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Sample records for adjacent cell layers

  1. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  2. Structured Water Layers Adjacent to Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Polcik, Martin; Fukuma, Takeshi; Sader, John E.; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2006-01-01

    Water amid the restricted space of crowded biological macromolecules and at membrane interfaces is essential for cell function, though the structure and function of this “biological water” itself remains poorly defined. The force required to remove strongly bound water is referred to as the hydration force and due to its widespread importance, it has been studied in numerous systems. Here, by using a highly sensitive dynamic atomic force microscope technique in conjunction with a carbon nanotube probe, we reveal a hydration force with an oscillatory profile that reflects the removal of up to five structured water layers from between the probe and biological membrane surface. Further, we find that the hydration force can be modified by changing the membrane fluidity. For 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel (Lβ) phase bilayers, each oscillation in the force profile indicates the force required to displace a single layer of water molecules from between the probe and bilayer. In contrast, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine fluid (Lα) phase bilayers at 60°C and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine fluid (Lα) phase bilayers at 24°C seriously disrupt the molecular ordering of the water and result predominantly in a monotonic force profile. PMID:16798815

  3. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  4. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  5. Geomechanical analysis of a welding salt layer and its effects on adjacent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Mahdi; Nikolinakou, Maria A.; Hudec, Michael R.; Flemings, Peter B.

    2016-06-01

    We simulate welding of the source layer of a salt diapir with a forward finite-element model and study stresses and deformation in the salt layer and the diapir, as well as in their adjacent sediments. Welded salt layers are abundant in mature salt basins, where most or all of the salt has withdrawn into diapirs. However, there is little understanding of the stress field in these layers and their adjacent sediments. We show that salt flow along the source layer leads to significant stress anomalies inside the layer and in adjacent sediments. In the source layer, salt pressure becomes higher than overburden stress in nearly welded areas and becomes lower than overburden stress in adjacent thicker areas. When the source layer welds, stresses increase significantly in sediments near the weld tip, which helps compaction of these sediments and possibly their fracturing and faulting. Our model illustrates that all sediments overlying the weld experience this stress increase and the associated material changes as the weld tip propagates along the weld. We present natural examples fitting our predictions and discuss the importance of our results for the exploration, characterization, and production of reservoirs near welded salt layers.

  6. Effect of adjacent insulating oxide layers on superconductivity of one unit cell thick YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ layers in PrBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ/YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ/insulating oxide trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Yoshichika; Terashima, Takahito; Shimura, Ken-ichi; Daitoh, Yoshihiro; Yano, Yoshihiko

    1995-05-01

    One unit cell thick (1-UCT) YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) adjacent to nonsuperconducting PrBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (PrBCO) buffer layers have been grown epitaxially on SrTiO 3 (100) using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The layer thickness was accurately controlled by monitoring reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) specular intensity oscillations. Various oxide caps were grown epitaxially on the 1-UCT YBCO layer to form PrBCO/1-UCT YBCO/insulating oxide trilayers. It was found that superconducting 1-UCT YBCO layers were achieved when BaO with a good lattice match to YBCO was used as an insulating oxide in the trilayers. As the terminating atomic layer of 1-UCT YBCO layer is CuO 1-δ, the addition of an atomic BaO layer means the completion of the charge reservoir block of BaO-CuO 1-δ-BaO positioned above the CuO 2 bilayer (CuO 2YCuO 2). The PrBCO buffer layers provide another charge reservoir block positioned below the CuO 2 bilayer interposing Y. Therefore, the minimum unit for superconductivity in YBCO is the CuO 2 bilayer sandwiched between the charge reservoir blocks. In the present study, the systematic substitution of various AO layers for the one-sided atomic BaO layer of the charge reservoir block has been made by epitaxial growth of cap oxides such as rock-salt-type and perovskite-type oxides on the CuO 1-δ-terminated surface of 1-UCT YBCO layers. It is found that the small lattice mismatch between YBCO and the cap oxides, in addition to divalent A ions such as Ba 2+, Sr 2+, Ca 2+, Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ in atomic AO layers subsequent to the CuO 1-δ-terminated surface, is a requirement for superconductivity in 1-UCT YBCO layers.

  7. Spatiotemporal morphometry of adjacent tissue layers with application to the study of sulcal formation.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Rousseau, François; Glenn, Orit A; Barkovich, A James; Studholme, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The process of brain growth involves the expansion of tissue at different rates at different points within the brain. As the layers within the developing brain evolve they can thicken or increase in area as the brain surface begins to fold. In this work we propose a new spatiotemporal formulation of tensor based volume morphometry that is derived in relation to tissue boundaries. This allows the study of the directional properties of tissue growth by separately characterizing the changes in area and thickness of the adjacent layers. The approach uses temporally weighted, local regression across a population of anatomies with different ages to model changes in components of the growth radial and tangential to the boundary between tissue layers. The formulation is applied to the study of sulcal formation from in-utero MR imaging of human fetal brain anatomy. Results show that the method detects differential growth of tissue layers adjacent to the cortical surface, particularly at sulcal locations, as early as 22 gestational weeks. PMID:21995063

  8. Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

  9. Investigation of energy transfer mechanisms between two adjacent phosphorescent emission layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Carola; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Seidel, Stefan; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2012-06-01

    The investigation of energy transfer mechanisms between two adjacent phosphorescent emission layers comprising the green emitter molecule fac-tris(2-phenly-pyridin)iridium (Ir(ppy)3) and the red emitter molecule iridium(III)bis(2-methyldibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline(acetylacetonate) (Ir(MDQ)2(acac)) is presented. We show that the performance can be enhanced by a variation of the emission layer thickness and the emitter concentration. By inserting different interlayer materials between the emission units, we demonstrate that triplet excitons are formed on the Ir(ppy)3 and subsequently transferred to the Ir(MDQ)2(acac) molecules via the hole transporting host material N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine of the red emission layer. The variation of the interlayer thickness shows that the triplet diffusion length is several tens of nanometers. After optimization of the guest-host system an efficiency enhancement by 15% was achieved and the lifetime of the red-green emissive unit could be enhanced by 55%. Additionally, it is shown that this improved red-green unit can be combined with a fluorescent blue emitter in a state-of-the-art stacked white emissive organic light emitting diode.

  10. Filler-depletion layer adjacent to interface impacts performance of thermal interface material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yada, Susumu; Oyake, Takafumi; Sakata, Masanori; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2016-01-01

    When installing thermal interface material (TIM) between heat source and sink to reduce contact thermal resistance, the interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) between the TIM and heat source/sink may become important, especially when the TIM thickness becomes smaller in the next-generation device integration. To this end, we have investigated ITR between TIM and aluminum surface by using the time-domain thermoreflectance method. The measurements reveal large ITR attributed to the depletion of filler particles in TIM adjacent to the aluminum surface. The thickness of the depletion layer is estimated to be about 100 nm. As a consequence, the fraction of ITR to the total contact thermal resistance becomes about 20% when the TIM thickness is about 50 μm (current thickness), and it exceeds 50% when the thickness is smaller than 10 μm (next-generation thickness).

  11. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  12. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  13. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I.; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71–80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of γ-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-α, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-α in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism. PMID:17514680

  14. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W

    2007-06-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71-80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-alpha, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-alpha in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism.

  15. Sound insulation property of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials carrying different masses at adjacent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuguang; Wen, Jihong; Zhao, Honggang; Yu, Dianlong; Cai, Li; Wen, Xisen

    2013-08-01

    We present the experimental realization and theoretical understanding of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials embedded with different masses at adjacent cells, capable of increasing the transmission loss at low frequency. Owing to the reverse vibration of adjacent cells, Transmission loss (TL) peaks appear, and the magnitudes of the TL peaks exceed the predicted results of the composite wall. Compared with commonly used configuration, i.e., all cells carrying with identical mass, the nonuniformity of attaching masses causes another much low TL peak. Finite element analysis was employed to validate and provide insights into the TL behavior of the structure.

  16. Use of Double Layer of Acellular Dermal Matrix and Modified Tunnel Technique to Treat Multiple Adjacent Gingival Recession Defects.

    PubMed

    Mahn, Douglas H

    2016-09-01

    The goal of connective tissue grafting is to cover exposed root surfaces with gingival tissues that are stable and have a natural appearance. The use of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has been shown to be a successful alternative to the palatal connective tissue graft. Use of a double layer of an ADM has been shown to have stable results for 1 year. Tunnel grafting techniques can yield root coverage with a natural appearing soft-tissue architecture. The purpose of this case report is to demonstrate the use of a modified tunnel technique and a double layer of ADM in the treatment of multiple adjacent gingival recession defects. Treated teeth were found to have root coverage and natural soft-tissue contours that were stable at 20 months. PMID:27606567

  17. Numerical Study of Transmission Loss Through a Slow Gas Layer Adjacent to a Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Beck, Benjamin S.; Slagle, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic numerical investigation of the sound transmission loss through a multilayer system consisting of a bagged gas and lightweight panel. The goal of the study is to better understand the effect of the gas on transmission loss and determine whether a gas with a slow speed of sound is beneficial for noise control applications. As part of the study, the density and speed of sound of the gas are varied independently to assess the impact of each on transmission loss. Results show that near grazing incidence the plane wave transmission loss through the multilayer system is more sensitive to the speed of sound than the density of the gas. In addition, it was found that a slow wave speed in the bagged gas provides more low-frequency transmission loss benefit than a fast wave speed. At low angles of incidence, close to the plate normal, the benefit is due to the reduction of the characteristic impedance of the gas. At high angles of incidence, the benefit is attributed to the fact that the incident waves at the air/gas interface are bent towards the surface normal. Since transmission loss is angle dependent, refraction in the slow gas layer results in a significant improvement in the transmission loss at high angles of incidence.

  18. The role of electron confinement in Pd films for the oscillatory magnetic anisotropy in an adjacent Co layer.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sujit; Przybylski, M; Sander, D; Kirschner, J

    2016-11-16

    We demonstrate the interplay between quantum well states in Pd and the magnetic anisotropy in Pd/Co/Cu (0 0 1) by combined scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements. Low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals occupied and unoccupied quantum well states (QWS) in atomically flat Pd films on Co/Cu (0 0 1). These states give rise to sharp peaks in the differential conductance spectra. A quantitative analysis of the spectra reveals the electronic dispersion of the Pd (0 0 1) d-band ([Formula: see text]-type) along the [Formula: see text]-X direction. In situ MOKE experiments on Pd/Co/Cu (1, 1, 13) uncover a periodic variation of the in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy as a function of Pd thickness with a period of 6 atomic layers Pd. STS shows that QWS in Pd cross the Fermi level with the same periodicity of 6 atomic layers. Backed by previous theoretical work we ascribe the variation of the magnetic anisotropy in Co to QWS in the Pd overlayer. Our results suggest a novel venue towards tailoring uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of ferromagnetic films by exploiting QWS in an adjacent material with large spin-orbit coupling. PMID:27609044

  19. The role of electron confinement in Pd films for the oscillatory magnetic anisotropy in an adjacent Co layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Sujit; Przybylski, M.; Sander, D.; Kirschner, J.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the interplay between quantum well states in Pd and the magnetic anisotropy in Pd/Co/Cu (0 0 1) by combined scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements. Low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals occupied and unoccupied quantum well states (QWS) in atomically flat Pd films on Co/Cu (0 0 1). These states give rise to sharp peaks in the differential conductance spectra. A quantitative analysis of the spectra reveals the electronic dispersion of the Pd (0 0 1) d-band ({{ Δ }5} -type) along the Γ -X direction. In situ MOKE experiments on Pd/Co/Cu (1, 1, 13) uncover a periodic variation of the in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy as a function of Pd thickness with a period of 6 atomic layers Pd. STS shows that QWS in Pd cross the Fermi level with the same periodicity of 6 atomic layers. Backed by previous theoretical work we ascribe the variation of the magnetic anisotropy in Co to QWS in the Pd overlayer. Our results suggest a novel venue towards tailoring uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of ferromagnetic films by exploiting QWS in an adjacent material with large spin-orbit coupling.

  20. Molecular heterogeneity in adjacent cells in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huebschman, Michael L; Lane, Nancy L; Liu, Huaying; Sarode, Venetia R; Devlin, Judith L; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study interrogates the molecular status of individual cells in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and explores the molecular identification and characterization of these tumors to consider the exploitation of a potential-targeted therapeutic approach. Patients and methods Hyperspectral immunologic cell by cell analysis was applied to touch imprint smears obtained from fresh tumors of breast cancer patients. Results Cell by cell analysis confirms significant intratumoral molecular heterogeneity in cancer markers with differences from polymerase chain reaction marker reporting. The individual cell heterogeneity was recognized in adjacent cells examined with panels of ten molecular markers in each single cell and included some markers that are considered to express “stem-cell” character. In addition, heterogeneity did not relate either to the size or stage of the primary tumor or to the site from within the cancer. Conclusion There is a very significant molecular heterogeneity when “adjacent cells” are examined in triple-negative breast cancer, thereby making a successful targeted approach unlikely. In addition, it is not reasonable to consider that these changes will provide an answer to tumor dormancy. PMID:26316815

  1. Preferential localization of IgG memory B cells adjacent to contracted germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Aiba, Yuichi; Kometani, Kohei; Hamadate, Megumi; Moriyama, Saya; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Tomura, Michio; Luche, Hervé; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Casellas, Rafael; Kanagawa, Osami; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    It has long been presumed that after leaving the germinal centers (GCs), memory B cells colonize the marginal zone or join the recirculating pool. Here we demonstrate the preferential localization of nitrophenol-chicken γ-globulin-induced CD38+IgG1+ memory B cells adjacent to contracted GCs in the spleen. The memory B cells in this region proliferated after secondary immunization, a response that was abolished by depletion of CD4+ T cells. We also found that these IgG1+ memory B cells could present antigen on their surface, and that this activity was required for their activation. These results implicate this peri-GC region as an important site for survival and reactivation of memory B cells. PMID:20547847

  2. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  3. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  4. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  5. Layered electrode for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Swathirajan, Swathy; Mikhail, Youssef M.

    2001-01-01

    There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

  6. Human breast cancer biopsies induce eosinophil recruitment and enhance adjacent cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Szalayova, Gabriela; Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Spencer, Brianna; Wade, Jacqueline; Bunn, Janice; Ambaye, Abiy; James, Ted; Rincon, Mercedes

    2016-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is known to facilitate cancer progression and metastasis. Less is known about the effect of acute inflammation within the tumor microenvironment, resulting from standard invasive procedures. Recent studies in mouse models have shown that the acute inflammatory response triggered by a biopsy in mammary cancer increases the frequency of distal metastases. Although tumor biopsies are part of the standard clinical practice in breast cancer diagnosis, no studies have reported their effect on inflammatory response. The objective of this study is to (1) determine whether core needle biopsies in breast cancer patients trigger an inflammatory response, (2) characterize the type of inflammatory response present, and (3) evaluate the potential effect of any acute inflammatory response on residual tumor cells. The biopsy wound site was identified in the primary tumor resection tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The inflammatory response in areas adjacent (i.e., immediately around previous biopsy site) and distant to the wound biopsy was investigated by histology and immunohistochemistry analysis. Proliferation of tumor cells was also assayed. We demonstrate that diagnostic core needle biopsies trigger a selective recruitment of inflammatory cells at the site of the biopsy, and they persist for extended periods of time. While macrophages were part of the inflammatory response, an unexpected accumulation of eosinophils at the edge of the biopsy wound was also identified. Importantly, we show that biopsy causes an increase in the proliferation rate of tumor cells located in the area adjacent to the biopsy wound. Diagnostic core needle biopsies in breast cancer patients do induce a unique acute inflammatory response within the tumor microenvironment and have an effect on the surrounding tumor cells. Therefore, biopsy-induced inflammation could have an impact on residual tumor cell progression and/or metastasis in human breast cancer. These findings

  7. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0layer is disposed on the back surface of the portion of the substrate. A semiconductor layer is disposed on the silicon oxynitride dielectric layer.

  8. Iterative Convergence Acceleration of Neutral Particle Transport Methods via Adjacent-Cell Preconditioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmy, Y. Y.

    1999-06-01

    We propose preconditioning as a viable acceleration scheme for the inner iterations of transport calculations in slab geometry. In particular we develop Adjacent-Cell Preconditioners (AP) that have the same coupling stencil as cell-centered diffusion schemes. For lowest order methods, e.g., Diamond Difference, Step, and 0-order Nodal Integral Method (0NIM), cast in a Weighted Diamond Difference (WDD) form, we derive AP for thick (KAP) and thin (NAP) cells that for model problems are unconditionally stable and efficient. For the First-Order Nodal Integral Method (1NIM) we derive a NAP that possesses similarly excellent spectral properties for model problems. [Note that the order of NIM refers to the truncated order of the local expansion of the cell and edge fluxes in Legendre series.] The two most attractive features of our new technique are: (1) its cell-centered coupling stencil, which makes it more adequate for extension to multidimensional, higher order situations than the standard edge-centered or point-centered Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) methods; and (2) its decreasing spectral radius with increasing cell thickness to the extent that immediate pointwise convergence, i.e., in one iteration, can be achieved for problems with sufficiently thick cells. We implemented these methods, augmented with appropriate boundary conditions and mixing formulas for material heterogeneities, in the test code AP1D that we use to successfully verify the analytical spectral properties for homogeneous problems. Furthermore, we conduct numerical tests to demonstrate the robustness of the KAP and NAP in the presence of sharp mesh or material discontinuities. We show that the AP for WDD is highly resilient to such discontinuities, but for 1NIM a few cases occur in which the scheme does not converge; however, when it converges, AP greatly reduces the number of iterations required to achieve convergence.

  9. Iterative convergence acceleration of neutral particle transport methods via adjacent-cell preconditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1999-06-10

    The author proposes preconditioning as a viable acceleration scheme for the inner iterations of transport calculations in slab geometry. In particular he develops Adjacent-Cell Preconditioners (AP) that have the same coupling stencil as cell-centered diffusion schemes. For lowest order methods, e.g., Diamond Difference, Step, and 0-order Nodal Integral Method (ONIM), cast in a Weighted Diamond Difference (WDD) form, he derives AP for thick (KAP) and thin (NAP) cells that for model problems are unconditionally stable and efficient. For the First-Order Nodal Integral Method (INIM) he derives a NAP that possesses similarly excellent spectral properties for model problems. The two most attractive features of the new technique are:(1) its cell-centered coupling stencil, which makes it more adequate for extension to multidimensional, higher order situations than the standard edge-centered or point-centered Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (DSA) methods; and (2) its decreasing spectral radius with increasing cell thickness to the extent that immediate pointwise convergence, i.e., in one iteration, can be achieved for problems with sufficiently thick cells. He implemented these methods, augmented with appropriate boundary conditions and mixing formulas for material heterogeneities, in the test code APID that he uses to successfully verify the analytical spectral properties for homogeneous problems. Furthermore, he conducts numerical tests to demonstrate the robustness of the KAP and NAP in the presence of sharp mesh or material discontinuities. He shows that the AP for WDD is highly resilient to such discontinuities, but for INIM a few cases occur in which the scheme does not converge; however, when it converges, AP greatly reduces the number of iterations required to achieve convergence.

  10. Spontaneous Activity of Cochlear Hair Cells Triggered by Fluid Secretion Mechanism in Adjacent Support Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Cheung, Rocky; Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Rock, Jason; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity of neurons in developing sensory systems promotes their maturation and proper connectivity. In the auditory system, spontaneous activity of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) is initiated by the release of ATP from glia-like inner supporting cells (ISCs), facilitating maturation of central pathways before hearing onset. Here, we find that ATP stimulates purinergic autoreceptors in ISCs, triggering Cl(-) efflux and osmotic cell shrinkage by opening TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. Release of Cl(-) from ISCs also forces K(+) efflux, causing transient depolarization of IHCs near ATP release sites. Genetic deletion of TMEM16A markedly reduces the spontaneous activity of IHCs and spiral ganglion neurons in the developing cochlea and prevents ATP-dependent shrinkage of supporting cells. These results indicate that supporting cells in the developing cochlea have adapted a pathway used for fluid secretion in other organs to induce periodic excitation of hair cells. PMID:26627734

  11. Cochlear supporting cell transdifferentiation and integration into hair cell layers by inhibition of ephrin-B2 signalling.

    PubMed

    Defourny, Jean; Mateo Sánchez, Susana; Schoonaert, Lies; Robberecht, Wim; Davy, Alice; Nguyen, Laurent; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2015-04-29

    In mammals, cochlear sensory hair cells that are responsible for hearing are postmitotic and are not replaced after loss. One of the most promising strategies to regenerate hair cells is to identify and inhibit the factors preventing the conversion of adjacent non-sensory supporting cells into hair cells. Here we demonstrate that mammalian hair cells can be directly generated from supporting cells by inhibition of ephrin-B2 signalling. Using either ephrin-B2 conditional knockout mice, shRNA-mediated gene silencing or soluble inhibitors, we found that downregulation of ephrin-B2 signalling at embryonic stages results in supporting cell translocation into hair cell layers and subsequent switch in cell identity from supporting cell to hair cell fate. As transdifferentiation is here a result of displacement across boundary, this original finding presents the interest that newly generated hair cells directly integrate either hair cell layer, then would be likely more rapidly able to fit into functional circuitry.

  12. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  13. Feeder Layer Cell Actions and Applications.

    PubMed

    Llames, Sara; García-Pérez, Eva; Meana, Álvaro; Larcher, Fernando; del Río, Marcela

    2015-08-01

    Cultures of growth-arrested feeder cells have been used for years to promote cell proliferation, particularly with low-density inocula. Basically, feeder cells consist in a layer of cells unable to divide, which provides extracellular secretions to help another cell to proliferate. It differs from a coculture system because only one cell type is capable to proliferate. It is known that feeder cells support the growth of target cells by releasing growth factors to the culture media, but this is not the only way that feeder cells promote the growth of target cells. In this work, we discuss the different mechanisms of action of feeder cells, tackling questions as to why for some cell cultures the presence of feeder cell layers is mandatory, while in some other cases, the growth of target cells can be achieved with just a conditioned medium. Different treatments to avoid feeder cells to proliferate are revised, not only the classical treatments as mitomycin or γ-irradiation but also the not so common treatments as electric pulses or chemical fixation. Regenerative medicine has been gaining importance in recent years as a discipline that moves biomedical technology from the laboratory to the patients. In this context, human stem and pluripotent cells play an important role, but the presence of feeder cells is necessary for these progenitor cells to grow and differentiate. This review addresses recent specific applications, including those associated to the growth of embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we have also dealt with safety issues, including feeder cell sources, as major factors of concern for clinical applications.

  14. Feeder Layer Cell Actions and Applications

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Eva; Meana, Álvaro; Larcher, Fernando; del Río, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Cultures of growth-arrested feeder cells have been used for years to promote cell proliferation, particularly with low-density inocula. Basically, feeder cells consist in a layer of cells unable to divide, which provides extracellular secretions to help another cell to proliferate. It differs from a coculture system because only one cell type is capable to proliferate. It is known that feeder cells support the growth of target cells by releasing growth factors to the culture media, but this is not the only way that feeder cells promote the growth of target cells. In this work, we discuss the different mechanisms of action of feeder cells, tackling questions as to why for some cell cultures the presence of feeder cell layers is mandatory, while in some other cases, the growth of target cells can be achieved with just a conditioned medium. Different treatments to avoid feeder cells to proliferate are revised, not only the classical treatments as mitomycin or γ-irradiation but also the not so common treatments as electric pulses or chemical fixation. Regenerative medicine has been gaining importance in recent years as a discipline that moves biomedical technology from the laboratory to the patients. In this context, human stem and pluripotent cells play an important role, but the presence of feeder cells is necessary for these progenitor cells to grow and differentiate. This review addresses recent specific applications, including those associated to the growth of embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we have also dealt with safety issues, including feeder cell sources, as major factors of concern for clinical applications. PMID:25659081

  15. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  16. Horizontal Divergence and Vertical Velocity Adjacent to the Pyrenees Measured During the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon & Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faloona, I. C.; Lothon, M.

    2014-12-01

    Because of the dominant influence of surface solar heating on atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows, the character and even underlying theories of turbulence vary diurnally over the continents. While great strides have been made in our understanding of the stable boundary layers that prevail overnight, the period of transition from a convective daytime to a stable nighttime ABL remains a very challenging problem in no small part because of its inherently non-stationary nature and because both of the main forcings, wind stress and surface heat flux, tend to flag at this time of day. These underexplored topics motivated the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field experiment held in the summer of 2011 at the CNRS Laboratorie d'Aerologie in Campistrous, France. On three of the twelve intensive observational days of the experiment, three rawinsondes were launched simultaneously approximately 3 km apart throughout the afternoon transition in order to directly measure mesoscale horizontal divergence in the ABL and lower free troposphere. Using the assumption of incompressibility, the observed divergence is integrated and a vertical profile of mean vertical wind is derived for the lower troposphere. Although the magnitude of the inferred vertical winds are much larger than expected (of order 0.1 ms-1), the measurements do indicate a clear trend in afternoon subsidence giving way to evening uplift at the site, which is within ~10 km of the Pyrenees' foothills. The observed transition from low-level divergence to convergence was accompanied by a deep surface pressure minimum that fluctuated by nearly 300 Pa diurnally, and we propose that it is likely related to the reversal of the plain-mountain circulation across the region. The impact of such behavior on boundary layer growth and entrainment during the afternoon hours are discussed along with evidence of similar behavior observed elsewhere in mountainous terrain.

  17. Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2014-06-24

    A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

  18. Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

  19. The growth and structure of double-diffusive cells adjacent to a cooled sidewall in a salt-stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki-Epshtein, Liora; Phillips, Owen M.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2004-11-01

    Observations and measurements are reported on the patterns and rates of growth in time of the double-diffusive cells that form adjacent to a cooled sidewall in a saltstratified environment. Fluid near the wall is cooled and sinks a distance h where its density, increased by cooling, matches that of the salt-stratified ambient. The fluid separates from the wall, moving outwards as a cool, fresher layer beneath a warmer, more saline region. This leads to growing double-diffusive cells that advance outward at a rate, found by dimensional reasoning, to initially be proportional to N_{0}h, where N_{0} is the initial buoyancy frequency in the ambient and h is the intrusion's vertical thickness. Near the wall at the top of each cell, the sinking colder fluid is continually replaced by selective withdrawal from the ambient ‘far field’. The fluid being withdrawn from the ambient is always the least dense in the cell, and as the experiment proceeds, the straining of the fluid in the ambient region reduces the stratification. The vertical density gradient inside the cell relaxes by continuous hydrostatic adjustment (CHA) to match the ambient and the speed of advance reduces. Measurements of the rate of advance of the cell nose were made in tanks of different lengths L with a range of initial salinity gradients and temperature differences. A simple two-dimensional model is developed to describe the rate of extension of the cells and the internal density gradient as functions of time in which the tank length appears as an important variable. This effect does not seem to have been recognized previously. The rates of evolution in each run involve the time scale tau {=} L /( {C_H hN_0 }), where C_H {≈} 10({) - 2} is a heat transfer coefficient. The mean length of the cells skew2bar {l}(t)and the internal buoyancy frequency as functions of time are given by [ skew2bar {l}(t) / L = t/tau - ( t/2tau)^2,quad N = N_0 (1 - t / 2tau ). ] Inversion of the first of these expressions

  20. Correlative light and electron microscopy of the frog adrenal gland cells using adjacent epon-embedded sections.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Y; Iwashita, T

    1976-07-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy on the same cells of the adrenal gland of the frog, Rana nigromaculata, fixed in glutaraldehyde followed by osmium tetroxide, was done using the adjacent Epon embedded sections. Electron microscope observation revealed three different types of granule-filled secretory cells; the noradrenaline-storing cells (NA cells) filled with intensely dense and varying shaped granules, the adrenaline-strong cells (A cells) filled with relatively less dense granules and the summer cells (STILLING, 1898) containing very large, round or polygonal granules (0.2-1.3 mu in diameter). Light microscopically, an essential difference could be observed in the affinity to ammoniacal silver solution between NA and A cells. It was clarified that the granules of NA cells stained in black and were clearly distinguishable from the yellow- or brown-stained granules in both A cells and summer cells. This silver method can be applied for the light microscopic identification of the NA cells in the Epon-embedded sections. Furthermore, after immersing the thick sections in toluidine blue or methylene blue, the granules of NA cells showed much stronger affinity to both dyes than those of A cells and became dark blue and occasionally stained greenish blue in methylene blue, while the summer cells became blue and the granules of the A cells stained light blue.

  1. Two-layer organic photovoltaic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, C.W.

    1986-01-13

    A thin-film, two-layer organic photovoltaic cell has been fabricated from copper phthalocyanine and a perylene tetracarboxylic derivative. A power conversion efficiency of about 1% has been achieved under simulated AM2 illumination. A novel feature of the device is that the charge-generation efficiency is relatively independent of the bias voltage, resulting in cells with fill factor values as high as 0.65. The interface between the two organic materials, rather than the electrode/organic contacts, is crucial in determining the photovoltaic properties of the cell.

  2. Photovoltaic cell with thin CS layer

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, John F.; Albright, Scot P.

    1994-01-18

    An improved photovoltaic panel and method of forming a photovoltaic panel are disclosed for producing a high efficiency CdS/CdTe photovoltaic cell. The photovoltaic panel of the present invention is initially formed with a substantially thick Cds layer, and the effective thickness of the CdS layer is substantially reduced during regrowth to both form larger diameter CdTe crystals and substantially reduce the effective thickness of the C This invention was made with Government support under Subcontract No. ZL-7-06031-3 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  3. Dynamics of re-constitution of the human nuclear proteome after cell division is regulated by NLS-adjacent phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Róna, Gergely; Borsos, Máté; Ellis, Jonathan J; Mehdi, Ahmed M; Christie, Mary; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Neubrandt, Máté; Tóth, Judit; Bozóky, Zoltán; Buday, László; Madarász, Emília; Bodén, Mikael; Kobe, Bostjan; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation by the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) adjacent to nuclear localization signals (NLSs) is an important mechanism of regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, no systematic survey has yet been performed in human cells to analyze this regulatory process, and the corresponding cell-cycle dynamics have not yet been investigated. Here, we focused on the human proteome and found that numerous proteins, previously not identified in this context, are associated with Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation sites adjacent to their NLSs. Interestingly, these proteins are involved in key regulatory events of DNA repair, epigenetics, or RNA editing and splicing. This finding indicates that cell-cycle dependent events of genome editing and gene expression profiling may be controlled by nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. For in-depth investigations, we selected a number of these proteins and analyzed how point mutations, expected to modify the phosphorylation ability of the NLS segments, perturb nucleocytoplasmic localization. In each case, we found that mutations mimicking hyper-phosphorylation abolish nuclear import processes. To understand the mechanism underlying these phenomena, we performed a video microscopy-based kinetic analysis to obtain information on cell-cycle dynamics on a model protein, dUTPase. We show that the NLS-adjacent phosphorylation by Cdk1 of human dUTPase, an enzyme essential for genomic integrity, results in dynamic cell cycle-dependent distribution of the protein. Non-phosphorylatable mutants have drastically altered protein re-import characteristics into the nucleus during the G1 phase. Our results suggest a dynamic Cdk1-driven mechanism of regulation of the nuclear proteome composition during the cell cycle. PMID:25483092

  4. [Species specificity of morphogenetic factors of Acetabularia, localized in the cytoplasmic zone adjacent to the cell membrane].

    PubMed

    Naumova, G A; Naumova, L P; Puchkova, L I; Savchenko, S M; Sandakhchiev, L S

    1976-01-01

    The species specificity of the factors controlling the cap development was established in the experiments with the transplantation of both the intact and centrifuged in the basal direction apical regions of Acetabularia meditteranea on nuclear basal regions of A. crenulata. These factors are found at the stage of 72 hrs of regeneration primarily in the cytoplasmic zone adjacent to the cell membrane which is not displaced during centrifugation. Using direct measurements and radiochemical method, we have shown that the accumulation of proteins proceeded in this zone due, mainly, to their transition from the cytoplasmic zone displaced during centrifugation.

  5. Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Christopher S.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Kahaian, Arthur J.; Kim, Jeom-Soo

    2008-04-15

    Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

  6. Transient nonlinear optically-thick radiative-convective double-diffusive boundary layers in a Darcian porous medium adjacent to an impulsively started surface: Network simulation solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar Bég, O.; Zueco, J.; Takhar, H. S.; Bég, T. A.; Sajid, A.

    2009-11-01

    A boundary-layer model is described for the two-dimensional nonlinear transient thermal convection heat and mass transfer in an optically-thick fluid in a Darcian porous medium adjacent to an impulsively started vertical surface, in the presence of significant thermal radiation and buoyancy forces in an (X∗,Y∗,t∗) coordinate system. An algebraic approximation is employed to simplify the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer for unidirectional flux normal to the plate into the boundary-layer regime, by incorporating this flux term in the energy conservation equation. The conservation equations are non-dimensionalized into an (X,Y,T) coordinate system and solved using the Network Simulation Method (NSM), a robust numerical technique which demonstrates high efficiency and accuracy. The transient variation of non-dimensional streamwise velocity component (u) and temperature (T) and concentration (C) functions is computed for various selected values of Stark number (radiation-conduction interaction parameter) and Darcy number. Transient velocity (u) and steady-state local skin friction (τX) are also studied for various thermal Grashof number (Gr), species Grashof number (Gm), Schmidt number (Sc) and Stark number (N) values. These computations for the infinite permeability case (Da → ∞) are compared with previous finite difference solutions [Prasad et al. Int J Therm Sci 2007;46(12):1251-8] and shown to be in excellent agreement. An increase in Darcy number is seen to accelerate the flow and boost velocity. A decrease in Stark number (corresponding to an increase in thermal radiation heat transfer contribution) is shown to increase the velocity values. Temperature function is observed to fall in value with a rise in Da and increase with decrease in N (corresponding to an increase in thermal radiation heat transfer contribution). Applications of the study include rocket combustion chambers, astrophysical flows, spacecraft thermal fluid dynamics in

  7. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  8. Magnetic structures of the low temperature phase of Mn3(VO4)2 - towards understanding magnetic ordering between adjacent Kagomé layers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Oliver; Rohrer, Jochen; Nénert, Gwilherm

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report on a detailed analysis of the magnetic structures of the magnetic phases of the low temperature (lt-) phase of Mn3(VO4)2 (=Mn3V2O8) with a Kagomé staircase structure determined by means of powder neutron diffraction. Two magnetic transitions were found at ∼25 K (HT1 phase, Cmc'a') and ∼17 K (LT1 phase, Pmc'a'), in excellent agreement with previous reports. The LT1 phase is characterized by commensurate magnetic ordering of the magnetic moments on two magnetic sites of the Mn1a/b (2a + 2d) and Mn2 (8i) ions of the nuclear structure (where for the latter site two different overall orientations of magnetic moments within the ab-plane (Mn2a and Mn2b) can be distinguished. This results in mainly antiferromagnetic interactions between edge-sharing Mn-octahedra within the Kagomé planes. The HT1 phase is characterised by strong spin frustration resulting from the loss of ordering of the magnetic moments of Mn2a/b ions along the b-axis. Both magnetic structures are in agreement with the previously reported ferrimagnetic properties of lt-Mn3(VO4)2 and shed light on the magnetic phase diagram of the compound reported previously. The magnetic structures are discussed with respect to superexchange interaction pathways within the Kagomé layers, which appear to be predominantly antiferromagnetic. The magnetic structures of Mn3(VO4)2 are different compared to those reported for Ni3(VO4)2 and Co3(VO4)2 and represent an unique commensurate way out of spin frustration for compounds with strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions within the Kagomé layers. Additionally, we derive a superexchange model, which will be called redox-mediated M-M(')(d(0))-M superexchange and which can help to understand the exclusively ferromagnetic ordering of adjacent Kagomé layers found only for lt-Mn3(VO4)2.

  9. Magnetic structures of the low temperature phase of Mn3(VO4)2 - towards understanding magnetic ordering between adjacent Kagomé layers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Oliver; Rohrer, Jochen; Nénert, Gwilherm

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report on a detailed analysis of the magnetic structures of the magnetic phases of the low temperature (lt-) phase of Mn3(VO4)2 (=Mn3V2O8) with a Kagomé staircase structure determined by means of powder neutron diffraction. Two magnetic transitions were found at ∼25 K (HT1 phase, Cmc'a') and ∼17 K (LT1 phase, Pmc'a'), in excellent agreement with previous reports. The LT1 phase is characterized by commensurate magnetic ordering of the magnetic moments on two magnetic sites of the Mn1a/b (2a + 2d) and Mn2 (8i) ions of the nuclear structure (where for the latter site two different overall orientations of magnetic moments within the ab-plane (Mn2a and Mn2b) can be distinguished. This results in mainly antiferromagnetic interactions between edge-sharing Mn-octahedra within the Kagomé planes. The HT1 phase is characterised by strong spin frustration resulting from the loss of ordering of the magnetic moments of Mn2a/b ions along the b-axis. Both magnetic structures are in agreement with the previously reported ferrimagnetic properties of lt-Mn3(VO4)2 and shed light on the magnetic phase diagram of the compound reported previously. The magnetic structures are discussed with respect to superexchange interaction pathways within the Kagomé layers, which appear to be predominantly antiferromagnetic. The magnetic structures of Mn3(VO4)2 are different compared to those reported for Ni3(VO4)2 and Co3(VO4)2 and represent an unique commensurate way out of spin frustration for compounds with strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions within the Kagomé layers. Additionally, we derive a superexchange model, which will be called redox-mediated M-M(')(d(0))-M superexchange and which can help to understand the exclusively ferromagnetic ordering of adjacent Kagomé layers found only for lt-Mn3(VO4)2. PMID:26585499

  10. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence. PMID:26609568

  11. The vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum produces biofilms required for its virulence on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yuka; Inoue, Kanako; Ikeda, Kenichi; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi; Higashimoto, Chikaki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of colonization of intercellular spaces by the soil-borne and vascular plant-pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum strain OE1-1 after invasion into host plants remains unclear. To analyse the behaviour of OE1-1 cells in intercellular spaces, tomato leaves with the lower epidermis layers excised after infiltration with OE1-1 were observed under a scanning electron microscope. OE1-1 cells formed microcolonies on the surfaces of tomato cells adjacent to intercellular spaces, and then aggregated surrounded by an extracellular matrix, forming mature biofilm structures. Furthermore, OE1-1 cells produced mushroom-type biofilms when incubated in fluids of apoplasts including intercellular spaces, but not xylem fluids from tomato plants. This is the first report of biofilm formation by R. solanacearum on host plant cells after invasion into intercellular spaces and mushroom-type biofilms produced by R. solanacearum in vitro. Sugar application led to enhanced biofilm formation by OE1-1. Mutation of lecM encoding a lectin, RS-IIL, which reportedly exhibits affinity for these sugars, led to a significant decrease in biofilm formation. Colonization in intercellular spaces was significantly decreased in the lecM mutant, leading to a loss of virulence on tomato plants. Complementation of the lecM mutant with native lecM resulted in the recovery of mushroom-type biofilms and virulence on tomato plants. Together, our findings indicate that OE1-1 produces mature biofilms on the surfaces of tomato cells after invasion into intercellular spaces. RS-IIL may contribute to biofilm formation by OE1-1, which is required for OE1-1 virulence.

  12. Periostin differentially induces proliferation, contraction and apoptosis of primary Dupuytren's disease and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vi, Linda; Feng, Lucy; Zhu, Rebecca D.; Wu, Yan; Satish, Latha; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David B.

    2009-12-10

    Dupuytren's disease, (DD), is a fibroproliferative condition of the palmar fascia in the hand, typically resulting in permanent contracture of one or more fingers. This fibromatosis is similar to scarring and other fibroses in displaying excess collagen secretion and contractile myofibroblast differentiation. In this report we expand on previous data demonstrating that POSTN mRNA, which encodes the extra-cellular matrix protein periostin, is up-regulated in Dupuytren's disease cord tissue relative to phenotypically normal palmar fascia. We demonstrate that the protein product of POSTN, periostin, is abundant in Dupuytren's disease cord tissue while little or no periostin immunoreactivity is evident in patient-matched control tissues. The relevance of periostin up-regulation in DD was assessed in primary cultures of cells derived from diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia from the same patients. These cells were grown in type-1 collagen-enriched culture conditions with or without periostin addition to more closely replicate the in vivo environment. Periostin was found to differentially regulate the apoptosis, proliferation, {alpha} smooth muscle actin expression and stressed Fibroblast Populated Collagen Lattice contraction of these cell types. We hypothesize that periostin, secreted by disease cord myofibroblasts into the extra-cellular matrix, promotes the transition of resident fibroblasts in the palmar fascia toward a myofibroblast phenotype, thereby promoting disease progression.

  13. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  14. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2015-03-10

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  15. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Goettler, Richard; Liu, Zhien

    2015-08-11

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  16. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-09-29

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  17. Replication Fork Velocities at Adjacent Replication Origins Are Coordinately Modified during DNA Replication in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Chiara; Saccà, Barbara; Herrick, John; Lalou, Claude; Pommier, Yves

    2007-01-01

    The spatial organization of replicons into clusters is believed to be of critical importance for genome duplication in higher eukaryotes, but its functional organization still remains to be fully clarified. The coordinated activation of origins is insufficient on its own to account for a timely completion of genome duplication when interorigin distances vary significantly and fork velocities are constant. Mechanisms coordinating origin distribution with fork progression are still poorly elucidated, because of technical difficulties of visualizing the process. Taking advantage of a single molecule approach, we delineated and compared the DNA replication kinetics at the genome level in human normal primary and malignant cells. Our results show that replication forks moving from one origin, as well as from neighboring origins, tend to exhibit the same velocity, although the plasticity of the replication program allows for their adaptation to variable interorigin distances. We also found that forks that emanated from closely spaced origins tended to move slower than those associated with long replicons. Taken together, our results indicate a functional role for origin clustering in the dynamic regulation of genome duplication. PMID:17522385

  18. Thin-Layer Fuel Cell for Teaching and Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirkhanzadeh, M.

    2009-01-01

    A thin-layer fuel cell is described that is simple and easy to set up and is particularly useful for teaching and classroom demonstrations. The cell is both an electrolyzer and a fuel cell and operates using a thin layer of electrolyte with a thickness of approximately 127 micrometers and a volume of approximately 40 microliters. As an…

  19. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  20. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  1. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called “cell transfer technology”, enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  2. Layer-by-layer tissue microfabrication supports cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Catros, Sylvain; Guillemot, Fabien; Nandakumar, Anandkumar; Ziane, Sophia; Moroni, Lorenzo; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Rousseau, Benoit; Chassande, Olivier; Amédée, Joëlle; Fricain, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer biofabrication represents a novel strategy to create three-dimensional living structures with a controlled internal architecture, using cell micromanipulation technologies. Laser assisted bioprinting (LAB) is an effective printing method for patterning cells, biomolecules, and biomaterials in two dimensions. "Biopapers," made of thin polymer scaffolds, may be appropriate to achieve three-dimensional constructs and to reinforce mechanical properties of printed materials. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the tridimensional organization of cells and biomaterials on cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The experimental LAB setup was comprised of an infrared laser, focused onto a glass ribbon coated with an absorbing layer of gold. The cell bioink was made of MG63 cells (50 millions cells/mL in culture medium and 1% alginate), transduced with Luciferase gene for tracking and quantification. The printing substrate was a 100-μm-thick polycaprolacton (PCL) electrospun scaffold. The building sequence comprised sequential layers of cells and PCL scaffolds stacked using two different tridimensional arrangements, which were compared in this study (layer-by-layer vs. seeding on a single locus of the scaffolds). Then the cell-seeded materials were cultured in vitro or implanted in vivo in NOD-SCID mice. The qualitative follow-up involved scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, live-dead assays, and histology. The cell amount was quantified by photon imager during 21 days in vitro and 2 months in vivo. Live- dead assay and SEM revealed that the cells survived after printing and spread onto PCL membranes. Circle-shaped patterns were maintained in vitro during the first week but they were no longer observable after 2 weeks, due to cell proliferation. Luciferase tracking displayed that the cell amount was increased in vitro and in vivo when the materials and the cells where stacked layer by layer. Histological sections of the in vivo

  3. Influence of texture modifications in silicon solar cells on absorption in the intrinsic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermes, M.; Bittkau, K.; Carius, R.

    2012-06-01

    The influence of the front texture of an etched transparent conductive oxide with crater-like structures of various sizes on the absorption of a thin amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer is investigated by rigorous optical simulations as part of two simplified systems: A simplified single junction device, using a perfect metal as back contact and a top cell of an amorphous/microcrystalline silicon tandem device, using a microcrystalline silicon halfspace adjacent to the amorphous layer. The texture is modified by stretching either in height or laterally and the average absorption in the a-Si:H layer is investigated relative to the original structure. We investigate the average absorption for each wavelength as well as the total absorption, weighted with an AM1.5g spectrum. Furthermore, the local absorption distribution inside the a-Si:H layer is examined to improve the understanding of local texture features and their influence on absorption and cell performance. For both modifications, an optimal point can be found to improve the absorption in the amorphous layer by up to 15% and 6% for a simplified single junction and tandem top cell, respectively. In case of the top cell of the simplified tandem device, it is found that additionally, the transmission into the microcrystalline silicon can be improved. Also, the local absorption distribution shows that there is an optimal size of the surface craters for all modifications, while steeper crater rims in general lead to higher absorption.

  4. Layer-by-layer all-transfer-based organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kyu; Kim, Wanjung; Wang, Dong Hwan; Lee, Haksoo; Cho, Sung M; Choi, Dae-Geun; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2013-04-30

    For the first time, we describe a novel cost- and time-effective vacuum-free process to fabricate bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics (OPVs) via layer-by-layer selective stamping transfer of all layers. By controlling the surface properties of polyurethane acrylate (PUA) stamping molds with ultraviolet (UV)-ozone (UVO) exposure, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS), BHJ layer, and metal cathode were uniformly transferred layer by layer onto each of the bottom layers. Among several interfaces between each layer, we found that the interface between the active layer and metal cathode is a critical factor in obtaining conventional device-like efficiency. To enhance the interfacial connectivity between the BHJ layer and metal cathode and increase electron extraction from the BHJ layer, a titanium oxide (TiOx) interlayer was introduced. Cell performance was optimized by controlling the concentration of TiOx solution. The poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PC60BM) BHJ device fabricated by transferring PEDOT/PSS, TiOx/active layer, and Al cathode showed 2.01% power conversion efficiency. This efficiency is not comparable to those of conventional OPVs, but our approach shows the possibility of fabricating OPVs via the layer-by-layer transfer method for the first time.

  5. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan; Rand, Barry P.

    2011-09-06

    A photosensitive device includes a plurality of organic photoconductive materials disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode, including a first continuous layer of donor host material, a second continuous layer of acceptor host material, and at least one other organic photoconductive material disposed as a plurality of discontinuous islands between the first continuous layer and the second continuous layer. Each of these other photoconductive materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor host material and the acceptor host material. Preferably, each of the discontinuous islands consists essentially of a crystallite of the respective organic photoconductive material, and more preferably, the crystallites are nanocrystals.

  6. The evaluation of layered separators for nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, Randall F.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of using layered separators to achieve the required electrolyte retention and bubble pressure fo nickel-hydrogen cells was evaluated in a boilerplate cell test. Zircar cloth, polyethylene paper and polypropylene felt were combined with a layer of radiation-grafted polyethylene film to achieve the required properties. Three cells of each layered separator were built and tested by characterization cycling and by low earth orbit cycling for 5000 cycles at 80 percent DOD. Three cells containing asbestos separators were used as the reference.

  7. Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Salem, Ahmed F.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells. PMID

  8. Development of a cell line from Echinococcus granulosus germinal layer.

    PubMed

    Albani, Clara María; Cumino, Andrea Carina; Elissondo, María Celina; Denegri, Guillermo María

    2013-10-01

    In vitro culture of parasitic helminths provides an important tool to study cell regeneration and physiology, as well as for molecular biology and genetic engineering studies. In the present study, we established in vitro propagation of cells from Echinococcus granulosus germinal cyst layer. E. granulosus germinal cells grew beyond 100 passages and showed no signs of reduced proliferation capacity. Microscopic analysis revealed that cells grew both attached to the substrate and in suspension, forming three-dimensional structures like mammalian stem cell aggregates. Examination of the chromosome number of attached germinal cells showed a high degree of heteroploidy, suggesting the occurrence of transformation during culture. Monolayer cells survived cryopreservation and were able to proliferate after thawing. Based on the characteristics displayed by E. granulosus germinal cells, we establish a cell line from the E. granulosus germinal layer. Furthermore, we propose that this cell line could be useful for drug screening and for obtaining parasite material.

  9. Murine matrix metalloproteinase-20 overexpression stimulates cell invasion into the enamel layer via enhanced Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masashi; Suzuki, Maiko; Guan, Xiaomu; Smith, Charles E.; Bartlett, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) is expressed by ameloblasts in developing teeth and MMP20 mutations cause enamel malformation. We established a stably transfected Tet-Off Mmp20-inducible ameloblast-lineage cell line and found that MMP20 expression promoted cell invasion. Previously, we engineered transgenic mice (Tg) that drive Mmp20 expression and showed that Mmp20+/+Tg mice had soft enamel. Here we asked if Mmp20 overexpression disrupts ameloblast function. Incisors from Mmp20+/+ mice expressing the Mmp20 Tg had a striking cell infiltrate which nearly replaced the entire enamel layer. A thin layer of enamel-like material remained over the dentin and at the outer tooth surface, but between these regions were invading fibroblasts and epithelial cells that surrounded ectopic bone-like calcifications. Mmp20+/+Tg mice had decreased enamel organ cadherin levels compared to the Mmp20 ablated and WT mice and, instead of predominantly locating adjacent to the ameloblast cell membrane, β-catenin was predominantly present within the nuclei of invading cells. Our data suggest that increased cadherin cleavage by transgenic MMP20 in the WT background releases excess β-catenin, which translocates to ameloblast nuclei to promote cell migration/invasion. Therefore, we conclude that MMP20 plays a role in normal ameloblast migration through tightly controlled Wnt signaling and that MMP20 overexpression disrupts this process. PMID:27403713

  10. Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rajeewa R.

    1988-01-12

    Superlattice doped layers for amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells comprise a plurality of first and second lattices of amorphous silicon alternatingly formed on one another. Each of the first lattices has a first optical bandgap and each of the second lattices has a second optical bandgap different from the first optical bandgap. A method of fabricating the superlattice doped layers also is disclosed.

  11. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  12. Silicon solar cell using optimized intermediate reflector layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed E.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2016-03-01

    Thin film silicon based photovoltaic cells have the advantages of using low cost nontoxic abundant constituents and low thermal manufacturing budget. However, better long-term efficiencies need to be achieved overcoming its inherent bad electrical properties of amorphous and/or microcrystalline Silicon. For the goal of achieving best results, multijunction cells of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin layers are industrially and lab utilized in addition to using one or more light management techniques such as textured layers, periodic and plasmonic back reflectors, flattened reflective substrates and intermediate reflector layer (IRL) between multijunction cells. The latter, IRL, which is the focus of this paper, serves as spectrally selective layer between different cells of the multijunction silicon thin film solar cell. IRL, reflects to the top cell short wavelength while permitting and scattering longer ones to achieve the best possible short circuit current. In this study, a new optimized periodic design of Intermediate reflector layer in micromorph (two multijunction cells of Microcrystalline and Amorphous Silicon) thin film solar cells is proposed. The optically simulated short circuit current reaches record values for same thickness designs when using all-ZnO design and even better results is anticipated if Lacquer material is used in combination with ZnO. The design methodology used in the paper can be easily applied to different types of IRL materials and also extended to triple and the relatively newly proposed quadruple thin films solar cells.

  13. Microfluidic approaches for epithelial cell layer culture and characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Thuenauer, Roland; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Römer, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, epithelial cell layers line most body cavities and form selective barriers that regulate the exchange of solutes between compartments. In order to fulfil these functions, the cells assume a polarised architecture and maintain two distinct plasma membrane domains, the apical domain facing the lumen and the basolateral domain facing other cells and the extracellular matrix. Microfluidic biochips offer the unique opportunity to establish novel in vitro models of epithelia in which the in vivo microenvironment of epithelial cells is precisely reconstituted. In addition, analytical tools to monitor biologically relevant parameters can be directly integrated on-chip. In this review we summarise recently developed biochip designs for culturing epithelial cell layers. Since endothelial cell layers, which line blood vessels, have similar barrier functions and polar organisation as epithelial cell layers, we also discuss biochips for culturing endothelial cell layers. Furthermore, we review approaches to integrate tools to analyse and manipulate epithelia and endothelia in microfluidic biochips, including methods to perform electrical impedance spectroscopy, methods to detect substances undergoing trans-epithelial transport via fluorescence, spectrophotometry, and mass spectrometry, techniques to mechanically stimulate cells via stretching and fluid flow-induced shear stress, and methods to carry out high-resolution imaging of vesicular trafficking with light microscopy. Taken together, this versatile microfluidic toolbox enables novel experimental approaches to characterise epithelial monolayers. PMID:24668405

  14. Wave Propagation in Expanding Cell Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The coordinated migration of groups of cells drives important biological processes, such as wound healing and morphogenesis. In this talk we present a minimal continuum model of an expanding cell monolayer coupling elastic deformations to myosin-based activity in the cells. The myosin-driven contractile activity is quantified by the chemical potential difference for the process of ATP hydrolysis by myosin motors. A new ingredient of the model is a feedback of the local strain rate of the monolayer on contractility that naturally yields a mechanism for viscoelasticity of the cellular medium. By combining analytics and numerics we show that this simple model reproduces qualitatively many experimental findings, including the build-up of contractile stresses at the center of the cell monolayer, and the existence of traveling mechanical waves that control spreading dynamics and stress propagation in the cell monolayer. KJCU and MCM were supported by the NSF through grants DMR-1004789 and DGE-1068780.

  15. Inversion layer solar cell fabrication and evaluation. [measurement of response of inversion layer solar cell to light of different wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. This charged layer was supplied through three mechanisms: (1) applying a positive potential to a transparent electrode separated from the silicon surface by a dielectric, (2) contaminating the oxide layer with positive ions, and (3) forming donor surface states that leave a positive charge on the surface. A movable semi-infinite shadow delineated the extent of sensitivity of the cell due to the inversion region. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  16. Percolation in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Water management in the catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is confronted by two issues, flooding and dry out, both of which result in improper functioning of the fuel cell and lead to poor performance and degradation. At the present time, the data that has been reported about water percolation and wettability within a fuel cell catalyst layer is limited. A method and apparatus for measuring the percolation pressure in the catalyst layer has been developed based upon an experimental apparatus used to test water percolation in porous transport layers (PTL). The experimental setup uses a pseudo Hele-Shaw type testing where samples are compressed and a fluid is injected into the sample. Testing the samples gives percolation pressure plots which show trends in increasing percolation pressure with an increase in flow rate. A decrease in pressure was seen as percolation occurred in one sample, however the pressure only had a rising effect in the other sample.

  17. A microfluidic galvanic cell on a single layer of paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Krutarth H.; Emrani, Saina; Rodriguez, Sandra; Liaw, Shi-Shen; Pham, Linda; Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Gomez, Frank A.; Haan, John L.

    2016-06-01

    Paper microfluidics is used to produce single layer galvanic and hybrid cells to produce energy that could power paper-based analytical sensors. When two aqueous streams are absorbed onto paper to establish co-laminar flow, the streams stay in contact with each other with limited mixing. The interface at which mixing occurs acts as a charge-transfer region, eliminating the need for a salt bridge. We designed a Cusbnd Zn galvanic cell that powers an LED when two are placed in series. We also used more powerful redox couples (formate and silver, formate and permanganate) to produce higher power density (18 and 3.1 mW mg-1 Pd). These power densities are greater than previously reported paper microfluidic fuel cells using formate or methanol. The single layer design is much more simplified than previous reports of multi-layer galvanic cells on paper.

  18. Flexible Protocrystalline Silicon Solar Cells with Amorphous Buffer Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Schubert, Markus B.

    2006-09-01

    A low deposition temperature of 110 °C is mandatory for directly growing amorphous-silicon-based solar cells on plastic foil. The optimum absorber material at this low temperature is protocrystalline, i.e., right at the transition between amorphous and crystalline silicon. Polyethylene terephtalate foil of 50 μm thickness form the substrate of our flexible p-i-n single-junction cells. We discuss three peculiar processing techniques for achieving the maximum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of flexible low-temperature solar cells. First, we employ an optimized microcrystalline silicon p-type window layer; second, we use protocrystalline silicon for the i-layer; third, we insert an undoped amorphous silicon buffer layer at the p/i interface. The best flexible cells attain power conversion efficiencies of up to 4.9%.

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of a dual-layer gas diffusion layer in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sehkyu

    2008-07-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) functions as a diffuser and a current collector. The GDL typically consists of the microporous layer (MPL) and the macroporous substrate (MPS). The MPL reduces the ohmic losses and facilitates water removal in the MEA. In this study, a novel method was developed to prepare a dual-layer GDL that enhances the catalyst utilization and the overall fuel cell performance. Several characterization techniques, including mercury porosimetry, water permeation measurement, electrochemical polarization and ac impedance spectroscopy were performed to investigate how carbon loading (or MPL thickness) and PTFE content in the MPL and in the MPS control the water management in PEM fuel cells. An experimental study on carbon loading in the MPL showed that a relatively low carbon loading (0.5 mg cm-2 in this study) results in a balancing of water saturations in the catalyst layer and the GDL, thus improving the oxygen diffusion kinetics. Experimental studies on PTFE content in the MPL and in the MPS indicated that effective water management is attributed to the trade-off between the pore volume and the hydrophobic property of each diffusion layer. A theoretical study of a dual-layer GDL in PEM fuel cells demonstrated that saturation in the MPS is intimately coupled with both the fraction of hydrophilic surface and the average pore diameter. A thin and more hydrophobic MPL altered the pore geometry and the hydrophobic property of a MPS, resulting in better mass transport of reactants and products in the MEA.

  20. Temperature variations at nano-scale level in phase transformed nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys adjacent to graphene layers.

    PubMed

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun; Naebe, Minoo; Church, Jeffrey S; Hameed, Nishar; Asgari, Alireza; Will, Frank

    2013-07-21

    The detection and control of the temperature variation at the nano-scale level of thermo-mechanical materials during a compression process have been challenging issues. In this paper, an empirical method is proposed to predict the temperature at the nano-scale level during the solid-state phase transition phenomenon in NiTi shape memory alloys. Isothermal data was used as a reference to determine the temperature change at different loading rates. The temperature of the phase transformed zone underneath the tip increased by ∼3 to 40 °C as the loading rate increased. The temperature approached a constant with further increase in indentation depth. A few layers of graphene were used to enhance the cooling process at different loading rates. Due to the presence of graphene layers the temperature beneath the tip decreased by a further ∼3 to 10 °C depending on the loading rate. Compared with highly polished NiTi, deeper indentation depths were also observed during the solid-state phase transition, especially at the rate dependent zones. Larger superelastic deformations confirmed that the latent heat transfer through the deposited graphene layers allowed a larger phase transition volume and, therefore, more stress relaxation and penetration depth. PMID:23744099

  1. Temperature variations at nano-scale level in phase transformed nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys adjacent to graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun; Naebe, Minoo; Church, Jeffrey S.; Hameed, Nishar; Asgari, Alireza; Will, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The detection and control of the temperature variation at the nano-scale level of thermo-mechanical materials during a compression process have been challenging issues. In this paper, an empirical method is proposed to predict the temperature at the nano-scale level during the solid-state phase transition phenomenon in NiTi shape memory alloys. Isothermal data was used as a reference to determine the temperature change at different loading rates. The temperature of the phase transformed zone underneath the tip increased by ~3 to 40 °C as the loading rate increased. The temperature approached a constant with further increase in indentation depth. A few layers of graphene were used to enhance the cooling process at different loading rates. Due to the presence of graphene layers the temperature beneath the tip decreased by a further ~3 to 10 °C depending on the loading rate. Compared with highly polished NiTi, deeper indentation depths were also observed during the solid-state phase transition, especially at the rate dependent zones. Larger superelastic deformations confirmed that the latent heat transfer through the deposited graphene layers allowed a larger phase transition volume and, therefore, more stress relaxation and penetration depth.

  2. Temperature variations at nano-scale level in phase transformed nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys adjacent to graphene layers.

    PubMed

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun; Naebe, Minoo; Church, Jeffrey S; Hameed, Nishar; Asgari, Alireza; Will, Frank

    2013-07-21

    The detection and control of the temperature variation at the nano-scale level of thermo-mechanical materials during a compression process have been challenging issues. In this paper, an empirical method is proposed to predict the temperature at the nano-scale level during the solid-state phase transition phenomenon in NiTi shape memory alloys. Isothermal data was used as a reference to determine the temperature change at different loading rates. The temperature of the phase transformed zone underneath the tip increased by ∼3 to 40 °C as the loading rate increased. The temperature approached a constant with further increase in indentation depth. A few layers of graphene were used to enhance the cooling process at different loading rates. Due to the presence of graphene layers the temperature beneath the tip decreased by a further ∼3 to 10 °C depending on the loading rate. Compared with highly polished NiTi, deeper indentation depths were also observed during the solid-state phase transition, especially at the rate dependent zones. Larger superelastic deformations confirmed that the latent heat transfer through the deposited graphene layers allowed a larger phase transition volume and, therefore, more stress relaxation and penetration depth.

  3. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  4. Tandem photovoltaic cells with a composite intermediate layer

    SciTech Connect

    Travkin, V. V. Pakhomov, G. L.; Luk’anov, A. Yu.; Stuzhin, P. A.

    2015-11-15

    We have fabricated and tested tandem photovoltaic cells containing series-connected subcells of the “oxide–organic semiconductor–metal” type. The organic semiconductors were two phthalocyanine dyes (SubPc and PcVO); Al or Ag:Mg were used as capping metallic electrodes. A semitransparent composite metal–oxide layer formed by molybdenum oxide MoO{sub x} deposited over an ultrathin Al layer is used to join the subcells. Additionally, a MoO{sub x} layer deposited onto glass/ITO substrates serves as an anode buffer in the front subcell, and LiF deposited onto the dye layers serves as a cathode buffer in the front or rear subcells. Upon optimization of the thickness and composition of the intermediate layer, the open circuit voltage U{sub oc} amounts to 1.6 V reflecting total summation of the contributions from the each of the subcells at a wide spectral coating from 300–1000 nm. The fill factor in the tandem cell is not worse than in individually made single cells with the same scheme or in disconnected subcells.

  5. Structural templating of multiple polycrystalline layers in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lassiter, Brian E; Lunt, Richard R; Renshaw, Kyle; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate that organic photovoltaic cell performance is influenced by changes in the crystalline orientation of composite layer structures. A 1.5 nm thick self-organized, polycrystalline template layer of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) orients subsequently deposited layers of a diindenoperylene exciton blocking layer, and the donor, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc). Control over the crystalline orientation of the CuPc leads to changes in its frontier energy levels, absorption coefficient, and surface morphology, resulting in an increase of power conversion efficiency at 1 sun from 1.42 ± 0.04% to 2.19 ± 0.05% for a planar heterojunction and from 1.89 ± 0.05% to 2.49 ± 0.03% for a planar-mixed heterojunction.

  6. Further study of inversion layer MIS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1992-01-01

    Many inversion layer metal-insulator-semiconductor (IL/MIS) solar cells have been fabricated. As of today, the best cell fabricated by us has a 9.138 percent AMO efficiency, with FF = 0.641, V(sub OC) = 0.557 V, and I(sub SC) = 26.9 micro A. Efforts made for fabricating an IL/MOS solar cell with reasonable efficiencies are reported. The more accurate control of the thickness of the thin layer of oxide between aluminum and silicon of the MIS contacts has been achieved by using two different process methods. Comparison of these two different thin oxide processings is reported. The effects of annealing time of the sample are discussed. The range of the resistivity of the substrates used in the IL cell fabrication is experimentally estimated. Theoretical study of the MIS contacts under dark conditions is addressed.

  7. Layer by Layer Three-dimensional Tissue Epitaxy by Cell-Laden Hydrogel Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Moon, SangJun; Hasan, Syed K.; Song, Young S.; Xu, Feng; Keles, Hasan Onur; Manzur, Fahim; Mikkilineni, Sohan; Hong, Jong Wook; Nagatomi, Jiro; Haeggstrom, Edward; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The ability to bioengineer three-dimensional (3D) tissues is a potentially powerful approach to treat diverse diseases such as cancer, loss of tissue function, or organ failure. Traditional tissue engineering methods, however, face challenges in fabricating 3D tissue constructs that resemble the native tissue microvasculature and microarchitectures. We have developed a bioprinter that can be used to print 3D patches of smooth muscle cells (5 mm × 5 mm × 81 μm) encapsulated within collagen. Current inkjet printing systems suffer from loss of cell viability and clogging. To overcome these limitations, we developed a system that uses mechanical valves to print high viscosity hydrogel precursors containing cells. The bioprinting platform that we developed enables (i) printing of multilayered 3D cell-laden hydrogel structures (16.2 μm thick per layer) with controlled spatial resolution (proximal axis: 18.0 ± 7.0 μm and distal axis: 0.5 ± 4.9 μm), (ii) high-throughput droplet generation (1 s per layer, 160 droplets/s), (iii) cell seeding uniformity (26 ± 2 cells/mm2 at 1 million cells/mL, 122 ± 20 cells/mm2 at 5 million cells/mL, and 216 ± 38 cells/mm2 at 10 million cells/mL), and (iv) long-term viability in culture (>90%, 14 days). This platform to print 3D tissue constructs may be beneficial for regenerative medicine applications by enabling the fabrication of printed replacement tissues. PMID:19586367

  8. Basal cell carcinoma develops in contact with the epidermal basal cell layer - a three-dimensional morphological study.

    PubMed

    Pirici, Ionica; Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Mîndrilă, Ion; Avrămoiu, Ioan; Pirici, Alexandru; Nicola, Monica Georgiana; Rogoveanu, Otilia Constantina

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the skin, and it develops most frequently on the areas of the body that make its treatment and care extremely difficult, especially in cases of neglecting or aggressive growth and invasion. Both typical mild cases as well as locally aggressive tumor types do not tend to metastasize, and it has been postulated that they should share some common biological and morphological features that might explain this behavior. In this study, we have utilized a high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction technique on pathological samples from 15 cases of common aggressive (fibrosing and adenoid types) and mild (superficial type) basal cell carcinomas, and showed that all these types shared contact points and bridges with the underlying basal cell layer of the epidermis or with the outmost layer of the hair follicle. The connections found had in fact the highest number for fibrosing type (100%), compared to the superficial (85.71%) and adenoid (55%) types. The morphology of the connection bridges was also different, adjacent moderate to abundant inflammatory infiltrate seeming to lead to a loss of basaloid features in these areas. For the adenoid type, tumor islands seemed to be connected also to each other more strongly, forming a common "tumor lace", and while it has been showed that superficial and fibrosing types have higher recurrence risks, all together these data might iterate a connection between the number of bridging points and the biological and clinical manifestation of this skin tumor. PMID:27151694

  9. Further study of inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1987-01-01

    A group of inversion layer MOS solar cells has been fabricated. The highest value of open-circuit voltage obtained for the cells is 0.568V. One of the cells has produced a short-circuit current of 79.6 mA and an open-circuit voltage of 0.54V. It is estimated that the actual area AMO efficiency of this cell is 6.6 percent with an assumed value of 0.75 for its fill factor. Efforts made for fabricating an IL/MOS cell with reasonable efficiencies are reported. Future work for 4 sq cm IL cells and 25 sq cm IL cells is discussed.

  10. Transparent Conductors and Barrier Layers for Thin Film Solar Cells:

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R. G.; Broomhall-Dillard, R.; Liu, X.; Pang, D.; Barton, J.

    2001-12-01

    This report describes the research undertaken to increase the efficiency of thin-film solar cells based on amorphous silicon in the so-called''superstrate structure'' (glass front surface/transparent electrically conductive oxide (TCO)/pin amorphous silicon/metal back electrode). The TCO layer must meet many requirements: high optical transparency in the wavelength region from about 350 to 900 nm, low electrical sheet resistance, stability during handling and deposition of the subsequent layers and during use, a textured (rough) surface to enhance optical absorption of red and near-infrared light, and low-resistance electrical contact to the amorphous silicon p-layer. Fluorine-doped tin oxide has been the TCO used in most commercial superstrate amorphous silicon cells. Fluorine-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:F) was later shown to be even more transparent than fluorine-doped tin oxide, as well as being more resistant to the strongly reducing conditions encountered during the deposition of amorphous silicon. Solar cells based on ZnO:F showed the expected higher currents, but the fill factors were lower than standard cells grown on tin oxide, resulting in no consistent improvement in efficiency. This problem was recently mitigated by using a new proprietary p/buffer layer combination developed at BP Solar.

  11. Familial papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer.

    PubMed

    Brena, Michela; Besagni, Francesca; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tadini, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer (PENS), a novel keratinocytic nevus, has recently been described as a mosaic condition with varying presentations. We herein describe typical PENS lesions, which usually occur sporadically, affecting two members of the same family. The concept of paradominant inheritance is proposed to explain the paradox of occasional transmission of normally sporadically occurring traits.

  12. Instrument for layer-by-layer deposition of catalyst layers directly on proton exchange membrane for direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Wang, L; Liang, J; Liu, C

    2012-09-01

    A catalyst layer (CL) layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition instrument, consisting of an electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) device and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fixing device, has been developed. It has been used to deposit anode CL on Nafion membrane under different working distances of 4, 5, and 6 mm. The incorporation of EHDA LbL deposition allowed the generation of the CLs with different structures, where the higher working distance produced more porous CL structure. A catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) was also produced using this EHDA LbL deposition and PEM fixing device. It was observed that the catalyst has been uniformly coated on the Nafion membrane and the CCM presents an uniform surface feature. The performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) assembled with the deposited CCM at different working temperatures was analysed. The cell performance increased when the temperature rose. This instrument has the potential of being developed into a powerful device for controlling the deposition of CL of desired structures directly on PEM for DMFCs.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin blocking layer for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell on nanoporous substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wonjong; Cho, Gu Young; Noh, Seungtak; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Cha, Suk Won; Ji, Sanghoon; An, Jihwan

    2015-01-15

    An ultrathin yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) blocking layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized for improving the performance and reliability of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) supported by an anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Physical vapor-deposited YSZ and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte layers were deposited by a sputtering method. The ultrathin ALD YSZ blocking layer was inserted between the YSZ and GDC sputtered layers. To investigate the effects of an inserted ultrathin ALD blocking layer, SOFCs with and without an ultrathin ALD blocking layer were electrochemically characterized. The open circuit voltage (1.14 V) of the ALD blocking-layered SOFC was visibly higher than that (1.05 V) of the other cell. Furthermore, the ALD blocking layer augmented the power density and improved the reproducibility.

  14. Enhancing cell-free layer thickness by bypass channels in a wall.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, M; Shimogonya, Y; Yamaguchi, T; Ishikawa, T

    2016-07-26

    When blood flows near a wall, red blood cells (RBCs) drift away from the wall and a cell-free layer (CFL) is formed adjacent to the wall. Controlling the CFL thickness is important for preventing adhesion of cells in the design of biomedical devices. In this study, a novel wall configuration with stenoses and bypass channels is proposed to increase the CFL thickness. We found that the presence of bypass channels modified the spatial distribution of cells and substantially increased the CFL downstream of the stenosis. A single-bypass geometry with 5% hematocrit (Hct) blood flow showed a 1.7μm increase in CFL thickness compared to without the bypass. In the case of three bypass channels, a 3μm increase in CFL thickness was observed. The CFL enhancement was observed up to 10% Hct, but no significant enhancement of CFL was indicated for 20% Hct blood flow. The mechanism of the CFL enhancement was investigated using a numerical simulation of the flow field. The results showed that the distance between each streamline and the corner of the stenosis compared with size of RBC was important parameter in regulating CFL thickness. These results show the potential of the proposed mechanism to prevent adhesion of cells to biomedical devices. PMID:26803337

  15. Multi-layer graphene membrane based memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahlo, Andrei I.; Popov, Andrey M.; Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Ratkevich, Sergey V.

    2016-10-01

    The scheme and operational principles of the nanoelectromechanical memory cell based on the bending of a multi-layer graphene membrane by the electrostatic force are proposed. An analysis of the memory cell total energy as a function of the memory cell sizes is used to determine the sizes corresponding to a bistable memory cell with the conducting ON and non-conducting OFF states and to calculate the switching voltage between the OFF and ON states. It is shown that a potential barrier between the OFF and ON states is huge for practically all sizes of a bistable memory cell which excludes spontaneous switching and allows the proposed memory cell to be used for long-term archival storage.

  16. Multi-Layer Inkjet Printed Contacts for Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C. J.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Kaydanova, T.; Smith, L.; Ginley, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Ag, Cu, and Ni metallizations were inkjet printed with near vacuum deposition quality. The approach developed can be easily extended to other conductors such as Pt, Pd, Au, etc. Thick highly conducting lines of Ag and Cu demonstrating good adhesion to glass, Si, and printed circuit board (PCB) have been printed at 100-200degC in air and N{sub 2} respectively. Ag grids were inkjet-printed on Si solar cells and fired through the silicon nitride AR layer at 850degC, resulting in 8% cells. Next generation inks, including an ink that etches silicon nitride, have now been developed. Multi-layer inkjet printing of the etching ink followed by Ag ink produced contacts under milder conditions and gave solar cells with efficiencies as high as 12%.

  17. Optical stability of silicon nitride MIS inversion layer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, K.; Hezel, R.

    1985-09-01

    For MIS inversion layer solar cells with silicon nitride as an AR coating, accelerated optical stress tests were performed. Degradation of the cell characteristics occurred which was found to be caused by photons with energies equal to or greater than 3.7 eV (wavelength of 335 nm or less). Generation of interface states at the silicon-insulator interface by UV light is shown to be the mechanism responsible. The original cell data could be completely restored by heat treatment (activation energy 0.5 eV) and partially by illumination with short-wavelength light. As the most striking result, however, it is demonstrated that the UV light-induced instability can be drastically improved by incorporation of cesium ions into the silicon nitride layer. An interpretation is given for this effect.

  18. Applications of atomic layer deposition in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenbin; Li, Xianglin; Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Fam, Derrick Wenhui; Fan, Hongjin; Shrestha, Santosh; Wong, Lydia Helena; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a unique tool for the growth of thin films with excellent conformity and thickness control down to atomic levels. The application of ALD in energy research has received increasing attention in recent years. In this review, the versatility of ALD in solar cells will be discussed. This is specifically focused on the fabrication of nanostructured photoelectrodes, surface passivation, surface sensitization, and band-structure engineering of solar cell materials. Challenges and future directions of ALD in the applications of solar cells are also discussed.

  19. Layer-by-layer coated gold nanoparticles: size-dependent delivery of DNA into cells.

    PubMed

    Elbakry, Asmaa; Wurster, Eva-Christina; Zaky, Alaa; Liebl, Renate; Schindler, Edith; Bauer-Kreisel, Petra; Blunk, Torsten; Rachel, Reinhard; Goepferich, Achim; Breunig, Miriam

    2012-12-21

    Because nanoparticles are finding uses in myriad biomedical applications, including the delivery of nucleic acids, a detailed knowledge of their interaction with the biological system is of utmost importance. Here the size-dependent uptake of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (20, 30, 50 and 80 nm), coated with a layer-by-layer approach with nucleic acid and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), into a variety of mammalian cell lines is studied. In contrast to other studies, the optimal particle diameter for cellular uptake is determined but also the number of therapeutic cargo molecules per cell. It is found that 20 nm AuNPs, with diameters of about 32 nm after the coating process and about 88 nm including the protein corona after incubation in cell culture medium, yield the highest number of nanoparticles and therapeutic DNA molecules per cell. Interestingly, PEI, which is known for its toxicity, can be applied at significantly higher concentrations than its IC(50) value, most likely because it is tightly bound to the AuNP surface and/or covered by a protein corona. These results are important for the future design of nanomaterials for the delivery of nucleic acids in two ways. They demonstrate that changes in the nanoparticle size can lead to significant differences in the number of therapeutic molecules delivered per cell, and they reveal that the toxicity of polyelectrolytes can be modulated by an appropriate binding to the nanoparticle surface. PMID:22911477

  20. Tissue Engineering the Retinal Ganglion Cell Nerve Fiber Layer

    PubMed Central

    Kador, Karl E.; Montero, Ramon B.; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Hertz, Jonathan; Zindell, Allison N.; Valenzuela, Daniel A.; Uddin, Mohammed S.; Lavik, Erin B.; Muller, Kenneth J.; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, affect millions of people worldwide and ultimately lead to retinal cell death and blindness. Cell transplantation therapies for photoreceptors demonstrate integration and restoration of function, but transplantation into the ganglion cell layer is more complex, requiring guidance of axons from transplanted cells to the optic nerve head in order to reach targets in the brain. Here we create a biodegradable electrospun (ES) scaffold designed to direct the growth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons radially, mimicking axon orientation in the retina. Using this scaffold we observed an increase in RGC survival and no significant change in their electrophysiological properties. When analyzed for alignment, 81% of RGCs were observed to project axons radially along the scaffold fibers, with no difference in alignment compared to the nerve fiber layer of retinal explants. When transplanted onto retinal explants, RGCs on ES scaffolds followed the radial pattern of the host retinal nerve fibers, whereas RGCs transplanted directly grew axons in a random pattern. Thus, the use of this scaffold as a cell delivery device represents a significant step towards the use of cell transplant therapies for the treatment of glaucoma and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23489919

  1. Photovoltaic Cell Having A P-Type Polycrystalline Layer With Large Crystals

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes R.

    1996-03-26

    A photovoltaic cell has an n-type polycrystalline layer and a p-type polycrystalline layer adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer to form a photovoltaic junction. The p-type polycrystalline layer comprises a substantially planar layer portion having relatively large crystals adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer. The planar layer portion includes oxidized impurities which contribute to obtainment of p-type electrical properties in the planar layer portion.

  2. Layer-by-layer engineered nanocapsules of curcumin with improved cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kittitheeranun, Paveenuch; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Phanpee, Sarunya; Treetong, Alongkot; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Suktham, Kunat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2015-08-15

    Nanocarriers based on electrostatic Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of CaCO3 nanoparticles (CaCO3 NPs) was investigated. These inorganic nanoparticles was used as templates to construct nanocapsules made from films based on two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly (sodium 4-styrene-sulfonate sodium salt), followed by core dissolution. The naked CaCO3 NPs, CaCO3 NPs coated with the polyelectrolytes and hollow nanocapsules were found with hexagonal shape with average sizes of 350-400 nm. A reversal of the surface charge between positive to negative zeta potential values was found, confirming the adsorption of polyelectrolytes. The loading efficiency and release of curcumin were controlled by the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the polyelectrolyte matrix of the hollow nanocapsules. The quantity of curcumin released from hollow nanocapsules was found to increase under acidic environments, which is a desirable for anti-cancer drug delivery. The hollow nanocapsules were found to localize in the cytoplasm and nucleus compartment of Hela cancer cells after 24 h of incubation. Hollow nanocapsules were non-toxic to human fibroblast cells. Furthermore, curcumin loaded hollow nanocapsules exhibited higher in vitro cell inhibition against Hela cells than that of free curcumin, suggesting that polyelectrolyte based-hollow nanocapsules can be utilized as new carriers for drug delivery. PMID:26143232

  3. LiNiFe-based layered structure oxide and composite for advanced single layer fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bin; Fan, Liangdong; Deng, Hui; He, Yunjune; Afzal, Muhammad; Dong, Wenjing; Yaqub, Azra; Janjua, Naveed K.

    2016-06-01

    A layered structure metal oxide, LiNi0.1Fe0.90O2-δ (LNF), is explored for the advanced single layer fuel cells (SLFCs). The temperature dependent impedance profiles and concentration cells (hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and H2/air atmospheres) tests prove LNF to be an intrinsically electronic conductor in air while mixed electronic and proton conductor in H2/air environment. SLFCs constructed by pure LNF materials show significant short circuiting reflected by a low device OCV and power output (175 mW cm-2 at 500 °C) due to high intrinsic electronic conduction. The power output is improved up to 640 and 760 mW cm-2, respectively at 500 and 550 °C by compositing LNF with ion conducting material, e.g., samarium doped ceria (SDC), to balance the electronic and ionic conductivity; both reached at 0.1 S cm-1 level. Such an SLFC gives super-performance and simplicity over the conventional 3-layer (anode, electrolyte and cathode) FCs, suggesting strong scientific and commercial impacts.

  4. Rice caryopsis development I: Dynamic changes in different cell layers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoba; Liu, Jinxin; Li, Dongqi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rice caryopsis as one of the most important food sources for humans has a complex structure that is composed of maternal tissues including the pericarp and testa and filial tissues including the endosperm and embryo. Although rice caryopsis studies have been conducted previously, a systematic characterization throughout the entire developmental process is still lacking. In this study, detailed morphological examinations of caryopses were made during the entire 30‐day developmental process. We observed some rapid changes in cell differentiation events and cataloged how cellular degeneration processes occurred in maternal tissues. The differentiations of tube cells and cross cells were achieved by 9 days after pollination (DAP). In the testa, the outer integument was degenerated by 3 DAP, while the outer layer of the inner integument degenerated by 7 DAP. In the nucellus, all tissues with the exception of the nucellar projection and the nucellar epidermis degenerated in the first 5 DAP. By 21 DAP, all maternal tissues, including vascular bundles, the nucellar projection and the nucellar epidermal cells were degenerated. In summary, this study provides a complete atlas of the dynamic changes in cell differentiation and degeneration for individual maternal cell layers of rice caryopsis. PMID:26472484

  5. Waves of ratcheting cancer cells in growing tumor tissue layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Taeseok; Kwon, Tae; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung; CenterCell Dynamics Team

    2015-03-01

    Over many years researchers have shown that the mechanical forces generated by, and acting on, tissues influence the way they grow, develop and migrate. As for cancer research goes, understanding the role of these forces may even be as influential as deciphering the relevant genetic and molecular basis. Often the key issues in the field of cancer mechanics are to understand the interplay of mechanics and chemistry. In this study, we discuss very intriguing population density waves observed in slowly proliferating of tumor cell layers. The temporal periods are around 4 hr and their wavelength is in the order of 1 mm. Tumor cell layer, which is initially plated in a small disk area, expands as a band of tumor cells is ``ratcheting'' in concert in radially outward direction. By adding Cytochalasin D and Latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, or Mytomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, we could halt and modulate the wave activities reversibly. The observed waves are visually quite similar to those of chemotaxing dictyostelium discodium amoeba population, which are driven by nonlinear chemical reaction-diffusion waves of cAMP. So far, we have not been able to show any relevant chemo-attractants inducing the collective behavior of these tumor cells. Researchers have been investigating how forces from both within and outside developing cancer cells interact in intricate feedback loops. This work reports the example of periodic density waves of tumor cells with an explanation purely based on nonlinear mechanics.

  6. Type-1 Collagen differentially alters β-catenin accumulation in primary Dupuytren's Disease cord and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    PubMed Central

    Vi, Linda; Njarlangattil, Anna; Wu, Yan; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David B

    2009-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's Disease (DD) is a debilitating contractile fibrosis of the palmar fascia characterised by excess collagen deposition, contractile myofibroblast development, increased Transforming Growth Factor-β levels and β-catenin accumulation. The aim of this study was to determine if a collagen-enriched environment, similar to in vivo conditions, altered β-catenin accumulation by primary DD cells in the presence or absence of Transforming Growth Factor-β. Methods Primary DD and patient matched, phenotypically normal palmar fascia (PF) cells were cultured in the presence or absence of type-1 collagen and Transforming Growth Factor-β1. β-catenin and α-smooth muscle actin levels were assessed by western immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results DD cells display a rapid depletion of cellular β-catenin not evident in patient-matched PF cells. This effect was not evident in either cell type when cultured in the absence of type-1 collagen. Exogenous addition of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 to DD cells in collagen culture negates the loss of β-catenin accumulation. Transforming Growth Factor-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin, a marker of myofibroblast differentiation, is attenuated by the inclusion of type-1 collagen in cultures of DD and PF cells. Conclusion Our findings implicate type-1 collagen as a previously unrecognized regulator of β-catenin accumulation and a modifier of TGF-β1 signaling specifically in primary DD cells. These data have implications for current treatment modalities as well as the design of in vitro models for research into the molecular mechanisms of DD. PMID:19545383

  7. Multi-layered environmental regulation on the homeostasis of stem cells: the saga of hair growth and alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chiang; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2012-04-01

    Stem cells are fascinating because of their potential in regenerative medicine. Stem cell homeostasis has been thought to be mainly regulated by signals from their adjacent micro-environment named the "stem cell niche". However, recent studies reveal that there can be multiple layers of environmental controls. Here we review these environmental controls using the paradigm of hair stem cells, because to observe and analyze the growth of hair is easier due to their characteristic cyclic regeneration pattern. The length of hair fibers is regulated by the duration of the growth period. In the hair follicles, hair stem cells located in the follicle bulge interact with signals from the dermal papilla. Outside of the follicle, activation of hair stem cells has been shown to be modulated by molecules released from the intra-dermal adipose tissue as well as body hormone status, immune function, neural activities, and aging. The general physiological status of an individual is further influenced by circadian rhythms and changing seasons. The interactive networks of these environmental factors provide new understanding on how stem cell homeostasis is regulated, inspiring new insights for regenerative medicine. Therapies do not necessarily have to be achieved by using stem cells themselves which may constitute a higher risk but by modulating stem cell activity through targeting one or multiple layers of their micro- and macro-environments. PMID:22391240

  8. Multi-layered environmental regulation on the homeostasis of stem cells: the saga of hair growth and alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chiang; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2012-04-01

    Stem cells are fascinating because of their potential in regenerative medicine. Stem cell homeostasis has been thought to be mainly regulated by signals from their adjacent micro-environment named the "stem cell niche". However, recent studies reveal that there can be multiple layers of environmental controls. Here we review these environmental controls using the paradigm of hair stem cells, because to observe and analyze the growth of hair is easier due to their characteristic cyclic regeneration pattern. The length of hair fibers is regulated by the duration of the growth period. In the hair follicles, hair stem cells located in the follicle bulge interact with signals from the dermal papilla. Outside of the follicle, activation of hair stem cells has been shown to be modulated by molecules released from the intra-dermal adipose tissue as well as body hormone status, immune function, neural activities, and aging. The general physiological status of an individual is further influenced by circadian rhythms and changing seasons. The interactive networks of these environmental factors provide new understanding on how stem cell homeostasis is regulated, inspiring new insights for regenerative medicine. Therapies do not necessarily have to be achieved by using stem cells themselves which may constitute a higher risk but by modulating stem cell activity through targeting one or multiple layers of their micro- and macro-environments.

  9. Method of making gas diffusion layers for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Frisk, Joseph William; Boand, Wayne Meredith; Larson, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for making a gas diffusion layer for an electrochemical cell comprising the steps of: a) combining carbon particles and one or more surfactants in a typically aqueous vehicle to make a preliminary composition, typically by high shear mixing; b) adding one or more highly fluorinated polymers to said preliminary composition by low shear mixing to make a coating composition; and c) applying the coating composition to an electrically conductive porous substrate, typically by a low shear coating method.

  10. CRISPR transcriptional repression devices and layered circuits in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Samira; Beal, Jacob; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Huh, Jin; Hall, Richard N; Xie, Zhen; Li, Yinqing; Weiss, Ron

    2014-01-01

    A key obstacle to creating sophisticated genetic circuits has been the lack of scalable device libraries. Here we present a modular transcriptional repression architecture based on clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system and examine approaches for regulated expression of guide RNAs in human cells. Subsequently we demonstrate that CRISPR regulatory devices can be layered to create functional cascaded circuits, which provide a valuable toolbox for engineering purposes. PMID:24797424

  11. CRISPR transcriptional repression devices and layered circuits in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Samira; Beal, Jacob; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Huh, Jin; Hall, Richard N; Xie, Zhen; Li, Yinqing; Weiss, Ron

    2014-07-01

    A key obstacle to creating sophisticated genetic circuits has been the lack of scalable device libraries. Here we present a modular transcriptional repression architecture based on clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system and examine approaches for regulated expression of guide RNAs in human cells. Subsequently we demonstrate that CRISPR regulatory devices can be layered to create functional cascaded circuits, which provide a valuable toolbox for engineering purposes. PMID:24797424

  12. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  13. Incorporation of superlattice crystal layers in multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackslee, A. E.; Mitchell, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    Superlattice layers are effective in decreasing the density of dislocations in lattice mismatched heterostructures at least four orders of magnitude. Hence it was proposed to utilize this feature of superlattices to alleviate the problems due to misfit dislocations generated in the regions between two or more photovoltaic collecting junctions. A further advantage is that the possibility is presented for using silicon as a low cost substrate as well as for the low band gap junction. In the test case, a silicon low gap cell was connected to a GaAs.7P.3 high gap cell through a connecting region containing a GaAs/GaP superlattice.

  14. Layer-by-layer assembled cell instructive nanocoatings containing platelet lysate.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara M; Santo, Vítor E; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-04-01

    Great efforts have been made to introduce growth factors (GFs) onto 2D/3D constructs in order to control cell behavior. Platelet lysate (PL) presents itself as a cost-effective source of multiple GFs and other proteins. The instruction given by a construct-PL combination will depend on how its instructive cues are presented to the cells. The content, stability and conformation of the GFs affect their instruction. Strategies for a controlled incorporation of PL are needed. Herein, PL was incorporated into nanocoatings by layer-by-layer assembling with polysaccharides presenting different sulfation degrees (SD) and charges. Heparin and several marine polysaccharides were tested to evaluate their PL and GF incorporation capability. The consequent effects of those multilayers on human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) were assessed in short-term cultures. Both nature of the polysaccharide and SD were important properties that influenced the adsorption of PL, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor b (FGFb) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF). The sulfated polysaccharides-PL multilayers showed to be efficient in the promotion of morphological changes, serum-free adhesion and proliferation of high passage hASCs (P > 5). These biomimetic multilayers promise to be versatile platforms to fabricate instructive devices allowing a tunable incorporation of PL. PMID:25701032

  15. Fabrication of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with a nanothin protective layer by atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anode aluminum oxide-supported thin-film fuel cells having a sub-500-nm-thick bilayered electrolyte comprising a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer were fabricated and electrochemically characterized in order to investigate the effect of the YSZ protective layer. The highly dense and thin YSZ layer acted as a blockage against electron and oxygen permeation between the anode and GDC electrolyte. Dense GDC and YSZ thin films were fabricated using radio frequency sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques, respectively. The resulting bilayered thin-film fuel cell generated a significantly higher open circuit voltage of approximately 1.07 V compared with a thin-film fuel cell with a single-layered GDC electrolyte (approximately 0.3 V). PMID:23342963

  16. Periostin differentially induces proliferation, contraction and apoptosis of primary Dupuytren’s disease and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    PubMed Central

    Vi, Linda; Feng, Lucy; Zhu, Rebecca D.; Wu, Yan; Satish, Latha; Gan, Bing Siang; O’Gorman, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Dupuytren’s disease, (DD), is a fibroproliferative condition of the palmar fascia in the hand, typically resulting in permanent contracture of one or more fingers. This fibromatosis is similar to scarring and other fibroses in displaying excess collagen secretion and contractile myofibroblast differentiation. In this report we expand on previous data demonstrating that POSTN mRNA, which encodes the extra-cellular matrix protein periostin, is up-regulated in Dupuytren’s disease cord tissue relative to phenotypically normal palmar fascia. We demonstrate that the protein product of POSTN, periostin, is abundant in Dupuytren’s disease cord tissue while little or no periostin immunoreactivity is evident in patient-matched control tissues. The relevance of periostin up-regulation in DD was assessed in primary cultures of cells derived from diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia from the same patients. These cells were grown in type-1 collagen-enriched culture conditions with or without periostin addition to more closely replicate the in vivo environment. Periostinwas found to differentially regulate the apoptosis, proliferation, α smooth muscle actin expression and stressed Fibroblast Populated Collagen Lattice contraction of these cell types. We hypothesize that periostin, secreted by disease cord myofibroblasts into the extra-cellular matrix, promotes the transition of resident fibroblasts in the palmar fascia toward a myofibroblast phenotype, thereby promoting disease progression. PMID:19619531

  17. Identification and characterization of a T-cell-specific enhancer adjacent to the murine CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins is a tightly regulated process tied to the maturation of functionally distinct classes of thymocytes. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of expression of the genes encoding CD4 and CD8 is likely to yield important insight into regulation of the differentiated functions of T cells. Here, we report the identification of a T-cell-specific enhancer in a DNase I-hypersensitive region about 13 kb 5' of the transcription initiation site of the murine CD4 gene. Within the minimal enhancer element, at least three nuclear protein binding sites were identified by DNase I footprint analysis. One site contains the consensus motif for TCF-1 alpha/LEF-1, a recently identified HMG box transcription factor primarily expressed in pre-B and T cells. By Southwestern (DNA-protein) blotting and binding competition analyses, the protein binding to this site was found to be indistinguishable from TCF-1 alpha/LEF-1. Mutagenesis of this site resulted in loss of factor binding but had a relatively minor effect on enhancer activity. In contrast, mutations in another site, containing two consensus binding motifs for basic helix-loop-helix proteins, abolished factor binding and dramatically reduced enhancer activity. None of the protein binding sites had activity on its own, suggesting that the CD4 enhancer requires the interaction of multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1922061

  18. The coordination of ploidy and cell size differs between cell layers in leaves.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Yohei; Hasegawa, Junko; Fujikura, Ushio; Hoshino, Rina; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    Growth and developmental processes are occasionally accompanied by multiple rounds of DNA replication, known as endoreduplication. Coordination between endoreduplication and cell size regulation often plays a crucial role in proper organogenesis and cell differentiation. Here, we report that the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume is different in the outer and inner cell layers of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using a novel imaging technique. Although there is a well-known, strong correlation between ploidy and cell volume in pavement cells of the epidermis, this correlation was extremely weak in palisade mesophyll cells. Induction of epidermis cell identity based on the expression of the homeobox gene ATML1 in mesophyll cells enhanced the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume to near that of wild-type epidermal cells. We therefore propose that the correlation between ploidy and cell volume is regulated by cell identity. PMID:26903507

  19. The coordination of ploidy and cell size differs between cell layers in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Yohei; Hasegawa, Junko; Fujikura, Ushio; Hoshino, Rina; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Growth and developmental processes are occasionally accompanied by multiple rounds of DNA replication, known as endoreduplication. Coordination between endoreduplication and cell size regulation often plays a crucial role in proper organogenesis and cell differentiation. Here, we report that the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume is different in the outer and inner cell layers of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using a novel imaging technique. Although there is a well-known, strong correlation between ploidy and cell volume in pavement cells of the epidermis, this correlation was extremely weak in palisade mesophyll cells. Induction of epidermis cell identity based on the expression of the homeobox gene ATML1 in mesophyll cells enhanced the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume to near that of wild-type epidermal cells. We therefore propose that the correlation between ploidy and cell volume is regulated by cell identity. PMID:26903507

  20. The coordination of ploidy and cell size differs between cell layers in leaves.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Yohei; Hasegawa, Junko; Fujikura, Ushio; Hoshino, Rina; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    Growth and developmental processes are occasionally accompanied by multiple rounds of DNA replication, known as endoreduplication. Coordination between endoreduplication and cell size regulation often plays a crucial role in proper organogenesis and cell differentiation. Here, we report that the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume is different in the outer and inner cell layers of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using a novel imaging technique. Although there is a well-known, strong correlation between ploidy and cell volume in pavement cells of the epidermis, this correlation was extremely weak in palisade mesophyll cells. Induction of epidermis cell identity based on the expression of the homeobox gene ATML1 in mesophyll cells enhanced the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume to near that of wild-type epidermal cells. We therefore propose that the correlation between ploidy and cell volume is regulated by cell identity.

  1. Redox modulation of adjacent thiols in VLA-4 by AS101 converts myeloid leukemia cells from a drug-resistant to drug-sensitive state.

    PubMed

    Layani-Bazar, Adi; Skornick, Itai; Berrebi, Alain; Pauker, Maor H; Noy, Elad; Silberman, Alon; Albeck, Michael; Longo, Dan L; Kalechman, Yona; Sredni, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Interaction between the integrin VLA-4 on acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells with stromal fibronectin is a decisive factor in chemotherapeutic resistance. In this study, we provide a rationale for a drug repositioning strategy to blunt integrin activation in AML cells and restore their sensitivity to chemotherapy. Specifically, we demonstrate that the nontoxic tellurium compound AS101, currently being evaluated in clinical trials, can abrogate the acquired resistance of AML. Mechanistic investigations revealed that AS101 caused redox inactivation of adjacent thiols in the exofacial domain of VLA-4 after its ligation to stromal fibronectin. This effect triggered cytoskeletal conformational changes that decreased PI3K/Akt/Bcl2 signaling, an obligatory step in chemosensitization by AS101. In a mouse xenograft of AML derived from patient leukemic cells with high VLA-4 expression and activity, we demonstrated that AS101 abrogated drug resistance and prolonged survival in mice receiving chemotherapy. Decreased integrin activity was confirmed on AML cells in vivo. The chemosensitizing activity of AS101 persisted in hosts with defective adaptive and innate immunity, consistent with evidence that integrin deactivation was not mediated by heightening immune attack. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to reposition the experimental clinical agent, AS101, to degrade VLA-4-mediated chemoresistance and improve clinical responses in patients with AML.

  2. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell layer thickness in patients receiving systemic isotretinoin therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekeryapan, Berrak; Dılek, Nursel; Oner, Veysi; Turkyılmaz, Kemal; Aslan, Mehmet Gokhan

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral isotretinoin therapy on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). This prospective study included newly diagnosed nodulocystic acne patients about to receive isotretinoin treatment. Macular average GCL thickness and peripapillary average, temporal, nasal, inferior, and superior quadrant RNFL thickness were measured by OCT before and after isotretinoin treatment. Pre- and post-treatment measurements were compared with paired t test. Fifty-six eyes of 28 patients were included. The mean duration of the treatment was 6.5 ± 1.3 months. The mean average GCL thickness was 90.04 ± 5.87 (80-96) μm at baseline and 90.75 ± 6.34 (81-96) μm after treatment. The mean average RNFL thickness was 93.25 ± 6.06 μm (84-107) before treatment and 93.05 ± 5.54 μm (82-106) after treatment. There were no statistically significant differences between pre- and post-treatment values (all p > 0.05). A 6-month course of systemic isotretinoin therapy seems to have no unfavorable effect on retinal ganglion cells; however, larger studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be conclusive.

  3. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Real, Markus

    1999-11-16

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  4. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  5. Tumor-induced solid stress activates β-catenin signaling to drive malignant behavior in normal, tumor-adjacent cells

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guanqing; Weaver, Valerie Marie

    2016-01-01

    Recent work by Fernández-Sánchez and coworkers examining the impact of applied pressure on the malignant phenotype of murine colon tissue in vivo revealed that mechanical perturbations can drive malignant behavior in genetically normal cells. Their findings build upon an existing understanding of how the mechanical cues experienced by cells within a tissue become progressively modified as the tissue transforms. Using magnetically stimulated ultra-magnetic liposomes to mimic tumor growth -induced solid stress, Fernández-Sánchez and coworkers were able to stimulate β-catenin to promote the cancerous behavior of both a normal and genetically modified colon epithelium. In this perspective, we discuss their findings in the context of what is currently known regarding the role of the mechanical landscape in cancer progression and β-catenin as a mechanotransducer. We review data that suggest that mechanically regulated activation of β-catenin fosters development of a malignant phenotype in tissue and predict that mechanical cues may contribute to tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26439949

  6. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  7. Computer modeling of inversion layer MOS solar cells and arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional numerical model of the inversion layer metal insulator semiconductor (IL/MIS) solar cell is proposed by using the finite element method. The two-dimensional current flow in the device is taken into account in this model. The electrostatic potential distribution, the electron concentration distribution, and the hole concentration distribution for different terminal voltages are simulated. The results of simple calculation are presented. The existing problems for this model are addressed. Future work is proposed. The MIS structures are studied and some of the results are reported.

  8. Spray CVD for Making Solar-Cell Absorber Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) processes of a special type have been investigated for use in making CuInS2 absorber layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells from either of two subclasses of precursor compounds: [(PBu3) 2Cu(SEt)2In(SEt)2] or [(PPh3)2Cu(SEt)2 In(SEt)2]. The CuInS2 films produced in the experiments have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and four-point-probe electrical tests.

  9. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management

    DOEpatents

    Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

    2013-08-27

    A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

  10. HATCN-based charge recombination layers as effective interconnectors for tandem organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Bin; Wang, Qian-Kun; Xie, Hao-Jun; Xu, Lu-Hai; Duhm, Steffen; Li, Yan-Qing; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2014-09-10

    A comprehensive understanding of the energy-level alignment at the organic heterojunction interfaces is of paramount importance to optimize the performance of organic solar cells (OSCs). Here, the detailed electronic structures of organic interconnectors, consisting of cesium fluoride-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline and hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HATCN), have been investigated via in situ photoemission spectroscopy, and their impact on the charge recombination process in tandem OSCs has been identified. The experimental determination shows that the HATCN interlayer plays a significant role in the interface energetics with a dramatic decrease in the reverse built-in potential for electrons and holes from stacked subcells, which is beneficial to the charge recombination between HATCN and the adjacent layer. In accordance with the energy-level alignments, the open-circuit voltage of tandem OSC incorporating a HATCN-based interconnector is almost 2 times that of a single-cell OSC, revealing the effectiveness of the HATCN-based interconnectors in tandem organic devices.

  11. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  12. The role of buffer layers and double windows layers in a solar cell CZTS performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarkia, C.; Dib, D.; Zerfaoui, H.; Belghit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In the overall context of the diversification of the use of natural resources, the use of renewable energy including solar photovoltaic has become increasingly indispensable. As such, the development of a new generation of photovoltaic cells based on CuZnSnS4 (CZTS) looks promising. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a new film absorber, with good physical properties (band gap energy 1.4-1.6 eV with a large absorption coefficient over 104 cm-1). Indeed, the performance of these cells exceeded 30% in recent years. In the present paper, our work based on modeling and numerical simulation, we used SCAPS to study the performance of solar cells based on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and thus evaluate the electrical efficiency η for typical structures of n-ZnO:Al / i-ZnO / n-CdS / p-CZTS and n-ITO / n-ZnO:Al / n-CdS /p-CZTS. Furthermore, the influence of the change of CdS by ZnSeand In2S3buffer layer was treated in this paper.

  13. Lipid Profiles of Canine Invasive Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder and Adjacent Normal Tissue by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Allison L.; Ifa, Demian R.; Manicke, Nicholas E.; Costa, Anthony B.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Knapp, Deborah W.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2009-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used in an imaging mode to interrogate the lipid profiles of thin tissue sections of canine spontaneous invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder (a model of human invasive bladder cancer) as well as adjacent normal tissue from four different dogs. The glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids that appear as intense signals in both the negative ion and positive ion modes were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) product ion scans using collision-induced dissociation. Differences in the relative distributions of the lipid species were present between the tumor and adjacent normal tissue in both the negative and positive ion modes. DESI-MS images showing the spatial distributions of particular glycerophospholipids, sphinoglipids and free fatty acids in both the negative and positive ion modes were compared to serial tissue sections that were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Increased absolute and relative intensities for at least five different glycerophospholipids and three free fatty acids in the negative ion mode and at least four different lipid species in the positive ion mode were seen in the tumor region of the samples in all four dogs. In addition, one sphingolipid species exhibited increased signal intensity in the positive ion mode in normal tissue relative to the diseased tissue. Principal component analysis (PCA) was also used to generate unsupervised statistical images from the negative ion mode data and these images are in excellent agreement with the DESI images obtained from the selected ions and also the H&E stained tissue PMID:19810710

  14. Electrocatalysts by atomic layer deposition for fuel cell applications

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Niancai; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-01-22

    Here, fuel cells are a promising technology solution for reliable and clean energy because they offer high energy conversion efficiency and low emission of pollutants. However, high cost and insufficient durability are considerable challenges for widespread adoption of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) in practical applications. Current PEMFCs catalysts have been identified as major contributors to both the high cost and limited durability. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is emerging as a powerful technique for solving these problems due to its exclusive advantages over other methods. In this review, we summarize recent developments of ALD in PEMFCs with a focusmore » on design of materials for improved catalyst activity and durability. New research directions and future trends have also been discussed.« less

  15. An approach for configuring space photovoltaic tandem arrays based on cell layer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flora, C. S.; Dillard, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Meeting solar array performance goals of 300 W/Kg requires use of solar cells with orbital efficiencies greater than 20 percent. Only multijunction cells and cell layers operating in tandem produce this required efficiency. An approach for defining solar array design concepts that use tandem cell layers involve the following: transforming cell layer performance at standard test conditions to on-orbit performance; optimizing circuit configuration with tandem cell layers; evaluating circuit sensitivity to cell current mismatch; developing array electrical design around selected circuit; and predicting array orbital performance including seasonal variations.

  16. Rechargeable solid polymer electrolyte battery cell

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terji

    1985-01-01

    A rechargeable battery cell comprising first and second electrodes sandwiching a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a layer of a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte adjacent said polymer blend and a layer of dry solid polymer electrolyte adjacent said layer of polymer blend and said second electrode.

  17. Antimony sulphide, an absorber layer for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Hussain, Arshad; Ahmed, R.; Shamsuri, W. N. Wan; Shaari, A.; Ahmad, N.; Abbas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of the toxic, expensive and scarce materials with nontoxic, cheap and earth-abundant one, in solar cell absorber layer, is immensely needed to realize the vision of green and sustainable energy. Two-micrometre-thin antimony sulphide film is considered to be adequate as an absorbing layer in solar cell applications. In this paper, we synthesize antimony sulphide thin films on glass substrate by physical vapour deposition technique, and the obtained films were then annealed at different temperatures (150-250 °C). The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated for structural and optoelectronic properties using different characterization techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the annealed samples were polycrystalline with Sb2S3 phase, while the as-deposited sample was amorphous in nature. The optical properties are measured via optical ellipsometric techniques. The measured absorbance of the film is adequately high, and every photon is found to be absorbed in visible and NIR range. The conductivity type of the films measured by hot-point probe technique is determined to be p-type. The optical band gap of the resulted samples was in the range (2.4-1.3 eV) for the as-deposited and annealed films.

  18. Multifunctional MgO Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xudong; Dong, Haopeng; Li, Wenzhe; Li, Nan; Wang, Liduo

    2015-06-01

    A multifunctional magnesium oxide (MgO) layer was successfully introduced into perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to enhance their performance. MgO was coated onto the surface of mesoporous TiO(2) by the decomposition of magnesium acetate and, therefore, could block contact between the perovskite and TiO(2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed that the amount of H(2)O/hydroxyl absorbed on the TiO(2) decreased after MgO modification. The UV/Vis absorption spectra of the perovskite with MgO modification revealed an enhanced photoelectric performance compared with that of unmodified perovskite after UV illumination. In addition to the photocurrent, the photovoltage and fill factor also showed an enhancement after modification, which resulted in an increase in the overall efficiency of the cell from 9.6 to 13.9 %. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirmed that MgO acts as an insulating layer to reduce charge recombination. PMID:25851999

  19. Multifunctional MgO Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xudong; Dong, Haopeng; Li, Wenzhe; Li, Nan; Wang, Liduo

    2015-06-01

    A multifunctional magnesium oxide (MgO) layer was successfully introduced into perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to enhance their performance. MgO was coated onto the surface of mesoporous TiO(2) by the decomposition of magnesium acetate and, therefore, could block contact between the perovskite and TiO(2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed that the amount of H(2)O/hydroxyl absorbed on the TiO(2) decreased after MgO modification. The UV/Vis absorption spectra of the perovskite with MgO modification revealed an enhanced photoelectric performance compared with that of unmodified perovskite after UV illumination. In addition to the photocurrent, the photovoltage and fill factor also showed an enhancement after modification, which resulted in an increase in the overall efficiency of the cell from 9.6 to 13.9 %. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirmed that MgO acts as an insulating layer to reduce charge recombination.

  20. Genetic programs constructed from layered logic gates in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Tae Seok; Lou, Chunbo; Tamsir, Alvin; Stanton, Brynne C.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic programs function to integrate environmental sensors, implement signal processing algorithms and control expression dynamics1. These programs consist of integrated genetic circuits that individually implement operations ranging from digital logic to dynamic circuits2–6, and they have been used in various cellular engineering applications, including the implementation of process control in metabolic networks and the coordination of spatial differentiation in artificial tissues. A key limitation is that the circuits are based on biochemical interactions occurring in the confined volume of the cell, so the size of programs has been limited to a few circuits1,7. Here we apply part mining and directed evolution to build a set of transcriptional AND gates in Escherichia coli. Each AND gate integrates two promoter inputs and controls one promoter output. This allows the gates to be layered by having the output promoter of an upstream circuit serve as the input promoter for a downstream circuit. Each gate consists of a transcription factor that requires a second chaperone protein to activate the output promoter. Multiple activator–chaperone pairs are identified from type III secretion pathways in different strains of bacteria. Directed evolution is applied to increase the dynamic range and orthogonality of the circuits. These gates are connected in different permutations to form programs, the largest of which is a 4-input AND gate that consists of 3 circuits that integrate 4 inducible systems, thus requiring 11 regulatory proteins. Measuring the performance of individual gates is sufficient to capture the behaviour of the complete program. Errors in the output due to delays (faults), a common problem for layered circuits, are not observed. This work demonstrates the successful layering of orthogonal logic gates, a design strategy that could enable the construction of large, integrated circuits in single cells. PMID:23041931

  1. Cytotoxic Effects and Osteogenic Activity of Calcium Sulfate with and without Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 and Nano-Hydroxyapatite Adjacent to MG-63 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Abbaszadeh, Armin; Ghorbanzadeh, Atiyeh; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxic effects and osteogenic activity of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP2) and nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) adjacent to MG-63 cell line. Materials and Methods: To assess cytotoxicity, the 4,5-dimethyl thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteogenic activity were evaluated using Alizarin red and the von Kossa staining and analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results: The n-HA/calcium sulfate (CS) mixture significantly promoted cell growth in comparison to pure CS. Moreover, addition of rhBMP2 to CS (P=0.02) and also mixing CS with n-HA led to further increase in extracellular calcium production and ALP activity (P=0.03). Conclusion: This in vitro study indicates that a scaffold material in combination with an osteoinductive material is effective for bone matrix formation. PMID:26877731

  2. Functionally deficient mesenchymal stem cells reside in the bone marrow niche with M2-macrophages and amyloid-β protein adjacent to loose total joint implants.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Bryan S; DeBoyace, Sean D; Parsons, Adrienne M; Policastro, Connor G; Ee, Jessica S S; Damron, Timothy S

    2015-05-01

    We sought to demonstrate whether there is a difference in the local mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) niche obtained from patients undergoing their first total joint replacement surgery versus those patients undergoing a revision surgery for an failing total joint implant. Bone marrow aspirates collected from patients undergoing revision total joint arthroplasty were observed to be less clonal and the expression of PDGFRα, CD51, ALCAM, endoglin, CXCL12, nestin, and nucleostemin were decreased. Revision MSC were also less able to commit to an osteoblast-lineage or an adipocyte-lineage. Further, in revision MSC, OPG, and IL6 expression were increased. Monocytes, derived from revision whole marrow aspirates, were less capable of differentiating into osteoclasts, the cells implicated in the pathologic degradation of bone. Osteoclasts were also not observed in tissue samples collected adjacent to the implants of revision patients; however, the alternatatively activated M2-macrophage phenotype was observed in parallel with pathologic accumulations of amyloid-β, τ-protien and 3-nitrotyrosine. Despite the limited numbers of patients examined, our data suggest that nucleostemin may be a useful functional marker for MSC while the observation of M2-macrophage infiltration around the implant lays the foundation for future investigation into a novel mechanism that we propose is associated with loose total joint implants.

  3. INDIVIDUAL TURBULENT CELL INTERACTION: BASIS FOR BOUNDARY LAYER ESTABLISHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boundary layers are important in determining the forces on objects in flowing fluids, mixing characteristics, and other phenomena. For example, benthic boundary layers are frequently active resuspension layers that determine bottom turbidity and transniissivity. Traditionally, bo...

  4. Calculating acoustical properties of cells: influence of surface topography and liquid layer between cell and substrate.

    PubMed

    Kundu, T; Bereiter-Hahn, J; Hillmann, K

    1992-05-01

    In this paper, a mathematical formulation is presented to compute the V(z) of a tapering layered solid and applying this formulation to the determination of acoustic properties of biological cells and tissues. The formulation is adopted in the simplex inversion algorithm to obtain the acoustic properties of a tapering cell from its V(z) values. The influence of two parameters had been considered: The tapering angle and the presence of a thin liquid layer present between cells and the substratum to which they adhere. Up to a tapering angle less than 10 degrees, it can be safely neglected. However, if a larger angle is neglected, then the acoustic wave velocity in the cell is overestimated. Cell thickness estimation is not affected significantly when the tapering angle is ignored. The calculations of acoustic properties of cells are considerably influenced by the introduction of a thin fluid layer between the solid substratum and the overlying cell, neglecting the presence of at least a very thin layer (20-30 nm), in general, results in a considerable overestimation of sound velocity. The reliability of the data calculated from V(z) values was ascertained using an independent method to determine cell thickness by calculating it from the interference fringe pattern obtained with the reflection-interference light microscope. The shape of the glutaraldehyde-fixed cells was similar to fried eggs. The highest sound velocities were found close to the periphery of the dome-shaped cell center. In the very center and over most of the area of the thin periphery, sound velocity was close to that in saline.

  5. Oligogalacturonides induce flowers in tobacco thin cell layers

    SciTech Connect

    Marfa-Riera, V.; Gollin, D.; Mohnen, D.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    An optimized tobacco thin-cell-layer (TCL) bioassay was used to study the induction of flowers by plant oligosaccharins. Endopolygalacturonase (EPG)-released fragments of suspension-cultured sycamore cell walls induced flowers on TCLs grown on a medium containing 1.5 {mu}M IBA and 0.9 {mu}M kinetin. The EPG-released fragments were primarily composed of the polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), and {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides. The {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides, subsequently purified from the EPG-released sycamore cell wall fragment mixture, induced flowers on TCLs. Purified RG-I and RG-II did not induce flowers. Oligosaccharide fragments, generated by partial acid hydrolysis of citrus pectin, were also capable of inducing flowers on the TCLs. The active components in the pectin fragment mixture were {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides. Oligogalacturonides with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 8-16, at concentrations of {approx} 0.1 {mu}M, induced flowers, while oligogalacturonides with a DP 2-7, even at higher concentrations, did not. Oligogalacturonides have previously been shown to induce the synthesis of phytoalexins, protease inhibitors, lignin, and ethylene in other plant systems. Thus, the ability of {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides to induce flower formation in the tobacco TCLs represents a new biological activity of these oligosaccharins.

  6. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  7. Electrodeposited cobalt sulfide hole collecting layer for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zampetti, Andrea; De Rossi, Francesca; Brunetti, Francesca; Reale, Andrea; Di Carlo, Aldo; Brown, Thomas M.

    2014-08-11

    In polymer solar cells based on the blend of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, the hole collecting layer has to be endowed with its ionization potential close to or greater than that of P3HT (∼5 eV). Conductive polymer blends such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and metal oxides such as vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) satisfy this requirement and have been the most common materials used so far in bulk heterojunction structures. We report here cobalt sulfide (CoS) to be a promising hole collecting material deposited by convenient and room temperature electrodeposition. By simply tuning the CoS electrodeposition parameters, power conversion efficiencies similar (within 15%) to a reference structure with PEDOT:PSS were obtained.

  8. Electrochemically Produced Graphene for Microporous Layers in Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Leeuwner, Magrieta J; Wilkinson, David P; Gyenge, Előd L

    2016-07-01

    The microporous layer (MPL) is a key cathodic component in proton exchange membrane fuel cells owing to its beneficial influence on two-phase mass transfer. However, its performance is highly dependent on material properties such as morphology, porous structure, and electrical resistance. To improve water management and performance, electrochemically exfoliated graphene (EGN) microsheets are considered as an alternative to the conventional carbon black (CB) MPLs. The EGN-based MPLs decrease the kinetic overpotential and the Ohmic potential loss, whereas the addition of CB to form a composite EGN+CB MPL improves the mass-transport limiting current density drastically. This is reflected by increases of approximately 30 and 70 % in peak power densities at 100 % relative humidity (RH) compared with those for CB- and EGN-only MPLs, respectively. The composite EGN+CB MPL also retains the superior performance at a cathode RH of 20 %, whereas the CB MPL shows significant performance loss. PMID:27254459

  9. Role of additional PCBM layer between ZnO and photoactive layers in inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Kwang-Dae; Heo, Jinhee; Lee, Joo Yul; Cha, Gihoon; Seo, Bo Yeol; Kim, Young Dok; Kim, Yong Soo; Choi, Si-young; Lim, Dong Chan

    2014-01-01

    In order to induce greater light absorption, nano-patterning is often applied to the metal-oxide buffer layer in inverted bulk-heterojunction(BHJ) solar cells. However, current homogeneity was significantly disturbed at the interface, leading to an efficiency that was not fully optimized. In this work, an additional PC61BM layer was inserted between the ZnO ripple and the photoactive layer to enhance the electron extraction. The insertion of additional PC61BM layer provided substantial advantages in the operation of inverted BHJ solar cells; specifically, it enhanced current homogeneity and lowered accumulation and trapping of photogenerated charges at the ZnO interface. Inclusion of the additional PC61BM layer led to effective quenching of electron–hole recombination by a reduction in the number of accumulated charges at the surface of ZnO ripples. This resulted in a 16% increase in the efficiency of inverted BHJ solar cells to 7.7%, compared to solar cells without the additional PC61BM layer. PMID:24603531

  10. Cell volume and plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in epithelial cell layers measured by interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farinas, J; Verkman, A S

    1996-01-01

    The development of strategies to measure plasma membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf) in epithelial cells has been motivated by the identification of a family of molecular water channels. A general approach utilizing interferometry to measure cell shape and volume was developed and applied to measure Pf in cell layers. The method is based on the cell volume dependence of optical path length (OPL) for a light beam passing through the cell. The small changes in OPL were measured by interferometry. A mathematical model was developed to relate the interference signal to cell volume changes for cells of arbitrary shape and size. To validate the model, a Mach-Zehnder interference microscope was used to image OPL in an Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell layer and to reconstruct the three-dimensional cell shape (OPL resolution < lambda/25). As predicted by the model, a doubling of cell volume resulted in a change in OPL that was proportional to the difference in refractive indices between water and the extracellular medium. The time course of relative cell volume in response to an osmotic gradient was computed from serial interference images. To measure cell volume without microscopy and image analysis, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was constructed in which one of two interfering laser beams passed through a flow chamber containing the cell layer. The interference signal in response to an osmotic gradient was analyzed to quantify the time course of relative cell volume. The calculated MDCK cell plasma membrane Pf of 6.1 x 10(-4) cm/s at 24 degrees C agreed with that obtained by interference microscopy and by a total internal reflection fluorescence method. Interferometry was also applied to measure the apical plasma membrane water permeability of intact toad urinary bladder; Pf increased fivefold after forskolin stimulation to 0.04 cm/s at 23 degrees C. These results establish and validate the application of interferometry to quantify cell volume and osmotic water

  11. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Germanium Active Layer for Top Cell of a Multi Junction Cell Structure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaehyun; Iftiquar, S M; Kim, Minbum; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Kim, Jiwoong; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy is generally used in the bottom cell because of its low band gap. The a-SiGe:H has a higher photo conductivity in comparison to the a-Si:H; thus, it is expected that the a-SiGe:H can show better short circuit current density than that of the a-Si:H based solar cell. Therefore, we optimized a-SiGe:H active layer that can be a suitable choice for the front cell of a multi junction.solar cell. Furthermore, we carried out a comparative study of the solar cells that have a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H as respective active layers. The a-SiGe:H based solar cells show higher short circuit current density, while the a-Si:H based cells show higheropen circuit voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of these cells are as follows: (a) V(oc) = 770 mV, J(sc) = 15.0 mA/cm2, FF = 64.5%, and η = 7.47% for a-SiGe:H based cell; and (b) V(oc) = 826 mV, J(sc) = 13.63 mA/cm2, FF = 72.0%, and η = 8.1% for a-Si:H based cell.

  12. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000–7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  13. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000-7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots.

  14. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000-7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  15. Double-layer anti-reflection coating containing a nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide layer for GaAs solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianshu; Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wen; Shi, Yanpeng; Yang, Fuhua

    2013-07-29

    Multilayer anti-reflection (AR) coatings can be used to improve the efficiency of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) solar cells. We propose an alternate method to obtain optical thin films with specified refractive indices, which is using a self-assembled nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template as an optical thin film whose effective refractive index can be tuned by pore-widening. Different kinds of double-layer AR coatings each containing an AAO layer were designed and investigated by finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We demonstrate that a λ /4n - λ /4n AR coating consisting of a TiO(2) layer and an AAO layer whose effective refractive index is 1.32 realizes a 96.8% light absorption efficiency of the GaAs solar cell under AM1.5 solar spectrum (400 nm-860 nm). We also have concluded some design principles of the double-layer AR coating containing an AAO layer for GaAs solar cells.

  16. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Klemchuk, Peter P.

    2001-02-13

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of an acid copolymer of polyethylene. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first layer of the acid copolymer of polyethylene, and a second layer of the acid copolymer of polyethlene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  17. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2000-09-05

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of ionomer. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first ionomer layer, and a second layer of ionomer is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  18. Methods For Improving Polymeric Materials For Use In Solar Cell Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2001-11-20

    A method of manufacturing a solar cell module includes the use of low cost polymeric materials with improved mechanical properties. A transparent encapsulant layer is placed adjacent a rear surface of a front support layer. Interconnected solar cells are positioned adjacent a rear surface of the transparent encapsulant layer to form a solar cell assembly. A backskin layer is placed adjacent a rear surface of the solar cell assembly. At least one of the transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer are predisposed to electron beam radiation.

  19. Methods For Improving Polymeric Materials For Use In Solar Cell Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2003-07-01

    A method of manufacturing a solar cell module includes the use of low cost polymeric materials with improved mechanical properties. A transparent encapsulant layer is placed adjacent a rear surface of a front support layer. Interconnected solar cells are positioned adjacent a rear surface of the transparent encapsulant layer to form a solar cell assembly. A backskin layer is placed adjacent a rear surface of the solar cell assembly. At least one of the transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer are predisposed to electron beam radiation.

  20. From front contact to back contact in cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide solar cells: Buffer layer and interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussillon, Yann

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) polycrystalline thin film solar cells, with their near optimum direct band-gap of 1.4 eV matching almost perfectly the sun radiation spectrum, are a strong contender as a less expensive alternative, among photovoltaic materials, than the more commonly used silicon-based cells. Polycrystalline solar cells are usually deposited over large areas. Such devices often exhibit strong fluctuations (nonuniformities) in electronic properties, which originate from deposition and post-deposition processes, and are detrimental to the device performance. Therefore their effects need to be constrained. A new approach in this work was, when a CdS/CdTe solar cell is exposed to light and immersed in a proper electrolyte, fluctuations in surface potential can drive electrochemical reactions which result in a nonuniform interfacial layer that could balance the original nonuniformity. This approach improved the device efficiency for CdS/CdTe photovoltaic devices from 1--3% to 11--12%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS), used as a window layer and heterojunction partner to CdTe, is electrically inactive and absorb light energies above its band-gap of 2.4 eV. Therefore, to maximize the device efficiency, a thin US layer needs to be used. However, more defects, such as pinholes, are likely to be present in the film, leading to shunts. A resistive transparent layer, called buffer layer, is therefore deposited before CdS. A key observation was that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for cells made using a buffer layer was high, around 800 mV, similar to cells without buffer layer after Cu doping. The standard p-n junction theory cannot explain this phenomena, therefore an alternative junction mechanism, similar to metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, was developed. Furthermore, alternative Cu-free back-contacts were used in conjunction with a buffer layer. The Voc of the devices was found to be dependent of the back contact used. This change occurs as the back-contact junction

  1. Regulating Cell Apoptosis on Layer-by-Layer Assembled Multilayers of Photosensitizer-Coupled Polypeptides and Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Ma, Kai; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-01-01

    The design of advanced, nanostructured materials by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly at the molecular level is of great interest because of the broad application of these materials in the biomedical field especially in regulating cell growth, adhesion, movement, differentiation and detachment. Here, we fabricated functional hybrid multilayer films by LbL assembly of biocompatible photosensitizer-coupled polypeptides and collagen-capped gold nanoparticles. The resulting multilayer film can well accommodate cells for adhesion, growth and proliferation. Most significantly, controlled cell apoptosis (detachment) and patterning of the multilayer film is achieved by a photochemical process yielding reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the site and shape of apoptotic cells can be controlled easily by adjusting the location and shape of the laser beam. The LbL assembled multilayer film with integration of functions provides an efficient platform for regulating cell growth and apoptosis (detachment). PMID:27211344

  2. Regulating Cell Apoptosis on Layer-by-Layer Assembled Multilayers of Photosensitizer-Coupled Polypeptides and Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Ma, Kai; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-05-01

    The design of advanced, nanostructured materials by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly at the molecular level is of great interest because of the broad application of these materials in the biomedical field especially in regulating cell growth, adhesion, movement, differentiation and detachment. Here, we fabricated functional hybrid multilayer films by LbL assembly of biocompatible photosensitizer-coupled polypeptides and collagen-capped gold nanoparticles. The resulting multilayer film can well accommodate cells for adhesion, growth and proliferation. Most significantly, controlled cell apoptosis (detachment) and patterning of the multilayer film is achieved by a photochemical process yielding reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the site and shape of apoptotic cells can be controlled easily by adjusting the location and shape of the laser beam. The LbL assembled multilayer film with integration of functions provides an efficient platform for regulating cell growth and apoptosis (detachment).

  3. Organic solar cells with graphene electrodes and vapor printed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as the hole transporting layers.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyesung; Howden, Rachel M; Barr, Miles C; Bulović, Vladimir; Gleason, Karen; Kong, Jing

    2012-07-24

    For the successful integration of graphene as a transparent conducting electrode in organic solar cells, proper energy level alignment at the interface between the graphene and the adjacent organic layer is critical. The role of a hole transporting layer (HTL) thus becomes more significant due to the generally lower work function of graphene compared to ITO. A commonly used HTL material with ITO anodes is poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as the solid-state dopant. However, graphene's hydrophobic surface renders uniform coverage of PEDOT:PSS (aqueous solution) by spin-casting very challenging. Here, we introduce a novel, yet simple, vapor printing method for creating patterned HTL PEDOT layers directly onto the graphene surface. Vapor printing represents the implementation of shadow masking in combination with oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD). The oCVD method was developed for the formation of blanket (i.e., unpatterened) layers of pure PEDOT (i.e., no PSS) with systematically variable work function. In the unmasked regions, vapor printing produces complete, uniform, smooth layers of pure PEDOT over graphene. Graphene electrodes were synthesized under low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using a copper catalyst. The use of another electron donor material, tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene, instead of copper phthalocyanine in the organic solar cells also improves the power conversion efficiency. With the vapor printed HTL, the devices using graphene electrodes yield comparable performances to the ITO reference devices (η(p,LPCVD) = 3.01%, and η(p,ITO) = 3.20%). PMID:22724887

  4. Layered method of electrode for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Russell R.

    1991-07-30

    A process for fabricating a fuel electrode comprising: slurry dipping to form layers which are structurally graded from all or mostly all stabilized zirconia at a first layer, to an outer most layer of substantially all metal powder, such an nickel. Higher performaance fuel electrodes may be achieved if sinter active stabilized zirconia doped for electronic conductivity is used.

  5. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing, between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.

  6. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing,more » between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.« less

  7. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, Voc and Jsc than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  8. Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylak, Aimy Ming Jii

    Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC provides pathways for mass, heat, and electronic transport to and from the catalyst layers and bipolar plates. When the GDL becomes flooded with liquid water, the PEMFC undergoes mass transport losses that can lead to decreased performance and durability. The work presented in this thesis includes contributions that provide insight into liquid water transport behaviour in and on the surface of the GDL, as well as insight into how future GDLs could be designed to enhance water management. The effects of compression on liquid water transport in the GDL and on the microstructure of the GDL are presented. It was found that compressed regions of the GDL provided preferential locations for water breakthrough, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging revealed irreversible damage to the GDL due to compression at typical fuel cell assembly pressures. The dynamic behaviour of droplet emergence and detachment in a simulated gas flow channel are also presented. It was found that on an initially dry and hydrophobic GDL, small droplets emerged and detached quickly from the GDL surface. However, over time, this water transport regime transitioned into that of slug formation and channel flooding. It was observed that after being exposed to a saturated environment, the GDL surface became increasingly prone to droplet pinning, which ultimately hindered droplet detachment and encouraged slug formation. A pore network model featuring invasion percolation with trapping was employed to evaluate the breakthrough pattern predictions of designed porous media. These designed pore networks consisted of randomized porous media with applied diagonal and radial gradients. Experimental microfluidic pore networks provided validation for the designed networks. Diagonal biasing provided a means of directing water

  9. Organic photovoltaic cell incorporating electron conducting exciton blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2014-08-26

    The present disclosure relates to photosensitive optoelectronic devices including a compound blocking layer located between an acceptor material and a cathode, the compound blocking layer including: at least one electron conducting material, and at least one wide-gap electron conducting exciton blocking layer. For example, 3,4,9,10 perylenetetracarboxylic bisbenzimidazole (PTCBI) and 1,4,5,8-napthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) function as electron conducting and exciton blocking layers when interposed between the acceptor layer and cathode. Both materials serve as efficient electron conductors, leading to a fill factor as high as 0.70. By using an NTCDA/PTCBI compound blocking layer structure increased power conversion efficiency is achieved, compared to an analogous device using a conventional blocking layers shown to conduct electrons via damage-induced midgap states.

  10. Exclusion of metal oxide by an RF sputtered Ti layer in flexible perovskite solar cells: energetic interface between a Ti layer and an organic charge transporting layer.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Seo, Hyung-Kee; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Shin, Hyung-Shik

    2015-04-14

    In this work, the effects of a titanium (Ti) layer on the charge transport and recombination rates of flexible perovskite solar cells were studied. Ti as an efficient barrier layer was deposited directly on PET-ITO flexible substrates through RF magnetic sputtering using a Ti-source and a pressure of ∼5 mTorr. A Ti coated PET-ITO was used for the fabrication of a flexible perovskite solar cell without using any metal oxide layer. The fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell was composed of a PET-ITO/Ti/perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3)/organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis [N,N'-di-p-methoxyphenylamine]-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD)-Li-TFSI/Ag. A high conversion efficiency of ∼8.39% along with a high short circuit current (JSC) of ∼15.24 mA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage (VOC) of ∼0.830 V and a high fill factor (FF) of ∼0.66 was accomplished by the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell under a light illumination of ∼100 mW cm(-2) (1.5 AM). Intensity-modulated photocurrent (IMPS)/photovoltage spectroscopy (IMVS) studies demonstrated that the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell considerably reduced the recombination rate.

  11. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production.

  12. Somatic Embryogenesis of Lilium from Microbulb Transverse Thin Cell Layers.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A reliable somatic embryogenesis protocol is a prerequisite for application of other plant biotechniques. Several protocols were reported for genus Lilium, with variable success. Between them, transverse Thin Cell Layers (tTCL) were used efficiently to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis of Lilium. Somatic embryogenesis potential is dependent on the genotype, explant, and culture medium composition, especially as for plant growth regulators and environmental conditions. Usually, the process comprises three phases: embryogenic callus induction, embryogenic callus proliferation and somatic embryo germination. Somatic embryo germination can be achieved in light or dark. In the first case, complete plantlets are formed, with green leaves and pseudobulb in the base. In darkness, microbulbs are formed from single somatic embryos or clusters. A last phase of microbulb enlargement allows plantlets or microbulbs to increase their biomass. These enlarged microbulbs do not need special acclimatization conditions when transferred to soil and quickly produce sturdy plants. This chapter describes a protocol for somatic embryogenesis of Lilium using tTCL from microbulbs.

  13. Somatic Embryogenesis of Lilium from Microbulb Transverse Thin Cell Layers.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A reliable somatic embryogenesis protocol is a prerequisite for application of other plant biotechniques. Several protocols were reported for genus Lilium, with variable success. Between them, transverse Thin Cell Layers (tTCL) were used efficiently to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis of Lilium. Somatic embryogenesis potential is dependent on the genotype, explant, and culture medium composition, especially as for plant growth regulators and environmental conditions. Usually, the process comprises three phases: embryogenic callus induction, embryogenic callus proliferation and somatic embryo germination. Somatic embryo germination can be achieved in light or dark. In the first case, complete plantlets are formed, with green leaves and pseudobulb in the base. In darkness, microbulbs are formed from single somatic embryos or clusters. A last phase of microbulb enlargement allows plantlets or microbulbs to increase their biomass. These enlarged microbulbs do not need special acclimatization conditions when transferred to soil and quickly produce sturdy plants. This chapter describes a protocol for somatic embryogenesis of Lilium using tTCL from microbulbs. PMID:26619874

  14. Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nechitailov, A. A. Zvonareva, T. K.; Remenyuk, A. D.; Tolmachev, V. A.; Goryachev, D. N.; El'tsina, O. S.; Belyakov, L. V.; Sreseli, O. M.

    2008-10-15

    Catalytic properties of composite amorphous carbon-platinum layers produced by magnetron cosputtering have been studied. The layers were characterized by electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, ellipsometry, gravimetry, and spectrophotometric chemical analysis. The catalytic activity of the layers was studied in an air-hydrogen fuel cell by measuring its load and power characteristics.

  15. TFB:TPDSi2 interfacial layer usable in organic photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Iobin J.; Hains, Alexander W.

    2011-02-15

    The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode; an active organic layer comprising an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material; and an interfacial layer formed between the anode and active organic layer, where the interfacial layer comprises a hole-transporting polymer characterized with a hole-mobility higher than that of the electron-donating organic material in the active organic layer, and a small molecule that has a high hole-mobility and is capable of crosslinking on contact with air.

  16. A water-processable organic electron-selective layer for solution-processed inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongcheng; Zhou, Hu; Cai, Ping; Sun, Shi; Ye, Hua; Su, Shi-Jian Cao, Yong

    2014-02-03

    A triazine- and pyridinium-containing water-soluble material of 1,1′,1″-(4,4′,4″-(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)) tris(methylene)tripyridinium bromide (TzPyBr) was developed as an organic electron-selective layer in solution-processed inverted organic solar cells due to its strong anti-erosion capacity against non-polar organic solvents commonly used for the active layer. Ohmic-like contact with the adjacent active materials like fullerene derivatives is speculated to be formed, as confirmed by the work-function measurements with scanning Kelvin probe and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Besides, considering the deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of TzPyBr, excellent hole-blocking property of the electron-selective layer is also anticipated. The inverted organic photovoltaic devices based on the TzPyBr/ITO (indium tin oxide) bilayer cathode exhibit dramatically enhanced performance compared to the control devices with bare ITO as the cathode and even higher efficiency than the conventional type devices with ITO and Al as the electrodes.

  17. Cathodes for secondary electrochemical power-producing cells. [layers of porous substrates impregnated with S alternate with layers containing electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Cairns, E.J.; Kyle, M.; Shimotake, H.

    1973-02-13

    A secondary electrochemical power-producing cell includes an anode containing lithium, an electrolyte containing lithium ions, and a cathode containing sulfur. The cathode comprises plates of a porous substrate material impregnated with sulfur alternating with layers (which may also comprise porous substrate plates) containing electrolyte.

  18. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y) to the conduction-band state Γ1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  19. Controlling surface enrichment in polymeric hole extraction layers to achieve high-efficiency organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Lim, Kyung-Geun; Park, Jong Hyeok; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2012-10-01

    Hole extraction in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can be modulated by a surface-enriched layer formed on top of the conducting polymer-based hole extraction layer (HEL). This tunes the surface work function of the HEL to better align with the ionization potential of the polymeric photoactive layer. Results show noticeable improvement in device power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) in OPVs. We achieved a 6.1 % PCE from the OPV by optimizing the surface-enriched layer.

  20. Application of 3A molecular sieve layer in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yuan; Wang, Jinzhong E-mail: qingjiang.yu@hit.edu.cn; Yu, Qingjiang E-mail: qingjiang.yu@hit.edu.cn; Huang, Yuewu; Chang, Quanhong; Hao, Chunlei; Jiao, Shujie; Gao, Shiyong; Li, Hongtao; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-08-25

    3A molecular sieve layer was used as dehydration and electronic-insulation layer on the TiO{sub 2} electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells. This layer diminished the effect of water in electrolyte efficiently and enhanced the performance of cells. The conversion efficiency increased from 9.58% to 10.2%. The good moisture resistance of cells was attributed to the three-dimensional interconnecting structure of 3A molecular sieve with strong adsorption of water molecule. While the performance enhancement benefited from the suppression of the charge recombination of electronic-insulation layer and scattering effect of large particles.

  1. Nanoparticle accumulation and transcytosis in brain endothelial cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Raghnaill, Michelle Nic; Bramini, Mattia; Mahon, Eugene; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2013-10-01

    order to investigate the capacity of nanoparticles to access and transport across the BBB, several different nanomaterials, including silica, titania and albumin- or transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles of different sizes, were exposed to a human in vitro BBB model of endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells. Extensive transmission electron microscopy imaging was applied in order to describe nanoparticle endocytosis and typical intracellular localisation, as well as to look for evidence of eventual transcytosis. Our results show that all of the nanoparticles were internalised, to different extents, by the BBB model and accumulated along the endo-lysosomal pathway. Rare events suggestive of nanoparticle transcytosis were also observed for several of the tested materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterization in relevant media by Dynamic Light Scattering and SDS-PAGE. Transport study for silica nanoparticles across the BBB layer. Additional Electron Microscopy images of cells treated with the different nanoparticles investigated and details of the filters of the transwell systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02905k

  2. Layers of dendritic cell-mediated T cell tolerance, their regulation and the prevention of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian T.; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The last decades of Nobel prize-honored research have unequivocally proven a key role of dendritic cells (DCs) at controlling both T cell immunity and tolerance. A tight balance between these opposing DC functions ensures immune homeostasis and host integrity. Its perturbation could explain pathological conditions such as the attack of self tissues, chronic infections, and tumor immune evasion. While recent insights into the complex DC network help to understand the contribution of individual DC subsets to immunity, the tolerogenic functions of DCs only begin to emerge. As these consist of many different layers, the definition of a “tolerogenic DC” is subjected to variation. Moreover, the implication of DCs and DC subsets in the suppression of autoimmunity are incompletely resolved. In this review, we point out conceptual controversies and dissect the various layers of DC-mediated T cell tolerance. These layers include central tolerance, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), anergy/deletion and negative feedback regulation. The mode and kinetics of antigen presentation is highlighted as an additional factor shaping tolerance. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between layers of tolerance as well as their differential regulation during inflammation. Furthermore, potential technical caveats of DC depletion models are considered. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of DC-mediated tolerance and its role for the suppression of autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance and their complex interplay is fundamental for the development of selective therapeutic strategies, e.g., for the modulation of autoimmune responses or for the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:22783257

  3. Between the sheets: inter-cell-layer communication in plant development.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2004-01-01

    The cells of plant meristems and embryos are arranged in an organized, and sometimes extremely beautiful, layered pattern. This pattern is maintained by the controlled orientation of cell divisions within layers. However, despite this layered structure, cell behaviour during plant development is not lineage dependent, and does not occur in a mosaic fashion. Many studies, both classical and recent, have shown that plant cell identity can be re-specified according to position, allowing plants to show remarkable developmental plasticity. However, the layered structure of meristems and the implications of this during plant development, remain subjects of some speculation. Of particular interest is the question of how cell layers communicate, and how communication between cell layers could allow coordinated developmental processes to take place. Recent research has uncovered several examples both of the molecular mechanisms by which cell layers can communicate, and of how this communication can infringe on developmental processes. A range of examples is used to illustrate the diversity of mechanisms potentially implicated in cell-layer communication during plant development. PMID:15306405

  4. Amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer of the cat retina.

    PubMed

    Wässle, H; Chun, M H; Müller, F

    1987-11-15

    Following transection of the optic nerve, ganglion cells in the cat retina undergo retrograde degeneration. However, many small profiles (less than or equal to 10 micron) survive in the ganglion cell layer. Previously considered to be neuroglia, there is now substantial evidence that they are displaced amacrine cells. Their density increases from approximately 1,000 cells/mm2 in peripheral retina to 7,000 cells/mm2 in the central area. Their total number was found to be 850,000, which is five times the number of ganglion cells and also five times the number of astrocytes. Uptake of 3H-muscimol followed by autoradiography labelled 75% of the displaced amacrine cells; hence, the majority seem to be GABAergic. Immunocytochemistry with an antibody directed against choline-acetyl-transferase labelled approximately 10% of the displaced amacrines in the peripheral retina and 17% in the central area. Uptake of serotonin (5-HT) followed by immunocytochemistry was found in 25-30% of displaced amacrines. NADPH diaphorase histochemistry labelled approximately 5% of displaced amacrine cells. The sum of the various percentages make colocalization likely. Intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow under microscopic control revealed that displaced amacrine cells constitute several morphological types. PMID:3693612

  5. Should tumor with direct adjacent lobe invasion (Tdali) be assigned to T2 or T3 in non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhilan; Cao, Christphor; Mei, Jiandong; Liao, Hu; Yan, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Background The staging of tumor with direct adjacent lobe invasion (Tdali) or interlobar invasion pleural 3 (ILI PL3) in TNM system of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still in controversy. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the prognosis of Tdali with T2 or T3 disease. Methods PubMed and Embase were searched for relevant studies. Ln hazard ratio (HR) and its standard error (SE) of each study were estimated in the comparison of overall survival (OS) between Tdali and T2 or T3 respectively. Forest plots were used to show the combined HRs. Results The meta-analysis for comparison of OS of Tdali and T2 or T3 disease both showed a significant HR [Tdali versus T2, 1.39 (1.21, 1.61), P<0.000, Tdali versus T3, 0.73 (0.57, 0.93), P=0.01]. Comparisons of OS of Tdali specified to T2 (Tdali-T2) and that of all patients of T2 or T3 disease also both showed significant HRs [Tdali-T2 versus T2, 1.44 (1.23, 1.69), P<0.000, Tdali-T2 versus T3, 0.77 (0.64, 0.94), P=0.008]. When only analyzing the patients with N0 status, those with Tdali-T2N0 compared to the T2N0 group had a HR of 1.79 (1.37, 2.34) (P<0.000). For those with Tdali-T2N0 compared to the T3N0 group, the HR was 0.98 (0.71, 1.35) (P=0.91). Conclusions Our meta-analysis showed that the prognosis of Tdali is poorer than T2 disease but similar to T3 disease after controlled for T and N status. We suggest that Tdali should be considered to be upgraded to T3. Our work challenges the current staging system regarding staging of Tdali, which might be important evidence of future revision of Tdali staging. As the malignancy of Tdali has been underrated till now, more attention needs to be drawn to proper treatment of Tdali patients. PMID:27621847

  6. Piezoelectric Resonator with Two Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephanou, Philip J. (Inventor); Black, Justin P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A piezoelectric resonator device includes: a top electrode layer with a patterned structure, a top piezoelectric layer adjacent to the top layer, a middle metal layer adjacent to the top piezoelectric layer opposite the top layer, a bottom piezoelectric layer adjacent to the middle layer opposite the top piezoelectric layer, and a bottom electrode layer with a patterned structure and adjacent to the bottom piezoelectric layer opposite the middle layer. The top layer includes a first plurality of electrodes inter-digitated with a second plurality of electrodes. A first one of the electrodes in the top layer and a first one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a first contact, and a second one of the electrodes in the top layer and a second one of the electrodes in the bottom layer are coupled to a second contact.

  7. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J.; Edri, E.

    2014-08-01

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  8. Flow and transport within a coastal aquifer adjacent to a stratified water body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Yechieli, Yoseph; Eyal, Shalev; Gavrieli, Ittai; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a freshwater-saltwater interface and the circulation flow of saltwater beneath the interface is a well-known phenomenon found at coastal aquifers. This flow is a natural phenomenon that occurs due to density differences between fresh groundwater and the saltwater body. The goals of this research are to use analytical, numerical, and physical models in order to examine the configuration of the freshwater-saltwater interface and the density-driven flow patterns within a coastal aquifer adjacent to long-term stratified saltwater bodies (e.g. meromictic lake). Such hydrological systems are unique, as they consist of three different water types: the regional fresh groundwater, and low and high salinity brines forming the upper and lower water layers of the stratified water body, respectively. This research also aims to examine the influence of such stratification on hydrogeological processes within the coastal aquifer. The coastal aquifer adjacent to the Dead Sea, under its possible future meromictic conditions, serves as an ideal example to examine these processes. The results show that adjacent to a stratified saltwater body three interfaces between three different water bodies are formed, and that a complex flow system, controlled by the density differences, is created, where three circulation cells are developed. These results are significantly different from the classic circulation cell that is found adjacent to non-stratified water bodies (lakes or oceans). In order to obtain a more generalized insight into the groundwater behavior adjacent to a stratified water body, we used the numerical model to perform sensitivity analysis. The hydrological system was found be sensitive to three dimensionless parameters: dimensionless density (i.e. the relative density of the three water bodies'); dimensionless thickness (i.e. the ratio between the relative thickness of the upper layer and the whole thickness of the lake); and dimensionless flux. The results

  9. Role of the S layer in morphogenesis and cell division of the archaebacterium Methanocorpusculum sinense.

    PubMed Central

    Pum, D; Messner, P; Sleytr, U B

    1991-01-01

    Thin sections, freeze-etched, and negatively stained preparations of Methanocorpusculum sinense cells reveal a highly lobed cell structure with a hexagonally arranged surface layer (S layer). Digital image processing of negatively stained envelope fragments show that the S layer forms a porous but strongly interconnected network. Since the S layer is the exclusive cell envelope component outside the cytoplasmic membrane it must have a cell shape determining and maintaining function. Although lattice faults such as disclinations and dislocations are a geometrical necessity on the surface of a closed protein crystal, our data indicate that they also play important roles as sites for the incorporation of new morphological units, in the formation of the lobed cell structure, and in the cell division process. In freeze-etched preparations of intact cells numerous positive and negative 60 degree wedge disclinations can be detected which form pentagons and heptagons in the hexagonal array. Complementary pairs of pentagons and heptagons are the termination points of edge dislocations. They can be expected to function both as sites for incorporation of new morphological units into the lattice and as initiation points for the cell division process. The latter is determined by the ratio between the increase of protoplast volume and the increase in actual S-layer surface area during cell growth. We postulate that this mode of cell fission represents a common feature in lobed archaebacteria which possess an S layer as the exclusive wall component. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:1938891

  10. Front contact solar cell with formed electrically conducting layers on the front side and backside

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2012-06-26

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by a silicon substrate and a first doped layer of a first dopant type on the backside of the solar cell. A second doped layer of a second dopant type makes an electrical connection to the substrate from the front side of the solar cell. A first metal contact of a first electrical polarity electrically connects to the first doped layer on the backside of the solar cell, and a second metal contact of a second electrical polarity electrically connects to the second doped layer on the front side of the solar cell. An external electrical circuit may be electrically connected to the first and second metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell.

  11. Evaluation of the percentage of ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer of the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Schlamp, Cassandra L.; Montgomery, Angela D.; Mac Nair, Caitlin E.; Schuart, Claudia; Willmer, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ganglion cells comprise a percentage of the neurons actually residing in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of the rodent retina. This estimate is useful to extrapolate ganglion cell loss in models of optic nerve disease, but the values reported in the literature are highly variable depending on the methods used to obtain them. Methods We tested three retrograde labeling methods and two immunostaining methods to calculate ganglion cell number in the mouse retina (C57BL/6). Additionally, a double-stain retrograde staining method was used to label rats (Long-Evans). The number of total neurons was estimated using a nuclear stain and selecting for nuclei that met specific criteria. Cholinergic amacrine cells were identified using transgenic mice expressing Tomato fluorescent protein. Total neurons and total ganglion cell numbers were measured in microscopic fields of 104 µm2 to determine the percentage of neurons comprising ganglion cells in each field. Results Historical estimates of the percentage of ganglion cells in the mouse GCL range from 36.1% to 67.5% depending on the method used. Experimentally, retrograde labeling methods yielded a combined estimate of 50.3% in mice. A retrograde method also yielded a value of 50.21% for rat retinas. Immunolabeling estimates were higher at 64.8%. Immunolabeling may introduce overestimates, however, with non-specific labeling effects, or ectopic expression of antigens in neurons other than ganglion cells. Conclusions Since immunolabeling methods may overestimate ganglion cell numbers, we conclude that 50%, which is consistently derived from retrograde labeling methods, is a reliable estimate of the ganglion cells in the neuronal population of the GCL. PMID:23825918

  12. Novel approaches for fabrication of thin film layers for solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murugesamoorthi, K. A.; Srinivasan, S.; Cocke, D. L.; Appleby, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The main objectives of the SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) project are to (1) identify viable and cost-effective techniques to prepare cell components for stable MSOFCs (monolithic SOFCs); (2) fabricate half and single cells; and (3) evaluate their performances. The approach used to fabricate stable MSOFCs is as follows: (1) the electrolyte layer is prepared in the form of a honeycomb structure by alloy oxidation and other cell components are deposited on it; (2) the electrolyte and anode layers are deposited on the cathode layer, which has a porous, honeycomb structure; and (3) the electrolyte and cathode layers are deposited on the anode layer. The current status of the project is reported.

  13. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  14. All solution processable organic photovoltaic cells using DMDCNQI as an organic N-type buffer layer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eui Yeol; So, Byoung Min; Chung, Chan Moon; Oh, Se Young

    2012-01-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells consisting of ITO/PEDOT-PSS/P3HT:PCBM/TiO(x)/DMDCNQI/Al have been fabricated by using dip-coated DMDCNQI layer as a cathode buffer material. We have investigated the physical effects of charge transfer complex and wettability of DMDCNQI between TiO(x)/P3HT:PCBM layer and Al cathode electrode on the performance of organic photovoltaic cell. The photovoltaic cell fabricated with a dip-coated DMDCNQI layer exhibited almost similar performance compared to the device using conventional evaporated DMDCNQI layer. Especially, the power conversion efficiency of the prepared organic photovoltaic cell using TiO(x)/DMDCNQI layer was improved to 3.1%, which is mainly due to the decrease in the low contact resistance of organic-metal interface.

  15. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  16. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)-polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  17. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates

    PubMed Central

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)–polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies. PMID:26734521

  18. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)-polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies. PMID:26734521

  19. Design and In Vitro Evaluation of Layer by Layer siRNA Nanovectors Targeting Breast Tumor Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Hamsa; Mitra, Sucharita; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi

    2014-01-01

    Efficient therapeutics and early detection has helped to increase breast cancer survival rates over the years. However, the recurrence of breast cancer remains to be a problem and this may be due to the presence of a small population of cells, called tumor initiating cells (TICs). Breast TICs are resistant to drugs, difficult to detect, and exhibit high self-renewal capabilities. In this study, layer by layer (LBL) small interfering RNA (siRNA) nanovectors (SNVs) were designed to target breast TICs. SNVs were fabricated using alternating layers of poly-L-lysine and siRNA molecules on gold (Au) nanoparticle (NP) surfaces. The stability, cell uptake, and release profile for SNVs were examined. In addition, SNVs reduced TIC-related STAT3 expression levels, CD44+/CD24−/EpCAM+ surface marker levels and the number of mammospheres formed compared to the standard transfection agent. The data from this study show, for the first time, that SNVs in LBL assembly effectively delivers STAT3 siRNA and inhibit the growth of breast TICs in vitro. PMID:24694753

  20. p-Type semiconducting nickel oxide as an efficiency-enhancing anodal interfacial layer in bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, Michael D; Buchholz, Donald B; Marks, Tobin J; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2014-11-25

    The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode, a p-type semiconductor layer formed on the anode, and an active organic layer formed on the p-type semiconductor layer, where the active organic layer has an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material.

  1. Ultraviolet-ozone-treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer for organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Zisheng; Wang, Lidan; Li, Yantao; Zhao, Haifeng; Chu, Bei; Li, Wenlian

    2012-08-17

    Ultraviolet-ozone-treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)was used as the anode buffer layer in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene-based solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of the cells with appropriated UV-ozone treatment was found to increase about 20% compared to the reference cell. The improved performance is attributed to the increased work function of the PEDOT:PSS layer, which improves the contact condition between PEDOT:PSS and CuPc, hence increasing the extraction efficiency of the photogenerated holes and decreasing the recombination probability of holes and electrons in the active organic layers.

  2. Carrier dynamics and design optimization of electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenchao; Seol, Gyungseon; Rinzler, Andrew G.; Guo, Jing

    2012-03-01

    Carrier dynamics of the electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cells is explored by numerical simulations. Operation mechanisms of the solar cells with and without the electrolyte-induced inversion layer are presented and compared, which clarifies the current flow mechanisms in a solar cell with an induced inversion layer. A heavily doped back contact layer can behave as a hole block layer. In addition to lowering contact resistance and surface recombination, it is particularly useful for improving carrier separation in an electrolyte-induced inversion layer solar cell or a metal-insulator-semiconductor grating solar cell.

  3. Solar cell modules with improved backskin and methods for forming same

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    1998-04-21

    A laminated solar cell module with a backskin layer that reduces the materials and labor required during the manufacturing process. The solar cell module includes a rigid front support layer formed of light transmitting material having first and second surfaces. A transparent encapsulant layer has a first surface disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. A plurality of interconnected solar cells have a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer is formed of a thermoplastic olefin, which includes first ionomer, a second ionomer, glass fiber, and carbon black. A first surface of the backskin layer is disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells. The transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer, in combination, encapsulate the interconnected solar cells. An end portion of the backskin layer can be wrapped around the edge of the module for contacting the first surface of the front support layer to form an edge seal. A laminated solar cell module with a backskin layer that reduces the materials and labor required during the manufacturing process. The solar cell module includes a rigid front support layer formed of light transmitting material having first and second surfaces. A transparent encapsulant layer has a first surface disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. A plurality of interconnected solar cells have a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer is formed of a thermoplastic olefin, which includes first ionomer, a second ionomer, glass fiber, and carbon black. A first surface of the backskin layer is disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells. The transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer, in combination, encapsulate the interconnected solar cells. An end portion of the backskin layer can be wrapped around the edge of the

  4. Modelling the effects of microgravity on the permeability of air interface respiratory epithelial cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marlise A.; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Russomano, Thais; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Falcão, Felipe; Marriott, Christopher; Forbes, Ben

    2010-09-01

    Although it has been suggested that microgravity might affect drug absorption in vivo, drug permeability across epithelial barriers has not yet been investigated in vitro during modelled microgravity. Therefore, a cell culture/diffusion chamber was designed specifically to accommodate epithelial cell layers in a 3D-clinostat and allow epithelial permeability to be measured under microgravity conditions in vitro with minimum alteration to established cell culture techniques. Human respiratory epithelial Calu-3 cell layers were used to model the airway epithelium. Cells grown at an air interface in the diffusion chamber from day 1 or day 5 after seeding on 24-well polyester Transwell cell culture inserts developed a similar transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) to cells cultured in conventional cell culture plates. Confluent Calu-3 layers exposed to modelled microgravity in the 3D-clinostat for up to 48 h maintained their high TER. The permeability of the paracellular marker 14C-mannitol was unaffected after a 24 h rotation of the cell layers in the 3D-clinostat, but was increased 2-fold after 48 h of modelled microgravity. It was demonstrated that the culture/diffusion chamber developed is suitable for culturing epithelial cell layers and, when subjected to rotation in the 3D-clinostat, will be a valuable in vitro system in which to study the influence of microgravity on epithelial permeability and drug transport.

  5. Grid cells correlation structure suggests organized feedforward projections into superficial layers of the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tocker, Gilad; Barak, Omri; Derdikman, Dori

    2015-12-01

    Navigation requires integration of external and internal inputs to form a representation of location. Part of this integration is considered to be carried out by the grid cells network in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). However, the structure of this neural network is unknown. To shed light on this structure, we measured noise correlations between 508 pairs of simultaneous previously recorded grid cells. We differentiated between pure grid and conjunctive cells (pure grid in Layers II, III, and VI vs. conjunctive in Layers III and V--only Layer III was bi-modal), and devised a new method to classify cell pairs as belonging/not-belonging to the same module. We found that pairs from the same module show significantly more correlations than pairs from different modules. The correlations between pure grid cells decreased in strength as their relative spatial phase increased. However, correlations were mostly at 0 time-lag, suggesting that the source of correlations was not only synaptic, but rather resulted mostly from common input. Given our measured correlations, the two functional groups of grid cells (pure vs. conjunctive), and the known disorganized recurrent connections within Layer II, we propose the following model: conjunctive cells in deep layers form an attractor network whose activity is governed by velocity-controlled signals. A second manifold in Layer II receives organized feedforward projections from the deep layers, giving rise to pure grid cells. Numerical simulations indicate that organized projections induce such correlations as we measure in superficial layers. Our results provide new evidence for the functional anatomy of the entorhinal circuit-suggesting that strong phase-organized feedforward projections support grid fields in the superficial layers.

  6. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  7. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  8. Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1980-01-01

    Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

  9. The investigation on the stratification phenomenon of aluminum rear alloyed layer in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xi; Chen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Song; Shi, Zhengrong; Li, Guohua

    2015-06-01

    A stratification phenomenon of aluminum rear alloyed layer was found in the study of aluminum rear emitter N-type solar cells. It is related to the composition of the paste. The outer aluminum alloyed layer can be called as aluminum doped emitter, and it gives the contribution to the junction formation. The inner layer is only the Al/Si mixed layer. The aluminum atoms in this layer are not bonded with silicon atoms. This inner layer will ruin the quality of the rear junction. The shunt resistance, reverse current density and the junction electric leakage value are getting worse when the thickness of the inner layer increases. The thickness of the inner Al/Si mixed layer increases with the increasing of firing temperature, while the depth of the aluminum doped emitter almost does not change. From the analyses, the inner Al/Si mixed layer is redundant and deleterious. Only a single deep aluminum doped rear emitter is needed for N-type solar cells. The highest power conversion efficiency of 19.93% for aluminum rear emitter N-type cells without the stratification phenomenon has been obtained.

  10. n +-Microcrystalline-Silicon Tunnel Layer in Tandem Si-Based Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Lee, Hsin-Ying; Chen, Kuan-Hao

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the p-SiC/ i-Si/ n-Si cell and the p-SiC/ i-SiGe/ n-Si cell deposited using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were cascaded for forming the tandem Si-based thin film solar cells to absorb the wide solar spectrum. To further improve the performances of the tandem Si-based thin film solar cells, a 5-nm-thick n +-microcrystalline-Si ( n +-μc-Si) tunnel layer deposited using the laser-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was inserted between the p-SiC/ i-Si/ n-Si cell and the p-SiC/ i-SiGe/ n-Si cell. Since both the plasma and the CO2 laser were simultaneously utilized to efficiently decompose the reactant and doping gases, the carrier concentration and the carrier mobility of the n +-μc-Si tunnel layer were significantly improved. The ohmic contact formed between the p-SiC layer and the n +-μc-Si tunnel layer with low resistance was beneficial to the generated current transportation and the carrier recombination rate. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of the tandem solar cells was promoted from 8.57% and 8.82% to 9.91% compared to that without tunnel layer and with 5-nm-thick n +-amorphous-Si tunnel layer.

  11. Quantification of cell-free layer thickness and cell distribution of blood by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauri, Janne; Bykov, Alexander; Fabritius, Tapio

    2016-04-01

    A high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) with 1-μm axial resolution was applied to assess the thickness of a cell-free layer (CFL) and a spatial distribution of red blood cells (RBC) next to the microchannel wall. The experiments were performed in vitro in a plain glass microchannel with a width of 2 mm and height of 0.2 mm. RBCs were suspended in phosphate buffered saline solution at the hematocrit level of 45%. Flow rates of 0.1 to 0.5 ml/h were used to compensate gravity induced CFL. The results indicate that OCT can be efficiently used for the quantification of CFL thickness and spatial distribution of RBCs in microcirculatory blood flow.

  12. Endomembrane proteomics reveals putative enzymes involved in cell wall metabolism in wheat grain outer layers

    PubMed Central

    Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Suliman, Muhtadi; Bouchet, Brigitte; Alvarado, Camille; Lollier, Virginie; Rogniaux, Hélène; Guillon, Fabienne; Larré, Colette

    2015-01-01

    Cereal grain outer layers fulfil essential functions for the developing seed such as supplying energy and providing protection. In the food industry, the grain outer layers called ‘the bran’ is valuable since it is rich in dietary fibre and other beneficial nutriments. The outer layers comprise several tissues with a high content in cell wall material. The cell wall composition of the grain peripheral tissues was investigated with specific probes at a stage of active cell wall synthesis. Considerable wall diversity between cell types was revealed. To identify the cellular machinery involved in cell wall synthesis, a subcellular proteomic approach was used targeting the Golgi apparatus where most cell wall polysaccharides are synthesized. The tissues were dissected into outer pericarp and intermediate layers where 822 and 1304 proteins were identified respectively. Many carbohydrate-active enzymes were revealed: some in the two peripheral grain fractions, others only in one tissue. Several protein families specific to one fraction and with characterized homologs in other species might be related to the specific detection of a polysaccharide in a particular cell layer. This report provides new information on grain cell walls and its biosynthesis in the valuable outer tissues, which are poorly studied so far. A better understanding of the mechanisms controlling cell wall composition could help to improve several quality traits of cereal products (e.g. dietary fibre content, biomass conversion to biofuel). PMID:25769308

  13. Characterization and cell behavior of titanium surfaces with PLL/DNA modification via a layer-by-layer technique.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenli; Feng, Bo; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie

    2012-08-01

    This study describes the fabrication of two types of multilayered films onto titanium by layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly, using poly-L-lysine (PLL) as the cationic polyelectrolyte and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the anionic polyelectrolyte. The assembling process of each component was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal balance (QCM). Zeta potential of the LBL-coated microparticles was measured by dynamic light scattering. Titanium substrates with or without multilayered films were used in osteoblast cell culture experiments to study cell proliferation, viability, differentiation, and morphology. Results of AFM and QCM indicated the progressive build-up of the multilayered coatings. The surface morphology of three types of multilayered films showed elevations in the nanoscale range. The data of zeta potential showed that the surface terminated with PLL displayed positive charge while the surface terminated with DNA displayed negative charge. The proliferation of osteoblasts on modified titanium films was found to be greater than that on control (p < 0.05) after 3 and 7 days culture, respectively. Alamar blue measurement showed that the PLL/DNA-modified films have higher cell viability (p < 0.05) than the control. Still, the alkaline phosphatase activity assay revealed a better differentiated phenotype on three types of multilayered surfaces compared to noncoated controls. Collectively our results suggest that PLL/DNA were successfully used to surface engineer titanium via LBL technique, and enhanced its cell biocompatibility.

  14. Surface modulation of complex stiffness via layer-by-layer assembly as a facile strategy for selective cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Zhang, He; Hu, Mi; Chen, Xia-chao; Ren, Ke-feng; Wang, Jin-lei; Ji, Jian

    2015-02-01

    In-stent restenosis and thrombosis are the main severe problems that occur after the percutaneous vascular intervention. The competition between endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role during these pathological changes. The regulation of this competition offers new opportunities to design biomaterials in the cardiovascular fields. Bioactive molecules have been typically employed to increase EC adhesion and thereafter to enhance EC competitiveness; however, this method is associated with limitations from the point of view of practical and industrial applications. Herein, we present an approach to enhance EC competitiveness over that of SMC through the selective EC adhesion, which is achieved by modulating a complex surface stiffness based on the technique of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. This complex stiffness can be achieved by regulating the thickness of multilayer films coordinating with a rigid underlying substrate. The selective cell adhesion is attributed to changes in the complex surface stiffness and a different intrinsic property between ECs and SMCs. This study provides a facile and broadly applicable approach for the purpose of the enhancement of EC competitiveness over that of SMC, which has great potential for the development of cell-based functional biomaterials in the cardiovascular field. PMID:26218126

  15. Inner ear stem cells derived feeder layer promote directional differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells into functional neurons.

    PubMed

    Zong, Ling; Chen, Kaitian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Di; Sun, Liang; Zhang, Xuemei; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-10-01

    Intact spiral ganglion neurons are required for cochlear implantation or conventional hearing amplification as an intervention for sensorineural hearing loss. Treatment strategies to replace the loss of spiral ganglion neurons are needed. Recent reports have suggested that amniotic fluid-derived stem cells are capable of differentiating into neuron-like cells in response to cytokines and are not tumorigenic. Amniotic fluid stem cells represent a potential resource for cellular therapy of neural deafness due to spiral ganglion pathology. However, the directional differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells is undetermined in the absence of cytokines and the consequence of inner ear supporting cells from the mouse cochlea organ of Corti on the differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells remains to be defined. In an effort to circumvent these limitations, we investigated the effect of inner ear stem cells derived feeder layer on amniotic fluid stem cells differentiation in vitro. An inner ear stem cells derived feeder layer direct contact system was established to induce differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells. Our results showed that inner ear stem cells derived feeder layer successfully promoted directional differentiation of amniotic fluid stem cells into neurons with characteristics of functionality. Furthermore, we showed that Wnt signaling may play an essential role in triggering neurogenesis. These findings indicate the potential use of inner ear stem cells derived feeder layer as a nerve-regenerative scaffold. A reliable and effective amniotic fluid stem cell differentiation support structure provided by inner ear stem cells derived feeder layer should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic.

  16. Peperomia leaf cell wall interface between the multiple hypodermis and crystal-containing photosynthetic layer displays unusual pit fields

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaves of succulent Peperomia obtusifolia (Piperaceae), and its related species, contain a large multilayered hypodermis (epidermis) subtended by a very small single-layered photosynthetic palisade parenchyma, the latter containing spherical aggregates of crystals called druses. Each druse is in a central vacuole surrounded by chloroplasts. All hypodermal cell walls are thin, except for thick lowermost periclinal walls associated with the upper periclinal walls of the subtending palisade cells. These thick walls display ‘quilted’ impressions (mounds) formed by many subtending palisade cells. Conspicuous depressions occur in most mounds, and each depression contains what appear to be many plasmodesmata. These depressions are opposite similar regions in adjacent thin palisade periclinal walls, and they can be considered special pit fields that represent thin translucent regions (‘windows’ or ‘skylights’). Druses in the vacuoles of palisade cells occur below these pit field regions and are surrounded by conspicuous cytoplasmic chloroplasts with massive grana oriented perpendicular to the crystals, probably providing for an efficient photosynthetic system under low-intensity light. Methods Leaf clearings and fractures, light microscopy and crossed polarizers, general and histochemical staining, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine these structures. Key Results Druses in the vacuoles of palisade cells occur below the thin pit field regions in the wall interface, suggesting an interesting physical relationship that could provide a pathway for light waves, filtered through the multiple hypodermis. The light waves pass into the palisade cells and are collected and dispersed by the druses to surrounding chloroplasts with large grana. Conclusions These results imply an intriguing possible efficient photosynthetic adaptation for species growing in low-light environments, and provide an opportunity for future

  17. New approaches for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, L.; Kaiser, M.; Ketelhut, S.; Pereira, S.; Goycoolea, F.; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables high resolution non-destructive inspection of technical surfaces and minimally-invasive label-free live cell imaging. However, the analysis of confluent cell layers represents a challenge as quantitative DHM phase images in this case do not provide sufficient information for image segmentation, determination of the cellular dry mass or calculation of the cell thickness. We present novel strategies for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative DHM phase contrast utilizing a histogram based-evaluation procedure. The applicability of our approach is illustrated by quantification of drug induced cell morphology changes and it is shown that the method is capable to quantify reliable global morphology changes of confluent cell layers.

  18. Effect of InAlAs window layer on efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide bandgap, lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In(0.52)Al(0.48)As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated by using the numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improved significantly with the use of the window layer. No improvement was seen for the n(+)p InP cells. The cell results were explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction band energy discontinuity. The calculated current voltage and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrated that In(0.52)Al(0.48)As is a very promising candidate for a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  19. Effect of InAlAs window layer on the efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide-bandgap lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In0.52Al0.48As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated using a numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improves significantly with the use of a window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p InP cells. Cell results are explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction-band energy discontinuity. The calculated I-V and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrate that In0.52Al0.48As is a promising candidate as a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  20. Double-layered collagen gel hemisphere for cell invasion assay: successful visualization and quantification of cell invasion activity.

    PubMed

    Takata, Masahiko; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Doi, Takefumi; Tanaka, Yugo; Okada, Kenji; Nishio, Wataru; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Okita, Yutaka

    2007-10-01

    Although various methods for collagen gel-based cell invasion assays have been described, there continues to be a need for a simpler and more objective assay. Here, we describe an easy-to-prepare double-layered collagen gel hemisphere (DL-CGH) system that satisfies these requirements, and we demonstrate the advantages of this new system for visualizing cell movements during invasion. DL-CGH consists of a central core collagen layer surrounded by an outer cover collagen layer. A droplet of collagen I solution (containing cells to be examined) naturally forms a small hemisphere on the bottom of the culture dish. After this central core layer gels, a second droplet is placed atop the first gel, encapsulating it completely. The hemisphere is submerged in the medium and cultured. The invasive activity of cells that infiltrate from the inner to the outer layer can be evaluated optically. Using this in vitro system, we measured the inhibitory effect of E-cadherin expression on cancer cell invasion. DL-CGH also allowed visualization of interactions between invading cancer cells and the stroma. Cancer cells, which lack the proteases required for direct entrance into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, were seen to slip like amoebas through matrix gaps generated by the pericellular proteolytic activity of fibroblasts. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Cell Communication and Adhesion for the following free supplemental resources: Movies 1-3; 4a and b]. PMID:17957531

  1. The effect of interfacial layers on charge transport in organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuyise, Xolani G.; Tonui, Patrick; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-09-01

    The effect of interfacial buffer layers in organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) whose active layer is composed of poly(3 hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend was studied. The electrical properties of OPV devices produced with and without interfacial layers are compared and discussed in terms of measured parameters of the cells. The charge transport properties showed significant difference on the mobility and activation factor between the two types of device structures. The life time measurements in the unprotected conditions are also presented and discussed.

  2. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer

    PubMed Central

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H.; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S. White, Matthew.; S. Sariciftci, Niyazi.; Scharber, Markus C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium–tin–oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor–acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  3. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S White, Matthew; S Sariciftci, Niyazi; Scharber, Markus C

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium-tin-oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor-acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  4. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S White, Matthew; S Sariciftci, Niyazi; Scharber, Markus C

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium-tin-oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor-acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process.

  5. [Endogenous content of the nitric oxide in the cell layers of the eye retina].

    PubMed

    Kalamkarov, G P; Bugrova, A E; Konstantinova, T S; Shevchenko, T F

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide is a universal molecule that regulates many different functions in an organism. In the eye retina nitric oxide plays both a regulatory role by modulation of the synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells and a toxic role in apoptosis induction in the outer nuclear layer and in the layer of ganglion cells. In this paper there has been made the first attempt to estimate the endogenous NO concentration in retina layers in vivo. The concentration of the nitric oxide was determined by two indepen- dent techniques: ESR spectrometry using spin trap for in vivo determination and NO-sensitive microelectrode for in situ determination in the survival isolated frog retina. The distinct NO con- centration was detected only in the ganglion cells layer (~0.25 μM) and in the inner segments layer of the photoreceptors (~0.6 μM). The activity and the kinetic characteristic of the NO-synthase localized in the same layers were also determined. Key words: retina cells layers, nitric oxide, ESR, NO-sensitive microelectrodes.

  6. Nanofibrous mats layer-by-layer assembled by HTCC/layered silicate composites with in vitro antitumor activity against SMMC-7721 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Xinqin; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Huan'guang; Shi, Xiaowen; Luo, Wenjing; Deng, Hongbing

    2014-03-01

    Organic rectorite (OREC) was used to prepare the intercalated nanocomposites with N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC), and then the immobilization of the positively charged HTCC-OREC nanocomposites and the negatively charged sodium alginate (ALG) on cellulose nanofibrous mats was performed through layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. Fiber diameter distribution results from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) images showed that the average fiber diameter of (HTCC-OREC/ALG)(n) films coating obviously increased from 433 to 608 nm. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results further confirmed the interaction between HTCC and OREC and their successful immobilization on cellulose template. MTT assay indicated that the prepared nanofibrous mats exhibited strong inhibitory activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (SMMC-7721) but a little cytotoxic effect on human Chang liver (CCL-13) cells. Furthermore, the experimental results from FE-SEM and Inverted Fluorescence Microscope of SMMC-7721 cells cultured on LBL structured nanofibrous mats demonstrated the significant antitumor activity of prepared samples. The developed approach to immobilize nanocomposites onto polymer nanofibers with controllable thickness may also be utilized to tumor therapy. PMID:24730244

  7. Dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Leguey, Ignacio; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rojo, Concepción; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of the structural design of cortical microcircuits is essential for understanding how they contribute to function in both health and disease. Since pyramidal neurons represent the most abundant neuronal type and their dendritic spines constitute the major postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the neocortex largely depends on the available knowledge regarding the structure of pyramidal cells. Previous studies have identified several apparently common rules in dendritic geometry. We study the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers to further shed light on the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells. We find that the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells from layers II-VI of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex suggest common design principles, despite the particular morphological and functional features that are characteristic of pyramidal cells in each cortical layer. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2567-2576, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Leguey, Ignacio; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rojo, Concepción; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of the structural design of cortical microcircuits is essential for understanding how they contribute to function in both health and disease. Since pyramidal neurons represent the most abundant neuronal type and their dendritic spines constitute the major postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the neocortex largely depends on the available knowledge regarding the structure of pyramidal cells. Previous studies have identified several apparently common rules in dendritic geometry. We study the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells across layers to further shed light on the principles that determine the geometric shapes of these cells. We find that the dendritic branching angles of pyramidal cells from layers II-VI of the juvenile rat somatosensory cortex suggest common design principles, despite the particular morphological and functional features that are characteristic of pyramidal cells in each cortical layer. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2567-2576, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850576

  9. Comparison of different structures of niobium oxide blocking layer for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chun, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jong Sung

    2014-08-01

    In this study, four different types of Nb2O5 thin layers were prepared using sol-gel process to improve energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Nb2O5 layer was prepared on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) layer, TiO2 electrode layer, and inside of TiO2 layer, respectively. The Nb2O5 layer was used to reduce the recombination of photo induced electrons and holes. The DSSCs were assembled with platinum (Pt) coated counter electrode, ruthenium dye, and iodine based electrolyte. The photocurrent-voltage (I-V) characteristics of DSSCs with different types of Nb2O5 were studied. The efficiency depends not only on the structure of DSSCs but also on the initial compositions for the preparation of Nb2O5.

  10. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  11. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.

  12. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. PMID:27232674

  13. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis. PMID:27359352

  15. Morphological Characteristics of Electrophysiologically Characterized Layer Vb Pyramidal Cells in Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Loucif, Alexandre J. C.; Schubert, Dirk; Möck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Layer Vb pyramidal cells are the major output neurons of the neocortex and transmit the outcome of cortical columnar signal processing to distant target areas. At the same time they contribute to local tactile information processing by emitting recurrent axonal collaterals into the columnar microcircuitry. It is, however, not known how exactly the two types of pyramidal cells, called slender-tufted and thick-tufted, contribute to the local circuitry. Here, we investigated in the rat barrel cortex the detailed quantitative morphology of biocytin-filled layer Vb pyramidal cells in vitro, which were characterized for their intrinsic electrophysiology with special emphasis on their action potential firing pattern. Since we stained the same slices for cytochrome oxidase, we could also perform layer- and column-related analyses. Our results suggest that in layer Vb the unambiguous action potential firing patterns "regular spiking (RS)" and "repetitive burst spiking (RB)" (previously called intrinsically burst spiking) correlate well with a distinct morphology. RS pyramidal cells are somatodendritically of the slender-tufted type and possess numerous local intralaminar and intracolumnar axonal collaterals, mostly reaching layer I. By contrast, their transcolumnar projections are less well developed. The RB pyramidal cells are somatodendritically of the thick-tufted type and show only relatively sparse local axonal collaterals, which are preferentially emitted as long horizontal or oblique infragranular collaterals. However, contrary to many previous slice studies, a substantial number of these neurons also showed axonal collaterals reaching layer I. Thus, electrophysiologically defined pyramidal cells of layer Vb show an input and output pattern which suggests RS cells to be more "locally segregating" signal processors whereas RB cells seem to act more on a "global integrative" scale. PMID:27706253

  16. Impact of micro-porous layer on liquid water distribution at the catalyst layer interface and cell performance in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabe, Yutaka; Aoyama, Yusuke; Kadowaki, Kazumasa; Suzuki, Kengo; Chikahisa, Takemi

    2015-08-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, a gas diffusion layer (GDL) with a micro-porous layer (MPL) gives better anti-flooding performance than GDLs without an MPL. To investigate the function and mechanism of the MPL to suppress water flooding, the liquid water distribution at the cathode catalyst layer (CL) surface are observed by a freezing method; in the method liquid water is immobilized in ice form by rapid freezing, followed by disassembling the cell for observations. The ice covered area is quantified by image processing and cells with and without an MPL are compared. The results show that the MPL suppresses water accumulation at the interface due to smaller pore size and finer contact with the CL, and this results in less water flooding. Investigation of ice formed after -10 °C cold start shutdowns and the temporary performance deterioration at ordinary temperatures also indicates a significant influence of the liquid water accumulating at the interface. The importance of the fine contact between CL and MPL, the relative absence of gaps, is demonstrated by a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) which is directly coated with catalyst ink on the surface of the MPL achieving finer contact of the layers.

  17. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-09

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + 66-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  18. Optical methods for measuring plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinas, Javier Anibal

    Optical methods were developed to measure water permeability in cell layers and used to characterize water channel transfected cells and measure individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells. The general approach was to measure the rate of change of cell volume in response to osmotic gradients. Changes in solute concentration resulting from cell volume changes were used to generate optical signals. Because of the high data acquisition rates obtainable with optical instruments, very high water permeabilities found in cells containing water channels can be measured. Total internal reflection microfluorimetry was used to measure water permeability in cells grown on transparent, solid supports. The fluorescence measured from cells containing a cytosolic fluorophore was inversely proportional to cell volume. The method was applied to transfected cells which expressed water channels and to investigate a cell model of the vasopressin-regulated shuttling of AQP2. Interferometry was used to measure cell volume and water permeability in adherent or non-adherent epithelial cell layers. Volume changes were shown to alter the optical path length of light passing through a cell layer. An interferometer was used to convert the small changes in optical path length to measurable changes in intensity. Cell membrane osmotic water permeability was determined from the time course of interference signal in response to osmotic gradients. Individual plasma membrane water permeabilities of epithelial cells were measured. To overcome the difficulties associated with interferometry, a spatial filtering microscopy method was developed based on changes in transmitted light intensity in a phase contrast microscope occurring after volume changes induced by osmotic gradients. A theory based on the refractive index changes observed in cells by interferometry was developed to explain the dependence of transmitted light intensity on cell volume. The method was applied to

  19. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  20. Multi-bits memory cell using degenerated magnetic states in a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Konoto, Makoto; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    We newly developed a magnetic memory cell having multi-bit function. The memory cell composed of a perpendicularly magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MB-pMTJ) and a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer. The multi-bit function is realized by combining the freedom of states of the magnetic free layer and that in the antiferromagnetically coupled reference layer. The structure of the reference layer is (FeB/Ta/[Co/Pt]3)/Ru/([Co/Pt]6); the top and the bottom layers are coupled through Ru layer where the reference layer has two degrees of freedom of a head-to-head and a bottom-to-bottom magnetic configuration. A four-state memory cell is realized by combination of both degrees of freedom. The states in the reference layer however is hardly detected by the total resistance of MB-pMTJ, because the magnetoresistance effect in the reference layer is negligibly small. That implies that the resistance values for the different states in the reference layer are degenerated. On the other hand, the two different states in the reference layer bring different stray fields to the free layer, which generate two different minor loop with different switching fields. Therefore, the magnetic states in the reference layer can be differentiated by the two-step reading, before and after applying the appropriately pulsed magnetic field which can identify the initial state in the reference layer. This method is similar to distinguishing different magnetic states in an in-plane magnetized spin-valve element. We demonstrated that four different states in the MB-pMTJ can be distinguished by the two-step read-out. The important feature of the two-step reading is a practically large operation margins (large resistance change in reading) which is equal to that of a single MTJ. Even though the two-step reading is a destructive method by which 50% of the magnetic state is changed, this MB-pMTJ is promising for high density non-volatile memory cell with a minor cost of operation speed.

  1. Catalyst-layer ionomer imaging of fuel cells

    DOE PAGES

    Guetaz, Laure; Lopez-Haro, M.; Escribano, S.; Morin, A.; Gebel, G.; Cullen, D. A.; More, K. L.; Borup, Rodney L.

    2015-09-14

    Investigation of membrane/electrode assembly (MEA) microstructure has become an essential step to optimize the MEA components and manufacturing processes or to study the MEA degradation. For these investigations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a tool of choice as it provides direct imaging of the different components. TEM is then widely used for analyzing the catalyst nanoparticles and their carbon support. However, the ionomer inside the electrode is more difficult to be imaged. The difficulties come from the fact that the ionomer forms an ultrathin layer surrounding the carbon particles and in addition, these two components, having similar density, present nomore » difference in contrast. In this paper, we show how the recent progresses in TEM techniques as spherical aberration (Cs) corrected HRTEM, electron tomography and X-EDS elemental mapping provide new possibilities for imaging this ionomer network and consequently to study its degradation.« less

  2. Catalyst-layer ionomer imaging of fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guetaz, Laure; Lopez-Haro, M.; Escribano, S.; Morin, A.; Gebel, G.; Cullen, D. A.; More, K. L.; Borup, Rodney L.

    2015-09-14

    Investigation of membrane/electrode assembly (MEA) microstructure has become an essential step to optimize the MEA components and manufacturing processes or to study the MEA degradation. For these investigations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a tool of choice as it provides direct imaging of the different components. TEM is then widely used for analyzing the catalyst nanoparticles and their carbon support. However, the ionomer inside the electrode is more difficult to be imaged. The difficulties come from the fact that the ionomer forms an ultrathin layer surrounding the carbon particles and in addition, these two components, having similar density, present no difference in contrast. In this paper, we show how the recent progresses in TEM techniques as spherical aberration (Cs) corrected HRTEM, electron tomography and X-EDS elemental mapping provide new possibilities for imaging this ionomer network and consequently to study its degradation.

  3. Internal quantum efficiency improvement in polysilicon solar cells with porous silicon layer on the rear side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, Abdessalem; Zouari, Abdelaziz

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reports on a simulation study carried out to determine and optimize the effect of porous silicon (PS) layer at the rear side on the performance of thin polysilicon solar cells. It analytically solved the complete set of equations necessary to determine the contribution that this material has with regard to the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the cell when acting as a backside reflector. The contribution of the different regions of the cell, the increase in IQE, and the effects of high porosity and number of PS layers were derived and compared to conventional BSF solar cells. The findings revealed that the IQE of the solar cell with a PS layer at the backside was higher than that of conventional BSF, particularly in terms of medium and long wavelength range λ > 0.5 μm. This improvement was more significant with thin cells, large grain widths, and well-passivated grain boundaries. Furthermore, while the use of the PS layer had a significant effect on the contribution of the base, it exerted no effect on the contribution of the emitter and depletion regions. Overall, the maximum level of IQE improvement was recorded with three double-porosity structures in the PS layer, reaching a high porosity value of about 80 %.

  4. The influence of scaffold elasticity on germ layer specification of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zoldan, Janet; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Lee, Christopher Y; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2011-12-01

    Mechanical forces are critical to embryogenesis, specifically, in the lineage-specification gastrulation phase, whereupon the embryo is transformed from a simple spherical ball of cells to a multi-layered organism, containing properly organized endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm germ layers. Several reports have proposed that such directed and coordinated movements of large cell collectives are driven by cellular responses to cell deformations and cell-generated forces. To better understand these environmental-induced cell changes, we have modeled the germ layer formation process by culturing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on three dimensional (3D) scaffolds with stiffness engineered to model that found in specific germ layers. We show that differentiation to each germ layer was promoted by a different stiffness threshold of the scaffolds, reminiscent of the forces exerted during the gastrulation process. The overall results suggest that three dimensional (3D) scaffolds can recapitulate the mechanical stimuli required for directing hESC differentiation and that these stimuli can play a significant role in determining hESC fate. PMID:21963156

  5. Carbon-Nanotube Conductive Layers for Thin-Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    Thin, transparent layers comprising mats of carbon nanotubes have been proposed for providing lateral (that is, inplane) electrical conductivities for collecting electric currents from the front surfaces of the emitter layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells. Traditionally, thin, semitransparent films of other electrically conductive materials (usually, indium tin oxide, zinc oxide, or cadmium sulfide) have been used for this purpose. As in the cases of the traditional semitransparent conductive films, the currents collected by the nanotube layers would, in turn, be further collected by front metal contact stripes. Depending on details of a specific solar-cell design, the layer of carbon nanotubes would be deposited in addition to, or instead of, a semitransparent layer of one of these traditional conductive materials (see figure). The proposal is expected to afford the following advantages: The electrical conductivity of the carbon- nanotube layer would exceed that of the corresponding semitransparent layer of traditional electrically conductive material. The greater electrical conductivity of the carbon-nanotube layer would make it possible to retain adequate lateral electrical conductivity while reducing the thickness of, or eliminating entirely, the traditional semitransparent conductive layer. As a consequence of thinning or elimination of the traditional semitransparent conductive layer, less light would be absorbed, so that more of the incident light would be available for photovoltaic conversion. The greater electrical conductivity of the carbon-nanotube layer would make it possible to increase the distance between front metal contact stripes, in addition to (or instead of) thinning or eliminating the layer of traditional semitransparent conductive material. Consequently, the fraction of solar-cell area shadowed by front metal contact stripes would be reduced again, making more of the incident light available for photovoltaic conversion. The electrical

  6. Layer-by-layer paper-stacking nanofibrous membranes to deliver adipose-derived stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenbing; Zhang, Shiwen; Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Fang, Xingxing; Yuan, Quan; Zhong, Wen; Ouyang, Jun; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering through seeding of stem cells in three-dimensional scaffolds has greatly improved bone regeneration technology, which historically has been a constant challenge. In this study, we researched the use of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-laden layer-by-layer paper-stacking polycaprolactone/gelatin electrospinning nanofibrous membranes for bone regeneration. Using this novel paper-stacking method makes oxygen distribution, nutrition, and waste transportation work more efficiently. ADSCs can also secrete multiple growth factors required for osteogenesis. After the characterization of ADSC surface markers CD29, CD90, and CD49d using flow cytometry, we seeded ADSCs on the membranes and found cells differentiated, with significant expression of the osteogenic-related proteins osteopontin, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin. During 4 weeks in vitro, the ADSCs cultured on the paper-stacking membranes in the osteogenic medium exhibited the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions. In vivo, the paper-stacking scaffolds were implanted into the rat calvarial defects (5 mm diameter, one defect per parietal bone) for 12 weeks. Investigating with microcomputer tomography, the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membranes showed the most significant bone reconstruction, and from a morphological perspective, this group occupied 90% of the surface area of the defect, produced the highest bone regeneration volume, and showed the highest bone mineral density of 823.06 mg/cm(3). From hematoxylin and eosin and Masson staining, the new bone tissue was most evident in the ADSC-laden scaffold group. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis from collected tissues, we found that the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membrane group presented the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions of osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, bone sialoprotein, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix (two to three times higher than the control group, and 1.5 times higher

  7. Layer-by-layer paper-stacking nanofibrous membranes to deliver adipose-derived stem cells for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenbing; Zhang, Shiwen; Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Fang, Xingxing; Yuan, Quan; Zhong, Wen; Ouyang, Jun; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering through seeding of stem cells in three-dimensional scaffolds has greatly improved bone regeneration technology, which historically has been a constant challenge. In this study, we researched the use of adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)-laden layer-by-layer paper-stacking polycaprolactone/gelatin electrospinning nanofibrous membranes for bone regeneration. Using this novel paper-stacking method makes oxygen distribution, nutrition, and waste transportation work more efficiently. ADSCs can also secrete multiple growth factors required for osteogenesis. After the characterization of ADSC surface markers CD29, CD90, and CD49d using flow cytometry, we seeded ADSCs on the membranes and found cells differentiated, with significant expression of the osteogenic-related proteins osteopontin, osteocalcin, and osteoprotegerin. During 4 weeks in vitro, the ADSCs cultured on the paper-stacking membranes in the osteogenic medium exhibited the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions. In vivo, the paper-stacking scaffolds were implanted into the rat calvarial defects (5 mm diameter, one defect per parietal bone) for 12 weeks. Investigating with microcomputer tomography, the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membranes showed the most significant bone reconstruction, and from a morphological perspective, this group occupied 90% of the surface area of the defect, produced the highest bone regeneration volume, and showed the highest bone mineral density of 823.06 mg/cm(3). From hematoxylin and eosin and Masson staining, the new bone tissue was most evident in the ADSC-laden scaffold group. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis from collected tissues, we found that the ADSC-laden paper-stacking membrane group presented the highest osteogenic-related gene expressions of osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, bone sialoprotein, runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix (two to three times higher than the control group, and 1.5 times higher

  8. Saccharides and temperature dual-responsive hydrogel layers for harvesting cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingbing; Pan, Guoqing; Guo, Qianping; Zhu, Caihong; Cui, Wenguo; Li, Bin; Yang, Huilin

    2015-01-14

    Saccharides and temperature dual-responsive hydrogels have been prepared based on PNIPAAm copolymers containing phenylboronic acid (PBA) groups and used for harvesting cell sheets. The cell sheet could be released from the hydrogel layer at 37 °C simply by increasing sugar concentration, and could be more efficiently released at a lower temperature and elevated sugar concentration.

  9. Intracellular interactions of electrostatically mediated layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolytes based sorafenib nanoparticles in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Poojari, Radhika; Kini, Sudarshan; Srivastava, Rohit; Panda, Dulal

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation of LbL-nanoSraf (100-300nm) comprising of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polyelectrolytes dextran-sulfate/poly-l-arginine, with a multikinase inhibitor sorafenib (Sraf) encapsulated calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles for oral cancer therapy in vitro. The zeta potential of LbL-nanoSraf exhibited a negative charge of the polyanionic dextran sulfate, which alternated with a positive charge of polycationic poly-l-arginine indicating a successful LbL assembly of the two polyelectrolyte bilayers on the CaCO3 nanoparticles. The LbL-nanoSraf exhibited an encapsulation efficiency of 61±4%. The LbL-nanoSraf was characterized using field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopic investigations showed the internalization of LbL-nanoSraf in human oral cancer (KB) cells. The LbL-nanoSraf exhibited more potent antiproliferative, apoptotic and antimigratory activities in KB cells than the free drug Sraf. The findings could promote the application of nano-sized LbL assembled polyelectrolytes for the delivery of Raf-kinase inhibitors and provide mechanistic insights for oral cancer therapy. PMID:26998875

  10. DBD atmospheric plasma-modified, electrospun, layer-by-layer polymeric scaffolds for L929 fibroblast cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Surucu, Seda; Turkoglu Sasmazel, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a study related to atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) Ar + O2 and Ar + N2 plasma modifications to alter surface properties of 3D PCL/Chitosan/PCL layer-by-layer hybrid scaffolds and to improve mouse fibroblast (L929 ATCC CCL-1) cell attachment, proliferation, and growth. The scaffolds were fabricated using electrospinning technique and each layer was electrospun sequentially on top of the other. The surface modifications were performed with an atmospheric pressure DBD plasma under different gas flow rates (50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 sccm) and for different modification times (0.5-7 min), and then the chemical and topographical characterizations of the modified samples were done by contact angle (CA) measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The samples modified with Ar + O2 plasma for 1 min under 70 cm(3)/min O2 flow rate (71.077° ± 3.578) showed a 18.83% decrease compare to unmodified samples' CA value (84.463° ± 3.864). Comparing with unmodified samples, the average fiber diameter values for plasma-modified samples by Ar + O2 (1 min 70 sccm) and Ar + N2 (40 s 70 sccm) increased 40.756 and 54.295%, respectively. Additionally, the average inter-fiber pore size values exhibited decrease of 37.699 and 48.463% for the same Ar + O2 and Ar + N2 plasma-modified samples, respectively, compare to unmodified samples. Biocompatibility performance was determined with MTT assay, fluorescence, Giemsa, and confocal imaging as well as SEM. The results showed that Ar + O2-based plasma modification increased the hydrophilicity and oxygen functionality of the surface, thus affecting the cell viability and proliferation on/within scaffolds. PMID:26494511

  11. Efficient Light Harvester Layer Prepared by Solid/Mist Interface Reaction for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiang; Li, Hongcui; Wu, Wenyi; Li, Yanhua; Fei, Dehou; Gao, Chunxiao; Liu, Xizhe

    2015-08-12

    A solid/mist reaction method is developed to produce well-crystallized light harvester layers without pinhole defects for perovskite solar cells. The reaction based on mist precursor can be facilely operated with low process temperature. And it can effectively control the volume of CH3NH3I solution and the reaction temperature, which affect the quality of perovskite harvester layers and the performance of perovskite solar cells remarkably. Under optimized condition, the efficiencies of devices reach 16.2% with the average efficiency of 14.9%. The solid/mist reaction is also used to fabricate planar junction solar cells and a PCE of 14.9% is obtained.

  12. Inversion layer solar cell fabrication and evaluation. [etching on silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Inversion layer solar cells were fabricated by etching through the diffused layer on p-type silicon wafers in a comb-like contact pattern. The charge separation comes from an induced p-n junction at the surface. The inverted surface is caused by a layer of transparent material applied to the surface that either contains free positive ions or that creates donor states at the interface. Cells are increased from 3 ma I sub sc to 100 ma by application of sodium silicate. The action is unstable, however, and decays. Non-mesa contaminated oxide cells were fabricated with short circuit currents of over 100 ma measured in the sun. Cells of this type have demonstrated stability.

  13. Quantification and simulation of layer-specific mitral valve interstitial cells deformation under physiological loading.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Carruthers, Christopher A; Ayoub, Salma; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-05-21

    Within each of the four layers of mitral valve (MV) leaflet tissues there resides a heterogeneous population of interstitial cells that maintain the structural integrity of the MV tissue via protein biosynthesis and enzymatic degradation. There is increasing evidence that tissue stress-induced MV interstitial cell (MVIC) deformations can have deleterious effects on their biosynthetic states that are potentially related to the reduction of tissue-level maintenance and to subsequent organ-level failure. To better understand the interrelationships between tissue-level loading and cellular responses, we developed the following integrated experimental-computational approach. Since in vivo cellular deformations are not directly measurable, we quantified the in-situ layer-specific MVIC deformations for each of the four layers under a controlled biaxial tension loading device coupled to multi-photon microscopy. Next, we explored the interrelationship between the MVIC stiffness and deformation to layer-specific tissue mechanical and structural properties using a macro-micro finite element computational model. Experimental results indicated that the MVICs in the fibrosa and ventricularis layers deformed significantly more than those in the atrialis and spongiosa layers, reaching a nucleus aspect ratio of 3.3 under an estimated maximum physiological tension of 150N/m. The simulated MVIC moduli for the four layers were found to be all within a narrow range of 4.71-5.35kPa, suggesting that MVIC deformation is primarily controlled by each tissue layer's respective structure and mechanical behavior rather than the intrinsic MVIC stiffness. This novel result further suggests that while the MVICs may be phenotypically and biomechanically similar throughout the leaflet, they experience layer-specific mechanical stimulatory inputs due to distinct extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical behaviors of the four MV leaflet tissue layers. This also suggests that MVICs may behave

  14. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  15. Tandem Solar Cells from Accessible Low Band-Gap Polymers Using an Efficient Interconnecting Layer.

    PubMed

    Bag, Santanu; Patel, Romesh J; Bunha, Ajaykumar; Grand, Caroline; Berrigan, J Daniel; Dalton, Matthew J; Leever, Benjamin J; Reynolds, John R; Durstock, Michael F

    2016-01-13

    Tandem solar cell architectures are designed to improve device photoresponse by enabling the capture of wider range of solar spectrum as compared to single-junction device. However, the practical realization of this concept in bulk-heterojunction polymer systems requires the judicious design of a transparent interconnecting layer compatible with both polymers. Moreover, the polymers selected should be readily synthesized at large scale (>1 kg) and high performance. In this work, we demonstrate a novel tandem polymer solar cell that combines low band gap poly isoindigo [P(T3-iI)-2], which is easily synthesized in kilogram quantities, with a novel Cr/MoO3 interconnecting layer. Cr/MoO3 is shown to be greater than 80% transparent above 375 nm and an efficient interconnecting layer for P(T3-iI)-2 and PCDTBT, leading to 6% power conversion efficiencies under AM 1.5G illumination. These results serve to extend the range of interconnecting layer materials for tandem cell fabrication by establishing, for the first time, that a thin, evaporated layer of Cr/MoO3 can work as an effective interconnecting layer in a tandem polymer solar cells made with scalable photoactive materials.

  16. Tandem Solar Cells from Accessible Low Band-Gap Polymers Using an Efficient Interconnecting Layer.

    PubMed

    Bag, Santanu; Patel, Romesh J; Bunha, Ajaykumar; Grand, Caroline; Berrigan, J Daniel; Dalton, Matthew J; Leever, Benjamin J; Reynolds, John R; Durstock, Michael F

    2016-01-13

    Tandem solar cell architectures are designed to improve device photoresponse by enabling the capture of wider range of solar spectrum as compared to single-junction device. However, the practical realization of this concept in bulk-heterojunction polymer systems requires the judicious design of a transparent interconnecting layer compatible with both polymers. Moreover, the polymers selected should be readily synthesized at large scale (>1 kg) and high performance. In this work, we demonstrate a novel tandem polymer solar cell that combines low band gap poly isoindigo [P(T3-iI)-2], which is easily synthesized in kilogram quantities, with a novel Cr/MoO3 interconnecting layer. Cr/MoO3 is shown to be greater than 80% transparent above 375 nm and an efficient interconnecting layer for P(T3-iI)-2 and PCDTBT, leading to 6% power conversion efficiencies under AM 1.5G illumination. These results serve to extend the range of interconnecting layer materials for tandem cell fabrication by establishing, for the first time, that a thin, evaporated layer of Cr/MoO3 can work as an effective interconnecting layer in a tandem polymer solar cells made with scalable photoactive materials. PMID:26699653

  17. Human amniotic epithelial cells as feeder layer to derive and maintain human embryonic stem cells from poor-quality embryos.

    PubMed

    Ávila-González, Daniela; Vega-Hernández, Eva; Regalado-Hernández, Juan Carlos; De la Jara-Díaz, Julio Francisco; García-Castro, Irma Lydia; Molina-Hernández, Anayansi; Moreno-Verduzco, Elsa Romelia; Razo-Aguilera, Guadalupe; Flores-Herrera, Héctor; Portillo, Wendy; Díaz-Martínez, Néstor Emmanuel; García-López, Guadalupe; Díaz, Néstor Fabián

    2015-09-01

    Data from the literature suggest that human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines used in research do not genetically represent all human populations. The derivation of hESC through conventional methods involve the destruction of viable human embryos, as well the use of mouse embryonic fibroblasts as a feeder layer, which has several drawbacks. We obtained the hESC line (Amicqui-1) from poor-quality (PQ) embryos derived and maintained on human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC). This line displays a battery of markers of pluripotency and we demonstrated the capacity of these cells to produce derivates of the three germ layers.

  18. What is really driving cell-surface interactions? Layer-by-layer assembled films may help to answer questions concerning cell attachment and response to biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Yulia N; Huang, Tongtong; Felix, Olivier; Jung, Laura; Tropel, Philippe; Viville, Stephane; Decher, Gero

    2016-03-10

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled multicomponent films offer the opportunity to control and to fine-tune cell attachment and behavior on solid surfaces [Layer-by-Layer Films for Biomedical Applications, edited by Picart et al. (Wiley, Weinheim, 2014) and El-Khouri et al., "Multifunctional layer-by-layer architectures for biological applications," in Functional Polymeric Ultrathin Films, edited by Advincula and Knoll (Wiley, Weinheim, 2011), Vol. 1]. At the same time, these films allow for quite detailed physicochemical characterization of static and dynamic surface properties that are typically not available in classic cell culture. In this report, the authors investigate cell adhesion and cytocompatibility of compositionally and morphologically similar thin films composed of oppositely charged synthetic or natural polyelectrolytes in which different physical parameters such as surface charge or water content are varied through chemical composition and deposition conditions. Human adult dermal fibroblasts were chosen as a model because of the need for chemically defined matrix in the field of primary cell amplification. The growth and the stability of the multilayer films in the incubation media were studied dissipation-enhanced quartz crystal micobalance (QCM-D) and ellipsometry. The QCM-D signals observed during the film deposition were analyzed qualitatively to estimate the viscoelastic properties of the films. The authors used contact angle measurements with water to study the contribution of the chemical functionalities to wetting behavior of the films. Most importantly, they also studied the interaction of the films with serum components. Our results underline that cell adhesion is a highly complex process which is not only governed by the functionality of a surface but also by its morphology, its affinity for serum components, and also by changes of surface properties brought about by adsorbing molecules. Of the many LbL-films tested, poly(4-styrenesulfonate

  19. What is really driving cell-surface interactions? Layer-by-layer assembled films may help to answer questions concerning cell attachment and response to biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Yulia N; Huang, Tongtong; Felix, Olivier; Jung, Laura; Tropel, Philippe; Viville, Stephane; Decher, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled multicomponent films offer the opportunity to control and to fine-tune cell attachment and behavior on solid surfaces [Layer-by-Layer Films for Biomedical Applications, edited by Picart et al. (Wiley, Weinheim, 2014) and El-Khouri et al., "Multifunctional layer-by-layer architectures for biological applications," in Functional Polymeric Ultrathin Films, edited by Advincula and Knoll (Wiley, Weinheim, 2011), Vol. 1]. At the same time, these films allow for quite detailed physicochemical characterization of static and dynamic surface properties that are typically not available in classic cell culture. In this report, the authors investigate cell adhesion and cytocompatibility of compositionally and morphologically similar thin films composed of oppositely charged synthetic or natural polyelectrolytes in which different physical parameters such as surface charge or water content are varied through chemical composition and deposition conditions. Human adult dermal fibroblasts were chosen as a model because of the need for chemically defined matrix in the field of primary cell amplification. The growth and the stability of the multilayer films in the incubation media were studied dissipation-enhanced quartz crystal micobalance (QCM-D) and ellipsometry. The QCM-D signals observed during the film deposition were analyzed qualitatively to estimate the viscoelastic properties of the films. The authors used contact angle measurements with water to study the contribution of the chemical functionalities to wetting behavior of the films. Most importantly, they also studied the interaction of the films with serum components. Our results underline that cell adhesion is a highly complex process which is not only governed by the functionality of a surface but also by its morphology, its affinity for serum components, and also by changes of surface properties brought about by adsorbing molecules. Of the many LbL-films tested, poly(4-styrenesulfonate

  20. More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer

    SciTech Connect

    Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L.; Aidarkhanov, Damir

    2014-05-26

    We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

  1. Transcripts of the MHM region on the chicken Z chromosome accumulate as non-coding RNA in the nucleus of female cells adjacent to the DMRT1 locus.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, M; Shimada, Y; Hori, T; Nakabayashi, O; Kikuchi, T; Macleod, T; Pym, R; Sheldon, B; Solovei, I; Macgregor, H; Mizuno, S

    2001-01-01

    The male hypermethylated (MHM) region, located near the middle of the short arm of the Z chromosome of chickens, consists of approximately 210 tandem repeats of a BamHI 2.2-kb sequence unit. Cytosines of the CpG dinucleotides of this region are extensively methylated on the two Z chromosomes in the male but much less methylated on the single Z chromosome in the female. The state of methylation of the MHM region is established after fertilization by about the 1-day embryonic stage. The MHM region is transcribed only in the female from the particular strand into heterogeneous, high molecular-mass, non-coding RNA, which is accumulated at the site of transcription, adjacent to the DMRT1 locus, in the nucleus. The transcriptional silence of the MHM region in the male is most likely caused by the CpG methylation, since treatment of the male embryonic fibroblasts with 5-azacytidine results in hypo-methylation and active transcription of this region. In ZZW triploid chickens, MHM regions are hypomethylated and transcribed on the two Z chromosomes, whereas MHM regions are hypermethylated and transcriptionally inactive on the three Z chromosomes in ZZZ triploid chickens, suggesting a possible role of the W chromosome on the state of the MHM region. PMID:11321370

  2. The length summation properties of layer VI cells in the visual cortex and hypercomplex cell end zone inhibition.

    PubMed

    Grieve, K L; Sillito, A M

    1991-01-01

    Layer VI of the visual cortex has been considered to be dominated by cells with very long receptive fields, typically summing to 8 degrees or more. We have re-examined this issue in a series of experiments in which the length tuning profiles of layer VI cells in the cat visual cortex have been quantitatively determined. Responses were assessed to optimally oriented bars of light of varying length drifted over the receptive field. The lengths were varied on a randomised interleaved sequence. Although our data confirm the presence of long field cells in layer VI, only 24% of a population of 119 cells had fields greater than 6 degrees in length. Fields greater than 8 degrees were only seen in 17% of cells. 61% of the population of cells had fields showing summation to 4 degrees or less with a mean length of 2.8 degrees (+/-0.15 sem). In this "short field" group, 18% had fields of 1 degrees or less. We observed 7 cells with rapid initial spatial summation up to 1 degree, followed by clear end zone inhibition. It has been recently suggested on the basis of localised inactivation experiments, that layer VI cells with long (greater than 8 degrees) fields may provide the drive to inhibitory interneurones in layer IV generating hypercomplex cell end zone inhibition. This observation is difficult to equate with evidence indicating that hypercomplex cell end zone inhibition reflects a mechanism showing maximal summation at lengths in the region of 2.8 degrees.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Graphene Quantum Dot Layers with Energy-Down-Shift Effect on Crystalline-Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung D; Park, Myung J; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Soo M; Kang, Byungjun; Kim, Seongtak; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kang, Yoonmook; Yoon, Sam S; Hong, Byung H; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-09-01

    Graphene quantum dot (GQD) layers were deposited as an energy-down-shift layer on crystalline-silicon solar cell surfaces by kinetic spraying of GQD suspensions. A supersonic air jet was used to accelerate the GQDs onto the surfaces. Here, we report the coating results on a silicon substrate and the GQDs' application as an energy-down-shift layer in crystalline-silicon solar cells, which enhanced the power conversion efficiency (PCE). GQD layers deposited at nozzle scan speeds of 40, 30, 20, and 10 mm/s were evaluated after they were used to fabricate crystalline-silicon solar cells; the results indicate that GQDs play an important role in increasing the optical absorptivity of the cells. The short-circuit current density was enhanced by about 2.94% (0.9 mA/cm(2)) at 30 mm/s. Compared to a reference device without a GQD energy-down-shift layer, the PCE of p-type silicon solar cells was improved by 2.7% (0.4 percentage points).

  4. Effect of hydrophilic treatment of microporous layer on fuel cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Davey, John R; Fairweather, Joseph D; Borup, Rodney L; Spernjak, Dusan; Spendelow, Jacob; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Wilde, Peter; Schweiss, Ruediger

    2010-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is the component primarily responsible for effective water management under a wide variety of conditions. The incorporation of hydrophilic alumosilicate fibers in the microporous layer leads to an improvement in the fuel cell performance associated with a decrease in the mass transport resistance especially under high RH operation. This improvement in performance is obtained without sacrificing performance under low RH conditions. The alumosilicate fibers create domains that wick liquid water away from the catalyst layer. The improved mass transport performance is corroborated by AC impedance and neutron radiography analysis and is consistent with an increase in the average pore diameter inside the microporous layer.

  5. Efficiency improvement of organic solar cells by tuning hole transport layer with germanium oxide.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Ju-Hyung; Yoon, Hyunsik; Tahk, Dongha; Seo, Soonmin; Shin, Kyusoon; Lee, Hong H

    2012-01-01

    Improving optical property is critical for optimizing the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. In the present research, we show that modification of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layer with GeO2 leads to 15% improvement of power conversion efficiency in a polymer solar cells through enhancement of short circuit currents. Modified PEDOT:PSS layer with optimized concentration of GeO2 assists active layer absorbing much light by playing a role of optical spacer. Using AFM and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) data, we also present the evidence that an addition of GeO2 does not affect crystallinity of active layer.

  6. Graphene oxide-based carbon interconnecting layer for polymer tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghua; Lin, Wei-Chun; Liu, Jun; Dai, Liming

    2014-03-12

    Tandem polymer solar cells (PSCs), consisting of more than one (normally two) subcells connected by a charge recombination layer (i.e., interconnecting layer), hold great promise for enhancing the performance of PSCs. For an ideal tandem solar cell, the open circuit voltage (Voc) equals to the sum of those of the subcells while keeping the short circuit current the same as the lower one, leading to an increased overall power conversion efficiency. The interconnecting layer plays an important role in regulating the tandem device performance. Here, we report that graphene oxide (GO)/GO-Cs (cesium neutralized GO) bilayer modified with ultrathin Al and MoO3 can act as an efficient interconnecting layer in tandem PSCs to achieve a significantly increased Voc, reaching almost 100% of the sum of the subcell V(oc)s under standard AM 1.5 conditions. PMID:24521516

  7. Modeling Low-Platinum-Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-01-20

    The cathode catalyst layer within a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is the most complex and critical, yet least understood, layer within the cell. The exact method and equations for modeling this layer are still being revised and will be discussed in this paper, including a 0.8 reaction order, existence of Pt oxides, possible non-isopotential agglomerates, and the impact of a film resistance towards oxygen transport. While the former assumptions are relatively straightforward to understand and implement, the latter film resistance is shown to be critically important in explaining increased mass-transport limitations with low Pt-loading catalyst layers. Model results demonstrate agreement with experimental data that the increased oxygen flux and/or diffusion pathway through the film can substantially decrease performance. Also, some scale-up concepts from the agglomerate scale to the more macroscopic porous-electrode scale are discussed and the resulting optimization scenarios investigated.

  8. Design, fabrication and characterization of a double layer solid oxide fuel cell (DLFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiangying; Cai, Yixiao; Ji, Yuan; Yaqub, Azra; Zhu, Bin

    2016-11-01

    A double layer solid oxide fuel cell (DLSOFC) without using the electrolyte (layer) has been designed by integrating advantages of positive electrode material of lithium ion battery(LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2) and oxygen-permeable membranes material (trace amount cobalt incorporated terbium doped ceria, TDC + Co) based on the semiconductor physics principle. Instead of using an electrolyte layer, the depletion layer between the anode and cathode served as an electronic insulator to block the electrons but to maintain the electrolyte function for ionic transport. Thus the device with two layers can realize the function of SOFC and at the same time avoids the electronic short circuiting problem. Such novel DLFC showed good performance at low temperatures, for instance, a maximum power density of 230 mWcm-2 was achieved at 500 °C. The working principle of the new device is presented.

  9. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Nayfeh, Ammar; Okyay, Ali K.

    2013-11-15

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO{sub 2} layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V V{sub t} shift, the memory with CrO{sub 2} layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO{sub 2} layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  10. Effect of electron collecting metal oxide layer in normal and inverted structure polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, A.; Liu, X.; Sun, Y. C.; Djurišić, A. B.; Ng, A. M. C.; Chan, W. K.

    2013-12-04

    We performed a systematic study of the effect of electron collecting metal oxide layer on the performance of P3HT: PCBM solar cells. Zinc oxide (ZnO) or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) buffer layers were prepared by either e-beam evaporation or solution processing method. We also compared the photovoltaic performance of inserting the buffer layer between indium tin oxide (ITO) and the polymer layer for the inverted structure (ITO/ ZnO or TiO{sub 2}/P3HT:PCBM/V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Au) as well as inserting the buffers layers between the polymer and the aluminum electrode for the conventional structure (ITO/V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/P3HT:PCBM/ZnO or TiO{sub 2}/Al). The results are shown in detail.

  11. CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cell with a zinc stannate buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Sheldon, P.; Mahathongdy, Y.; Ribelin, R.; Mason, A.; Moutinho, H. R.; Coutts, T. J.

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes an improved CdS/CdTe polycrystalline thin-film solar-cell device structure that integrates a zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4 or ZTO) buffer layer between the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer and the CdS window layer. Zinc stannate films have a high bandgap, high transmittance, low absorptance, and low surface roughness. In addition, these films are chemically stable and exhibit higher resistivities that are roughly matched to that of the CdS window layer in the device structure. Preliminary device results have demonstrated that by integrating a ZTO buffer layer in both SnO2-based and Cd2SnO4 (CTO)-based CdS/CdTe devices, performance and reproducibility can be significantly enhanced.

  12. Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using a Dual-Layer Integrated Cell Line-Drug Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yun; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Liu, X. Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to personalized treatment. Existing approaches to predicting drug sensitivity rely primarily on profiling of cancer cell line panels that have been treated with different drugs and selecting genomic or functional genomic features to regress or classify the drug response. Here, we propose a dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model, which uses both cell line similarity network (CSN) data and drug similarity network (DSN) data to predict the drug response of a given cell line using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Cancer Genome Project (CGP) studies as benchmark datasets, our single-layer model with CSN or DSN and only a single parameter achieved a prediction performance comparable to the previously generated elastic net model. When using the dual-layer model integrating both CSN and DSN, our predicted response reached a 0.6 Pearson correlation coefficient with observed responses for most drugs, which is significantly better than the previous results using the elastic net model. We have also applied the dual-layer cell line-drug integrated network model to fill in the missing drug response values in the CGP dataset. Even though the dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model does not specifically model mutation information, it correctly predicted that BRAF mutant cell lines would be more sensitive than BRAF wild-type cell lines to three MEK1/2 inhibitors tested. PMID:26418249

  13. Method of bonding an interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B.; Isenberg, Arnold O.; Folser, George R.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell containing an air electrode (16), contacting electrolyte and electronically conductive interconnection layer (26), and a fuel electrode, has the interconnection layer (26) attached by: (A) applying a thin, closely packed, discrete layer of LaCrO.sub.3 particles (30), doped with an element selected from the group consisting of Ca, Sr, Co, Ba, Mg and their mixtures on a portion of the air electrode, and then (B) electrochemical vapor depositing a dense skeletal structure (32) between and around the doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles (30).

  14. Method of bonding an interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Pal, U.B.; Isenberg, A.O.; Folser, G.R.

    1992-01-14

    An electrochemical cell containing an air electrode, contacting electrolyte and electronically conductive interconnection layer, and a fuel electrode, has the interconnection layer attached by: (A) applying a thin, closely packed, discrete layer of LaCrO[sub 3] particles, doped with an element selected from the group consisting of Ca, Sr, Co, Ba, Mg and their mixtures on a portion of the air electrode, and then (B) electrochemical vapor depositing a dense skeletal structure between and around the doped LaCrO[sub 3] particles. 2 figs.

  15. Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Rieke, Peter C.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    A series of cathodes using Pt supported onto graphene sheets with different contents of carbon black in the catalyst layer were prepared and characterized. Carbon black was added as a spacer between two-dimensional graphene sheets in the catalyst layer to study its effect on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Electrochemical properties and surface morphology of the cathodes with and without carbon black were characterized using cyclic voltammetry, ac-impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical polarization technique, and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that carbon black effectively modifies the array of graphene supports, resulting in more Pt nanoparticles available for electrochemical reaction and better mass transport in the catalyst layer.

  16. Organic photosensitive cells having a reciprocal-carrier exciton blocking layer

    DOEpatents

    Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2007-06-12

    A photosensitive cell includes an anode and a cathode; a donor-type organic material and an acceptor-type organic material forming a donor-acceptor junction connected between the anode and the cathode; and an exciton blocking layer connected between the acceptor-type organic material of the donor-acceptor junction and the cathode, the blocking layer consisting essentially of a material that has a hole mobility of at least 10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2/V-sec or higher, where a HOMO of the blocking layer is higher than or equal to a HOMO of the acceptor-type material.

  17. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Downie, Craig Michael; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George Hamilton; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin Aslaug; Eaglesham, David

    2015-10-27

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqeuous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  18. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Downie, Craig Michael; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George Hamilton; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin Aslaug; Eaglesham, David

    2016-07-26

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  19. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    DOEpatents

    Doe, Robert E.; Downie, Craig M.; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George H.; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin A.; Eaglesham, David

    2016-01-19

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  20. Flexible inverted polymer solar cells with an indium-free tri-layer cathode

    SciTech Connect

    El Hajj, Ahmad; Lucas, Bruno Schirr-Bonnans, Martin; Ratier, Bernard; Kraft, Thomas M.; Torchio, Philippe

    2014-01-21

    Indium tin oxide (ITO)-free inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) have been fabricated without the need of an additional electron transport layer. The indium-free transparent electrode consists of a tri-layer stack ZnO (30 nm)/Ag (14 nm)/ZnO (30 nm) deposited on glass and plastic substrates via ion-beam sputtering. The tri-layer electrodes exhibit similar physical properties to its ITO counterpart, specifically yielding high transmittance and low resistivity (76.5% T at 550 nm, R{sub sq} of 8 Ω/◻) on plastic substrates. The novel tri-layer electrode allows for the fabrication of inverted PSCs without the additional ZnO interfacial layer commonly deposited between ITO and the photoactive layer. This allows for the preparation of thinner plastic solar cells using less material than conventional architectures. Initial studies involving the newly realized architecture (tri-layer electrode/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag) have shown great promise for the transition from ITO to other viable electrodes in organic electronics.

  1. Human amniotic epithelial cells as novel feeder layers for promoting ex vivo expansion of limbal epithelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ting; Li, Wei; Hayashida, Yasutaka; He, Hua; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tseng, David Y; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2007-08-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (HAECs) are a unique embryonic cell source that potentially can be used as feeder layers for expanding different types of stem cells. In vivo, HAECs uniformly expressed pan-cytokeratins (pan-CK) and heterogeneously expressed vimentin (Vim). The two phenotypes expressing either pan-CK(+)/Vim(+) or pan-CK(+)/Vim(-) were maintained in serum-free media with high calcium. In contrast, all HAECs became pan-CK(+)/Vim(+) in serum-containing media, which also promoted HAEC proliferation for at least eight passages, especially supplemented with epidermal growth factor and insulin. Mitomycin C-arrested HAEC feeder layers were more effective in promoting clonal growth of human limbal epithelial progenitors than conventional 3T3 murine feeder layers. Cells in HAEC-supported clones were uniformly smaller, sustained more proliferation, and expressed less CK12 and connexin 43 but higher levels of stem cell-associated markers such as p63, Musashi-1, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G2 than those of 3T3-supported clones. Subculturing of clonally expanded limbal progenitors from HAEC feeder layers, but not from 3T3 feeder layers, gave rise to uniformly p63-positive epithelial progenitor cells as well as nestin-positive neuronal-like progenitors. Collectively, these results indicated that HAECs can be used as a human feeder layer equivalent for more effective ex vivo expansion of adult epithelial stem cells from the human limbus. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  2. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers.

    PubMed

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang Michael; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiO(x) and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiO(x)/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  3. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang (Michael); Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiOx and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiOx/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  4. A membrane-less enzymatic fuel cell with layer-by-layer assembly of redox polymer and enzyme over graphite electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Saravanan; Mani, Vigneshwaran; Kavanagh, Paul; Rusling, James; Leech, Dónal

    2011-11-21

    Layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of alternate osmium redox polymers and glucose oxidase, at anode, and laccase, at cathode, using graphite electrodes form a membrane-less glucose/O(2) enzymatic fuel cell providing a power density of 103 μW cm(-2) at pH 5.5. PMID:21975371

  5. Measurement of effective gas diffusion coefficients of catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells with a Loschmidt diffusion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Navessin, Titichai; Liu, Zhong-Sheng (Simon); Lei, Chao; Rohling, Jurandir H.; Bessarabov, Dmitri; Knights, Shanna; Ye, Siyu

    In this work, using an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell, we measure the effective coefficient of dry gas (O 2-N 2) diffusion in cathode catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells at 25 °C and 1 atmosphere. The thicknesses of the catalyst layers under investigation are from 6 to 29 μm. Each catalyst layer is deposited on an Al 2O 3 membrane substrate by an automated spray coater. Diffusion signal processing procedure is developed to deduce the effective diffusion coefficient, which is found to be (1.47 ± 0.05) × 10 -7 m 2 s -1 for the catalyst layers. Porosity and pore size distribution of the catalyst layers are also measured using Hg porosimetry. The diffusion resistance of the interface between the catalyst layer and the substrate is found to be negligible. The experimental results show that the O 2-N 2 diffusion in the catalyst layers is dominated by the Knudsen effect.

  6. Efficient hole-blocking layer-free planar halide perovskite thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Wan, Jiawei; Tao, Hong; Liu, Qin; Xiong, Liangbin; Qin, Pingli; Wang, Jing; Lei, Hongwei; Yang, Guang; Qin, Minchao; Zhao, Xingzhong; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-01-01

    Efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells use hole-blocking layers to help collection of photogenerated electrons and to achieve high open-circuit voltages. Here, we report the realization of efficient perovskite solar cells grown directly on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated substrates without using any hole-blocking layers. With ultraviolet-ozone treatment of the substrates, a planar Au/hole-transporting material/CH₃NH₃PbI₃-xClx/substrate cell processed by a solution method has achieved a power conversion efficiency of over 14% and an open-circuit voltage of 1.06 V measured under reverse voltage scan. The open-circuit voltage is as high as that of our best reference cell with a TiO₂ hole-blocking layer. Besides ultraviolet-ozone treatment, we find that involving Cl in the synthesis is another key for realizing high open-circuit voltage perovskite solar cells without hole-blocking layers. Our results suggest that TiO₂ may not be the ultimate interfacial material for achieving high-performance perovskite solar cells. PMID:25798925

  7. Distribution and fine structural analysis of undifferentiated cells in the primate subependymal layer.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, K W; Lantos, P L

    1991-01-01

    The subependymal layer (SEL) of the postnatal marmoset, a simian primate, has been investigated by histological and electron microscopic techniques. Although well documented in rodents, little is known about this layer in primates. The distribution of the SEL in marmosets is most extensive at birth around the anterior lateral ventricles, where the layer is generally 5-10 cells deep; however, there is considerable regional variation. With age the size of the SEL decreases dramatically, becoming very poorly demarcated in adult animals. Ultrastructurally, many subependymal cells in neonatal and young brains display the features of undifferentiated cells, although neurons and glia are also present. Cells displaying features intermediate between astrocytes and undifferentiated SEL cells are occasionally encountered. In adults undifferentiated cells are seen rarely and the former SEL is composed primarily of glial and neuronal processes. Thus the layer in primates probably represents a site of continued cellular differentiation in the postnatal brain and as such must play an important role in the final stages of cortical development. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10(a,b) Fig. 11 PMID:1810935

  8. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  9. Assembly and Testing of Stem Cell-Seeded Layered Collagen Constructs for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, Mary E.; Simionescu, Agneta; Chen, Joseph; Liao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for treatment of valvular diseases. Despite excellent progress in the field, current approaches do not fully take into account each patient's valve anatomical uniqueness, the presence of a middle spongiosa cushion that allows shearing of external fibrous layers (fibrosa and ventricularis), and the need for autologous valvular interstitial cells. In this study we propose a novel approach to heart valve tissue engineering based on bioreactor conditioning of mesenchymal stem cell-seeded, valve-shaped constructs assembled from layered collagenous scaffolds. Fibrous scaffolds were prepared by decellularization of porcine pericardium and spongiosa scaffolds by decellularization and elastase treatment of porcine pulmonary arteries. To create anatomically correct constructs, we created silicone molds from native porcine aortic valves, dried two identical fibrous scaffolds onto the molds, and stabilized them with penta-galloyl-glucose a reversible collagen-binding polyphenol that reduces biodegradation. The layers were fused with a protein/aldehyde scaffold bio-adhesive and neutralized to reduce cytotoxicity. Spongiosa scaffolds, seeded with human bone marrow-derived stem cells, were inserted within the valve-shaped layered scaffolds and sutured inside the original aortic root. The final product was mounted in a heart valve bioreactor and cycled in cell culture conditions. Most cells were alive after 8 days, elongated significantly, and stained positive for vimentin, similar to native human valvular interstitial cells, indicating feasibility of our approach. PMID:20673028

  10. Efficient hole-blocking layer-free planar halide perovskite thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Wan, Jiawei; Tao, Hong; Liu, Qin; Xiong, Liangbin; Qin, Pingli; Wang, Jing; Lei, Hongwei; Yang, Guang; Qin, Minchao; Zhao, Xingzhong; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-03-01

    Efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells use hole-blocking layers to help collection of photogenerated electrons and to achieve high open-circuit voltages. Here, we report the realization of efficient perovskite solar cells grown directly on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated substrates without using any hole-blocking layers. With ultraviolet-ozone treatment of the substrates, a planar Au/hole-transporting material/CH3NH3PbI3-xClx/substrate cell processed by a solution method has achieved a power conversion efficiency of over 14% and an open-circuit voltage of 1.06 V measured under reverse voltage scan. The open-circuit voltage is as high as that of our best reference cell with a TiO2 hole-blocking layer. Besides ultraviolet-ozone treatment, we find that involving Cl in the synthesis is another key for realizing high open-circuit voltage perovskite solar cells without hole-blocking layers. Our results suggest that TiO2 may not be the ultimate interfacial material for achieving high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  11. Efficient hole-blocking layer-free planar halide perovskite thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Wan, Jiawei; Tao, Hong; Liu, Qin; Xiong, Liangbin; Qin, Pingli; Wang, Jing; Lei, Hongwei; Yang, Guang; Qin, Minchao; Zhao, Xingzhong; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-01-01

    Efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells use hole-blocking layers to help collection of photogenerated electrons and to achieve high open-circuit voltages. Here, we report the realization of efficient perovskite solar cells grown directly on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated substrates without using any hole-blocking layers. With ultraviolet-ozone treatment of the substrates, a planar Au/hole-transporting material/CH₃NH₃PbI₃-xClx/substrate cell processed by a solution method has achieved a power conversion efficiency of over 14% and an open-circuit voltage of 1.06 V measured under reverse voltage scan. The open-circuit voltage is as high as that of our best reference cell with a TiO₂ hole-blocking layer. Besides ultraviolet-ozone treatment, we find that involving Cl in the synthesis is another key for realizing high open-circuit voltage perovskite solar cells without hole-blocking layers. Our results suggest that TiO₂ may not be the ultimate interfacial material for achieving high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  12. Effects of hole-transporting layers of perovskite-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Kida, Tomoyasu; Takagi, Tatsuru; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Fabrication and characterization of the photovoltaic and optical properties, and microstructure of perovskite-based solar cells with lead phthalocyanine (PbPc), zinc phthalocyanine, poly[bis(4-phenyl)(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)amine], and copper(I) thiocyanate as hole-transporting layers were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to identify surface morphologies of the crystal structure and the elemental composition. Introducing PbPc into perovskite solar cells extended the retaining period of photovoltaic activity and performance. The effects of the hole-transporting layer on incident photon-to-current efficiency were investigated. The energy diagram and photovoltaic mechanism of the perovskite solar cells with the hole-transporting layer are discussed.

  13. Role of ultrathin metal fluoride layer in organic photovoltaic cells: mechanism of efficiency and lifetime enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Geun; Choi, Mi-Ri; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Dong Hun; Jung, Gwan Ho; Park, Yongsup; Lee, Jong-Lam; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Although rapid progress has been made recently in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, systematic studies on an ultrathin interfacial layer at the electron extraction contact have not been conducted in detail, which is important to improve both the device efficiency and the lifetime. We find that an ultrathin BaF2 layer at the electron extraction contact strongly influences the open-circuit voltage (Voc ) as the nanomorphology evolves with increasing BaF2 thickness. A vacuum-deposited ultrathin BaF2 layer grows by island growth, so BaF2 layers with a nominal thickness less than that of single-coverage layer (≈3 nm) partially cover the polymeric photoactive layer. As the nominal thickness of the BaF2 layer increased to that of a single-coverage layer, the Voc and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) increased but the short-circuit current remained almost constant. The fill factor and the PCE decreased abruptly as the thickness of the BaF2 layer exceeded that of a single-coverage layer, which was ascribed to the insulating nature of BaF2 . We find the major cause of the increased Voc observed in these devices is the lowered work function of the cathode caused by the reaction and release of Ba from thin BaF2 films upon deposition of Al. The OPV device with the BaF2 layer showed a slightly improved maximum PCE (4.0 %) and a greatly (approximately nine times) increased device half-life under continuous simulated solar irradiation at 100 mW cm(-2) as compared with the OPV without an interfacial layer (PCE=2.1 %). We found that the photodegradation of the photoactive layer was not a major cause of the OPV degradation. The hugely improved lifetime with cathode interface modification suggests a significant role of the cathode interfacial layer that can help to prolong device lifetimes.

  14. Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites transfer lipophosphopeptidoglycans to enteric cell layers.

    PubMed

    Lauwaet, Tineke; Oliveira, Maria José; De Bruyne, Georges; Bruchhaus, Iris; Duchêne, Michael; Mareel, Marc; Leroy, Ancy

    2004-04-01

    Transfer of antigens frequently follows adhesion of protozoan parasites to host cells. We were interested in such transfer from the Entamoeba surface to enterocytes following adhesion of trophozoites. Therefore, cocultures of enterocytes in vitro and ex vivo with Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM-1:IMSS) or Entamoeba dispar (strain SAW760) trophozoites were processed for immunocytochemistry. The EH5 monoclonal antibody against amoebic proteophosphoglycans marked a dotted pattern on the apical side of enterocytes in in vitro cocultures with HM-1:IMSS and SAW760 trophozoites. Basolateral staining was present in cocultures following dysfunction of tight junctions, or when trophozoites made direct contact with the basolateral side of enterocytes in in vitro and ex vivo cocultures. Based on the molecular mass in Western blot, the transferred proteophosphoglycan was identified as a lipophosphopeptidoglycan. In conclusion, trophozoites transfer LPPG to the apical side of enterocytes following adhesion and prior to dysfunction of tight junctions.

  15. Improved performance of microcrystalline silicon solar cell with graded-band-gap silicon oxide buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhen-Liang; Ji, Yun; Yu, Wei; Yang, Yan-Bin; Cong, Ri-Dong; Chen, Ying-Juan; Li, Xiao-Wei; Fu, Guang-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) solar cell with graded band gap microcrystalline silicon oxide (μc-SiOx:H) buffer layer is prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and exhibits improved performance compared with the cell without it. The buffer layer moderates the band gap mismatch by reducing the barrier of the p/i interface, which promotes the nucleation of the i-layer and effectively eliminates the incubation layer, and then enhances the collection efficiency of the cell in the short wavelength region of the spectrum. The p/i interface defect density also decreases from 2.2 × 1012 cm-2 to 5.0 × 1011 cm-2. This graded buffer layer allows to simplify the deposition process for the μc-Si:H solar cell application. Project supported by the Key Basic Research Project of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. 12963930D and 12963929D), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. F2013201250 and E2012201059), and the Science and Technology Research Projects of the Education Department of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. ZH2012030).

  16. Effects of oxygen incorporation in solar cells with a-SiOx:H absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuo; Smirnov, Vladimir; Chen, Tao; Holländer, Bernhard; Zhang, Xiaodan; Xiong, Shaozhen; Zhao, Ying; Finger, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The effects of oxygen incorporation on layer properties and cell performance were investigated in thin film solar cells with a-SiOx:H absorber layers. Besides the widened optical band gap and increased defect densities, a doping effect is observed upon oxygen incorporation even for the layers with wide band gap. From comparison of solar cells illuminated from either p- or n-side, we conclude that overall hole carrier collection is strongly deteriorated by increasing the oxygen concentration. The donor-like states induced by oxygen reform the electric field in the absorber. The intensified electric field near the p/i interface improves the quantum efficiency (QE) around 400 nm, which is attributed to the better carrier collection in the p-layer. The maximum of QE shows a blue shift with both p- and n-side illumination. It is consistent with the enhanced optical band gap of the absorber layer and shows the potential of usage in multi-junction solar cells.

  17. Diffractive intermediate layer enables broadband light trapping for high efficiency ultrathin c-Si tandem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guijun Ho, Jacob Y. L.; Li, He; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2014-06-09

    Light management through the intermediate reflector in the tandem cell configuration is of great practical importance for achieving high stable efficiency and also low cost production. So far, however, the intermediate reflectors employed currently are mainly focused on the light absorption enhancement of the top cell. Here, we present a diffractive intermediate layer that allows for light trapping over a broadband wavelength for the ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cell. Compared with the standard intermediate reflector, this nanoscale architectural intermediate layer results in a 35% and 21% remarkable enhancement of the light absorption in the top (400–800 nm) and bottom (800–1100 nm) cells simultaneously, and ultrathin c-Si tandem cells with impressive conversion efficiency of 13.3% are made on the glass substrate.

  18. Improved performance of GaAs tunnel diode by embedding InAs quantum dot layer for tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwang Wook; Kang, Seok Jin; Ravindran, Sooraj; Min, Jung Wook; Lee, Soo Kyung; Park, Min Su; Tak Lee, Yong

    2015-06-01

    GaAs tunnel diodes (TDs) embedded with an InAs quantum dot (QD) layer were grown and their performance was compared with that of TDs without a QD layer. The TDs embedded with a QD layer showed enhanced peak tunnel current density and lower differential resistivity at zero bias compared with the TDs without a QD layer. The samples were then annealed to mimic the overlayer growth process. It was found that the performance degradation after annealing was smaller for the QD-layer-embedded TDs. The improved characteristics of the QD-layer-embedded GaAs TDs make them advantageous for interconnecting unit cells in tandem solar cells.

  19. Three-dimensional cell manipulation and patterning using dielectrophoresis via a multi-layer scaffold structure.

    PubMed

    Chu, H K; Huan, Z; Mills, J K; Yang, J; Sun, D

    2015-02-01

    Cell manipulation is imperative to the areas of cellular biology and tissue engineering, providing them a useful tool for patterning cells into cellular patterns for different analyses and applications. This paper presents a novel approach to perform three-dimensional (3D) cell manipulation and patterning with a multi-layer engineered scaffold. This scaffold structure employed dielectrophoresis as the non-contact mechanism to manipulate cells in the 3D domain. Through establishing electric fields via this multi-layer structure, the cells in the medium became polarized and were attracted towards the interior part of the structure, forming 3D cellular patterns. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the manipulation and the patterning processes with the proposed structure. Results show that with the presence of a voltage input, this multi-layer structure was capable of manipulating different types of biological cells examined through dielectrophoresis, enabling automatic cell patterning in the time-scale of minutes. The effects of the voltage input on the resultant cellular pattern were examined and discussed. Viability test was performed after the patterning operation and the results confirmed that majority of the cells remained viable. After 7 days of culture, 3D cellular patterns were observed through SEM. The results suggest that this scaffold and its automated dielectrophoresis-based patterning mechanism can be used to construct artificial tissues for various tissue engineering applications.

  20. Electron-collecting oxide layers in inverted polymer solar cells via oxidation of thermally evaporated titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetti, A.; Salamandra, L.; Brunetti, F.; Reale, A.; Di Carlo, A.; Brown, T. M.

    2016-10-01

    A simple and intuitive deposition technique is discussed to obtain titanium oxide used as an electron collecting layer in polymer solar cells based on the thermal evaporation of pristine titanium and further thermal treatment to convert the metal in oxide. Since the degradation of indium-doped tin oxide at high temperatures is an issue, we demonstrate that the combination of glass/fluorine tin oxide and high temperatures represents a promising approach in the fabrication of inverted polymer solar cells with such a titanium oxide electron collecting layer.

  1. Production of Cell Wall Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Barley Aleurone Layers in Response to Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Honigman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    The cell walls of barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya) aleurone layers undergo extensive degradation during the tissue's response to gibberellic acid. Previous work had shown that these cell walls consist almost entirely of arabinoxylan. In this study we show that gibberellic acid stimulates endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity in isolated aleurone layers. In addition, gibberellic acid enhances the activity of two glycosidases: β-xylopyranosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase. No gibberellic acid-stimulated cellulase activity was detected. Germination studies showed a similar pattern of enzyme development in intact seeds. Images PMID:16659683

  2. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  3. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell aggregate: an optimal cell therapy for full-layer cutaneous wound vascularization and regeneration.

    PubMed

    An, Yulin; wei, Wei; Jing, Huan; Ming, Leiguo; Liu, Shiyu; Jin, Yan

    2015-11-23

    Cutaneous wounds are among the most common soft tissue injuries. Wounds involving dermis suffer more from outside influence and higher risk of chronic inflammation. Therefore the appearance and function restoration has become an imperative in tissue engineering research. In this study, cell-aggregates constructed with green fluorescent protein-expressing (GFP(+)) rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were applied to rat acute full-layer cutaneous wound model to confirm its pro-regeneration ability and compare its regenerative efficacy with the currently thriving subcutaneous and intravenous stem cell administration strategy, with a view to sensing the advantages, disadvantages and the mechanism behind. According to results, cell-aggregates cultured in vitro enjoyed higher expression of several pro-healing genes than adherent cultured cells. Animal experiments showed better vascularization along with more regular dermal collagen deposition for cell-aggregate transplanted models. Immunofluorescence staining on inflammatory cells indicated a shorter inflammatory phase for cell-aggregate group, which was backed up by further RT-PCR. The in situ immunofluorescence staining manifested a higher GFP(+)-cell engraftment for cell-aggregate transplanted models versus cell administered ones. Thus it is safe to say the BMMSCs aggregate could bring superior cutaneous regeneration for full layer cutaneous wound to BMMSCs administration, both intravenous and subcutaneous.

  4. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell aggregate: an optimal cell therapy for full-layer cutaneous wound vascularization and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    An, Yulin; wei, Wei; Jing, Huan; Ming, Leiguo; Liu, Shiyu; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous wounds are among the most common soft tissue injuries. Wounds involving dermis suffer more from outside influence and higher risk of chronic inflammation. Therefore the appearance and function restoration has become an imperative in tissue engineering research. In this study, cell-aggregates constructed with green fluorescent protein-expressing (GFP+) rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were applied to rat acute full-layer cutaneous wound model to confirm its pro-regeneration ability and compare its regenerative efficacy with the currently thriving subcutaneous and intravenous stem cell administration strategy, with a view to sensing the advantages, disadvantages and the mechanism behind. According to results, cell-aggregates cultured in vitro enjoyed higher expression of several pro-healing genes than adherent cultured cells. Animal experiments showed better vascularization along with more regular dermal collagen deposition for cell-aggregate transplanted models. Immunofluorescence staining on inflammatory cells indicated a shorter inflammatory phase for cell-aggregate group, which was backed up by further RT-PCR. The in situ immunofluorescence staining manifested a higher GFP+-cell engraftment for cell-aggregate transplanted models versus cell administered ones. Thus it is safe to say the BMMSCs aggregate could bring superior cutaneous regeneration for full layer cutaneous wound to BMMSCs administration, both intravenous and subcutaneous. PMID:26594024

  5. Method for automatically identifying spectra of different wood cell wall layers in Raman imaging data set.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Ji, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Ma, Jian-Feng; Hu, Ya-Hong; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-20

    The technique of Raman spectroscopic imaging is finding ever-increasing applications in the field of wood science for its ability to provide spatial and spectral information about the sample. On the basis of the acquired Raman imaging data set, it is possible to determine the distribution of chemical components in various wood cell wall layers. However, the Raman imaging data set often contains thousands of spectra measured at hundreds or even thousands of individual frequencies, which results in difficulties accurately and quickly extracting all of the spectra within a specific morphological region of wood cell walls. To address this issue, the authors propose a new method to automatically identify Raman spectra of different cell wall layers on the basis of principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. A Raman imaging data set collected from a 55.5 μm × 47.5 μm cross-section of poplar tension wood was analyzed. Several thousand spectra were successfully classified into five groups in accordance with different morphological regions, namely, cell corner (CC), compound middle lamella (CML), secondary wall (SW), gelatinous layer (G-layer), and cell lumen. Their corresponding average spectra were also calculated. In addition, the relationship between different characteristic peaks in the obtained Raman spectra was estimated and it was found that the peak at 1331 cm(-1) is more related to lignin rather than cellulose. Not only can this novel method provide a convenient and accurate procedure for identifying the spectra of different cell wall layers in a Raman imaging data set, but it also can bring new insights into studying the morphology and topochemistry in wood cell walls.

  6. Morphological and electrophysiological properties of atypically oriented layer 2 pyramidal cells of the juvenile rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    van Brederode, J F; Foehring, R C; Spain, W J

    2000-01-01

    We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings combined with intracellular dye-filling to examine the morphological and electrophysiological properties of atypically oriented pyramidal cells located at the layer 1/2 border of the juvenile rat neocortex. Orientation of the apical dendrite varied from oblique (>20 degrees from vertical) to truly horizontal (90 degrees from vertical). The length of the apical dendrite ranged from 150 to 400 microm. The total horizontal domain of the dendritic tree (including basal dendrites) of the longest horizontal pyramids exceeded 500 microm, but we also found short horizontal cells with horizontal dendritic domains of less than 300 microm. In addition, atypically oriented pyramids had long horizontal axon collaterals in layer 1/2. Electrophysiologically, atypically oriented pyramidal cells had intrinsic membrane properties similar to regularly oriented pyramids that have been described in the superficial layers at this age in the rat. Cells that fired repetitively were all regular spiking. In addition, we identified a subgroup of neurons (20%) in this sample, which were unable to fire more than a few spikes at the beginning of the current pulse. We suggest that the unique orientation and size of their dendritic trees and the length and arrangement of their local axons collaterals make atypically oriented pyramids in layer 2 ideally suited to perform horizontal integration of synaptic inputs in the neocortex.

  7. Thermal phase transition behavior of lipid layers on a single human corneocyte cell.

    PubMed

    Imai, Tomohiro; Nakazawa, Hiromitsu; Kato, Satoru

    2013-09-01

    We have improved the selected area electron diffraction method to analyze the dynamic structural change in a single corneocyte cell non-invasively stripped off from human skin surface. The improved method made it possible to obtain reliable diffraction images to trace the structural change in the intercellular lipid layers on a single corneocyte cell during heating from 24°C to 100°C. Comparison of the results with those of synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on human stratum corneum sheets revealed that the intercellular lipid layers on a corneocyte cell exhibit essentially the same thermal phase transitions as those in a stratum corneum sheet. These results suggest that the structural features of the lipid layers are well preserved after the mechanical stripping of the corneocyte cell. Moreover, electron diffraction analyses of the thermal phase transition behaviors of the corneocyte cells that had the lipid layers with different distributions of orthorhombic and hexagonal domains at 24°C suggested that small orthorhombic domains interconnected with surrounding hexagonal domains transforms in a continuous manner into new hexagonal domains.

  8. Proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells on 3D porous silicon gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouassi, S.; Gautier, G.; Thery, J.; Desplobain, S.; Borella, M.; Ventura, L.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    2012-10-01

    Since the 90's, porous silicon has been studied and implemented in many devices, especially in MEMS technology. In this article, we present a new approach to build miniaturized proton exchange membrane micro-fuel cells using porous silicon as a hydrogen diffusion layer. In particular, we propose an innovative process to build micro fuel cells from a “corrugated iron like” 3D structured porous silicon substrates. This structure is able to increase up to 40% the cell area keeping a constant footprint on the silicon wafer. We propose here a process route to perform electrochemically 3D porous gas diffusion layers and to deposit fuel cell active layers on such substrates. The prototype peak power performance was measured to be 90 mW cm-2 in a “breathing configuration” at room temperature. These performances are less than expected if we compare with a reference 2D micro fuel cell. Actually, the active layer deposition processes are not fully optimized but this prototype demonstrates the feasibility of these 3D devices.

  9. Endothelial Cell Layer Subjected to Impinging Flow Mimicking the Apex of an Arterial Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Michael P.; Metaxa, Eleni; Meng, Hui; Kolega, John

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about endothelial responses to the impinging flow hemodynamics that occur at arterial bifurcation apices, where intracranial aneurysms usually form. Such hemodynamic environments are characterized by high wall shear stress (WSS >40 dynes/cm2) and high wall shear stress gradients (WSSG >300 dynes/cm3). In this study, confluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to impinging flow in a T-shaped chamber designed to mimic a bifurcation. After 24−72 h under flow, cells around the stagnation point maintained polygonal shapes but cell density was reduced, whereas cells in adjacent downstream regions exposed to very high WSS and WSSG were elongated, aligned parallel to flow, and at higher density. Such behavior was not blocked by inhibiting proliferation, indicating that cells migrated downstream from the stagnation point in response to impinging flow. Furthermore, although the area of highest cell density moved downstream and away from the impingement point over time, it never moved beyond the WSS maximum. The accumulation of cells upstream of maximal WSS and downstream of maximal WSSG suggests that positive WSSG is responsible for the observed migration. These results demonstrate a unique endothelial response to aneurysm-promoting flow environments at bifurcation apices. PMID:18654851

  10. Transparent conductive oxide layer-less dye-sensitized solar cells consisting of floating electrode with gradient TiOx blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Pandey, Shyam S.; Uzaki, Kenshiro; Hayase, Shuzi; Kono, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-01

    A transparent conductive oxide less dye-sensitized solar cell (TCO-less DSC) consisting of a glass/a floating electrode (FE)/a stained nanoporous titania layer/a gel electrolyte sheet/a Pt layer/a Ti sheet is reported. The FE is composed of a stainless mesh sheet covered with a gradient TiOx layer, which suppressed back-electron transfers from the stainless to electrolytes. The efficiency increased from 2.87% to 4.68% by replacing a conventional dense TiO2 blocking layer with the gradient TiOx layer. The cell in this architecture gave the efficiency of 5.56% after optimization.

  11. High thick layer-by-layer 3D multiscale fibrous scaffolds for enhanced cell infiltration and it's potential in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shalumon, K T; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-12-01

    This work explains the fabrication and potential applicability of high thick three dimensional (3-D) electrospun multiscale fibrous scaffolds in tissue engineering by focusing on the possible fabrication techniques. Multiscale fibrous scaffold of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was fabricated by combining nano and micro fibers in optimum concentrations. Finely chopped multiscale fibers were allowed to undergo compression, freeze-drying, resin embedding, cryo-grinding and layering techniques to make 3D scaffolds and the layer-by-layer method was found to be most suitable for 3-D scaffold fabrication. Cell studies in layered 3D scaffolds were performed using MG 63 cells and infiltration was observed using SEM and confocal microscope. Since the layered high thick 3D scaffold perfectly complies with the requirements, this could be proposed as one of the suitable methods for constructing 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:24266265

  12. YKL-40 is differentially expressed in human embryonic stem cells and in cell progeny of the three germ layers.

    PubMed

    Brøchner, Christian B; Johansen, Julia S; Larsen, Lars A; Bak, Mads; Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Byskov, Anne Grete; Andersen, Claus Yding; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2012-03-01

    The secreted glycoprotein YKL-40 participates in cell differentiation, inflammation, and cancer progression. High YKL-40 expression is reported during early human development, but its functions are unknown. Six human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines were cultured in an atmosphere of low or high oxygen tension, in culture medium with or without basic fibroblast growth factor, and on feeder layers comprising mouse embryonic fibroblasts or human foreskin fibroblasts to evaluate whether hESCs and their progeny produced YKL-40 and to characterize YKL-40 expression during differentiation. Secreted YKL-40 protein and YKL-40 mRNA expression were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative RT-PCR. Serial-sectioned colonies were stained for YKL-40 protein and for pluripotent hESC (OCT4, NANOG) and germ layer (HNF-3β, PDX1, CD34, p63, nestin, PAX6) markers. Double-labeling showed YKL-40 expression in OCT4-positive hESCs, PAX6-positive neuroectodermal cells, and HNF-3β-positive endodermal cells. The differentiating progeny showed strong YKL-40 expression. Abrupt transition between YKL-40 and OCT4-positive hESCs and YKL-40-positive ecto- and neuroectodermal lineages was observed within the same epithelial-like layer. YKL-40-positive cells within deeper layers lacked contact with OCT4-positive cells. YKL-40 may be important in initial cell differentiation from hESCs toward ectoderm and neuroectoderm, with retained epithelial morphology, whereas later differentiation into endoderm and mesoderm involves a transition into the deeper layers of the colony.

  13. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-01

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency. PMID:26431263

  14. Tailored porosities of the cathode layer for improved polymer electrolyte fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotorowicz, A.; Jayasayee, K.; Dahl, P. I.; Thomassen, M. S.; Kjelstrup, S.

    2015-08-01

    We show experimentally for the first time that the introduction of macro-pores in the nanoporous catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell can improve its performance. We have achieved a Pt utilization of about 0.23 mg W-1 at 0.6 V which is twice the value of the DOE target for 2020, and three times (0.60 mg W-1) smaller than the value of a fully nanoporous reference layer at a catalyst loading of 0.11 mg cm-2. In this work, monodispersed polystyrene particles with diameters of 0.5 and 1 μm were used as pore formers. Cathode catalyst layers with macroporous volume fractions between 0 and 0.58 were investigated. Maximum performance was observed for fuel cells with a macroporous volume fraction of about 0.52 for a 1 μm thick catalyst layer. The results, which were obtained for the cathode layer, support earlier theoretical predictions that gas access to and water escape from the catalyst can be facilitated by introduction of macropores in the nanoporous layer.

  15. Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide as Highly Stable Electron Collection Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyue; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaochong; Tai, Meiqian; Li, Jingfeng; Li, Jianbao; Li, Xin; Lin, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although low-temperature, solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) has been widely adopted as the electron collection layer (ECL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because of its simple synthesis and excellent electrical properties such as high charge mobility, the thermal stability of the perovskite films deposited atop ZnO layer remains as a major issue. Herein, we addressed this problem by employing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as the ECL and obtained extraordinarily thermally stable perovskite layers. The improvement of the thermal stability was ascribed to diminish of the Lewis acid-base chemical reaction between perovskite and ECL. Notably, the outstanding transmittance and conductivity also render AZO layer as an ideal candidate for transparent conductive electrodes, which enables a simplified cell structure featuring glass/AZO/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. Optimization of the perovskite layer leads to an excellent and repeatable photovoltaic performance, with the champion cell exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.94 V, a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 20.2 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (FF) of 0.67, and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6% under standard 1 sun illumination. It was also revealed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence that the AZO/perovskite interface resulted in less quenching than that between perovskite and hole transport material. PMID:26960451

  16. Organic solar cells with graded absorber layers processed from nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Stefan; Reich, Stefan; Bruns, Michael; Czolk, Jens; Colsmann, Alexander

    2016-03-28

    The fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures from solution is often limited by the choice of solvents since most organic semiconductors dissolve in the same aromatic agents. In this work, we investigate multi-pass deposition of organic semiconductors from eco-friendly ethanol dispersion. Once applied, the nanoparticles are insoluble in the deposition agent, allowing for the application of further nanoparticulate layers and hence for building poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):indene-C60 bisadduct absorber layers with vertically graded polymer and conversely graded fullerene concentration. Upon thermal annealing, we observe some degrees of polymer/fullerene interdiffusion by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Replacing the common bulk-heterojunction by such a graded photo-active layer yields an enhanced fill factor of the solar cell due to an improved charge carrier extraction, and consequently an overall power conversion efficiency beyond 4%. Wet processing of such advanced device architectures paves the way for a versatile, eco-friendly and industrially feasible future fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures.

  17. Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide as Highly Stable Electron Collection Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyue; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xiaochong; Tai, Meiqian; Li, Jingfeng; Li, Jianbao; Li, Xin; Lin, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although low-temperature, solution-processed zinc oxide (ZnO) has been widely adopted as the electron collection layer (ECL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because of its simple synthesis and excellent electrical properties such as high charge mobility, the thermal stability of the perovskite films deposited atop ZnO layer remains as a major issue. Herein, we addressed this problem by employing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) as the ECL and obtained extraordinarily thermally stable perovskite layers. The improvement of the thermal stability was ascribed to diminish of the Lewis acid-base chemical reaction between perovskite and ECL. Notably, the outstanding transmittance and conductivity also render AZO layer as an ideal candidate for transparent conductive electrodes, which enables a simplified cell structure featuring glass/AZO/perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. Optimization of the perovskite layer leads to an excellent and repeatable photovoltaic performance, with the champion cell exhibiting an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.94 V, a short-circuit current (Jsc) of 20.2 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (FF) of 0.67, and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.6% under standard 1 sun illumination. It was also revealed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence that the AZO/perovskite interface resulted in less quenching than that between perovskite and hole transport material.

  18. Organic solar cells with graded absorber layers processed from nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Stefan; Reich, Stefan; Bruns, Michael; Czolk, Jens; Colsmann, Alexander

    2016-03-28

    The fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures from solution is often limited by the choice of solvents since most organic semiconductors dissolve in the same aromatic agents. In this work, we investigate multi-pass deposition of organic semiconductors from eco-friendly ethanol dispersion. Once applied, the nanoparticles are insoluble in the deposition agent, allowing for the application of further nanoparticulate layers and hence for building poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):indene-C60 bisadduct absorber layers with vertically graded polymer and conversely graded fullerene concentration. Upon thermal annealing, we observe some degrees of polymer/fullerene interdiffusion by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Replacing the common bulk-heterojunction by such a graded photo-active layer yields an enhanced fill factor of the solar cell due to an improved charge carrier extraction, and consequently an overall power conversion efficiency beyond 4%. Wet processing of such advanced device architectures paves the way for a versatile, eco-friendly and industrially feasible future fabrication of organic solar cells with advanced multi-layer architectures. PMID:26952692

  19. Perovskite solar cell using a two-dimensional titania nanosheet thin film as the compact layer.

    PubMed

    Li, Can; Li, Yahui; Xing, Yujin; Zhang, Zelin; Zhang, Xianfeng; Li, Zhen; Shi, Yantao; Ma, Tingli; Ma, Renzhi; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan

    2015-07-22

    The compact layer plays an important role in conducting electrons and blocking holes in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Here, we use a two-dimensional titania nanosheet (TNS) thin film as the compact layer in CH3NH3PbI3 PSCs. TNS thin films with thicknesses ranging from 8 to 75 nm were prepared by an electrophoretic deposition method from a dilute TNS/tetrabutylammonium hydroxide solution. The TNS thin films contact the fluorine-doped tin oxide grains perfectly. Our results show that a 8-nm-thick TNS film is sufficient for acting as the compact layer. Currently, the PSC with a TNS compact layer has a high efficiency of 10.7% and relatively low hysteresis behavior. PMID:26158908

  20. Thin catalyst layers based on carbon nanotubes for PEM-fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenberger, T.; Matovic, J.; Schmid, U.

    2011-06-01

    In this study, two approaches are compared to develop thin, multifunctional films of carbon nanotubes (CNT) which are targeted to serve as a catalyst layer in fuel cells. The first is based on the direct deposition of mixed multi- and single-wall CNTs on metalized silicon wafers, using the metallization as a sacrificial layer to subsequently detach the CNT film from the substrate. It is a less time consuming and a straight forward method compared to the alternative under investigation, the layer-by-layer technique (LbL). The LbL uses bilayers of charged nanotubes to slowly build up a film with an exactly defined thickness. The process is well controlled, but the time constants for deposition of each bilayer are rather high (i.e. about 1 h). With additional annealing steps implemented during film generation this method, however, is regarded advantageous as membranes results with improved mechanical stability and a good homogeneity.

  1. Different materials as a cathode modification layer on the impact of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jian; Huang, Qiuyan; Yu, Junsheng; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    Organic thin film solar cells based on conjugated polymer or small molecules have showed an interesting approach to energy conversion since Tang reported a single donor-accepter hetero-junction solar cell. The power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells has increased steadily over last decade. Small-molecular weight organic double heterojunction donor-acceptor layer organic solar cells (OSC) with a structure of indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/x/Ag(1000Å), using CuPc(copper Phthalocyanine)as donor layer, and Alq3(8-Hydroxyquinoline aluminum salt), BCP(Bromocresol purple sodium salt) and Bphen(4'7-diphyenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) as cathode modification layer, respectively were fabricated. The performance of OSC was studied as a function of the different materials as an cathode modification layer to optimize the structure. The current-voltage characteristic of the solar cell under AM1.5 solar illumination at an intensity of 100 mw/cm2 showed that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was dependent of the different materials of the cathode modification layer. the efficiency along with the different materials as an cathode modification layer will diminish under that standard solar illumination(AM1.5)was obtained. Using a double heterostructure of ITO/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/Alq3(60Å)/Ag(1000Å) with high-vacuum evaporation technology, the efficiency was 0.587%.the efficiency was 0.967% when the material of the cathode modification layer was BCP, with the structure of ITO/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/BCP(35Å)/Ag(1000Å), and the efficiency was 0.742% when the material of the cathode modification layer was Bphen, with the structure of ITO/CuPc(200Å)/C60(400Å)/ Bphen(50Å)/Ag(1000Å).Using different materials as a cathode modification layer, it can be seen that the material which matches the energy level could even eventually be able to improve the energy conversion efficiency more.

  2. Theoretical performance of multi-layer grid patterns for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flat, A.; Milnes, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Multilayer grid patterns consist of fine closely spaced grid lines overlaid by coarser patterns of wider and thicker grid lines to collect the current from the finer grids with low series voltage drop and low active-layer sheet losses. An analytical approach leads to closed form solutions with simple relationships between the power losses in the active layer, in the grid and shadowing losses for optimum design proportions. The results show that multilayer grids, with line thickness equal to line width, greatly reduce losses in cell efficiency under concentration conditions of high current collection. (AlGa)As-pn GaAs cells of areas 1-25 sq cm and sheet resistance 40 ohms/square are considered. Also the performance of a n/p GaAs cell of dimensions 10 x 10 cm is studied. With optimized grid patterns high efficiencies are predicted for large area cells.

  3. Physical properties of as-prepared and post-annealed TiO2 layers by atomic layer deposition and their cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Ji; Ahn, Kyun; Choi, Hun Seok; Pham-Cong, De; Gao, Ying Jun; Cho, Jin Hyuk; Park, Cheul Un; Cho, Chae-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    We report on the physical properties of TiO2 blocking layers with various thicknesses in both the as-prepared and the post-annealed states and on their cell performances in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The TiO2 layers of various thicknesses (up to 50 nm) were prepared on fluorine-doped SnO2/glass substrates by using atomic layer deposition. The electron lifetime of the DSSCs was observed to depend critically on both the thickness and the annealing treatment for TiO2 layers with thicknesses up to 10 nm. However, for thicknesses above 20 nm, the cell performance of the DSSCs decreased because of increases in the defect density and charge recombination. We conclude that the cell efficiency of DSSCs with a 10-nm-thick TiO2 layer is higher than those of DSSCs with layers of other thicknesses; in addition, the cell characteristics of the post-annealed structures were better than those of the as-prepared ones.

  4. Engineering meniscus structure and function via multi-layered mesenchymal stem cell-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew B; Henning, Elizabeth A; Söegaard, Nicole; Bostrom, Marc; Esterhai, John L; Mauck, Robert L

    2015-06-01

    Despite advances in tissue engineering for the knee meniscus, it remains a challenge to match the complex macroscopic and microscopic structural features of native tissue, including the circumferentially and radially aligned collagen bundles essential for mechanical function. To mimic this structural hierarchy, this study developed multi-lamellar mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded nanofibrous constructs. Bovine MSCs were seeded onto nanofibrous scaffolds comprised of poly(ε-caprolactone) with fibers aligned in a single direction (0° or 90° to the scaffold long axis) or circumferentially aligned (C). Multi-layer groups (0°/0°/0°, 90°/90°/90°, 0°/90°/0°, 90°/0°/90°, and C/C/C) were created and cultured for a total of 6 weeks under conditions favoring fibrocartilaginous tissue formation. Tensile testing showed that 0° and C single layer constructs had stiffness values several fold higher than 90° constructs. For multi-layer groups, the stiffness of 0°/0°/0° constructs was higher than all other groups, while 90°/90°/90° constructs had the lowest values. Data for collagen content showed a general positive interactive effect for multi-layers relative to single layer constructs, while a positive interaction for stiffness was found only for the C/C/C group. Collagen content and cell infiltration occurred independent of scaffold alignment, and newly formed collagenous matrix followed the scaffold fiber direction. Structural hierarchies within multi-lamellar constructs dictated biomechanical properties, and only the C/C/C constructs with non-orthogonal alignment within layers featured positive mechanical reinforcement as a consequence of the layered construction. These multi-layer constructs may serve as functional substitutes for the meniscus as well as test beds to understand the complex mechanical principles that enable meniscus function.

  5. Liquid-phase-deposited siloxane-based capping layers for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Veith-Wolf, Boris; Wang, Jianhui; Hannu-Kuure, Milja; Chen, Ning; Hadzic, Admir; Williams, Paul; Leivo, Jarkko; Karkkainen, Ari; Schmidt, Jan

    2015-02-02

    We apply non-vacuum processing to deposit dielectric capping layers on top of ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) films, used for the rear surface passivation of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. We examine various siloxane-based liquid-phase-deposited (LPD) materials. Our optimized AlO{sub x}/LPD stacks show an excellent thermal and chemical stability against aluminum metal paste, as demonstrated by measured surface recombination velocities below 10 cm/s on 1.3 Ωcm p-type silicon wafers after firing in a belt-line furnace with screen-printed aluminum paste on top. Implementation of the optimized LPD layers into an industrial-type screen-printing solar cell process results in energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.8% on p-type Czochralski silicon.

  6. Buffer layer between a planar optical concentrator and a solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, Manuel E.; Barber, Greg D.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Faryad, Muhammad; Monk, Peter B.; Mallouk, Thomas E.

    2015-09-15

    The effect of inserting a buffer layer between a periodically multilayered isotropic dielectric (PMLID) material acting as a planar optical concentrator and a photovoltaic solar cell was theoretically investigated. The substitution of the photovoltaic material by a cheaper dielectric material in a large area of the structure could reduce the fabrication costs without significantly reducing the efficiency of the solar cell. Both crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) were considered as the photovoltaic material. We found that the buffer layer can act as an antireflection coating at the interface of the PMLID and the photovoltaic materials, and the structure increases the spectrally averaged electron-hole pair density by 36% for c-Si and 38% for GaAs compared to the structure without buffer layer. Numerical evidence indicates that the optimal structure is robust with respect to small changes in the grating profile.

  7. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-07-31

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  8. Dilute group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2015-02-24

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  9. Culture of human limbal epithelial stem cells on tenon's fibroblast feeder-layers: a translational approach.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, Gaia; Siciliano, Camilla; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The coculture technique is the standard method to expand ex vivo limbal stem cells (LSCs) by using inactivated embryonic murine feeder layers (3T3). Although alternative techniques such as amniotic membranes or scaffolds have been proposed, feeder layers are still considered to be the best method, due to their ability to preserve some critical properties of LSCs such as cell growth and viability, stemness phenotype, and clonogenic potential. Furthermore, clinical applications of LSCs cultured on 3T3 have taken place. Nevertheless, for an improved Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliance, the use of human feeder-layers as well as a fine standardization of the process is strictly encouraged. Here, we describe a translational approach in accordance with GMP regulations to culture LSCs onto human Tenon's fibroblasts (TFs). In this chapter, based on our experience we identify and analyze issues that often are encountered by researchers and discuss solutions to common problems. PMID:25063497

  10. Culture of human limbal epithelial stem cells on tenon's fibroblast feeder-layers: a translational approach.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, Gaia; Siciliano, Camilla; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The coculture technique is the standard method to expand ex vivo limbal stem cells (LSCs) by using inactivated embryonic murine feeder layers (3T3). Although alternative techniques such as amniotic membranes or scaffolds have been proposed, feeder layers are still considered to be the best method, due to their ability to preserve some critical properties of LSCs such as cell growth and viability, stemness phenotype, and clonogenic potential. Furthermore, clinical applications of LSCs cultured on 3T3 have taken place. Nevertheless, for an improved Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliance, the use of human feeder-layers as well as a fine standardization of the process is strictly encouraged. Here, we describe a translational approach in accordance with GMP regulations to culture LSCs onto human Tenon's fibroblasts (TFs). In this chapter, based on our experience we identify and analyze issues that often are encountered by researchers and discuss solutions to common problems.

  11. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, Ashok S; Cole, J Vernon

    2008-11-01

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  12. Small-molecule organic solar cells with multiple-layer donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisawa, Kenta; Harafuji, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    Small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs) with a multifunction three-layer donor are experimentally investigated to achieve higher power conversion efficiency. The proposed OSC has an indium tin oxide (ITO, anode)/three-layer donor/fullerene (C60, acceptor, 40 nm)/bathocuproine (BCP, cathode buffer, 10 nm)/Ag (cathode, 100 nm) structure. The three-layer donor is composed of 3-nm-thick pentacene/20-nm-thick copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/5-nm-thick aluminum phthalocyanine chloride (ClAlPc). The OSC achieves a power conversion efficiency of 1.79%, which is 1.7 times as large as that for an OSC with a single-layer donor of 20-nm-thick CuPc. Atomic force microscopy observation is carried out to clarify in detail the surface morphology at typical organic layers. The acceptor C60 is in contact not only with ClAlPc but also with CuPc due to the vertical and wall-like growth of the ClAlPc layer. The open-circuit voltage for the OSC with the ClAlPc/C60 contact is 0.56 V, compared with 0.47 V for the OSC with the CuPc/C60 contact. The thin pentacene layer is uniformly grown on the ITO and serves to achieve a high short-circuit current density Jsc by lowering the barrier height for hole transport between ITO and CuPc. Jsc for the OSC with the thin pentacene layer is 5.60 mA/cm2, compared with 4.32 mA/cm2 for the OSC without the thin pentacene layer.

  13. Efficiency Enhancement of Nanotextured Black Silicon Solar Cells Using Al2O3/TiO2 Dual-Layer Passivation Stack Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Meng-Chen; Yang, Jason; Hsu, Chuck; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2015-05-20

    In this study, efficient nanotextured black silicon (NBSi) solar cells composed of silicon nanowire arrays and an Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack on the n(+) emitter were fabricated. The highly conformal Al2O3 and TiO2 surface passivation layers were deposited on the high-aspect-ratio surface of the NBSi wafers using atomic layer deposition. Instead of the single Al2O3 passivation layer with a negative oxide charge density, the Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack treated with forming gas annealing provides a high positive oxide charge density and a low interfacial state density, which are essential for the effective field-effect and chemical passivation of the n(+) emitter. In addition, the Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack suppresses the total reflectance over a broad range of wavelengths (400-1000 nm). Therefore, with the Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack, the short-circuit current density and efficiency of the NBSi solar cell were increased by 11% and 20%, respectively. In conclusion, a high efficiency of 18.5% was achieved with the NBSi solar cells by using the n(+)-emitter/p-base structure passivated with the Al2O3/TiO2 stack.

  14. Efficiency Enhancement of Nanotextured Black Silicon Solar Cells Using Al2O3/TiO2 Dual-Layer Passivation Stack Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tsai, Meng-Chen; Yang, Jason; Hsu, Chuck; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2015-05-20

    In this study, efficient nanotextured black silicon (NBSi) solar cells composed of silicon nanowire arrays and an Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack on the n(+) emitter were fabricated. The highly conformal Al2O3 and TiO2 surface passivation layers were deposited on the high-aspect-ratio surface of the NBSi wafers using atomic layer deposition. Instead of the single Al2O3 passivation layer with a negative oxide charge density, the Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack treated with forming gas annealing provides a high positive oxide charge density and a low interfacial state density, which are essential for the effective field-effect and chemical passivation of the n(+) emitter. In addition, the Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack suppresses the total reflectance over a broad range of wavelengths (400-1000 nm). Therefore, with the Al2O3/TiO2 dual-layer passivation stack, the short-circuit current density and efficiency of the NBSi solar cell were increased by 11% and 20%, respectively. In conclusion, a high efficiency of 18.5% was achieved with the NBSi solar cells by using the n(+)-emitter/p-base structure passivated with the Al2O3/TiO2 stack. PMID:25919200

  15. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with allelic deletions at 13q14 commonly have one intact RB1 gene: Evidence for a role of an adjacent locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, Y.; Grander, D.; Linder, S.; Einhorn, S.; Soederhall, S. ); Szekely, L. ); Juliusson, G.; Gahrton, G. )

    1993-09-15

    The authors have previously shown that 30% of patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) have hemizygous deletions of the retinoblastoma (RB1) gene at 13q14. RB1 gene deletions may thus participate in malignant transformation of B-CLL, but is it also possible that a neighboring gene on 13q is the relevant one. To answer this question the remaining RB1 allele of eight clones with hemizygous deletions was studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and immunofluorescense techniques. Cells from 10 patients without RB1 gene deletions were also studied by these methods. Lack of RB1 mRNA and RB protein expression was seen in leukemia cells from one of the patients. All other cases were found to be normal with regard to immunofluorescense, RT-PCR, and SSCP analysis, indicating at least one functional RB1 allele and supporting the importance of another gene in the 13q14 deletions. The authors then performed extended Southern blot analysis of the 13q region, using probes for 10 different loci. In 14 of 31 CLL clones (45%), deletions of a region telomeric to the RB1 gene (D13S25) were observed. In 4 of the cases the deletions were homozygous. Hemizygous deletions of the RB1 gene were observed in 11 of these patients and in one of the patients without D13S25 deletions. These data thus indicate that a gene(s) telomeric to RB1 is involved in the malignant transformation of CLL clones and that deletions of this region are a common event in this disease. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Preparation and Evaluation of Multi-Layer Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, Diana; Farmer, Serene C.; Setlock, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an energy device with abundant energy generation, ultra-high specific power density, high stability and long life is critical for enabling longer missions and for reducing mission costs. Of all different types of fuel cells, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is a promising high temperature device that can generate electricity as a byproduct of a chemical reaction in a clean way and produce high quality heat that can be used for other purposes. For aerospace applications, a power-to-weight of (is) greater than 1.0 kW/kg is required. NASA has a patented fuel cell technology under development, capable of achieving the 1.0 kW/kg figure of merit. The first step toward achieving these goals is increasing anode durability. The catalyst plays an important role in the fuel cells for power generation, stability, efficiency and long life. Not only the anode composition, but its preparation and reduction are key to achieving better cell performance. In this research, multi-layer anodes were prepared varying the chemistry of each layer to optimize the performance of the cells. Microstructure analyses were done to the new anodes before and after fuel cell operation. The cells' durability and performance were evaluated in 200 hrs life tests in hydrogen at 850 C. The chemistry of the standard nickel anode was modified successfully reducing the anode degradation from 40% to 8.4% in 1000 hrs and retaining its microstructure.

  17. Chameleonic electrochemical metallization cells: dual-layer solid electrolyte-inducing various switching behaviours.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Soni, Rohit; Kim, Dohun; Kim, Guhyun; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Kim, Inho; Park, Jong-Keuk; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2016-08-25

    We present 'unusual' resistive switching behaviours in electrochemical metallization (ECM) cells utilizing a dual-layer (SiOx/GeSex: SiOx on GeSex) solid electrolyte (SE). The observed switching behaviour markedly varies with the thickness of the upper SiOx layer and compliance current: (i) monostable switching, (ii) counter-eightwise bipolar switching, and (iii) combination of monostable and eightwise bipolar switching behaviours. Focusing on cases (i) and (iii), electrical and chemical analyses on these chameleonic cells were performed in an attempt to gain clues to the understanding of the observed complexity. The chemical analysis indicated the upper SiOx layer as a chemical potential well for Cu ions-Cu ions were largely confined in the well. This non-uniform distribution of Cu across the SE perhaps hints at the mechanism for the complex behaviour; it may be a 'zero-sum game' between SiOx and GeSex layers, in which the two layers fight over the limited number of Cu atoms/ions. PMID:27510607

  18. Improving performance of inverted organic solar cells using ZTO nanoparticles as cathode buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Meng-Yen; Cheng, Wen-Hui; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Jen-Sue

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a low-temperature solution-processed zinc tin oxide (ZTO) films are successfully utilized as the cathode buffer layer in the inverted organic P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells. ZTO film cathode buffer layer with an appropriate Sn-doping concentration outperforms the zinc oxide (ZnO) film with an improved power conversion efficiency (1.96% (ZTO film) vs. 1.56% (ZnO film)). Furthermore, ZTO nanoparticles (NPs) are also synthesized via low-temperature solution route and the device with ZTO NPs buffer layer exhibits a significant improvement in device performance to reach a PCE of 2.60%. The crystallinity of the cathode buffer layer plays an influential factor in the performance. From impedance spectroscopy analysis, a correlation between short circuit current (Jsc), carrier life time (τavg) and, thus, PCE is observed. The interplay between composition and crystallinity of the cathode buffer layers is discussed to find their influences on the solar cell performance.

  19. Prevention of the water flooding by micronizing the pore structure of gas diffusion layer for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramitsu, Yusuke; Sato, Hitoshi; Hori, Michio

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells, high humidity must be established to maintain high proton conductivity in the polymer electrolyte. However, the water that is produced electrochemically at the cathode catalyst layer can condense in the cell and cause an obstruction to the diffusion of reaction gas in the gas diffusion layer and the gas channel. This leads to a sudden decrease of the cell voltage. To combat this, strict water management techniques are required, which usually focus on the gas diffusion layer. In this study, the use of specially treated carbon paper as a flood-proof gas diffusion layer under extremely high humidity conditions was investigated experimentally. The results indicated that flooding originates at the interface between the gas diffusion layer and the catalyst layer, and that such flooding could be eliminated by control of the pore size in the gas diffusion layer at this interface.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of flow over and transmigration through a cultured endothelial cell layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Lori; Pipinos, Iraklis; Baxter, Timothy; MacTaggart, Jason; Moormeier, Derek; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    The measurement and analysis of fluid forces on endothelial cells at the cellular and subcellular levels is an essential component of understanding mechanotransduction and atherogenesis. The ultimate goal of this study is to examine and model the transport and transmigration of low-density lipoproteins across a confluent endothelial layer as a function of fluid loading and time. In this study, steady flow over a cultured endothelial cell layer at shear rates up to 20 dynes/cm2 in a 350 μm × 70 μm cross section mircrochannel was measured using μPTV measurements. By using multiple measurement planes parallel to the channel wall, wall shear stress and wall pressure were computed as well as the endothelial cell topography. The study was performed over a period of 18 hours in which the transport and transmigration of fluorescently tagged low-density lipoproteins through a cultured endothelial cell layer were examined as a function of fluid forces, cell topography, and time. The help of Dr. Richard Leighton is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. On-chip single cell funneling operated by microfabricated thermo-responsive hydrogel layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaniello, Tommaso; Yan, Yunsong; Tocchio, Alessandro; Martello, Federico; Gassa, Federico; Webb, Patrick; Zhao, Weiwei; Tamplenizza, Margherita; Schulte, Carsten; Liu, Yang; Hutt, David; Milani, Paolo; Conway, Paul; Lenardi, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    We present a multilayer microfluidic system having a KrF excimer laser micro-patterned thermo-responsive poly-(N-isopropyl)-acrylamide (PNIPAAm) based hydrogel layer integrated as a freestanding component that operates as a temperature-triggered cell isolation actuator for single cell assays applications. When the system is assembled, the size of the laser machined micro-through-hole (entrance diameter is 150 μm, while exit hole diameter varies from 10 to 80 μm) can be reversibly modulated as a consequence of the polymer volumetric phase transition induced by heating the device above the critical temperature of 32 °C as a result of the polymer water loss, the shrinkage of the layer caused the hole to homogeneously shrink, thus reducing its original size to about 40% in the polymer collapsed state. This actuation mechanism was exploited to trap a cellular sample in the shrunken exit hole on the top of the hydrogel layer by applying a negative pressure across the film when the system is brought to 37 °C. Subsequently, the funneling of the trapped cell took place through the orifice when the polymer’s natural relaxation at room temperature toward its initial state occurred; the functionality of the device was proved using optical microscopy to monitor MG63 cells as a model cell line during the funneling through the size-modulating structure.

  2. Surface-layer (S-layer) proteins sap and EA1 govern the binding of the S-layer-associated protein BslO at the cell septa of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kern, Valerie J; Kern, Justin W; Theriot, Julie A; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2012-08-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Bacillus anthracis contains 24 genes whose products harbor the structurally conserved surface-layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domain. Proteins endowed with the SLH domain associate with the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) following secretion. Two such proteins, Sap and EA1, have the unique ability to self-assemble into a paracrystalline layer on the surface of bacilli and form S layers. Other SLH domain proteins can also be found within the S layer and have been designated Bacillus S-layer-associated protein (BSLs). While both S-layer proteins and BSLs bind the same SCWP, their deposition on the cell surface is not random. For example, BslO is targeted to septal peptidoglycan zones, where it catalyzes the separation of daughter cells. Here we show that an insertional lesion in the sap structural gene results in elongated chains of bacilli, as observed with a bslO mutant. The chain length of the sap mutant can be reduced by the addition of purified BslO in the culture medium. This complementation in trans can be explained by an increased deposition of BslO onto the surface of sap mutant bacilli that extends beyond chain septa. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the Sap S layer does not overlap the EA1 S layer and slowly yields to the EA1 S layer in a growth-phase-dependent manner. Although present all over bacilli, Sap S-layer patches are not observed at septa. Thus, we propose that the dynamic Sap/EA1 S-layer coverage of the envelope restricts the deposition of BslO to the SCWP at septal rings.

  3. Surface-Layer (S-Layer) Proteins Sap and EA1 Govern the Binding of the S-Layer-Associated Protein BslO at the Cell Septa of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Valerie J.; Kern, Justin W.; Theriot, Julie A.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Bacillus anthracis contains 24 genes whose products harbor the structurally conserved surface-layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domain. Proteins endowed with the SLH domain associate with the secondary cell wall polysaccharide (SCWP) following secretion. Two such proteins, Sap and EA1, have the unique ability to self-assemble into a paracrystalline layer on the surface of bacilli and form S layers. Other SLH domain proteins can also be found within the S layer and have been designated Bacillus S-layer-associated protein (BSLs). While both S-layer proteins and BSLs bind the same SCWP, their deposition on the cell surface is not random. For example, BslO is targeted to septal peptidoglycan zones, where it catalyzes the separation of daughter cells. Here we show that an insertional lesion in the sap structural gene results in elongated chains of bacilli, as observed with a bslO mutant. The chain length of the sap mutant can be reduced by the addition of purified BslO in the culture medium. This complementation in trans can be explained by an increased deposition of BslO onto the surface of sap mutant bacilli that extends beyond chain septa. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that the Sap S layer does not overlap the EA1 S layer and slowly yields to the EA1 S layer in a growth-phase-dependent manner. Although present all over bacilli, Sap S-layer patches are not observed at septa. Thus, we propose that the dynamic Sap/EA1 S-layer coverage of the envelope restricts the deposition of BslO to the SCWP at septal rings. PMID:22609927

  4. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair.

  5. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  6. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm2. The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  7. Highly efficient multiple-layer CdS quantum dot sensitized III-V solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chung; Han, Hau-Vei; Chen, Hsin-Chu; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wein-Yi; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Yu, Peichen

    2014-02-01

    In this review, the concept of utilization of solar spectrum in order to increase the solar cell efficiency is discussed. Among the three mechanisms, down-shifting effect is investigated in detail. Organic dye, rare-earth minerals and quantum dots are three most popular down-shift materials. While the enhancement of solar cell efficiency was not clearly observed in the past, the advances in quantum dot fabrication have brought strong response out of the hybrid platform of a quantum dot solar cell. A multiple layer structure, including PDMS as the isolation layer, is proposed and demonstrated. With the help of pulse spray system, precise control can be achieved and the optimized concentration can be found.

  8. Multi-Layer Inkjet Printed Contacts for Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C. J.; van hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Kaydanova, T.; Smith, L.; Ginley, D. S.

    2006-05-01

    Ag, Cu, and Ni metallizations were inkjet printed with near vacuum deposition quality. The approach developed can be easily extended to other conductors such as Pt, Pd, Au, etc. Thick highly conducting lines of Ag and Cu demonstrating good adhesion to glass, Si, and printed circuit board (PCB) have been printed at 100-200 C in air and N2 respectively. Ag grids were inkjet-printed on Si solar cells and fired through the silicon nitride AR layer at 850 C, resulting in 8% cells. Next generation inks, including an ink that etches silicon nitride, have now been developed. Multi-layer inkjet printing of the etching ink followed by Ag ink produced contacts under milder conditions and gave solar cells with efficiencies as high as 12%.

  9. The effect of the unstirred layer on human red cell water permeability.

    PubMed

    Sha'afi, R I; Rich, G T; Sidel, V W; Bossert, W; Solomon, A K

    1967-05-01

    A study has been made of water entry into human red blood cells under an osmotic pressure gradient. The measurements were made using a rapid reaction stop flow apparatus, whose construction, calibration, and performance are described in detail. Red cell volume changes were determined from 90 degrees scattered light. The permeability coefficient for water entry under a relative isosmolar concentration of 1 to 1.5 was found to be 0.22 +/- 0.01 cm(4)/sec osmol, which agrees well with our previously published value. The experiments were also designed to measure the thickness of the unstirred layer around the6 red cells. This was found to be 5.5 +/- 0.8 micro under the present experimental conditions. It is concluded that our previously measured permeability coefficient for water entrance under a diffusion gradient does not require correction on account of the unstirred layer.

  10. Effective Transport Properties Accounting for Electrochemical Reactions of Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Pharoah, Jon; Choi, Hae-Won; Chueh, Chih-Che; Harvey, David

    2011-07-01

    There has been a rapidly growing interest in three-dimensional micro-structural reconstruction of fuel cell electrodes so as to derive more accurate descriptors of the pertinent geometric and effective transport properties. Due to the limited accessibility of experiments based reconstruction techniques, such as dual-beam focused ion beam-scanning electro microscopy or micro X-Ray computed tomography, within sample micro-structures of the catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a particle based numerical model is used in this study to reconstruct sample microstructure of the catalyst layers in PEMFCs. Then the reconstructed sample structure is converted into the computational grid using body-fitted/cut-cell based unstructured meshing technique. Finally, finite volume methods (FVM) are applied to calculate effective properties on computational sample domains.

  11. Surface engineering of nanoporous substrate for solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sanghoon; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Yu, Wonjong; Kang, Sungmin; Cho, Gu Young; Kim, Sung Han; An, Jihwan; Cha, Suk Won

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited thin film electrolytes supported on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) are electrochemically characterized with varying thickness of bottom electrode catalyst (BEC); BECs which are 0.5 and 4 times thicker than the size of AAO pores are tested. The thicker BEC ensures far more active mass transport on the BEC side and resultantly the thicker BEC cell generates ≈11 times higher peak power density than the thinner BEC cell at 500 °C.

  12. Multi-Layer Inkjet Printed Contacts for Si Solar Cells (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C. J.; van hest, M. F. A. M.; Miedaner, A.; Kaydanova, T.; Smith, L.; Ginley, D. S.

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this report is to develop inkjet printing (including tools, inks, and processing conditions) for high-quality Ag contacts for Si solar cells. The conclusions are: (1) Tools and inks for the atmospheric inkjet printing of Ag metallization for Si solar cells have been developed. (2) Line widths, conductivities and thicknesses comparable to, or better than, those produced by screen printing. (3) A new fire-through ink and layered printing were found to decrease the processing temperature for contact formation to as low as 650 C and improve printed cell performance.

  13. Surface engineering of nanoporous substrate for solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Sanghoon; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Yu, Wonjong; Kang, Sungmin; Cho, Gu Young; Kim, Sung Han

    2015-01-01

    Summary Solid oxide fuel cells with atomic layer-deposited thin film electrolytes supported on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) are electrochemically characterized with varying thickness of bottom electrode catalyst (BEC); BECs which are 0.5 and 4 times thicker than the size of AAO pores are tested. The thicker BEC ensures far more active mass transport on the BEC side and resultantly the thicker BEC cell generates ≈11 times higher peak power density than the thinner BEC cell at 500 °C. PMID:26425432

  14. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  15. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  16. Interface characterization of nanometer scale CdS buffer layer in chalcopyrite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Cheng, Tzu-Huan

    2016-06-01

    The buffer layer of a chalcopyrite solar cell plays an important role in optical responses of open circuit voltage (V oc) and short circuit current (J sc). A CdS buffer layer is applicable on the nanometer scale owing to its high carrier concentration and n-type semiconductor behavior in chalcopyrite solar cells. The thin buffer layer also contributes to the passivation of the absorber surface to reduce defect recombination loss. Non-destructive metrological parameters such as photoluminescence (PL) intensity, external quantum efficiency (EQE), and depth-resolved photovoltage are used to characterize the interface quality of CdS/chalcopyrite. The defects and dangling bonds at the absorber surface will cause interface recombination and reduce the cell performance in build-in voltage distribution. Post annealing can improve Cd ion diffusion from the buffer layer to the absorber surface and reduce the density of defects and dangling bonds. After thermal annealing, the EQE, PL intensity, and minority carrier lifetime are improved.

  17. A thin layer electrochemical cell for disinfection of water contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gusmão, Isabel C. P.; Moraes, Peterson B.; Bidoia, Ederio D.

    2009-01-01

    A thin layer electrochemical cell was tested and developed for disinfection treatment of water artificially contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus. Electrolysis was performed with a low-voltage DC power source applying current densities of 75 mA cm-2 (3 A) or 25 mA cm-2 (1 A). A dimensionally stable anode (DSA) of titanium coated with an oxide layer of 70%TiO2 plus 30%RuO2 (w/w) and a 3 mm from a stainless-steel 304 cathode was used in the thin layer cell. The experiments were carried out using a bacteria suspension containing 0.08 M sodium sulphate with chloride-free to determine the bacterial inactivation efficacy of the thin layer cell without the generation of chlorine. The chlorine can promote the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) that are carcinogenic. S. aureus inactivation increased with electrolysis time and lower flow rate. The flow rates used were 200 or 500 L h-1. At 500 L h-1 and 75 mA cm-2 the inactivation after 60 min was about three logs of decreasing for colony forming units by mL. However, 100% inactivation for S. aureus was observed at 5.6 V and 75 mA cm-2 after 30 min. Thus, significant disinfection levels can be achieved without adding oxidant substances or generation of chlorine in the water. PMID:24031410

  18. A thin layer electrochemical cell for disinfection of water contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Isabel C P; Moraes, Peterson B; Bidoia, Ederio D

    2009-07-01

    A thin layer electrochemical cell was tested and developed for disinfection treatment of water artificially contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus. Electrolysis was performed with a low-voltage DC power source applying current densities of 75 mA cm(-2) (3 A) or 25 mA cm(-2) (1 A). A dimensionally stable anode (DSA) of titanium coated with an oxide layer of 70%TiO2 plus 30%RuO2 (w/w) and a 3 mm from a stainless-steel 304 cathode was used in the thin layer cell. The experiments were carried out using a bacteria suspension containing 0.08 M sodium sulphate with chloride-free to determine the bacterial inactivation efficacy of the thin layer cell without the generation of chlorine. The chlorine can promote the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) that are carcinogenic. S. aureus inactivation increased with electrolysis time and lower flow rate. The flow rates used were 200 or 500 L h(-1). At 500 L h(-1) and 75 mA cm(-2) the inactivation after 60 min was about three logs of decreasing for colony forming units by mL. However, 100% inactivation for S. aureus was observed at 5.6 V and 75 mA cm(-2) after 30 min. Thus, significant disinfection levels can be achieved without adding oxidant substances or generation of chlorine in the water. PMID:24031410

  19. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-10-01

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm(-2) increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  20. Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformitiesin Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, results from mathematical, pseudo 2-D simulations are shown for four different along-the-channel thickness distributions of both the membrane and cathode catalyst layer. The results and subsequent analysis clearly demonstrate that for the membrane thickness distributions, cell performance is affected a few percent under low relative-humidity conditions and that the position along the gas channel is more important than the local thickness variations. However, for the catalyst-layer thickness distributions, global performance is not impacted, although for saturated conditions there is a large variability in the local temperature and performance depending on the thickness.

  1. Polymer solar cells with gold nanoclusters decorated multi-layer graphene as transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Choy, Wallace C. H.; Wang, Charlie C. D.; Li, Xiao; Fan, Lili; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2011-11-01

    A thin layer of ultraviolet-ozone (UVO) treated gold (Au) is introduced on multi-layer graphene (MLG) to enable the MLG as an effective anode for polymer solar cells (PSCs). By optimizing the Au thickness and the durations of the UVO treatments at different stages, MLG PSCs with enhanced fill factor and power conversion efficiency are obtained, exhibiting better performance compared with MLG devices directly modified with UVO and poly(3,4-ethylenedioythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate). Further analysis shows that UVO treated Au provides favorable band alignment at the MLG/polymer interface. Moreover, the improved interfacial contact and shortened UVO durations reduce the series resistance of PSCs significantly.

  2. Cell-substrate contact: another factor may influence transepithelial electrical resistance of cell layers cultured on permeable filters.

    PubMed

    Lo, C M; Keese, C R; Giaever, I

    1999-08-01

    Transepithelial resistance (TER) measurement has often been used to study the paracellular transport properties of epithelia grown on permeable filters, especially the barrier function of tight junctions. However, the TER value includes another source, the resistance caused by cell-substrate contact, that may give rise to a high TER value if cell-substrate separation is small. In this study we use electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) to measure both paracellular resistance and the average cell-substrate distance of MDCK (II), HEp-2, and WI-38 VA13 cells. Comparing ECIS data with those from TER measurements of cell layers cultured on polycarbonate filters, we can obtain the approximate extra resistance resulting from cell-substrate contact for each cell type. The value of cell-substrate resistance was also estimated by two theoretical calculations that bracket the true values. Our results demonstrate that cell-substrate contact substantially influences the TER data measured using polycarbonate filters and that the extra resistance due to cell-substrate spaces depends on both cell type and filter property.

  3. DNA Methylation Profiling of Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation into the Three Germ Layers

    PubMed Central

    Isagawa, Takayuki; Nagae, Genta; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Fujita, Takanori; Sato, Noriko; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Kume, Shoen; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Embryogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple levels of epigenetic regulation such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. DNA methylation patterns are erased in primordial germ cells and in the interval immediately following fertilization. Subsequent developmental reprogramming occurs by de novo methylation and demethylation. Variance in DNA methylation patterns between different cell types is not well understood. Here, using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and tiling array technology, we have comprehensively analyzed DNA methylation patterns at proximal promoter regions in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, ES cell-derived early germ layers (ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm) and four adult tissues (brain, liver, skeletal muscle and sperm). Most of the methylated regions are methylated across all three germ layers and in the three adult somatic tissues. This commonly methylated gene set is enriched in germ cell-associated genes that are generally transcriptionally inactive in somatic cells. We also compared DNA methylation patterns by global mapping of histone H3 lysine 4/27 trimethylation, and found that gain of DNA methylation correlates with loss of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation. Our combined findings indicate that differentiation of ES cells into the three germ layers is accompanied by an increased number of commonly methylated DNA regions and that these tissue-specific alterations in methylation occur for only a small number of genes. DNA methylation at the proximal promoter regions of commonly methylated genes thus appears to be an irreversible mark which functions to fix somatic lineage by repressing the transcription of germ cell-specific genes. PMID:22016810

  4. Induction of pluripotency in human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in feeder layer-free condition.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Nasibeh; Rasedee, Abdullah; Shamsabadi, Fatemeh Tash; Moeini, Hassan; Mehrboud, Parvaneh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Boroojerdi, Mohadeseh Hashem; Vellasamy, Shalini

    2015-12-01

    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) has been produced by the reprogramming of several types of somatic cells through the expression of different sets of transcription factors. This study consists of a technique to obtain iPSCs from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) in a feeder layer-free process using a mini-circle vector containing defined reprogramming genes, Lin28, Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. The human MSCs transfected with the minicircle vector were cultured in iPSCs medium. Human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies with tightly packed domelike structures appeared 7-10 days after the second transfection. In the earliest stages, the colonies were green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive, while upon continuous culture and passage, genuine hiPSC clones expressing GFP were observed. The induced cells, based on the ectopic expression of the pluripotent markers, exhibited characteristics similar to the embryonic stem cells. These iPSCs demonstrated in vitro capabilities for differentiation into the three main embryonic germ layers by embryoid bodies formation. There was no evidence of transgenes integration into the genome of the iPSCs in this study. In conclusion, this method offers a means of producing iPSCs without viral delivery that could possibly overcome ethical concerns and immune rejection in the use of stem cells in medical applications. PMID:26471847

  5. Induction of pluripotency in human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in feeder layer-free condition.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Nasibeh; Rasedee, Abdullah; Shamsabadi, Fatemeh Tash; Moeini, Hassan; Mehrboud, Parvaneh; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Boroojerdi, Mohadeseh Hashem; Vellasamy, Shalini

    2015-12-01

    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) has been produced by the reprogramming of several types of somatic cells through the expression of different sets of transcription factors. This study consists of a technique to obtain iPSCs from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) in a feeder layer-free process using a mini-circle vector containing defined reprogramming genes, Lin28, Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2. The human MSCs transfected with the minicircle vector were cultured in iPSCs medium. Human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies with tightly packed domelike structures appeared 7-10 days after the second transfection. In the earliest stages, the colonies were green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive, while upon continuous culture and passage, genuine hiPSC clones expressing GFP were observed. The induced cells, based on the ectopic expression of the pluripotent markers, exhibited characteristics similar to the embryonic stem cells. These iPSCs demonstrated in vitro capabilities for differentiation into the three main embryonic germ layers by embryoid bodies formation. There was no evidence of transgenes integration into the genome of the iPSCs in this study. In conclusion, this method offers a means of producing iPSCs without viral delivery that could possibly overcome ethical concerns and immune rejection in the use of stem cells in medical applications.

  6. The Enhancer of Split Complex and Adjacent Genes in the 96f Region of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Required for Segregation of Neural and Epidermal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schrons, H.; Knust, E.; Campos-Ortega, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] of Drosophila melanogaster is located in the 96F region of the third chromosome and comprises at least seven structurally related genes, HLH-mδ, HLH-mγ, HLH-mβ, HLH-m3, HLH-m5, HLH-m7 and E(spl). The functions of these genes are required during early neurogenesis to give neuroectodermal cells access to the epidermal pathway of development. Another gene in the 96F region, namely groucho, is also required for this process. However, groucho is not structurally related to, and appears to act independently of, the genes of the E(spl)-C; the possibility is discussed that groucho acts upstream to the E(spl)-C genes. Indirect evidence suggests that a neighboring transcription unit (m4) may also take part in the process. Of all these genes, only gro is essential; m4 is a dispensable gene, the deletion of which does not produce detectable morphogenetic abnormalities, and the genes of the E(spl)-C are to some extent redundant and can partially substitute for each other. This redundancy is probably due to the fact that the seven genes of the E(spl)-C encode highly conserved putative DNA-binding proteins of the bHLH family. The genes of the complex are interspersed among other genes which appear to be unrelated to the neuroepidermal lineage dichotomy. PMID:1427039

  7. Atomic layer deposited gallium oxide buffer layer enables 1.2 V open-circuit voltage in cuprous oxide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Seog; Chua, Danny; Brandt, Riley E; Siah, Sin Cheng; Li, Jian V; Mailoa, Jonathan P; Lee, Sang Woon; Gordon, Roy G; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2014-07-16

    The power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on copper (I) oxide (Cu2 O) is enhanced by atomic layer deposition of a thin gallium oxide (Ga2 O3 ) layer. By improving band-alignment and passivating interface defects, the device exhibits an open-circuit voltage of 1.20 V and an efficiency of 3.97%, showing potential of over 7% efficiency.

  8. Roles of SiNx layers in light trapping and carrier collection of nanostructured crystalline Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yunae; Kim, Eunah; Gwon, Minji; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    We investigated optical properties and photovoltaic (PV) performance of nanostructured Si solar cells with and without SiNx dielectric layers. The SiNx layer contributed to the enhancement of internal quantum efficiency of the nanostructured cells at both short and long wavelengths. In contrast, the surface passivation of SiNx layers on flat cells helped the carrier collection mainly at short wavelength. The surface nanopatterned array enhanced the optical absorption and also concentrated incoming light near the surface in broad wavelength range, revealed by experimental data and optical simulation results. As a result, the nanostructured cells had high density of photo-generated carriers near the surface. This could lead to significant recombination loss of the cells without SiNx layers. Our work suggested that the SiNx layer played a crucial role in the improved carrier collection of the nanostructured Si PV devices.

  9. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  10. TiO2 Sub-microsphere Film as Scaffold Layer for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yong; Chen, Shuanghong; Zhang, Changneng; Dai, Songyuan

    2016-03-01

    TiO2 sub-microspheres composed of anatase granular-like nanocrystallines with an average diameter ∼250 nm are synthesized using sol-gel method and employed as the scaffold layer for efficient mesocopic perovskite solar cells. Compared with mesoporous TiO2 films composed of ∼18 nm nanoparticles, the sub-microsphere films show superior light-trapping characteristics and significantly improve the light-harvesting capability of the solar cells. In addition, the charge-transport performance is also dramatically improved according to the transient photocurrent decay despite there being no significant difference in the perovskite layer surface morphology. As a result, an average power conversion efficiency of 15% with a highly uniform distribution is achieved for the solar cells with TiO2 sub-microsphere films, 12% higher than those with TiO2 nanoparticle films. The combination of light-harvesting capability and fast charge transfer make the TiO2 sub-microsphere film a good candidate as the scaffold layer for efficient perovskite solar cells. PMID:26953635

  11. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  12. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  13. Optimization of multi-layer front-contact grid patterns for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flat, A.; Milnes, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    In a front-contact grid pattern for a solar cell there is a trade-off necessary between shadowing loss and excessive power loss due to voltage drop in the metalization itself. If the metalization is too little there may be excessive contact resistance to the underlying semiconductor and insufficient coverage to control losses in the thin front-surface layer of the solar cell. Optimization of grid pattern area and geometry is considered analytically to minimize total losses. Worthwhile performance advantages are shown to be possible, particularly in concentrator systems, if multi-layer grid patterns are used. The current carrying fingers should be approximately square in metal cross section and the main current feedout bars should not only be wider but also thicker than the primary collecting fingers. This is termed multi-level metalization. Effective use of multi-level grid metalization allows much greater concentration-to-loss ratio for a cell of large area and permits good performance from cells of high front-layer sheet resistance.

  14. TiO2 Sub-microsphere Film as Scaffold Layer for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Yong; Chen, Shuanghong; Zhang, Changneng; Dai, Songyuan

    2016-03-01

    TiO2 sub-microspheres composed of anatase granular-like nanocrystallines with an average diameter ∼250 nm are synthesized using sol-gel method and employed as the scaffold layer for efficient mesocopic perovskite solar cells. Compared with mesoporous TiO2 films composed of ∼18 nm nanoparticles, the sub-microsphere films show superior light-trapping characteristics and significantly improve the light-harvesting capability of the solar cells. In addition, the charge-transport performance is also dramatically improved according to the transient photocurrent decay despite there being no significant difference in the perovskite layer surface morphology. As a result, an average power conversion efficiency of 15% with a highly uniform distribution is achieved for the solar cells with TiO2 sub-microsphere films, 12% higher than those with TiO2 nanoparticle films. The combination of light-harvesting capability and fast charge transfer make the TiO2 sub-microsphere film a good candidate as the scaffold layer for efficient perovskite solar cells.

  15. Self-assembly Columnar Structure in Active Layer of Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Cheng; Segui, Jennifer; Yu, Yingjie; Li, Hongfei; Akgun, Bulent; Satijia, Sushil. K.; Gersappe, Dilip; Nam, Chang-Yong; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their flexibility and relatively low cost. However, due to the disordered inner structure in active layer, the power conversion efficiency of BHJ solar cell is relatively low. Our research provides the method to produce ordered self-assembly columnar structure within active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell by introducing polystyrene (PS) into the active layer. The blend thin film of polystyrene, poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) at different ratio are spin coated on substrate and annealed in vacuum oven for certain time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show uniform phase segregation on the surface of polymer blend thin film and highly ordered columnar structure is then proven by etching the film with ion sputtering. TEM cross-section technology is also used to investigate the column structure. Neutron reflectometry was taken to establish the confinement of PCBM at the interface of PS and P3HT. The different morphological structures formed via phase segregation will be correlated with the performance of the PEV cells to be fabricated at the BNL-CFN.

  16. Effect of the glycocalyx layer on transmission of interstitial flow shear stress to embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a simple theoretical model is developed to describe the transmission of force from interstitial fluid flow to the surface of a cell covered by a proteoglycan / glycoprotein layer (glycocalyx) and embedded in an extracellular matrix. Brinkman equations are used to describe flow through the extracellular matrix and glycocalyx layers and the solid mechanical stress developed in the glycocalyx by the fluid flow loading is determined. Using reasonable values for the Darcy permeability of extracellular matrix and glycocalyx layers and interstitial flow velocity, we are able to estimate the fluid and solid shear stresses imposed on the surface of embedded vascular, cartilage and tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. The principal finding is that the surface solid stress is typically one to two orders of magnitude larger than the surface fluid stress. This indicates that interstitial flow shear stress can be sensed by the cell surface glycocalyx, supporting numerous recent observations that interstitial flow can induce mechanotransduction in embedded cells. This study may contribute to understanding of interstitial flow-related mechanobiology in embryogenesis, tumorigenesis, tissue physiology and diseases and has implications in tissue engineering.

  17. Single Unit Cell Bismuth Tungstate Layers Realizing Robust Solar CO2 Reduction to Methanol.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Lei, Fengcai; Gao, Shan; Sun, Yongfu; Jiao, Xingchen; Wu, Ju; Qamar, Shaista; Xie, Yi

    2015-11-16

    Solar CO2 reduction into hydrocarbons helps to solve the global warming and energy crisis. However, conventional semiconductors usually suffer from low photoactivity and poor photostability. Here, atomically-thin oxide-based semiconductors are proposed as excellent platforms to overcome this drawback. As a prototype, single-unit-cell Bi2WO6 layers are first synthesized by virtue of a lamellar Bi-oleate intermediate. The single-unit-cell thickness allows 3-times larger CO2 adsorption capacity and higher photoabsorption than bulk Bi2WO6. Also, the increased conductivity, verified by density functional theory calculations and temperature-dependent resistivities, favors fast carrier transport. The carrier lifetime increased from 14.7 to 83.2 ns, revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, which accounts for the improved electron-hole separation efficacy. As a result, the single-unit-cell Bi2WO6 layers achieve a methanol formation rate of 75 μmol g(-1) h(-1), 125-times higher than that of bulk Bi2WO6. The catalytic activity of the single-unit-cell layers proceeds without deactivation even after 2 days. This work will shed light on designing efficient and robust photoreduction CO2 catalysts.

  18. CIGS absorber layer with double grading Ga profile for highly efficient solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, M.; Moradi, M.; Zahedifar, M.

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that the band gap grading in CIGS solar cells is crucial for achieving highly efficient solar cells. We stimulate a CIGS solar cell and investigate the effects of the band gap grading on performance of the CIGS solar cell, where Ga/(Ga + In) ratio (GGI) at back (Cb) and front (Cf) of the absorber layer are considered constant. Our simulations show that by increasing the GGI at middle of CIGS absorber layer (Cm), the JSC decreases and VOC increases independent of the distance of the Cm from the back contact (Xm). For Cm lower than Cf, JSC increases and VOC decreases when the Xm shifts to the front of the CIGS layer. The behavior of JSC and VOC became reverse for the case of Cm greater than Cf. Almost in all of the structures, efficiency and FF have same behaviors. Our simulations show that the highest efficiency is obtained at Cm = 0.8 and Xm = 200 nm.

  19. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Feikert, John H.; Kachmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  20. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Feikert, John H.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  1. Method for forming a cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1994-08-09

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack. 2 figs.

  2. Effects of Erythrocyte Deformability and Aggregation on the Cell Free Layer and Apparent Viscosity of Microscopic Blood Flows

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Johnson, Paul C.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated erythrocyte (i.e., red blood cell) suspensions flowing in microchannels have been simulated with an immersed-boundary lattice Boltzmann algorithm, to examine the cell layer development process and the effects of cell deformability and aggregation on hemodynamic and hemorheological behaviors. The cells are modeled as two-dimensional deformable biconcave capsules and experimentally measured cell properties have been utilized. The aggregation among cells is modeled by a Morse potential. The flow development process demonstrates how red blood cells migrate away from the boundary toward the channel center, while the suspending plasma fluid is displaced to the cell free layer regions left by the migrating cells. Several important characteristics of microscopic blood flows observed experimentally have been well reproduced in our model, including the cell free layer, blunt velocity profile, changes in apparent viscosity, and the Fahraeus effect. We found that the cell free layer thickness increases with both cell deformability and aggregation strength. Due to the opposing effects of the cell free layer lubrication and the high viscosity of cell-concentrated core, the influence of aggregation is complex but. The lubrication effect appears to dominate, causing the relative apparent viscosity to decrease with aggregation. It appears therefore that the immersed-boundary lattice Boltzmann numerical model may be useful in providing valuable information on microscopic blood flows in various microcirculation situations. PMID:19323969

  3. Toward a complete in silico, multi-layered embryonic stem cell regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huilei; Schaniel, Christoph; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Ma’ayan, Avi

    2010-01-01

    Recent efforts in systematically profiling embryonic stem (ES) cells have yielded a wealth of high-throughput data. Complementarily, emerging databases and computational tools facilitate ES cell studies and further pave the way toward the in silico reconstruction of regulatory networks encompassing multiple molecular layers. Here, we briefly survey databases, algorithms, and software tools used to organize and analyze high-throughput experimental data collected to study mammalian cellular systems with a focus on ES cells. The vision of using heterogeneous data to reconstruct a complete multilayered ES cell regulatory network is discussed. This review also provides an accompanying manually extracted dataset of different types of regulatory interactions from low-throughput experimental ES cell studies available at http://amp.pharm.mssm.edu/iscmid/literature. PMID:20890967

  4. Transparent polymer solar cells employing a layered light-trapping architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancur, Rafael; Romero-Gomez, Pablo; Martinez-Otero, Alberto; Elias, Xavier; Maymó, Marc; Martorell, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    Organic solar cells have unique properties that make them very attractive as a renewable energy source. Of particular interest are semi-transparent cells, which have the potential to be integrated into building façades yet not completely block light. However, making organic cells transparent limits the metal electrode thickness to a few nanometres, drastically reducing its reflectivity and the device photon-harvesting capacity. Here, we propose and implement an ad hoc path for light-harvesting recovery to bring the photon-to-charge conversion up to almost 80% that of its opaque counterpart. We report semi-transparent PTB7:PC71BM cells that exhibit 30% visible light transmission and 5.6% power conversion efficiency. Non-periodic photonic crystals are used to trap near-infrared and near-ultraviolet photons. By modifying the layer structure it is possible to tune the device colour without significantly altering cell performance.

  5. Performance enhancement in inverted solar cells by interfacial modification of ZnO nanoparticle buffer layer.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Swapnil B; Ambade, Rohan B; Kim, Seojin; Park, Hanok; Yoo, Dong Jin; Leel, Soo-Hyoung

    2014-11-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted increasing attention in recent years. The rapid progress and mounting interest suggest the feasibility of PSC commercialization. However, critical issues such as stability and the weak nature of their interfaces posses quite a challenge. In the context of improving stability, PSCs with inverted geometry consising of inorganic oxide layer acting as an n-buffer offer quite the panacea. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the most preferred semiconducting wide band gap oxides as an efficient cathode layer that effectively extracts and transports photoelectrons from the acceptor to the conducting indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) due to its high conductivity and transparency. However, the existence of a back charge transfer from metal oxides to electron-donating conjugated polymer and poor contact with the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) active layer results in serious interfacial recombination and leads to relatively low photovoltaic performance. One approach to improving the performance and charge selectivity of these types of inverted devices consists of modifying the interface between the inorganic metal oxide (e.g., ZnO) and organic active layer using a sub-monolayer of interfacial materials (e.g., functional dyes). In this work, we demonstrate that the photovoltaic parameters of inverted solar cells comprising a thin overlayer of functional dyes over ZnO nanoparticle as an n-buffer layer are highly influenced by the anchoring groups they possess. While an inverted PSC containing an n-buffer of only ZnO exhibited an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.87%, the devices with an interlayer of dyes containing functional cyano-carboxylic, cyano-cyano, and carboxylic groups exhibited PCE of 3.52%, 3.39%, and 3.21%, respectively, due to increased forward charge collection resulting from enhanced electronic coupling between the ZnO and BHJ active layers. PMID:25958563

  6. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, Charles J.; Folser, George R.; Vora, Shailesh D.; Kuo, Lewis; Richards, Von L.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO.sub.3 layer to about 1100.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell.

  7. Method of forming a plasma sprayed interconnection layer on an electrode of an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, C.J.; Folser, G.R.; Vora, S.D.; Kuo, L.; Richards, V.L.

    1995-06-20

    A dense, substantially gas-tight, electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by plasma spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} powder, preferably compensated with chromium as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and/or dopant element, preferably by plasma arc spraying; and, (C) heating the doped and compensated LaCrO{sub 3} layer to about 1100 C to 1300 C to provide a dense, substantially gas-tight, substantially hydration-free, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the unselected portion of the air electrode, and a fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to provide an electrochemical cell. 6 figs.

  8. The effect of skin-depth interfacial defect layer in perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, Bizuneh; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-08-01

    The hole transport buffer layer (HTL) known as PEDOT:PSS is found to be sensitive to polar solvents often used in the preparation of solution-processed perovskite-based solar cell. We employed {CH}3 {NH}3 {PbI}3 perovskite absorber sandwiched between two charge transport layers to analyze the effect of precursor solvent. By introducing skin-depth interfacial defect layer (IDL) on PEDOT:PSS film we studied the overall performance of the devices using one-dimensional device simulator. Both enhanced conductivity and variations in valence band offset (VBO) of IDL were considered to analyze device performance. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices was found to grow by 35 % due to increased conductivity of IDL by a factor of 1000. Furthermore, we noted a drastic reduction in PCE of the device by reducing the work function of IDL by more than 0.3eV . The thickness of interfacial defect layer was also analyzed and found to decrease the PCE of the devices by 18 % for fourfold increase in IDL thickness. The analysis was remarkably reproduced the experimentally generated device parameters and will help to understand the underlying physical process in perovskite-based solar cell.

  9. Quantitative characterization of water transport and flooding in the diffusion layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalegno, A.; Colombo, L.; Galbiati, S.; Marchesi, R.

    Optimization of water management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is a very important factor for the achievement of high performances and long lifetime. A good hydration of the electrolyte membrane is essential for high proton conductivity; on the contrary water in excess may lead to electrode flooding and severe reduction in performances. Many studies on water transport across the gas diffusion layer (GDL) have been carried out to improve these components; anyway efforts in this field are affected by lack of effective experimental methods. The present work reports an experimental investigation with the purpose to determine the global coefficient of water transport across different diffusion layers under real operating conditions. An appropriate and accurate experimental apparatus has been designed and built to test the single GDL under a wide range of operating conditions. Data analysis has allowed quantification of both the water vapor transport across different diffusion layers, and the effects of micro-porous layers; furthermore flooding onset and its consequences on the mass transport coefficient have been characterized by means of suitably defined parameters.

  10. Evaluation of HPV Infection and Smoking Status Impacts on Cell Proliferation in Epithelial Layers of Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Guillaud, Martial; Buys, Timon P. H.; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Follen, Michele; Scheurer, Michael; Storthz, Karen Adler; van Niekerk, Dirk; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesion grading is needed for effective patient management. We applied computer-assisted scanning and analytic approaches to immuno-stained CIN lesion sections to more accurately delineate disease states and decipher cell proliferation impacts from HPV and smoking within individual epithelial layers. A patient cohort undergoing cervical screening was identified (n = 196) and biopsies of varying disease grades and with intact basement membranes and epithelial layers were obtained (n = 261). Specimens were sectioned, stained (Mib1), and scanned using a high-resolution imaging system. We achieved semi-automated delineation of proliferation status and epithelial cell layers using Otsu segmentation, manual image review, Voronoi tessellation, and immuno-staining. Data were interrogated against known status for HPV infection, smoking, and disease grade. We observed increased cell proliferation and decreased epithelial thickness with increased disease grade (when analyzing the epithelium at full thickness). Analysis within individual cell layers showed a ≥50% increase in cell proliferation for CIN2 vs. CIN1 lesions in higher epithelial layers (with minimal differences seen in basal/parabasal layers). Higher rates of proliferation for HPV-positive vs. -negative cases were seen in epithelial layers beyond the basal/parabasal layers in normal and CIN1 tissues. Comparing smokers vs. non-smokers, we observed increased cell proliferation in parabasal (low and high grade lesions) and basal layers (high grade only). In sum, we report CIN grade-specific differences in cell proliferation within individual epithelial layers. We also show HPV and smoking impacts on cell layer-specific proliferation. Our findings yield insight into CIN progression biology and demonstrate that rigorous, semi-automated imaging of histopathological specimens may be applied to improve disease grading accuracy. PMID:25210770

  11. Uncovering the role of cathode buffer layer in organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Jizheng

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) as the third generation photovoltaic devices have drawn intense research, for their ability to be easily deposited by low-cost solution coating technologies. However the cathode in conventional OSCs, Ca, can be only deposited by thermal evaporation and is highly unstable in ambient. Therefore various solution processible cathode buffer layers (CBLs) are synthesized as substitute of Ca and show excellent effect in optimizing performance of OSCs. Yet, there is still no universal consensus on the mechanism that how CBL works, which is evidently a critical scientific issue that should be addressed. In this article detailed studies are targeted on the interfacial physics at the interface between active layer and cathode (with and without treatment of a polar CBL) by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage measurement, and impedance spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrate that CBL mainly takes effect in three ways: suppressing surface states at the surface of active layer, protecting the active layer from being damaged by thermally evaporated cathode, and changing the energy level alignment by forming dipole moments with active layer and/or cathode. Our findings here provide a comprehensive picture of interfacial physics in devices with and without CBL. PMID:25588623

  12. Uncovering the role of cathode buffer layer in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Jizheng

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) as the third generation photovoltaic devices have drawn intense research, for their ability to be easily deposited by low-cost solution coating technologies. However the cathode in conventional OSCs, Ca, can be only deposited by thermal evaporation and is highly unstable in ambient. Therefore various solution processible cathode buffer layers (CBLs) are synthesized as substitute of Ca and show excellent effect in optimizing performance of OSCs. Yet, there is still no universal consensus on the mechanism that how CBL works, which is evidently a critical scientific issue that should be addressed. In this article detailed studies are targeted on the interfacial physics at the interface between active layer and cathode (with and without treatment of a polar CBL) by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage measurement, and impedance spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrate that CBL mainly takes effect in three ways: suppressing surface states at the surface of active layer, protecting the active layer from being damaged by thermally evaporated cathode, and changing the energy level alignment by forming dipole moments with active layer and/or cathode. Our findings here provide a comprehensive picture of interfacial physics in devices with and without CBL. PMID:25588623

  13. Uncovering the role of cathode buffer layer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Boyuan; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Jizheng

    2015-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) as the third generation photovoltaic devices have drawn intense research, for their ability to be easily deposited by low-cost solution coating technologies. However the cathode in conventional OSCs, Ca, can be only deposited by thermal evaporation and is highly unstable in ambient. Therefore various solution processible cathode buffer layers (CBLs) are synthesized as substitute of Ca and show excellent effect in optimizing performance of OSCs. Yet, there is still no universal consensus on the mechanism that how CBL works, which is evidently a critical scientific issue that should be addressed. In this article detailed studies are targeted on the interfacial physics at the interface between active layer and cathode (with and without treatment of a polar CBL) by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage measurement, and impedance spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrate that CBL mainly takes effect in three ways: suppressing surface states at the surface of active layer, protecting the active layer from being damaged by thermally evaporated cathode, and changing the energy level alignment by forming dipole moments with active layer and/or cathode. Our findings here provide a comprehensive picture of interfacial physics in devices with and without CBL.

  14. Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Combined With a Collagenfibrin Double-layered Membrane Accelerates Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenbin; Liu, Rui; Chen, Hongli; Xu, Zhihao; Chen, Jiannan; Wang, Manman; Yuan, Zhiqing

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in combination with a collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane on wound healing in mice. A collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane was prepared, and the surface properties of the support material were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. Twenty-four mice were prepared for use as full-thickness skin wound models and randomly divided into 3 groups: group A, a control group in which the wounds were bound using a conventional method; group B, a group treated with hUCMSCs combined with a collagen membrane; and group C, a group treated with hUCMSCs combined with a collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane. The postoperative concrescence of the wounds was observed daily to evaluate the effects of the different treatments. Scanning electron microscope observation showed the collagen-fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure, and wound healing in the double-layered membrane group was better than in groups A or B. Treatment with hUCMSCs combined with a collagen-fibrin double-layered membrane accelerated wound healing.

  15. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; He, Zhiqun E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ∼5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  16. Metal-ceramic/ceramic nanostructured layered composites for solid oxide fuel cells by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Borodianska, Hanna; Sakka, Yoshio; Vasylkiv, Oleg

    2014-06-01

    In this work, bi-layered Fe-Ni-Co-YSZ/YSZ nanostructured composites for solid oxide fuel cells were obtained using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The microstructures of the anode and electrolyte were controlled by optimization of SPS consolidation parameters. The resulting bilayers have a full dense YSZ electrolyte and porous Fe-Ni-Co/YSZ anode as well as crack-free and well-bonded anode/electrolyte interface. On the other hand, SPS under non-optimized processing parameters cannot yield the desired results. The high resistance to thermal stresses of the fabricated half-cells was achieved with Fe-Ni-Co/YSZ anode. The developed anode showed higher thermal compatibility with YSZ electrolyte than usual Ni/YSZ cermet. Thus, with the successful combination of SPS parameters and anode material, we have obtained bi-layers for SOFCs with required microstructure and thermal compatibility.

  17. Depletion layer recombination effects on the radiation damage hardness of gallium arsenide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garlick, G. F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The significant effect of junction depletion layer recombination on the efficiency of windowed GaAs cells was demonstrated. The effect becomes more pronounced as radiation damage occurs. The depletion is considered for 1 MeV electron fluences up to 10 to the 16th power e/sq m. The cell modeling separates damage in emitter and base or buffer layers using different damage coefficients is reported. The lower coefficient for the emitter predicts less loss of performance at fluences greater than 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. A method for obtaining information on junction recombination effects as damage proceeds is described; this enables a more complete diagnosis of damage to be made.

  18. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; He, Zhiqun; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ˜5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  19. Clusters of synaptic inputs on dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Onur; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Scheuss, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization of synaptic inputs on the dendritic tree of cortical neurons plays a major role for dendritic integration and neural computations, yet, remarkably little is known about it. We mapped the spatial organization of glutamatergic synapses between layer 5 pyramidal cells by combining optogenetics and 2-photon calcium imaging in mouse neocortical slices. To mathematically characterize the organization of inputs we developed an approach based on combinatorial analysis of the likelihoods of specific synapse arrangements. We found that the synapses of intralaminar inputs form clusters on the basal dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells. These clusters contain 4 to 14 synapses within ≤30 µm of dendrite. According to the spatiotemporal characteristics of synaptic summation, these numbers suggest that there will be non-linear dendritic integration of synaptic inputs during synchronous activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09222.001 PMID:27431612

  20. Inverted polymer solar cells with enhanced fill factor by inserting the potassium stearate interfacial modification layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangsheng; Jiu, Tonggang; Li, Bairu; Kuang, Chaoyang; Chen, Qiushan; Ma, Sushuang; Shu, Jie; Fang, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    A thin potassium stearate (KSt) film combined with an optimized ZnO film was introduced to improve the fill factor (FF) of highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements were used to show that the introduction of KSt did not change the morphology of interlayer. On the contrary, it is beneficial for the spread of the active layer on the interlayer. The origin of enhanced FF was systematically studied by the ideal current-voltage model for a single heterojunction solar cell and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the data analysis, the reduced charge recombination loss was responsible for this improved FF. At last, when KSt was replaced by sodium stearate (NaSt), the similar experiment phenomenon was observed. This indicates that inserting a metallic stearate modified layer is a promising strategy to enhance inverted PSCs performance.

  1. Improvement in endothelial cell adhesion and retention under physiological shear stress using a laminin–apatite composite layer on titanium

    PubMed Central

    He, Fupo; Wang, Xiupeng; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-01-01

    Apatite (Ap), laminin–apatite composite (L5Ap, L10Ap, L20Ap and L40Ap) and albumin–apatite (AlbAp) composite layers were prepared on titanium (Ti) using a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution supplemented with laminin (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 μg ml−1) or albumin (800 μg ml−1). With an increase in the concentrations of laminin in the supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions, the amounts of laminin immobilized on the Ti increased. The number of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhered to the laminin–apatite composite layers were remarkably higher than those to the untreated Ti, Ap layer and AlbAp composite layer. The number of cells adhered to the L40Ap was 4.3 times the untreated Ti. Moreover, cells adhered to the laminin–apatite composite layers showed significantly higher cell retention under the physiological shear stress for 1 h and 2 h than those to the untreated Ti, Ap layer and AlbAp composite layer. The number of cells remaining on the L40Ap under the physiological shear stress for 2 h was 9.5 times that of the untreated Ti. The laminin–apatite composite layer is a promising interfacial layer for endothelialization of blood-contacting materials. PMID:23407573

  2. Photochemical bonding of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice to rat muscle layer for esophageal tissue engineering: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Barbara P.; Sato, M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Redmond, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    Bilayered tube structures consist of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice and muscle layer have been fabricated for esophageal tissue engineering. Good adhesion between layers in order to facilitate cell infiltration and neovascularization in the collagen lattice is required. Previous efforts include using other bioglues such as fibrin glue and silicone tube as the physical support. However, the former is subjected to chances of transmitting blood-born infectious disease and is time consuming while the latter requires a second surgical procedure. The current project aimed to bond the cell-seeded collagen lattice to muscle layer using photochemical bonding, which has previously been demonstrated a rapid and non-thermal procedure in bonding collagenous tissues. Rat esophageal epithelial cells were seeded on collagen lattice and together with the latissimus dorsi muscle layer, were exposed to a photosensitizer rose Bengal at the bonding surface. An argon laser was used to irradiate the approximated layers. Bonding strength was measured during the peeling test of the collagen layer from the muscle layer. Post-bonding cell viability was assessed using a modified NADH-diaphorase microassay. A pilot in vivo study was conducted by directly bonding the cell-seeded collagen layer onto the muscle flap in rats and the structures were characterized histologically. Photochemical bonding was found to significantly increase the adherence at the bonding interface without compromising the cell viability. This indicates the feasibility of using the technique to fabricate multi-layered structures in the presence of living cells. The pilot animal study demonstrated integration of the collagen lattice with the muscle layer at the bonding interface although the subsequent surgical manipulation disturbed the integration at some region. This means that an additional procedure removing the tube could be avoided if the approximation and thus the bonding are optimized. Cell infiltration

  3. Improved performance of polymer solar cells by using inorganic, organic, and doped cathode buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taohong, Wang; Changbo, Chen; Kunping, Guo; Guo, Chen; Tao, Xu; Bin, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The interface between the active layer and the electrode is one of the most critical factors that could affect the device performance of polymer solar cells. In this work, based on the typical poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) polymer solar cell, we studied the effect of the cathode buffer layer (CBL) between the top metal electrode and the active layer on the device performance. Several inorganic and organic materials commonly used as the electron injection layer in an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) were employed as the CBL in the P3HT:PCBM polymer solar cells. Our results demonstrate that the inorganic and organic materials like Cs2CO3, bathophenanthroline (Bphen), and 8-hydroxyquinolatolithium (Liq) can be used as CBL to efficiently improve the device performance of the P3HT:PCBM polymer solar cells. The P3HT:PCBM devices employed various CBLs possess power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 3.0%-3.3%, which are ca. 50% improved compared to that of the device without CBL. Furthermore, by using the doped organic materials Bphen:Cs2CO3 and Bphen:Liq as the CBL, the PCE of the P3HT:PCBM device will be further improved to 3.5%, which is ca. 70% higher than that of the device without a CBL and ca. 10% increased compared with that of the devices with a neat inorganic or organic CBL. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61204014), the “Chenguang” Project (13CG42) supported by Shanghai Municipal Education Commission and Shanghai Education Development Foundation, China, and the Shanghai University Young Teacher Training Program of Shanghai Municipality, China.

  4. ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2009-11-03

    The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

  5. Identification of Human Fibroblast Cell Lines as a Feeder Layer for Human Corneal Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Rong; Bian, Fang; Lin, Jing; Su, Zhitao; Qu, Yangluowa; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2012-01-01

    There is a great interest in using epithelium generated in vitro for tissue bioengineering. Mouse 3T3 fibroblasts have been used as a feeder layer to cultivate human epithelia including corneal epithelial cells for more than 3 decades. To avoid the use of xeno-components, we evaluated human fibroblasts as an alternative feeder supporting human corneal epithelial regeneration. Five human fibroblast cell lines were used for evaluation with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts as a control. Human epithelial cells isolated from fresh corneal limbal tissue were seeded on these feeders. Colony forming efficiency (CFE) and cell growth capacity were evaluated on days 5–14. The phenotype of the regenerated epithelia was evaluated by morphology and immunostaining with epithelial markers. cDNA microarray was used to analyze the gene expression profile of the supportive human fibroblasts. Among 5 strains of human fibroblasts evaluated, two newborn foreskin fibroblast cell lines, Hs68 and CCD1112Sk, were identified to strongly support human corneal epithelial growth. Tested for 10 passages, these fibroblasts continually showed a comparative efficiency to the 3T3 feeder layer for CFE and growth capacity of human corneal epithelial cells. Limbal epithelial cells seeded at 1×104 in a 35-mm dish (9.6 cm2) grew to confluence (about 1.87–2.41×106 cells) in 12–14 days, representing 187–241 fold expansion with over 7–8 doublings on these human feeders. The regenerated epithelia expressed K3, K12, connexin 43, p63, EGFR and integrin β1, resembling the phenotype of human corneal epithelium. DNA microarray revealed 3 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated genes, which may be involved in the functions of human fibroblast feeders. These findings demonstrate that commercial human fibroblast cell lines support human corneal epithelial regeneration, and have potential use in tissue bioengineering for corneal reconstruction. PMID:22723892

  6. High Efficiency Organic/Silicon-Nanowire Hybrid Solar Cells: Significance of Strong Inversion Layer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuegong; Shen, Xinlei; Mu, Xinhui; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Baoquan; Zeng, Lingsheng; Yang, Lifei; Wu, Yichao; He, Hang; Yang, Deren

    2015-01-01

    Organic/silicon nanowires (SiNWs) hybrid solar cells have recently been recognized as one of potentially low-cost candidates for photovoltaic application. Here, we have controllably prepared a series of uniform silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with various diameters on silicon substrate by metal-assisted chemical etching followed by thermal oxidization, and then fabricated the organic/SiNWs hybrid solar cells with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). It is found that the reflective index of SiNWs layer for sunlight depends on the filling ratio of SiNWs. Compared to the SiNWs with the lowest reflectivity (LR-SiNWs), the solar cell based on the SiNWs with low filling ratio (LF-SiNWs) has a higher open-circuit voltage and fill factor. The capacitance-voltage measurements have clarified that the built-in potential barrier at the LF-SiNWs/PEDOT:PSS interface is much larger than that at the LR-SiNWs/PEDOT one, which yields a strong inversion layer generating near the silicon surface. The formation of inversion layer can effectively suppress the carrier recombination, reducing the leakage current of solar cell, and meanwhile transfer the LF-SiNWs/PEDOT:PSS device into a p-n junction. As a result, a highest efficiency of 13.11% is achieved for the LF-SiNWs/PEDOT:PSS solar cell. These results pave a way to the fabrication of high efficiency organic/SiNWs hybrid solar cells. PMID:26610848

  7. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere. PMID:27483916

  8. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  9. Optical spacing effect in organic photovoltaic cells incorporating a dilute acceptor layer

    SciTech Connect

    Menke, S. Matthew; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Holmes, Russell J.

    2014-06-16

    The addition of spacing layers in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can enhance light absorption by optimizing the spatial distribution of the incident optical field in the multilayer structure. We explore the optical spacing effect in OPVs achieved using a diluted electron acceptor layer of C{sub 60}. While optical spacing is often realized by optimizing buffer layer thickness, we find that optical spacing via dilution leads to cells with similar or enhanced photocurrent. This is observed despite a smaller quantity of absorbing molecules, suggesting a more efficient use of absorbed photons. In fact, dilution is found to concentrate optical absorption near the electron donor-acceptor interface, resulting in a marked increase in the exciton diffusion efficiency. Contrasting the use of changes in thickness to engineer optical absorption, the use of dilution does not significantly alter the overall thickness of the OPV. Optical spacing via dilution is shown to be a viable alternative to more traditional optical spacing techniques and may be especially useful in the continued optimization of next-generation, tandem OPVs where it is important to minimize competition for optical absorption between individual sub-cells.

  10. Optical spacing effect in organic photovoltaic cells incorporating a dilute acceptor layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, S. Matthew; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Holmes, Russell J.

    2014-06-01

    The addition of spacing layers in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) can enhance light absorption by optimizing the spatial distribution of the incident optical field in the multilayer structure. We explore the optical spacing effect in OPVs achieved using a diluted electron acceptor layer of C60. While optical spacing is often realized by optimizing buffer layer thickness, we find that optical spacing via dilution leads to cells with similar or enhanced photocurrent. This is observed despite a smaller quantity of absorbing molecules, suggesting a more efficient use of absorbed photons. In fact, dilution is found to concentrate optical absorption near the electron donor-acceptor interface, resulting in a marked increase in the exciton diffusion efficiency. Contrasting the use of changes in thickness to engineer optical absorption, the use of dilution does not significantly alter the overall thickness of the OPV. Optical spacing via dilution is shown to be a viable alternative to more traditional optical spacing techniques and may be especially useful in the continued optimization of next-generation, tandem OPVs where it is important to minimize competition for optical absorption between individual sub-cells.

  11. Optimization of CdS Buffer Layer for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donguk; Jang, Yong-Jun; Jung, Ho-Sung; Kim, Minha; Baek, Dohyun; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Youngkwan

    2016-05-01

    In present work, effects of the thickness on the structural and optical properties of chemically deposited CdS thin films were investigated. In addition, we fabricated Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells with various thicknesses of CdS buffer layer and optimized the thickness for a high efficiency. When the CdS thin films were thicker, the crystallinity improved but the transmittance decreased. The short-circuit current density (J(sc)) and the fill factor are the major efficiency limiting factors for the CIGS solar cells. As the thickness of the CdS buffer layer, the open-circuit voltage (V(oc)) and the fill factor increased, whereas the J(sc) slightly decreased. The improvement of the fill factor and thus efficiency resulted from larger shunt resistance. For the solar cells without a high resistive intrinsic ZnO layer, the highest efficiency was acquired at the thickness of 89 nm. With further increasing the thickness, the J(sc) decreased significantly, resulting in poor efficiency. PMID:27483874

  12. Conductive conjugated polyelectrolyte as hole-transporting layer for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huiqiong; Zhang, Yuan; Mai, Cheng-Kang; Collins, Samuel D; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-02-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been extensively used as the hole-transporting layer (HTL) in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, however, its anisotropic electrical conduction and intrinsic acidic nature generally limit the device performance. Here we demonstrate the application of a water/alcohol soluble CPE (CPE-K) as HTLs in BHJ solar cells, achieving a PCE up to 8.2%. The more superior and uniform vertical electrical conductivity found in CPE-K reduces the series resistance and provides efficient hole extraction. PMID:24170587

  13. Improved Power Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Organic Solar Cells by Incorporating Au Nanorods into Active Layer.

    PubMed

    He, Yeyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Li, Zhiqi; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-07-29

    This Research Article describes a cooperative plasmonic effect on improving the performance of organic solar cells. When Au nanorods(NRs) are incorporated into the active layers, the designed project shows superior enhanced light absorption behavior comparing with control devices, which leads to the realization of organic solar cell with power conversion efficiency of 6.83%, accounting for 18.9% improvement. Further investigations unravel the influence of plasmonic nanostructures on light trapping, exciton generation, dissociation, and charge recombination and transport inside the thin films devices. Moreover, the introduction of high-conductivity Au NRs improves electrical conductivity of the whole device, which contributes to the enhanced fill factor.

  14. Hierarchy carbon paper for the gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunyu; Wang, Baorong; Cheng, Xinqun

    This communication described the fabrication of a hierarchy carbon paper, and its application to the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The carbon paper was fabricated by growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibers via covalently assembling metal nanocatalysts. Surface morphology observation revealed a highly uniform distribution of hydrophobic materials within the carbon paper. The contact angle to water of this carbon paper was not only very large but also particularly even. Polarization measurements verified that the hierarchy carbon paper facilitated the self-humidifying of PEM fuel cells, which could be mainly attributed to its higher hydrophobic property as diagnosed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

  15. New Physical Deposition Approach for Low Cost Inorganic Hole Transport Layer in Normal Architecture of Durable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza

    2015-10-01

    In this work we reported sputter deposited NiOx/Ni double layer as an HTM/contact couple in normal architecture of perovskite solar cell. A perovskite solar cell that is durable for more than 60 days was achieved, with increasing efficiency from 1.3% to 7.28% within 6 days. Moreover, low temperature direct deposition of NiOx layer on perovskite layer was introduced as a potential hole transport material for an efficient cost-effective solar cell applicable for various morphologies of perovskite layers, even for perovskite layers containing pinholes, which is a notable challenge in perovskite solar cells. The angular deposition of NiOx layers by dc reactive magnetron sputtering showed uniform and crack-free coverage of the perovskite layer with no negative impact on perovskite structure that is suitable for nickel back contact layer, surface shielding against moisture, and mechanical damages. Replacing the expensive complex materials in previous perovskite solar cells with low cost available materials introduces cost-effective scalable perovskite solar cells.

  16. Fuel cell having electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Maynard K.

    1989-01-01

    A fuel cell having an electrolyte control volume includes a pair of porous opposed electrodes. A maxtrix is positioned between the pair of electrodes for containing an electrolyte. A first layer of backing paper is positioned adjacent to one of the electrodes. A portion of the paper is substantially previous to the acceptance of the electrolyte so as to absorb electrolyte when there is an excess in the matrix and to desorb electrolyte when there is a shortage in the matrix. A second layer of backing paper is positioned adjacent to the first layer of paper and is substantially impervious to the acceptance of electrolyte.

  17. The use of human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells as the feeder layer to establish human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Soong, Yung-Kwei; Huang, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Chiu-Hsiang; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Jen; Shaw, S W Steven

    2015-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells that have the potential to differentiate into the three germ layers and possibly all tissues of the human body. To fulfil the clinical potentials for cell-based therapy, banks of hESC lines that express different combinations of the major histocompatibility genes should be established, preferably without exposing such cells to animal cells and proteins. In this study, we tested human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) as feeder cells to support the growth of hESCs. Our results indicated that mitomycin-treated AFMSCs were able to support the newly established hESC lines CGLK-1 and CGLK-2. The hESC colonies cultured on AFMSCs expressed alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-4, Nanog and Sox-2, which are markers for undifferentiated hESCs. Chromosomal analyses of both hESC lines, CGLK-1 and CGLK-2, which were cultured on AFMSC feeders for 22 and 14 passages, respectively, were confirmed to be normal karyotypes (46, XX). The ability of AFMSCs as feeder cells to maintain the undifferentiated growth and pluripotency of hESCs was confirmed by in vivo formation of teratomas derived on AFMSC hESCs in severe combined immune-compromised mice. The use of AFMSCs for feeder cells to culture hESCs has several advantages, in that AFMSCs are not tumourigenic and can be expanded extensively with a short doubling time.

  18. Barium: An Efficient Cathode Layer for Bulk-heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay; Kyaw, Aung Ko Ko; Wang, Dong Hwan; Chand, Suresh; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Heeger, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    We report Barium (Ba) cathode layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells which enhanced the fill factor (FF) of p-DTS(FBTTh2)2/PC71BM BHJ solar cell up to 75.1%, one of the highest value reported for an organic solar cell. The external quantum efficiency exceeds 80%. Analysis of recombination mechanisms using the current-voltage (J–V) characteristics at various light intensities in the BHJ solar cell layer reveals that Ba prevents trap assisted Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination at the interface and with different thicknesses of the Ba, the recombination shifts towards bimolecular from monomolecular. Moreover, Ba increases shunt resistance and decreases the series resistance significantly. This results in an increase in the charge collection probability leading to high FF. This work identifies a new cathode interlayer which outclasses the all the reported interlayers in increasing FF leading to high power conversion efficiency and have significant implications in improving the performance of BHJ solar cells. PMID:23752562

  19. Device lifetime improvement of polymer-based bulk heterojunction solar cells by incorporating copper oxide layer at Al cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingdong; Xie, Fangyan; Xie, Weiguang; Zheng, Shizhao; Ke, Ning; Chen, Jian; Zhao, Ni; Xu, J. B.

    2011-05-01

    Organic solar cells are commonly susceptible to degradation in air. We present that insertion of a thin layer of thermally evaporated copper oxide (CuOx) between the organic active layer and the Al cathode can greatly extend the lifetime of P3HT:PCBM based bulk heterojunction solar cells. The performance can be further improved by applying an interfacial bilayer of CuOx/LiF. Our results suggest that the CuOx functions not only as a charge transport layer but also as a protection layer, which prevents formation of thick organic-Al interdiffusion area. This leads to a more air-resistive cathode/organic interface.

  20. Silicon quantum dot superlattice solar cell structure including silicon nanocrystals in a photogeneration layer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The solar cell structure of n-type poly-silicon/5-nm-diameter silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxycarbide matrix (30 layers)/p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon/Al electrode was fabricated on a quartz substrate. An open-circuit voltage and a fill factor of 518 mV and 0.51 in the solar cell were obtained, respectively. The absorption edge of the solar cell was 1.49 eV, which corresponds to the optical bandgap of the silicon nanocrystal materials, suggesting that it is possible to fabricate the solar cells with silicon nanocrystal materials, whose bandgaps are wider than that of crystalline silicon. PACS 85.35.Be; 84.60.Jt; 78.67.Bf PMID:24936160

  1. Hybrid pn-junction solar cells based on layers of inorganic nanocrystals and organic semiconductors: optimization of layer thickness by considering the width of the depletion region.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudip K; Guchhait, Asim; Pal, Amlan J

    2014-03-01

    We report the formation and characterization of hybrid pn-junction solar cells based on a layer of copper diffused silver indium disulfide (AgInS2@Cu) nanoparticles and another layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules. With copper diffusion in the nanocrystals, their optical absorption and hence the activity of the hybrid pn-junction solar cells was extended towards the near-IR region. To decrease the particle-to-particle separation for improved carrier transport through the inorganic layer, we replaced the long-chain ligands of copper-diffused nanocrystals in each monolayer with short-ones. Under illumination, the hybrid pn-junctions yielded a higher short-circuit current as compared to the combined contribution of the Schottky junctions based on the components. A wider depletion region at the interface between the two active layers in the pn-junction device as compared to that of the Schottky junctions has been considered to analyze the results. Capacitance-voltage characteristics under a dark condition supported such a hypothesis. We also determined the width of the depletion region in the two layers separately so that a pn-junction could be formed with a tailored thickness of the two materials. Such a "fully-depleted" device resulted in an improved photovoltaic performance, primarily due to lessening of the internal resistance of the hybrid pn-junction solar cells.

  2. Hybrid pn-junction solar cells based on layers of inorganic nanocrystals and organic semiconductors: optimization of layer thickness by considering the width of the depletion region.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudip K; Guchhait, Asim; Pal, Amlan J

    2014-03-01

    We report the formation and characterization of hybrid pn-junction solar cells based on a layer of copper diffused silver indium disulfide (AgInS2@Cu) nanoparticles and another layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules. With copper diffusion in the nanocrystals, their optical absorption and hence the activity of the hybrid pn-junction solar cells was extended towards the near-IR region. To decrease the particle-to-particle separation for improved carrier transport through the inorganic layer, we replaced the long-chain ligands of copper-diffused nanocrystals in each monolayer with short-ones. Under illumination, the hybrid pn-junctions yielded a higher short-circuit current as compared to the combined contribution of the Schottky junctions based on the components. A wider depletion region at the interface between the two active layers in the pn-junction device as compared to that of the Schottky junctions has been considered to analyze the results. Capacitance-voltage characteristics under a dark condition supported such a hypothesis. We also determined the width of the depletion region in the two layers separately so that a pn-junction could be formed with a tailored thickness of the two materials. Such a "fully-depleted" device resulted in an improved photovoltaic performance, primarily due to lessening of the internal resistance of the hybrid pn-junction solar cells. PMID:24452695

  3. Assessment of crystal quality and unit cell orientation in epitaxial Cu₂ZnSnSe₄ layers using polarized Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Krämmer, Christoph; Lang, Mario; Redinger, Alex; Sachs, Johannes; Gao, Chao; Kalt, Heinz; Siebentritt, Susanne; Hetterich, Michael

    2014-11-17

    We use polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy to assess the crystal quality of epitaxial kesterite layers. It is demonstrated for the example of epitaxial Cu₂ZnSnSe₄ layers on GaAs(001) that "standing" and "lying" kesterite unit cell orientations (c'-axis parallel / perpendicular to the growth direction) can be distinguished by the application of Raman tensor analysis. From the appearance of characteristic intensity oscillations when the sample is rotated one can distinguish polycrystalline and epitaxial layers. The method can be transferred to kesterite layers oriented in any crystal direction and can shed light on the growth of such layers in general. PMID:25402065

  4. Optimization of the Energy Level Alignment between the Photoactive Layer and the Cathode Contact Utilizing Solution-Processed Hafnium Acetylacetonate as Buffer Layer for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Li, Qiuxiang; Shi, Zhenzhen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Fuzhi; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Songyuan; Lin, Jun; Tan, Zhan'ao

    2016-01-13

    The insertion of an appropriate interfacial buffer layer between the photoactive layer and the contact electrodes makes a great impact on the performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Ideal interfacial buffer layers could minimize the interfacial traps and the interfacial barriers caused by the incompatibility between the photoactive layer and the electrodes. In this work, we utilized solution-processed hafnium(IV) acetylacetonate (Hf(acac)4) as an effective cathode buffer layer (CBL) in PSCs to optimize the energy level alignment between the photoactive layer and the cathode contact, with the short-circuit current density (Jsc), open-circuit voltage (Voc), and fill factor (FF) all simultaneously improved with Hf(acac)4 CBL, leading to enhanced power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) were performed to confirm that the interfacial dipoles were formed with the same orientation direction as the built-in potential between the photoactive layer and Hf(acac)4 CBL, benefiting the exciton separation and electron transport/extraction. In addition, the optical characteristics and surface morphology of the Hf(acac)4 CBL were also investigated.

  5. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2016-01-01

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells—including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles—face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes’ surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research. PMID:27708359

  6. Self-loading and cell culture in one layer microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Ni, Xiao-Fang; Luo, Chun-Xiong; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen; Chen, Yong

    2009-06-01

    We report on a simple method for self loading and culture of mammalian cells in microfluidic multi-chambers for high throughput screening. The device was obtained by using one layer soft lithography with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and thermal bonding on a glass slide. Self loading of cell suspension could be possible after degassing of the PDMS device for 30 min. Both cell loading efficiency and cell proliferation behaviors have been analyzed with triangle chambers of different sizes, all connected to the main flow channels with small entrances. We found that the number of cells loaded into the micro-chamber increased with the side length of the triangle, showing well size dependence and that self loading at a single cell level was possible for small chambers. For large chambers, the cell area density after loading and proliferation is however quite heterogeneous. For demonstration, HeLa cell growth behavior has been followed for 11 days until the total area of the largest chambers was fully filled.

  7. Monolithic-Structured Single-Layered Textile-Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min Ju; Cha, Seung I.; Kim, Han Seong; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Dong Y.

    2016-10-01

    Textile-structured solar cells are frequently discussed in the literature due to their prospective applications in wearable devices and in building integrated solar cells that utilize their flexibility, mechanical robustness, and aesthetic appearance, but the current approaches for textile-based solar cells—including the preparation of fibre-type solar cells woven into textiles—face several difficulties from high friction and tension during the weaving process. This study proposes a new structural concept and fabrication process for monolithic-structured textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells that are fabricated by a process similar to the cloth-making process, including the preparation of wires and yarns that are woven for use in textiles, printed, dyed, and packaged. The fabricated single-layered textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells successfully act as solar cells in our study, even under bending conditions. By controlling the inter-weft spacing and the number of Ti wires for the photoelectrode conductor, we have found that the performance of this type of dye-sensitized solar cell was notably affected by the spacing between photoelectrodes and counter-electrodes, the exposed areas of Ti wires to photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes’ surface morphology. We believe that this study provides a process and concept for improved textile-based solar cells that can form the basis for further research.

  8. Development of a silver/polymer nanocomposite interconnection layer for organic tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Naeimeh; Behjat, Abbas; Shahpari, Mahboobeh; Edalati, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Interconnecting layers (ICL) play an important role in regulating the performance of tandem devices. We report the design of a solution-processed ICL that consists of a silver/polymer nanocomposite deposited on the top of a TiO2 layer. This nanocomposite contains modified poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonic acid (PEDOT:PSS), and silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) synthesized by the chemical reduction of silver nitrate in the presence of PEDOT:PSS. Formation of Ag NPs was confirmed by monitoring the plasmon absorption peak characteristics in the UV-visible spectrum of the synthesized nanocomposite. Transmission electron microscopy analysis indicated the presence of spherical silver NPs in a polymer matrix with a mean size of around 20 nm. The sheet resistance of PEDOT:PSS was found to be 2474±35 Ω/sq. It was changed to 445±28 Ω/sq after solvent modification and decreased to 53.31±3.59 Ω/sq after synthesizing silver NPs in the polymer medium. Meanwhile, the transparency of the nanocomposite film deposited on TiO2 was 89.6%, which is considered appropriate for an interconnecting electrode. We demonstrated that by incorporating a silver/polymer nanocomposite as a hole-transporting layer in contact with TiO2 as an electron-transporting layer, the ohmic behavior of ICL is enhanced with respect to pristine PEDOT:PSS. P3HT:PCBM-based tandem solar cells based on this solution-processed intermediate electrode represent significantly increased open-circuit voltage (Voc), reaching close to the sum of the single cells. By incorporating the nanocomposite in the tandem structure, a Voc of 1.1 V was obtained. This value was almost the sum of the Voc of two single cells, which was 1.18 V.

  9. Rebound spiking in layer II medial entorhinal cortex stellate cells: Possible mechanism of grid cell function.

    PubMed

    Shay, Christopher F; Ferrante, Michele; Chapman, G William; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2016-03-01

    Rebound spiking properties of medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) stellate cells induced by inhibition may underlie their functional properties in awake behaving rats, including the temporal phase separation of distinct grid cells and differences in grid cell firing properties. We investigated rebound spiking properties using whole cell patch recording in entorhinal slices, holding cells near spiking threshold and delivering sinusoidal inputs, superimposed with realistic inhibitory synaptic inputs to test the capacity of cells to selectively respond to specific phases of inhibitory input. Stellate cells showed a specific phase range of hyperpolarizing inputs that elicited spiking, but non-stellate cells did not show phase specificity. In both cell types, the phase range of spiking output occurred between the peak and subsequent descending zero crossing of the sinusoid. The phases of inhibitory inputs that induced spikes shifted earlier as the baseline sinusoid frequency increased, while spiking output shifted to later phases. Increases in magnitude of the inhibitory inputs shifted the spiking output to earlier phases. Pharmacological blockade of h-current abolished the phase selectivity of hyperpolarizing inputs eliciting spikes. A network computational model using cells possessing similar rebound properties as found in vitro produces spatially periodic firing properties resembling grid cell firing when a simulated animal moves along a linear track. These results suggest that the ability of mEC stellate cells to fire rebound spikes in response to a specific range of phases of inhibition could support complex attractor dynamics that provide completion and separation to maintain spiking activity of specific grid cell populations. PMID:26385258

  10. Human iPS cell-derived fibroblast-like cells as feeder layers for iPS cell derivation and expansion.

    PubMed

    Du, Shou-Hui; Tay, Johan Chin-Kang; Chen, Can; Tay, Felix-Chang; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Li, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Shu

    2015-08-01

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are commonly used as feeder cells for the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). However, medical applications of cell derivatives of hiPSCs generated with a MEF feeder system run the risk of having xeno-factor contamination due to long-term cell culturing under an animal factor-containing environment. We developed a new method for the derivation of human fibroblast-like cells (FLCs) from a previously established hiPSC line in an FLC differentiation medium. The method was based on direct differentiation of hiPSCs seeded on Matrigel followed by expansion of differentiating cells on gelatin. Using inactivated FLCs as feeder layers, primary human foreskin fibroblasts were successfully reprogrammed into a state of pluripotency by Oct4, Sox2 Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) transcription factor genes, with a reprogramming efficiency under an optimized condition superior to that obtained on MEF feeder layers. Furthermore, the FLCs were more effective in supporting the growth of human pluripotent stem cells. The pluripotency and differentiation capability of the cells cultured on FLC feeder layers were well retained. Our results suggest that FLCs are a safe alternative to MEFs for hiPSC generation and expansion, especially in the clinical settings wherein hiPSC derivatives will be used for medical treatment.

  11. Efficiency Enhancement of InGaN-Based Solar Cells via Stacking Layers of Light-Harvesting Nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amri, Amal M.; Fu, Po-Han; Lai, Kun-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Li, Lain-Jong; He, Jr-Hau

    2016-01-01

    An effective light-harvesting scheme for InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells is demonstrated using stacking layers of polystyrene nanospheres. Light-harvesting efficiencies on the solar cells covered with varied stacks of nanospheres are evaluated through numerical and experimental methods. The numerical simulation reveals that nanospheres with 3 stacking layers exhibit the most improved optical absorption and haze ratio as compared to those obtained by monolayer nanospheres. The experimental demonstration, agreeing with the theoretical analyses, shows that the application of 3-layer nanospheres improves the conversion efficiency of the solar cell by ~31%. PMID:27339612

  12. Efficiency Enhancement of InGaN-Based Solar Cells via Stacking Layers of Light-Harvesting Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Al-Amri, Amal M; Fu, Po-Han; Lai, Kun-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Li, Lain-Jong; He, Jr-Hau

    2016-01-01

    An effective light-harvesting scheme for InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells is demonstrated using stacking layers of polystyrene nanospheres. Light-harvesting efficiencies on the solar cells covered with varied stacks of nanospheres are evaluated through numerical and experimental methods. The numerical simulation reveals that nanospheres with 3 stacking layers exhibit the most improved optical absorption and haze ratio as compared to those obtained by monolayer nanospheres. The experimental demonstration, agreeing with the theoretical analyses, shows that the application of 3-layer nanospheres improves the conversion efficiency of the solar cell by ~31%. PMID:27339612

  13. Efficiency Enhancement of InGaN-Based Solar Cells via Stacking Layers of Light-Harvesting Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amri, Amal M.; Fu, Po-Han; Lai, Kun-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Li, Lain-Jong; He-Hau, Jr.

    2016-06-01

    An effective light-harvesting scheme for InGaN-based multiple quantum well solar cells is demonstrated using stacking layers of polystyrene nanospheres. Light-harvesting efficiencies on the solar cells covered with varied stacks of nanospheres are evaluated through numerical and experimental methods. The numerical simulation reveals that nanospheres with 3 stacking layers exhibit the most improved optical absorption and haze ratio as compared to those obtained by monolayer nanospheres. The experimental demonstration, agreeing with the theoretical analyses, shows that the application of 3-layer nanospheres improves the conversion efficiency of the solar cell by ~31%.

  14. Relationship Between Absorber Layer Properties and Device Operation Modes For High Efficiency Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Ram; Kokenyesi, Robert; Wager, John; Keszler, Douglas; CenterInverse Design Team

    2014-03-01

    A thin film solar cell (TFSC) can be differentiated into two distinct operation modes based on the transport mechanism. Current TFSCs predominantly exploit diffusion to extract photogenerated minority carriers. For efficient extraction, the absorber layer requires high carrier mobilities and long minority carrier lifetimes. Materials exhibiting a strong optical absorption onset near the fundamental band gap allows reduction of the absorber layer thickness to significantly less than 1 μm. In such a TFSC, a strong intrinsic electric field drives minority carrier extraction, resulting in drift-based transport. The basic device configuration utilized in this simulation study is a heterojunction TFSC with a p-type absorber layer. The diffusion/drift device operation modes are simulated by varying the thickness and carrier concentration of the absorber layer, and device performance between the two modes is compared. In addition, the relationship between device operation mode and transport properties, including carrier mobility and minority carrier lifetime are explored. Finally, candidate absorber materials that enable the advantages of a drift-based TFSC developed within the Center for Inverse Design are presented. School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

  15. Polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells with PEDOT:PSS bilayer structure as hole extraction layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Namhun; Kim, Jung Kyu; Park, Insun; Choi, Yeong Suk; Wang, Dong Hwan; Chae, Heeyeop; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2013-06-01

    A high current density obtained in a limited, nanometer-thick region is important for high efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs). The conversion of incident photons to charge carriers only occurs in confined active layers; therefore, charge-carrier extraction from the active layer within the device by using solar light has an important impact on the current density and the related to power conversion efficiency. In this study, we observed a surprising result, that is, extracting the charge carrier generated in the active layer of a PSC device, with a thickness-controlled PEDOT:PSS bilayer that acted as a hole extraction layer (HEL), yielded a dramatically improved power conversion efficiency in two different model systems (P3HT:PC₆₀BM and PCDTBT:PC₇₀BM). To understand this phenomenon, we conducted optical strength simulation, photocurrent-voltage measurements, incident photon to charge carrier efficiency measurements, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and AFM studies. The results revealed that approximately 60 nm was the optimum PEDOT:PSS bilayer HEL thickness in PSCs for producing the maximum power conversion efficiency.

  16. Cooperative tin oxide fullerene electron selective layers for high-performance planar perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Weijun; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Grice, Corey R.; Yang, Mengjin; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Zhu, Kai; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Fang, Guojia; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-01-01

    Both tin oxide (SnO2) and fullerenes have been reported as electron selective layers (ESLs) for producing efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells. Here, we report that SnO2 and fullerenes can work cooperatively to further boost the performance of perovskite solar cells. We find that fullerenes can be redissolved during perovskite deposition, allowing ultra-thin fullerenes to be retained at the interface and some dissolved fullerenes infiltrate into perovskite grain boundaries. The SnO2 layer blocks holes effectively; whereas, the fullerenes promote electron transfer and passivate both the SnO2/perovskite interface and perovskite grain boundaries. With careful device optimization, the best-performing planar perovskite solar cell using a fullerene passivated SnO2 ESL has achieved a steady-state efficiency of 17.75% and a power conversion efficiency of 19.12% with an open circuit voltage of 1.12 V, a short-circuit current density of 22.61 mA cm-2, and a fill factor of 75.8% when measured under reverse voltage scanning. We find that the partial dissolving of fullerenes during perovskite deposition is the key for fabricating high-performance perovskite solar cells based on metal oxide/fullerene ESLs.

  17. Design of Bicontinuous Donor/Acceptor Morphologies for Use as Organic Solar Cell Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, Dylan; Mok, Jorge; Verduzco, Rafael; Ganesan, Venkat

    Two of the primary challenges limiting the marketability of organic solar cells are i) the smaller device efficiency of the organic solar cell relative to the conventional silicon-based solar cell and ii) the long term thermal instability of the device active layer. The achievement of equilibrium donor/acceptor morphologies with the characteristics believed to yield high device performance characteristics could address each of these two challenges. In this work, we present the results of a combined simulations and experiments-based approach to investigate if a conjugated BCP additive can be used to control the self-assembled morphologies taken on by conjugated polymer/PCBM mixtures. First, we use single chain in mean field Monte Carlo simulations to identify regions within the conjugated polymer/PCBM composition space in which addition of copolymers can lead to bicontinuous equilibrium morphologies with high interfacial areas and nanoscale dimensions. Second, we conduct experiments as directed by the simulations to achieve such morphologies in the PTB7 + PTB7- b-PNDI + PCBM model blend. We characterize the results of our experiments via a combination of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering techniques and demonstrate that the morphologies from experiments agree with those predicted in simulations. Accordingly, these results indicate that the approach utilized represents a promising approach to intelligently design the morphologies taken on by organic solar cell active layers.

  18. Layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in the medial prefrontal cortex moderate stress induced depressive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Prerana; Mousa, Awni; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent illness that can be precipitated by acute or chronic stress. Studies of patients with Wolfram syndrome and carriers have identified Wfs1 mutations as causative for MDD. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is known to be involved in depression and behavioral resilience, although the cell types and circuits in the mPFC that moderate depressive behaviors in response to stress have not been determined. Here, we report that deletion of Wfs1 from layer 2/3 pyramidal cells impairs the ability of the mPFC to suppress stress-induced depressive behaviors, and results in hyperactivation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and altered accumulation of important growth and neurotrophic factors. Our data identify superficial layer 2/3 pyramidal cells as critical for moderation of stress in the context of depressive behaviors and suggest that dysfunction in these cells may contribute to the clinical relationship between stress and depression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08752.001 PMID:26371510

  19. Superhydrophobic PAN nanofibers for gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Mohammad; Hwang, Gisuk; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are considered to be the promising alternatives of natural resources for generating electricity and power. An optimal water management in the gas diffusion layers (GDL) is critical to high fuel cell performance. Its basic functions include transportation of the reactant gas from flow channels to catalyst effectively, draining out the liquid water from catalyst layer to flow channels, and conducting electrons with low humidity. In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in a solvent and electrospun at various conditions to produce PAN nanofibers prior to the stabilization at 280 °C for 1 hour in the atmospheric pressure and carbonization at 850 °C for 1 hour. The surface hydrophobicity values of the carbonized PAN nanofibers were adjusted using superhydrophobic and hydrophilic agents. The thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of the new GDLs depicted much better results compared to the conventionally used ones. The water condensation tests on the surfaces (superhydrophobic and hydrophilic) of the GDL showed a crucial step towards improved water managements in the fuel cell. This study may open up new possibilities for developing high- performing GDL materials for future PEM fuel cell applications.

  20. Transition Metal-Oxide Free Perovskite Solar Cells Enabled by a New Organic Charge Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sehoon; Han, Ggoch Ddeul; Weis, Jonathan G; Park, Hyoungwon; Hentz, Olivia; Zhao, Zhibo; Swager, Timothy M; Gradečak, Silvija

    2016-04-01

    Various electron and hole transport layers have been used to develop high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. To achieve low-temperature solution processing of perovskite solar cells, organic n-type materials are employed to replace the metal oxide electron transport layer (ETL). Although PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) has been widely used for this application, its morphological instability in films (i.e., aggregation) is detrimental. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative (isobenzofulvene-C60-epoxide, IBF-Ep) that serves as an electron transporting material for methylammonium mixed lead halide-based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)) solar cells, both in the normal and inverted device configurations. We demonstrate that IBF-Ep has superior morphological stability compared to the conventional acceptor, PCBM. IBF-Ep provides higher photovoltaic device performance as compared to PCBM (6.9% vs 2.5% in the normal and 9.0% vs 5.3% in the inverted device configuration). Moreover, IBF-Ep devices show superior tolerance to high humidity (90%) in air. By reaching power conversion efficiencies up to 9.0% for the inverted devices with IBF-Ep as the ETL, we demonstrate the potential of this new material as an alternative to metal oxides for perovskite solar cells processed in air.

  1. Identification of a mannoprotein present in the inner layer of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Moukadiri, I; Armero, J; Abad, A; Sentandreu, R; Zueco, J

    1997-01-01

    Cell wall extracts from the double-mutant mnn1 mnn9 strain were used as the immunogen to obtain a monoclonal antibody (MAb), SAC A6, that recognizes a specific mannoprotein--which we have named Icwp--in the walls of cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Icwp runs as a polydisperse band of over 180 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of Zymolyase extracts of cell walls, although an analysis of the secretory pattern of the mannoprotein shows that at the level of secretory vesicles, it behaves like a discrete band of 140 kDa. Immunofluorescence analysis with the MAb showed that Icwp lies at the inner layer of the cell wall, being accessible to the antibody only after the outer layer of mannoproteins is disturbed by treatment with tunicamycin. The screening of a lambda gt11 expression library enabled us to identify the open reading frame (ORF) coding for Icwp. ICWP (EMBL accession number YLR391w, frame +3) codes for 238 amino acids, of which over 40% are serine or threonine, and contains a putative N-glycosylation site and a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment signal. Both disruption and overexpression of the ORF caused increased sensitivities to calcofluor white and Congo red, while the disruption caused an increased sensitivity to Zymolyase digestion, suggesting for Icwp a structural role in association with glucan. PMID:9079899

  2. Stochastic microstructural modeling of fuel cell gas diffusion layers and numerical determination of transport properties in different liquid water saturation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayarani-Yoosefabadi, Z.; Harvey, D.; Bellerive, J.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-01-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are commonly made hydrophobic to enhance water management by avoiding liquid water blockage of the pores and facilitating reactant gas transport to the adjacent catalyst layer. In this work, a stochastic microstructural modeling approach is developed to simulate the transport properties of a commercial carbon paper based GDL under a range of PTFE loadings and liquid water saturation levels. The proposed novel stochastic method mimics the GDL manufacturing process steps and resolves all relevant phases including fiber, binder, PTFE, liquid water, and gas. After thorough validation of the general microstructure with literature and in-house data, a comprehensive set of anisotropic transport properties is simulated for the reconstructed GDL in different PTFE loadings and liquid water saturation levels and validated through a comparison with in-house ex situ experimental data and empirical formulations. In general, the results show good agreement between simulated and measured data. Decreasing trends in porosity, gas diffusivity, and permeability is obtained by increasing the PTFE loading and liquid water content, while the thermal conductivity is found to increase with liquid water saturation. Using the validated model, new correlations for saturation dependent GDL properties are proposed.

  3. Studies on the Properties of Organic Photovoltaic Cells Using TiOx and DMDCNQI as Double Buffer Layers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyu Min; Han, Seong Hun; Oh, Se Young

    2015-02-01

    Various types of n-type buffer layers have been used in organic electronic devices. These buffer layers turned out to expedite carrier injection and reduce series resistance, leading to good performance of organic electronic devices. In our current work, we have fabricated organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells consisting of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/TiOx/DMDCNQI/AI which were fabricated in the presence of air. To incorporate the individual advantages of each n-type buffer layer, a DMDCNQI and TiOx layers were inserted to act as n-type double buffer layers. This leads to an increase of short-circuit current (JSC) and fill factor (FF) with good stability, in comparison to P3HT:PCBM based conventional cells. The results imply that the structures of double buffer layers can provide possible alternative to achieving high performance and air durability.

  4. Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in corneal tissue layers and cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Valtink, Monika; Takayoshi, Sumioka; Okada, Yuka; Miyajima, Masayasu; Saika, Shizuya; Reinach, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    We here provide a brief summary of the characteristics of transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) identified in corneal tissue layers and cells. In general, TRPs are nonselective cation channels which are Ca(2+) permeable. Most TRPs serve as thermosensitive molecular sensors (thermo-TRPs). Based on their functional importance, the possibilities are described for drug-targeting TRP activity in a clinical setting. TRPs are expressed in various tissues of the eye including both human corneal epithelial and endothelial layers as well as stromal fibroblasts and stromal nerve fibers. TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) heat receptor, also known as capsaicin receptor, along with TRP melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) cold receptor, which is also known as menthol receptor, are prototypes of the thermo-TRP family. The TRPV1 functional channel is the most investigated TRP channel in these tissues, owing to its contribution to maintaining tissue homeostasis as well as eliciting wound healing responses to injury. Other thermo-TRP family members identified in these tissues are TRPV2, 3 and 4. Finally, there is the TRP ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) cold receptor. All of these thermo-TRPs can be activated within specific temperature ranges and transduce such inputs into chemical and electrical signals. Although several recent studies have begun to unravel complex roles for thermo-TRPs such as TRPV1 in corneal layers and resident cells, additional studies are needed to further elucidate their roles in health and disease.

  5. The influence of magnesium oxide interfacial layer on photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asemi, M.; Ghanaatshoar, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, to enhance the power conversion efficiency of the DSSCs, we introduce MgO insulating layers at the interface between TiO2 and electrolyte to decrease charge recombination rate by suppressing the electron transfer from TiO2 to the electrolyte. The thickness of the MgO layer plays a vital role in the kinetics of dye-sensitized solar cells and affects their overall efficiency. The cell with optimized thickness of MgO layer exhibits the highest conversion efficiency ( η = 5.12 %) with a high short-circuit current density (18.15 mA/cm2) and open-circuit voltage (0.571 V). Open-circuit voltage decay measurement results verify the improvement of the electrons lifetime in the DSSCs fabricated with surface-modified photoanodes due to the retarding the charge recombination. In order to explore the reasons for the J SC improvement, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency measurement was taken. Our results show that the enhancement in the photoinjected electron lifetime can contribute to an increase in the electron collection efficiency, leading to the improved J SC value. Furthermore, the enhancement in the photoinjected electron recombination rate is also demonstrated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  6. Co-solvent enhanced zinc oxysulfide buffer layers in Kesterite copper zinc tin selenide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Steirer, K Xerxes; Garris, Rebekah L; Li, Jian V; Dzara, Michael J; Ndione, Paul F; Ramanathan, Kannan; Repins, Ingrid; Teeter, Glenn; Perkins, Craig L

    2015-06-21

    A co-solvent, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), is added to the aqueous chemical "bath" deposition (CBD) process used to grow ZnOS buffer layers for thin film Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) solar cells. Device performance improves markedly as fill factors increase from 0.17 to 0.51 upon the co-solvent addition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses are presented for quasi-in situ CZTSe/CBD-ZnOS interfaces prepared under an inert atmosphere and yield valence band offsets equal to -1.0 eV for both ZnOS preparations. When combined with optical band gap data, conduction band offsets exceed 1 eV for the water and the water/DMSO solutions. XPS measurements show increased downward band bending in the CZTSe absorber layer when the ZnOS buffer layer is deposited from water only. Admittance spectroscopy data shows that the ZnOS deposited from water increases the built-in potential (Vbi) yet these solar cells perform poorly compared to those made with DMSO added. The band energy offsets imply an alternate form of transport through this junction. Possible mechanisms are discussed, which circumvent the otherwise large conduction band spike between CZTSe and ZnOS, and improve functionality with the low-band gap absorber, CZTSe (Eg = 0.96 eV). PMID:26000570

  7. Co-solvent enhanced zinc oxysulfide buffer layers in Kesterite copper zinc tin selenide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Steirer, K Xerxes; Garris, Rebekah L; Li, Jian V; Dzara, Michael J; Ndione, Paul F; Ramanathan, Kannan; Repins, Ingrid; Teeter, Glenn; Perkins, Craig L

    2015-06-21

    A co-solvent, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), is added to the aqueous chemical "bath" deposition (CBD) process used to grow ZnOS buffer layers for thin film Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) solar cells. Device performance improves markedly as fill factors increase from 0.17 to 0.51 upon the co-solvent addition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses are presented for quasi-in situ CZTSe/CBD-ZnOS interfaces prepared under an inert atmosphere and yield valence band offsets equal to -1.0 eV for both ZnOS preparations. When combined with optical band gap data, conduction band offsets exceed 1 eV for the water and the water/DMSO solutions. XPS measurements show increased downward band bending in the CZTSe absorber layer when the ZnOS buffer layer is deposited from water only. Admittance spectroscopy data shows that the ZnOS deposited from water increases the built-in potential (Vbi) yet these solar cells perform poorly compared to those made with DMSO added. The band energy offsets imply an alternate form of transport through this junction. Possible mechanisms are discussed, which circumvent the otherwise large conduction band spike between CZTSe and ZnOS, and improve functionality with the low-band gap absorber, CZTSe (Eg = 0.96 eV).

  8. Optimization of non-periodic plasmonic light-trapping layers for thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Pala, Ragip A; Liu, John S Q; Barnard, Edward S; Askarov, Daulet; Garnett, Erik C; Fan, Shanhui; Brongersma, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Non-periodic arrangements of nanoscale light scatterers allow for the realization of extremely effective broadband light-trapping layers for solar cells. However, their optimization is challenging given the massive number of degrees of freedom. Brute-force, full-field electromagnetic simulations are computationally too time intensive to identify high-performance solutions in a vast design space. Here we illustrate how a semi-analytical model can be used to quickly identify promising non-periodic spatial arrangements of nanoscale scatterers. This model only requires basic knowledge of the scattering behaviour of a chosen nanostructure and the waveguiding properties of the semiconductor layer in a cell. Due to its simplicity, it provides new intuition into the ideal amount of disorder in high-performance light-trapping layers. Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that arrays of nanometallic stripes featuring a limited amount of disorder, for example, following a quasi-periodic or Fibonacci sequence, can substantially enhance solar absorption over perfectly periodic and random arrays. PMID:23817445

  9. High-rate/high-temperature capability of a single-layer zicar-separator nickel-hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1995-01-01

    A 50 Ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen cell with a single-layer Zircar separator stack design was fully charged and then discharged at a 2C current rate to an end voltage of 1 volt. This extreme test resulted in high temperatures which were recorded at three locations on the cell, i.e., the cell wall, the boss (barrel of the compression seal), and a terminal. The results provide new information about the high-temperature and high-discharge-rate capabilities of nickel-hydrogen cells. This information also adds to the growing data base for single-layer zirconium-oxide-cloth (Zircar) separator cell designs.

  10. Towards printed perovskite solar cells with cuprous oxide hole transporting layers: a theoretical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xia, Zhonggao; Liang, Jun; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Yiming; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhou, Hang

    2015-05-01

    Solution-processed p-type metal oxide materials have shown great promise in improving the stability of perovskite-based solar cells and offering the feasibility for a low cost printing fabrication process. Herein, we performed a device modeling study on planar perovskite solar cells with cuprous oxide (Cu2O) hole transporting layers (HTLs) by using a solar cell simulation program, wxAMPS. The performance of a Cu2O/perovskite solar cell was correlated to the material properties of the Cu2O HTL, such as thickness, carrier mobility, mid-gap defect, and doping concentrations. The effect of interfacial defect densities on the solar cell performance was also investigated. Our simulation indicates that, with an optimized Cu2O HTL, high performance perovskite solar cells with efficiencies above 13% could be achieved, which shows the potential of using Cu2O as an alternative HTL over other inorganic materials, such as NiOx and MoOx. This study provides theoretical guidance for developing perovskite solar cells with inorganic hole transporting materials via a printing process.

  11. Copper thiocyanate: An attractive hole transport/extraction layer for use in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, Neil D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Stingelin, Natalie; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Faber, Hendrik; Perumal, Ajay K.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk

    2015-07-06

    We report the advantageous properties of the inorganic molecular semiconductor copper(I) thiocyanate (CuSCN) for use as a hole collection/transport layer (HTL) in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. CuSCN possesses desirable HTL energy levels [i.e., valence band at −5.35 eV, 0.35 eV deeper than poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)], which produces a 17% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) relative to PEDOT:PSS-based devices. In addition, a two-fold increase in shunt resistance for the solar cells measured in dark conditions is achieved. Ultimately, CuSCN enables polymer:fullerene based OPV cells to achieve PCE > 8%. CuSCN continues to offer promise as a chemically stable and straightforward replacement for the commonly used PEDOT:PSS.

  12. Solution-processed In2S3 buffer layer for chalcopyrite thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lan; Lin, Xianzhong; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Wolf, Christian; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Klenk, Reiner

    2016-02-01

    We report a route to deposit In2S3 thin films from air-stable, low-cost molecular precursor inks for Cd-free buffer layers in chalcopyrite-based thin film solar cells. Different precursor compositions and processing conditions were studied to define a reproducible and robust process. By adjusting the ink properties, this method can be applied in different printing and coating techniques. Here we report on two techniques, namely spin-coating and inkjet printing. Active area efficiencies of 12.8% and 12.2% have been achieved for In2S3-buffered solar cells respectively, matching the performance of CdS-buffered cells prepared with the same batch of absorbers.

  13. Layered Double Hydroxide as a Vehicle to Increase Toxicity of Gallate Ions against Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Rivas-Fuentes, Selma; Saavedra, Karina J Parra; Lamas, Adriana M Macías; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    The antineoplasic activity of gallic acid has been reported. This compound induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of several neoplasic cells. However, this molecule is easily oxidized and degraded in the body. The aim of this work was to intercalate gallate ions into layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles under controlled conditions to reduce oxidation of gallate and to evaluate its toxicity against the A549 adenocarcinoma cell line. An isopropanol medium under nitrogen atmosphere was adequate to intercalate gallate ions with a lesser oxidation degree as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Concentrations of the hybrid LDH-gallate nanoparticles between 0.39 and 25 µg/mL reduced the cell viability to 67%, while the value reached with the pure gallic acid and LDH was 90% and 78%, respectively, thus proving that the combination of gallate ions with the inorganic nanoparticles increases the toxicity potential within this dose range. PMID:27438820

  14. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  15. Identification of Sporopollenin as the Outer Layer of Cell Wall in Microalga Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella protothecoides has been put forth as a promising candidate for commercial biodiesel production. However, the cost of biodiesel remains much higher than diesel from fossil fuel sources, partially due to the high costs of oil extraction from algae. Here, we identified the presence of a sporopollenin layer outside the polysaccharide cell wall; this was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, 2-aminoethanol treatment, acetolysis, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. We also performed bioinformatics analysis of the genes of the C. protothecoides genome that are likely involved in sporopollenin synthesis, secretion, and translocation, and evaluated the expression of these genes via real-time PCR. We also found that that removal of this sporopollenin layer greatly improved the efficiency of oil extraction. PMID:27446068

  16. Identification of Sporopollenin as the Outer Layer of Cell Wall in Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xi; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella protothecoides has been put forth as a promising candidate for commercial biodiesel production. However, the cost of biodiesel remains much higher than diesel from fossil fuel sources, partially due to the high costs of oil extraction from algae. Here, we identified the presence of a sporopollenin layer outside the polysaccharide cell wall; this was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, 2-aminoethanol treatment, acetolysis, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. We also performed bioinformatics analysis of the genes of the C. protothecoides genome that are likely involved in sporopollenin synthesis, secretion, and translocation, and evaluated the expression of these genes via real-time PCR. We also found that that removal of this sporopollenin layer greatly improved the efficiency of oil extraction. PMID:27446068

  17. Atomic layer deposition of titanium sulfide and its application in extremely thin absorber solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahuli, Neha; Sarkar, Shaibal K.

    2015-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiS{sub 2} is investigated with titanium tetrachloride and hydrogen sulfide precursors. In-situ quartz crystal microbalance and ex-situ x-ray reflectivity measurements are carried out to study self-limiting deposition chemistry and material growth characteristics. The saturated growth rate is found to be ca. 0.5 Å/cycle within the ALD temperature window of 125–200 °C. As grown material is found poorly crystalline. ALD grown TiS{sub 2} is applied as a photon harvesting material for solid state sensitized solar cells with TiO{sub 2} as electron transport medium. Initial results with Spiro-OMeTAD as hole conducting layer show ca. 0.6% energy conversion efficiency under 1 sun illumination.

  18. Direct Visualization of the Hydration Layer on Alumina Nanoparticles with the Fluid Cell STEM in situ

    PubMed Central

    Firlar, Emre; Çınar, Simge; Kashyap, Sanjay; Akinc, Mufit; Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Rheological behavior of aqueous suspensions containing nanometer-sized powders is of relevance to many branches of industry. Unusually high viscosities observed for suspensions of nanoparticles compared to those of micron size powders cannot be explained by current viscosity models. Formation of so-called hydration layer on alumina nanoparticles in water was hypothesized, but never observed experimentally. We report here on the direct visualization of aqueous suspensions of alumina with the fluid cell in situ. We observe the hydration layer formed over the particle aggregates and show that such hydrated aggregates constitute new particle assemblies and affect the flow behavior of the suspensions. We discuss how these hydrated nanoclusters alter the effective solid content and the viscosity of nanostructured suspensions. Our findings elucidate the source of high viscosity observed for nanoparticle suspensions and are of direct relevance to many industrial sectors including materials, food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical among others employing colloidal slurries with nanometer-scale particles. PMID:25996055

  19. Efficient inverted polymer solar cells integrated with a compound electron extraction layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Qian-Kun; Li, Chi; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2015-12-01

    We constructed an effective electron extraction layer (EEL) used for polymer solar cells by integrating one new kind of organic material of 4,4‧-(1,4-phenylene) bis(2-phenyl-6-p-tolylnicotinonitrile) (p-PPtNT) and cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) used as a compound EEL (CEEL). The CEEL based device exhibits an ideal PCE of 4.15%, corresponding to an enhancement 220% in contrast to that of control device without EEL, which is also comparable to that of ZnO based device. Our analyses indicated that the remarkably improved PCE for CEEL based device is mainly ascribed to the Ohmic contact and the negligible electron extraction barrier at cathode/active layer by inserting CEEL.

  20. Doped hole transport layer for efficiency enhancement in planar heterojunction organolead trihalide perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Bi, Cheng; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-05-06

    We demonstrated the efficiency of a solution-processed planar heterojunction organometallic trihalide perovskite solar cell can be increased to 17.5% through doping the hole transporting layer for reducing the resistivity. Doped Poly(triaryl amine) (PTAA) by 2,3,5,6-Tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) reduced device series resistance by three-folds, increasing the device fill factor to 74%, open circuit voltage to 1.09 V without sacrificing the short circuit current. As a result, this study reveals that the high resistivity of currently broadly applied polymer hole transport layer limits the device efficiency, and points a new direction to improve the device efficiency.

  1. Ultrathin Polyaniline-based Buffer Layer for Highly Efficient Polymer Solar Cells with Wide Applicability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenchao; Ye, Long; Zhang, Shaoqing; Fan, Bin; Sun, Mingliang; Hou, Jianhui

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial buffer layers often attribute the improved device performance in organic optoelectronic device. Herein, a water-soluble hydrochloric acid doped polyanilines (HAPAN) were utilized as p-type electrode buffer layer in highly efficient polymer solar cells (PSC) based on PBDTTT-EFT and several representative polymers. The PBDTTT-EFT-based conventional PSC featuring ultrathin HAPAN (1.3 nm) delivered high PCE approximately 9%, which is one of the highest values among conventional PSC devices. Moreover, ultrathin HAPAN also exhibited wide applicability in a variety of efficient photovoltaic polymers including PBDTTT-C-T, PTB7, PBDTBDD, PBTTDPP-T, PDPP3T and P3HT. The excellent performances were originated from the high transparency, small film roughness and suitable work function. PMID:25300365

  2. Impact of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell microporous layer nano-scale features on thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botelho, S. J.; Bazylak, A.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the microporous layer (MPL) of the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell was analysed at the nano-scale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was utilized to image the top layer of MPL particles, and a curve fitting algorithm was used to determine the particle size and filling radius distributions for SGL-10BB and SGL-10BC. The particles in SGL-10BC (approximately 60 nm in diameter) have been found to be larger than those in SGL-10BB (approximately 40 nm in diameter), highlighting structural variability between the two materials. The impact of the MPL particle interactions on the effective thermal conductivity of the bulk MPL was analysed using a discretization of the Fourier equation with the Gauss-Seidel iterative method. It was found that the particle spacing and filling radius dominates the effective thermal conductivity, a result which provides valuable insight for future MPL design.

  3. Indium-gallium-zinc-oxide layer used to increase light transmittance efficiency of adhesive layer for stacked-type multijunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshidomi, Shinya; Kimura, Shunsuke; Hasumi, Masahiko; Sameshima, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    We report the increase in transmittance efficiency of the intermediate layer for multijunction solar cells caused by the indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) layer used as the antireflection layer. Si substrates coated with a 200-nm-thick IGZO layer with a refractive index of 1.85 were prepared. The resistivity of the IGZO layer was increased from 0.0069 (as-deposited) to 0.032 Ω cm by heat treatment at 350 °C for 1 h to prevent free-carrier optical absorption. Samples with the Si/IGZO/adhesive/IGZO/Si structure were fabricated. The average transmissivity for wavelengths between 1200 and 1600 nm was 49%, which was close to 55% of single-crystal silicon substrates. A high effective transmittance efficiency of 89% was experimentally achieved. The numerical calculation showed in an effective transmittance efficiency of 99% for 170-nm-thick antireflection layers with a resistivity of 0.6 Ω cm and a refractive index of 2.1.

  4. A pumpless perfusion cell culture cap with two parallel channel layers keeping the flow rate constant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Yi, Sang Hyun; Ku, Bosung; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel pumpless perfusion cell culture cap, the gravity-driven flow rate of which is kept constant by the height difference of two parallel channel layers. Previous pumpless perfusion cell culture systems create a gravity-driven flow by means of the hydraulic head difference (Δh) between the source reservoir and the drain reservoir. As more media passes from the source reservoir to the drain reservoir, the source media level decreases and the drain media level increases. Thus, previous works based on a gravity-driven flow were unable to supply a constant flow rate for the perfusion cell culture. However, the proposed perfusion cell culture cap can supply a constant flow rate, because the media level remains unchanged as the media moves laterally through each channel having same media level. In experiments, using the different fluidic resistances, the perfusion cap generated constant flow rates of 871 ± 27 μL h(-1) and 446 ± 11 μL h(-1) . The 871 and 446 μL h(-1) flow rates replace the whole 20 mL medium in the petri dish with a fresh medium for days 1 and 2, respectively. In the perfusion cell (A549 cell line) culture with the 871 μL h(-1) flow rate, the proposed cap can maintain a lactate concentration of about 2200 nmol mL(-1) and an ammonia concentration of about 3200 nmol mL(-1) . Moreover, although the static cell culture maintains cell viability for 5 days, the perfusion cell culture with the 871 μL h(-1) flow rate can maintain cell viability for 9 days. PMID:22927366

  5. Establishment of an adherent cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood for support of long-term hematopoietic progenitor cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Z Q; Burkholder, J K; Qiu, P; Schultz, J C; Shahidi, N T; Yang, N S

    1994-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish a stromal cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) have met with very limited success. It has been suggested that there is an insufficient number of stromal precursor cells in HUCB to form a hematopoietic-supporting feeder layer in primary cultures. The present study shows that HUCB does contain a significant accessory cell population that routinely develops into a confluent, adherent cell layer under defined primary culture conditions. HUCB-derived adherent layers were shown to support long-term hematopoietic activity for an average of 4 months. This was achieved by using a customized coverslip with a modified surface structure as the cell attachment substratum and using a specialized culture feeding regime. We have characterized the various cell types (including fibroblasts, macrophages, and endothelial cells) and extracellular matrix proteins (including fibronectin, collagen III, and laminin) that were present in abundance in the HUCB-derived adherent cell layer. In contrast, oil red O-staining fat cells were rarely detected. ELISA and bioassays showed that stem cell factor and interleukin 6 were produced by the HUCB stromal cell cultures, but interleukin 3 or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor was not detected. Application of this hematopoietic culture system to transgenic and gene therapy studies of stem cells is discussed. Images PMID:7527553

  6. A futuristic approach towards interface layer modifications for improved efficiency in inverted organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, J. P. E-mail: tiwarijp@mail.nplindia.org; Ali, Farman; Sharma, Abhishek; Chand, Suresh; Pillai, Sriraj; Parakh, Sonal

    2014-01-27

    Inverted polymer Solar Cells of the classical poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C{sub 61}butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 61}BM) blend on indium tin oxide substrates were fabricated, which shows improved device performance, by using a facile solution–processed ZnO-polyelectrolytes [poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC), Poly (acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAS), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS), and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)] nanocomposite as a cathode interface layer compared to devices using pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layer in ambient conditions. The devices with different combinations of polyelectrolyte with ZnO show different improvements in the device efficiency. The combinations of ZnO with PVP and PDADMAC show highest amount of improvements in the efficiency by a factor of ∼17–19. The improvement of the efficiency may be due to various phenomena, such as the passivation of ZnO surface as well as bulk traps, work function modification, improved energy level alignment, improved electronic coupling of the inorganic/organic interface, improved light harvesting, and decrease of surface as well as bulk charge recombination in the device. The introduction of polyelectrolyte into ZnO inhibits the aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles yielding the large area ZnO nanoclusters; and hence, forming the uniform film of ZnO resulting in the modifications of morphology as well as electronic structure of ZnO-polyelectrolyte nano-composite favouring better electronic coupling between cathode and active layer and hence enhancing the current and, consequently, the efficiency. This simple low temperature ZnO-polyelectrolyte nanocomposite based protocol proposed for cathode interface layer modification may be very much useful for roll to roll industrial manufacturing of organic solar cells.

  7. A futuristic approach towards interface layer modifications for improved efficiency in inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, J. P.; Pillai, Sriraj; Parakh, Sonal; Ali, Farman; Sharma, Abhishek; Chand, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Inverted polymer Solar Cells of the classical poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) blend on indium tin oxide substrates were fabricated, which shows improved device performance, by using a facile solution-processed ZnO-polyelectrolytes [poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC), Poly (acrylic acid sodium salt) (PAS), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS), and Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)] nanocomposite as a cathode interface layer compared to devices using pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layer in ambient conditions. The devices with different combinations of polyelectrolyte with ZnO show different improvements in the device efficiency. The combinations of ZnO with PVP and PDADMAC show highest amount of improvements in the efficiency by a factor of ˜17-19. The improvement of the efficiency may be due to various phenomena, such as the passivation of ZnO surface as well as bulk traps, work function modification, improved energy level alignment, improved electronic coupling of the inorganic/organic interface, improved light harvesting, and decrease of surface as well as bulk charge recombination in the device. The introduction of polyelectrolyte into ZnO inhibits the aggregation of ZnO nanoparticles yielding the large area ZnO nanoclusters; and hence, forming the uniform film of ZnO resulting in the modifications of morphology as well as electronic structure of ZnO-polyelectrolyte nano-composite favouring better electronic coupling between cathode and active layer and hence enhancing the current and, consequently, the efficiency. This simple low temperature ZnO-polyelectrolyte nanocomposite based protocol proposed for cathode interface layer modification may be very much useful for roll to roll industrial manufacturing of organic solar cells.

  8. A novel (ex situ) method to quantify oxygen diffusion coefficient of polymer fuel cells backing and catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricci, Andrea; Casalegno, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Limiting current density of oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is determined by several mass transport resistances that lower the concentration of oxygen on the catalyst active site. Among them, diffusion across porous media plays a significant role. Despite the extensive experimental activity documented in PEMFC literature, only few efforts have been dedicated to the measurement of the effective transport properties in porous layers. In the present work, a methodology for ex situ measurement of the effective diffusion coefficient and Knudsen radius of porous layers for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (gas diffusion layer, micro porous layer and catalyst layer) is described and applied to high temperature polymer fuel cells State of Art materials. Regression of the measured quantities by means of a quasi 2D physical model is performed to quantify the Knudsen effect, which is reported to account, respectively, for 30% and 50% of the mass transport resistance in micro porous layer and catalyst layer. On the other side, the model reveals that pressure gradient consequent to permeation in porous layers of high temperature polymer fuel cells has a negligible effect on oxygen concentration in relevant operating conditions.

  9. Development of electrodeposited ZnTe layers as window materials in ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe multi-layer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A.B.M.O. Chaure, N.B.; Wellings, J.; Tolan, G.; Dharmadasa, I.M.

    2009-02-15

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin films have been deposited on glass/conducting glass substrates using a low-cost electrodeposition method. The resulting films have been characterized using various techniques in order to optimize growth parameters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been used to identify the phases present in the films. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and optical absorption measurements have been performed to determine the electrical conductivity type, and the bandgap of the layers, respectively. It has been confirmed by XRD measurement that the deposited layers mainly consist of ZnTe phases. The PEC measurements indicate that the ZnTe layers are p-type in electrical conduction and optical absorption measurements show that their bandgap is in the range 2.10-2.20 eV. p-Type ZnTe window materials have been used in CdTe based solar cell structures, following new designs of graded bandgap multi-layer solar cells. The structures of FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/metal and FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe/metal have been investigated. The results are presented in this paper using observed experimental data.

  10. Ceramic barrier layers for flexible thin film solar cells on metallic substrates: a laboratory scale study for process optimization and barrier layer properties.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Sanchez, Jose-Maria; Guilera, Nuria; Francesch, Laia; Alba, Maria D; Lopez, Laura; Sanchez, Emilio

    2014-11-12

    Flexible thin film solar cells are an alternative to both utility-scale and building integrated photovoltaic installations. The fabrication of these devices over electrically conducting low-cost foils requires the deposition of dielectric barrier layers to flatten the substrate surface, provide electrical isolation between the substrate and the device, and avoid the diffusion of metal impurities during the relatively high temperatures required to deposit the rest of the solar cell device layers. The typical roughness of low-cost stainless-steel foils is in the hundred-nanometer range, which is comparable or larger than the thin film layers comprising the device and this may result in electrical shunts that decrease solar cell performance. This manuscript assesses the properties of different single-layer and bilayer structures containing ceramics inks formulations based on Al2O3, AlN, or Si3N4 nanoparticles and deposited over stainless-steel foils using a rotogravure printing process. The best control of the substrate roughness was achieved for bilayers of Al2O3 or AlN with mixed particle size, which reduced the roughness and prevented the diffusion of metals impurities but AlN bilayers exhibited as well the best electrical insulation properties.

  11. PbS Quantum Dots Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells Prepared by Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction with Different Adsorption Layers.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jie; Duan, Yanfang; Liu, Chunxia; Gao, Shaohong; Han, Xueting; An, Limin

    2016-04-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized via successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoporous film for the fabrication of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). The reaction is environmental friendly and energy saving. The green synthesized PbS QDs match the maximum remittance region of the solar spectrum and are suitable as sensitizers for TiO2 electrodes for cell devices application. PbS QDs were adsorbed in different adsorption layers in order to improve the solar cell performance. The optical properties of PbS sensitized TiO2 films were studied by scanning electron microscopy and UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy. The photovoltaic characteristics of the PbS QDSCs were analyzed by I-V characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As a result, the light harvesting was enhanced with increasing SILAR adsorption layers. The maximum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the PbS QDSCs (3.14%) was obtained at the 12 adsorption layers with the highest short circuit current density and lowest charge transfer resistance. PMID:27451735

  12. Role of the buffer layer in the active junction in amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallarès, J.; Schropp, R. E. I.

    2000-07-01

    We fabricated pn and pin a-SiC:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells following two different processes. In the first approach, wafers were subjected to an extra atomic hydrogen (produced by hot wire chemical vapor deposition) prior to the deposition of the amorphous layer. A reduction in the open-circuit voltage was observed for the passivated cells due to their higher leakage current. In the second process, pin solar cells with two different quality intrinsic a-Si:H buffer layers were fabricated using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The cells with a device quality buffer layer (deposited at higher temperature) showed better performance than those with a buffer layer with high hydrogen content and higher defect density (deposited at lower temperatures).

  13. Improved efficiency of P3HT:PCBM solar cells by incorporation of silver oxide interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantan; Alford, T. L.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, a substantial amount of research has been focused on identifying suitable interfacial layers in organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells which has efficient charge transport properties. In this work, a very thin layer of AgOx is deposited on top of the ITO layer along with PEDOT:PSS and is observed that the solar cells having the AgOx interfacial layer showed a 28% increase in power conversion efficiency in comparison to that of the control cell. The enhancement in efficiency has been ascribed to improvements in fill factor as well as the increase in shunt resistance and decrease in the series resistance of the solar cells. An equivalent circuit model is also provided to understand the changes in the series and shunt resistances in the AgOx modified devices.

  14. Symmetry breaking, germ layer specification and axial organisation in aggregates of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Susanne C; Baillie-Johnson, Peter; Balayo, Tina; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Nowotschin, Sonja; Turner, David A; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are clonal populations derived from preimplantation mouse embryos that can be propagated in vitro and, when placed into blastocysts, contribute to all tissues of the embryo and integrate into the normal morphogenetic processes, i.e. they are pluripotent. However, although they can be steered to differentiate in vitro into all cell types of the organism, they cannot organise themselves into structures that resemble embryos. When aggregated into embryoid bodies they develop disorganised masses of different cell types with little spatial coherence. An exception to this rule is the emergence of retinas and anterior cortex-like structures under minimal culture conditions. These structures emerge from the cultures without any axial organisation. Here, we report that small aggregates of mESCs, of about 300 cells, self-organise into polarised structures that exhibit collective behaviours reminiscent of those that cells exhibit in early mouse embryos, including symmetry breaking, axial organisation, germ layer specification and cell behaviour, as well as axis elongation. The responses are signal specific and uncouple processes that in the embryo are tightly associated, such as specification of the anteroposterior axis and anterior neural development, or endoderm specification and axial elongation. We discuss the meaning and implications of these observations and the potential uses of these structures which, because of their behaviour, we suggest to call 'gastruloids'.

  15. Design of a Three-Layer Antireflection Coating for High Efficiency Indium Phosphide Solar Cells Using a Chemical Oxide as First Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulot, Jacques; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Goradia, Chandra; Goradia, Manju; Bailey, Sheila

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the behavior of III-V compound based solar cells is largely controlled by their surface, since the majority of light generated carriers (63% for GaAs and 79% for InP) are created within 0.2 microns of the illuminated surface of the cell. Consequently, the always observed high surface recombination velocity (SRV) on these cells is a serious limiting factor for their high efficiency performance, especially for those with the p-n junction made by either thermal diffusion or ion implantation. A good surface passivation layer, ideally, a grown oxide as opposed to a deposited one, will cause a significant reduction in the SRV without adding interface problems, thus improving the performance of III-V compound based solar cells. Another significant benefit to the overall performance of the solar cells can be achieved by a substantial reduction of their large surface optical reflection by the use of a well designed antireflection (AR) coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a chemically grown, thermally and chemically stable oxide, not only for surface passivation but also as an integral part of a 3- layer AR coating for thermally diffused p(+)n InP solar cells. A phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide, In(PO3)3, is grown at the surface of the p(+) emitter using an etchant based on HNO3, o-H3PO4 and H2O2. This oxide has the unique properties of passivating the surface as well as serving as a fairly efficient antireflective layer yielding a measured record high AM0, 25 C, open-circuit voltage of 890.3 mV on a thermally diffused InP(Cd,S) solar cell. Unlike conventional single layer AR coatings such as ZnS, Sb2O3, SiO or double layer AR coatings such as ZnS/MgF2 deposited by e-beam or resistive evaporation, this oxide preserves the stoichiometry of the InP surface. We show that it is possible to design a three-layer AR coating for a thermally diffused InP solar cell using the In(PO3)3 grown oxide as the first layer and Al2O3, MgF2 or

  16. Design of a three-layer antireflection coating for high efficiency indium phosphide solar cells using a chemical oxide as first layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulot, Jacques; Faur, M.; Faur, M.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.; Bailey, S.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the behavior of III-V compound based solar cells is largely controlled by their surface, since the majority of light generated carriers (63% for GaAs and 79% for InP) are created within 0.2 mu m of the surface of the illuminated cell. Consequently, the always observed high surface recombination velocity (SRV) on these cells is a serious limiting factor for their high efficiency performance, especially for those with p-n junction made by either thermal diffusion or ion implantation. A good surface passivation layer, ideally a grown oxide as opposed to a deposited one, will cause a significant reduction in the SRV without adding interface problems, thus improving the performance of III-V compound based solar cells. Another significant benefit to the overall performance of the solar cells can be achieved by a substantial reduction of their large surface optical reflection by the use of a well designed antireflection (AR) coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a chemically grown thermally and chemically stable oxide, not only for surface passivation but also as an integral part of a 3-layer AR coating for thermally diffused p+n InP solar cells. A phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide, In(PO3)3, is grown at the surface of the p+ emitter using an etchant based on HNO3, o-H3PO4 and H2O2. This oxide has the unique properties of passivating the surface as well as serving as an efficient antireflective layer yielding a measured record high AMO open-circuit voltage of 890.3 mV on a thermally diffused InP(Cd,S) solar cell. Unlike conventional single layer AR coatings such as ZnS, Sb2O3, SiO or double layer AR coatings such as ZnS/MgF2 deposited by e-beam or resistive evaporation, this oxide preserves the stoichiometry of the InP surface. We show that it is possible to design a three-layer AR coating for a thermally diffused InP solar cell using the In(PO3)3 grown oxide as the first layer and Al2O3 and MgF2 as the second and third

  17. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  18. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  19. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  20. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-07

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  1. Double-layer capacitance in a dual lithium ion insertion cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, I.J.; Newman, J.

    1999-12-01

    The addition of double-layer capacitance into a mathematical model of a dual lithium ion insertion cell is investigated. Double-layer capacitance is introduced in both the negative electrode and the positive electrode. For the purposes of this paper, a Li{sub x}C{sub 6}{vert{underscore}bar}propylene carbonate + 1 M LiClO{sub 4}{vert{underscore}bar}Li{sub y}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell is used for the collection of simulation results. Simulation results on the effect of short-time pulses passed through the cell are presented. Differences in the transient potential response in the negative and positive electrodes at short times are made between an electrode with a resistive film and one without and between situations with small and large rates of change of the open-circuit potential with state of charge. A simpler resistive-capacitive model is developed which clarifies many features of the modified behavior due to the capacitance but without simultaneously dealing with the discharge of the active material and concentration gradients.

  2. Fabrication of a circular PDMS microchannel for constructing a three-dimensional endothelial cell layer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2013-12-01

    We describe a simple and efficient fabrication method for generating microfluidic channels with a circular cross-sectional geometry by exploiting the reflow phenomenon of a thick positive photoresist. Initial rectangular shaped positive photoresist micropatterns on a silicon wafer, which were fabricated by a conventional photolithography process, were converted into a half-circular shape by tuning the temperature to around 105 °C. Through optimization of the reflow conditions, we could obtain a perfect circular micropattern of the positive photoresist, and control the diameter in a range from 100 to 400 μm. The resultant convex half-circular photoresist was used as a template for fabricating a concave polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through a replica molding process, and a circular PDMS microchannel was produced by bonding two half-circular PDMS layers. A variety of channel dimensions and patterns can be easily prepared, including straight, S-curve, X-, Y-, and T-shapes to mimic an in vivo vascular network. To form an endothelial cell layer, we cultured primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells inside circular PDMS microchannels, and demonstrated successful cell adhesion, proliferation, and alignment along the channel.

  3. Photophysics of Voltage Increase by Photoinduced Dipole Layers in Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kazes, Miri; Buhbut, Sophia; Itzhakov, Stella; Lahad, Ohr; Zaban, Arie; Oron, Dan

    2014-08-01

    Significant overpotentials between the sensitizer and both the electron and hole conductors hamper the performance of sensitized solar cells, leading to a reduced photovoltage. We show that by using properly designed type-II quantum dots (QDs) between the sensitizer and the hole conductor in thin absorber cells, it is possible to increase the open circuit voltage (Voc) by more than 100 mV. This increase is due to the formation of a photoinduced dipole (PID) layer. Photogenerated holes in the type-II QDs are retained in the core for a relatively long time, allowing for the accumulation of a positively charged layer. Negative charges are, in turn, injected and accumulated in the TiO2 anode, creating a dipole moment, which negatively shifts the TiO2 conduction band relative to the electrolyte. We study this phenomenon using a unique TiO2/CdSe/(ZnSe:Te/CdS)/polysulfide system, where the formation of a PID depends on the color of the illumination. The PID concept thus introduces a new design strategy, where the operating parameters of the solar cell can be manipulated separately.

  4. Epitaxial 1D electron transport layers for high-performance perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gill Sang; Chung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Byeong Jo; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Cho, In Sun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport.We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport

  5. Radial junction solar cells based on heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Haoting

    The radial junction wire array structure was previously proposed as a solar cell geometry to separate the direction of carrier collection from the direction of light absorption, thereby circumventing the need to use high quality but expensive single crystal silicon (c-Si) material that has long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The Si radial junction structure can be realized by forming radial p-n junctions on Si pillar/wire arrays that have a diameter comparable to the minority carrier diffusion length. With proper design, the Si pillar arrays are also able to enhance light trapping and thereby increase the light absorption. However, the larger junction area and surface area on the pillar arrays compared to traditional planar junction Si solar cells makes it challenging to fabricate high performance devices due an in increase in surface defects. Therefore, effective surface passivation strategies are essential for radial junction devices. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using a heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) structure has previously been demonstrated as a very effective surface passivation layer for planar c-Si solar cells. It is therefore of interest to use a-Si:H in a HIT layer structure for radial p-n junction c-Si pillar array solar cells. This poses several challenges, however, including the need to fabricate ultra-thin a-Si:H layers conformally on high aspect ratio Si pillars, control the crystallinity at the a-Si:H/c-Si interface to yield a low interface state density and optimize the layer thicknesses, doping and contacts to yield high performance devices. This research in this thesis was aimed at developing the processing technology required to apply the HIT structure to radial junction Si pillar array solar cell devices and to evaluate the device characteristics. Initial studies focused on understanding the effects of process conditions on the growth rate and

  6. Roles of endothelial A-type lamins in migration of T cells on and under endothelial layers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Jaehyun; Park, HyoungJun; Kim, Hye Mi; Park, Jeehun; Kwon, Keon Woo; Doh, Junsang

    2016-01-01

    Stiff nuclei in cell-dense microenvironments may serve as distinct biomechanical cues for cell migration, but such a possibility has not been tested experimentally. As a first step addressing this question, we altered nuclear stiffness of endothelial cells (ECs) by reducing the expression of A-type lamins using siRNA, and investigated the migration of T cells on and under EC layers. While most T cells crawling on control EC layers avoided crossing over EC nuclei, a significantly higher fraction of T cells on EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins crossed over EC nuclei. This result suggests that stiff EC nuclei underlying T cells may serve as “duro-repulsive” cues to direct T cell migration toward less stiff EC cytoplasm. During subendothelial migration under EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins, T cells made prolonged contact and substantially deformed EC nuclei, resulting in reduced speed and directional persistence. This result suggests that EC nuclear stiffness promotes fast and directionally persistent subendothelial migration of T cells by allowing minimum interaction between T cells and EC nuclei. PMID:26996137

  7. Roles of endothelial A-type lamins in migration of T cells on and under endothelial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Jaehyun; Park, Hyoungjun; Kim, Hye Mi; Park, Jeehun; Kwon, Keon Woo; Doh, Junsang

    2016-03-01

    Stiff nuclei in cell-dense microenvironments may serve as distinct biomechanical cues for cell migration, but such a possibility has not been tested experimentally. As a first step addressing this question, we altered nuclear stiffness of endothelial cells (ECs) by reducing the expression of A-type lamins using siRNA, and investigated the migration of T cells on and under EC layers. While most T cells crawling on control EC layers avoided crossing over EC nuclei, a significantly higher fraction of T cells on EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins crossed over EC nuclei. This result suggests that stiff EC nuclei underlying T cells may serve as “duro-repulsive” cues to direct T cell migration toward less stiff EC cytoplasm. During subendothelial migration under EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins, T cells made prolonged contact and substantially deformed EC nuclei, resulting in reduced speed and directional persistence. This result suggests that EC nuclear stiffness promotes fast and directionally persistent subendothelial migration of T cells by allowing minimum interaction between T cells and EC nuclei.

  8. PEMFC catalyst layers: the role of micropores and mesopores on water sorption and fuel cell activity.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Xie, Zhong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven

    2011-06-01

    The effects of carbon microstructure and ionomer loading on water vapor sorption and retention in catalyst layers (CLs) of PEM fuel cells are investigated using dynamic vapor sorption. Catalyst layers based on Ketjen Black and Vulcan XC-72 carbon blacks, which possess distinctly different surface areas, pore volumes, and microporosities, are studied. It is found that pores <20 nm diameter facilitate water uptake by capillary condensation in the intermediate range of relative humidities. A broad pore size distribution (PSD) is found to enhance water retention in Ketjen Black-based CLs whereas the narrower mesoporous PSD of Vulcan CLs is shown to have an enhanced water repelling action. Water vapor sorption and retention properties of CLs are correlated to electrochemical properties and fuel cell performance. Water sorption enhances electrochemical properties such as the electrochemically active surface area (ESA), double layer capacitance and proton conductivity, particularly when the ionomer content is very low. The hydrophilic properties of a CL on the anode and the cathode are adjusted by choosing the PSD of carbon and the ionomer content. It is shown that a reduction of ionomer content on either cathode or anode of an MEA does not necessarily have a significant detrimental effect on the MEA performance compared to the standard 30 wt % ionomer MEA. Under operation in air and high relative humidity, a cathode with a narrow pore size distribution and low ionomer content is shown to be beneficial due to its low water retention properties. In dry operating conditions, adequate ionomer content on the cathode is crucial, whereas it can be reduced on the anode without a significant impact on fuel cell performance.

  9. Use of antireflection layers to avoid ghost plating on Ni/Cu plated crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong Sang; Choi, Sung Jin; Chang, Hyo Sik; In Lee, Jeong; Kang, Min Gu; Kim, Donghwan; Song, Hee-eun

    2016-03-01

    Screen printing is a method commonly used for making electrodes for crystalline silicon solar cells. Although the screen-printing method is fast and easy, screen-printed electrodes have a porous structure, high contact resistance, and low aspect ratio. On the other hand, plated electrodes have low contact resistance and narrow electrode width. Therefore, the plating method could be substituted for the screen-printing method in crystalline silicon solar cells. During the plating process, ghost plating can appear at the surface when the quality of the passivation layer is poor, causing an increase in the recombination rate. In this paper, light-induced plating was applied to the fabrication of electrodes, and various passivation layers were investigated to remove ghost plating in crystalline silicon solar cells. These included, (1) SiNx deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), (2) a double SiNx layer formed by PECVD, (3) a double layer with thermal silicon oxide and SiNx deposited by PECVD, and (4) a double layer comprising SiNx and SiOx formed by PECVD. For the plated solar cells, a laser was used to remove various antireflection coating (ARC) layers and phosphoric acid was spin-coated onto the doped silicon wafer prior to laser ablation. Also, a screen-printed solar cell was fabricated to compare plated solar cells with screen-printed solar cells. As a result, we found that a thermal SiO2/PECVD SiNx layer showed the lowest pinhole density and its wet vapor transmission rate was characterized. The solar cell with the thermal SiO2/PECVD SiNx layer showed the lowest J02 value, as well as improved Voc and Jsc.

  10. Tissue Engineering: Construction of a Multicellular 3D Scaffold for the Delivery of Layered Cell Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Turner, William S.; Sandhu, Nabjot; McCloskey, Kara E.

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues, such as the adult human hearts, are unable to adequately regenerate after damage.2,3 Strategies in tissue engineering propose innovations to assist the body in recovery and repair. For example, TE approaches may be able to attenuate heart remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) and possibly increase total heart function to a near normal pre-MI level.4 As with any functional tissue, successful regeneration of cardiac tissue involves the proper delivery of multiple cell types with environmental cues favoring integration and survival of the implanted cell/tissue graft. Engineered tissues should address multiple parameters including: soluble signals, cell-to-cell interactions, and matrix materials evaluated as delivery vehicles, their effects on cell survival, material strength, and facilitation of cell-to-tissue organization. Studies employing the direct injection of graft cells only ignore these essential elements.2,5,6 A tissue design combining these ingredients has yet to be developed. Here, we present an example of integrated designs using layering of patterned cell sheets with two distinct types of biological-derived materials containing the target organ cell type and endothelial cells for enhancing new vessels formation in the “tissue”. Although these studies focus on the generation of heart-like tissue, this tissue design can be applied to many organs other than heart with minimal design and material changes, and is meant to be an off-the-shelf product for regenerative therapies. The protocol contains five detailed steps. A temperature sensitive Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAM) is used to coat tissue culture dishes. Then, tissue specific cells are cultured on the surface of the coated plates/micropattern surfaces to form cell sheets with strong lateral adhesions. Thirdly, a base matrix is created for the tissue by combining porous matrix with neovascular permissive hydrogels and endothelial cells. Finally, the cell sheets are lifted

  11. Comparison of graphene oxide with reduced graphene oxide as hole extraction layer in organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung Soon; Park, Yensil; Kim, Soo Young

    2013-05-01

    A comparison was performed between the use of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as a hole extraction layer (HEL) in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Hydrazine hydrate (HYD) and the thermal method (Thermal) were adopted to change the GO to rGO. The GO HEL was deposited on an indium tin oxide electrode by spin coating, followed by the reduction process to form the rGO HELs. The success of the reduction processes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmittance, and 2-point probe method. The OPV cell with the GO (-3 nm) HEL exhibits an increased power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 2.5% under 100 mW/cm2 illumination under air mass conditions, which is higher than that of the OPV cell without HEL, viz. 1.78%. However, the PCE of the OPV cell with rGO HEL is not high as the values of 1.8% for the HYD-rGO and 1.9% for the Thermal-rGO. The ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy results showed that the work function of GO was 4.7 eV, but those of HYD-rGO and Thermal-rGO were 4.2 eV and 4.5 eV, respectively. Therefore, it is considered that GO is adequate to extract the holes from the active layer, but HYD-rGO and Thermal-rGO are not appropriate to use as HELs in OPV cells from the viewpoint of the energy alignment.

  12. The investigation of resin degradation in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shaohua; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-01-01

    In order to separate resin degradation in catalyst layer (CL) from membrane degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), Fluorine emission rate (FER) was specially selected to highlight the degradation of Nafion® resin in CL by employing hydrocarbon membrane as membrane. The drain water from the cathode and anode was collected and analyzed separately. It is found that FERs of drain water are 0.065 μmol cm-2 h-1 (cathode) and 0.049 μmol cm-2 h-1 (anode), suggesting resin degradation happened in CLs and the predominant degradation occurred in the cathode in open circuit operation.

  13. Improve efficiency of perovskite solar cells by using Magnesium doped ZnO and TiO2 compact layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baktash, Ardeshir; Amiri, Omid; Sasani, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Here the effect of Magnesium doped TiO2 and ZnO as hole blocking layers (HBLs) are investigated by using solar cell capacitance simulator (SCAPS). The Impact of Magnesium concentration into the TiO2 and ZnO and effect of operating temperature on the performance of the perovskite solar cell are investigated. Best cell performance for both TiO2 and ZnO HBLs (with cell efficiencies of 19.86% and 19.57% respectively) are concluded for the doping level of 10% of Mg into the structure of HBLs. Increase in operating temperature from 300 K to 400 K are decreased the performance of the perovskite solar cell with both pure and Mg-doped HBLs. However, the cells with pure ZnO layer and with Zn0.9 Mg0.1O layer show the highest (with a decline of 8.88% in efficiency) and the lowest stability (with a decline of 50.49% in efficiency) at higher temperatures respectively. Moreover, the cell with Ti0.9 Mg0.1O2 layer shows better stability (with 21.85% reduction in efficiency) than the cell with pure TiO2 compact layer (with 23.28% reduction in efficiency) at higher operating temperatures.

  14. Single-Layer Graphene Enhances the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Jianzhang; Lv, Longwei; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, although several studies have demonstrated the potential of graphene-coated substrates in promoting attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the effects of single-layer graphene on the osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs) remains unclear, especially in vivo. In this study, we transferred chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown single-layer graphene to glass slides and observed its effects on adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro. Then, in vivo, we incubated hASCs and hBMMSCs on single-layer graphene-coated smooth titanium (Ti) disks before implanting them into the back subcutaneous area of nude mice. We found that single-layer graphene accelerated cell adhesion to the substrate without influencing cell proliferation of hMSCs. Moreover, we present the first study that explores the epigenetic role of single-layer graphene in determining stem cell fate. By utilizing epigenetic approaches, we reveal that single-layer graphene promotes osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, potentially by upregulating methylation of H3K4 at the promoter regions of osteogenesis-associated genes. Overall, our results highlight the potential of this material in implants and injured tissues in clinical applications.

  15. Single-Layer Graphene Enhances the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Jianzhang; Lv, Longwei; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, although several studies have demonstrated the potential of graphene-coated substrates in promoting attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the effects of single-layer graphene on the osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs) remains unclear, especially in vivo. In this study, we transferred chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown single-layer graphene to glass slides and observed its effects on adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro. Then, in vivo, we incubated hASCs and hBMMSCs on single-layer graphene-coated smooth titanium (Ti) disks before implanting them into the back subcutaneous area of nude mice. We found that single-layer graphene accelerated cell adhesion to the substrate without influencing cell proliferation of hMSCs. Moreover, we present the first study that explores the epigenetic role of single-layer graphene in determining stem cell fate. By utilizing epigenetic approaches, we reveal that single-layer graphene promotes osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, potentially by upregulating methylation of H3K4 at the promoter regions of osteogenesis-associated genes. Overall, our results highlight the potential of this material in implants and injured tissues in clinical applications. PMID:27319220

  16. S-layer and cytoplasmic membrane - exceptions from the typical archaeal cell wall with a focus on double membranes.

    PubMed

    Klingl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The common idea of typical cell wall architecture in archaea consists of a pseudo-crystalline proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer), situated upon the cytoplasmic membrane. This is true for the majority of described archaea, hitherto. Within the crenarchaea, the S-layer often represents the only cell wall component, but there are various exceptions from this wall architecture. Beside (glycosylated) S-layers in (hyper)thermophilic cren- and euryarchaea as well as halophilic archaea, one can find a great variety of other cell wall structures like proteoglycan-like S-layers (Halobacteria), glutaminylglycan (Natronococci), methanochondroitin (Methanosarcina) or double layered cell walls with pseudomurein (Methanothermus and Methanopyrus). The presence of an outermost cellular membrane in the crenarchaeal species Ignicoccus hospitalis already gave indications for an outer membrane similar to Gram-negative bacteria. Although there is just limited data concerning their biochemistry and ultrastructure, recent studies on the euryarchaeal methanogen Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, cells of the ARMAN group, and the SM1 euryarchaeon delivered further examples for this exceptional cell envelope type consisting of two membranes.

  17. S-layer and cytoplasmic membrane – exceptions from the typical archaeal cell wall with a focus on double membranes

    PubMed Central

    Klingl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The common idea of typical cell wall architecture in archaea consists of a pseudo-crystalline proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer), situated upon the cytoplasmic membrane. This is true for the majority of described archaea, hitherto. Within the crenarchaea, the S-layer often represents the only cell wall component, but there are various exceptions from this wall architecture. Beside (glycosylated) S-layers in (hyper)thermophilic cren- and euryarchaea as well as halophilic archaea, one can find a great variety of other cell wall structures like proteoglycan-like S-layers (Halobacteria), glutaminylglycan (Natronococci), methanochondroitin (Methanosarcina) or double layered cell walls with pseudomurein (Methanothermus and Methanopyrus). The presence of an outermost cellular membrane in the crenarchaeal species Ignicoccus hospitalis already gave indications for an outer membrane similar to Gram-negative bacteria. Although there is just limited data concerning their biochemistry and ultrastructure, recent studies on the euryarchaeal methanogen Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, cells of the ARMAN group, and the SM1 euryarchaeon delivered further examples for this exceptional cell envelope type consisting of two membranes. PMID:25505452

  18. Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Alexander H.; Labelle, André J.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-12-23

    Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells.

  19. Computational modelling of epidermal stratification highlights the importance of asymmetric cell division for predictable and robust layer formation

    PubMed Central

    Gord, Alexander; Holmes, William R.; Dai, Xing; Nie, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Skin is a complex organ tasked with, among other functions, protecting the body from the outside world. Its outermost protective layer, the epidermis, is comprised of multiple cell layers that are derived from a single-layered ectoderm during development. Using a new stochastic, multi-scale computational modelling framework, the anisotropic subcellular element method, we investigate the role of cell morphology and biophysical cell–cell interactions in the formation of this layered structure. This three-dimensional framework describes interactions between collections of hundreds to thousands of cells and (i) accounts for intracellular structure and morphology, (ii) easily incorporates complex cell–cell interactions and (iii) can be efficiently implemented on parallel architectures. We use this approach to construct a model of the developing epidermis that accounts for the internal polarity of ectodermal cells and their columnar morphology. Using this model, we show that cell detachment, which has been previously suggested to have a role in this process, leads to unpredictable, randomized stratification and that this cannot be abrogated by adjustment of cell–cell adhesion interaction strength. Polarized distribution of cell adhesion proteins, motivated by epithelial polarization, can however eliminate this detachment, and in conjunction with asymmetric cell division lead to robust and predictable development. PMID:25100322

  20. Power generation using carbon mesh cathodes with different diffusion layers in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Bin; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Logan, Bruce E.

    An inexpensive carbon material, carbon mesh, was examined to replace the more expensive carbon cloth usually used to make cathodes in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different diffusion layers were tested using carbon mesh: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and Goretex cloth. Carbon mesh with a mixture of PDMS and carbon black as a diffusion layer produced a maximum power density of 1355 ± 62 mW m -2 (normalized to the projected cathode area), which was similar to that obtained with a carbon cloth cathode (1390 ± 72 mW m -2). Carbon mesh with a PTFE diffusion layer produced only a slightly lower (6.6%) maximum power density (1303 ± 48 mW m -2). The Coulombic efficiencies were a function of current density, with the highest value for the carbon mesh and PDMS (79%) larger than that for carbon cloth (63%). The cost of the carbon mesh cathode with PDMS/Carbon or PTFE (excluding catalyst and binder costs) is only 2.5% of the cost of the carbon cloth cathode. These results show that low cost carbon materials such as carbon mesh can be used as the cathode in an MFC without reducing the performance compared to more expensive carbon cloth.