconstruction fails, leading to loss of the entire midline portion of the lower face with massive scarring of the remaining tissues. Bone transport distraction osteogenesis can provide a viable treatment option for these patients. One of such cases will be presented, followed by a discussion of the advantages, disadvantages, and limitations of the technique.

  19. Multifunctional and stable bone mimic proteinaceous matrix for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong-Eun; Yun, Ye-Rang; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Yang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Wall, Ivan B; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-07-01

    Biomaterial surface design with biomimetic proteins holds great promise for successful regeneration of tissues including bone. Here we report a novel proteinaceous hybrid matrix mimicking bone extracellular matrix that has multifunctional capacity to promote stem cell adhesion and osteogenesis with excellent stability. Osteocalcin-fibronectin fusion protein holding collagen binding domain was networked with fibrillar collagen, featuring bone extracellular matrix mimic, to provide multifunctional and structurally-stable biomatrices. The hybrid protein, integrated homogeneously with collagen fibrillar networks, preserved structural stability over a month. Biological efficacy of the hybrid matrix was proven onto tethered surface of biopolymer porous scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells quickly anchored to the hybrid matrix, forming focal adhesions, and substantially conformed to cytoskeletal extensions, benefited from the fibronectin adhesive domains. Cells achieved high proliferative capacity to reach confluence rapidly and switched to a mature and osteogenic phenotype more effectively, resulting in greater osteogenic matrix syntheses and mineralization, driven by the engineered osteocalcin. The hybrid biomimetic matrix significantly improved in vivo bone formation in calvarial defects over 6 weeks. Based on the series of stimulated biological responses in vitro and in vivo the novel hybrid proteinaceous composition will be potentially useful as stem cell interfacing matrices for osteogenesis and bone regeneration.

  20. Characterization of bone marrow mononuclear cells on biomaterials for bone tissue engineering in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  1. Comparative proteome analysis of human esophageal cancer and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yazdian–Robati, Rezvan; Ahmadi, Homa; Riahi, Maryam Matbou; Lari, Parisa; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ranking as the sixth commonest cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) represents one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. One of the main reasons for the low survival of patients with esophageal cancer is its late diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We used proteomics approach to analyze ESCC tissues with the aim of a better understanding of the malignant mechanism and searching candidate protein biomarkers for early diagnosis of esophageal cancer. The differential protein expression between cancerous and normal esophageal tissues was investigated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). Then proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) and MASCOT web based search engine. Results: We reported 4 differentially expressed proteins involved in the pathological process of esophageal cancer, such as annexinA1 (ANXA1), peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2), transgelin (TAGLN) andactin-aortic smooth muscle (ACTA2). Conclusion: In this report we have introduced new potential biomarker (ACTA2). Moreover, our data confirmed some already known markers for EC in our region. PMID:28392898

  2. Breast Field Cancerization: Isolation and Comparison of Telomerase-Expressing Cells in Tumor and Tumor Adjacent, Histologically Normal Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Hines, William C.; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase stabilizes chromosomes by maintaining telomere length, immortalizes mammalian cells, and is expressed in more than 90% of human tumors. However, the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is not restricted to tumor cells. We have previously shown that a subpopulation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in tumor-adjacent, histologically normal (TAHN) breast tissues expresses hTERT mRNA at levels comparable with levels in breast tumors. In the current study, we first validated a reporter for measuring levels of hTERT promoter activity in early-passage HMECs and then used this reporter to compare hTERT promoter activity in HMECs derived from tumor and paired TAHN tissues 1, 3, and 5 cm from the tumor (TAHN-1, TAHN-3, and TAHN-5, respectively). Cell sorting, quantitative real-time PCR, and microarray analyses showed that the 10% of HMECs with the highest hTERT promoter activity in both tumor and TAHN-1 tissues contain more than 95% of hTERT mRNA and overexpress many genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. The percentage of HMECs within this subpopulation showing high hTERT promoter activity was significantly reduced or absent in TAHN-3 and TAHN-5 tissues. We conclude that the field of normal tissue proximal to the breast tumors contains a population of HMECs similar in hTERT expression levels and in gene expression to the HMECs within the tumor mass and that this population is significantly reduced in tissues more distal to the tumor. PMID:21775421

  3. Comparison of mechanical behavior between implant-simulated bone tissue and implant-jaw bone tissue interfaces based on Pull Out testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, C.; Muñoz, J. C.; Pinillos, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    The main purpose of this research was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship within the mechanical properties of human cadaver jaw bone with kind D2 density regarding a substitute polymer to simulate bone tissue, proposed by the ASTM, to evaluate orthopedic implants. However, despite the existence of several densities of foams and his mechanical characterization has been classified into different degrees of tissue densities to simulate cancellous and cortical bone, the value of the densities are different contrasted with the densities of bone tissue, making difficult to establish direct relationship about mechanical behavior between the polymer and the bone material, and therefore no clear criteria known for choosing the polymeric foam which describes the mechanical behavior of tissue for a specific or particular study. To understand such behavior from bone tissue regarding the polymer samples, on this research was a dental implant inserted into the samples, and subjected to destructive Pull Out test according to ASTM F543The Pull Out strength was compared between implant-jawbone and implant-rigid polyurethane foam interfaces. Thus, the test pieces with mechanical behavior similar to bone tissue, enabling an approximation to choose degree appropriate of polymer to replace the bone tissue in future trials biomechanical.

  4. Monte Carlo assessment of computed tomography dose to tissue adjacent to the scanned volume.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Cooper, V N; Nemzek, W R; McGahan, J P; Seibert, J A

    2000-10-01

    The assessment of the radiation dose to internal organs or to an embryo or fetus is required on occasion for risk assessment or for comparing imaging studies. Limited resources hinder the ability to accurately assess the radiation dose received to locations outside the tissue volume actually scanned during computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this study was to assess peripheral doses and provide tabular data for dose evaluation. Validated Monte Carlo simulation techniques were used to compute the dose distribution along the length of water-equivalent cylindrical phantoms, 16 and 32 cm in diameter. For further validation, comparisons between physically measured and Monte Carlo-derived air kerma profiles were performed and showed excellent (1% to 2%) agreement. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp with beam shaping filters were studied. Using 10(8) simulated photons input to the cylinders perpendicular to their long axis, line spread functions (LSF) of the dose distribution were determined at three depths in the cylinders (center, mid-depth, and surface). The LSF data were then used with appropriate mathematics to compute dose distributions along the long axis of the cylinder. The dose distributions resulting from helical (pitch = 1.0) scans and axial scans were approximately equivalent. Beyond about 3 cm from the edge of the CT scanned tissue volume, the fall-off of radiation dose was exponential. A series of tables normalized at 100 milliampere seconds (mAs) were produced which allow the straight-forward assessment of dose within and peripheral to the CT scanned volume. The tables should be useful for medical physicists and radiologists in the estimation of dose to sites beyond the edge of the CT scanned volume.

  5. Micro-distribution of uranium in bone after contamination: new insight into its mechanism of accumulation into bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Damien; Burt-Pichat, Brigitte; Le Goff, Xavier; Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter; Falkenberg, Gerald; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vincze, Laszlo; Denecke, Melissa A; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude; Boivin, Georges

    2015-09-01

    After internal contamination, uranium rapidly distributes in the body; up to 20 % of the initial dose is retained in the skeleton, where it remains for years. Several studies suggest that uranium has a deleterious effect on the bone cell system, but little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to accumulation of uranium in bone tissue. We have performed synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR μ-XRF) studies to assess the initial distribution of uranium within cortical and trabecular bones in contaminated rats' femurs at the micrometer scale. This sensitive technique with high spatial resolution is the only method available that can be successfully applied, given the small amount of uranium in bone tissue. Uranium was found preferentially located in calcifying zones in exposed rats and rapidly accumulates in the endosteal and periosteal area of femoral metaphyses, in calcifying cartilage and in recently formed bone tissue along trabecular bone. Furthermore, specific localized areas with high accumulation of uranium were observed in regions identified as micro-vessels and on bone trabeculae. These observations are of high importance in the study of the accumulation of uranium in bone tissue, as the generally proposed passive chemical sorption on the surface of the inorganic part (apatite) of bone tissue cannot account for these results. Our study opens original perspectives in the field of exogenous metal bio-mineralization.

  6. Fabrication of Bioceramic Bone Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fwu-Hsing

    2014-10-01

    In this study, microhydroxyapatite and nanosilica sol were used as the raw materials for fabrication of bioceramic bone scaffold using selective laser sintering technology in a self-developed 3D Printing apparatus. When the fluidity of ceramic slurry is matched with suitable laser processing parameters, a controlled pore size of porous bone scaffold can be fabricated under a lower laser energy. Results shown that the fabricated scaffolds have a bending strength of 14.1 MPa, a compressive strength of 24 MPa, a surface roughness of 725 nm, a pore size of 750 μm, an apparent porosity of 32%, and a optical density of 1.8. Results indicate that the mechanical strength of the scaffold can be improved after heat treatment at 1200 °C for 2 h, while simultaneously increasing surface roughness conducive to osteoprogenitor cell adhesion. MTT method and SEM observations confirmed that bone scaffolds fabricated under the optimal manufacturing process possess suitable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, allowing smooth adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells. Therefore, they have great potential for development in the field of tissue engineering.

  7. [Experimental-morphologic study of bone tissue reaction to carbon-containing material implantation with initiated X-ray contrast property].

    PubMed

    Grigorian, A S; Nabiev, F Kh; Golovin, R V

    2005-01-01

    In experimental study on 15 rabbits (chinchilla) influence of titanium plates implanted lapped on adjacent tissues in the region of the lower jaw body (comparison group) and carbon material with added boron in the concentrations of 8 and 15% (the study group) was studied. Results of the experimental-morphological investigation show that carbon-based materials with boron addition (with its content 8 and 15%) did not impede adaptive rebuilding of bone tissues and in particular bone structure regeneration in the process of reactive rebuilding of the "maternal" bone. Moreover, as the result of reactive processes developing in osseous tissues after implantation of the tested materials their successful integration in surrounding tissue structures was detected.

  8. Bone tissue engineering using silica-based mesoporous nanobiomaterials:Recent progress.

    PubMed

    Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    Bone disorders are of significant concern due to increase in the median age of our population. It is in this context that tissue engineering has been emerging as a valid approach to the current therapies for bone regeneration/substitution. Tissue-engineered bone constructs have the potential to alleviate the demand arising from the shortage of suitable autograft and allograft materials for augmenting bone healing. Silica based mesostructured nanomaterials possessing pore sizes in the range 2-50 nm and surface reactive functionalities have elicited immense interest due to their exciting prospects in bone tissue engineering. In this review we describe application of silica-based mesoporous nanomaterials for bone tissue engineering. We summarize the preparation methods, the effect of mesopore templates and composition on the mesopore-structure characteristics, and different forms of these materials, including particles, fibers, spheres, scaffolds and composites. Also, the effect of structural and textural properties of mesoporous materials on development of new biomaterials for production of bone implants and bone cements was discussed. Also, application of different mesoporous materials on construction of manufacture 3-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was discussed. It begins by giving the reader a brief background on tissue engineering, followed by a comprehensive description of all the relevant components of silica-based mesoporous biomaterials on bone tissue engineering, going from materials to scaffolds and from cells to tissue engineering strategies that will lead to "engineered" bone.

  9. Solid Free-form Fabrication Technology and Its Application to Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Jong Young; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2010-01-01

    The development of scaffolds for use in cell-based therapies to repair damaged bone tissue has become a critical component in the field of bone tissue engineering. However, design of scaffolds using conventional fabrication techniques has limited further advancement, due to a lack of the required precision and reproducibility. To overcome these constraints, bone tissue engineers have focused on solid free-form fabrication (SFF) techniques to generate porous, fully interconnected scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. This paper reviews the potential application of SFF fabrication technologies for bone tissue engineering with respect to scaffold fabrication. In the near future, bone scaffolds made using SFF apparatus should become effective therapies for bone defects. PMID:24855546

  10. Immunohistochemical Expression of p16 and p21 in Pituitary Tissue Adjacent to Pituitary Adenoma versus Pituitary Tissue Obtained at Autopsy: Is There a Difference?

    PubMed

    Manojlovic Gacic, Emilija; Skender-Gazibara, Milica; Soldatovic, Ivan; Dundjerovic, Dusko; Boricic, Novica; Raicevic, Savo; Popovic, Vera

    2015-05-01

    Normal pituitary tissue is frequently used for comparison with protein expression in tumor tissue, being obtained either at surgery or at autopsy. p16 and p21 proteins are cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, belonging to INK4 and Cip/Kip family, respectively. Their expression is increased in response to DNA damage or other cellular stressors, resulting in the activation of cell cycle checkpoints. They also play important roles in cellular senescence. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in p16 and p21 immunohistochemical expression in normal pituitary tissue adjacent to pituitary adenoma obtained during neurosurgical procedure with pituitary tissue obtained at autopsy, from patients who died from non-endocrinological diseases. Our results show significant difference in p16 nuclear and p21 cytoplasmic immunohistochemical expression between two types of normal pituitary tissues. One of the reasons for this difference could be the age of subjects because those who underwent autopsy for a non-endocrinological disease were significantly older than subjects who underwent neurosurgery for a pituitary adenoma. Our finding that differences are probably not influenced by postmortem changes is supported by no significant correlation between postmortem interval and immunohistochemical p16 and p21 expression. The influence of the presence of a pituitary adenoma could not be evaluated in these specimens.

  11. Osteocalcin/fibronectin-functionalized collagen matrices for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, S G; Lee, D S; Lee, S; Jang, J-H

    2015-06-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein found in the extracellular matrix and is widely used to build scaffolds for biomedical applications which are the result of its biocompatibility and biodegradability. In the present study, we constructed a rhOCN/FNIII9-10 fusion protein and rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices and investigated the potential value for bone tissue engineering. In vitro studies carried out with preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed that rhOCN/FNIII9-10 fusion protein promoted cell adhesion and the mRNA levels of osteogenic markers including osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and collagen type I. In addition, rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices showed significant induction of the ALP activity more than rhFNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices or collagen matrices alone. These results suggested that rhOCN/FNIII9-10-functionalized collagen matrices have potential for bone tissue engineering.

  12. Titanium phosphate glass microspheres for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lakhkar, Nilay J; Park, Jeong-Hui; Mordan, Nicola J; Salih, Vehid; Wall, Ivan B; Kim, Hae-Won; King, Scott P; Hanna, John V; Martin, Richard A; Addison, Owen; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2012-11-01

    We have demonstrated the successful production of titanium phosphate glass microspheres in the size range of ∼10-200 μm using an inexpensive, efficient, easily scalable process and assessed their use in bone tissue engineering applications. Glasses of the following compositions were prepared by melt-quench techniques: 0.5P₂O₅-0.4CaO-(0.1-x)Na₂O-xTiO₂, where x=0.03, 0.05 and 0.07 mol fraction (denoted as Ti3, Ti5 and Ti7 respectively). Several characterization studies such as differential thermal analysis, degradation (performed using a novel time lapse imaging technique) and pH and ion release measurements revealed significant densification of the glass structure with increased incorporation of TiO₂ in the glass from 3 to 5 mol.%, although further TiO₂ incorporation up to 7 mol.% did not affect the glass structure to the same extent. Cell culture studies performed using MG63 cells over a 7-day period clearly showed the ability of the microspheres to provide a stable surface for cell attachment, growth and proliferation. Taken together, the results confirm that 5 mol.% TiO₂ glass microspheres, on account of their relative ease of preparation and favourable biocompatibility, are worthy candidates for use as substrate materials in bone tissue engineering applications.

  13. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  14. Peculiarities of the bone tissue resorption under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N.; Oganov, V.; Polkovenko, O.; Nitsevich, T.

    The actual problem - peculiarities of resorptive processes in the spongiose of thingbones - we studied with the use of tranmissive electron microscopy in experiments on rats (American space station SLS-2) and on monkeys Macaca mulatt? (BION-11). Animals were onboard during 2 weeks. There was established, that the resorption happen with osteoclasts participation. They can create groups of cells. In the osteoclasts population we indicated not typical for the control (ground experiment) "giant" cells, which have on ultrathin sections 5-6 nuclei, many lysosomes, well developed "light" zone and "brush-border". The destruction of minera lized matrix in bone lacunas also happens by the way of osteolytic activity of osteocytes. Lysosome ferments of osteocytes are secreted by the eczocytosis. The osteocytic osteolysis, as well as the osteoclastic one can be seen as a physiological, gormon-dependent mechanism of resorption. The presence of a considerable number of neutrophiles, which enter in some zones of resorption is also typical. When these neutrophiles destruct, they release lysosomic ferments that dissolve the bone matrix. In some zones of resorption we noted the presence of the row from collagen fibrils, which loosed crystals , on mineralized matrix borders. The cell detritus is noted in zones of surface dissolving among crystallic conglomerates. It certificates the processes of osteogenic cells destruction that happen here. So, under the microgravity conditions in zones of adaptive remodeling of the spongiose the processes of the bone tissue resorption happen by some ways, namely: by the functional activization of osteoclasts; by the osteocytic osteolysis increasing; as a result of hydrolytic activity of neutrophiles, entering in these zones, and also by the local demineralization and further destruction of bone matrix surface zones.

  15. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  16. Insights into reference point indentation involving human cortical bone: sensitivity to tissue anisotropy and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Coulmier, Aurélie; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-09-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) is a microindentation technique involving 20 cycles of loading in "force-control" that can directly assess a patient׳s bone tissue properties. Even though preliminary clinical studies indicate a capability for fracture discrimination, little is known about what mechanical behavior the various RPI properties characterize and how these properties relate to traditional mechanical properties of bone. To address this, the present study investigated the sensitivity of RPI properties to anatomical location and tissue organization as well as examined to what extent RPI measurements explain the intrinsic mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Multiple indents with a target force of 10N were done in 2 orthogonal directions (longitudinal and transverse) per quadrant (anterior, medial, posterior, and lateral) of the femoral mid-shaft acquired from 26 donors (25-101 years old). Additional RPI measurements were acquired for 3 orthogonal directions (medial only). Independent of age, most RPI properties did not vary among these locations, but they did exhibit transverse isotropy such that resistance to indentation is greater in the longitudinal (axial) direction than in the transverse direction (radial or circumferential). Next, beam specimens (~2mm×5mm×40mm) were extracted from the medial cortex of femoral mid-shafts, acquired from 34 donors (21-99 years old). After monotonically loading the specimens in three-point bending to failure, RPI properties were acquired from an adjacent region outside the span. Indent direction was orthogonal to the bending axis. A significant inverse relationship was found between resistance to indentation and the apparent-level mechanical properties. Indentation distance increase (IDI) and a linear combination of IDI and the loading slope, averaged over cycles 3 through 20, provided the best explanation of the variance in ultimate stress (r(2)=0.25, p=0.003) and toughness (r(2)=0.35, p=0.004), respectively

  17. In-vitro imaging of bone tissue and monitoring of tissue viability by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Wang, Ruikang K.; El Haj, Alicia

    2001-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed as a promising medical diagnostic imaging technology for non- invasive in situ cross-sectional imaging of biological tissues. We present this technique to image bone tissue and to monitor the redox state of mitochondria enzyme Cytochrome oxidase (CytOx) in bone for applications in tissue engineering. Superluminescent diode (SLD) with its peak emission wavelength (λ = 820nm) on the absorption band of oxidized form of CytOx was used in the experiments. The results demonstrate that the OCT system is capable of imaging the calvaria of newborn rats tomographically with a resolution at 9 microns, which could only be previously obtained by the conventional excisional biopsy. The thickness of periosteum of various calvarias from different ages of rats can be accurately determined by the system. The backscattered power-versus-depth profile form the liquid phantoms (naphthol green B with intralipid) and tissue specimens (periosteum of calvaria from newborn rats) are used to quantify the absorption changes of the sample. Absorption coefficients of naphthol green B could be quantified accurately by the linear relationship between attenuation coefficients from the slopes of the reflected signals and naphthol green B concentration. The results also show that the attenuation coefficient decreases in periosteums as CytOx being reduced by sodium dithionite, demonstrating the feasibility of this method to monitor the redox state of tissues studied.

  18. A polycaprolactone/cuttlefish bone-derived hydroxyapatite composite porous scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Yang, Sun-Sik; Lee, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Cuttlefish bone (CB) is an attractive natural biomaterial source to obtain hydroxyapatite (HAp). In this study, a porous polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold incorporating CB-derived HAp (CB-HAp) powder was fabricated using the solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The presence of CB-HAp in PCL/CB-HAp scaffold was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and porosity analysis showed that the average pore dimension of the fabricated scaffold was approximately 200-300 μm, with ∼85% porosity, and that the compressive modulus increased after addition of CB-HAp powders. In vitro tests such as cell proliferation assay, cytotoxicity analysis, cell attachment observations, and alkaline phosphatase activity assays showed that the PCL/CB-HAp scaffold could improve the proliferation, viability, adherence, and osteoblast differentiation rate of MG-63 cells. When surgically implanted into rabbit calvarial bone defects, consistent with the in vitro results, PCL/CB-HAp scaffold implantation resulted in significantly higher new bone formation than did implantation of PCL alone. These findings suggest that addition of CB-HAp powder to the PCL scaffold can improve cellular response and that the PCL/CB-HAp composite scaffold has great potential for use in bone tissue engineering.

  19. Current Concepts of Bone Tissue Engineering for Craniofacial Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fishero, Brian Alan; Kohli, Nikita; Das, Anusuya; Christophel, John Jared; Cui, Quanjun

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial fractures and bony defects are common causes of morbidity and contribute to increasing health care costs. Successful regeneration of bone requires the concomitant processes of osteogenesis and neovascularization. Current methods of repair and reconstruction include rigid fixation, grafting, and free tissue transfer. However, these methods carry innate complications, including plate extrusion, nonunion, graft/flap failure, and donor site morbidity. Recent research efforts have focused on using stem cells and synthetic scaffolds to heal critical-sized bone defects similar to those sustained from traumatic injury or ablative oncologic surgery. Growth factors can be used to augment both osteogenesis and neovascularization across these defects. Many different growth factor delivery techniques and scaffold compositions have been explored yet none have emerged as the universally accepted standard. In this review, we will discuss the recent literature regarding the use of stem cells, growth factors, and synthetic scaffolds as alternative methods of craniofacial fracture repair. PMID:25709750

  20. Developing bioactive composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun

    bone-like apatite/collagen composite coating. Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells were used to evaluate the cellular behaviors on these biomimetic coatings. Cell morphologies on the surfaces of PLLA films and scaffolds, PLLA films and scaffolds with apatite coating, and PLLA films and scaffolds with apatite/collagen composite coating were studied by SEM. Cell viability was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrasodium bromide (MTT) assay. In addition, differentiated cell function was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggested that the apatite coating and apatite/collagen composite coating fabricated through the accelerated biomimetic processes could improve the interactions between osteoblasts and PLLA. The composite coating was more effective than apatite coating in improving such interactions. PLLA scaffolds coated with submicron collagen fibrils and submicron apatite paticulates are expected to be one of the promising 3D substrates for bone tissue engineering. To facilitate coating into scaffolds, the flowing condition was introduced into the accelerated biomimetic process. The apatite formed in the different sites in the scaffold was characterized using SEM. It was found that the accelerated biomimetic process performed in the flowing condition yielded more uniform spatial distribution of apatite particles than that in the regular shaking condition. This work provides a novel condition for obtaining uniform spatial distribution of bone-like apatite within the scaffolds in a timely manner, which is expected to facilitate uniform distribution of attached cells within the scaffoldsin vitro and in vivo.

  1. Calcium Phosphate Scaffolds Combined with Bone Morphogenetic Proteins or Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to review the current status of calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds combined with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the field of bone tissue engineering (BTE). Date Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained primarily from PubMed and Medline in publications from 1979 to 2014, with highly regarded older publications also included. The terms BTE, CaP, BMPs, and MSC were used for the literature search. Study Selection: Reviews focused on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results concerning the efficiency of CaP/BMPs or CaP/MSCs composites were retrieved, reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. Results: An ideal BTE product contains three elements: Scaffold, growth factors, and stem cells. CaP-based scaffolds are popular because of their outstanding biocompatibility, bioactivity, and osteoconductivity. However, they lack stiffness and osteoinductivity. To solve this problem, composite scaffolds of CaP with BMPs have been developed. New bone formation by CaP/BMP composites can reach levels similar to those of autografts. CaP scaffolds are compatible with MSCs and CaP/MSC composites exhibit excellent osteogenesis and stiffness. In addition, a CaP/MSC/BMP scaffold can repair bone defects more effectively than an autograft. Conclusions: Novel BTE products possess remarkable osteoconduction and osteoinduction capacities, and exhibit balanced degradation with osteogenesis. Further work should yield safe, viable, and efficient materials for the repair of bone lesions. PMID:25881610

  2. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Panis, C.; Victorino, V. J.; Herrera, A. C. S. A.; Cecchini, A. L.; Simão, A. N. C.; Tomita, L. Y.; Cecchini, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  3. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  4. Micro-Brillouin scattering measurements in mature and newly formed bone tissue surrounding an implant.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Vincent; Fukui, Kenji; Matsukawa, Mami; Kawabe, Masahiko; Vayron, Romain; Soffer, Emmanuel; Anagnostou, Fani; Haiat, Guillaume

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of implant stability in bone tissue remains difficult to assess because remodeling phenomena at the bone-implant interface are still poorly understood. The characterization of the biomechanical properties of newly formed bone tissue in the vicinity of implants at the microscopic scale is of importance in order to better understand the osseointegration process. The objective of this study is to investigate the potentiality of micro-Brillouin scattering techniques to differentiate mature and newly formed bone elastic properties following a multimodality approach using histological analysis. Coin-shaped Ti-6Al-4V implants were placed in vivo at a distance of 200 μm from rabbit tibia leveled cortical bone surface, leading to an initially empty cavity of 200 μm×4.4 mm. After 7 weeks of implantation, the bone samples were removed, fixed, dehydrated, embedded in methyl methacrylate, and sliced into 190 μm thick sections. Ultrasonic velocity measurements were performed using a micro-Brillouin scattering device within regions of interest (ROIs) of 10 μm diameter. The ROIs were located in newly formed bone tissue (within the 200 μm gap) and in mature bone tissue (in the cortical layer of the bone sample). The same section was then stained for histological analysis of the mineral content of the bone sample. The mean values of the ultrasonic velocities were equal to 4.97×10(-3) m/s in newly formed bone tissue and 5.31×10(-3) m/s in mature bone. Analysis of variance (p=2.42×10(-4)) tests revealed significant differences between the two groups of measurements. The standard deviation of the velocities was significantly higher in newly formed bone than in mature bone. Histological observations allow to confirm the accurate locations of the velocity measurements and showed a lower degree of mineralization in newly formed bone than in the mature cortical bone. The higher ultrasonic velocity measured in newly formed bone tissue compared with

  5. Blood and Interstitial flow in the hierarchical pore space architecture of bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cowin, Stephen C.; Cardoso, Luis

    2015-01-01

    There are two main types of fluid in bone tissue, blood and interstitial fluid. The chemical composition of these fluids varies with time and location in bone. Blood arrives through the arterial system containing oxygen and other nutrients and the blood components depart via the venous system containing less oxygen and reduced nutrition. Within the bone, as within other tissues, substances pass from the blood through the arterial walls into the interstitial fluid. The movement of the interstitial fluid carries these substances to the cells within the bone and, at the same time, carries off the waste materials from the cells. Bone tissue would not live without these fluid movements. The development of a model for poroelastic materials with hierarchical pore space architecture for the description of blood flow and interstitial fluid flow in living bone tissue is reviewed. The model is applied to the problem of determining the exchange of pore fluid between the vascular porosity and the lacunar-canalicular porosity in bone tissue due to cyclic mechanical loading and blood pressure. These results are basic to the understanding of interstitial flow in bone tissue that, in turn, is basic to understanding of nutrient transport from the vasculature to the bone cells buried in the bone tissue and to the process of mechanotransduction by these cells. PMID:25666410

  6. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: The Influence of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue on Bone Loss and of Osteocalcin on Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Maira L.; Batista, Sérgio L.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Salmon, Carlos E.G.; de Paula, Francisco J.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 21 controls (CG). Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01). Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%). The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005), but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity. PMID:27626477

  7. Rapid prototyping for tissue-engineered bone scaffold by 3D printing and biocompatibility study

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Mi, Xue; Hu, Yang; Gu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold (calcined goat spongy bone-biphasic ceramic composite/PVA gel) by 3D printing was performed, and the biocompatibility of the fabricated bone scaffold was studied. Pre-designed STL file was imported into the GXYZ303010-XYLE 3D printing system, and the tissue-engineered bone scaffold was fabricated by 3D printing using gel extrusion. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in vitro and then inoculated to the sterilized bone scaffold obtained by 3D printing. The growth of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of the tissue-engineered bone scaffold on the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs using MTT assay. Universal testing machine was adopted to test the tensile strength of the bone scaffold. The leachate of the bone scaffold was prepared and injected into the New Zealand rabbits. Cytotoxicity test, acute toxicity test, pyrogenic test and intracutaneous stimulation test were performed to assess the biocompatibility of the bone scaffold. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing had uniform pore size with the porosity of about 68.3%. The pores were well interconnected, and the bone scaffold showed excellent mechanical property. Rabbit BMSCs grew and proliferated on the surface of the bone scaffold after adherence. MTT assay indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold did not differ significantly from that of the cells in the control. In vivo experiments proved that the bone scaffold fabricated by 3D printing had no acute toxicity, pyrogenic reaction or stimulation. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing allows the rabbit BMSCs to adhere, grow and proliferate and exhibits excellent biomechanical property and high biocompatibility. 3D printing has a good application prospect in the prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold. PMID:26380018

  8. Rapid prototyping for tissue-engineered bone scaffold by 3D printing and biocompatibility study.

    PubMed

    He, Hui-Yu; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Mi, Xue; Hu, Yang; Gu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold (calcined goat spongy bone-biphasic ceramic composite/PVA gel) by 3D printing was performed, and the biocompatibility of the fabricated bone scaffold was studied. Pre-designed STL file was imported into the GXYZ303010-XYLE 3D printing system, and the tissue-engineered bone scaffold was fabricated by 3D printing using gel extrusion. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in vitro and then inoculated to the sterilized bone scaffold obtained by 3D printing. The growth of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold was observed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effect of the tissue-engineered bone scaffold on the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs using MTT assay. Universal testing machine was adopted to test the tensile strength of the bone scaffold. The leachate of the bone scaffold was prepared and injected into the New Zealand rabbits. Cytotoxicity test, acute toxicity test, pyrogenic test and intracutaneous stimulation test were performed to assess the biocompatibility of the bone scaffold. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing had uniform pore size with the porosity of about 68.3%. The pores were well interconnected, and the bone scaffold showed excellent mechanical property. Rabbit BMSCs grew and proliferated on the surface of the bone scaffold after adherence. MTT assay indicated that the proliferation and differentiation of rabbit BMSCs on the bone scaffold did not differ significantly from that of the cells in the control. In vivo experiments proved that the bone scaffold fabricated by 3D printing had no acute toxicity, pyrogenic reaction or stimulation. Bone scaffold manufactured by 3D printing allows the rabbit BMSCs to adhere, grow and proliferate and exhibits excellent biomechanical property and high biocompatibility. 3D printing has a good application prospect in the prototyping of tissue-engineered bone scaffold.

  9. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Processing and characterization of innovative scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, D; Chiellini, F; Ciardelli, G; Gazzarri, M; Gentile, P; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2012-06-01

    A new protocol, based on a modified replication method, is proposed to obtain bioactive glass scaffolds. The main feature of these samples, named "shell scaffolds", is their external surface that, like a compact and porous shell, provides both high permeability to fluids and mechanical support. In this work, two different scaffolds were prepared using the following slurry components: 59 % water, 29 % 45S5 Bioglass(®) and 12 % polyvinylic binder and 51 % water, 34 % 45S5 Bioglass(®), 10 % polyvinylic binder and 5 % polyethylene. All the proposed samples were characterized by a widespread microporosity and an interconnected macroporosity, with a total porosity of 80 % vol. After immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF), the scaffolds showed strong ability to develop hydroxyapatite, enhanced by the high specific surface of the porous systems. Moreover preliminary biological evaluations suggested a promising role of the shell scaffolds for applications in bone tissue regeneration. As regards the mechanical behaviour, the shell scaffolds could be easily handled without damages, due to their resistant external surface. More specifically, they possessed suitable mechanical properties for bone regeneration, as proved by compression tests performed before and after immersion in SBF.

  11. Microporous Nanofibrous Fibrin-based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Linnes, Michael L.; Rajachar, Rupak M.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Somerman, Martha J.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2008-01-01

    The fibrotic response of the body to synthetic polymers limits their success in tissue engineering and other applications. Though porous polymers have demonstrated improved healing, difficulty in controlling their pore sizes and pore interconnections has clouded the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, a novel method to fabricate natural polymer/calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tightly controllable pore size, pore interconnection, and calcium phosphate deposition was developed. Microporous, nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds were fabricated using sphere-templating methods. Composite scaffolds were created by solution deposition of calcium phosphate on fibrin surfaces or by direct incorporation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). The SEM results showed that fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure. Osteoblast-like cells, obtained from murine calvaria, attached, spread and showed a polygonal morphology on the surface of the biomaterial. Multiple cell layers and fibrillar matrix deposition were observed. Moreover, cells seeded on mineralized fibrin scaffolds exhibited significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity as well as osteoblast marker gene expression compared to fibrin scaffolds and nHA incorporated fibrin scaffolds (0.25 g and 0.5 g). All types of scaffolds were degraded both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these scaffolds promoted bone formation in a mouse calvarial defect model and the bone formation was enhanced by addition of rhBMP-2. PMID:18640716

  12. Viral inactivation of human bone tissue using supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Fages, J; Poirier, B; Barbier, Y; Frayssinet, P; Joffret, M L; Majewski, W; Bonel, G; Larzul, D

    1998-01-01

    A new bone tissue process using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) has been evaluated for its ability to inactivate or eliminate viruses. Four viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Sindbis virus, polio Sabin type I virus, and pseudorabies virus (PRV), were exposed to four different processing steps. In addition to supercritical CO2, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydroxide, and ethanol treatments were evaluated. The mean cumulated reduction factors (log10) for the four viruses exposed to these four steps were > 14.2 for HIV-1, > 18.2 for Sindbis virus, > 24.4 for poliovirus, and > 17.6 for PRV. The mean reduction factors obtained by the supercritical fluid extraction alone were > 4.0, > 4.3, > 6.6, and > 4.0, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SFE process is effective in inactivating viruses on human femoral heads, and provides a level of inactivation similar to that obtained by traditional cleaning methods. It is proposed that CO2 SFE be incorporated as a routine step in the processing of bone allografts for transplantation either to replace or supplement existing procedures.

  13. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of cancellous bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lifeng; Lashkari, Bahman; Tan, Joel W Y; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    We used ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities to characterize cattle trabecular bones. The PA signals were generated with an 805-nm continuous wave laser used for optimally deep optical penetration depth. The detector for both modalities was a 2.25-MHz US transducer with a lateral resolution of ~1 mm at its focal point. Using a lateral pixel size much larger than the size of the trabeculae, raster scanning generated PA images related to the averaged values of the optical and thermoelastic properties, as well as density measurements in the focal volume. US backscatter yielded images related to mechanical properties and density in the focal volume. The depth of interest was selected by time-gating the signals for both modalities. The raster scanned PA and US images were compared with microcomputed tomography (μCT) images averaged over the same volume to generate similar spatial resolution as US and PA. The comparison revealed correlations between PA and US modalities with the mineral volume fraction of the bone tissue. Various features and properties of these modalities such as detectable depth, resolution, and sensitivity are discussed.

  14. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of cancellous bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lifeng; Lashkari, Bahman; Tan, Joel W. Y.; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    We used ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities to characterize cattle trabecular bones. The PA signals were generated with an 805-nm continuous wave laser used for optimally deep optical penetration depth. The detector for both modalities was a 2.25-MHz US transducer with a lateral resolution of ˜1 mm at its focal point. Using a lateral pixel size much larger than the size of the trabeculae, raster scanning generated PA images related to the averaged values of the optical and thermoelastic properties, as well as density measurements in the focal volume. US backscatter yielded images related to mechanical properties and density in the focal volume. The depth of interest was selected by time-gating the signals for both modalities. The raster scanned PA and US images were compared with microcomputed tomography (μCT) images averaged over the same volume to generate similar spatial resolution as US and PA. The comparison revealed correlations between PA and US modalities with the mineral volume fraction of the bone tissue. Various features and properties of these modalities such as detectable depth, resolution, and sensitivity are discussed.

  15. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p < 0.05) among all composites. Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteopontin, Runx-2, and Bone Sialoprotein was observed on all composites. In conclusion, SWCNT/PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications.

  16. Bone-like tissue formation on a biomimetic titanium surface in an explant model of osteoconduction.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Juliane; Loty, Sabine; Hamdan, Ahmad; Kokubo, Tadashi; Kim, Hyun-Min; Berdal, Ariane; Sautier, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-01

    The clinical use of titanium in dental and orthopedic applications is limited. Over recent years, implant surfaces have undergone numerous modifications to enhance bone integration. In this study, we experimented a bioactive titanium using a simple chemical and moderate heat treatment that led to the formation of a bone-like apatite layer on its surface in simulated body fluids. We used a bone explant model to demonstrate that cells can migrate from the explants and subsequently differentiate to form a mineralized nodular structure. Furthermore, these cells expressed alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin and the transcription factor, Runx2. Using this model of osteoconduction, we showed that bioactive titanium bonds directly to bone, while pure titanium cannot. These findings show the importance of implant surface composition in promoting osteogenic cell differentiation and subsequent apposition of the bone matrix, allowing strong bonds to form. This model could be particularly beneficial to closely mimic bone formation adjacent to endosseous implants.

  17. Bisphosphonate-adsorbed ceramic nanoparticles increase bone formation in an injectable carrier for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tegan L; Murphy, Ciara M; Ravarian, Roya; Dehghani, Fariba; Little, David G; Schindeler, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) is a sugar-based carrier. We have previously applied SAIB as a minimally invasive system for the co-delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and found synergy when co-delivering zoledronic acid (ZA) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. Alternative bioceramics were investigated in a murine SAIB/rhBMP-2 injection model. Neither beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nor Bioglass (BG) 45S5 had a significant effect on bone volume (BV) alone or in combination with the ZA. 14C-labelled ZA binding assays showed particle size and ceramic composition affected binding with nano-HA > micro-HA > TCP > BG. Micro-HA and nano-HA increased BV in a rat model of rhBMP-2/SAIB injection (+278% and +337%), and BV was further increased with ZA–adsorbed micro-HA and nano-HA (+530% and +889%). These data support the use of ZA–adsorbed nanoparticle-sized HA as an optimal additive for the SAIB/rhBMP-2 injectable system for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26668709

  18. Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal Cadaveric Tissue.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Mahmoud; Elsobky, Emad; Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elhameed, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahim, Mona; Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir

    2016-12-01

    The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC) specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers. All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead, selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel, selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further work-up is needed to support this

  19. Expression of TAK1/TAB1 expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma and adjacent normal tissues and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Li, Qiang; He, Jin-Tao; Liu, Guang-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its activation ligand, TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1), in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and adjacent normal tissues and to analyze the relevance between TAK1 and TAB1 protein expression and the pathological features of NSCLC patients. Surgical resection NSCLC specimens were collected from 74 patients undergoing surgery in our hospital from September 2003 to July 2008; tumor-adjacent normal tissue specimens were collected as controls. All cases were pathologically confirmed after surgery, and pathological data were complete for all patients. The expression of TAK1/TAB1 proteins in NSCLC and adjacent cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. The correlation between TAK1/TAB1 protein expression and the clinicopathological features and outcome of NSCLC was assessed. The positive expression ratio of TAK1 in NSCLC tissue was 63.5%, which was significantly higher than that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue (31.1%). The positive expression ratio of TAB1 in NSCLC tissue was 51.4%, which was significantly higher than that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue (24.3%). Further analysis showed that positive protein expression of TAK1 and TAB1 was unrelated to patient gender, age, tumor size, degree of differentiation, and history of smoking (P>0.05) but was significantly related to clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Additionally, the expression of TAK1 as well as TAB1 was negatively related to NSCLC patient prognosis, and patients with positive protein expression had a significantly lower 5-year survival rate than those with negative protein expression (P<0.05). TAK1/TAB1 expression in NSCLC tissue is significantly increased and closely associated with patient clinical prognosis. These two proteins are likely to become new therapeutic targets for the treatment of NSCLC.

  20. An update on the Application of Nanotechnology in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, MF; Kalaskar, DM; Seifalian, A.; Butler, PE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural bone is a complex and hierarchical structure. Bone possesses an extracellular matrix that has a precise nano-sized environment to encourage osteoblasts to lay down bone by directing them through physical and chemical cues. For bone tissue regeneration, it is crucial for the scaffolds to mimic the native bone structure. Nanomaterials, with features on the nanoscale have shown the ability to provide the appropriate matrix environment to guide cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. Methods: This review summarises the new developments in bone tissue engineering using nanobiomaterials. The design and selection of fabrication methods and biomaterial types for bone tissue engineering will be reviewed. The interactions of cells with different nanostructured scaffolds will be discussed including nanocomposites, nanofibres and nanoparticles. Results: Several composite nanomaterials have been able to mimic the architecture of natural bone. Bioceramics biomaterials have shown to be very useful biomaterials for bone tissue engineering as they have osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties. Nanofibrous scaffolds have the ability to provide the appropriate matrix environment as they can mimic the extracellular matrix structure of bone. Nanoparticles have been used to deliver bioactive molecules and label and track stem cells. Conclusion: Future studies to improve the application of nanomaterials for bone tissue engineering are needed. PMID:28217209

  1. Hard tissue regeneration using bone substitutes: an update on innovations in materials

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a unique organ composed of mineralized hard tissue, unlike any other body part. The unique manner in which bone can constantly undergo self-remodeling has created interesting clinical approaches to the healing of damaged bone. Healing of large bone defects is achieved using implant materials that gradually integrate with the body after healing is completed. Such strategies require a multidisciplinary approach by material scientists, biological scientists, and clinicians. Development of materials for bone healing and exploration of the interactions thereof with the body are active research areas. In this review, we explore ongoing developments in the creation of materials for regenerating hard tissues. PMID:25995658

  2. Alendronate treatment alters bone tissues at multiple structural levels in healthy canine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Claire; Bale, Hrishikesh; Gludovatz, Bernd; Wat, Amy; Tang, Simon Y; Wang, Mingyue; Busse, Björn; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Schaible, Eric; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-12-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoporosis, but have been associated with atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) in the long term, which raises a critical health problem for the aging population. Several clinical studies have suggested that the occurrence of AFFs may be related to the bisphosphonate-induced changes of bone turnover, but large discrepancies in the results of these studies indicate that the salient mechanisms responsible for any loss in fracture resistance are still unclear. Here the role of bisphosphonates is examined in terms of the potential deterioration in fracture resistance resulting from both intrinsic (plasticity) and extrinsic (shielding) toughening mechanisms, which operate over a wide range of length-scales. Specifically, we compare the mechanical properties of two groups of humeri from healthy beagles, one control group comprising eight females (oral doses of saline vehicle, 1 mL/kg/day, 3 years) and one treated group comprising nine females (oral doses of alendronate used to treat osteoporosis, 0.2mg/kg/day, 3 years). Our data demonstrate treatment-specific reorganization of bone tissue identified at multiple length-scales mainly through advanced synchrotron x-ray experiments. We confirm that bisphosphonate treatments can increase non-enzymatic collagen cross-linking at molecular scales, which critically restricts plasticity associated with fibrillar sliding, and hence intrinsic toughening, at nanoscales. We also observe changes in the intracortical architecture of treated bone at microscales, with partial filling of the Haversian canals and reduction of osteon number. We hypothesize that the reduced plasticity associated with BP treatments may induce an increase in microcrack accumulation and growth under cyclic daily loadings, and potentially increase the susceptibility of cortical bone to atypical (fatigue-like) fractures.

  3. Immuno-inflammatory tissue reaction to stainless-steel and titanium plates used for internal fixation of long bones.

    PubMed

    Voggenreiter, Gregor; Leiting, Stefan; Brauer, Holger; Leiting, Peter; Majetschak, Matthias; Bardenheuer, Mark; Obertacke, Udo

    2003-01-01

    The immuno-inflammatory responses to stainless-steel (21 implants in 20 patients) and titanium plates (22 implants in 20 patients) used in the treatment of long bone fractures were studied immunohistochemically. All fractures healed without complications. In the soft tissue adjacent to the surface of the implants a dark discolouration of the tissue was visible in 18/21 stainless-steel and 20/22 titanium plates. Tissue specimens of all patients contained positive staining for macrophages (CD68-positive cells). Serial sections showed that the majority of cells were found to express the HLA-DR molecule indicating their activation. Many of the macrophages were surrounded by clusters of T-lymphocytes (CD3-positive cells). 17 out of 21 steel specimens and 15 out of 22 titanium specimens showed the infiltration of moderate amounts of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8-positive cells). Moderate amounts of B-lymphocytes (CD79alpha positive cells) were evident in four patients with steel and six patients with titanium implants. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate the presence of a marked inflammation and tissue reaction in the soft tissue covering stainless-steel and titanium plates used for internal fixation of fractures of long bones independently from the material used.

  4. Graphene and its nanostructure derivatives for use in bone tissue engineering: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine represent areas of increasing interest because of the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Tissue-engineered bone constructs have the potential to alleviate the demand arising from the shortage of suitable autograft and allograft materials for augmenting bone healing. Graphene and its derivatives have attracted much interest for applications in bone tissue engineering. For this purpose, this review focuses on more recent advances in tissue engineering based on graphene-biomaterials from 2013 to May 2015. The purpose of this article was to give a general description of studies of nanostructured graphene derivatives for bone tissue engineering. In this review, we highlight how graphene family nanomaterials are being exploited for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which graphene based materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed. In addition, graphene-based bioactive glass, as a potential drug/growth factor carrier, was reviewed which includes the composition-structure-drug delivery relationship and the functional effect on the tissue-stimulation properties. Also, the effect of structural and textural properties of graphene based materials on development of new biomaterials for production of bone implants and bone cements were discussed. Finally, the present review intends to provide the reader an overview of the current state of the graphene based biomaterials in bone tissue engineering, its limitations and hopes as well as the future research trends for this exciting field of science.

  5. Structural bone allograft combined with genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells as a novel platform for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Reynolds, David; Awad, Hani; Rubery, Paul T; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan; Guldberg, Robert E; Schwarz, Edward M; O'Keefe, Regis J; Zhang, Xinping

    2007-03-01

    The presence of live periosteal progenitor cells on the surface of bone autografts confers better healing than devitalized allograft. We have previously demonstrated in a murine 4 mm segmental femoral bone-grafting model that live periosteum produces robust endochondral and intramembraneous bone formation that is essential for effective healing and neovascularization of structural bone grafts. To the end of engineering a live pseudo-periosteum that could induce a similar response onto devitalized bone allograft, we seeded a mesenchymal stem cell line stably transfected with human bone morphogenic protein-2/beta-galactosidase (C9) onto devitalized bone allografts or onto a membranous small intestinal submucosa scaffold that was wrapped around the allograft. Histology showed that C9-coated allografts displayed early cartilaginous tissue formation at day 7. By 6 and 9 weeks, a new cortical shell was found bridging the segmental defect that united the host bones. Biomechanical testing showed that C9-coated allografts displayed torsional strength and stiffness equivalent to intact femurs at 6 weeks and superior to live isografts at 9 weeks. Volumetric and histomorphometric micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrated a 2-fold increase in new bone formation around C9-coated allografts, which resulted in a substantial increase in polar moment of inertia (pMOI) due to the formation of new cortical shell around the allografts. Positive correlations between biomechanics and new bone volume and pMOI were found, suggesting that the biomechanical function of the grafted femur relates to both morphological parameters. C9-coated allograft also exhibited slower resorption of the graft cortex at 9 weeks than live isograft. Both new bone formation and the persistent allograft likely contributed to the improved biomechanics of C9-coated allograft. Taken together, we propose a novel strategy to combine structural bone allograft with genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells as

  6. Computational model-informed design and bioprinting of cell-patterned constructs for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Aurélie; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Hafezi, Forough; Ferraris, Eleonora; Patterson, Jennifer; Koç, Bahattin; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly advancing tissue engineering technology that holds great promise for the regeneration of several tissues, including bone. However, to generate a successful 3D bone tissue engineering construct, additional complexities should be taken into account such as nutrient and oxygen delivery, which is often insufficient after implantation in large bone defects. We propose that a well-designed tissue engineering construct, that is, an implant with a specific spatial pattern of cells in a matrix, will improve the healing outcome. By using a computational model of bone regeneration we show that particular cell patterns in tissue engineering constructs are able to enhance bone regeneration compared to uniform ones. We successfully bioprinted one of the most promising cell-gradient patterns by using cell-laden hydrogels with varying cell densities and observed a high cell viability for three days following the bioprinting process. In summary, we present a novel strategy for the biofabrication of bone tissue engineering constructs by designing cell-gradient patterns based on a computational model of bone regeneration, and successfully bioprinting the chosen design. This integrated approach may increase the success rate of implanted tissue engineering constructs for critical size bone defects and also can find a wider application in the biofabrication of other types of tissue engineering constructs.

  7. [Effect of peptide regulators on the structural and functional status of bone tissue in ageing rats].

    PubMed

    Povorozniuk, V V; Khavinson, V Kh; Makogonchuk, A V; Ryzhak, G A; Kreslov, E A; Gopkalova, I V

    2007-01-01

    The wide spread of osteoporosis in women in the post-menopausal period stipulates the need for new effective means of prevention and correction of pathologic alterations in the bone tissue. Effect of two peptide bioregulators: cartilages preparation based on the cartilaginous tissue extract and T-31 substance on the mineral density of rat bone tissue has been studied in the experimental model of osteoporosis. The study has revealed an osteoprotective effect of both studied substances, with significantly higher efficacy of the preparation based on cartilaginous tissue extract. The substances exerted both prophylactic effect on the status of the cartilaginous tissue, preventing the decrease of mineral density of the bone tissue in rats after ovariectomy, and corrective effect by increasing the bone tissue density, which was reduced as a result of ovariectomy.

  8. Method and system for in vivo measurement of bone tissue using a two level energy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. R.; Judy, P. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for radiologically determining the bone mineral content of living human bone tissue independently of the concurrent presence of adipose and other soft tissues. A target section of the body of the subject is irradiated with a beam of penetrative radiations of preselected energy to determine the attenuation of such beam with respect to the intensity of each of two radiations of different predetermined energy levels. The resulting measurements are then employed to determine bone mineral content.

  9. Does metaphyseal cement augmentation in fracture management influence the adjacent subchondral bone and joint cartilage?: an in vivo study in sheep stifle joints.

    PubMed

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage.Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests.Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24).The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage.

  10. Comparison of Gene Expression Profile Between Tumor Tissue and Adjacent Non-tumor Tissue in Patients with Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

    PubMed

    Kou, Youwei; Zhao, Ying; Bao, Chenhui; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are defined as spindle cell and/or epithelioid tumors originated from interstitial Cajal cells or precursors in the digestive tract. This study was conducted to identify genes differing in expression between the gastric tumors and the adjacent non-cancerous mucosas in patients with primary gastric GIST. The gene expression profile was determined by using oligonucleotide-based DNA microarrays and further validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis was performed to predict signaling pathways involved in gastric GIST. Our data showed that the expression levels of 957 genes (RAB39B, member RAS oncogene family; VCAN, versican; etc.) were higher and that of 526 genes (CXCL14, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 14; MTUS1, microtubule-associated tumor suppressor 1; etc.) were lower in the gastric tumor tissues as compared with normal gastric tissues. Results from KEGG pathway analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched into 16 signaling transduction pathways, including Hedeghog and Wnt signaling pathways. Our study may provide basis for identification of novel biomarkers associated with primary gastric GIST pathogenesis and for exploration of underlying mechanisms involved in this gastric sarcoma.

  11. Biomimetic stratified scaffold design for ligament-to-bone interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Helen H; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P

    2009-07-01

    The emphasis in the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is on imparting biomimetic functionality to tissue engineered bone or soft tissue grafts and enabling their translation to the clinic. A significant challenge in achieving extended graft functionality is engineering the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as with the host environment. Biological fixation will require re-establishment of the structure-function relationship inherent at the native soft tissue-to-bone interface on these tissue engineered grafts. To this end, strategic biomimicry must be incorporated into advanced scaffold design. To facilitate integration between distinct tissue types (e.g., bone with soft tissues such as cartilage, ligament, or tendon), a stratified or multi-phasic scaffold with distinct yet continuous tissue regions is required to pre-engineer the interface between bone and soft tissues. Using the ACL-to-bone interface as a model system, this review outlines the strategies for stratified scaffold design for interface tissue engineering, focusing on identifying the relevant design parameters derived from an understanding of the structure-function relationship inherent at the soft-to-hard tissue interface. The design approach centers on first addressing the challenge of soft tissue-to-bone integration ex vivo, and then subsequently focusing on the relatively less difficult task of bone-to-bone integration in vivo. In addition, we will review stratified scaffold design aimed at exercising spatial control over heterotypic cellular interactions, which are critical for facilitating the formation and maintenance of distinct yet continuous multi-tissue regions. Finally, potential challenges and future directions in this emerging area of advanced scaffold design will be discussed.

  12. Bone tissue heating and ablation by short and ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Rice, Colin E. W.; George, Thomas F.

    2010-02-01

    Biological hard tissues, such as those found in bone and teeth, are complex tissues that build a strong mineral structure over an organic matrix framework. The laser-matter interaction for bone hard tissues holds great interest to laser surgery and laser dentistry; the use of short/ultrashort pulses, in particular, shows interesting behaviors not seen in continuous wave lasers. High laser energy densities in ultrashort pulses can be focused on a small irradiated surface (spot diameter is 10-50 μm) leading to rapid temperature rise and thermal ablation of the bone tissue. Ultrashort pulses, specifically those in the picosecond and femtosecond ranges, impose several challenges in modeling bone tissue response. In the present paper we perform time-dependent thermal simulations of short and ultrashort pulse laser-bone interactions in singlepulse and multipulse (set of ultrashort pulses) modes of laser heating. A comparative analysis for both radiation modes is discussed for laser heating of different types of the solid bone on the nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time scales. It is shown that ultrashort laser pulses with high energy densities can ablate bone tissue without heating tissues bordering the ablation creator. This reaction is particularly desirable as heat accumulation and thermal damage are the main factors affecting tissue regrowth rates, and thus patient recovery times.

  13. Preparation and characterization of bionic bone structure chitosan/hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiazhen; Nie, Jingyi; Zhang, Qirong; Li, Youliang; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional oriented chitosan (CS)/hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds were prepared via in situ precipitation method in this research. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that the scaffolds with acicular nano-HA had the spoke-like, multilayer and porous structure. The SEM of osteoblasts which were polygonal or spindle-shaped on the composite scaffolds after seven-day cell culture showed that the cells grew, adhered, and spread well. The results of X-ray powder diffractometer and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer showed that the mineral particles deposited in the scaffold had phase structure similar to natural bone and confirmed that particles were exactly HA. In vitro biocompatibility evaluation indicated the composite scaffolds showed a higher degree of proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cell compared with the pure CS scaffolds and the CS/HA10 scaffold was the highest one. The CS/HA scaffold also had a higher ratio of adhesion and alkaline phosphate activity value of osteoblasts compared with the pure CS scaffold, and the ratio increased with the increase of HA content. The ALP activity value of composite scaffolds was at least six times of the pure CS scaffolds. The results suggested that the composite scaffolds possessed good biocompatibility. The compressive strength of CS/HA15 increased by 33.07% compared with the pure CS scaffold. This novel porous scaffold with three-dimensional oriented structure might have a potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Recent Developments of Functional Scaffolds for Craniomaxillofacial Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Yukihiko; Maeda, Hatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous bone grafting remains a gold standard for the reconstruction critical-sized bone defects in the craniomaxillofacial region. Nevertheless, this graft procedure has several disadvantages such as restricted availability, donor-site morbidity, and limitations in regard to fully restoring the complicated three-dimensional structures in the craniomaxillofacial bone. The ultimate goal of craniomaxillofacial bone reconstruction is the regeneration of the physiological bone that simultaneously fulfills both morphological and functional restorations. Developments of tissue engineering in the last two decades have brought such a goal closer to reality. In bone tissue engineering, the scaffolds are fundamental, elemental and mesenchymal stem cells/osteoprogenitor cells and bioactive factors. A variety of scaffolds have been developed and used as spacemakers, biodegradable bone substitutes for transplanting to the new bone, matrices of drug delivery system, or supporting structures enhancing adhesion, proliferation, and matrix production of seeded cells according to the circumstances of the bone defects. However, scaffolds to be clinically completely satisfied have not been developed yet. Development of more functional scaffolds is required to be applied widely to cranio-maxillofacial bone defects. This paper reviews recent trends of scaffolds for crania-maxillofacial bone tissue engineering, including our studies. PMID:24163634

  15. Fabrication of polylactide nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa J.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-05-22

    Highly porous three-dimensional polylactide (PLA) scaffolds were obtained from PLA incorporated with different amounts of chitosan-modified montmorillonite (CS-MMT), through solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The processed scaffolds were tested in vitro for their possible application in bone tissue engineering. Scaffolds were characterized by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to study their structure and intermolecular interactions. Bioresorbability tests in simulated body fluid (pH 7.4) were conducted to assess the response of the scaffolds in a simulated physiological condition. The FIB SEM images of the scaffolds showed a porous architecture with gradual change in morphology with increasing CS-MMT concentration. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of both PLA and CS-MMT particles on the surface of the scaffolds. XRD showed that the crystalline unit cell type was the same for all the scaffolds, and crystallinity decreased with an increase in CS-MMT concentration. The scaffolds were found to be bioresorbable, with rapid bioresorbability on the scaffolds with a high CS-MMT concentration.

  16. High rate properties of porcine skull bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, Kyle Jeffry

    Several recent studies have shown the importance of understanding the nature of blast injuries. Traditionally, the lungs and other air filled organs were the focus of these injuries but it is being discovered that some level of brain trauma may result after encountering a blast. These injuries are referred to as traumatic brain injuries, or TBI. There has been many clinical studies and statistical analyses done concerning these injuries, but there is still no physical understanding of the problem. In order to develop a model of how this injury can occur, rate dependent material properties of the tissues the stress wave will travel through are needed. In this study, the compressive response of porcine skull bone through the thickness direction was experimentally determined over a wide range of rates, ranging from 0.001 sec -1 to approximately 3000 sec-1. The results reveal that for most mechanical properties there is a clear rate dependence of the material. However, only one subset of the skull section appeared to have a rate dependent initial modulus, with the rest showing no significant statistical dependence on loading rate. Other mechanical properties appeared to be affected by the loading rate, including the strain energy density.

  17. Finite Element Method (FEM), Mechanobiology and Biomimetic Scaffolds in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, A.; Ballini, A.; Pappalettere, C.; Tullo, D.; Cantore, S.; Desiate, A.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques of bone reconstructive surgery are largely based on conventional, non-cell-based therapies that rely on the use of durable materials from outside the patient's body. In contrast to conventional materials, bone tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences towards the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve bone tissue function. Bone tissue engineering has led to great expectations for clinical surgery or various diseases that cannot be solved with traditional devices. For example, critical-sized defects in bone, whether induced by primary tumor resection, trauma, or selective surgery have in many cases presented insurmountable challenges to the current gold standard treatment for bone repair. The primary purpose of bone tissue engineering is to apply engineering principles to incite and promote the natural healing process of bone which does not occur in critical-sized defects. The total market for bone tissue regeneration and repair was valued at $1.1 billion in 2007 and is projected to increase to nearly $1.6 billion by 2014. Usually, temporary biomimetic scaffolds are utilized for accommodating cell growth and bone tissue genesis. The scaffold has to promote biological processes such as the production of extra-cellular matrix and vascularisation, furthermore the scaffold has to withstand the mechanical loads acting on it and to transfer them to the natural tissues located in the vicinity. The design of a scaffold for the guided regeneration of a bony tissue requires a multidisciplinary approach. Finite element method and mechanobiology can be used in an integrated approach to find the optimal parameters governing bone scaffold performance. In this paper, a review of the studies that through a combined use of finite element method and mechano-regulation algorithms described the possible patterns of tissue differentiation in biomimetic scaffolds for bone

  18. Measurement of guided mode wavenumbers in soft tissue-bone mimicking phantoms using ultrasonic axial transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiangang; Foiret, Josquin; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Talmant, Maryline; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    Human soft tissue is an important factor that influences the assessment of human long bones using quantitative ultrasound techniques. To investigate such influence, a series of soft tissue-bone phantoms (a bone-mimicking plate coated with a layer of water, glycerol or silicon rubber) were ultrasonically investigated using a probe with multi-emitter and multi-receiver arrays in an axial transmission configuration. A singular value decomposition signal processing technique was applied to extract the frequency-dependent wavenumbers of several guided modes. The results indicate that the presence of a soft tissue-mimicking layer introduces additional guided modes predicted by a fluid waveguide model. The modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate covered by the soft-tissue phantom are only slightly modified compared to their counterparts in the free bone-mimicking plate, and they are still predicted by an elastic transverse isotropic two-dimensional waveguide. Altogether these observations suggest that the soft tissue-bone phantoms can be modeled as two independent waveguides. Even in the presence of the overlying soft tissue-mimicking layer, the modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate can still be extracted and identified. These results suggest that our approach can be applied for the purpose of the characterization of the material and structural properties of cortical bone.

  19. Mechanical response tissue analyzer for estimating bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Steele, Charles; Mauriello, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    One of the major concerns for extended space flight is weakness of the long bones of the legs, composed primarily of cortical bone, that functions to provide mechanical support. The strength of cortical bone is due to its complex structure, described simplistically as cylinders of parallel osteons composed of layers of mineralized collagen. The reduced mechanical stresses during space flight or immobilization of bone on Earth reduces the mineral content, and changes the components of its matrix and structure so that its strength is reduced. Currently, the established clinical measures of bone strength are indirect. The measures are based on determinations of mineral density by means of radiography, photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computer tomography. While the mineral content of bone is essential to its strength, there is growing awareness of the limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Other experimental methods in clinical trials that more directly evaluate the physical properties of bone, and do not require exposure to radiation, include ultrasound, acoustic emission, and low-frequency mechanical vibration. The last method can be considered a direct measure of the functional capacity of a long bone since it quantifies the mechanical response to a stimulus delivered directly to the bone. A low frequency vibration induces a response (impedance) curve with a minimum at the resonant frequency, that a few investigators use for the evaluation of the bone. An alternative approach, the method under consideration, is to use the response curve as the basis for determination of the bone bending stiffness EI (E is the intrinsic material property and I is the cross-sectional moment of inertia) and mass, fundamental mechanical properties of bone.

  20. Cartilage, bone, and intermandibular connective tissue in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Kemp, Anne

    2013-10-01

    The connective tissue that links the bones of the mandible in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, has been described as an intermandibular cartilage, and as such has been considered important for phylogenetic analyses among lower vertebrates. However, light and electron microscopy of developing lungfish jaws demonstrates that the intermandibular tissue, like the connective tissue that links the bones of the upper jaw, contains fibroblasts and numerous bundles of collagen fibrils, extending from the trabeculae of the bones supporting the tooth plates. It differs significantly in structure and in staining reactions from the cartilage and the bone found in this species. In common with the cladistian Polypterus and with actinopterygians and some amphibians, lungfish have no intermandibular cartilage. The connective tissue linking the mandibular bones has no phylogenetic significance for systematic grouping of lungfish, as it is present in a range of different groups among lower vertebrates.

  1. Unusual endosteally formed bone tissue in a patagonian basal sauropodomorph dinosaur.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Ignacio A; Chinsamy, Anusuya; Pol, Diego

    2014-08-01

    Mussaurus patagonicus (Dinosauria: Sauropodomorpha) is a basal sauropodomorph from the Late Triassic of southern Argentina that is known from a large number of individuals, including juveniles, subadults, and adults. Here, we report on the occurrence of an unusual bone tissue in an individual of M. patagonicus. The rather atypical bone tissue is located within the femoral medullary cavity and also occurs within several erosion cavities of the midinner part of the cortex. This tissue is well vascularized and is composed of a matrix that consists of abundant and densely packed osteocyte lacunae. Although some features of this tissue resembles avian medullary bone, the histological features are distinctive and share more features with the pathological, reactive bone produced in extant birds in response to a retrovirus-induced disease (avian osteopetrosis). Here, we also discuss and provide histological features to effectively differentiate endosteally formed medullary bone from pathological avian osteopetrosis.

  2. Tissue Engineering Strategies for the Tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lester; Xia, Younan; Galatz, Leesa M.; Genin, Guy M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Injuries to connective tissues are painful and disabling and result in costly medical expenses. These injuries often require re-attachment of an unmineralized connective tissue to bone. The uninjured tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion (enthesis) is a functionally graded material that exhibits a gradual transition from soft tissue (i.e., tendon or ligament) to hard tissue (i.e., mineralized bone) through a fibrocartilaginous transition region. This transition is believed to facilitate force transmission between the two dissimilar tissues by ameliorating potentially damaging interfacial stress concentrations. The transition region is impaired or lost upon tendon/ligament injury and is not regenerated following surgical repair or natural healing, exposing the tissue to risk of re-injury. The need to regenerate a robust tendon-to-bone insertion has led a number of tissue engineering repair strategies. This review treats the tendon-to-bone insertion site as a tissue structure whose primary role is mechanical and discusses current and emerging strategies for engineering the tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion in this context. The focus lies on strategies for producing mechanical structures that can guide and subsequently sustain a graded tissue structure and the associated cell populations. PMID:22185608

  3. Biomimetic composite scaffolds containing bioceramics and collagen/gelatin for bone tissue engineering - A mini review.

    PubMed

    Kuttappan, Shruthy; Mathew, Dennis; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-12-01

    Bone is a natural composite material consisting of an organic phase (collagen) and a mineral phase (calcium phosphate, especially hydroxyapatite). The strength of bone is attributed to the apatite, while the collagen fibrils are responsible for the toughness and visco-elasticity. The challenge in bone tissue engineering is to develop such biomimetic composite scaffolds, having a balance between biological and biomechanical properties. This review summarizes the current state of the field by outlining composite scaffolds made of gelatin/collagen in combination with bioactive ceramics for bone tissue engineering application.

  4. Prostate Field Cancerization: Deregulated Expression of Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and Platelet Derived Growth Factor A (PDGF-A) in Tumor Adjacent Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Shoshan, Dor S.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prostate field cancerization denotes molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Such alterations include deregulated protein expression, as we have previously shown for the key transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Here we add the two secreted factors macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) to the growing list of protein markers of prostate field cancerization. Expression of MIC-1 and PDGF-A was measured quantitatively by immunofluorescence and comprehensively analyzed using two methods of signal capture and several groupings of data generated in human cancerous (n = 25), histologically normal adjacent (n = 22), and disease-free (n = 6) prostate tissues. A total of 208 digitized images were analyzed. MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in tumor tissues were elevated 7.1x to 23.4x and 1.7x to 3.7x compared to disease-free tissues, respectively (p<0.0001 to p = 0.08 and p<0.01 to p = 0.23, respectively). In support of field cancerization, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in adjacent tissues were elevated 7.4x to 38.4x and 1.4x to 2.7x, respectively (p<0.0001 to p<0.05 and p<0.05 to p = 0.51, respectively). Also, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression were similar in tumor and adjacent tissues (0.3x to 1.0x; p<0.001 to p = 0.98 for MIC-1; 0.9x to 2.6x; p<0.01 to p = 1.00 for PDGF-A). All analyses indicated a high level of inter- and intra-tissue heterogeneity across all types of tissues (mean coefficient of variation of 86.0%). Our data shows that MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression is elevated in both prostate tumors and structurally intact adjacent tissues when compared to disease-free specimens, defining field cancerization. These secreted factors could promote tumorigenesis in histologically normal tissues and lead to tumor multifocality. Among several clinical applications, they could also be exploited as indicators of disease in false negative

  5. Prostate field cancerization: deregulated expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) in tumor adjacent tissue.

    PubMed

    Jones, Anna C; Antillon, Kresta S; Jenkins, Shannon M; Janos, Sara N; Overton, Heidi N; Shoshan, Dor S; Fischer, Edgar G; Trujillo, Kristina A; Bisoffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prostate field cancerization denotes molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Such alterations include deregulated protein expression, as we have previously shown for the key transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Here we add the two secreted factors macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) to the growing list of protein markers of prostate field cancerization. Expression of MIC-1 and PDGF-A was measured quantitatively by immunofluorescence and comprehensively analyzed using two methods of signal capture and several groupings of data generated in human cancerous (n = 25), histologically normal adjacent (n = 22), and disease-free (n = 6) prostate tissues. A total of 208 digitized images were analyzed. MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in tumor tissues were elevated 7.1x to 23.4x and 1.7x to 3.7x compared to disease-free tissues, respectively (p<0.0001 to p = 0.08 and p<0.01 to p = 0.23, respectively). In support of field cancerization, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in adjacent tissues were elevated 7.4x to 38.4x and 1.4x to 2.7x, respectively (p<0.0001 to p<0.05 and p<0.05 to p = 0.51, respectively). Also, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression were similar in tumor and adjacent tissues (0.3x to 1.0x; p<0.001 to p = 0.98 for MIC-1; 0.9x to 2.6x; p<0.01 to p = 1.00 for PDGF-A). All analyses indicated a high level of inter- and intra-tissue heterogeneity across all types of tissues (mean coefficient of variation of 86.0%). Our data shows that MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression is elevated in both prostate tumors and structurally intact adjacent tissues when compared to disease-free specimens, defining field cancerization. These secreted factors could promote tumorigenesis in histologically normal tissues and lead to tumor multifocality. Among several clinical applications, they could also be exploited as indicators of disease in false negative

  6. Bone Tissue Engineering Using High Permeability Poly-epsilon-caprolactone Scaffolds Conjugated with Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsak, Anna Guyer

    Bone is the second most commonly transplanted tissue in the United States. Limitations of current bone defect treatment options include morbidity at the autograft harvest site, mechanical failure, and poorly controlled growth factor delivery. Combining synthetic scaffolds with biologics may address these issues and reduce dependency on autografts. The ideal scaffolding system should promote tissue in-growth and nutrient diffusion, control delivery of biologics and maintain mechanical integrity during bone formation. This dissertation evaluates how scaffold permeability, conjugated bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and differentiation medium affect osteogenesis in vitro and bone growth in vivo.. "High" and "low" permeability polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with regular architectures were manufactured using solid free form fabrication. Bone growth in vivo was evaluated in an ectopic mouse model. High permeability scaffolds promoted better 8 week bone growth, supported tissue penetration into the scaffold core, and demonstrated increased mechanical properties due to newly formed bone. Next, the effects of differentiation medium and conjugated BMP-2 on osteogenesis were compared. Conjugation may improve BMP-2 loading efficiency, help localize bone growth and control release. High permeability scaffolds were conjugated with BMP-2 using the crosslinker, sulfo-SMCC. When adipose-derived and bone marrow stromal cells were seeded onto constructs (with or without BMP-2), BMSC expressed more differentiation markers, and differentiation medium affected differentiation more than BMP-2. In vivo, scaffolds with ADSC pre-differentiated in osteogenic medium (with and without BMP-2) and scaffolds with only BMP-2 grew the most bone. Bone volume did not differ among these groups, but constructs with ADSC had evenly distributed, scaffold-guided bone growth. Analysis of two additional BMP-2 attachment methods (heparin and adsorption) showed highest conjugation efficiency for the

  7. Effects of gas produced by degradation of Mg-Zn-Zr Alloy on cancellous bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Jiang, Hongfeng; Bi, Yanze; Sun, Jin e; Chen, Minfang; Liu, Debao

    2015-10-01

    Mg-Zn-Zr alloy cylinders were implanted into the femoral condyles of Japanese big-ear white rabbits. X-ray showed that by 12 weeks following implantation the implant became obscure, around which the low-density area appeared and enlarged. By 24 weeks, the implant was more obscure and the density of the surrounding cancellous bone increased. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed bone tissue on the surface of the alloy attached by living fibers at 12 weeks. Micro-CT confirmed that new bone tissue on the surface of the residual alloy implant increased from 12 weeks to 24 weeks. By 12 weeks, many cavities in the cancellous bone tissue around the implant were noted with a CT value, similar to gas value, and increasing by 24 weeks (P<0.01). Histological examination of hard tissue slices showed that bone tissue was visibly attached to the alloy in the femoral condyle at 12 weeks. The trabecular bone tissues became more intact and dense, and the cavities were filled with soft tissue at 24 weeks. In general, gas produced by the degradation of the Mg-Zn-Zr alloy can cause cavitation within cancellous bone, which does not affect osteogenesis of Mg alloy.

  8. Bone tissue engineering: the role of interstitial fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that vascularization is required for effective bone healing. This implies that blood flow and interstitial fluid (ISF) flow are required for healing and maintenance of bone. The fact that changes in bone blood flow and ISF flow are associated with changes in bone remodeling and formation support this theory. ISF flow in bone results from transcortical pressure gradients produced by vascular and hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical loading. Conditions observed to alter flow rates include increases in venous pressure in hypertension, fluid shifts occurring in bedrest and microgravity, increases in vascularization during the injury-healing response, and mechanical compression and bending of bone during exercise. These conditions also induce changes in bone remodeling. Previously, we hypothesized that interstitial fluid flow in bone, and in particular fluid shear stress, serves to mediate signal transduction in mechanical loading- and injury-induced remodeling. In addition, we proposed that a lack or decrease of ISF flow results in the bone loss observed in disuse and microgravity. The purpose of this article is to review ISF flow in bone and its role in osteogenesis.

  9. Systemically transplanted human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells contributing to bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan-Chen; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Ji, Qiu-Xia; Yu, Xin-Bo; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Deng, Jing; Yang, Pi-Shan

    2014-01-01

    As novel postnatal stem cells, gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) have been considered as an ideal candidate cell resource for tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. GMSCs implanted into sites of injury have been confirmed to promote the injury repair. However, no studies have demonstrated whether systemically transplanted GMSCs can home to the bone injuries and contribute to the new bone formation in vivo. In this study, we transplanted human GMSCs into C57BL/6J mice with defects in mandibular bone via the tail vein to explore the capacity of transplanted GMSCs to promote bone regeneration. Results showed that the transplanted GMSCs were detected in the bone defects and employed in new bone formation. And the newly formed bone area in mice with GMSCs transplantation was significantly higher than that in control mice. Our findings indicate that systemically transplanted GMSCs can not only home to the mandibular defect but also promote bone regeneration.

  10. The expression patterns of tight junction protein claudin-1, -3, and -4 in human gastric neoplasms and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiming; Yang, Xingwang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is growing evidence that tight junction proteins are often abnormally regulated in human tumors. The function of tight junction proteins in the maintenance of normal epithelial physiology has been well discussed, but their role in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer is less well defined. To explore the expression distinction of the tight junction proteins claudin-1, -3, and -4 expression in the gastric cancer, the expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4 in 92 gastric cancer tissues and the non-neoplastic tissues adjacent to the tumors were examined by immunohistochemistry. Compared with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, the expression of claudin-1 was down regulated. However, the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 were up-regulated in gastric cancer tissue. In addition, the expression of claudin-3 is correlated with claudin-4 expression in gastric cancer. Our present study reveals that claudin-1, -3, and -4 protein expression altered between human gastric cancers and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. PMID:25755790

  11. Treatment of long bone intramedullary infection using the RIA for removal of infected tissue: indications, method and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Zalavras, Charalampos G; Sirkin, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Treatment of intramedullary infections of long bones is based upon the principles of surgical debridement, irrigation, fracture site stabilization, soft tissue coverage, and antibiotic administration. Reaming of the medullary canal is an essential component of surgical debridement because it removes intramedullary debris and infected bone surrounding the removed intramedullary device and within the intramedullary canal. The Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator (RIA) has distinct features that appear to be beneficial for management of intramedullary infections. It allows reaming under simultaneous irrigation and aspiration, which minimizes the residual amount of infected fluid and tissue in the medullary canal and the propagation of infected material. The disposable reamer head is sharp, which combined with the continuous irrigation may attenuate the increased temperature associated with reaming and its potential adverse effects on adjacent endosteal bone. The disadvantage of the RIA is increased cost because of use of disposable parts. Potential complications can be avoided by detailed preoperative planning and careful surgical technique. The RIA should be used with caution in patients with narrow medullary canals and in infections involving the metaphysis or a limited part of the medullary canal. Reaming of the canal is performed with one pass of the RIA under careful fluoroscopic control. Limited information is available in the literature on the results of the RIA for management of intramedullary infections of long bones; however preliminary results are promising. The RIA device appears to be an effective and safe tool for debridement of the medullary canal and management of intramedullary infections of the long bones. Further research is needed to clarify the exact contribution of the RIA in the management of these infections.

  12. PULSED FOCUSED ULTRASOUND TREATMENT OF MUSCLE MITIGATES PARALYSIS-INDUCED BONE LOSS IN THE ADJACENT BONE: A STUDY IN A MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Poliachik, Sandra L.; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Bone loss can result from bed rest, space flight, spinal cord injury or age-related hormonal changes. Current bone loss mitigation techniques include pharmaceutical interventions, exercise, pulsed ultrasound targeted to bone and whole body vibration. In this study, we attempted to mitigate paralysis-induced bone loss by applying focused ultrasound to the midbelly of a paralyzed muscle. We employed a mouse model of disuse that uses onabotulinumtoxinA-induced paralysis, which causes rapid bone loss in 5 d. A focused 2 MHz transducer applied pulsed exposures with pulse repetition frequency mimicking that of motor neuron firing during walking (80 Hz), standing (20 Hz), or the standard pulsed ultrasound frequency used in fracture healing (1 kHz). Exposures were applied daily to calf muscle for 4 consecutive d. Trabecular bone changes were characterized using micro-computed tomography. Our results indicated that application of certain focused pulsed ultrasound parameters was able to mitigate some of the paralysis-induced bone loss. PMID:24857416

  13. Biomimetic approaches in bone tissue engineering: Integrating biological and physicomechanical strategies.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Yague, Marc A; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; McNamara, Laoise; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I; Pandit, Abhay; Biggs, Manus J

    2015-04-01

    The development of responsive biomaterials capable of demonstrating modulated function in response to dynamic physiological and mechanical changes in vivo remains an important challenge in bone tissue engineering. To achieve long-term repair and good clinical outcomes, biologically responsive approaches that focus on repair and reconstitution of tissue structure and function through drug release, receptor recognition, environmental responsiveness and tuned biodegradability are required. Traditional orthopedic materials lack biomimicry, and mismatches in tissue morphology, or chemical and mechanical properties ultimately accelerate device failure. Multiple stimuli have been proposed as principal contributors or mediators of cell activity and bone tissue formation, including physical (substrate topography, stiffness, shear stress and electrical forces) and biochemical factors (growth factors, genes or proteins). However, optimal solutions to bone regeneration remain elusive. This review will focus on biological and physicomechanical considerations currently being explored in bone tissue engineering.

  14. Identification of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in oral squamous cell carcinomas compared to adjacent normal tissues in the F344 rat model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L

    2016-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers and the model has been widely used for carcinogenesis and chemoprevention studies. Molecular characterization of this model needs reliable reference genes (RGs) to avoid false- positive and -negative results for proper interpretation of gene expression data between tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified 10 stably expressed genes in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p>0.5, CV<15%) that could serve as potential RGs in this model. The commonly used 27 RGs in the rat were also analyzed based on microarray data and most of them were found unsuitable for RGs in this model. Traditional RGs such as ACTB and GAPDH were significantly altered in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p<0.01, n=11); however, the Hsp90ab1 was ranked as the best RG candidate and the combination of Hsp90ab1 and HPRT1 was identified by NormFinder to be a superior reference for gene normalization among the commonly used RGs. This result was also validated by RT-PCR based on the selected top RG candidate pool. These data suggest that there are no common RGs suitable for different models and RG(s) should be identified before gene expression analysis. We successfully identified Hsp90ab1 as a stable RG in 4-NQO-induced OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues in F344 rats. The combination of two stably expressed genes may be a better option for gene normalization in tissue samples.

  15. Recent progresses in gene delivery-based bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Yu-Han; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Li, Kuei-Chang; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Gene therapy has converged with bone engineering over the past decade, by which a variety of therapeutic genes have been delivered to stimulate bone repair. These genes can be administered via in vivo or ex vivo approach using either viral or nonviral vectors. This article reviews the fundamental aspects and recent progresses in the gene therapy-based bone engineering, with emphasis on the new genes, viral vectors and gene delivery approaches.

  16. Quantitative plutonium microdistribution in bone tissue of vertebra from a Mayak worker.

    PubMed

    Lyovkina, Yekaterina V; Miller, Scott C; Romanov, Sergey A; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P; Belosokhov, Maxim V

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain quantitative data on plutonium microdistribution in different structural elements of human bone tissue for local dose assessment and dosimetric models validation. A sample of the thoracic vertebra was obtained from a former Mayak worker with a rather high plutonium burden. Additional information was obtained on occupational and exposure history, medical history, and measured plutonium content in organs. Plutonium was detected in bone sections from its fission tracks in polycarbonate film using neutron-induced autoradiography. Quantitative analysis of randomly selected microscopic fields on one of the autoradiographs was performed. Data included fission fragment tracks in different bone tissue and surface areas. Quantitative information on plutonium microdistribution in human bone tissue was obtained for the first time. From these data, the quantitative relationships of plutonium decays in bone volume to decays on bone surface in cortical and trabecular fractions were defined as 2.0 and 0.4, correspondingly. The measured quantitative relationship of decays in bone volume to decays on bone surface does not coincide with recommended models for the cortical bone fraction by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Biokinetic model parameters of extrapulmonary compartments might need to be adjusted after expansion of the data set on quantitative plutonium microdistribution in other bone types in humans as well as other cases with different exposure patterns and types of plutonium.

  17. The orthotropic elastic properties of fibrolamellar bone tissue in juvenile white-tailed deer femora.

    PubMed

    Barrera, John W; Le Cabec, Adeline; Barak, Meir M

    2016-10-01

    Fibrolamellar bone is a transient primary bone tissue found in fast-growing juvenile mammals, several species of birds and large dinosaurs. Despite the fact that this bone tissue is prevalent in many species, the vast majority of bone structural and mechanical studies are focused on human osteonal bone tissue. Previous research revealed the orthotropic structure of fibrolamellar bone, but only a handful of experiments investigated its elastic properties, mostly in the axial direction. Here we have performed for the first time an extensive biomechanical study to determine the elastic properties of fibrolamellar bone in all three orthogonal directions. We have tested 30 fibrolamellar bone cubes (2 × 2 × 2 mm) from the femora of five juvenile white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in compression. Each bone cube was compressed iteratively, within its elastic region, in the axial, transverse and radial directions, and bone stiffness (Young's modulus) was recorded. Next, the cubes were kept for 7 days at 4 °C and then compressed again to test whether bone stiffness had significantly deteriorated. Our results demonstrated that bone tissue in the deer femora has an orthotropic elastic behavior where the highest stiffness was in the axial direction followed by the transverse and the radial directions (21.6 ± 3.3, 17.6 ± 3.0 and 14.9 ± 1.9 Gpa, respectively). Our results also revealed a slight non-significant decrease in bone stiffness after 7 days. Finally, our sample size allowed us to establish that population variance was much bigger in the axial direction than the radial direction, potentially reflecting bone adaptation to the large diversity in loading activity between individuals in the loading direction (axial) compared with the normal (radial) direction. This study confirms that the mechanically well-studied human transverse-isotropic osteonal bone is just one possible functional adaptation of bone tissue and that other vertebrate species use

  18. State of the mineral component of rat bone tissue during hypokinesia and the recovery period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Stupakov, G. P.; Pavlova, M. N.; Muradov, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on young growing rats. Hypokinesia lasting from 20 to 200 days caused retarded gain in weight and volume of the femur and delayed development of the cortical layer of the diaphysis. In contrast, the density of the cortical layer of the femoral diaphysis increased due to elevation of the mineral saturation of the bone tissue microstructures. Incorporation of Ca into the bone tissue in hypokinesia had a tendency to reduce. Partial normalization of the bone tissue mineral component occurred during a 20 day recovery period following hypokinesia.

  19. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  20. Histological Features and Biocompatibility of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitutes in the Atrophic Alveolar Ridge Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rancitelli, Davide; Grossi, Giovanni Battista; Herford, Alan Scott

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the atrophic alveolar ridges for implant placement is today a common procedure in dentistry daily practice. The surgical reconstruction provides for the optimization of the supporting bone for the implants and a restoration of the amount of keratinized gingiva for esthetic and functional reasons. In the past, tissue regeneration has been performed with autogenous bone and free gingival or connective tissue grafts. Nowadays, bone substitutes and specific collagen matrix allow for a complete restoration of the atrophic ridge without invasive harvesting procedures. A maxillary reconstruction of an atrophic ridge by means of tissue substitutes and its histological features are then presented. PMID:27022489

  1. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-01

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  2. Effect of the deformation rate on the nature of compound bone tissue fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnis, A. É.

    1983-01-01

    An electron microscopic study showed that the major type of fracture of moist bone tissue is viscous fracture with the extrusion of elements on various structural levels. Larger elements are found at lower deformation rates, and finer elements are found at higher ɛ11. The longitudinal shear deformation between the osteons and interosteon ground substance, between the individual lamellae in the osteons, between the collagen-mineral fibers and interfibrillar ground substance, and between hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen molecules largely accounts for the viscoelastic properties of bone tissue. Processes occurring on some structural level of bone tissue predominate at certain specific deformation rates.

  3. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  4. Morphogenesis and tissue engineering of bone and cartilage: inductive signals, stem cells, and biomimetic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Reddi, A H

    2000-08-01

    Morphogenesis is the developmental cascade of pattern formation, body plan establishment, and the architecture of mirror-image bilateral symmetry of many structures and asymmetry of some, culminating in the adult form. Tissue engineering is the emerging discipline of design and construction of spare parts for the human body to restore function based on principles of molecular developmental biology and morphogenesis governed by bioengineering. The three key ingredients for both morphogenesis and tissue engineering are inductive signals, responding stem cells, and the extracellular matrix. Among the many tissues in the human body, bone has considerable powers for regeneration and is a prototype model for tissue engineering based on morphogenesis. Implantation of demineralized bone matrix into subcutaneous sites results in local bone induction. This model mimics sequential limb morphogenesis and permitted the isolation of bone morphogens. Although it is traditional to study morphogenetic signals in embryos, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), the inductive signals for bone, were isolated from demineralized bone matrix from adults. BMPs and related cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (CDMPs) initiate, promote, and maintain chondrogenesis and osteogenesis and have actions beyond bone. The symbiosis of bone inductive and conductive strategies are critical for tissue engineering, and is in turn governed by the context and biomechanics. The context is the microenvironment, consisting of extracellular matrix, which can be duplicated by biomimetic biomaterials such as collagens, hydroxyapatite, proteoglycans, and cell adhesion proteins including fibronectins. Thus, the rules of architecture for tissue engineering are an imitation of the laws of developmental biology and morphogenesis, and thus may be universal for all tissues, including bones and joints.

  5. Effect of cryo-induced microcracks on microindentation of hydrated cortical bone tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Webb, Daryl; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua

    2009-08-15

    Microcracks accumulate in cortical bone tissue as a consequence of everyday cyclic loading. However, it remains unclear to what extent microdamage accumulation contributes to an increase in fracture risk. A cryo-preparation technique was applied to induce microcracks in cortical bone tissue. Microcracks with lengths up to approximately 20 {mu}m, which were initiated mainly on the boundaries of haversian canals, were observed with cryo-scanning electron microscopy. A microindentation technique was applied to study the mechanical loading effect on the microcracked hydrated bone tissue. The microindentation patterns were section-scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to understand the deformation and bone damage mechanisms made by mechanical loading. The results show that there was no significant difference with respect to microhardness between the original and microcracked hydrated cortical bone tissues (ANOVA, p > 0.05). The cryo-induced microcracks in the bone tissue were not propagated further under the mechanical loads applied. The deformation mechanism of the microcracked cortical bone tissue was plastic deformation, not brittle fracture.

  6. Engineered bone tissue associated with vascularization utilizing a rotating wall vessel bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-02-01

    Tissue-engineered bone has attracted much attention as an alternative material for bone grafting; however, implantable bone tissue of an appropriate size and shape for clinical use has not yet been developed due to a lack of vascularization, which results in necrosis of the seeded cells in vivo. This is the first report of bone tissue engineering associated with vascularization by co-culturing bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous scaffold using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. MSC-derived ECs were identified by immunofluorescence staining for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and by flow cytometry for CD31 expression. The tissue obtained was histochemically analyzed using toluidin blue, hematoxylin and eosin, anti-osteopontin antibody, anti-osteocalcin antibody, and tomato-lectin stain. Results showed that bone tissue containing vascular-like structures was generated. Three-dimensional culture condition created by medium flow in the RWV vessel and the interaction of MSCs with MSC-derived ECs might provide the cells an advantage in the construction of three-dimensional bone tissue with blood vessels.

  7. Osteoimmunology: the study of the relationship between the immune system and bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Luis; Castañeda, Santos

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is a highly regulated structure, which plays an essential role in various physiological functions. Through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms, bone tissue is involved in hematopoiesis, influencing the fate of hematopoietic stem cells. There are a number of molecules shared by bone cells and immune system cells indicating that there are multiple connections between the immune system and bone tissue. In order to pool all the knowledge concerning both systems, a new discipline known under the term «osteoimmunology» has been developed. Their progress in recent years has been exponential and allowed us to connect and increase our knowledge in areas not seemingly related such as rheumatoid erosion, postmenopausal osteoporosis, bone metastases or periodontal disease. In this review, we have tried to summarize the most important advances that have occurred in the last decade, especially in those areas of interest related to rheumatology.

  8. Is Bone a Target-Tissue for the Nervous System?

    PubMed Central

    García-Castellano, José M; Díaz-Herrera, Pilar; Morcuende, José A

    2000-01-01

    Bone cells respond in specific ways to various hormones and growth factors, but the biology of skeletal innervation and its physiologic significance in bone metabolism is poorly understood. With the introduction of immunohistochemical staining techniques and new molecular biology tools, the knowledge in this field has significantly improved. In this review, we update current understanding of the effects of neuropeptides on bone metabolism, specifically vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP). In addition, new information concerning the role of growth factors, such as neurotrophins, is also discussed. There is strong evidence to suggest that bone can be a target of the nervous system. Further investigations in this field will allow us to answer questions related to pre-natal development, bone growth, fracture healing, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis or neoplasias of mesoderm origin. PMID:10934625

  9. Mag-seeding of rat bone marrow stromal cells into porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2007-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering has been investigated as an alternative strategy for autograft transplantation. In the process of tissue engineering, cell seeding into three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds is the first step for constructing 3-D tissues. We have proposed a methodology of cell seeding into 3-D porous scaffolds using magnetic force and magnetite nanoparticles, which we term Mag-seeding. In this study, we applied this Mag-seeding technique to bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and 3-D hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds. BMSCs were magnetically labeled with our original magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) having a positive surface charge to improve adsorption to cell surface. Magnetically labeled BMSCs were seeded onto a scaffold, and a 1-T magnet was placed under the scaffold. By using Mag-seeding, the cells were successfully seeded into the internal space of scaffolds with a high cell density. The cell seeding efficiency into HA scaffolds by Mag-seeding was approximately threefold larger than that by static-seeding (conventional method, without a magnet). After a 14-d cultivation period using the osteogenic induction medium by Mag-seeding, the level of two representative osteogenic markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) were significantly higher than those by static-seeding. These results indicated that Mag-seeding of BMSCs into HA scaffolds is an effective approach to bone tissue engineering.

  10. Automating the Processing Steps for Obtaining Bone Tissue-Engineered Substitutes: From Imaging Tools to Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro F.; Martins, Albino; Neves, Nuno M.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2014-01-01

    Bone diseases and injuries are highly incapacitating and result in a high demand for tissue substitutes with specific biomechanical and structural features. Tissue engineering has already proven to be effective in regenerating bone tissue, but has not yet been able to become an economically viable solution due to the complexity of the tissue, which is very difficult to be replicated, eventually requiring the utilization of highly labor-intensive processes. Process automation is seen as the solution for mass production of cellularized bone tissue substitutes at an affordable cost by being able to reduce human intervention as well as reducing product variability. The combination of tools such as medical imaging, computer-aided fabrication, and bioreactor technologies, which are currently used in tissue engineering, shows the potential to generate automated production ecosystems, which will, in turn, enable the generation of commercially available products with widespread clinical application. PMID:24673688

  11. Bone tissue engineering via human induced pluripotent, umbilical cord and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in rat cranium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Xian; Zhao, Liang; Weir, Michael D; Sun, Jirun; Chen, Wenchuan; Man, Yi; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are an exciting cell source with great potential for tissue engineering. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) have been used in clinics but are limited by several disadvantages, hence alternative sources of MSCs such as umbilical cord MSCs (hUCMSCs) are being investigated. However, there has been no report comparing hiPSCs, hUCMSCs and hBMSCs for bone regeneration. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate hiPSCs, hUCMSCs and hBMSCs for bone tissue engineering, and compare their bone regeneration via seeding on biofunctionalized macroporous calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in rat cranial defects. For all three types of cells, approximately 90% of the cells remained alive on CPC scaffolds. Osteogenic genes were up-regulated, and mineral synthesis by cells increased with time in vitro for all three types of cells. The new bone area fractions at 12weeks (mean±sd; n=6) were (30.4±5.8)%, (27.4±9.7)% and (22.6±4.7)% in hiPSC-MSC-CPC, hUCMSC-CPC and hBMSC-CPC respectively, compared to (11.0±6.3)% for control (p<0.05). No significant differences were detected among the three types of stem cells (p>0.1). New blood vessel density was higher in cell-seeded groups than control (p<0.05). De novo bone formation and participation by implanted cells was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, (1) hiPSCs, hUCMSCs and hBMSCs greatly enhanced bone regeneration, more than doubling the new bone amount of cell-free CPC control; (2) hiPSC-MSCs and hUCMSCs represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs; (3) biofunctionalized macroporous CPC-stem cell constructs had a robust capacity for bone regeneration.

  12. Lamellar bone is an incremental tissue reconciling enamel rhythms, body size, and organismal life history.

    PubMed

    Bromage, Timothy G; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Hogg, Russell; Goldman, Haviva M; McFarlin, Shannon C; Warshaw, Johanna; Dirks, Wendy; Perez-Ochoa, Alejandro; Smolyar, Igor; Enlow, Donald H; Boyde, Alan

    2009-05-01

    Mammalian enamel formation is periodic, including fluctuations attributable to the daily biological clock as well as longer-period oscillations that enigmatically correlate with body mass. Because the scaling of bone mass to body mass is an axiom of vertebrate hard tissue biology, we consider that long-period enamel formation rhythms may reflect corresponding and heretofore unrecognized rhythms in bone growth. The principal aim of this study is to seek a rhythm in bone growth demonstrably related to enamel oscillatory development. Our analytical approach is based in morphology, using a variety of hard tissue microscopy techniques. We first ascertain the relationship among long-period enamel rhythms, the striae of Retzius, and body mass using a large sample of mammalian taxa. In addition, we test whether osteocyte lacuna density (a surrogate for rates of cell proliferation) in bone is correlated with mammalian body mass. Finally, using fluorescently labeled developing bone tissues, we investigate whether the bone lamella, a fundamental microanatomical unit of bone, relates to rhythmic enamel growth increments. Our results confirm a positive correlation between long-period enamel rhythms and body mass and a negative correlation between osteocyte density and body mass. We also confirm that lamellar bone is an incremental tissue, one lamella formed in the species-specific time dependency of striae of Retzius formation. We conclude by contextualizing our morphological research with a current understanding of autonomic regulatory control of the skeleton and body mass, suggesting a central contribution to the coordination of organismal life history and body mass.

  13. Predicting the external formation of callus tissues in oblique bone fractures: idealised and clinical case studies.

    PubMed

    Comiskey, D; MacDonald, B J; McCartney, W T; Synnott, K; O'Byrne, J

    2013-11-01

    It is proposed that the external asymmetric formation of callus tissues that forms naturally about an oblique bone fracture can be predicted computationally. We present an analysis of callus formation for two cases of bone fracture healing: idealised and subject-specific oblique bone fractures. Plane strain finite element (FE) models of the oblique fractures were generated to calculate the compressive strain field experienced by the immature callus tissues due to interfragmentary motion. The external formations of the calluses were phenomenologically simulated using an optimisation style algorithm that iteratively removes tissue that experiences low strains from a large domain. The resultant simulated spatial formation of the healing tissues for the two bone fracture cases showed that the calluses tended to form at an angle equivalent to the angle of the oblique fracture line. The computational results qualitatively correlated with the callus formations found in vivo. Consequently, the proposed methods show potential as a means of predicting callus formation in pre-clinical testing.

  14. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  15. Immunohistochemical quantification of the cobalamin transport protein, cell surface receptor and Ki-67 in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors and in adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sysel, Annette M.; Valli, Victor E.; Bauer, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an obligate need for cobalamin (vitamin B12) to enable DNA synthesis necessary for cellular replication. This study quantified the immunohistochemical expression of the cobalamin transport protein (transcobalamin II; TCII), cell surface receptor (transcobalamin II-R; TCII-R) and proliferation protein (Ki-67) in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors, and compared these results to expression in corresponding adjacent normal tissues. All malignant tumor tissues stained positively for TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 proteins; expression varied both within and between tumor types. Expression of TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 was significantly higher in malignant tumor tissues than in corresponding adjacent normal tissues in both species. There was a strong correlation between TCII and TCII-R expression, and a modest correlation between TCII-R and Ki-67 expression in both species; a modest association between TCII and Ki-67 expression was present in canine tissues only. These results demonstrate a quantifiable, synchronous up-regulation of TCII and TCII-R expression by proliferating canine and feline malignant tumors. The potential to utilize these proteins as biomarkers to identify neoplastic tissues, streamline therapeutic options, evaluate response to anti-tumor therapy and monitor for recurrent disease has important implications in the advancement of cancer management for both human and companion animal patients. PMID:25633912

  16. Is there any information on micro-structure in microwave tomography of bone tissue?

    PubMed

    Irastorza, R M; Carlevaro, C M; Vericat, F

    2013-08-01

    In this work, two-dimensional simulations of the microwave dielectric properties of models with ellipses and realistic models of trabecular bone tissue are performed. In these simulations, finite difference time domain methodology has been applied to simulate two-phase structures containing inclusions. The results presented here show that the micro-structure is an important factor in the effective dielectric properties of trabecular bone. We consider the feasibility of using the dielectric behaviour of bone tissue to be an indicator of bone health. The frequency used was 950 MHz. It was found that the dielectric properties can be used as an estimate of the degree of anisotropy of the micro-structure of the trabecular tissue. Conductivity appears to be the most sensitive parameter in this respect. Models with ellipse shaped-inclusions are also tested to study their application to modelling bone tissue. Models with ellipses that had an aspect ratio of a/b=1.5 showed relatively good agreement when compared with realistic models of bone tissue. According to the results presented here, the anisotropy of trabecular bone must be accounted for when measuring its dielectric properties using microwave imaging.

  17. Evaluation of tissue-engineered bone constructs using rabbit fetal osteoblasts on acellular bovine cancellous bone matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi; Pathak, Rekha; Amarpal; Aithal, H. P.; Kinjavdekar, P.; Pawde, A. M.; Tiwari, A. K.; Sangeetha, P.; Tamilmahan, P.; Manzoor, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to generate composite bone graft and investigate the rabbit fetal osteoblasts adhesion, proliferation and penetration on acellular matrices of cancellous bone. Materials and Methods: Acellular cancellous bone was prepared and developed as in the previous study with little modification. These matrices were decellularized by rapid freeze and thaw cycle. To remove the cell debris, they were then treated with hydrogen peroxide (3%) and ethanol to remove antigenic cellular and nuclear materials from the scaffold. Primary osteoblast cells were harvested from 20 to 22 days old rabbit fetal long and calvarial bone. These cells were cultured and characterized using a specific marker. The third passaged fetal osteoblast cells were then seeded on the scaffold and incubated for 14 days. The growth pattern of the cells was observed. Scanning electron microscope and hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to investigate cells proliferation. Results: The cells were found to be growing well on the surface of the scaffold and were also present in good numbers with the matrix filopodial extensions upto inside of the core of the tissue. Conclusion: Thus, a viable composite scaffold of bone could be developed which has a great potential in the field of bone tissue engineering. PMID:28344398

  18. Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser perforation of exposed cranial bone to stimulate granulation tissue.

    PubMed

    Bailin, P L; Wheeland, R G

    1985-06-01

    The technique of CO2 laser perforation of exposed bone has been discussed. The advantages of this rapid and safe technique, which minimizes patient anxiety, limits tissue destruction, and can be performed without anesthesia in an outpatient setting, suggest that it can be considered as a possible alternative treatment to stimulate the production of granulation tissue over exposed bone to allow healing by secondary intention or skin grafting.

  19. Bone Regeneration Based on Tissue Engineering Conceptions — A 21st Century Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A.; Epari, Devakara R.; Steck, Roland; Glatt, Vaida; Dickinson, Ian C.; Choong, Peter F. M.; Schuetz, Michael A.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Bone Tissue Engineering in the field of Regenerative Medicine has been the topic of substantial research over the past two decades. Technological advances have improved orthopaedic implants and surgical techniques for bone reconstruction. However, improvements in surgical techniques to reconstruct bone have been limited by the paucity of autologous materials available and donor site morbidity. Recent advances in the development of biomaterials have provided attractive alternatives to bone grafting expanding the surgical options for restoring the form and function of injured bone. Specifically, novel bioactive (second generation) biomaterials have been developed that are characterised by controlled action and reaction to the host tissue environment, whilst exhibiting controlled chemical breakdown and resorption with an ultimate replacement by regenerating tissue. Future generations of biomaterials (third generation) are designed to be not only osteoconductive but also osteoinductive, i.e. to stimulate regeneration of host tissues by combining tissue engineering and in situ tissue regeneration methods with a focus on novel applications. These techniques will lead to novel possibilities for tissue regeneration and repair. At present, tissue engineered constructs that may find future use as bone grafts for complex skeletal defects, whether from post-traumatic, degenerative, neoplastic or congenital/developmental “origin” require osseous reconstruction to ensure structural and functional integrity. Engineering functional bone using combinations of cells, scaffolds and bioactive factors is a promising strategy and a particular feature for future development in the area of hybrid materials which are able to exhibit suitable biomimetic and mechanical properties. This review will discuss the state of the art in this field and what we can expect from future generations of bone regeneration concepts. PMID:26273505

  20. Effects of implantation of three-dimensional engineered bone tissue with a vascular-like structure on repair of bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2012-12-01

    Previously, to create an implantable bone tissue associated with blood vessels, we co-cultured rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous polylactic acid-based scaffold utilizing a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Here, this engineered tissue was orthotopically implanted into defects made in femurs of immunodeficient rats, and histological analysis were carried out to examine the repair of the damage and the formation of bone around the implant. The bone defects were better repaired in the implanted group than control group after 3 weeks. The results indicate that the engineered bone could repair bone defects.

  1. Porous decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage as a scaffold for large bone defect healing.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Vinardell, Tatiana; Murphy, J Mary; Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Clinical translation of tissue engineered therapeutics is hampered by the significant logistical and regulatory challenges associated with such products, prompting increased interest in the use of decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) to enhance endogenous regeneration. Most bones develop and heal by endochondral ossification, the replacement of a hypertrophic cartilaginous intermediary with bone. The hypothesis of this study is that a porous scaffold derived from decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage will retain the necessary signals to instruct host cells to accelerate endogenous bone regeneration. Cartilage tissue (CT) and hypertrophic cartilage tissue (HT) were engineered using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, decellularized and the remaining ECM was freeze-dried to generate porous scaffolds. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, only the decellularized HT-derived scaffolds were found to induce vascularization and de novo mineral accumulation. Furthermore, when implanted into critically-sized femoral defects, full bridging was observed in half of the defects treated with HT scaffolds, while no evidence of such bridging was found in empty controls. Host cells which had migrated throughout the scaffold were capable of producing new bone tissue, in contrast to fibrous tissue formation within empty controls. These results demonstrate the capacity of decellularized engineered tissues as 'off-the-shelf' implants to promote tissue regeneration.

  2. Human bone hardness seems to depend on tissue type but not on anatomical site in the long bones of an old subject.

    PubMed

    Ohman, Caroline; Zwierzak, Iwona; Baleani, Massimiliano; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesised that among different human subjects, the bone tissue quality varies as a function of the bone segment morphology. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the quality, evaluated in terms of hardness of packages of lamellae, of cortical and trabecular bones, at different anatomical sites within the human skeleton. The contralateral six long bones of an old human subject were indented at different levels along the diaphysis and at both epiphyses of each bone. Hardness value, which is correlated to the degree of mineralisation, of both cortical and trabecular bone tissues was calculated for each indentation location. It was found that the cortical bone tissue was harder (+18%) than the trabecular one. In general, the bone hardness was found to be locally highly heterogeneous. In fact, considering one single slice obtained for a bone segment, the coefficient of variation of the hardness values was up to 12% for cortical bone and up to 17% for trabecular bone. However, the tissue hardness was on average quite homogeneous within and among the long bones of the studied donor, although differences up to 9% among levels and up to 7% among bone segments were found. These findings seem not to support the mentioned hypothesis, at least not for the long bones of an old subject.

  3. Bone Marrow Stromal Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Polymeri, A; Giannobile, W V; Kaigler, D

    2016-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are adult multipotent cells, which have the potential to differentiate into cell types of mesodermal origin, namely osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Due to their accessibility and expansion potential, BMSCs have historically held therapeutic promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, it has been demonstrated that not only can bone marrow stromal stem cells directly participate in tissue regeneration, but they also have the capacity to migrate to distant sites of tissue injury, where they can participate in tissue repair either directly through their differentiation or indirectly through paracrine mechanisms. Additionally, they can elicit various immunomodulatory signals, which can attenuate the inflammatory and immune responses. As such, bone marrow stromal stem cells have been explored clinically for treatment of a wide variety of different conditions including bone defects, graft-vs.-host disease, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and liver and kidney diseases. This review provides an overview of current clinical applications of bone marrow stromal stem cells and discusses their therapeutic properties, while also addressing limitations of their use. PubMed, Ovid, and Google Scholar online databases were searched using several keywords, including "stem cells", "tissue engineering", tissue regeneration" and "clinical trials". Additionally, Clinical trials.gov was used to locate completed clinical trials using bone marrow derived stem cells.

  4. Isotopic evidence for resorption of soft tissues and bone in immobilized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, L.; Player, J.S.; Heiple, K.G.; Bahniuk, E.; Goldberg, V.M.

    1982-02-01

    Various experimental methods for producing bone and ligament atrophy have yielded contradictory results. These methods include denervation, immobilization (both internal and external), and disarticulation. We studied a model of internal skeletal fixation for twelve weeks in dogs that were chronically prelabeled with 3H-tetracycline, 45Ca, and 3H-proline. Bone resorption was analyzed by the loss of 3H-tetracycline, and bone and soft-tissue mass were analyzed by the radiochemical and chemical analysis of calcium and collagen. The strength of the anterior cruciate ligament was studied in tension to failure when a fast rate of deformation was applied. Failure of the femur-ligament-tibia complex occurred through the insertion of the ligament into the tibia for both the experimental and the control limbs. Loss of collagen was greater in the tibia and femur than in the lateral meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament, and correlated with a mechanical failure via bone. No evidence for collagen replacement in atrophied tissues was found, but one-half of the resorbed calcium was conserved. The marked loss of 3H-tetracycline indicated that bone atrophy was the result of increased resorption of bone rather than decreased bone formation. Clinical Relevance: We have demonstrated significant atrophy of the soft tissues (lateral meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament) as well as of bone in immobilized joints of dogs. It is likely that the decrease in strength of the bone-ligament-bone complex is related to this atrophy of soft tissues and bone around the joint.

  5. Clinically applied models of bone regeneration in tissue engineering research.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, T A

    1999-10-01

    The development of new strategies for the engineering of bone regeneration requires appropriate model systems. Selection of the best model for testing a new technology depends on a host of factors. In general, the best model system is the one which most closely mimics the clinical situation for which this technology is being developed, will not heal spontaneously unless the technology is used, and will not heal when another technology is used if that technology is less advanced than the one being tested. For the purposes of developing new strategies for bone regeneration, systems which can be considered include those which model normal fracture healing, the segmental loss of bone or critical size defects, and various forms of nonunions in which fracture healing is perturbed either by mechanical, metabolic, or neurologic means. Careful experimental design and selection of the appropriate model system will enhance scientific efforts in bone regeneration research.

  6. Guided tissue regeneration using a collagen barrier and bone swaging technique in noncontained infrabony defects.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Toshiro; Minabe, Masato; Sugiyama, Takashi; Mitarai, Eiko; Fushimi, Hajime; Kitsugi, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Kouji; Katsuki, Makiko

    2013-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effectiveness of guided tissue regeneration using a resorbable collagen membrane and bone swaging in noncontained infrabony defects by assessing changes in probing pocket depth, probing attachment level, and radiographic bone level after 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. Postsurgical clinical and radiographic measurements were statistically significantly different from presurgical measurements. The rate of bone fill was positively associated with the baseline depth of the bone defect but not associated with the width. The noncontained infrabony defects treated with this combined regenerative method improved clinically and radiographically.

  7. Optical clearing in transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of murine cortical bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of optical clearing with glycerol on the Raman spectra of bone tissue acquired transcutaneously on right and left tibiae from four mice was studied. Multiple transcutaneous measurements were obtained from each limb; glycerol was then applied as an optical clearing agent, and additional transcutaneous measurements were taken. Glycerol reduces the noise in the raw spectra (p=0.0037) and significantly improves the cross-correlation between the recovered bone factor and the exposed bone measurement in a low signal-to-noise region of the bone spectra (p=0.0245). PMID:18465957

  8. Alterations to the Gut Microbiome Impair Bone Strength and Tissue Material Properties.

    PubMed

    Guss, Jason D; Horsfield, Michael W; Fontenele, Fernanda F; Sandoval, Taylor N; Luna, Marysol; Apoorva, Fnu; Lima, Svetlana F; Bicalho, Rodrigo C; Singh, Ankur; Ley, Ruth E; van der Meulen, Marjolein Ch; Goldring, Steven R; Hernandez, Christopher J

    2017-02-27

    Alterations in the gut microbiome have been associated with changes in bone mass and microstructure, but the effects of the microbiome on bone biomechanical properties are not known. Here we examined bone strength under two conditions of altered microbiota: (1) an inbred mouse strain known to develop an altered gut microbiome due to deficits in the immune system (the Toll-like receptor 5-deficient mouse [TLR5KO]); and (2) disruption of the gut microbiota (ΔMicrobiota) through chronic treatment with selected antibiotics (ampicillin and neomycin). The bone phenotypes of TLR5KO and WT (C57Bl/6) mice were examined after disruption of the microbiota from 4 weeks to 16 weeks of age as well as without treatment (n = 7 to 16/group, 39 animals total). Femur bending strength was less in ΔMicrobiota mice than in untreated animals and the reduction in strength was not fully explained by differences in bone cross-sectional geometry, implicating impaired bone tissue material properties. Small differences in whole-bone bending strength were observed between WT and TLR5KO mice after accounting for differences in bone morphology. No differences in trabecular bone volume fraction were associated with genotype or disruption of gut microbiota. Treatment altered the gut microbiota by depleting organisms from the phyla Bacteroidetes and enriching for Proteobacteria, as determined from sequencing of fecal 16S rRNA genes. Differences in splenic immune cell populations were also observed; B and T cell populations were depleted in TLR5KO mice and in ΔMicrobiota mice (p < 0.001), suggesting an association between alterations in bone tissue material properties and immune cell populations. We conclude that alterations in the gut microbiota for extended periods during growth may lead to impaired whole-bone mechanical properties in ways that are not explained by bone geometry. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  9. Biodegradable hybrid tissue engineering scaffolds for reconstruction of large bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, Danial

    Complex skeletal injuries and large bone fractures are still a significant clinical problem in US. Approximately 1.5 million Americans (veterans, their families, and civilians) every year suffer from bone loss due to traumatic skeletal injuries, infection, and resection of primary tumors that require extensive grafting to bridge the gap. The US bone graft market is over $2.2 billion a year. Due to insufficient mechanical stability, lack of vascularity, and inadequate resorption of the graft, patients with traumatic large skeletal injuries undergo multiple costly operations followed by extensive recovery steps to maintain proper bone alignment and length. Current strategies for repairing damaged or diseased bones include autologous or allograft bone transplantations. However, limited availability of autografts and risk of disease transmission associated with allografts have necessitated the search for the development of new bone graft options and strategies. The overall goal of this project is to develop a much-needed bone-mimetic engineered graft as a substitute for current strategies providing required bone grafts for reconstruction of large bone defects. This project will use the structure of natural cortical bone as a guide to produce an engineered bone graft with balanced strength, osteogenesis, vascularization, and resorption. The outcome of this project will be a biodegradable hybrid scaffold system (similar to natural cortical bone) including a mechanically strong scaffold allowing for mechanical stability of the load-bearing defect site and a soft and highly porous structure such as a hydrogel phase which will allow for efficient cell and growth factor delivery into the defect implantation site, cell niche establishment and promotion of mineralization. Successful completion of this project will transform bone graft technology for regeneration of complex bone defects from a frozen or freeze-dried allograft to a safe, infection-free, mechanically

  10. Engraftment of Prevascularized, Tissue Engineered Constructs in a Novel Rabbit Segmental Bone Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaempfen, Alexandre; Todorov, Atanas; Güven, Sinan; Largo, René D.; Jaquiéry, Claude; Scherberich, Arnaud; Martin, Ivan; Schaefer, Dirk J.

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard treatment of large segmental bone defects is autologous bone transfer, which suffers from low availability and additional morbidity. Tissue engineered bone able to engraft orthotopically and a suitable animal model for pre-clinical testing are direly needed. This study aimed to evaluate engraftment of tissue-engineered bone with different prevascularization strategies in a novel segmental defect model in the rabbit humerus. Decellularized bone matrix (Tutobone) seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells was used directly orthotopically or combined with a vessel and inserted immediately (1-step) or only after six weeks of subcutaneous “incubation” (2-step). After 12 weeks, histological and radiological assessment was performed. Variable callus formation was observed. No bone formation or remodeling of the graft through TRAP positive osteoclasts could be detected. Instead, a variable amount of necrotic tissue formed. Although necrotic area correlated significantly with amount of vessels and the 2-step strategy had significantly more vessels than the 1-step strategy, no significant reduction of necrotic area was found. In conclusion, the animal model developed here represents a highly challenging situation, for which a suitable engineered bone graft with better prevascularization, better resorbability and higher osteogenicity has yet to be developed. PMID:26053395

  11. The Effect of Osteoporosis Treatments on Fatigue Properties of Cortical Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Brock, Garry R; Chen, Julia T; Ingraffea, Anthony R; MacLeay, Jennifer; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Boskey, Adele L; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2015-06-01

    Bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed for treatment of osteoporosis. Long-term use of bisphosphonates has been correlated to atypical femoral fractures (AFF). AFFs arise from fatigue damage to bone tissue that cannot be repaired due to pharmacologic treatments. Despite fatigue being the primary damage mechanism of AFFs, the effects of osteoporosis treatments on fatigue properties of cortical bone are unknown. To examine if fatigue-life differences occur in bone tissue after different pharmacologic treatments for osteoporosis, we tested bone tissue from the femurs of sheep given a metabolic acidosis diet to induce osteoporosis, followed by treatment with a selective estrogen reception modulator (raloxifene), a bisphosphonate (alendronate or zoledronate), or parathyroid hormone (teriparatide, PTH). Beams of cortical bone tissue were created and tested in four-point bending fatigue to failure. Tissues treated with alendronate had reduced fatigue life and less modulus loss at failure compared to other treatments, while tissue treated with PTH had a prolonged fatigue life. No loss of fatigue life occurred with zoledronate treatment despite its greater binding affinity and potency compared to alendronate. Tissue mineralization measured by microCT did not explain the differences seen in fatigue behavior. Increased fatigue life with PTH suggests that current treatment methods for AFF could have beneficial effects for restoring fatigue life. These results indicate that fatigue life differs with each type of osteoporosis treatment.

  12. Spatial regulation of controlled bioactive factor delivery for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Samorezov, Julia E.; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-01-01

    Limitations of current treatment options for critical size bone defects create a significant clinical need for tissue engineered bone strategies. This review describes how control over the spatiotemporal delivery of growth factors, nucleic acids, and drugs and small molecules may aid in recapitulating signals present in bone development and healing, regenerating interfaces of bone with other connective tissues, and enhancing vascularization of tissue engineered bone. State-of-the-art technologies used to create spatially controlled patterns of bioactive factors on the surfaces of materials, to build up 3D materials with patterns of signal presentation within their bulk, and to pattern bioactive factor delivery after scaffold fabrication are presented, highlighting their applications in bone tissue engineering. As these techniques improve in areas such as spatial resolution and speed of patterning, they will continue to grow in value as model systems for understanding cell responses to spatially regulated bioactive factor signal presentation in vitro, and as strategies to investigate the capacity of the defined spatial arrangement of these signals to drive bone regeneration in vivo. PMID:25445719

  13. Comparative histomorphometric study of bone tissue synthesized after electric and ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Coman, Mălina; Hîncu, Mihaela; Surlin, Petra; Mateescu, Garofiţa; Nechita, A; Banu, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The clinical use of the alternative therapies in traumatology is conditioned by the knowledge and understanding of their actions on the bone tissue. The hereby study aims at the comparative assessment of the effectiveness of the direct current and ultrasounds in treating the fractures. Thus, we have proceeded to a comparative histological study of the bone tissue in the fractured area and the biomechanical description and the three-dimensional model of the stimulated bone's behavior by using micro-CT X-rays and the finite element analysis. The findings clearly show that the bone, which has been stimulated during a period of two weeks, has regained its functions, that is 85% of the compression one and 95% of the shearing one. These values prove that 90% of the bone structure has healed.

  14. The Effect of Soft Tissue on Temperature Estimation from Burnt Bone Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellingham, Sarah T D; Thompson, Tim J U; Islam, Meez

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of soft tissue and different exposure times on the prediction of burning temperatures of bone when using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Ovis aries rib bones were burnt at different temperatures and for varying time intervals. Results of a linear regression analysis indicated that burn temperatures can be predicted with a standard error of ±70 °C from defleshed bone spectra. Exposure time does not have a significant impact on prediction accuracy. The presence of soft tissue has a significant impact on heat-induced changes of the bone matrix in low (<300 °C) as well as high temperatures (>800 °C), slowing down combustion in the former and accelerating it in the latter (p < 0.05). At medium temperatures, no significant difference was noted. These results provide forensic investigators a new perspective with which to interpret the results of crystallinity measures derived from burnt bone.

  15. Aesthetic Surgical Approach for Bone Dehiscence Treatment by Means of Single Implant and Interdental Tissue Regeneration: A Case Report with Five Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Giorgio; Pighi, Jacopo; Corrocher, Giovanni; Mascellaro, Anna; Lehrberg, Jeffrey; Marincola, Mauro; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of single anterior teeth by means of endosseous implants implies the achievement of success in restoring both aesthetic and function. However, the presence of wide endoperiodontal lesions can lead to horizontal hard and soft tissues defects after tooth extraction, making it impossible to correctly place an implant in the compromised alveolar socket. Vertical augmentation procedures have been proposed to solve these clinical situations, but the amount of new regenerated bone is still not predictable. Furthermore, bone augmentation can be complicated by the presence of adjacent teeth, especially if they bring with them periodontal defects. Therefore, it is used to restore periodontal health of adjacent teeth before making any augmentation procedures and to wait a certain healing period before placing an implant in vertically augmented sites, otherwise risking to obtain a nonsatisfactory aesthetic result. All of these procedures, however, lead to an expansion of treatment time which should affect patient compliance. For this reason, this case report suggests a surgical technique to perform vertical bone augmentation at a single gap left by a central upper incisor while placing an implant and simultaneously to regenerate the periodontal attachment of an adjacent lateral incisor, without compromising the aesthetic result. PMID:27119031

  16. Tissue Engineering for Bone Production- Stem Cells, Gene Therapy and Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, E.G; Saleh, M; Hindocha, S; Griffin, M; Khan, Wasim S

    2011-01-01

    A bone graft has been the gold standard treatment for repairing bone defects. However, due to bone grafts associated donor site morbidity several alternative bone substitutes options have been made available but with their added expense and limited osteoinductive properties they are not ideal. Therefore, research has begun in tissue engineering to investigate stem cells, which are one of the body’s own mechanisms used to repair bone. Stem cells are clonogenic undifferentiated cells capable of self-renewal. Readily available from numerous of sources stem cells have the potential to differentiate in osteoblasts and chrondrocytes showing capability to repair both bone and cartilage. The known immunologic properties of stem cells further enhance their therapeutic appeal. Stem cells have shown to be excellent carriers for gene transfer having the capability to be transduced. Gene transfer could enable growth factors and bone morphogentic proteins to enhance bone repair. Stem cells are implanted onto scaffolds, which are structures capable of supporting tissue formation by allowing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Research aims to produce scaffolds that deliver and retain cells, allow for cell attachment has adequate biodegradability, biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity. However, having tried and testing numerous materials including synthetic and natural products research into the perfect scaffold product continues. This review aims to explain how stem cells were discovered, the techniques used to isolate stem cells, identify and manipulate them down different cell lineages and discuss the research into using stem cells to reconstruct bone using genetic modification and scaffolds. PMID:21886695

  17. Feasibility of endoscopic laser speckle imaging modality in the evaluation of auditory disorder: study in bone-tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Lee, Sangyeob; Park, Jihoon; Ha, Myungjin; Radfar, Edalat; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of an endoscopic laser speckle imaging modality (ELSIM) in the measurement of perfusion of flowing fluid in optical bone tissue phantom(OBTP). Many studies suggested that the change of cochlear blood flow was correlated with auditory disorder. Cochlear microcirculation occurs under the 200μm thickness bone which is the part of the internal structure of the temporal bone. Concern has been raised regarding of getting correct optical signal from hard tissue. In order to determine the possibility of the measurement of cochlear blood flow under bone tissue using the ELSIM, optical tissue phantom (OTP) mimicking optical properties of temporal bone was applied.

  18. Tannerella forsythia infection-induced calvarial bone and soft tissue transcriptional profiles.

    PubMed

    Bakthavatchalu, V; Meka, A; Sathishkumar, S; Lopez, M C; Bhattacharyya, I; Boyce, B F; Mans, J J; Lamont, R J; Baker, H V; Ebersole, J L; Kesavalu, L

    2010-10-01

    Tannerella forsythia is associated with subgingival biofilms in adult periodontitis, although the molecular mechanisms contributing to chronic inflammation and loss of periodontal bone remain unclear. We examined changes in the host transcriptional profiles during a T. forsythia infection using a murine calvarial model of inflammation and bone resorption. Tannerella forsythia was injected into the subcutaneous soft tissue over calvariae of BALB/c mice for 3 days, after which the soft tissues and calvarial bones were excised. RNA was isolated and Murine GeneChip (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) array analysis of transcript profiles showed that 3226 genes were differentially expressed in the infected soft tissues (P < 0.05) and 2586 genes were differentially transcribed in calvarial bones after infection. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcription levels of selected genes corresponded well with the microarray results. Biological pathways significantly impacted by T. forsythia infection in calvarial bone and soft tissue included leukocyte transendothelial migration, cell adhesion molecules (immune system), extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, adherens junction, and antigen processing and presentation. Histologic examination revealed intense inflammation and increased osteoclasts in calvariae compared with controls. In conclusion, localized T. forsythia infection differentially induces transcription of a broad array of host genes, and the profiles differ between inflamed soft tissues and calvarial bone.

  19. Controlled nucleation of hydroxyapatite on alginate scaffolds for stem cell-based bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Barnhart, Kara; Saito, Eiji; Vanderby, Ray; Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2010-10-01

    Current bone tissue engineering strategies aim to grow a tissue similar to native bone by combining cells and biologically active molecules with a scaffold material. In this study, a macroporous scaffold made from the seaweed-derived polymer alginate was synthesized and mineralized for cell-based bone tissue engineering applications. Nucleation of a bone-like hydroxyapatite mineral was achieved by incubating the scaffold in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF) for 4 weeks. Analysis using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral primarily composed of calcium and phosphorous. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite, the major inorganic constituent of human bone tissue. In addition to the mineral characterization, the ability to control nucleation on the surface, into the bulk of the material, or on the inner pore surfaces of scaffolds was demonstrated. Finally, human MSCs attached and proliferated on the mineralized scaffolds and cell attachment improved when seeding cells on mineral coated alginate scaffolds. This novel alginate- HAP composite material could be used in bone tissue engineering as a scaffold material to deliver cells, and perhaps also biologically active molecules.

  20. Bioactive mesoporous wollastonite particles for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, S; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation was aimed at identifying the role of mesoporous wollastonite particles on the healing of rat tibial bone defect. The bone defect was created with a 3-mm-diameter dental drill, and it was filled with mesoporous wollastonite particles. After second and fourth weeks of filling treatments, it was found that mesoporous wollastonite particles promoted bone formation as evidenced by X-ray, histological, scanning electron microscope, and energy-dispersive spectra studies. X-ray study showed the closure of drill hole as seen by high-dense radio-opacity image. Histological analysis depicted the deposition of collagen in the bone defect area in response to mesoporous wollastonite particles’ treatment. Scanning electron microscope–energy-dispersive spectra analyses of the sectioned implants also identified the deposition of apatite by these particles. Thus, our results suggested that mesoporous wollastonite particles have bioactive properties, and they can be used as a suitable filling material for promotion of bone formation in vivo. PMID:27928496

  1. A mathematical model for describing the metastasis of cancer in bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, Diego Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis is the rapid proliferation of cancer cells (secondary tumour) at a specific place, generally leading to death. This occurs at anatomical parts providing the necessary environment for vascularity, oxygen and food to hide their actions and trigger the rapid growth of cancer. Prostate and breast cancers, for example, use bone marrow for their proliferation. Bone-supporting cancer cells thus adapt to the environment, mimicking the behaviour of genetic and molecular bone cells. Evidence of this has been given in Cecchini et al. (2005, EAU Update Ser. 3:214-226), providing arguments such as how cancer cell growth is so active during bone reabsorption. This paper simulates metastasis activation in bone marrow. A mathematical model has been developed involving the activation of molecules from bone tissue cells, which are necessary for cancer to proliferate. Here, we simulate two forms of secondary tumour growth depending on the type of metastasis: osteosclerosis and osteolysis.

  2. Bone tissue engineering and regeneration: from discovery to the clinic--an overview.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Regis J; Mao, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    A National Institutes of Health sponsored workshop "Bone Tissue Engineering and Regeneration: From Discovery to the Clinic" gathered thought leaders from medicine, science, and industry to determine the state of art in the field and to define the barriers to translating new technologies to novel therapies to treat bone defects. Tissue engineering holds enormous promise to improve human health through prevention of disease and the restoration of healthy tissue functions. Bone tissue engineering, similar to that for other tissues and organs, requires integration of multiple disciplines such as cell biology, stem cells, developmental and molecular biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science, and immunology and transplantation science. Although each of the research areas has undergone enormous advances in last decade, the translation to clinical care and the development of tissue engineering composites to replace human tissues has been limited. Bone, similar to other tissue and organs, has complex structure and functions and requires exquisite interactions between cells, matrices, biomechanical forces, and gene and protein regulatory factors for sustained function. The process of engineering bone, thus, requires a comprehensive approach with broad expertise. Although in vitro and preclinical animal studies have been pursued with a large and diverse collection of scaffolds, cells, and biomolecules, the field of bone tissue engineering remains fragmented up to the point that a clear translational roadmap has yet to emerge. Translation is particularly important for unmet clinical needs such as large segmental defects and medically compromised conditions such as tumor removal and infection sites. Collectively, manuscripts in this volume provide luminary examples toward identification of barriers and strategies for translation of fundamental discoveries into clinical therapeutics.

  3. Non-viral gene therapy for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wegman, Fiona; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of using gene therapy for bone regeneration have been extensively investigated. Improvements in the design of new transfection agents, combining vectors and delivery/release systems to diminish cytotoxicity and increase transfection efficiencies have led to several successful in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo strategies. These include growth factor or short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivery, or even enzyme replacement therapies, and have led to increased osteogenic differentiation and bone formation in vivo. These results provide optimism to consider use in humans with some of these gene-delivery strategies in the near future.

  4. The influence of follistatin on mechanical properties of bone tissue in growing mice with overexpression of follistatin.

    PubMed

    Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Ochedalski, Tomasz; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical competence of bones is mainly associated with tissue quality that depends on proper bone metabolism processes. An imbalance in the regulation of bone metabolism leads to pathological changes in bone tissue leading to susceptibility to bone fractures and bone deterioration processes. Bone metabolism is regulated to a large extent by the members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, i.e., activins and bone morphogenetic proteins. However, their function is regulated by a single-chain protein called follistatin (FS). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that overexpression of FS in growing mice results in impairments in bone morphology and mechanical properties. Moreover, we wanted to investigate how geometrical, structural and material properties of bone tissue change with age. The experiment was performed on growing C57BL/6 TgNK14-mFst/6J mice, overexpressing FS (F mice) versus C57BL/6J mice used as controls (C mice). To establish how overexpression of FS influences bone tissue quality, we studied mice femurs to determine geometrical, structural and material properties of the skeleton. To determine mechanical resistance of bone tissue, femurs were loaded to failure in a three-point bending test. Obtained results indicated that overexpression of FS negatively influences bone metabolism. It was found that mutation results with a significant decrease of all measured biomechanical strength variables in F mice in comparison to C mice. Overexpression of FS leads to decreased quality of skeleton, increasing susceptibility to bone fractures.

  5. Bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation with tissue-engineered autologous osteoblasts and demineralized freeze-dried bone

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Aashish; Kalra, Rinku; Chhadva, Shruti; Shetye, Angad

    2015-01-01

    The pneumatization of the maxillary sinus often results in a lack of sufficient alveolar bone for implant placement. In the last decades, maxillary sinus lift has become a very popular procedure with predictable results. Sinus floor augmentation procedures are generally carried out using autologous bone grafts, bone substitutes, or composites of bone and bone substitutes. However, the inherent limitations associated with each of these, have directed the attention of investigators to new technologies like bone tissue engineering. Bone marrow stromal cells have been regarded as multi-potent cells residing in bone marrow. These cells can be harvested from a person, multiplied outside his body using bioengineering principles and technologies and later introduced into a tissue defect. We present a case where tissue-engineered autologous osteoblasts were used along with demineralized freeze-dried bone for sinus floor augmentation. PMID:26097364

  6. Biodegradable polymer scaffold fabrication and the creation of tissue-engineered bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Robert Craig

    It is estimated that over one million surgeries to restore lost bone function are performed each year in the U.S. Although existing therapies generally result in adequate restoration of mechanical or aesthetic function, they are by no means ideal. An alternative method for bone regeneration has been proposed which utilizes autologous cell transplantation within porous biodegradable polymer foam scaffolds. The work presented in this thesis was aimed at creating a porous biodegradable scaffold with appropriate mechanical properties, which in concert with an appropriate vascular environment, would be sufficient to create tissue engineered bone. A method was developed to fabric ate three-dimensional poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams which involves the production of PLGA/gelatin composites followed by leaching of the embedded gelatin microspheres. These PLGA foams had insufficient yield strength in compression. However, the results served as a basis for the design of foams with mechanical properties suitable for bone regeneration. As a means of enhancing foam compressive strength, this processing technique was modified to produce composite foams of PLGA and hydroxyapatite short fibers. Low porosity composite foams with enhanced compressive yield strengths were produced. We were able to manufacture: high porosity foams suitable for cell seeding but which have minimal compressive yield strength; or low porosity foams with enhanced compressive yield strength but which may not suitable for cell seeding. Using bone chambers filled with morcellized bone graft and implanted against ovine rib periosteum, we were able to form a clinically significant mass of vascularized bone with substantial compressive strength which was comparable to normal bone. Appropriately designed PLGA foams implanted against the periosteum allowed vascularized tissue ingrowth. We believe this tissue may have a large number of osteoprogenitor cells of periosteal origin and may therefore

  7. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mayao; Gao, Xing; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Li, Simin; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Riedel, Christoph; Busse, Björn; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control), young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM) was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the lowest.

  8. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-02-01

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO2 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P2O5 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  9. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-02-05

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO{sub 2} 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  10. Tissue Engineering Whole Bones Through Endochondral Ossification: Regenerating the Distal Phalanx

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Eamon J.; Mesallati, Tariq; Kelly, Lara; Vinardell, Tatiana; Buckley, Conor T.; Kelly, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Novel strategies are urgently required to facilitate regeneration of entire bones lost due to trauma or disease. In this study, we present a novel framework for the regeneration of whole bones by tissue engineering anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous grafts in vitro that subsequently drive endochondral bone formation in vivo. To realize this, we first fabricated molds from digitized images to generate mesenchymal stem cell-laden alginate hydrogels in the shape of different bones (the temporomandibular joint [TMJ] condyle and the distal phalanx). These constructs could be stimulated in vitro to generate anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous tissues that had begun to calcify around their periphery. Constructs were then formed into the shape of the distal phalanx to create the hypertrophic precursor of the osseous component of an engineered long bone. A layer of cartilage engineered through self-assembly of chondrocytes served as the articular surface of these constructs. Following chondrogenic priming and subcutaneous implantation, the hypertrophic phase of the engineered phalanx underwent endochondral ossification, leading to the generation of a vascularized bone integrated with a covering layer of stable articular cartilage. Furthermore, spatial bone deposition within the construct could be modulated by altering the architecture of the osseous component before implantation. These findings open up new horizons to whole limb regeneration by recapitulating key aspects of normal bone development. PMID:26309799

  11. Mineralization of human bone tissue under hypokinesia and physical exercise with calcium supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Verentsov, Grigori E.; Abratov, Nikolai I.

    It has been suggested that physical exercise and calcium supplements may be used to prevent demineralization of bone tissue under hypokinesia (diminished muscular activity). Thus, the aim of this study was to determine mineral content of bones of 12 physically healthy men aged 19-24 years under 90 days of hypokinesia and intensive physical exercise (PE) with calcium lactate (C) supplements. They were divided into experimental and control groups with 6 men in each. The experimental group of men were subjected to hypokinesia (HK) and intensive PE and took 650 mg C 6 times per day; the control group was placed under pure HK, i.e. without the use of any preventive measures. The mineral content of different bone tissues was measured with a densitometric X-ray method in milligrams of calcium per 1 mm 3 before and after exposure to HK. The level of bone density of the examined bone tissues decreased by 7-9% and 5-7% for the control and experimental groups of men, respectively. A statistical analysis revealed that the reduction of bone mineralization was significant with P < 0.01 in both groups of men. A comparison between bone density changes in the control and experimental groups of men failed to demonstrate significant differences. It was concluded that the level of mineralization of bone tissues decreased under hypokinesia and physical exercise with calcium supplements. Experimental studies of hypokinetic physiology are generally based on the assumption that diminished muscular activity (progressive reduction of number of steps per day) is detrimental to animal and human organisms, since the entire animal kingdom had been formed in an environment of high motor activity which left its imprint on the evolution, structure, function and behaviour of animals and men. The impossibility of the body tissues to retain optimum amounts of fluid and electrolytes is the dominant hypokinetic effect.

  12. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: their mobilization and homing to bone marrow and peripheral tissue.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Massberg, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are a rare population of precursor cells that possess the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. In the bone marrow (BM), HSPCs warrant blood cell homeostasis. In addition, they may also replenish tissue-resident myeloid cells and directly participate in innate immune responses once they home to peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize recent data on the signaling molecules that modulate the mobilization of HSPCs from BM and their migration to peripheral tissues.

  13. Perinatal stem cells: A promising cell resource for tissue engineering of craniofacial bone

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jia-Wen; Wang, Xu-Dong; Shen, Steve GF

    2015-01-01

    In facing the mounting clinical challenge and suboptimal techniques of craniofacial bone defects resulting from various conditions, such as congenital malformations, osteomyelitis, trauma and tumor resection, the ongoing research of regenerative medicine using stem cells and concurrent advancement in biotechnology have shifted the focus from surgical reconstruction to a novel stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for customized and functional craniofacial bone regeneration. Given the unique ontogenetical and cell biological properties of perinatal stem cells, emerging evidence has suggested these extraembryonic tissue-derived stem cells to be a promising cell source for extensive use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In this review, we summarize the current achievements and obstacles in stem cell-based craniofacial bone regeneration and subsequently we address the characteristics of various types of perinatal stem cells and their novel application in tissue engineering of craniofacial bone. We propose the promising feasibility and scope of perinatal stem cell-based craniofacial bone tissue engineering for future clinical application. PMID:25621114

  14. In situ strategy for bone repair by facilitated endogenous tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingdi; Zhang, Yujue; Pan, Panpan; Fan, Tiantang; Chen, Mingmao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-11-01

    Traditional tissue engineering procedures are expensive and time consuming. Facilitated endogenous tissue engineering (FETE) provides a solution that can avoid the ex vivo culture of autologous cells and initiate in situ reparative endogenous repair processes in vivo. This method involves fabricating a porous scaffold that mimics the environment present during the bone formation process, consisting of components that provide biomimetic interfacial interactions to cells. After the scaffold is implanted, progenitor cells provided by autologous bone marrow and surrounding tissues then differentiate to bone cells under the direction of the in situ scaffold. This paper reports a biomimetic method to prepare a hierarchically structured hybrid scaffold. Bone-like nano hydroxyapatite (HA) was crystallized from a collagen and chitosan (CC) matrix to form a porous scaffold. The in vivo study demonstrates that this nanohybrid scaffold supports excellent bone repair. This means that the FETE approach, in which the cell culture portion of traditional tissue engineering takes place in vivo, can promote the intrinsic regenerative potential of endogenous tissues.

  15. Freeze casting of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Deville, Sylvain; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2006-11-01

    Although extensive efforts have been put into the development of porous scaffolds for bone regeneration, with encouraging results, all porous materials have a common limitation: the inherent lack of strength associated with porosity. Hence, the development of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds has been hindered to non-load bearing applications. We report here how freeze casting can be applied to synthesize porous scaffolds exhibiting unusually high compressive strength, e.g. up to 145 MPa for 47% porosity and 65 MPa for 56% porosity. The materials are characterized by well-defined pore connectivity along with directional and completely open porosity. Various parameters affecting the porosity and compressive strength have been investigated, including initial slurry concentration, freezing rate, and sintering conditions. The implications and potential application as bone substitute are discussed. These results might open the way for hydroxyapatite-based materials designed for load-bearing applications. The biological response of these materials is yet to be tested.

  16. Bone and Soft Tissue Trauma Research at the USAISR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    casualties result in unusually high morbidity due to high rates of bone loss, mal-union, and osteomyelitis . To reduce the negative impact of fractures, we...volume and weight, making it a less than ideal substance in far-forward medical treatment facilities. Given the great advances in materials science in...gauze casts while greatly reducing weight. These materials are currently under development through several partnerships with both academia and industry

  17. Composite Bone and Soft Tissue Loss Treated with Distraction Histiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Mahuluxmivala, J., Nadarajah, R., Allen, P. W., et al. Ilizarov external fixator: acute shortening and lengthening versus bone transport in the management of...Presented at the Limb Lengthening and Reconstruction Society Annual Meeting 2006,William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Texas Tech University Health... lengthening by the Ilizarov technique. Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. 250:81– 104, 1990. 28 JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ORTHOPAEDIC ADVANCES

  18. Tissue and cellular basis for impaired bone formation in aluminum-related osteomalacia in the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Sedman, A B; Alfrey, A C; Miller, N L; Goodman, W G

    1987-01-01

    Bone formation is impaired in aluminum-associated bone disease. Reductions in the number of osteoblasts or in the function of individual osteoblasts could account for this finding. Thus, quantitative bone histology and measurements of bone formation were done at three skeletal sites in piglets given aluminum (Al) parenterally, 1.5 mg/kg per d, for 8 wk (Al, n = 4) and in control animals (C, n = 4). Bone Al was 241 +/- 40 mg/kg per dry weight in Al and 1.6 +/- 0.9 in C, P less than 0.001. All Al-treated animals developed osteomalacia with increases in osteoid seam width, osteoid volume, and mineralization lag time at each skeletal site, P less than 0.05 vs. C for all values. Mineralized bone formation at the tissue level was lower in Al than in C, P less than 0.05 for each skeletal site, due to reductions in active bone forming surface. Bone formation at the cellular level was similar in each group, however, and total osteoid production by osteoblasts did not differ in C and Al. Aluminum impairs the formation of mineralized bone in vivo by decreasing the number of active osteoblasts, and this change can be distinguished from the effect of aluminum to inhibit, either directly or indirectly, the calcification of osteoid. PMID:3793934

  19. Genetic and tissue level muscle-bone interactions during unloading and reambulation

    PubMed Central

    Judex, S.; Zhang, W.; Donahue, L.R.; Ozcivici, E.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about interactions between muscle and bone during the removal and application of mechanical signals. Here, we applied 3wk of hindlimb unloading followed by 3wk of reambulation to a genetically heterogeneous population of 352 adult mice and tested the hypothesis that changes in muscle are associated with changes in bone at the level of the tissue and the genome. During unloading and relative to normally ambulating control mice, most mice lost muscle and cortical bone with large variability across the population. During reambulation, individual mice regained bone and muscle at different rates. Across mice, changes in muscle and trabecular/cortical bone were not correlated to each other during unloading or reambulation. For unloading, we found one significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) for muscle area and five QTLs for cortical bone without overlap between mechano-sensitive muscle and cortical bone QTLs (but some overlap between muscle and trabecular QTLs). The low correlations between morphological changes in muscle and bone, together with the largely distinct genetic regulation of the response indicate that the premise of a muscle-bone unit that co-adjusts its size during (un)loading may need to be reassessed. PMID:27609032

  20. Role of bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase and PHOSPO1 in vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor; Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2014-01-01

    Matrix vesicle (MV)-mediated mineralization is important for bone ossification. However, under certain circumstances such as atherosclerosis, mineralization may occur in the arterial wall. Bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and generates inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is essential for MV-mediated hydroxyapatite formation. MVs contain another phosphatase, PHOSPHO1, that serves as an additional supplier of Pi. Activation of bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in vascular smooth muscle cells precedes vascular calcification. By degrading PPi, TNAP plays a procalcific role changing the Pi/PPi ratio toward mineralization. A pathologic role of bone-type TNAP and PHOSPHO1 make them to be attractive targets for cardiovascular therapy.

  1. Bio-inspired mineralization of hydroxyapatite in 3D silk fibroin hydrogel for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yashi; Kundu, Banani; Cai, Yurong; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming

    2015-10-01

    To fabricate hard tissue implants with bone-like structure using a biomimetic mineralization method is drawing much more attentions in bone tissue engineering. The present work focuses in designing 3D silk fibroin hydrogel to modulate the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals via a simple ion diffusion method. The study indicates that Ca(2+) incorporation within the hydrogel provides the nucleation sites for hydroxyapatite crystals and subsequently regulates their oriented growth. The mineralization process is regulated in a Ca(2+) concentration- and minerlization time-dependent way. Further, the compressive strength of the mineralized hydrogels is directly proportional with the mineral content in hydrogel. The orchestrated organic/inorganic composite supports well the viability and proliferation of human osteoblast cells; improved cyto-compatibility with increased mineral content. Together, the present investigation reports a simple and biomimetic process to fabricate 3D bone-like biomaterial with desired efficacy to repair bone defects.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells and alginate microcarriers for craniofacial bone tissue engineering: A review.

    PubMed

    Saltz, Adam; Kandalam, Umadevi

    2016-05-01

    Craniofacial bone is a complex structure with an intricate anatomical and physiological architecture. The defects that exist in this region therefore require a precise control of osteogenesis in their reconstruction. Unlike traditional surgical intervention, tissue engineering techniques mediate bone development with limited postoperative risk and cost. Alginate stands as the premier polymer in bone repair because of its mild ionotropic gelation and excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, and injectability. Alginate microcarriers are candidates of choice to mediate cells and accommodate into 3-D environment. Several studies reported the use of alginate microcarriers for delivering cells, drugs, and growth factors. This review will explore the potential use of alginate microcarrier for stem cell systems and its application in craniofacial bone tissue engineering.

  3. The effects of swimming training on bone tissue in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bruton, A; González-Agüero, A; Gómez-Cabello, A; Matute-Llorente, A; Casajús, J A; Vicente-Rodríguez, G

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to analyze bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) in regular swimming trained adolescents and the interaction that weigh-bearing sports may have on these values. Bone mass was evaluated by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) in 77 swimmers (34 females/43 males) and 52 normoactive controls (CG; 23 females/29 males) from 11 to 18 years. Swimmers who had performed or were performing other sports (OSP; 11 females/20 males) were compared with pure swimmers (PSW; 23 females/23 males). Both groups were compared with CG. Bone values were compared using analyses of covariance adjusting for height, calcium intake, subtotal lean (whole body lean minus head), and pubertal status. Male PSW showed lower BMD and BMC at several sites than male CG. However, for male OSP, only lumbar spine BMC was lower in OSP than male CG. Male PSW showed lower BMD and BMC when compared with male OSP. Female PSW showed higher arm BMD and lower leg BMC than female CG, while female OSP only presented lower leg BMC than female CG. Contrary to males, female-PSW presented higher BMD and BMC than female OSP. No differences in QUS values were found between swimmers and CG. To summarize, although more information is needed for females, it seems that for males, swimming is associated with lower BMC and BMD.

  4. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J.; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration. PMID:25136093

  5. Age related changes in the bone tissue under conditions of hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podrushnyak, E. P.; Suslov, E. I.

    1980-01-01

    Microroentgenography of nine young people, aged 24-29, before and after hypokinesia (16-37 days strict bed rest), showed that the heel bone density of those with initially high bone density generally decreased and that of those with initially low bone density generally increased. X-ray structural analysis of the femurs of 25 corpses of accidentally killed healthy people, aged 18-70, data are presented and discussed, with the conclusion that the bone hydroxyapatite crystal structure stabilizes by ages 20 to 25, is stable from ages 25 to 60 and decreases in density after age 60. It is concluded that bone tissue structure changes, both with age, and in a comparatively short time in hypokinesia.

  6. Augmentation of the rat jaw with autogeneic cortico-cancellous bone grafts and guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Donos, Nikolaos; Kostopoulos, Lambros; Karring, Thorkild

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of augmenting the maxillary alveolar ridge and the lateral aspect of the mandible with onlay autogeneic cortico-cancellous bone grafts that were covered with e-PTFE membranes. The experiment was carried out in 51 rats. In 15 rats, the edentulous maxillary jaw between the incisor and the first molar was augmented by means of an autogeneic ischiac bone graft that was fixed with a gold-coated microimplant. In one side, the graft was covered with an e-PTFE membrane, while the other side, which served as control, was treated without a membrane. In the other 36 rats, the lateral aspect of the mandible was augmented in both sides by means of an autogeneic ischiac bone graft that was fixed with a gold-coated or a titanium microimplant. In one side, the augmented area was covered with an e-PTFE membrane, while the contralateral side was treated without a membrane. Histological analysis at 60, 120 and 180 days after augmentation of the maxilla showed that, in the case of the test sites (where most of the membranes were either exposed or lost), the bone grafts presented extensive resorption and there was a lack of bone continuity between the graft and the recipient site. Similar findings were made at the non-membrane-treated control sides. In the case of augmentation of the mandible with membranes, the bone grafts were not resorbed, but were integrated into newly formed bone at the recipient site. In the control sides, the grafts presented varying degrees of resorption and integration into the recipient bone. It is concluded that, in comparison to bone grafting alone, onlay ischiac bone grafting combined with guided tissue regeneration eliminates the risk of bone graft resorption and ensures integration of the graft into newly formed bone at the recipient site, provided that closure of the operated area can be maintained during healing.

  7. Immobilization and Application of Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffold-based Growth Factor in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers have been extensively used in growth factor delivery and regenerative medicine due to many advantages including large surface area to volume ratio, high porosity, excellent loading capacity, ease of access and cost effectiveness. Their relatively large surface area is helpful for cell adhesion and growth factor loading, while storage and release of growth factor are essential to guide cellular behaviors and tissue formation and organization. In bone tissue engineering, growth factors are expected to transmit signals that stimulate cellular proliferation, migration, differentiation, metabolism, apoptosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Bolus administration is not always an effective method for the delivery of growth factors because of their rapid diffusion from the target site and quick deactivation. Therefore, the integration of controlled release strategy within electrospun nanofibers can provide protection for growth factors against in vivo degradation, and can manipulate desired signal at an effective level with extended duration in local microenvironment to support tissue regeneration and repair which normally takes a much longer time. In this review, we provide an overview of growth factor delivery using biomimetic electrospun nanofiber scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. It begins with a brief introduction of different kinds of polymers that were used in electrospinning and their applications in bone tissue engineering. The review further focuses on the nanofiber-based growth factor delivery and summarizes the strategies of growth factors loading on the nanofiber scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. The perspectives on future challenges in this area are also pointed out.

  8. Experimental and numerical analysis of Izod impact test of cortical bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-05-01

    Bones can only sustain loads until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Usually, the reasons for bone fracture are traumatic falls, sports injuries, and engagement in transport or industrial accidents. A proper treatment of bones and prevention of their fracture can be supported by in-depth understanding of deformation and fracture behavior of this tissue in such dynamic events. In this paper, a combination of experimental and numerical analysis was carried out in order to comprehend the fracture behavior of cortical bone tissue. Experimental tests were performed to study the transient dynamic behavior of cortical bone tissue under impact bending loading. The variability of absorbed energy for different cortex positions and notch depths was studied using Izod impact tests. Also, Extended Finite-Element Method implemented into the commercial finite-element software Abaqus was used to simulate the crack initiation and growth processes in a cantilever beam of cortical bone exposed to impact loading using the Izod loading scheme. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Anatomy and histophysiology of the periosteum: quantification of the periosteal blood supply to the adjacent bone with 85Sr and gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chanavaz, M

    1995-01-01

    corresponding periosteal vascular system by selective ligation of the thigh muscles. The results clearly show the fundamental predominance of periosteal blood circulation to the bone cortex (70 to 80% of the arterial supply and 90 to 100% of venous return) compared with centromedullary vascularization. A quantitative formula related to the general blood circulation in the bone cortex and marrow, taking into account the two pathways, is presented. Although the application of these results (which concern a long-bone site in an animal) to the alveolar and maxillo-mandibular periosteum requires the conception of an appropriate human experimental model, the extrapolation of the findings seems plausible in the case of the mandible, where the osseous structures and the vascular network are comparable with those found in long bone. However, in the maxilla, where the general blood supply is more intense and anastomotic, the periosteal contribution may legitimately be considered less important than the centro-medullary circulation. Finally, the presentation analyzes the physio-pathology of an experimentally damaged periosteum either directly (by thermodestruction, squashing, and chemodestruction), or indirectly (by muscular pull and tear), leading to the inevitable chain reaction, i.e., "ischemia-necrosis-atrophy and partial regeneration" of the underlying bone and very frequently compromising the survival of an implant that had been placed within it. The report emphasizes the importance of impeccable soft tissue and periosteum management at the time of implant surgery and indicates a number of technical precautions that should be observed in order to avoid periosteal damage.

  10. [Research progress on application of carbon nanotubes in bone tissue engineering scaffold].

    PubMed

    Yao, Mengzhu; Sheng, Xiaoxia; Lin, Jun; Gao, Jianqing

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes possess excellent mechanical and electrical properties and demonstrate broad application prospects in medical fields. Carbon nanotubes are composed of inorganic materials, natural biodegradable polymer or synthetic biodegradable polymer. The composite bone tissue engineering scaffolds are constructed by particle-hole method, lyophilization, microsphere aggregation method, electrostatic spinning or three-dimensional printing. Composite scaffolds overcome the shortcomings of single material and have good biocompatibility, osteoconduction and osteoinduction. With the study of surface chemistry, toxicology, and biocompatibility, a degradable "human-friendly" carbon nanotubes composite bone tissue scaffold will be available; and under the drive of new fabrication techniques, the clinical application of carbon nanotubes composite bone tissue engineering scaffolds will be better developed.

  11. Biosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of macroporous mineralized bacterial nanocellulose scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Johan; Götherström, Cecilia; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Macroporous bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) scaffolds with calcium phosphate coated surfaces is a candidate for future bone tissue engineering applications. The mineralization of the macroporous BNC scaffolds was achieved by a biomimetic process, resulting in an environment resembling native bone tissues' mineralized extra cellular matrix both topographically and chemically. The deposited crystals were analyzed with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray crystallography (XRD). MSCs were cultured in osteogeneic medium for 21 days on the scaffolds. The results of this study show that macroporous BNC can be mineralized with hydroxyapatite and that MSCs retain their ability to proliferate and differentiate towards an osteoblastic phenotype within the mineralized BNC, showing the promise of this material in bone tissue engineering applications.

  12. Boron containing poly-(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Bayir, Yasin; Halici, Zekai; Karakus, Emre; Aydin, Ali; Cadirci, Elif; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Demirci, Elif; Karaman, Adem; Ayan, Arif Kursat; Gundogdu, Cemal; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2014-11-01

    Scaffold-based bone defect reconstructions still face many challenges due to their inadequate osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Various biocompatible and biodegradable scaffolds, combined with proper cell type and biochemical signal molecules, have attracted significant interest in hard tissue engineering approaches. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of boron incorporation into poly-(lactide-co-glycolide-acid) (PLGA) scaffolds, with or without rat adipose-derived stem cells (rADSCs), on bone healing in vitro and in vivo. The results revealed that boron containing scaffolds increased in vitro proliferation, attachment and calcium mineralization of rADSCs. In addition, boron containing scaffold application resulted in increased bone regeneration by enhancing osteocalcin, VEGF and collagen type I protein levels in a femur defect model. Bone mineralization density (BMD) and computed tomography (CT) analysis proved that boron incorporated scaffold administration increased the healing rate of bone defects. Transplanting stem cells into boron containing scaffolds was found to further improve bone-related outcomes compared to control groups. Additional studies are highly warranted for the investigation of the mechanical properties of these scaffolds in order to address their potential use in clinics. The study proposes that boron serves as a promising innovative approach in manufacturing scaffold systems for functional bone tissue engineering.

  13. Ionic Colloidal Molding as a Biomimetic Scaffolding Strategy for Uniform Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Jia, Jinpeng; Kim, Jimin P; Shen, Hong; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Meng; Bi, Wenzhi; Wang, Xing; Yang, Jian; Wu, Decheng

    2017-02-21

    Inspired by the highly ordered nanostructure of bone, nanodopant composite biomaterials are gaining special attention for their ability to guide bone tissue regeneration through structural and biological cues. However, bone malformation in orthopedic surgery is a lingering issue, partly due to the high surface energy of traditional nanoparticles contributing to aggregation and inhomogeneity. Recently, carboxyl-functionalized synthetic polymers have been shown to mimic the carboxyl-rich surface motifs of non-collagenous proteins in stabilizing hydroxyapatite and directing intrafibrillar mineralization in-vitro. Based on this biomimetic approach, it is herein demonstrated that carboxyl functionalization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) can achieve great material homogeneity in nanocomposites. This ionic colloidal molding method stabilizes hydroxyapatite precursors to confer even nanodopant packing, improving therapeutic outcomes in bone repair by remarkably improving mechanical properties of nanocomposites and optimizing controlled drug release, resulting in better cell in-growth and osteogenic differentiation. Lastly, better controlled biomaterial degradation significantly improved osteointegration, translating to highly regular bone formation with minimal fibrous tissue and increased bone density in rabbit radial defect models. Ionic colloidal molding is a simple yet effective approach of achieving materials homogeneity and modulating crystal nucleation, serving as an excellent biomimetic scaffolding strategy to rebuild natural bone integrity.

  14. Systemic drug delivery systems for bone tissue regeneration- a mini review.

    PubMed

    Xinluan, Wang; Yuxiao, Lai; Helena, Ng HueiLeng; Zhijun, Yang; Ling, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis have become the major public health problems worldwide in our aging society. Pharmaceutical therapy is one of the approaches to prevent and treat related medical conditions. Most of the clinically used anti-osteoporotic drugs are administered systemically and have demonstrated some side effects in non-skeletal tissues. One of the innovative approaches to prevent potential adverse effects is the development of bone-targeting drug delivery technologies that not only minimizes the systemic toxicity but also improves the pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic efficacy of chemical drugs. This paper reviews the currently available bone targeting drug delivery systems with emphasis as bone-targeting moieties, including the bonesurface- site-specific (bone formation dominant or bone resorption dominant) and cell-specific moieties. In addition, the connections of drug-bone-targeting moieties-carrier are also summarized, and the newly developed liposomes and nanoparticles are discussed for their potential use and main challenges in delivering therapeutic agents to bone tissue. As a rapid-developing biotechnology, systemic bonetargeting delivery system is promising but still in its infancy where challenges are ahead of us, including the stability and the toxicity issues, especially to fulfill the regulatory requirement to realize bench-to-bedside translation. Newly developed biomaterials and technologies with potential for safer and more effective drug delivery require multidisciplinary collaborations with preclinical and clinical scientists that are essential to facilitate their clinical applications.

  15. Reduced tissue hardness of trabecular bone is associated with severe osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Dall'Ara, Enrico; Ohman, Caroline; Baleani, Massimiliano; Viceconti, Marco

    2011-05-17

    This study investigated whether changes in hardness of human trabecular bone are associated with osteoarthritis. Twenty femoral heads extracted from subjects without musculoskeletal diseases (subject age: 49-83 years) and twenty femoral heads extracted from osteoarthritic subjects (subject age: 42-85 years) were tested. Sixty indentations were performed along the main trabecular direction of each sample at a fixed relative distance. Two microstructures were found on the indenting locations: packs of parallel-lamellae (PL) and secondary osteons (SO). A 25gf load was applied for 15s and the Vickers Hardness (HV) was assessed. Trabecular tissue extracted from osteoarthritic subjects was found to be about 13% less hard compared to tissue extracted from non-pathologic subjects. However, tissue hardness was not significantly affected by gender or age. The SO was 10% less hard than the PL for both pathologic and non-pathologic tissues. A hardness of 34.1HV for PL and 30.8HV for SO was found for the non-pathologic tissue. For osteoarthritic tissue, the hardness was 30.2HV for PL and 27.1HV for SO. In the bone tissue extracted from osteoarthritic subjects the occurrence of indenting a SO (28%) was higher than that observed in the non-pathological tissue (15%). Osteoarthritis is associated with reduced tissue hardness and alterations in microstructure of the trabecular bone tissue. Gender does not significantly affect trabecular bone hardness either in non-pathological or osteoarthritic subjects. A similar conclusion can be drawn for age, although a larger donor sample size would be necessary to definitively exclude the existence of a slight effect.

  16. Use of osteoplastic material to guide bone tissue regeneration deffect.

    PubMed

    Machavariani, A; Mazmishvili, K; Grdzelidze, T; Menabde, G; Amiranashvili, I

    2011-12-01

    The goal of research was study of restoration processes in jaw-teeth bone defects by application of osteoplastic materials in the experiment. The experiment was performed over 32 white (6-12 month old) rats; the animals were divided into 2 groups; 16 animals were enrolled in the first group; the section was performed in the edge of lower jaw; the lower jaw body was revealed. Under the effect of the dental drilling machine and the # 1 cooling mean by the fissure bohrium (distilled water) the defect of the dimension of 2x2 mm was created; the defect was washed by 0/9% saline to remove the bone sawdust; the wound was sutured tightly, in layers. The second group of the experiment was staffed with 16 animals (main group); the similar bone defect of the size 2 x 2mm was created on the rat's jaw's body. After washing of modeled defect we inserted osteopathic materials PORESORB-TCP crystals with the size of 0,6-1.0 mm the wound was sutured tightly, in layers. After the 3-rd, 15-th, 30-th and 90-th days from the date of operation there was performed X-ray and morphological examination over the animals in the control as well as the main group. The analysis of the examination performed over the experimental materials showed that in the control group in samples taken at 90th day the defects were not completely restored. In the test group in samples taken at 90th day reparative regeneration is confirmed. This is stimulated by the factor that within the main group's animals the defect regeneration process is supported with the osteoplastic material PORESORB-TCP.

  17. Paper-based bioactive scaffolds for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yu, Seung Jung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Cho, Ann-Na; Kim, Jin; Lee, Bora; Yang, Hee Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive, functional scaffolds are required to improve the regenerative potential of stem cells for tissue reconstruction and functional recovery of damaged tissues. Here, we report a paper-based bioactive scaffold platform for stem cell culture and transplantation for bone reconstruction. The paper scaffolds are surface-engineered by an initiated chemical vapor deposition process for serial coating of a water-repellent and cell-adhesive polymer film, which ensures the long-term stability in cell culture medium and induces efficient cell attachment. The prepared paper scaffolds are compatible with general stem cell culture and manipulation techniques. An optimal paper type is found to provide structural, physical, and mechanical cues to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). A bioactive paper scaffold significantly enhances in vivo bone regeneration of hADSCs in a critical-sized calvarial bone defect. Stacking the paper scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated hADSCs and human endothelial cells resulted in vascularized bone formation in vivo. Our study suggests that paper possesses great potential as a bioactive, functional, and cost-effective scaffold platform for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the feasibility of a paper material for stem cell application to repair tissue defects.

  18. Coculture strategies in bone tissue engineering: the impact of culture conditions on pluripotent stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Janardhanan, Sathyanarayana; Wang, Martha O; Fisher, John P

    2012-08-01

    The use of pluripotent stem cell populations for bone tissue regeneration provides many opportunities and challenges within the bone tissue engineering field. For example, coculture strategies have been utilized to mimic embryological development of bone tissue, and particularly the critical intercellular signaling pathways. While research in bone biology over the last 20 years has expanded our understanding of these intercellular signaling pathways, we still do not fully understand the impact of the system's physical characteristics (orientation, geometry, and morphology). This review of coculture literature delineates the various forms of coculture systems and their respective outcomes when applied to bone tissue engineering. To understand fully the key differences between the different coculture methods, we must appreciate the underlying paradigms of physiological interactions. Recent advances have enabled us to extrapolate these techniques to larger dimensions and higher geometric resolutions. Finally, the contributions of bioreactors, micropatterned biomaterials, and biomaterial interaction platforms are evaluated to give a sense of the sophistication established by a combination of these concepts with coculture systems.

  19. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to fluid shear stress on osteogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Semeins, Cornelis M; Wuisman, Paul I J M; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2005-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, mechanosensitive cells are needed that are able to perform bone cell-specific functions, such as (re)modeling of bone tissue. In vivo, local bone mass and architecture are affected by mechanical loading, which is thought to provoke a cellular response via loading-induced flow of interstitial fluid. Adipose tissue is an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering, and is available in abundant amounts compared with bone marrow. We studied whether adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) on osteogenic stimulation in vitro. We found that ATMSCs show a bone cell-like response to fluid shear stress as a result of PFF after the stimulation of osteogenic differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PFF increased nitric oxide production, as well as upregulated cyclooxygenase-2, but not cyclooxygenase-1, gene expression in osteogenically stimulated AT-MSCs. These data suggest that AT-MSCs acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to pulsating fluid shear stress on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-induced osteogenic differentiation. ATMSCs might be able to perform bone cell-specific functions during bone (re)modeling in vivo and, therefore, provide a promising new tool for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Fragmented Adipose Tissue Graft for Bone Healing: Histological and Histometric Study in Rabbits’ Calvaria

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lidiane C.; Giovanini, Allan F.; Abuabara, Allan; Klug, Luiz G.; Gonzaga, Carla C.; Zielak, João C.; Urban, Cícero A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The adipose tissue represents an important reservoir of stem cells. There are few studies in the literature with which to histologically evaluate whether or not the adipose tissue graft is really a safe option to achieve bone repair. This study histologically analyzed the effect of fragmented autogenous adipose tissue grafts on bone healing in surgically created, critical-size defects (CSD) in a rabbit’s calvaria. Study design Forty-two New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. CSD that were 15 mm in diameter were created in the calvarium of each animal. The defects were randomly divided into two groups: in Group C (control), the defect was filled only by a blood clot and, in Group FAT (i.e., fragmented adipose tissue), the defect was filled with fragmented autogenous adipose tissue grafts. The groups were divided into subgroups (n = 7) for euthanasia at 7, 15, and 40 days after the procedure had been conducted. Histologic and histometric analyses were performed. Data were statistically analysed with ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p < 0.05). Results The amount of bone formation did not show statistically significant differences seven days after the operation, which indicates that the groups had similar amounts of mineral deposition in the earlier period of the repair. Conversely, a significant of amount of bone matrix deposition was identified in the FAT group at 15 and 40 days following the operation, both on the border and in the body of the defect. Such an outcome was not found in the control group. Conclusion In this study, an autologous adipose tissue graft may be considered as likely biomaterial for bone regeneration, since it positively affected the amount of bone formation in surgically created CSD in the rabbits’ calvaria 40 days after the procedure had been performed. Further investigations with a longer time evaluation are warranted to determine the effectiveness of autologous adipose tissue graft in the bone healing. Key words

  1. Baculovirus as a gene delivery vector for cartilage and bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Lu, Chia-Hsin; Luo, Wen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Han; Sung, Li-Yu; Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Baculovirus is an effective vector for gene delivery into various mammalian cells, including chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and has been employed for diverse applications. By gene delivery and expression of the growth factor, recombinant baculovirus has been shown to modulate the differentiation state of the cells and stimulates the production of extracellular matrix and tissue formation, hence repairing the damaged cartilage and bone in vivo. This article reviews the studies pertaining to the applications of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery in cartilage and bone tissue engineering and discusses recent progress, future applications and potential hurdles.

  2. Scaffold degradation during bone tissue reconstruction in Macaca nemestrina mandible

    PubMed Central

    Bachtiar, Endang W.; Amir, Lisa Rinanda; Suhardi, Pradono; Abas, Basril

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the degradation of three scaffolds composed of hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) with 70∶30 ratio, HA/TCP with 50∶50 ratio, and HA/TCP/chitosan scaffold as analyzed by the RNA expression of matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP2), interleukin 13 (IL13), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) genes. Methods The three tested scaffolds and dental pulp stromal cells (DPSCs) were transplanted into the mandibular bone defect of six young male Macaca nemestrina. Defect on the left mandible served as the experimental group and the right mandible served as control group (split mouth design). The biopsies were retrieved at 0, 2, and 4 weeks after cell-scaffold transplantation. The expression of MMP2, IL13, and TRAP was analyzed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Results The inflammatory cells were still detected in areas where active bone and blood vessel formation occurred. The remnants of scaffold biomaterials were rarely seen. The expression of MMP2, IL13, and TRAP was observed in all samples. Their expressions were increased at week 4 and the decrease of TRAP gene expression in the experimental group was found higher than the control group. TRAP gene in the HA/TCP/chitosan group was found to be the highest at week 2 and lowest at week 4. Conclusions Degradation of the scaffold did not induce higher inflammatory response compared to the control yet it induced more osteoclast activity. PMID:28386463

  3. Absorbed fractions for alpha-particles in tissues of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watchman, Christopher J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-10-01

    Bone-seeking alpha-particle emitting radionuclides are common health physics hazards. Additionally, they are under consideration as an option for therapeutic molecular radiotherapy applications. Current dose models do not account for energy or bone-site dependence as shown by alpha-particle absorbed fractions given in ICRP Publication 30. Energy-dependent, yet bone-site independent, alpha-particle absorbed fractions have been presented by the models of Stabin and Siegel (2003 Health Phys. 85 294-310). In this work, a chord-based computational model of alpha-particle transport in cortical bone has been developed that explicitly accounts for both the bone-site and particle-energy dependence of alpha-particle absorbed fractions in this region of the skeleton. The model accounts for energy deposition to three targets: cortical endosteum, haversian space tissues and cortical bone. Path length distributions for cortical bone given in Beddoe (1977 Phys. Med. Biol. 22 298-308) provided additional transport regions in the absorbed fraction calculation. Significant variations in absorbed fractions between different skeletal sites were observed. Differences were observed between this model and the absorbed fractions given in ICRP Publication 30, which varied by as much as a factor of 2.1 for a cortical bone surface source irradiating cortical endosteum.

  4. Bone Tissue Properties Measurement by Reference Point Indentation in Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Mellibovsky, Fernando; Güerri-Fernández, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Randall, Connor; Hansma, Paul K; Díez-Perez, Adolfo

    2015-09-01

    Glucocorticoids, widely used in inflammatory disorders, rapidly increase bone fragility and, therefore, fracture risk. However, common bone densitometry measurements are not sensitive enough to detect these changes. Moreover, densitometry only partially recognizes treatment-induced fracture reductions in osteoporosis. Here, we tested whether the reference point indentation technique could detect bone tissue property changes early after glucocorticoid treatment initiation. After initial laboratory and bone density measurements, patients were allocated into groups receiving calcium + vitamin D (Ca+D) supplements or anti-osteoporotic drugs (risedronate, denosumab, teriparatide). Reference point indentation was performed on the cortical bone layer of the tibia by a handheld device measuring bone material strength index (BMSi). Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Although Ca+D-treated patients exhibited substantial and significant deterioration, risedronate-treated patients exhibited no significant change, and both denosumab- and teriparatide-treated participants exhibited significantly improved BMSi 7 weeks after initial treatment compared with baseline; these trends remained stable for 20 weeks. In contrast, no densitometry changes were observed during this study period. In conclusion, our study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate that reference point indentation is sensitive enough to reflect changes in cortical bone indentation after treatment with osteoporosis therapies in patients newly exposed to glucocorticoids.

  5. Inhibitory effect of menaquinone-7 (vitamin K2) on the bone-resorbing factors-induced bone resorption in elderly female rat femoral tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Yoshinori

    2003-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of menaquinone-7 (MK-7; vitamin K2) on osteoclast-like cell formation and osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro is found (Mol Cell Biochem 228: 39-47, 2001). This study, furthermore, was undertaken to determine the effect of MK-7 on the bone-resorbing factor-induced bone resorption using the femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues obtained from elderly female rats in vitro. Femoral-diaphyseal and -metaphyseal tissues were cultured for 48 h in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (high glucose, 4.5%) supplemented with antibiotics and bovine serum albumin. The experimental cultures contained MK-7 (10(-7)-10(-5) M). The bone-resorbing factors, parathyroid hormone (1-34) (PTH; 10(-7) M) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2; 10(-5) M), caused a significant decrease in calcium content in the diaphyseal and metaphyseal tissues. The PTH or PGE2-induced decrease in bone calcium content was completely inhibited in the presence of MK-7 (10(-7)-10(-5) M). In addition, MK-7 (10(-7)-10(-5) M) completely prevented the PTH (10(-7) M)- or PGE2 (10(-5) M)-induced increase in medium glucose consumption and lactic acid production by bone tissues. These results support the view that MK-7 has a direct inhibitory effect on the bone-resorbing factor-induced bone resorption in bone culture using female aged femoral tissues in vitro.

  6. Nanohydroxyapatite Effect on the Degradation, Osteoconduction and Mechanical Properties of Polymeric Bone Tissue Engineered Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Salmasi, Shima; Nayyer, Leila; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Statistical reports show that every year around the world approximately 15 million bone fractures occur; of which up to 10% fail to heal completely and hence lead to complications of non-union healing. In the past, autografts or allografts were used as the “gold standard” of treating such defects. However, due to various limitations and risks associated with these sources of bone grafts, other avenues have been extensively investigated through which bone tissue engineering; in particular engineering of synthetic bone graft substitutes, has been recognised as a promising alternative to the traditional methods. METHODS A selective literature search was performed. RESULTS Bone tissue engineering offers unlimited supply, eliminated risk of disease transmission and relatively low cost. It could also lead to patient specific design and manufacture of implants, prosthesis and bone related devices. A potentially promising building block for a suitable scaffold is synthetic nanohydroxyapatite incorporated into synthetic polymers. Incorporation of nanohydroxyapatite into synthetic polymers has shown promising bioactivity, osteoconductivity, mechanical properties and degradation profile compared to other techniques previously considered. CONCLUSION Scientific research, through extensive physiochemical characterisation, in vitro and in vivo assessment has brought together the optimum characteristics of nanohydroxyapatite and various types of synthetic polymers in order to develop nanocomposites of suitable nature for bone tissue engineering. The aim of the present article is to review and update various aspects involved in incorporation of synthetic nanohydroxyapatite into synthetic polymers, in terms of their potentials to promote bone growth and regeneration in vitro, in vivo and consequently in clinical applications. PMID:28217213

  7. Correlation Between Bone and Soft Tissue Thickness in Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanizadeh, Nasrin; Daneshparvar, Niloufar; Askarpour, Farinaz; Akhoundi, Nasrin; Panjnoush, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine buccal bone and soft tissue thicknesses and their correlation in the maxillary anterior region using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 330 sound maxillary incisors in 60 patients with a mean age of 37.5 years were assessed by CBCT scans. For better visualization of soft tissue, patients were asked to use plastic retractors in order to retract their lips and cheeks away from the gingival tissue before taking the scans. Measurements were made in three different positions: at the crest and at 2 and 5mm apical to the crest. The cementoenamel junction–crest distance was measured. for data analyses, the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, ANOVA and intraclass correlation coefficient were used. Results: There were mildly significant linear associations between labial soft tissue and bone thickness in the canines and incisors (r<0.40, P<0.05), but no association was found for the lateral incisors. The mean thickness of buccal bone differed significantly in the maxillary anterior teeth, being greater for the lateral incisors (P<0.05). For soft tissue thickness, the results were the same, and the least thickness was recorded for the canines. There was a mild association between labial soft tissue and bone thickness in canines and incisors (r=0.2, P=0.3), but no such linear association was seen for the lateral incisors. Conclusions: The mean thickness of buccal bone and soft tissue in the anterior maxilla was <1mm and there was a mild linear correlation between them. PMID:28127323

  8. Novel bioactivity of phosvitin in connective tissue and bone organogenesis revealed by live calvarial bone organ culture models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jess; Czernick, Drew; Lin, Shih-Chun; Alasmari, Abeer; Serge, Dibart; Salih, Erdjan

    2013-09-01

    Egg yolk phosvitin is one of the most highly phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins known in nature with unique physico-chemical properties deemed to be critical during ex-vivo egg embryo development. We have utilized our unique live mouse calvarial bone organ culture models under conditions which dissociates the two bone remodeling stages, viz., resorption by osteoclasts and formation by osteoblasts, to highlight important and to date unknown critical biological functions of egg phosvitin. In our resorption model live bone cultures were grown in the absence of ascorbate and were stimulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) to undergo rapid osteoclast formation/differentiation with bone resorption. In this resorption model native phosvitin potently inhibited PTH-induced osteoclastic bone resorption with simultaneous new osteoid/bone formation in the absence of ascorbate (vitamin C). These surprising and critical observations were extended using the bone formation model in the absence of ascorbate and in the presence of phosvitin which supported the above results. The results were corroborated by analyses for calcium release or uptake, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity (marker for osteoclasts), alkaline phosphatase activity (marker for osteoblasts), collagen and hydroxyproline composition, and histological and quantitative histomorphometric evaluations. The data revealed that the discovered bioactivity of phosvitin mirrors that of ascorbate during collagen synthesis and the formation of new osteoid/bone. Complementing those studies use of the synthetic collagen peptide analog and cultured calvarial osteoblasts in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis provided results that augmented the bone organ culture work and confirmed the capacity of phosvitin to stimulate differentiation of osteoblasts, collagen synthesis, hydroxyproline formation, and biomineralization. There are striking implications and interrelationships of this affect that relates to

  9. Microindentation for In Vivo Measurement of Bone Tissue Mechanical Properties in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Güerri, Roberto; Nogues, Xavier; Cáceres, Enric; Peña, Maria Jesus; Mellibovsky, Leonardo; Randall, Connor; Bridges, Daniel; Weaver, James C; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Koester, Kurt J; Ritchie, Robert O; Hansma, Paul K

    2010-01-01

    Bone tissue mechanical properties are deemed a key component of bone strength, but their assessment requires invasive procedures. Here we validate a new instrument, a reference point indentation (RPI) instrument, for measuring these tissue properties in vivo. The RPI instrument performs bone microindentation testing (BMT) by inserting a probe assembly through the skin covering the tibia and, after displacing periosteum, applying 20 indentation cycles at 2 Hz each with a maximum force of 11 N. We assessed 27 women with osteoporosis-related fractures and 8 controls of comparable ages. Measured total indentation distance (46.0 ± 14 versus 31.7 ± 3.3 µm, p = .008) and indentation distance increase (18.1 ± 5.6 versus 12.3 ± 2.9 µm, p = .008) were significantly greater in fracture patients than in controls. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the two measurements were 93.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.1–100) and 90.3% (95% CI 73.2–100), respectively. Interobserver coefficient of variation ranged from 8.7% to 15.5%, and the procedure was well tolerated. In a separate study of cadaveric human bone samples (n = 5), crack growth toughness and indentation distance increase correlated (r = –0.9036, p = .018), and scanning electron microscope images of cracks induced by indentation and by experimental fractures were similar. We conclude that BMT, by inducing microscopic fractures, directly measures bone mechanical properties at the tissue level. The technique is feasible for use in clinics with good reproducibility. It discriminates precisely between patients with and without fragility fracture and may provide clinicians and researchers with a direct in vivo measurement of bone tissue resistance to fracture. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200991

  10. Pesticide residues in adipose tissue from hippopotami (Hippopotamus amphibius L) living in and adjacent to the Luangwa River in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Flåøyen, A; Polder, A; Mwase, M; Almli, B; Musonda, M M

    2005-06-01

    The concentration of organochlorines (OCs) such as organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls were measured in adipose tissue collected from 14 male hippopotami at Mfuwe in the southern part of the Luangwa National Park, Zambia. The samples contained low levels of OCs, and the concentrations of OCs were comparable to or lower than reported for wild herbivores studied in other parts of the world.

  11. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  12. Repair of Segmental Bone Defect Using Totally Vitalized Tissue Engineered Bone Graft by a Combined Perfusion Seeding and Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ya-Fei; Li, Xiang; Hu, Yun-Yu; Wang, Zhen; Ma, Zhen-Sheng; Lei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The basic strategy to construct tissue engineered bone graft (TEBG) is to combine osteoblastic cells with three dimensional (3D) scaffold. Based on this strategy, we proposed the “Totally Vitalized TEBG” (TV-TEBG) which was characterized by abundant and homogenously distributed cells with enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation and further investigated its biological performance in repairing segmental bone defect. Methods In this study, we constructed the TV-TEBG with the combination of customized flow perfusion seeding/culture system and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold fabricated by Rapid Prototyping (RP) technique. We systemically compared three kinds of TEBG constructed by perfusion seeding and perfusion culture (PSPC) method, static seeding and perfusion culture (SSPC) method, and static seeding and static culture (SSSC) method for their in vitro performance and bone defect healing efficacy with a rabbit model. Results Our study has demonstrated that TEBG constructed by PSPC method exhibited better biological properties with higher daily D-glucose consumption, increased cell proliferation and differentiation, and better cell distribution, indicating the successful construction of TV-TEBG. After implanted into rabbit radius defects for 12 weeks, PSPC group exerted higher X-ray score close to autograft, much greater mechanical property evidenced by the biomechanical testing and significantly higher new bone formation as shown by histological analysis compared with the other two groups, and eventually obtained favorable healing efficacy of the segmental bone defect that was the closest to autograft transplantation. Conclusion This study demonstrated the feasibility of TV-TEBG construction with combination of perfusion seeding, perfusion culture and RP technique which exerted excellent biological properties. The application of TV-TEBG may become a preferred candidate for segmental bone defect repair in orthopedic and maxillofacial

  13. Biomechanical comparison of the hand-based transplant used in bone-tissue-bone scapho-lunate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gay, A M; Thoreson, A; Berger, R A

    2014-02-01

    Although work has been published comparing the five most commonly used transplant techniques to the properties of the scapho-lunate interosseous ligament (SLIL), no study has been carried out which compares the biomechanical properties of the different bone-tissue-bone autografts to each other, using a standard methodology of testing. The hypothesis of this study was that mechanically significant differences in the material properties of commonly used bone-tissue-bone exist when compared to each other. We tested the dorsal part of the SLIL and the five most quoted transplants in the literature: capitate to trapezoid; trapezoid to second metacarpal; third metacarpal-carpal; dorsal capitate-hamate; 4-5 extensor retinaculum. For each transplant, we measured failure load, failure displacement, width, and thickness. Anova was used to compare the different results obtained and the level of significance attributed to P<0.05. Load to failure were: SLIL 94.3±42.86N; capitate to trapezoid 37.7±23.13N; trapezoid to second metacarpal 45.43±14.28N; third metacarpal-carpal 60.11±19.94N; dorsal capitate-hamate 63±25.51N; 4-5 retinaculum 15.67±10.7N. Only the dorsal capitate-hamate ligament showed to have no significant (P>0.05) difference in term of load to failure, all the others was significantly weaker (P<0.05). Previous biomechanical studies have identified the dorsal region of the SLIL as the most structurally and functionally important area of the SLIL. As a result, attention has been more specifically brought to the replacement of the dorsal portion of the SLIL. An attempt to achieve a reconstruction that reproduces more closely the SLIL has generated research on the use of bone-tissue-bone composite graft, several donor sites have been used in order to find the most similar. Our results suggest that, using a normalized method to compare the previously described grafts harvested at the wrist level, that the dorsal capitate-hamate ligament has the closest properties

  14. Effect of coating Straumann Bone Ceramic with Emdogain on mesenchymal stromal cell hard tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Mrozik, Krzysztof Marek; Gronthos, Stan; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark

    2012-06-01

    Periodontal tissue engineering requires a suitable biocompatible scaffold, cells with regenerative capacity, and instructional molecules. In this study, we investigated the capacity of Straumann Bone Ceramic coated with Straumann Emdogain, a clinical preparation of enamel matrix protein (EMP), to aid in hard tissue formation by post-natal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) including bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLFs). MSCs were isolated and ex vivo-expanded from human bone marrow and periodontal ligament and, in culture, allowed to attach to Bone Ceramic in the presence or absence of Emdogain. Gene expression of bone-related proteins was investigated by real time RT-PCR for 72 h, and ectopic bone formation was assessed histologically in subcutaneous implants of Bone Ceramic containing MSCs with or without Emdogain in NOD/SCID mice. Alkaline phosphatase activity was also assessed in vitro, in the presence or absence of Emdogain. Collagen-I mRNA was up-regulated in both MSC populations over the 72-h time course with Emdogain. Expression of BMP-2 and the osteogenic transcription factor Cbfa-1 showed early stimulation in both MSC types after 24 h. In contrast, expression of BMP-4 was consistently down-regulated in both MSC types with Emdogain. Up-regulation of osteopontin and periostin mRNA was restricted to BMSCs, while higher levels of bone sialoprotein-II were observed in PDLFs with Emdogain. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase activity levels were reduced in both BMSCs and PDLFs in the presence of Emdogain. Very little evidence was found for ectopic bone formation following subcutaneous implantation of MSCs with Emdogain-coated or -uncoated Bone Ceramic in NOD/SCID mice. The early up-regulation of several important bone-related genes suggests that Emdogain may have a significant stimulatory effect in the commitment of mesenchymal cells to osteogenic differentiation in vitro. While Emdogain inhibited AP activity and appeared

  15. Structural changes in femoral bone tissue of rats after subchronic peroral exposure to selenium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of selenium (Se) on bone microarchitecture is still poorly understood. The present study aims to investigate the macroscopic and microscopic structures of femoral bone tissue in adult male rats after subchronic peroral administration of Se. Methods Twenty one-month-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups. In the first group (Se group) young males were exposed to 5 mg Na2SeO3/L in drinking water, for 90 days. Ten one-month-old males without Se administration served as a control group. At the end of the experiment, macroscopic and microscopic structures of the femurs were analysed using analytical scales, sliding instrument, and polarized light microscopy. Results The body weight, femoral length and cortical bone thickness were significantly decreased in Se group rats. These rats also displayed different microstructure in the middle part of the femur, both in medial and lateral views, where vascular canals expanded into the central area of the bone while, in control rats, these canals occurred only near the endosteal surfaces. Additionally, a smaller number of primary and secondary osteons was identified in Se group rats. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant increases for area, perimeter, maximum and minimum diameters of primary osteons’ vascular canals but significant reductions for all measured variables of Haversian canals and secondary osteons. Conclusions Se negatively affected the macroscopic and microscopic structures of femoral bone tissue in adult male rats. The results contribute to the knowledge on damaging impact of Se on bone. PMID:23369508

  16. Monitoring Healing Progression and Characterizing the Mechanical Environment in Preclinical Models for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Stephanie; Windolf, Markus; Henkel, Jan; Tavakoli, Aramesh; Schuetz, Michael A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Epari, Devakara R

    2015-12-15

    The treatment of large segmental bone defects remains a significant clinical challenge. Due to limitations surrounding the use of bone grafts, tissue-engineered constructs for the repair of large bone defects could offer an alternative. Before translation of any newly developed tissue engineering (TE) approach to the clinic, efficacy of the treatment must be shown in a validated preclinical large animal model. Currently, biomechanical testing, histology, and microcomputed tomography are performed to assess the quality and quantity of the regenerated bone. However, in vivo monitoring of the progression of healing is seldom performed, which could reveal important information regarding time to restoration of mechanical function and acceleration of regeneration. Furthermore, since the mechanical environment is known to influence bone regeneration, and limb loading of the animals can poorly be controlled, characterizing activity and load history could provide the ability to explain variability in the acquired data sets and potentially outliers based on abnormal loading. Many approaches have been devised to monitor the progression of healing and characterize the mechanical environment in fracture healing studies. In this article, we review previous methods and share results of recent work of our group toward developing and implementing a comprehensive biomechanical monitoring system to study bone regeneration in preclinical TE studies.

  17. Fabrication and characterization of strontium incorporated 3-D bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue from biosilica.

    PubMed

    Özarslan, Ali Can; Yücel, Sevil

    2016-11-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds that contain silica are high viable biomaterials as bone supporters for bone tissue engineering due to their bioactive behaviour in simulated body fluid (SBF). In the human body, these materials help inorganic bone structure formation due to a combination of the particular ratio of elements such as silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na) and phosphorus (P), and the doping of strontium (Sr) into the scaffold structure increases their bioactive behaviour. In this study, bioactive glass scaffolds were produced by using rice hull ash (RHA) silica and commercial silica based bioactive glasses. The structural properties of scaffolds such as pore size, porosity and also the bioactive behaviour were investigated. The results showed that undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds have better bioactivity than that of commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds. Moreover, undoped and Sr-doped RHA silica-based bioactive glass scaffolds will be able to be used instead of undoped and Sr-doped commercial silica based bioactive glass scaffolds for bone regeneration applications. Scaffolds that are produced from undoped or Sr-doped RHA silica have high potential to form new bone for bone defects in tissue engineering.

  18. Distribution of Lipid Formulations of Amphotericin B into Bone Marrow and Fat Tissue in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Andreas H.; Mickiene, Diana; Piscitelli, Stephen C.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of the three currently available lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) into bone marrow and fat tissue was evaluated in noninfected rabbits. Groups of four animals each received either 1 mg of AmB deoxycholate (D-AmB) per kg of body weight per day or 5 mg of AmB colloidal dispersion, AmB lipid complex, or liposomal AmB per kg per day for seven doses. Plasma, bone marrow, fat, and liver were collected at autopsy, and AmB concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. At the investigated dosages of 5 mg/kg/day, all AmB lipid formulations achieved at least fourfold-higher concentrations in bone marrow than did standard D-AmB at a dosage of 1 mg/kg/day. Concentrations in bone marrow were 62 to 76% of concurrent AmB concentrations in the liver. In contrast, all AmB formulations accumulated comparatively poorly in fat tissue. The results of this study show that high concentrations of AmB can be achieved in the bone marrow after administration of lipid formulations, suggesting their particular usefulness against disseminated fungal infections involving the bone marrow and against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:10639371

  19. Microfibril Orientation Dominates the Microelastic Properties of Human Bone Tissue at the Lamellar Length Scale

    PubMed Central

    Rupin, Fabienne; Raum, Kay; Peyrin, Françoise; Burghammer, Manfred; Saïed, Amena; Laugier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The elastic properties of bone tissue determine the biomechanical behavior of bone at the organ level. It is now widely accepted that the nanoscale structure of bone plays an important role to determine the elastic properties at the tissue level. Hence, in addition to the mineral density, the structure and organization of the mineral nanoparticles and of the collagen microfibrils appear as potential key factors governing the elasticity. Many studies exist on the role of the organization of collagen microfibril and mineral nanocrystals in strongly remodeled bone. However, there is no direct experimental proof to support the theoretical calculations. Here, we provide such evidence through a novel approach combining several high resolution imaging techniques: scanning acoustic microscopy, quantitative scanning small-Angle X-ray scattering imaging and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography. We find that the periodic modulations of elasticity across osteonal bone are essentially determined by the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and to a lesser extent only by the particle size and density. Based on the strong correlation between the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and the collagen molecules, we conclude that the microfibril orientation is the main determinant of the observed undulations of microelastic properties in regions of constant mineralization in osteonal lamellar bone. This multimodal approach could be applied to a much broader range of fibrous biological materials for the purpose of biomimetic technologies. PMID:23472132

  20. Design and Characterization of Calcium Phosphate Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Liisa T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our goal is to review design strategies for the fabrication of calcium phosphate ceramic scaffolds (CPS), in light of their transient role in bone tissue engineering and associated requirements for effective bone regeneration. Methods We examine the various design options available to meet mechanical and biological requirements of CPS and later focus on the importance of proper characterization of CPS in terms of architecture, mechanical properties and time-sensitive properties such as biodegradability. Finally, relationships between in vitro vs. in vivo testing are addressed, with an attempt to highlight reliable performance predictors. Results A combinatory design strategy should be used with CPS taking into consideration 3D architecture, adequate surface chemistry and topography, all of which are needed to promote bone formation. CPS represent the media of choice for delivery of osteogenic factors and anti-infectives. Non-osteoblast mediated mineral deposition can confound in vitro osteogenesis testing of CPS and therefore the expression of a variety of proteins or genes including collagen type I, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin should be confirmed in addition to increased mineral content. Conclusions CPS are a superior scaffold material for bone regeneration because they actively promote osteogenesis. Biodegradability of CPS via calcium and phosphate release represents a unique asset. Structural control of CPS at the macro, micro and nanoscale and their combination with cells and polymeric materials is likely to lead to significant developments in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26423007

  1. Pre-implanted Sensory Nerve Could Enhance the Neurotization in Tissue-Engineered Bone Graft.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Jing, Da; Ouyang, Hongwei; Li, Liang; Zhai, Mingming; Li, Yan; Bi, Long; Guoxian, Pei

    2015-08-01

    In our previous study, it was found that implanting the sensory nerve tract into the tissue-engineered bone to repair large bone defects can significantly result in better osteogenesis effect than tissue-engineered bone graft (TEBG) alone. To study the behavior of the preimplanted sensory nerve in the TEBG, the TEBG was constructed by seeding bone mesenchymal stem cells into β-tricalcium phosphate scaffold with (treatment group) or without (blank group) implantation of the sensory nerve. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which helps in the healing of bone defect in the treatment group was significantly higher than the blank group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), which might be expressed during nerve healing in the treatment group, was significantly higher than the blank group at 4 and 8 weeks. The nerve tracts of the preimplanted sensory nerve were found in the scaffold by the nerve tracing technique. The implanted sensory nerve tracts grew into the pores of scaffolds much earlier than the vascular. The implanted sensory nerve tracts traced by Dil could be observed at 4 weeks, but at the same time, no vascular was observed. In conclusion, the TEBG could be benefited from the preimplanted sensory nerve through the healing behavior of the sensory nerve. The sensory nerve fibers could grow into the pores of the TEBG rapidly, and increase the expression of CGRP, which is helpful in regulating the bone formation and the blood flow.

  2. Expression of transforming growth factor-β2in vitreous body and adjacent tissues during prenatal development of human eye.

    PubMed

    Sukhikh, G T; Panova, I G; Smirnova, Yu A; Milyushina, L A; Firsova, N V; Markitantova, Yu V; Poltavtseva, R A; Zinov'eva, R D

    2010-12-01

    Expression of transforming growth factor-β2 was detected by PCR in the vitreous body, lens, retina, and ciliary-iris complex of human eye at early stages of fetal development. Immunochemical assay of the corresponding protein in eye tissues revealed a correlation between the localization of transforming growth factor-β2 and the development of intraocular hyaloid vascular network, its regression, formation of the vitreous body, and development of definite retinal vessels.

  3. Mechanisms of fluid-flow-induced matrix production in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Morris, H L; Reed, C I; Haycock, J W; Reilly, G C

    2010-12-01

    Matrix production by tissue-engineered bone is enhanced when the growing tissue is subjected to mechanical forces and/or fluid flow in bioreactor culture. Cells deposit collagen and mineral, depending upon the mechanical loading that they receive. However, the molecular mechanisms of flow-induced signal transduction in bone are poorly understood. The hyaluronan (HA) glycocalyx has been proposed as a potential mediator of mechanical forces in bone. Using a parallel-plate flow chamber the effects of removal of HA on flow-induced collagen production and NF-kappaB activation in MLO-A5 osteoid osteocytes were investigated. Short periods of fluid flow significantly increased collagen production and induced translocation of the NF-kappaB subunit p65 to the cell's nuclei in 65 per cent of the cell population. Enzymatic removal of the HA coat and antibody blocking of CD44 (a transmembrane protein that binds to HA) eliminated the fluid-flow-induced increase in collagen production but had no effect on the translocation of p65. HA and CD44 appear to play roles in transducing the flow signals that modulate collagen production over long-term culture but not in the short-term flow-induced activation of NF-kappaB, implying that multiple signalling events are initiated from the commencement of flow. Understanding the mechanotransduction events that enable fluid flow to stimulate bone matrix production will allow the optimization of bioreactor design and flow profiles for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Synchrotron imaging techniques for bone and cartilage tissue engineering: potential, current trends, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Olubamiji, Adeola Deborah; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chen, Daniel Xiongbiao

    2014-10-01

    Biomedical imaging is crucial to the success of bone/cartilage tissue engineering (TE) by providing detailed three-dimensional information on tissue-engineered scaffolds and associated bone/cartilage growth during the healing process. Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based biomedical imaging is an emerging technique for this purpose that has been drawing considerable recent attention. Due to the unique properties of synchrotron light, SR biomedical imaging can provide information that conventional X-ray imaging is not able to capture. SR biomedical imaging techniques notably differ from conventional imaging in both physics and implementation, thus varying with regard to both capability and popularity for biomedical imaging applications. In the earlier decade, synchrotron-based imaging was used in bone/cartilage TE to characterize bone/cartilage scaffolds and tissues as well as the varying degrees of success in reconstruction. However, several key issues should be addressed through research before SR biomedical imaging can be advanced to a noninvasive method for application to live animals and eventually to human patients. This review briefly presents recent developments in this area, focusing on different synchrotron-based biomedical imaging techniques and their advantages and limitations, as well as reported applications to bone and cartilage TE. Key issues and challenges are also identified and discussed along with recommendations for future research.

  5. Development of bioactive porous α-TCP/HAp beads for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Teruo; Ohtake, Shoji; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Tamura, Akito; Ushida, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Porous beads of bioactive ceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HAp) and tribasic calcium phosphate (TCP) are considered a promising scaffold for cultivating bone cells. To realize this, α-TCP/HAp functionally graded porous beads are fabricated with two main purposes: to maintain the function of the scaffold with sufficient strength up to the growth of new bone, and is absorbed completely after the growth. HAp is a bioactive material that has both high strength and strong tissue-adhesive properties, but is not readily absorbed by the human body. On the contrary, α-TCP is highly bioabsorbable, resulting in a scaffold that is absorbed before it is completely replaced by bone. In this study, we produced porous, bead-shaped carriers as scaffolds for osteoblast culture. To control the solubility in vivo, the fabricated beads contained α-TCP at the center and HAp at the surface. Cell adaptability of these beads for bone tissue engineering was confirmed in vitro. It was found that α-TCP/HAp bead carriers exhibit low toxicity in the initial stages of cell seeding and cell adhesion. The presence of HAp in the composite bead form effectively increased ALP activity. In conclusion, it is suggested that these newly developed α-TCP/HAp beads are a promising tool for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Surface-mediated bone tissue morphogenesis from tunable nanolayered implant coatings*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Moskowitz, Joshua S.; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Morton, Stephen W.; Seeherman, Howard J.; Padera, Robert F.; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    The functional success of a biomedical implant critically depends on its stable bonding with the host tissue. Aseptic implant loosening accounts for over half of all joint replacement failures. Various materials, including metals and plastic, confer mechanical integrity to the device, but often these materials are not suitable for direct integration with the host tissue, which leads to implant loosening and patient morbidity. We describe a self-assembled, osteogenic, polymer-based conformal coating that promotes stable mechanical fixation of an implant in a surrogate rodent model. A single modular, polymer-based multilayered coating was deposited using a water-based layer-by-layer approach, by which each element was introduced on the surface in nanoscale layers. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite (HAP) and osteoinductive bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) contained within the nanostructured coating acted synergistically to induce osteoblastic differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells within the bone marrow, without indications of a foreign body response. The tuned release of BMP-2, controlled by a hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester), was essential for tissue regeneration and, in the presence of HAP, the modular coating encouraged the direct deposition of highly cohesive trabecular bone on the implant surface. The bone-implant interfacial tensile strength was significantly higher than standard bone cement, did not fracture at the interface, and had long-term stability. Collectively, these results suggest that the multilayered coating system promotes biological fixation of orthopedic and dental implants to improve surgical outcomes by preventing loosening and premature failure. PMID:23803705

  7. Natural marine sponges for bone tissue engineering: The state of art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Granito, Renata Neves; Custódio, Márcio Reis; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2016-05-10

    Marine life and its rich biodiversity provide a plentiful resource of potential new products for the society. Remarkably, marine organisms still remain a largely unexploited resource for biotechnology applications. Among them, marine sponges are sessile animals from the phylum Porifera dated at least from 580 million years ago. It is known that molecules from marine sponges present a huge therapeutic potential in a wide range of applications mainly due to its antitumor, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotic effects. In this context, this article reviews all the information available in the literature about the potential of the use of marine sponges for bone tissue engineering applications. First, one of the properties that make sponges interesting as bone substitutes is their structural characteristics. Most species have an efficient interconnected porous architecture, which allows them to process a significant amount of water and facilitates the flow of fluids, mimicking an ideal bone scaffold. Second, sponges have an organic component, the spongin, which is analogous to vertebral collagen, the most widely used natural polymer for tissue regeneration. Last, osteogenic properties of marine sponges is also highlighted by their mineral content, such as biosilica and other compounds, that are able to support cell growth and to stimulate bone formation and mineralization. This review focuses on recent studies concerning these interesting properties, as well as on some challenges to be overcome in the bone tissue engineering field. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  8. Prediction of Local Ultimate Strain and Toughness of Trabecular Bone Tissue by Raman Material Composition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stüssi, Edgar; Müller, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that bone mineral density correlates with fracture risk at the population level but does not correlate with individual fracture risk well. Current research aims to better understand the failure mechanism of bone and to identify key determinants of bone quality, thus improving fracture risk prediction. To get a better understanding of bone strength, it is important to analyze tissue-level properties not influenced by macro- or microarchitectural factors. The aim of this pilot study was to identify whether and to what extent material properties are correlated with mechanical properties at the tissue level. The influence of macro- or microarchitectural factors was excluded by testing individual trabeculae. Previously reported data of mechanical parameters measured in single trabeculae under tension and bending and its compositional properties measured by Raman spectroscopy was evaluated. Linear and multivariate regressions show that bone matrix quality but not quantity was significantly and independently correlated with the tissue-level ultimate strain and postyield work (r = 0.65–0.94). Principal component analysis extracted three independent components explaining 86% of the total variance, representing elastic, yield, and ultimate components according to the included mechanical parameters. Some matrix parameters were both included in the ultimate component, indicating that the variation in ultimate strain and postyield work could be largely explained by Raman-derived compositional parameters. PMID:25695083

  9. Metal debris concentrations in soft tissues adjacent to loosened femoral stems is higher in uncemented than cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are still many questions related to aseptic femoral stem loosening. Systemic and local immune responses to the implanted “foreign body” is one of the reasons for loosening. The purpose of the study was to measure metal ion concentration (Ti, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Al) around loosened femoral stems and compare their levels around uncemented and cemented implants. Methods This paper reports 50 hips operated for isolated stem loosening, in 50 patients at the mean age of 57 years (from 21 to 87). There were 25 cemented (Co,Cr29,Mo,Ni) and 25 uncemented (Ti, Al) stems. The mean follow-up from primary hip replacement to revision was 10.1 years (from 0.5 to 17). During the procedure, scar tissue around the stem was taken for analysis of metal ions. Results The concentrations of titanium and aluminium in soft tissues around uncemented loosened stems were higher than cemented ones (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between both types of stems in terms of ions of the metal of which cemented implants had been made of (Co, Cr, Mo, Ni). Conclusions In soft tissue around a loosened stem, the concentrations of metal ions from implants are much higher in case of uncemented stems than of cemented ones. Metal ions from vitalium femoral heads were found around uncemented stems in similar values to cemented streams. PMID:25098913

  10. Poly(caprolactone) based magnetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañobre-López, M.; Piñeiro-Redondo, Y.; De Santis, R.; Gloria, A.; Ambrosio, L.; Tampieri, A.; Dediu, V.; Rivas, J.

    2011-04-01

    Synthetic scaffolds for tissue engineering coupled to stem cells represent a promising approach aiming to promote the regeneration of large defects of damaged tissues or organs. Magnetic nanocomposites formed by a biodegradable poly(caprolactone) (PCL) matrix and superparamagnetic iron doped hydroxyapatite (FeHA) nanoparticles at different PCL/FeHA compositions have been successfully prototyped, layer on layer, through 3D bioplotting. Magnetic measurements, mechanical testing, and imaging were carried out to calibrate both model and technological processing in the magnetized scaffold prototyping. An amount of 10% w/w of magnetic FeHA nanoparticles represents a reinforcement for PCL matrix, however, a reduction of strain at failure is also observed. Energy loss (absorption) measurements under a radio-frequency applied magnetic field were performed in the resulting magnetic scaffolds and very promising heating properties were observed, making them very useful for potential biomedical applications.

  11. Selective Laser Sintering of Polycaprolactone Bone Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    design goals for tissue engineering scaffolds (i.e. need to create strong, stiff structures incorporating high levels of porosity ). They typically... porosity ). Ease of part break-out is a qualitative measure of the effort involved in removing the support powder surrounding a completed part. This...sectional photomicrographs of each base and scaffold structure using ImageJ (http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij/) image analysis software. Thresholding operations

  12. An in vitro 3D bone metastasis model by using a human bone tissue culture and human sex-related cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Salamanna, Francesca; Borsari, Veronica; Brogini, Silvia; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Cepollaro, Simona; Cadossi, Matteo; Martini, Lucia; Mazzotti, Antonio; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    One of the main limitations, when studying cancer-bone metastasis, is the complex nature of the native bone environment and the lack of reliable, simple, inexpensive models that closely mimic the biological processes occurring in patients and allowing the correct translation of results. To enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying human bone metastases and in order to find new therapies, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) cancer-bone metastasis model by culturing human breast or prostate cancer cells with human bone tissue isolated from female and male patients, respectively. Bone tissue discarded from total hip replacement surgery was cultured in a rolling apparatus system in a normoxic or hypoxic environment. Gene expression profile, protein levels, histological, immunohistochemical and four-dimensional (4D) micro-CT analyses showed a noticeable specificity of breast and prostate cancer cells for bone colonization and ingrowth, thus highlighting the species-specific and sex-specific osteotropism and the need to widen the current knowledge on cancer-bone metastasis spread in human bone tissues. The results of this study support the application of this model in preclinical studies on bone metastases and also follow the 3R principles, the guiding principles, aimed at replacing/reducing/refining (3R) animal use and their suffering for scientific purposes. PMID:27765913

  13. Hydroxyapatite reinforced inherent RGD containing silk fibroin composite scaffolds: Promising platform for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sibaram; Naskar, Deboki; Sapru, Sunaina; Bhattacharjee, Promita; Dey, Tuli; Ghosh, Ananta K; Mandal, Mahitosh; Kundu, Subhas C

    2017-03-08

    Replacement and repair of ectopic bone defects and traumatized bone tissues are done using porous scaffolds and composites. The prerequisites for such scaffolds include high mechanical strength, osseoconductivity and cytocompatibility. The present work is designed to address such requirements by fabricating a reinforced cytocompatible scaffold. Biocompatible silk protein fibroin collected from tropical non-mulberry tasar silkworm (Antheraea mylitta) is used to fabricate fibroin-hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocomposite particles using chemical precipitation method. In situ reinforcement of fibroin-HAp nanocomposite and external deposition of HAp particles on fibroin scaffold is carried out for comparative evaluations of bio-physical and biochemical characteristics. HAp deposited fibroin scaffolds provide greater mechanical strength and cytocompatibility, when compared with fibroin-HAp nanoparticles reinforced fibroin scaffolds. Minimal immune responses of both types of composite scaffolds are observed using osteoblast-macrophage co-culture model. Nanocomposite reinforced fibroin scaffold can be tailored further to accommodate different requirements depending on bone type or bone regeneration period.

  14. Quantitative analysis of the reconstruction errors of the currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography at the interfaces of adjacent tissues.

    PubMed

    Duan, Song; Xu, Chao; Deng, Guanhua; Wang, Jiajia; Liu, Feng; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2016-06-01

    This work quantitatively analyzed the reconstruction errors (REs) of electrical property (EP) images using a currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT), which occurred along the tissue interfaces. Transmitted magnetic fields B1+ were acquired at 3 T using a birdcage coil loaded with a phantom consisting of various adjacent tissues. Homogeneous Helmholtz was employed to calculate the EP maps by Laplacian computation of central differences. The maps of absolute REs (aREs) and relative REs (rREs) were calculated. The maximum and mean rREs, in addition to rRE distributions at the interfaces, were presented. Reconstructed EP maps showed various REs along different interface boundaries. Among all the investigated tissue interfaces, the kidney-fat interface presented the maximum mean rREs for both conductivity and relative permittivity. The minimum mean rRE of conductivity was observed at the spleen-muscle interface, and the minimum mean rRE of relative permittivity was detected along the lung-heart interface. The mean rREs ranged from 0.3986 to 36.11 for conductivity and 0.2218 to 11.96 for relative permittivity. Overall, this research indicates that different REs occur at various tissue boundaries, as shown by the currently popular algorithm of MREPT. Thus, REs should be considered when applying MREPT to reconstruct the EP distributions inside the human body. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Laboratory and in vivo transport characterization of hollow fiber membranes and adjacent scar tissue that forms following their implantation in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Michael John

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) cell encapsulation devices use a semipermeable membrane to physically immunoisolate transplanted secretory cells from host tissues and high molecular weight solutes. Advantages inherent to macroencapsulation technology have led to extensive research towards their utilization for treating a wide range of disorders including a number of neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. Although feasibility studies have already established the therapeutic potential of macroencapsulation technology, a common observation among these and later studies is diminishing therapeutic efficacy over a span of a few weeks following implantation of devices. Progress towards fulfilling the therapeutic potential of this technology initially recognized by investigators has potentially been hampered by inadequate diffusive transport characterization of membranes employed in studies. In addition, the potential effects of host tissue responses following central nervous system (CNS) implantation of these devices is completely unknown. To address these issues a membrane characterization instrument capable of efficiently characterizing the diffusive and convective transport properties of individual HFM segments, such as they are used in devices, was developed. The instrument was then employed to study the effects of ethanol exposure, a common sterilization method, on PAN-PVC membranes commonly used in CNS implantation macro encapsulation device studies. Lastly, the solute diffusivity properties of tissue that forms adjacent to the membranes of brain implanted transcranial access devices were investigated. Coinciding with this investigation was the development of a novel technique for examining the solute diffusivity properties in the extracellular spaces of CNS tissue.

  16. Conception on the cell mechanisms of bone tissue loss under spase flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Oganov, Victor; Kabitskaya, Olga

    Basing on the analysis of available literature and the results of our own electron microscopic and radioautographic researches the data are presented about the morpho-functional peculiarities and succession of cellular interactions in adaptive remodeling of bone structures under normal conditions and after exposure of animals (rats, monkeys, mice) to microgravity (SLS-2, Bion-11, BionM-1). The probable cellular mechanisms of the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis are considered. Our conception on remodeling proposes the following sequence in the development of cellular interactions after decrease of the mechanical loading: a primary response of osteocytes (mechanosensory cells) to the mechanical stimulus; osteocytic remodeling (osteolysis); transmission of the mechanical signals through a system of canals and processes to functionally active osteoblasts and surface osteocytes as well as to the bone-marrow stromal cells and to those lying on bone surfaces. As a response to the mechanical stimulus (microgravity) the system of stromal cell-preosteoblast-osteoblast shows a delay in proliferation, differentiation and specific functioning of the osteogenetic cells, some of the osteoblasts undergo apoptosis. Then the osteoclastic reaction occurs (attraction of monocytes and formation of osteoclasts and bone matrix resorption in the loci of apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes). The macrophagal reaction is followed by osteoblastogenesis, which appears to be a rehabilitating process. However, during prolonged absence of mechanical stimuli (microgravity, long-time immobilization) the adaptive activization of osteoblastogenesis doesn’t occur (as it is the case during the physiological remodeling of bone tissue) or it occurs to a smaller degree. The loading deficit leads to an adaptive differentiation of stromal cells to fibroblastic cells and adipocytes in these remodeling loci. These cell reactions are considered as adaptive-compensatory, but they don’t result

  17. The contribution of bone and cartilage to the near-infrared spectrum of osteochondral tissue

    PubMed Central

    McGoverin, Cushla M.; Lewis, Karl; Yang, Xu; Bostrom, Mathias P. G.; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been utilized to assess hyaline cartilage quality in human and animal osteochondral tissues. However, due to the lack of NIR signal from bone phosphate, and the relatively deep penetration depth of the radiation, the separate contributions of cartilage and bone to the spectral signatures have not been well defined. The objectives of the current study were 1) to improve the understanding of the contributions of bone and cartilage to NIR spectra acquired from osteochondral tissue, and 2) to assess the ability of this non-destructive method to predict cartilage thickness and modified Mankin grade of human tibial plateau articular cartilage. NIR spectra were acquired from samples of bovine bone and cartilage with varying thicknesses, and from twenty-two tibial plateaus harvested from patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Spectra were recorded from regions of the tibial plateaus with varying degrees of degradation, and the cartilage thickness and modified Mankin grade of these regions were assessed histologically. Spectra from bone and cartilage samples of known thicknesses were investigated to identify spectral regions that were distinct for these two tissues. Univariate and multivariate linear regression methods were used to correlate modified Mankin grade and cartilage thickness with NIR spectral changes. The ratio of the NIR absorbances associated with water at 5270 and 7085 cm−1 were the best differentiator of cartilage and bone spectra. NIR prediction models for thickness and Mankin grade calculated using partial least squares regression were more accurate than univariate-based prediction models, with root mean square errors of cross validation of 0.42 mm (thickness) and 1.3 (modified Mankin grade), respectively. We conclude that NIR spectroscopy may be used to simultaneously assess articular cartilage thickness and modified Mankin grade, based in part on differences in spectral contributions from bone and cartilage

  18. Recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to periodontal tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Komaki, Motohiro; Iwasaki, Kengo; Sata, Masataka; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) are considered to be a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in adults and are known to be effective in periodontal tissue regeneration. However, whether endogenous BMCs are involved in periodontal tissue repair process is uncertain. We therefore created periodontal tissue defects in the buccal alveolar bone of mandibular first molars in bone marrow chimeric mice, and immunohistochemically examined the expression of stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and the mobilization of BMCs. We found that SDF-1 expression was increased around the defects at as early as 1 week after injury and that BMCs were mobilized to the defects, while GFP+/CD45+ were rarely observed. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the number of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (pdgfr) α+/Sca-1+ (PαS) cells in the bone marrow decreased after injury. Taken together, these results suggest that BMCs are mobilized to the periodontal tissue defects. Recruitment of BMCs, including a subset of MSCs could be a new target of periodontal treatment. PMID:25364726

  19. [Use of mesenchymal stem cells for reparative processes activation in bone jaw tissue in experimental conditions].

    PubMed

    Volozhin, A I; Vasil'ev, A Iu; Malyginov, N N; Bulanova, I M; Grigor''ian, A S; Kiseleva, E V; Cherniaev, S E; Tarasenko, I V

    2010-01-01

    In experiment on 12 Chinchilla rabbits dynamics of reparative regeneration was studied at the terms 2 and 4 months. Bone defect in mandible corner was closed by osteoplastic material Gapkol which was covered from inside by allogenic or autologic stem cells received from rabbit adipose tissue. The results of the ray tracing methods of study were verified by SEM and histological methods.

  20. Osteogenic cells on bio-inspired materials for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vagaská, B; Bacáková, L; Filová, E; Balík, K

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the development of artificial bone substitutes from their older single-phase forms to novel multi-phase composites, mimicking the composition and architecture of natural bone tissue. The new generation of bone implants should be bioactive, i.e. they should induce the desired cellular responses, leading to integration of the material into the natural tissue and stimulating self-healing processes. Therefore, the first part of the review explains the common principles of the cell-material interaction and summarizes the strategies how to improve the biocompatibility and bioactivity of the materials by modifying the physico-chemical properties of the material surface, such as surface chemistry, wettability, electrical charge, rigidity, microroughness and especially nanoroughness. The latter has been shown to stimulate preferentially the growth of osteoblasts in comparison with other competitive cell types, such as fibroblasts, which could prevent fibrous tissue formation upon implantation. The second more specialized part of the review deals with materials suitable for bone contact and substitution, particularly novel polymer-based composites reinforced with fibres or inorganic particles and containing bioactive components, such as crystals of hydroxyapatite or other calcium phosphates, synthetic ligands for cell adhesion receptors or growth factors. Moreover, if they are degradable, they can be gradually replaced with a regenerating tissue.

  1. Activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against bone and soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sangiolo, Dario; Mesiano, Giulia; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Aglietta, Massimo; Grignani, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are T lymphocytes expanded ex vivo that are endowed with MHC-independent tumoricidal activity. We have recently demonstrated, in a preclinical setting, that CIK cells are active against autologous bone and soft tissue sarcomas. In particular, CIK cells killed a putative sarcoma stem cell population that may underlie disease relapse and chemoresistance. PMID:25050197

  2. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells in the field of bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Cecilia; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering represents one of the most challenging emergent fields for scientists and clinicians. Current failures of autografts and allografts in many pathological conditions have prompted researchers to find new biomaterials able to promote bone repair or regeneration with specific characteristics of biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoinductivity. Recent advancements for tissue regeneration in bone defects have occurred by following the diamond concept and combining the use of growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In particular, a more abundant and easily accessible source of MSCs was recently discovered in adipose tissue. These adipose stem cells (ASCs) can be obtained in large quantities with little donor site morbidity or patient discomfort, in contrast to the invasive and painful isolation of bone marrow MSCs. The osteogenic potential of ASCs on scaffolds has been examined in cell cultures and animal models, with only a few cases reporting the use of ASCs for successful reconstruction or accelerated healing of defects of the skull and jaw in patients. Although these reports extend our limited knowledge concerning the use of ASCs for osseous tissue repair and regeneration, the lack of standardization in applied techniques makes the comparison between studies difficult. Additional clinical trials are needed to assess ASC therapy and address potential ethical and safety concerns, which must be resolved to permit application in regenerative medicine. PMID:24772241

  3. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells in the field of bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Cecilia; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-04-26

    Bone tissue engineering represents one of the most challenging emergent fields for scientists and clinicians. Current failures of autografts and allografts in many pathological conditions have prompted researchers to find new biomaterials able to promote bone repair or regeneration with specific characteristics of biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoinductivity. Recent advancements for tissue regeneration in bone defects have occurred by following the diamond concept and combining the use of growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In particular, a more abundant and easily accessible source of MSCs was recently discovered in adipose tissue. These adipose stem cells (ASCs) can be obtained in large quantities with little donor site morbidity or patient discomfort, in contrast to the invasive and painful isolation of bone marrow MSCs. The osteogenic potential of ASCs on scaffolds has been examined in cell cultures and animal models, with only a few cases reporting the use of ASCs for successful reconstruction or accelerated healing of defects of the skull and jaw in patients. Although these reports extend our limited knowledge concerning the use of ASCs for osseous tissue repair and regeneration, the lack of standardization in applied techniques makes the comparison between studies difficult. Additional clinical trials are needed to assess ASC therapy and address potential ethical and safety concerns, which must be resolved to permit application in regenerative medicine.

  4. Effect of microstructure on micromechanical performance of dry cortical bone tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua

    2009-12-15

    The mechanical properties of bone depend on composition and structure. Previous studies have focused on macroscopic fracture behavior of bone. In the present study, we performed microindentation studies to understand the deformation properties and microcrack-microstructure interactions of dry cortical bone. Dry cortical bone tissues from lamb femurs were tested using Vickers indentation with loads of 0.245-9.8 N. We examined the effect of bone microstructure on deformation and crack propagation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed the significant effect of cortical bone microstructure on indentation deformation and microcrack propagation. The indentation deformation of the dry cortical bone was basically plastic at any applied load with a pronounced viscoelastic recovery, in particular at lower loads. More microcracks up to a length of approximately 20 {mu}m occurred when the applied load was increased. At loads of 4.9 N and higher, most microcracks were found to develop from the boundaries of haversian canals, osteocyte lacunae and canaliculi. Some microcracks propagated from the parallel direction of the longitudinal interstitial lamellae. At loads 0.45 N and lower, no visible microcracks were observed.

  5. Local electronic structure and nanolevel hierarchical organization of bone tissue: theory and NEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlychev, A. A.; Avrunin, A. S.; Vinogradov, A. S.; Filatova, E. O.; Doctorov, A. A.; Krivosenko, Yu S.; Samoilenko, D. O.; Svirskiy, G. I.; Konashuk, A. S.; Rostov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of native bone are carried out to understand relationships between its hierarchical organization and local electronic and atomic structure of the mineralized phase. The 3D superlattice model of a coplanar assembly of the hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocrystallites separated by the hydrated nanolayers is introduced to account the interplay of short-, long- and super-range order parameters in bone tissue. The model is applied to (i) predict and rationalize the HAP-to-bone spectral changes in the electronic structure and (ii) describe the mechanisms ensuring the link of the hierarchical organization with the electronic structure of the mineralized phase in bone. To check the predictions the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) at the Ca 2p, P 2p and O 1s thresholds is measured for native bone and compared with NEXAFS for reference compounds. The NEXAFS analysis has demonstrated the essential hierarchy induced HAP-to-bone red shifts of the Ca and P 2p-to-valence transitions. The lowest O 1s excitation line at 532.2 eV in bone is assigned with superposition of core transitions in the hydroxide OH-(H2O) m anions, Ca2+(H2O) n cations, the carboxyl groups inside the collagen and [PO4]2- and [PO4]- anions with unsaturated P-O bonds.

  6. Contribution of mineral to bone structural behavior and tissue mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Eve; Chen, Dan X; Boskey, Adele L; Baker, Shefford P; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2010-11-01

    Bone geometry and tissue material properties jointly govern whole-bone structural behavior. While the role of geometry in structural behavior is well characterized, the contribution of the tissue material properties is less clear, partially due to the multiple tissue constituents and hierarchical levels at which these properties can be characterized. Our objective was to elucidate the contribution of the mineral phase to bone mechanical properties across multiple length scales, from the tissue material level to the structural level. Vitamin D and calcium deficiency in 6-week-old male rats was employed as a model of reduced mineral content with minimal collagen changes. The structural properties of the humeri were measured in three-point bending and related to the mineral content and geometry from microcomputed tomography. Whole-cortex and local bone tissue properties were examined with infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation to understand the role of altered mineral content on the constituent material behavior. Structural stiffness (-47%) and strength (-50%) were reduced in vitamin D-deficient (-D) humeri relative to controls. Moment of inertia (-38%), tissue mineral density (TMD, -9%), periosteal mineralization (-28%), and IR mineral:matrix ratio (-19%) were reduced in -D cortices. Thus, both decreased tissue mineral content and changes in cortical geometry contributed to impaired skeletal load-bearing function. In fact, 97% of the variability in humeral strength was explained by moment of inertia, TMD, and IR mineral:matrix ratio. The strong relationships between structural properties and cortical material composition demonstrate a critical role of the microscale material behavior in skeletal load-bearing performance.

  7. [Bone lengthening and soft tissue correction using the Ilizarov technique].

    PubMed

    Schiessel, A; Windhager, R; Fellinger, E; Kotz, R

    1998-05-22

    From March 1989 to September 1995 at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the Vienna General Hospital 31 limb-lengthenings or corrections of the soft-tissue (contractions of joints, clubfeet) using the Ilizarov method were performed. 15 patients have already finished growth. All complications were analysed according to Paley's classification. The tibia-group (n=13) reached an average lengthening of 3.5 cm (2-5.7 cm) [16% (6-35%) of the initial length] with a healing index of 1.7 mo/cm and a complication rate of 42%. In the femur-group (n=8) a mean lengthening of 5.4 cm (2.5-9.4 cm) [21% (7-34%) of the initial length] could be achieved with a healing rate of 1.3 mo/cm and a complication rate of 40%. The ulna-group (n=3) reached an average lengthening of 2.6 cm (2.2-3.4 cm) [21% (17-24%) or the initial length] with a healing index of 1.4 mo/cm and a complication rate of 17%. The knee contracture group (n=2) was free of complications. The Ilizarov technique has been performed successfully in a high percentage although extensive elongations reported by Ilizarov could not be achieved neither by us nor by other authors. The above-mentioned method has been proved to be efficient and successful to correct deformities of the soft-tissue.

  8. The effects of corrosive substances on human bone, teeth, hair, nails, and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Kristen M; Fulginiti, Laura C; Di Modica, Frank

    2011-07-01

    This research investigates the effects of household chemicals on human tissues. Five different human tissues (bone, tooth, hair, fingernails, and skin/muscle/fat) were immersed into six different corrosive agents. These agents consisted of hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, lye, bleach, organic septic cleaner, and Coca-Cola(®) soda. Tap water was used as a control. Tissue samples were cut to consistent sizes and submerged in the corrosive liquids. Over time, the appearance, consistency, and weight were documented. Hydrochloric acid was the most destructive agent in this study, consuming most tissues within 24 h. Sulfuric acid was the second most destructive agent in this study. Bleach, lye, and cola had no structural effects on the hard tissues of the body, but did alter the appearance or integrity of the hair, nails, or flesh in some way. The organic septic cleaner and tap water had no effect on any of the human tissue tested during the timeframe of the study.

  9. Effect of allogenic freeze-dried demineralized bone matrix on guided tissue regeneration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Caplanis, N; Lee, M B; Zimmerman, G J; Selvig, K A; Wikesjö, U M

    1998-08-01

    This randomized, split-mouth study was designed to evaluate the adjunctive effect of allogenic, freeze-dried, demineralized bone matrix (DBM) to guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Contralateral fenestration defects (6 x 4 mm) were created 6 mm apical to the buccal alveolar crest on maxillary canine teeth in 6 beagle dogs. DBM was implanted into one randomly selected fenestration defect. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membranes were used to provide bilateral GTR. Tissue blocks including defects with overlying membranes and soft tissues were harvested following a four-week healing interval and prepared for histometric analysis. Differences between GTR+DBM and GTR defects were evaluated using a paired t-test (N = 6). DBM was discernible in all GTR+DBM defects with limited, if any, evidence of bone metabolic activity. Rather, the DBM particles appeared solidified within a dense connective tissue matrix, often in close contact to the instrumented root. There were no statistically significant differences between the GTR+DBM versus the GTR condition for any histometric parameter examined. Fenestration defect height averaged 3.7+/-0.3 and 3.9+/-0.3 mm, total bone regeneration 0.8+/-0.6 and 1.5+/-0.8 mm, and total cementum regeneration 2.0+/-1.3 and 1.6+/-1.7 mm for GTR+DBM and GTR defects, respectively. The histologic and histometric observations, in concert, suggest that allogenic freeze-dried DBM has no adjunctive effect to GTR in periodontal fenestration defects over a four-week healing interval. The critical findings were 1) the DBM particles remained, embedded in dense connective tissue without evidence of bone metabolic activity; and 2) limited and similar amounts of bone and cementum regeneration were observed for both the GTR+DBM and GTR defects.

  10. Bioactive glass/polymer composite scaffolds mimicking bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Piergiorgio; Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Chiono, Valeria; Ferretti, Concetta; Baino, Francesco; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Pashkuleva, Iva; Reis, Rui L; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was the preparation and characterization of scaffolds with mechanical and functional properties able to regenerate bone. Porous scaffolds made of chitosan/gelatin (POL) blends containing different amounts of a bioactive glass (CEL2), as inorganic material stimulating biomineralization, were fabricated by freeze-drying. Foams with different compositions (CEL2/POL 0/100; 40/60; 70/30 wt %/wt) were prepared. Samples were crosslinked using genipin (GP) to improve mechanical strength and thermal stability. The scaffolds were characterized in terms of their stability in water, chemical structure, morphology, bioactivity, and mechanical behavior. Moreover, MG63 osteoblast-like cells and periosteal-derived stem cells were used to assess their biocompatibility. CEL2/POL samples showed interconnected pores having an average diameter ranging from 179 ± 5 μm for CEL2/POL 0/100 to 136 ± 5 μm for CEL2/POL 70/30. GP-crosslinking and the increase of CEL2 amount stabilized the composites to water solution (shown by swelling tests). In addition, the SBF soaking experiment showed a good bioactivity of the scaffold with 30 and 70 wt % CEL2. The compressive modulus increased by increasing CEL2 amount up to 2.1 ± 0.1 MPa for CEL2/POL 70/30. Dynamical mechanical analysis has evidenced that composite scaffolds at low frequencies showed an increase of storage and loss modulus with increasing frequency; furthermore, a drop of E' and E″ at 1 Hz was observed, and for higher frequencies both moduli increased again. Cells displayed a good ability to interact with the different tested scaffolds which did not modify cell metabolic activity at the analyzed points. MTT test proved only a slight difference between the two cytotypes analyzed.

  11. Free bone graft reconstruction of irradiated facial tissue: Experimental effects of basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, B.L.; Connolly, D.T.; Winkelmann, T.; Sadove, A.M.; Heuvelman, D.; Feder, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential utility of basic fibroblast growth factor in the induction of angiogenesis and osseous healing in bone previously exposed to high doses of irradiation. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were evaluated by introducing basic fibroblast growth factor into irradiated mandibular resection sites either prior to or simultaneous with reconstruction by corticocancellous autografts harvested from the ilium. The fate of the free bone grafts was then evaluated at 90 days postoperatively by microangiographic, histologic, and fluorochrome bone-labeling techniques. Sequestration, necrosis, and failure to heal to recipient osseous margins was observed both clinically and histologically in all nontreated irradiated graft sites as well as those receiving simultaneous angiogenic stimulation at the time of graft placement. No fluorescent activity was seen in these graft groups. In the recipient sites pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor prior to placement of the graft, healing and reestablishment of mandibular contour occurred in nearly 50 percent of the animals. Active bone formation was evident at cortical margins adjacent to the recipient sites but was absent in the more central cancellous regions of the grafts.

  12. The influence of caffeine on the biomechanical properties of bone tissue during pregnancy in a population of rats.

    PubMed

    Olchowik, Grażyna; Chadaj-Polberg, Emilia; Tomaszewski, Marek; Polberg, Mateusz; Tomaszewska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    The influence of pregnancy on bone tissue metabolism is not completely understood. Caffeine also has a potentially negative influence on bones. The aim of this study was the evaluation of changes in the bones of pregnant rats under the influence of caffeine. The experiment was carried out on Wistar rats. The evaluation of rats' bone tissue quality was performed based on bone density measurements and resistance examinations. It analyzed the impact of caffeine on the degree of bone tissue mineralization and the composition of the bones. The mean value of pelvises 'wet' and 'dry' densities in a group of pregnant rats with caffeine intake was lower compared to the control group. The deformation in maximal load point of the femur shaft in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group. In the experimental group, the percentage of water in the bones was significantly higher, while the content of inorganic phase was significantly lower compared to the control group. The changes of biomechanical parameters in the group of pregnant rats with caffeine intake indicate its negative influence on the bone. Our results show higher plasticization of the bone shafts of the animals under the influence of caffeine. Higher deformation of bone shafts may have an effect on the statics of the skeleton. The administration of caffeine significantly affected the quantitative composition of the bone.

  13. The relationship between the mechanical anisotropy of human cortical bone tissue and its microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Orias, Alejandro A.

    Orthopedics research has made significant advances in the areas of biomechanics, bone implants and bone substitute materials. However, to date there is no definitive model to explain the structure-property relationships in bone as a material to enable better implant designs or to develop a true biomechanical analog of bone. The objective of this investigation was to establish a relationship between the elastic anisotropy of cortical bone tissue and its microstructure. Ultrasonic wave propagation was used to measure stiffness coefficients for specimens sectioned along the length of a human femur. The elastic constants were orthotropic and varied with anatomical location. Stiffness coefficients were generally largest at the midshaft and stiffness anisotropy ratios were largest at the distal and proximal ends. These tests were run on four additional human femurs to assess the influence of phenotypic variation, and in most cases, it was found that phenotypes do not exert a significant effect. Stiffness coefficients were shown to be correlated as a power law relation to apparent density, but anisotropy ratios were not. Texture analysis was performed on selected samples to measure the orientation distribution of the bone mineral crystals. Inverse pole figures showed that bone mineral crystals had a preferred crystallographic orientation, coincident with the long axis of the femur, which is its principal loading direction. The degree of preferred orientation was represented in Multiples of a Random Distribution (MRD), and correlated to the anisotropy ratios. Variation in elastic anisotropy was shown to be primarily due to the bone mineral orientation. The results found in this work can be used to incorporate anisotropy into structural analysis for bone as a material.

  14. Value and limits of μ-CT for nondemineralized bone tissue processing.

    PubMed

    Draenert, Miriam Esther; Draenert, Alice Irène; Forriol, Francisco; Cerler, Michael; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz; Hickel, Reinhard; Draenert, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    An experimental approach was performed on 20 giant rabbits to establish the possibilities and limitations of μ-CT for routine processing of nondemineralized bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HA) or β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP) bead implants or a melange of both, microchambered and solid, were implanted into a standardized and precise defect in the patellar groove. The bone-healing phase was chosen for the histology considering 1 or 2 days, and 2, 3, and 6 weeks. Normal X-ray and μ-CT were applied on all specimens; five specimens in the 6-week stage were additionally processed according to the full range of conventional nondemineralized bone processing methods. μ-CT increased the possibilities of nondemineralized histology with respect to bone morphometry and a complete sequence of sections, thus providing a complete analysis of the bone response. μ-CT was limited in differentiating bone quality, cell analyses, and mineralization stages. The investigation based on normal X-rays is limited to defining integration and excluding the fibrous and bony encapsulation of loose implants. μ-CT allows a 3D evaluation of newly formed bone which is clearly marked against the ceramic implant. It does not allow, however, for the differentiation between woven and lamellar bone, the presentation of the canalicular lacunar system, or on the cell level, revealing canaliculi or details of the mineralization process which can be documented by high-resolution microradiography. Titer dynamics of bone formation remains the domain of polychromatic sequential labeling. The complete sequence of μ-CT slices enhances the possibilities for routine histology, tremendously allowing to the focus on detail histology to topographically well-defined cuts, thus providing more precise conclusions which take into consideration the whole implant.

  15. Chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianshuo; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Chen, Yong; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    A novel composite scaffold based on chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite (CS-COL/OMMT) was prepared to improve swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio, biomineralization and mechanical properties for use in tissue engineering applications. In order to expend the basal spacing, montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and was characterized by XRD, TGA and FTIR. The results indicated that the anionic surfactants entered into interlayer of MMT and the basal spacing of MMT was expanded to 3.85 nm. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SEM. The swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio and mechanical properties of composite scaffolds were also studied. The results demonstrated that the scaffold decreased swelling ratio, degradation ratio and improved mechanical and biomineralization properties because of OMMT.

  16. Design and optimization of a tissue-engineered bone graft substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimko, Daniel Andrew

    2004-12-01

    In 2000, 3.1 million surgical procedures on the musculoskeletal system were reported in the United States. For many of these cases, bone grafting was essential for successful fracture stabilization. Current techniques use intact bone obtained either from the patient (autograft) or a cadaver (allograft) to repair large defects, however, neither source is optimal. Allografts suffer integration problems, and for autografts, the tissue supply is limited. Because of these shortcomings, and the high demand for graft tissues, alternatives are being explored. To successfully engineer a bone graft replacement, one must employ a three pronged research approach, addressing (1) the cells that will inhabit the new tissue, (2) the culture environment that these cells will be exposed to, and (3) the scaffold in which these cells will reside. The work herein examines each of these three aspects in great detail. Both adult and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were considered for the tissue-engineered bone graft. Both exhibited desirable qualities, however, neither were optimal in all categories examined. In the end, the possibility of teratoma formation and ethical issues surrounding ESCs, made the use of adult marrow-derived stem cells in the remaining experiments obligatory. In subsequent experiments, the adult stem cells' ability to form bone was optimized. Basic fibroblast growth factor, fetal bovine serum, and extracellular calcium supplementation studies were all performed. Ultimately, adult stem cells cultured in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 10mM beta-glycerophosphate, 10nM dexamethasone, 50mug/ml ascorbic acid, 1%(v/v) antibiotic/antimycotic, and 10.4mM CaCl2 performed the best, producing nearly four times more mineral than any other medium formulation. Several scaffolds were then investigated including those fabricated from poly(alpha-hydroxy esters), tantalum, and poly-methylmethacrylate. In the final study, the most appealing cell type, medium

  17. Poly(dopamine) coating to biodegradable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Bor; Chen, Wen-Tung; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Kuo, Wei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a technique based on poly(dopamine) deposition to promote cell adhesion was investigated for the application in bone tissue engineering. The adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblasts were evaluated on poly(dopamine)-coated biodegradable polymer films, such as polycaprolactone, poly(l-lactide) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), which are commonly used biodegradable polymers in tissue engineering. Cell adhesion was significantly increased to a plateau by merely 15 s of dopamine incubation, 2.2-4.0-folds of increase compared to the corresponding untreated substrates. Cell proliferation was also greatly enhanced by poly(dopamine) deposition, indicated by shortened cell doubling time. Mineralization was also increased on the poly(dopamine)-deposited surfaces. The potential of poly(dopamine) deposition in bone tissue engineering is demonstrated in this study.

  18. Experimental construction of BMP2 and VEGF gene modified tissue engineering bone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia; Fan, Cun-Yi; Zeng, Bing-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and advantages of constructing a novel tissue engineering bone, using β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), modified with human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene (hBMP2) and human vascular endothelial growth factor 165 gene (hVEGF165), through lentiviral transfection. Both genes were successfully co-expressed in the co-transfection group for up to eight weeks confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After seeding MSCs onto the scaffolds, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation showed that MSCs grew and proliferated well in co-transfection group at 7 and 14 days. There was no significant difference among all the groups in hoechst DNA assay for cell proliferation for 14 days after cell seeding (P > 0.05), but the highest alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was observed in the co-transfection group at 14 days after cell seeding (p < 0.01). These results demonstrated that it was advantageous to construct tissue engineering bone using β-TCP combined with MSCs lentivirally co-transfected with BMP2 and VEGF165, providing an innovative way for treating bone defects.

  19. Polarization control of Raman spectroscopy optimizes the assessment of bone tissue

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Patil, Chetan A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is potential for Raman spectroscopy (RS) to complement tools for bone diagnosis due to its ability to assess compositional and organizational characteristics of both collagen and mineral. To aid this potential, the present study assessed specificity of RS peaks to the composition of bone, a birefringent material, for different degrees of instrument polarization. Specifically, relative changes in peaks were quantified as the incident light rotated relative to the orientation of osteonal and interstitial tissue, acquired from cadaveric femurs. In a highly polarized instrument (106∶1 extinction ratio), the most prominent mineral peak (ν1 Phosphate at 961  cm−1) displayed phase similarity with the Proline peak at 856  cm−1. This sensitivity to relative orientation between bone and light observed in the highly polarized regime persisted for certain sensitive peaks (e.g., Amide I at 1666  cm−1) in unaltered instrumentation (200∶1 extinction ratio). Though Proline intensity changed with bone rotation, the phase of Proline matched that of ν1 Phosphate. Moreover, when mapping ν1 Phosphate/Proline across osteonal-interstitial borders, the mineralization difference between the tissue types was evident whether using a 20x or 50x objectives. Thus, the polarization bias inherent in commercial RS systems does not preclude the assessment of bone composition when using phase-matched peaks. PMID:23708192

  20. Micromechanical modeling of elastic properties of cortical bone accounting for anisotropy of dense tissue.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Laura; Saadat, Fatemeh; Sevostianov, Igor

    2014-10-17

    The paper analyzes the connection between microstructure of the osteonal cortical bone and its overall elastic properties. The existing models either neglect anisotropy of the dense tissue or simplify cortical bone microstructure (accounting for Haversian canals only). These simplifications (related mostly to insufficient mathematical apparatus) complicate quantitative analysis of the effect of microstructural changes - produced by age, microgravity, or some diseases - on the overall mechanical performance of cortical bone. The present analysis fills this gap; it accounts for anisotropy of the dense tissue and uses realistic model of the porous microstructure. The approach is based on recent results of Sevostianov et al. (2005) and Saadat et al. (2012) on inhomogeneities in a transversely-isotropic material. Bone's microstructure is modeled according to books of Martin and Burr (1989), Currey (2002), and Fung (1993) and includes four main families of pores. The calculated elastic constants for porous cortical bone are in agreement with available experimental data. The influence of each of the pore types on the overall moduli is examined.

  1. The evolution of simulation techniques for dynamic bone tissue engineering in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Vetsch, Jolanda Rita; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Bone tissue engineering aims to overcome the drawbacks of current bone regeneration techniques in orthopaedics. Bioreactors are widely used in the field of bone tissue engineering, as they help support efficient nutrition of cultured cells with the possible combination of applying mechanical stimuli. Beneficial influencing parameters of in vitro cultures are difficult to find and are mostly determined by trial and error, which is associated with significant time and money spent. Mathematical simulations can support the finding of optimal parameters. Simulations have evolved over the last 20 years from simple analytical models to complex and detailed computational models. They allow researchers to simulate the mechanical as well as the biological environment experienced by cells seeded on scaffolds in a bioreactor. Based on the simulation results, it is possible to give recommendations about specific parameters for bone bioreactor cultures, such as scaffold geometries, scaffold mechanical properties, the level of applied mechanical loading or nutrient concentrations. This article reviews the evolution in simulating various aspects of dynamic bone culture in bioreactors and reveals future research directions.

  2. Calcium phosphate ceramic systems in growth factor and drug delivery for bone tissue engineering: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman

    2012-01-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are the most widely used bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering due to their compositional similarities to bone mineral and excellent biocompatibility. In recent years, CaPs, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, have attracted significant interest in simultaneous use as bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle, adding a new dimension to their application. CaPs are more biocompatible than many other ceramic and inorganic nanoparticles. Their biocompatibility and variable stoichiometry, thus surface charge density, functionality, and dissolution properties, make them suitable for both drug and growth factor delivery. CaP matrices and scaffolds have been reported to act as delivery vehicles for growth factors and drugs in bone tissue engineering. Local drug delivery in musculoskeletal disorder treatments can address some of the critical issues more effectively and efficiently than the systemic delivery. CaPs are used as coatings on metallic implants, CaP cements, and custom designed scaffolds to treat musculoskeletal disorders. This review highlights some of the current drug and growth factor delivery approaches and critical issues using CaP particles, coatings, cements, and scaffolds towards orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:22127225

  3. Modeling of the interaction between bone tissue and resorbable biomaterial as linear elastic materials with voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreaus, Ugo; Giorgio, Ivan; Madeo, Angela

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a continuum mixture model with evolving mass densities and porosity is proposed to describe the process of bone remodeling in the presence of bio-resorbable materials as driven by externally applied loads. From a mechanical point of view, both bone tissue and biomaterial are modeled as linear elastic media with voids in the sense of Cowin and Nunziato (J Elast 13:125-147, 1983). In the proposed continuum model, the change of volume fraction related to the void volume is directly accounted for by considering porosity as an independent kinematical field. The bio-mechanical coupling is ensured by the introduction of a suitable stimulus which allows for discriminating between resorption (of both bone and biomaterial) and synthesis (of the sole natural bone) depending on the level of externally applied loads. The presence of a `lazy zone' associated with intermediate deformation levels is also considered in which neither resorption nor synthesis occur. Some numerical solutions of the integro-differential equations associated with the proposed model are provided for the two-dimensional case. Ranges of values of the parameters for which different percentages of biomaterial substitution occur are proposed, namely parameters characterizing initial and maximum values of mass densities of bone tissue and of the bio-resorbable material.

  4. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P < 0.05). Three of the proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  5. RT97- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity in lumbar intervertebral discs and adjacent tissue from the rat.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, P W; Petts, P; Hamilton, A

    1992-01-01

    The innervation of rat intervertebral disc and adjacent ligamentous tissue has been investigated using 2 antibodies, RT97 and anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide. Immunoreactivity to the peptide was found in many fibres throughout the long ligaments around the intervertebral discs and in the periosteum, especially associated with vascular channels entering the vertebral bodies. Few of the immunoreactive fibres entered the annular lamellae of the disc tissue. Most of those which terminated did so as fine fibres which lay close to, or in, the interlamellar spaces of the outer annulus fibrosus. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity was also found in more complex endings in the longitudinal ligaments and rarely within the annulus fibrosus. RT97-immunoreactivity was also present in the complex endings and associated fibres. Conversely, RT97-immunoreactivity was apparent only in a few fine filamentous fibre endings. This suggested that the majority of fine filamentous, or free, nerve endings were of an unmyelinated sensory origin. Alternatively, those endings of a more complex nature, which were RT97-immunoreactive, were of a myelinated sensory origin. No immunoreactivity to either antibody was seen in the inner annular or nuclear tissue. It was therefore concluded that the sensory innervation of the rat intervertebral disc has both myelinated and unmyelinated components, the latter being more extensive. Both types of innervation appear to be restricted to the outermost rings of the annulus fibrosus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1452470

  6. Tautomerizable β-ketonitrile copolymers for bone tissue engineering: Studies of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lastra, M Laura; Molinuevo, M Silvina; Giussi, Juan M; Allegretti, Patricia E; Blaszczyk-Lezak, Iwona; Mijangos, Carmen; Cortizo, M Susana

    2015-06-01

    β-Ketonitrile tautomeric copolymers have demonstrated tunable hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity properties according to surrounding environment, and mechanical properties similar to those of human bone tissue. Both characteristic properties make them promising candidates as biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. Based on this knowledge we have designed two scaffolds based on β-ketonitrile tautomeric copolymers which differ in chemical composition and surface morphology. Two of them were nanostructured, using an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template, and the other two obtained by solvent casting methodology. They were used to evaluate the effect of the composition and their structural modifications on the biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and degradation properties. Our results showed that the nanostructured scaffolds exhibited higher degradation rate by macrophages than casted scaffolds (6 and 2.5% of degradation for nanostructured and casted scaffolds, respectively), a degradation rate compatible with bone regeneration times. We also demonstrated that the β-ketonitrile tautomeric based scaffolds supported osteoblastic cell proliferation and differentiation without cytotoxic effects, suggesting that these biomaterials could be useful in the bone tissue engineering field.

  7. Bisphosphonate-Based Strategies for Bone Tissue Engineering and Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Juan Pablo; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Lucangioli, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a group of well-established drugs that are applied in the development of metabolic bone disorder-related therapies. There is increasing interest also in the application of BPs in the context of bone tissue engineering, which is the topic of this review, in which an extensive overview of published studies on the development and applications of BPs-based strategies for bone regeneration is provided with special focus on the rationale for the use of different BPs in three-dimensional (3D) bone tissue scaffolds. The different alternatives that are investigated to address the delivery and sustained release of these therapeutic drugs in the nearby tissues are comprehensively discussed, and the most significant published approaches on bisphosphonate-conjugated drugs in multifunctional 3D scaffolds as well as the role of BPs within coatings for the improved fixation of orthopedic implants are presented and critically evaluated. Finally, the authors' views regarding the remaining challenges in the fields and directions for future research efforts are highlighted. PMID:22440082

  8. Tissue engineered humanized bone supports human hematopoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Boris M; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Nowlan, Bianca; Barbier, Valerie; Thibaudeau, Laure; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hooper, John D; Loessner, Daniela; Clements, Judith A; Russell, Pamela J; Pettit, Allison R; Winkler, Ingrid G; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Advances in tissue-engineering have resulted in a versatile tool-box to specifically design a tailored microenvironment for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in order to study diseases that develop within this setting. However, most current in vivo models fail to recapitulate the biological processes seen in humans. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to engineer humanized bone constructs that are able to recapitulate the morphological features and biological functions of the HSC niches. Ectopic implantation of biodegradable composite scaffolds cultured for 4 weeks with human mesenchymal progenitor cells and loaded with rhBMP-7 resulted in the development of a chimeric bone organ including a large number of human mesenchymal cells which were shown to be metabolically active and capable of establishing a humanized microenvironment supportive of the homing and maintenance of human HSCs. A syngeneic mouse-to-mouse transplantation assay was used to prove the functionality of the tissue-engineered ossicles. We predict that the ability to tissue engineer a morphologically intact and functional large-volume bone organ with a humanized bone marrow compartment will help to further elucidate physiological or pathological interactions between human HSCs and their native niches.

  9. Osteogenic Differentiation Capacity of In Vitro Cultured Human Skeletal Muscle for Expedited Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Chunlei; Zhou, Lulu; Tian, Lufeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fanghong; Liu, Tianyi

    2017-01-01

    Expedited bone tissue engineering employs the biological stimuli to harness the intrinsic regenerative potential of skeletal muscle to trigger the reparative process in situ to improve or replace biological functions. When genetically modified with adenovirus mediated BMP2 gene transfer, muscle biopsies from animals have demonstrated success in regenerating bone within rat bony defects. However, it is uncertain whether the human adult skeletal muscle displays an osteogenic potential in vitro when a suitable biological trigger is applied. In present study, human skeletal muscle cultured in a standard osteogenic medium supplemented with dexamethasone demonstrated significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity approximately 24-fold over control at 2-week time point. More interestingly, measurement of mRNA levels revealed the dramatic results for osteoblast transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoproteins, transcription factor CBFA1, collagen type I, and osteocalcin. Calcified mineral deposits were demonstrated on superficial layers of muscle discs after an extended 8-week osteogenic induction. Taken together, these are the first data supporting human skeletal muscle tissue as a promising potential target for expedited bone regeneration, which of the technologies is a valuable method for tissue repair, being not only effective but also inexpensive and clinically expeditious. PMID:28210626

  10. From stem cells to bone: phenotype acquisition, stabilization, and tissue engineering in animal models.

    PubMed

    Gordeladze, Jan O; Reseland, Janne E; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Apparailly, Florence; Jorgensen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The regeneration of bone tissue depends on the concerted actions of a plethora of signals that recruit mesenchymal stem cells for lineage-specific differentiation, with cellular phenotypes serving various functions throughout their life span. The signals are conveyed in hormones, growth factors, and mechanical forces, all of which ensure proper modeling and remodeling. Both processes are secured by indigenous and programmed metabolism in osteoblasts/osteocytes as well as in other stem cell (SC)-derived cell types (e.g., osteoclasts, bone lining cells) involved in the remodeling of the subject tissue. The focus of this review is the concerted action of these signals as well as the regulatory and/or stabilizing control circuits exhibited by a class of small RNAs, designated microRNAs. We discuss an in vitro approach for ensuring proper phenotype acquisition as well as the choice of scaffolds and animal models for in vivo tissue repair. This approach includes selection of SC niches to optimize bone formation in vivo, transcription factors important for osteoblastogenesis, the Wnt and Notch pathways of signaling, selection of delivery systems for gene therapy, use of appropriate matrices and scaffolds, in vivo mechanostimulation, choice of lesions to be repaired, and type of animal to use. We also discuss Wnt-related and SC-based treatment of osteoporosis. Throughout, we offer considerations for the selection of model systems and parameters to assess the entire procedure from initial SC selection to final bone repair, and conclude with a table summarizing our recommendations.

  11. Boon and Bane of Inflammation in Bone Tissue Regeneration and Its Link with Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Kwee, Brian J; Mooney, David J; Duda, Georg N

    2015-08-01

    Delayed healing or nonhealing of bone is an important clinical concern. Although bone, one of the two tissues with scar-free healing capacity, heals in most cases, healing is delayed in more than 10% of clinical cases. Treatment of such delayed healing condition is often painful, risky, time consuming, and expensive. Tissue healing is a multistage regenerative process involving complex and well-orchestrated steps, which are initiated in response to injury. At best, these steps lead to scar-free tissue formation. At the onset of healing, during the inflammatory phase, stationary and attracted macrophages and other immune cells at the fracture site release cytokines in response to injury. This initial reaction to injury is followed by the recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells, synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins, angiogenesis, and finally tissue remodeling. Failure to heal is often associated with poor revascularization. Since blood vessels mediate the transport of circulating cells, oxygen, nutrients, and waste products, they appear essential for successful healing. The strategy of endogenous regeneration in a tissue such as bone is interesting to analyze since it may represent a blueprint of successful tissue formation. This review highlights the interdependency of the time cascades of inflammation, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. A better understanding of these inter-relations is mandatory to early identify patients at risk as well as to overcome critical clinical conditions that limit healing. Instead of purely tolerating the inflammatory phase, modulations of inflammation (immunomodulation) might represent a valid therapeutic strategy to enhance angiogenesis and foster later phases of tissue regeneration.

  12. Magnesium intake mediates the association between bone mineral density and lean soft tissue in elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Matias, Catarina N; Santos, Diana A; Monteiro, Cristina P; Vasco, Ana M; Baptista, Fátima; Sardinha, Luís B; Laires, Maria J; Silva, Analiza M

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) deficiency has been associated with bone disorders. Physical activity is also crucial for bone mineralization. Bone mass loss has been observed to be accelerated in subjects with low Mg intake. We aim to understand if Mg intake mediates the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and lean soft tissue (LST) in elite swimmers. Seventeen elite swimmers (eight males; nine females) were evaluated. Bone mineral content, BMD, LST, and fat mass were assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Energy and nutrient intake were assessed during a seven-day period and analyzed with Food Processor SQL. Males presented lower values than the normative data for BMD. Mg, phosphorus (P) and vitamin D intake were significantly lower than the recommended daily allowance. A linear regression model demonstrated a significant association between LST and BMD. When Mg intake was included, we observed that this was a significant, independent predictor of BMD, with a significant increase of 24% in the R(2) of the initial predictive model. When adjusted for energy, vitamin D, calcium, and P intake, Mg remained a significant predictor of BMD. In conclusion, young athletes engaged in low impact sports, should pay special attention to Mg intake, given its potential role in bone mineral mass acquisition during growth.

  13. Bioactive glass scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    The repair and regeneration of large bone defects resulting from disease or trauma remains a significant clinical challenge. Bioactive glass has appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering, but the application of glass scaffolds for the repair of load-bearing bone defects is often limited by their low mechanical strength and fracture toughness. This paper provides an overview of recent developments in the fabrication and mechanical properties of bioactive glass scaffolds. The review reveals the fact that mechanical strength is not a real limiting factor in the use of bioactive glass scaffolds for bone repair, an observation not often recognized by most researchers and clinicians. Scaffolds with compressive strengths comparable to those of trabecular and cortical bones have been produced by a variety of methods. The current limitations of bioactive glass scaffolds include their low fracture toughness (low resistance to fracture) and limited mechanical reliability, which have so far received little attention. Future research directions should include the development of strong and tough bioactive glass scaffolds, and their evaluation in unloaded and load-bearing bone defects in animal models. PMID:21912447

  14. A Mechanobiology-based Algorithm to Optimize the Microstructure Geometry of Bone Tissue Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Uva, Antonio Emmanuele; Fiorentino, Michele; Lamberti, Luciano; Monno, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Complexity of scaffold geometries and biological mechanisms involved in the bone generation process make the design of scaffolds a quite challenging task. The most common approaches utilized in bone tissue engineering require costly protocols and time-consuming experiments. In this study we present an algorithm that, combining parametric finite element models of scaffolds with numerical optimization methods and a computational mechano-regulation model, is able to predict the optimal scaffold microstructure. The scaffold geometrical parameters are perturbed until the best geometry that allows the largest amounts of bone to be generated, is reached. We study the effects of the following factors: (1) the shape of the pores; (2) their spatial distribution; (3) the number of pores per unit area. The optimal dimensions of the pores have been determined for different values of scaffold Young's modulus and compression loading acting on the scaffold upper surface. Pores with rectangular section were predicted to lead to the formation of larger amounts of bone compared to square section pores; similarly, elliptic pores were predicted to allow the generation of greater amounts of bone compared to circular pores. The number of pores per unit area appears to have rather negligible effects on the bone regeneration process. Finally, the algorithm predicts that for increasing loads, increasing values of the scaffold Young's modulus are preferable. The results shown in the article represent a proof-of-principle demonstration of the possibility to optimize the scaffold microstructure geometry based on mechanobiological criteria. PMID:26722213

  15. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: A Reliable, Challenging Tool for In Vitro Osteogenesis and Bone Tissue Engineering Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Ute; Müller, Katrin; Preissler, Carolin; Noack, Carolin; Boxberger, Sabine; Dieter, Peter; Bornhäuser, Martin; Wobus, Manja

    2016-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) are important for many scientific purposes because of their multipotency, availability, and relatively easy handling. They are frequently used to study osteogenesis in vitro. Most commonly, hBMSC are isolated from bone marrow aspirates collected in clinical routine and cultured under the “aspect plastic adherence” without any further selection. Owing to the random donor population, they show a broad heterogeneity. Here, the osteogenic differentiation potential of 531 hBMSC was analyzed. The data were supplied to correlation analysis involving donor age, gender, and body mass index. hBMSC preparations were characterized as follows: (a) how many passages the osteogenic characteristics are stable in and (b) the influence of supplements and culture duration on osteogenic parameters (tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), octamer binding transcription factor 4, core-binding factor alpha-1, parathyroid hormone receptor, bone gla protein, and peroxisome proliferator-activated protein γ). The results show that no strong prediction could be made from donor data to the osteogenic differentiation potential; only the ratio of induced TNAP to endogenous TNAP could be a reliable criterion. The results give evidence that hBMSC cultures are stable until passage 7 without substantial loss of differentiation potential and that established differentiation protocols lead to osteoblast-like cells but not to fully authentic osteoblasts. PMID:27293446

  16. Degradability of injectable calcium sulfate/mineralized collagen-based bone repair material and its effect on bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zonggang; Kang, Lingzhi; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Liu, Huanye; Wang, Zhaoliang; Guo, Zhongwu; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-12-01

    The nHAC/CSH composite is an injectable bone repair material with controllable injectability and self-setting properties prepared by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) into mineralized collagen (nHAC). When mixed with water, the nHAC/CSH composites can be transformed into mineralized collagen/calcium sulfate dihydrate (nHAC/CSD) composites. The nHAC/CSD composites have good biocompatibility and osteogenic capability. Considering that the degradation behavior of bone repair material is another important factor for its clinical applications, the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites was studied. The results showed that the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with lower nHAC content increased with the L/S ratio increase of injectable materials, but the variety of L/S ratio had no significant effect on the degradation ratio of the nHAC/CSD composites with higher nHAC content. Increasing nHAC content in the composites could slow down the degradation of nHAC/CSD composite. Setting accelerator had no significant effect on the degradability of nHAC/CSD composites. In vivo histological analysis suggests that the degradation rate of materials can match the growth rate of new mandibular bone tissues in the implanted site of rabbit. The regulable degradability of materials resulting from the special prescriptions of injectable nHAC/CSH composites will further improve the workability of nHAC/CSD composites.

  17. Design and application of chitosan/biphasic calcium phosphate porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendemir-Urkmez, Aylin

    For the restoration of maxillofacial bone tissue, design of novel tissue engineering scaffolds capable of inducing bone remodeling through the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and an angiogenic growth factor, directly at the site of the defect was investigated in order to replace autogenous cancellous bone grafts with synthetic materials. Porous, three dimensional scaffolds were fabricated by a freeze drying method. In culture media, biphasic calcium phosphate particles within chitosan produced a surface reprecipitate of a composition similar to natural apatite that led to a uniform distribution of cells and mineralized ECM through chemotaxis. Further, the reprecipitation regulated the differentiation pathway and phenotype commitment of stem cells by altering the initial cell attachment morphology and actin cytoskeleton organization. In order to induce neovascularization after implantation, constructs were designed to be loaded with gelatin microspheres that delivered basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent angiogenic factor. In vitro proliferation tests performed on fibroblastic cells showed no detectible loss of bFGF activity when delivered through enzymatic degradation of gelatin. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that gelatin microspheres can be injected evenly into cell-scaffold constructs owing to the spongy characteristics of the scaffold. To examine the binding interactions of bFGF with surface bound gelatin, a label free biosensor system, Biomolecular INteraction Detection sensor (BIND) was used. Results confirm that the principal interaction that takes place between bFGF and gelatin is electrostatic. Cell loaded tissue engineered constructs were produced in vitro at clinically relevant sizes and implanted with and without bFGF into a porcine mandibular defect model. Tissue engineered constructs facilitated the healing of mandibular defects only if combined with delivery of bFGF via gelatin microspheres. b

  18. Stafne bone cavity with ectopic salivary gland tissue in the anterior of mandible

    PubMed Central

    Deyhimi, Parviz; Darisavi, Soheila; Khalesi, Saeideh

    2016-01-01

    Stafne bone cavities (SBCs) are uncommon well-demarcated defects of the mandible, which often occur in the posterior portion of the jaw bone and are usually asymptomatic. Furthermore, SBC is found in men aged 50–70-year-old. Anterior mandibular variants of SBC are very rare. This article describes a case of anterior SBC in a 45-year-old man that resembled endodontic periapical lesions. Upon histopathological examination, it turned out to be a normal salivary gland tissue. PMID:27857772

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of bone tissue of experimental animals after glucocorticoid treatment and recovery period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitić, Žarko J.; Najman, Stevo J.; Cakić, Milorad D.; Ajduković, Zorica R.; Ignjatović, Nenad L.; Nikolić, Ružica S.; Nikolić, Goran M.; Stojanović, Sanja T.; Vukelić, Marija Đ.; Trajanović, Miroslav D.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of glucocorticoids on the composition and mineral/organic content of the mandible in tested animals after recovery and healing phase was investigated in this work. The results of FTIR analysis demonstrated that bone tissue composition was changed after glucocorticoid treatment. The increase of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus content and mineral part of bones was statistically significant in recovery phase and in treatment phase that included calcitonin and thymus extract. Some changes also happened in the organic part of the matrix, as indicated by intensity changes for already present IR bands and the appearance of new IR bands in the region 3500-1300 cm-1.

  20. Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

  1. Low temperature setting polymer-ceramic composites for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    Tissue engineering is defined as "the application of biological, chemical and engineering principles towards the repair, restoration or regeneration of tissues using scaffolds, cells, factors alone or in combination". The hypothesis of this thesis is that a matrix made of a synthetic biocompatible, biodegradable composite can be designed to mimic the properties of bone, which itself is a composite. The overall goal was to design and develop biodegradable, biocompatible polymer-ceramic composites that will be a practical alternative to current bone repair materials. The first specific aim was to develop and evaluate the osteocompatibility of low temperature self setting calcium deficient apatites for bone tissue engineering. The four different calcium deficient hydroxyapatites evaluated were osteocompatible and expressed the characteristic genes for osteoblast proliferation, maturation, and differentiation. Our next objective was to develop and evaluate the osteocompatibility of biodegradable amino acid ester polyphosphazene in vitro as candidates for forming composites with low temperature apatites. We determined the structure-property relationship, the cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of primary rat osteoblast cells on two dimensional amino acid ester based polyphosphazene films. Our next goal was to evaluate the amino acid ester based polyphosphazenes in a subcutaneous rat model and our results demonstrated that the polyphosphazenes evaluated in the study were biocompatible. The physio-chemical property characterization, cellular response and gene expression on the composite surfaces were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the precursors formed calcium deficient hydroxyapatite in the presence of biodegradable polyphosphazenes. In addition, cells on the surface of the composites expressed normal phenotype and characteristic genes such as type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein. The in vivo

  2. Comparison of osteogenic ability of rat mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, periosteum, and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ousuke; Katsube, Yoshihiro; Hirose, Motohiro; Ohgushi, Hajime; Ito, Hiromoto

    2008-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reside in many types of tissue and are able to differentiate into various functional cells including osteoblasts. Recently, adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AMSCs) have been shown to differentiate into many lineages, and they are considered a source for tissue regeneration. The purpose of this study was to compare the osteogenic differentiation capability of MSCs from bone marrow (BMSCs), MSCs from periosteum (PMSCs), and AMSCs using in vitro culture and in vivo implantation experiments. We harvested these MSCs from 7-week-old rats. The cells were seeded and cultured for 7 days in primary culture to assay a colony-forming unit. The frequency of the unit was the smallest in the BMSCs (P < 0.001). After primary culture, subculture was performed under osteogenic differentiation conditions for 1 and 2 weeks to detect mineralization as well as the bone-specific proteins of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin as osteogenic markers. BMSCs and PMSCs showed distinct osteogenic differentiation capability in comparison with other MSCs (P < 0.001). For the in vivo assay, composites of these cells and hydroxyapatite ceramics were subcutaneously implanted into syngeneic rats and harvested after 6 weeks. Micro-computed tomographic (CT) and histological analyses demonstrated that new bone formation was detected in the composites using BMSCs and PMSCs, although it was hard to detect in other composites. The CT analyses also demonstrated that the bone volume of BMSC composites was more than that of AMSC composites (P < 0.001). These results indicate that BMSCs and PMSCs could be ideal candidates for utilization in practical bone tissue regeneration.

  3. Wound healing after irradiation of bone tissues by Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hisashi; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Aoki, Akira; Ishikawa, Isao

    1997-05-01

    Clinical applications of Er:YAG laser are now developing in periodontics and restorative dentistry. To date, there have been few studies indicating safety criteria for intraoral usage of the Er:YAG laser. The present study examined the effects of the Er:YAG laser on bone tissues, supposing mis- irradiation in the oral cavity during dental application, especially periodontal surgery. The experiments were performed using the newly-developed Er:YAG laser apparatus equipped with a contact probe. In experiment 1, 10 pulses of laser irradiation were administered to the parietal bone of a rat at 50, 150 and 300 mJ/pulse with and without water irrigation, changing the irradiation distance to 0, 5, 10 and 20 mm, respectively. As a control, electric knife was employed. Macroscopic and SEM observations of the wound surface were performed. In experiment 2, laser irradiation in a straight line was performed at 150 mJ/pulse, 1- pps and 0,5, 10 mm irradiation distance without water irrigation. Wound healing was observed histologically at 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after laser irradiation and compared with that of the control. Non-contact irradiation by Er:YAG laser did not cause severe damage to the parietal bone tissue under water irrigation. Contact irradiation induced a limited wound, however, new bone formation was observed 28 days after laser irradiation, while osseous defect with thermal degenerative tissue remained at the control site. In conclusion, irradiation with an Er:YAG laser would not cause severe damage to surrounding bone tissues in the oral cavity when used within the usual power settings for dental treatment. Furthermore, this laser may be applicable for osseous surgery because of its high ablation efficiency and good wound healing after irradiation.

  4. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  5. Cultivation of human bone-like tissue from pluripotent stem cell-derived osteogenic progenitors in perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an unlimited source of skeletal tissue progenitors for studies of bone biology, pathogenesis, and the development of new approaches for bone reconstruction and therapies. In order to construct in vitro models of bone tissue development and to grow functional, clinical-size bone substitutes for transplantation, cell cultivation in three-dimensional environments composed of porous osteoconductive scaffolds and dynamic culture systems-bioreactors-has been studied. Here, we describe a stepwise procedure for the induction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (collectively termed PSCs) into mesenchymal-like progenitors, and their subsequent cultivation on decellularized bovine bone scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, to support the development of viable, stable bone-like tissue in defined geometries.

  6. Biochemical and biophysical analyses of tissue-engineered bone obtained from three-dimensional culture of a subset of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Federico; Falini, Giuseppe; Spelat, Renza; D'Aurizio, Federica; Puppato, Elisa; Pandolfi, Maura; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Impiombato, Francesco Saverio Ambesi; Curcio, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Grafts of tissue-engineered bone represent a promising alternative in the treatment of large and small bone defects. Current approaches are often badly tolerated by patients because of invasiveness, ethical problems, culture, and possibility of infection. Autologous grafts have been indicated as a solution to such problems. Because of tissue availability, many have proposed the use of cultured cells derived from bone marrow expanded in culture and induced to differentiate in bone tissue. Data reported in the literature show that it is possible to produce tissue substitutes in vitro indeed, but results are not always concordant regarding the in vitro produced bone quality. In the present work, we investigated bone formation in aggregates of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced to differentiate in bone. After osteoinduction we characterized the mineral matrix produced using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. Cells were obtained from bone marrow, subjected to immunodepletion for CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD66b, and glycophorin A using RosetteSep and cultured in a new formulation of medium for four passages and then were allowed to form spontaneous aggregates. At the end of proliferation before aggregation, cells were analyzed by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) for markers routinely used to characterize expanded mesenchymal stem cells and were found to be remarkably homogeneous for CD29 (99% ± 1%), CD73 (99% ± 1%), CD90 (95% ± 4%), CD105 (96% ± 4%), and CD133 (0% ± 1%) expression. Our results show that not only aggregated cells express the major markers of osteogenic differentiation, such as osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein, but also the inorganic matrix is made of an apatite structurally and morphologically similar to native bone even without a scaffold.

  7. Combining high-resolution micro-computed tomography with material composition to define the quality of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Judex, Stefan; Boyd, Steve; Qin, Yi-Xian; Miller, Lisa; Müller, Ralph; Rubin, Clinton

    2003-06-01

    Atraumatic fractures of the skeleton in osteoporotic patients are directly related to a deterioration of bone strength. However, the failure of the bone tissue to withstand functional load bearing cannot be explained as a simple decrease in bone mineral density (quantity); strength is also significantly dependent upon bone quality. While a formal definition of bone quality is somewhat elusive, at the very least, it incorporates architectural, physical, and biologic factors that are critical to bone strength. Such factors include bone morphology (ie, trabecular connectivity, cross-sectional geometry, longitudinal curvature); the tissue's material properties (eg, stiffness, strength); its chemical composition and architecture (eg, ratio of calcium to other components of the organic and/or inorganic phase, collagen orientation, porosity, permeability); and the viability of the tissue (eg, responsivity of the bone cell population). Combining high-resolution structural indices of bone, as determined by micro-computed tomography; material properties determined by nanoindentation; and the chemical make-up of bone, as determined by infrared spectroscopy, helps to provide critical information toward a more comprehensive assessment of the interdependence of bone quality, quantity, and fracture risk.

  8. Guided bone regeneration in pig calvarial bone defects using autologous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells - a comparison of different tissue sources.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Philipp; Park, Jung; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Nkenke, Emeka; Felszeghy, Endre; Dehner, Jan-Friedrich; Schmitt, Christian; Tudor, Christian; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Due to donor side morbidity and the absence of osteogenic properties in bone substitutes, there is a growing need for an alternative to traditional bone grafting within the scope of tissue engineering. This animal study was conducted to compare the in vivo osteogenic potential of adipose-derived (AD), periosteum-derived (PD) and bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSC). Autologous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells of named tissue origin were induced into osteogenic differentiation following in vitro cell expansion. Ex vivo cultivated cells were seeded on a collagen scaffold and subsequently added to freshly created monocortical calvarial bone defects in 21 domestic pigs. Pure collagen scaffold served as a control defect. The animals were sacrificed at specific time points and de novo bone formation was quantitatively analyzed by histomorphometry. Bone volume/total defect volume (BV/TV) and the mineralization rate of newly formed bone were compared among the groups. In the early stages of wound healing, up to 30 days, the test defects did not show better bone regeneration than those in the control defect, but the bone healing process in the test defects was accelerated in the later stage compared to those in the control defect. All the test defects showed complete osseous healing after 90 days compared to those in the control defect. During the observation period, no significant differences in BV/TV and mineralization of newly formed bone among the test defects were observed. Irrespective of the tissue sources of MSC, the speed and pattern of osseous healing after cell transplantations into monocortical bone defects were comparable. Our results indicate that the efficiency of autologous AD-MSC, PD-MSC and BM-MSC transplantation following ex vivo cell expansion is not significantly different for the guided regeneration of bone defects.

  9. Oncolytic virotherapy for human bone and soft tissue sarcomas using live attenuated poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Satoru; Matsumine, Akihiko; Toyoda, Hidemi; Niimi, Rui; Iino, Takahiro; Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsubara, Takao; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Komada, Yoshihiro; Uchida, Atsumasa; Sudo, Akihiro

    2012-09-01

    The poliovirus receptor CD155, is essential for poliovirus to infect and induce death in neural cells. Recently, CD155 has been shown to be selectively expressed on certain types of tumor cells originating from the neural crest, including malignant glioma and neuroblastoma. However, the expression pattern of CD155 in soft tissue sarcoma has not been examined. Therefore, we first examined CD155 expression in sarcoma cell lines, and found the expression of both CD155 mRNA and protein in 12 soft and bone tissue sarcoma cell lines. Furthermore, we examined the effect of live attenuated poliovirus (LAPV) on 6 bone and soft tissue sarcoma cell lines in vitro, and found that LAPV induced apoptosis by activating caspases 7 and 3 in all of these cell lines. Furthermore, in BALB/c nu/nu mice xenotransplanted with HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, administration of live attenuated poliovirus caused growth suppression of the tumors. These results suggest that oncolytic therapy using a LAPV may represent a new option for the treatment of bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  10. Fourth near-infrared optical window for assessment of bone and other tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Diana C.; Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, additional near-infrared (NIR) optical windows beyond the conventional first therapeutic window have been utilized for deep tissue imaging through scattering media. Biomedical applications using a second optical window (1100 to 1300 nm) and a third (1600 to 1870 nm) are emerging. A fourth window (2100 to 2300 nm) has been largely ignored due to high water absorption and a lack of high sensitivity imaging detectors and ultrafast laser sources. In this study, optical properties of bone in this fourth NIR optical window, were investigated. Results were compared to those seen at the first, second and third windows, and are consistent with our previous work on malignant and benign breast and prostate tissues. Bone and malignant tissues showed highest uptake in the third and fourth windows. As collagen is a major chromophore with prominent spectral peaks between 2100 and 2300 nm, it may be that the fourth optical window is particularly useful for studying tissues with a higher collagen content, such as bone or malignant tumors.

  11. Biomineralization of Natural Collagenous Nanofibrous Membranes and Their Potential Use in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingying; Zhou, Guanshan; Castano-Izquierdo, Harold; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) membranes as a decellularized tissue are known to be a natural nanofibrous biomaterial mainly made of type I collagen fibers and containing some growth factors (fibroblast growth factor 2 and transforming growth factor β) desired in tissue engineering. Here we show that the SIS membranes can promote the formation of bone mineral hydroxylapatite (HAP) crystals along the collagen fibers constituting the membranes from a HAP-supersaturated solution. The resultant biomineralized HAP-SIS scaffolds were found to promote the attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in both basal and osteogenic media by the evaluation of osteogenic marker formation. More importantly, the HAP-SIS scaffolds could induce the osteogenic differentiation in the basal media without osteogenic supplements due to the presence of HAP crystals in the scaffolds. Histological characterization of the MSC-seeded scaffolds showed that HAP-SIS scaffolds are biocompatible and promote the formation of new tissue in vitro. The biomineralized SIS membranes mimic some aspects of natural bone in terms of the composition and nanostructures and can find potential use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25883539

  12. The sensitivity of nonlinear computational models of trabecular bone to tissue level constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andrew P; Shi, Xiutao; Roeder, Ryan K; Niebur, Glen L

    2016-01-01

    Microarchitectural finite element models have become a key tool in the analysis of trabecular bone. Robust, accurate, and validated constitutive models would enhance confidence in predictive applications of these models and in their usefulness as accurate assays of tissue properties. Human trabecular bone specimens from the femoral neck (n = 3), greater trochanter (n = 6), and lumbar vertebra (n = 1) of eight different donors were scanned by μ-CT and converted to voxel-based finite element models. Unconfined uniaxial compression and shear loading were simulated for each of three different constitutive models: a principal strain-based model, Drucker-Lode, and Drucker-Prager. The latter was applied with both infinitesimal and finite kinematics. Apparent yield strains exhibited minimal dependence on the constitutive model, differing by at most 16.1%, with the kinematic formulation being influential in compression loading. At the tissue level, the quantities and locations of yielded tissue were insensitive to the constitutive model, with the exception of the Drucker-Lode model, suggesting that correlation of microdamage with computational models does not improve the ability to discriminate between constitutive laws. Taken together, it is unlikely that a tissue constitutive model can be fully validated from apparent-level experiments alone, as the calculations are too insensitive to identify differences in the outcomes. Rather, any asymmetric criterion with a valid yield surface will likely be suitable for most trabecular bone models.

  13. The role of membrane ERα signaling in bone and other major estrogen responsive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, K. L.; Farman, H.; Henning, P.; Lionikaite, V.; Movérare-Skrtic, S.; Wu, J.; Ryberg, H.; Koskela, A.; Gustafsson, J.-Å.; Tuukkanen, J.; Levin, E. R.; Ohlsson, C.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling leads to cellular responses in several tissues and in addition to nuclear ERα-mediated effects, membrane ERα (mERα) signaling may be of importance. To elucidate the significance, in vivo, of mERα signaling in multiple estrogen-responsive tissues, we have used female mice lacking the ability to localize ERα to the membrane due to a point mutation in the palmitoylation site (C451A), so called Nuclear-Only-ER (NOER) mice. Interestingly, the role of mERα signaling for the estrogen response was highly tissue-dependent, with trabecular bone in the axial skeleton being strongly dependent (>80% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice), cortical and trabecular bone in long bones, as well as uterus and thymus being partly dependent (40–70% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice) and effects on liver weight and total body fat mass being essentially independent of mERα (<35% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice). In conclusion, mERα signaling is important for the estrogenic response in female mice in a tissue-dependent manner. Increased knowledge regarding membrane initiated ERα actions may provide means to develop new selective estrogen receptor modulators with improved profiles. PMID:27388455

  14. Longitudinal elastic properties and porosity of cortical bone tissue vary with age in human proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Malo, M K H; Rohrbach, D; Isaksson, H; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Tamminen, I S; Kröger, H; Raum, K

    2013-04-01

    Tissue level structural and mechanical properties are important determinants of bone strength. As an individual ages, microstructural changes occur in bone, e.g., trabeculae and cortex become thinner and porosity increases. However, it is not known how the elastic properties of bone change during aging. Bone tissue may lose its elasticity and become more brittle and prone to fractures as it ages. In the present study the age-dependent variation in the spatial distributions of microstructural and microelastic properties of the human femoral neck and shaft were evaluated by using acoustic microscopy. Although these properties may not be directly measured in vivo, there is a major interest to investigate their relationships with the linear elastic measurements obtained by diagnostic ultrasound at the most severe fracture sites, e.g., the femoral neck. However, before the validity of novel in vivo techniques can be established, it is essential to understand the age-dependent variation in tissue elastic properties and porosity at different skeletal sites. A total of 42 transverse cross-sectional bone samples were obtained from the femoral neck (Fn) and proximal femoral shaft (Ps) of 21 men (mean±SD age 47.1±17.8, range 17-82years). Samples were quantitatively imaged using a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) equipped with a 50MHz ultrasound transducer. Distributions of the elastic coefficient (c33) of cortical (Ct) and trabecular (Tr) tissues and microstructure of cortex (cortical thickness Ct.Th and porosity Ct.Po) were determined. Variations in c33 were observed with respect to tissue type (c33Trc33(Ct.Fn)=35.3GPa>c33(Tr.Ps)=33.8GPa>c33(Tr.Fn)=31.9GPa), and cadaver age (R(2)=0.28-0.46, p<0.05). Regional variations in porosity were found in the neck (superior 13.1%; inferior 6.1%; anterior 10.1%; posterior 8.6%) and in the shaft (medial 9.5%; lateral 7.7%; anterior 8.6%; posterior 12.0%). In conclusion, significant variations in

  15. Differentiation potentials of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the close topographical interconnection with blood capillaries followed by perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3Н- thymidine (Kimmel D.B., Fee W.S., 1980; Rodionova N.V., 1989, 2006) has shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic ones. Using electron microscopy and cytochemistry we studied perivsacular cells in metaphysis of the rats femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity (28 days duration) and in femoral bonеs metaphyses of rats flown on board of the space laboratory (Spacelab - 2) It was revealed that population of the perivascular cells is not homogeneous in adaptive zones of the remodeling in both control and test groups (lowering support loading). This population comprises adjacent to endothelium little differentiated forms and isolated cells with differentiation features (specific volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm is increased). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In little differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of animals under microgravitaty reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not for all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. There is also visible trend of individual alkaline phosphatase containing perivascular cells amounts decrease (i.e. osteogenic cells-precursors). Under microgravity some little differentiated perivascular cells reveal destruction signs. Found decrease trend of the alkaline phosphatase containing cells (i.e. osteogenic cells) number in

  16. Peripha