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Sample records for adjacent chromosomal dna

  1. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, John K; Okely, Ewa A; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K; Leach, David R F

    2010-12-28

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  2. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  3. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  4. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  5. Visualization of yeast chromosomal DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubega, Seth

    1990-01-01

    The DNA molecule is the most significant life molecule since it codes the blue print for other structural and functional molecules of all living organisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis is now being widely used to separate DNA of virus, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. The task was undertaken of reviewing the existing methods of DNA fractionation and microscopic visualization of individual chromosonal DNA molecules by gel electrophoresis as a basis for a proposed study to investigate the feasibility of separating DNA molecules in free fluids as an alternative to gel electrophoresis. Various techniques were studied. On the molecular level, agarose gel electrophoresis is being widely used to separate chromosomal DNA according to molecular weight. Carl and Olson separate and characterized the entire karyotype of a lab strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Smith et al. and Schwartz and Koval independently reported the visualization of individual DNA molecules migrating through agarose gel matrix during electrophoresis. The techniques used by these researchers are being reviewed in the lab as a basis for the proposed studies.

  6. Association of Chromosome Loss with Centromere-Adjacent Mitotic Recombination in a Yeast Disomic Haploid

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D. A.; Fogel, S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments designed to characterize the association between disomic chromosome loss and centromere-adjacent mitotic recombination were performed. Mitotic gene convertants were selected at two heteroallelic sites on the left arm of disomic chromosome III and tested for coincident chromosome loss. The principal results are: (1) Disomic chromosome loss is markedly enhanced (nearly 40-fold) over basal levels among mitotic gene convertants selected to arise close to the centromere; no such enhancement is observed among convertants selected to arise relatively far from the centromere. (2) Chromosome loss is primarily associated with proximal allele conversion at the centromere-adjacent site, and many of these convertants are reciprocally recombined in the adjacent proximal interval. (3) Partial aneuploid exceptions provisionally identified as carrying left arm telocentrics have been found. A testable model is proposed suggesting that centromere involvement in genetic recombination may precipitate segregational disfunction leading to mitotic chromosome loss. PMID:324869

  7. SMC complexes: from DNA to chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Frank

    2016-07-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complexes - which include condensin, cohesin and the SMC5-SMC6 complex - are major components of chromosomes in all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. These ring-shaped protein machines, which are powered by ATP hydrolysis, topologically encircle DNA. With their ability to hold more than one strand of DNA together, SMC complexes control a plethora of chromosomal activities. Notable among these are chromosome condensation and sister chromatid cohesion. Moreover, SMC complexes have an important role in DNA repair. Recent mechanistic insight into the function and regulation of these universal chromosomal machines enables us to propose molecular models of chromosome structure, dynamics and function, illuminating one of the fundamental entities in biology. PMID:27075410

  8. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Marder, B A; Morgan, W F

    1993-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation can result in gene mutation, gene amplification, chromosome rearrangements, cellular transformation, and cell death. Although many of these changes may be induced directly by the radiation, there is accumulating evidence for delayed genomic instability following X-ray exposure. We have investigated this phenomenon by studying delayed chromosomal instability in a hamster-human hybrid cell line by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. We examined populations of metaphase cells several generations after expanding single-cell colonies that had survived 5 or 10 Gy of X rays. Delayed chromosomal instability, manifested as multiple rearrangements of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes, was observed in 29% of colonies surviving 5 Gy and in 62% of colonies surviving 10 Gy. A correlation of delayed chromosomal instability with delayed reproductive cell death, manifested as reduced plating efficiency in surviving clones, suggests a role for chromosome rearrangements in cytotoxicity. There were small differences in chromosome destabilization and plating efficiencies between cells irradiated with 5 or 10 Gy of X rays after a previous exposure to 10 Gy and cells irradiated only once. Cell clones showing delayed chromosomal instability had normal frequencies of sister chromatid exchange formation, indicating that at this cytogenetic endpoint the chromosomal instability was not apparent. The types of chromosomal rearrangements observed suggest that chromosome fusion, followed by bridge breakage and refusion, contributes to the observed delayed chromosomal instability. Images PMID:8413263

  9. Size and Structure of Yeast Chromosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Petes, Thomas D.; Byers, Breck; Fangman, Walton L.

    1973-01-01

    Electron microscopic analysis indicates that yeast nuclear DNA can be isolated as linear molecules ranging in size from 50 μm (1.2 × 108 daltons) to 355 μm (8.4 × 108 daltons). Analysis indicates the data is consistent with the hypothesis that each yeast chromosome contains a single, linear DNA duplex. Mitochondrial DNA molecules have a contour length of 21 ± 2 μm and are mostly linear. Images PMID:4594033

  10. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  11. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  12. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  13. A new light on DNA replication from the inactive X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    While large portions of the mammalian genome are known to replicate sequentially in a distinct, tissue-specific order, recent studies suggest that the inactive X chromosome is duplicated rapidly via random, synchronous DNA synthesis at numerous adjacent regions. The rapid duplication of the inactive X chromosome was observed in high-resolution studies visualizing DNA replication patterns in the nucleus, and by allele-specific DNA sequencing studies measuring the extent of DNA synthesis. These studies conclude that inactive X chromosomes complete replication earlier than previously thought and suggest that the strict order of DNA replication detected in the majority of genomic regions is not preserved in non-transcribed, “silent” chromatin. These observations alter current concepts about the regulation of DNA replication in non-transcribed portions of the genome in general and in the inactive X-chromosome in particular. PMID:24706495

  14. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  15. Micromanipulation Study of DNA, DNA-protein Interactions, and Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John F.

    2002-03-01

    Physical - and to a large degree mechanical - properties of nucleic acids and proteins are essential to their functions in living cells. Therefore understanding the micromechanics of biomolecules is important to understanding cell machinery. I will review the rapid progress that has been made over the last decade in studying physical properties of single DNA molecules using micromanipulation techniques, and the future research directions for this field. I will then discuss how our lab has started to study whole chromosomes from cells with micromanipulation techniques. I focus on the use of in-situ enzyme reactions to show that DNA itself is the contiguous load-bearing element of the folded chromosome.

  16. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  17. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Ladeana W; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Graves, Tina A; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Wagner-McPherson, Caryn; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; Jaeger, Sara; Walker, Rebecca; Wylie, Kristine; Sekhon, Mandeep; Becker, Michael C; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Schaller, Mark E; Fewell, Ginger A; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Miner, Tracie L; Nash, William E; Cordes, Matt; Du, Hui; Sun, Hui; Edwards, Jennifer; Bradshaw-Cordum, Holland; Ali, Johar; Andrews, Stephanie; Isak, Amber; Vanbrunt, Andrew; Nguyen, Christine; Du, Feiyu; Lamar, Betty; Courtney, Laura; Kalicki, Joelle; Ozersky, Philip; Bielicki, Lauren; Scott, Kelsi; Holmes, Andrea; Harkins, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Strong, Cynthia Madsen; Hou, Shunfang; Tomlinson, Chad; Dauphin-Kohlberg, Sara; Kozlowicz-Reilly, Amy; Leonard, Shawn; Rohlfing, Theresa; Rock, Susan M; Tin-Wollam, Aye-Mon; Abbott, Amanda; Minx, Patrick; Maupin, Rachel; Strowmatt, Catrina; Latreille, Phil; Miller, Nancy; Johnson, Doug; Murray, Jennifer; Woessner, Jeffrey P; Wendl, Michael C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Schultz, Brian R; Wallis, John W; Spieth, John; Bieri, Tamberlyn A; Nelson, Joanne O; Berkowicz, Nicolas; Wohldmann, Patricia E; Cook, Lisa L; Hickenbotham, Matthew T; Eldred, James; Williams, Donald; Bedell, Joseph A; Mardis, Elaine R; Clifton, Sandra W; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Marra, Marco A; Raymond, Christopher; Haugen, Eric; Gillett, Will; Zhou, Yang; James, Rose; Phelps, Karen; Iadanoto, Shawn; Bubb, Kerry; Simms, Elizabeth; Levy, Ruth; Clendenning, James; Kaul, Rajinder; Kent, W James; Furey, Terrence S; Baertsch, Robert A; Brent, Michael R; Keibler, Evan; Flicek, Paul; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Portnoy, Matthew E; Torrents, David; Chinwalla, Asif T; Gish, Warren R; Eddy, Sean R; McPherson, John D; Olson, Maynard V; Eichler, Evan E; Green, Eric D; Waterston, Robert H; Wilson, Richard K

    2003-07-10

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame. PMID:12853948

  18. Forces on chromosomal DNA during anaphase.

    PubMed Central

    Jannink, G; Duplantier, B; Sikorav, J L

    1996-01-01

    In the course of anaphase, the chromosomal DNA is submitted to the traction of the spindle. Several physical problems are associated with this action. In particular, the sister chromatids are generally topologically intertwined at the onset of anaphase, and the removal of the intertwinings results from a coupling between the enzymatic action of type II DNA topoisomerases and the force exerted by the spindle. We propose a physical analysis of some of these problems: 1) We compare the maximum force the spindle can produce with the force required to break a DNA molecule, and define the conditions compatible with biological safety during anaphase. 2) We show that the behavior of the sister chromatids in the absence of type II DNA topoisomerases can be described by two distinct models: a chain pullout model accounts for the experimental observations made in the budding yeast, and a model of the mechanical rupture of rubbers accounts for the nondisjunction in standard cases. 3) Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we introduce an effective protein friction associated with the strand-passing activity of type II DNA topoisomerases. We show that this friction can be used to describe the situation in which one chromosome passes entirely through another one. Possible experiments that could test these theoretical analyses are discussed. PMID:8804628

  19. Fluorescence imaging of chromosomal DNA using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Takumi; Liu, Hong Shan; Ito, Kenichiro; Xu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome visualization is essential for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. Here, we developed a click chemistry approach for multicolor imaging of chromosomal DNA instead of the traditional dye method. We first demonstrated that the commercially available reagents allow for the multicolor staining of chromosomes. We then prepared two pro-fluorophore moieties that served as light-up reporters to stain chromosomal DNA based on click reaction and visualized the clear chromosomes in multicolor. We applied this strategy in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, telomere DNA at the end of the chromosome. We further extended this approach to observe several basic stages of cell division. We found that the click reaction enables direct visualization of the chromosome behavior in cell division. These results suggest that the technique can be broadly used for imaging chromosomes and may serve as a new approach for chromosome analysis and genetic diagnostics. PMID:27620982

  20. Analysis of DNA haplotypes suggests a genetic predisposition to trisomy 21 associated with DNA sequences on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, S E; Kittur, S D; Metaxotou, C; Watkins, P C; Patel, A S

    1985-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is a genetic predisposition to nondisjunction and trisomy 21 associated with DNA sequences on chromosome 21, we used DNA polymorphism haplotypes for chromosomes 21 to examine the distribution of different chromosomes 21 in Down syndrome and control families from the same ethnic group. The chromosomes 21 from 20 Greek families with a Down syndrome child and 27 control Greek families have been examined for DNA polymorphism haplotypes by using four common polymorphic sites adjacent to two closely linked single-copy DNA sequences (namely pW228C and pW236B), which map somewhere near the proximal long arm of chromosome 21. Three haplotypes, +, +---, and - with respective frequencies of 43/108, 24/108, and 23/108, account for the majority of chromosomes 21 in the control families. However, haplotype - was found to be much more commonly associated with chromosomes 21 that underwent nondisjunction in the Down syndrome families (frequency of 21/50; X2 for the two distributions is 9.550; P = 0.023; degrees of freedom, 3). The two populations (control and trisomic families) did not differ in the distribution of haplotypes for two DNA polymorphisms on chromosome 17. The data from this initial study suggest that the chromosome 21, which is marked in Greeks with haplotype - for the four above described polymorphic sites, is found more commonly in chromosomes that participate in nondisjunction than in controls. We propose an increased tendency for nondisjunction due to DNA sequences associated with a subset of chromosomes 21 bearing this haplotype. Images PMID:2987923

  1. Chromosomal Allocation of DNA Sequences in Wheat Using Flow-Sorted Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cápal, Petr; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Endo, Takashi R; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry enables chromosomes to be sorted into different groups based on their characteristics, such as relative DNA content and the presence of repetitive DNA sequences. Despite the recent progress in the analysis of plant genome organization and chromosome structure, there is a need for easy methods to assign DNA sequences to individual chromosomes. Here, we describe an easy way to allocate genes or DNA sequences to chromosomes in wheat using flow-sorted chromosomes combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analyses. PMID:27557693

  2. Biophysics of protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization

    PubMed Central

    Marko, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The function of DNA in cells depends on its interactions with protein molecules, which recognize and act on base sequence patterns along the double helix. These notes aim to introduce basic polymer physics of DNA molecules, biophysics of protein-DNA interactions and their study in single-DNA experiments, and some aspects of large-scale chromosome structure. Mechanisms for control of chromosome topology will also be discussed. PMID:25419039

  3. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  4. One-step cloning and chromosomal integration of DNA.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, François; Cui, Lun; Priest, David G; Endy, Drew; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2013-09-20

    We describe "clonetegration", a method for integrating DNA into prokaryotic chromosomes that approaches the simplicity of cloning DNA within extrachromosomal vectors. Compared to existing techniques, clonetegration drastically decreases the time and effort needed for integration of single or multiple DNA fragments. Additionally, clonetegration facilitates cloning and expression of genetic elements that are impossible to propagate within typical multicopy plasmids. PMID:24050148

  5. Micromechanical study of protein-DNA interactions and chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John

    I will discuss micromechanics experiments that our group has used to analyze protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization. In single-DNA experiments we have found that a feature of protein-DNA complexes is that their dissociation rates can depend strikingly on bulk solution concentrations of other proteins and DNA segments; I will describe experiments which demonstrate this effect, which can involve tens-fold changes in off-rates with submicromolar changes in solution concentrations. Second, I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing large-scale human chromosome structure; we isolate metaphase chromosomes, which in their native form behave as remarkably elastic networks of chromatin. Exposure to DNA-cutting restriction enzymes completely eliminates this elasticity, indicating that there is not a mechanically contiguous protein ''scaffold'' from which the chromosome gains its stability. I will show results of siRNA experiments indicating that depletion of condensin proteins leads to destabilization of chromosome mechanics, indicating condensin's role as the major chromatin ''cross-linker'' in metaphase chromosomes. Finally I will discuss similar experiments on human G1 nuclei, where we use genetic and chemical modifications to separate the contributions of the nuclear lamina and chromatin to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus as a whole. Supported by the NSF (DMR-1206868, MCB-1022117) and the NIH (GM105847, CA193419).

  6. Isolation and analysis of a novel gene, HXC-26, adjacent to the rab GDP dissociation inhibitor gene located at human chromosome Xq28 region.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, A; Sakai, T; Sugiyama, Y; Kusuda, J; Hashimoto, K; Maeda, H

    1996-10-31

    We screened potential promoter regions from NotI-linking cosmid clones mapped on human chromosome Xq28 region with our constructed trapping vector and isolated six fragments containing transcription activity. Using one of the obtained fragments as a probe, a novel gene was isolated by screening a human skeletal muscle cDNA library. The isolated cDNA, termed HXC-26, contained an open reading frame of 975 nucleotides encoding 325 amino acids (38,848 Da). The HXC-26 gene was composed of 13 exons that span approximately 8 kb. Several potential GC boxes were found in the putative promoter region, but no typical TATA box. The HXC-26 gene associated with a CpG island was located adjacent to the rab GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) gene. PMID:9039504

  7. Impact of repetitive DNA on sex chromosome evolution in plants.

    PubMed

    Hobza, Roman; Kubat, Zdenek; Cegan, Radim; Jesionek, Wojciech; Vyskot, Boris; Kejnovsky, Eduard

    2015-09-01

    Structurally and functionally diverged sex chromosomes have evolved in many animals as well as in some plants. Sex chromosomes represent a specific genomic region(s) with locally suppressed recombination. As a consequence, repetitive sequences involving transposable elements, tandem repeats (satellites and microsatellites), and organellar DNA accumulate on the Y (W) chromosomes. In this paper, we review the main types of repetitive elements, their gathering on the Y chromosome, and discuss new findings showing that not only accumulation of various repeats in non-recombining regions but also opposite processes form Y chromosome. The aim of this review is also to discuss the mechanisms of repetitive DNA spread involving (retro) transposition, DNA polymerase slippage or unequal crossing-over, as well as modes of repeat removal by ectopic recombination. The intensity of these processes differs in non-recombining region(s) of sex chromosomes when compared to the recombining parts of genome. We also speculate about the relationship between heterochromatinization and the formation of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. PMID:26474787

  8. Integrative bacterial artificial chromosomes for DNA integration into the Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a well-characterized model bacterium frequently used for a number of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Novel strategies combining the advantages of B. subtilis with the DNA assembly and editing tools of Escherichia coli are crucial for B. subtilis engineering efforts. We combined Gibson Assembly and λ red recombineering in E. coli with RecA-mediated homologous recombination in B. subtilis for bacterial artificial chromosome-mediated DNA integration into the well-characterized amyE target locus of the B. subtilis chromosome. The engineered integrative bacterial artificial chromosome iBAC(cav) can accept any DNA fragment for integration into B. subtilis chromosome and allows rapid selection of transformants by B. subtilis-specific antibiotic resistance and the yellow fluorescent protein (mVenus) expression. We used the developed iBAC(cav)-mediated system to integrate 10kb DNA fragment from E. coli K12 MG1655 into B. subtilis chromosome. iBAC(cav)-mediated chromosomal integration approach will facilitate rational design of synthetic biology applications in B. subtilis. PMID:27033694

  9. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  10. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Mark T.; Grafham, Darren V.; Coffey, Alison J.; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R.; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P.; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L.; Howe, Kevin L.; Ashurst, Jennifer L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Scott, Carol E.; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L.; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D.; Ansari-Lari, M. Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I. S.; Babbage, Anne K.; Bagguley, Claire L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E.; Barlow, Karen F.; Barrett, Ian P.; Bates, Karen N.; Beare, David M.; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M.; Brown, Andrew J.; Brown, Mary J.; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M.; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C.; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y.; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M.; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G.; Conquer, Jen S.; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E.; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; DeShazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K. James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L.; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E.; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G.; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A.; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D.; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J.; Huckle, Elizabeth J.; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J.; Hunt, Adrienne R.; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J.; Joseph, Shirin S.; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K.; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J.; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K.; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M.; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E.; Lovell, Jamieson D.; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H.; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L.; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C.; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O’Dell, Christopher N.; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V.; Pearson, Danita M.; Pelan, Sarah E.; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M.; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A.; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G.; Sehra, Harminder K.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M.; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D.; Smith, Michelle L.; Sotheran, Elizabeth C.; Steingruber, Helen E.; Steward, Charles A.; Storey, Roy; Swann, R. Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E.; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C.; d’Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L.; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L.; Whiteley, Mathew N.; Wilkinson, Jane E.; Willey, David L.; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L.; Wray, Paul W.; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Willard, Huntington F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Rice, Catherine M.; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L.; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E.; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A.; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  11. Cell-free DNA screening and sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Mennuti, Michael T; Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Khalek, Nahla; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidies. This technology may also identify fetal sex and can be used to screen for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Physicians offering this screening will need to be prepared to offer comprehensive prenatal counseling about these disorders to an increasing number of patients. The purpose of this article is to consider the source of information to use for counseling, factors in parental decision-making, and the performance characteristics of cfDNA testing in screening for SCAs. Discordance between ultrasound examination and cfDNA results regarding fetal sex is also discussed. PMID:26088741

  12. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Humphray, S J; Oliver, K; Hunt, A R; Plumb, R W; Loveland, J E; Howe, K L; Andrews, T D; Searle, S; Hunt, S E; Scott, C E; Jones, M C; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Ashwell, R I S; Babbage, A K; Babbage, S; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Barker, D J; Barlow, K F; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Beasley, O; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Chen, Y; Clarke, G; Clark, S Y; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Collier, R E; Corby, N; Crosier, M; Cummings, A T; Davies, J; Dhami, P; Dunn, M; Dutta, I; Dyer, L W; Earthrowl, M E; Faulkner, L; Fleming, C J; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; French, L; Fricker, D G; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Ghori, J; Gilbert, J G R; Glison, C; Grafham, D V; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Griffiths-Jones, S; Grocock, R; Guy, J; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Harrison, E S I; Hart, E A; Heath, P D; Henderson, C D; Hopkins, B L; Howard, P J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Joy, A A; Kay, M; Keenan, S; Kershaw, J K; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A; Laird, G K; Langford, C; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Leversha, M; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Lovell, J; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nisbett, J; Nordsiek, G; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Porter, K M; Pandian, R; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Povey, S; Ramsey, Y; Rand, V; Scharfe, M; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S K; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C A; Swarbreck, D; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Thomas, D W; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; West, A P; Whitehead, S L; Willey, D L; Williams, S A; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Ashurst, J L; Coulson, A; Blöcker, H; Durbin, R; Sulston, J E; Hubbard, T; Jackson, M J; Bentley, D R; Beck, S; Rogers, J; Dunham, I

    2004-05-27

    Chromosome 9 is highly structurally polymorphic. It contains the largest autosomal block of heterochromatin, which is heteromorphic in 6-8% of humans, whereas pericentric inversions occur in more than 1% of the population. The finished euchromatic sequence of chromosome 9 comprises 109,044,351 base pairs and represents >99.6% of the region. Analysis of the sequence reveals many intra- and interchromosomal duplications, including segmental duplications adjacent to both the centromere and the large heterochromatic block. We have annotated 1,149 genes, including genes implicated in male-to-female sex reversal, cancer and neurodegenerative disease, and 426 pseudogenes. The chromosome contains the largest interferon gene cluster in the human genome. There is also a region of exceptionally high gene and G + C content including genes paralogous to those in the major histocompatibility complex. We have also detected recently duplicated genes that exhibit different rates of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting natural selection. PMID:15164053

  13. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    Humphray, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Hunt, A. R.; Plumb, R. W.; Loveland, J. E.; Howe, K. L.; Andrews, T. D.; Searle, S.; Hunt, S. E.; Scott, C. E.; Jones, M. C.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Ashwell, R. I. S.; Babbage, A. K.; Babbage, S.; Bagguley, C. L.; Bailey, J.; Banerjee, R.; Barker, D. J.; Barlow, K. F.; Bates, K.; Beasley, H.; Beasley, O.; Bird, C. P.; Bray-Allen, S.; Brown, A. J.; Brown, J. Y.; Burford, D.; Burrill, W.; Burton, J.; Carder, C.; Carter, N. P.; Chapman, J. C.; Chen, Y.; Clarke, G.; Clark, S. Y.; Clee, C. M.; Clegg, S.; Collier, R. E.; Corby, N.; Crosier, M.; Cummings, A. T.; Davies, J.; Dhami, P.; Dunn, M.; Dutta, I.; Dyer, L. W.; Earthrowl, M. E.; Faulkner, L.; Fleming, C. J.; Frankish, A.; Frankland, J. A.; French, L.; Fricker, D. G.; Garner, P.; Garnett, J.; Ghori, J.; Gilbert, J. G. R.; Glison, C.; Grafham, D. V.; Gribble, S.; Griffiths, C.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Grocock, R.; Guy, J.; Hall, R. E.; Hammond, S.; Harley, J. L.; Harrison, E. S. I.; Hart, E. A.; Heath, P. D.; Henderson, C. D.; Hopkins, B. L.; Howard, P. J.; Howden, P. J.; Huckle, E.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.; Joy, A. A.; Kay, M.; Keenan, S.; Kershaw, J. K.; Kimberley, A. M.; King, A.; Knights, A.; Laird, G. K.; Langford, C.; Lawlor, S.; Leongamornlert, D. A.; Leversha, M.; Lloyd, C.; Lloyd, D. M.; Lovell, J.; Martin, S.; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M.; Matthews, L.; McLaren, S.; McLay, K. E.; McMurray, A.; Milne, S.; Nickerson, T.; Nisbett, J.; Nordsiek, G.; Pearce, A. V.; Peck, A. I.; Porter, K. M.; Pandian, R.; Pelan, S.; Phillimore, B.; Povey, S.; Ramsey, Y.; Rand, V.; Scharfe, M.; Sehra, H. K.; Shownkeen, R.; Sims, S. K.; Skuce, C. D.; Smith, M.; Steward, C. A.; Swarbreck, D.; Sycamore, N.; Tester, J.; Thorpe, A.; Tracey, A.; Tromans, A.; Thomas, D. W.; Wall, M.; Wallis, J. M.; West, A. P.; Whitehead, S. L.; Willey, D. L.; Williams, S. A.; Wilming, L.; Wray, P. W.; Young, L.; Ashurst, J. L.; Coulson, A.; Blöcker, H.; Durbin, R.; Sulston, J. E.; Hubbard, T.; Jackson, M. J.; Bentley, D. R.; Beck, S.; Rogers, J.; Dunham, I.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 9 is highly structurally polymorphic. It contains the largest autosomal block of heterochromatin, which is heteromorphic in 6–8% of humans, whereas pericentric inversions occur in more than 1% of the population. The finished euchromatic sequence of chromosome 9 comprises 109,044,351 base pairs and represents >99.6% of the region. Analysis of the sequence reveals many intra- and interchromosomal duplications, including segmental duplications adjacent to both the centromere and the large heterochromatic block. We have annotated 1,149 genes, including genes implicated in male-to-female sex reversal, cancer and neurodegenerative disease, and 426 pseudogenes. The chromosome contains the largest interferon gene cluster in the human genome. There is also a region of exceptionally high gene and G + C content including genes paralogous to those in the major histocompatibility complex. We have also detected recently duplicated genes that exhibit different rates of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting natural selection. PMID:15164053

  14. Multiple cellular mechanisms prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolyn M.; Alani, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is present in the eukaryotic genome in the form of segmental duplications, tandem and interspersed repeats, and satellites. Repetitive sequences can be beneficial by serving specific cellular functions (e.g. centromeric and telomeric DNA) and by providing a rapid means for adaptive evolution. However, such elements are also substrates for deleterious chromosomal rearrangements that affect fitness and promote human disease. Recent studies analyzing the role of nuclear organization in DNA repair and factors that suppress non-allelic homologous recombination have provided insights into how genome stability is maintained in eukaryotes. In this review we outline the types of repetitive sequences seen in eukaryotic genomes and how recombination mechanisms are regulated at the DNA sequence, cell organization, chromatin structure, and cell cycle control levels to prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving these sequences. PMID:22494239

  15. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Earthrowl, M E; Grafham, D V; Rubenfield, M; French, L; Steward, C A; Sims, S K; Jones, M C; Searle, S; Scott, C; Howe, K; Hunt, S E; Andrews, T D; Gilbert, J G R; Swarbreck, D; Ashurst, J L; Taylor, A; Battles, J; Bird, C P; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ashwell, R I S; Ambrose, K D; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D C; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Cahill, P; Camire, D; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Corby, N; Coulson, A; Dhami, P; Dutta, I; Dunn, M; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Grocock, R; Gustafson, E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E; Heath, P D; Ho, T P; Hopkins, B; Horne, J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hynds, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kana, A; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; Kershaw, J K; Kokkinaki, M; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lee, H M; Leongamornlert, D A; Laird, G; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nguyen, M; Overton-Larty, E; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K; Rice, C M; Rogosin, A; Ross, M T; Sarafidou, T; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Standring, L; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Torcasso, W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tsolas, J; Wall, M; Walsh, J; Wang, H; Weinstock, K; West, A P; Willey, D L; Whitehead, S L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Chen, Y; Lovering, R C; Moschonas, N K; Siebert, R; Fechtel, K; Bentley, D; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Doucette-Stamm, L; Beck, S; Smith, D R; Rogers, J

    2004-05-27

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence. PMID:15164054

  16. Sex chromosome evolution: life, death and repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Nikita; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-01-01

    Dimorphic sex chromosomes create problems. Males of many species, including Drosophila, are heterogametic, with dissimilar X and Y chromosomes. The essential process of dosage compensation modulates the expression of X-linked genes in one sex to maintain a constant ratio of X to autosomal expression. This involves the regulation of hundreds of dissimilar genes whose only shared property is chromosomal address. Drosophila males dosage compensate by up regulating X-linked genes 2 fold. This is achieved by the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex, which is recruited to genes on the X chromosome and modifies chromatin to increase expression. How the MSL complex is restricted to X-linked genes remains unknown. Recent studies of sex chromosome evolution have identified a central role for 2 types of repetitive elements in X recognition. Helitrons carrying sites that recruit the MSL complex have expanded across the X chromosome in at least one Drosophila species.1 Our laboratory found that siRNA from an X-linked satellite repeat promotes X recognition by a yet unknown mechanism.2 The recurring adoption of repetitive elements as X-identify elements suggests that the large and mysterious fraction of the genome called “junk” DNA is actually instrumental in the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:25751570

  17. Sex chromosome evolution: life, death and repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nikita; Meller, Victoria H

    2014-01-01

    Dimorphic sex chromosomes create problems. Males of many species, including Drosophila, are heterogametic, with dissimilar X and Y chromosomes. The essential process of dosage compensation modulates the expression of X-linked genes in one sex to maintain a constant ratio of X to autosomal expression. This involves the regulation of hundreds of dissimilar genes whose only shared property is chromosomal address. Drosophila males dosage compensate by up regulating X-linked genes 2 fold. This is achieved by the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex, which is recruited to genes on the X chromosome and modifies chromatin to increase expression. How the MSL complex is restricted to X-linked genes remains unknown. Recent studies of sex chromosome evolution have identified a central role for 2 types of repetitive elements in X recognition. Helitrons carrying sites that recruit the MSL complex have expanded across the X chromosome in at least one Drosophila species. (1) Our laboratory found that siRNA from an X-linked satellite repeat promotes X recognition by a yet unknown mechanism. (2) The recurring adoption of repetitive elements as X-identify elements suggests that the large and mysterious fraction of the genome called "junk" DNA is actually instrumental in the evolution of sex chromosomes. PMID:25751570

  18. Construction of DNA libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Deaven, L.L.; McCormick, M.K.; Grady, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a series of DNA libraries from flow-sorted chromosomes. Small insert, complete digest libraries cloned into the EcoRI insertion site of Charon 21A are available from the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Partial digest libraries cloned into cosmid (sCos1) or phage (Charon 40) vectors have been constructed for chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, X and Y. Purity estimates by in situ analysis of sorted chromosomes, flow karyotype analysis, and plaque or colony hybridization indicate that most of these libraries are 90-95% pure. Additional cosmid library constructions, 5-10X arrays of libraries into microtiter plates, and high density membrane arrays of libraries are in progress. Recently, we have completed YAC libraries for chromosomes 5, 9, 16, and 21. These libraries are made from complete DNA digests using the rare cutters Clal, SacII, EagI, or NotI/NheI. The average insert size is {similar_to}200 kb, and chimera frequencies are low (1-10%). Libraries have also been constructed using M13 or bluescript vectors (chromosomes 5, 7, 17) to generate STS markers for the selection of chromosome-specific inserts from total genomic AC libraries. Because of the advantages of insert size and stability associated with BAC and PAC cloning systems, we are currently attempting to adapt pBAC108L and pCYPAC1 vectors for use with flow-sorted chromosomal DNA.

  19. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24929514

  20. Birefringence and DNA Condensation of Liquid Crystalline Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Man H.; Yan, Kosmo T. H.; Bennett, Michael J.; Wong, Joseph T. Y.

    2010-01-01

    DNA can self-assemble in vitro into several liquid crystalline phases at high concentrations. The largest known genomes are encoded by the cholesteric liquid crystalline chromosomes (LCCs) of the dinoflagellates, a diverse group of protists related to the malarial parasites. Very little is known about how the liquid crystalline packaging strategy is employed to organize these genomes, the largest among living eukaryotes—up to 80 times the size of the human genome. Comparative measurements using a semiautomatic polarizing microscope demonstrated that there is a large variation in the birefringence, an optical property of anisotropic materials, of the chromosomes from different dinoflagellate species, despite their apparently similar ultrastructural patterns of bands and arches. There is a large variation in the chromosomal arrangements in the nuclei and individual karyotypes. Our data suggest that both macroscopic and ultrastructural arrangements affect the apparent birefringence of the liquid crystalline chromosomes. Positive correlations are demonstrated for the first time between the level of absolute retardance and both the DNA content and the observed helical pitch measured from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photomicrographs. Experiments that induced disassembly of the chromosomes revealed multiple orders of organization in the dinoflagellate chromosomes. With the low protein-to-DNA ratio, we propose that a highly regulated use of entropy-driven force must be involved in the assembly of these LCCs. Knowledge of the mechanism of packaging and arranging these largest known DNAs into different shapes and different formats in the nuclei would be of great value in the use of DNA as nanostructural material. PMID:20400466

  1. Extraction of Chromosomal DNA from Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    Extraction of DNA from Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells is required for various uses, including templating polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), Southern blotting, library construction, and high-throughput sequencing. To purify high-quality DNA, the cell wall is removed by digestion with Zymolyase or Lyticase and the resulting spheroplasts lysed using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Cell debris, SDS, and SDS-protein complexes are subsequently precipitated by the addition of potassium acetate and removed by centrifugation. Finally, DNA is precipitated using isopropanol. At this stage, purity is usually sufficient for PCR. However, for more sensitive procedures, such as restriction enzyme digestion, additional purification steps, including proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform extraction, are recommended. All of these steps are described in detail here. PMID:27140918

  2. Mechanism of Suppression of Chromosomal Instability by DNA Polymerase POLQ

    PubMed Central

    Yousefzadeh, Matthew J.; Wyatt, David W.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Mu, Yunxiang; Hensley, Sean C.; Tomida, Junya; Bylund, Göran O.; Doublié, Sylvie; Johansson, Erik; Ramsden, Dale A.; McBride, Kevin M.; Wood, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Although a defect in the DNA polymerase POLQ leads to ionizing radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells, the relevant enzymatic pathway has not been identified. Here we define the specific mechanism by which POLQ restricts harmful DNA instability. Our experiments show that Polq-null murine cells are selectively hypersensitive to DNA strand breaking agents, and that damage resistance requires the DNA polymerase activity of POLQ. Using a DNA break end joining assay in cells, we monitored repair of DNA ends with long 3′ single-stranded overhangs. End joining events retaining much of the overhang were dependent on POLQ, and independent of Ku70. To analyze the repair function in more detail, we examined immunoglobulin class switch joining between DNA segments in antibody genes. POLQ participates in end joining of a DNA break during immunoglobulin class-switching, producing insertions of base pairs at the joins with homology to IgH switch-region sequences. Biochemical experiments with purified human POLQ protein revealed the mechanism generating the insertions during DNA end joining, relying on the unique ability of POLQ to extend DNA from minimally paired primers. DNA breaks at the IgH locus can sometimes join with breaks in Myc, creating a chromosome translocation. We found a marked increase in Myc/IgH translocations in Polq-defective mice, showing that POLQ suppresses genomic instability and genome rearrangements originating at DNA double-strand breaks. This work clearly defines a role and mechanism for mammalian POLQ in an alternative end joining pathway that suppresses the formation of chromosomal translocations. Our findings depart from the prevailing view that alternative end joining processes are generically translocation-prone. PMID:25275444

  3. 3D view of chromosomes, DNA damage, and translocations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Hakim, Ofir

    2014-04-01

    The cell nucleus is a busy and organized organelle. In this megalopolis made of billions of nucleotides, protein factors find their target loci to exert nuclear functions such as transcription and replication. Remarkably, despite the lack of internal membrane barrier, the interlinked and tightly regulated nuclear processes occur in spatially organized fashion. These processes can lead to double-strand breaks (DSBs) that compromise the integrity of the genome. Moreover, in some cells like lymphocytes, DNA damage is also targeted within the context of immunoglobulin gene recombination. If not repaired correctly, DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements, including translocations which are etiological in numerous tumors. Therefore, the chromosomal locations of DSBs, as well as their spatial positioning, are important contributors to formation of chromosomal translocations at specific genomic loci. To obtain a mechanistic understanding of chromosomal translocations these parameters should be accounted for in a global and integrative fashion. In this review we will discuss recent findings addressing how genome architecture, DNA damage, and repair contribute to the genesis of chromosomal translocations. PMID:24632298

  4. Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA variation in Lithuanians.

    PubMed

    Kasperaviciūte, D; Kucinskas, V; Stoneking, M

    2004-09-01

    The genetic composition of the Lithuanian population was investigated by analysing mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region 1, RFLP polymorphisms and Y chromosomal biallelic and STR markers in six ethnolinguistic groups of Lithuanians, to address questions about the origin and genetic structure of the present day population. There were no significant genetic differences among ethnolinguistic groups, and an analysis of molecular variance confirmed the homogeneity of the Lithuanian population. MtDNA diversity revealed that Lithuanians are close to both Slavic (Indo-European) and Finno-Ugric speaking populations of Northern and Eastern Europe. Y-chromosome SNP haplogroup analysis showed Lithuanians to be closest to Latvians and Estonians. Significant differences between Lithuanian and Estonian Y chromosome STR haplotypes suggested that these populations have had different demographic histories. We suggest that the observed pattern of Y chromosome diversity in Lithuanians may be explained by a population bottleneck associated with Indo-European contact. Different Y chromosome STR distributions in Lithuanians and Estonians might be explained by different origins or, alternatively, be the result of some period of isolation and genetic drift after the population split. PMID:15469421

  5. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  6. Chromosome banding and DNA replication patterns in bird karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, M; Enderle, E; Schindler, D; Schempp, W

    1989-01-01

    The karyotypes of the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix), and griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) were studied with a variety of banding techniques. The DNA replication patterns of bird chromosomes, analyzed by incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT), are presented here for the first time. In particular, the time sequence of replication of the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes throughout the S-phase was meticulously analyzed. BrdU and dT incorporation are very useful methods to identify homoeologies between karyotypes, as well as rearrangements that occurred in the macroautosomes during speciation. The Z chromosomes of the three birds displayed the same replication patterns, indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservation. In the homogametic male, BrdU and dT incorporation revealed no evidence of asynchronous replication between euchromatic bands in the ZZ pair. The same was true of the three Z chromosomes in a triploid-diploid chimeric chicken embryo. Minor replication asynchronies between the homologous ZZ or ZZZ chromosomes were restricted to heterochromatic C-bands. These results confirm that, in the ZZ male/ZW female sex-determining system of birds, dosage compensation for Z-linked genes does not occur by inactivation of one of the two Z chromosomes in the homogametic male. The heterochromatic W chromosomes of the three species showed bright labeling with distamycin A/mithramycin counterstain-enhanced fluorescence and exhibited significantly delayed DNA replication. The nucleolus organizers of birds, frequently located in microchromosomes, were also distinguished by bright distamycin A/mithramycin fluorescence. PMID:2630186

  7. Mitochondrial DNA repairs double-strand breaks in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, M; Fairhead, C; Dujon, B

    1999-11-01

    The endosymbiotic theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells proposes that genetic information can be transferred from mitochondria to the nucleus of a cell, and genes that are probably of mitochondrial origin have been found in nuclear chromosomes. Occasionally, short or rearranged sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA are seen in the chromosomes of different organisms including yeast, plants and humans. Here we report a mechanism by which fragments of mitochondrial DNA, in single or tandem array, are transferred to yeast chromosomes under natural conditions during the repair of double-strand breaks in haploid mitotic cells. These repair insertions originate from noncontiguous regions of the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome indicates that the yeast nuclear genome does indeed contain several short sequences of mitochondrial origin which are similar in size and composition to those that repair double-strand breaks. These sequences are located predominantly in non-coding regions of the chromosomes, frequently in the vicinity of retrotransposon long terminal repeats, and appear as recent integration events. Thus, colonization of the yeast genome by mitochondrial DNA is an ongoing process. PMID:10573425

  8. Horizontal transfer of DNA methylation patterns into bacterial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Eun; Lin, Chris; Lim, Han N

    2016-05-19

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the non-inherited acquisition of novel DNA sequences. HGT is common and important in bacteria because it enables the rapid generation of new phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance. Here we show that in vivo and in vitro DNA methylation patterns can be horizontally transferred into bacterial chromosomes to program cell phenotypes. The experiments were performed using a synthetic system in Escherichia coli where different DNA methylation patterns within the cis-regulatory sequence of the agn43 gene turn on or off a fluorescent reporter (CFP). With this system we demonstrated that DNA methylation patterns not only accompany the horizontal transfer of genes into the bacterial cytoplasm but can be transferred into chromosomes by: (i) bacteriophage P1 transduction; and (ii) transformation of extracellular synthetic DNA. We also modified the experimental system by replacing CFP with the SgrS small RNA, which regulates glucose and methyl α-D-glucoside uptake, and showed that horizontally acquired DNA methylation patterns can increase or decrease cell fitness. That is, horizontally acquired DNA methylation patterns can result in the selection for and against cells that have HGT. Findings from these proof-of-concept experiments have applications in synthetic biology and potentially broad implications for bacterial adaptation and evolution. PMID:27084942

  9. Horizontal transfer of DNA methylation patterns into bacterial chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Eun; Lin, Chris; Lim, Han N.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the non-inherited acquisition of novel DNA sequences. HGT is common and important in bacteria because it enables the rapid generation of new phenotypes such as antibiotic resistance. Here we show that in vivo and in vitro DNA methylation patterns can be horizontally transferred into bacterial chromosomes to program cell phenotypes. The experiments were performed using a synthetic system in Escherichia coli where different DNA methylation patterns within the cis-regulatory sequence of the agn43 gene turn on or off a fluorescent reporter (CFP). With this system we demonstrated that DNA methylation patterns not only accompany the horizontal transfer of genes into the bacterial cytoplasm but can be transferred into chromosomes by: (i) bacteriophage P1 transduction; and (ii) transformation of extracellular synthetic DNA. We also modified the experimental system by replacing CFP with the SgrS small RNA, which regulates glucose and methyl α-D-glucoside uptake, and showed that horizontally acquired DNA methylation patterns can increase or decrease cell fitness. That is, horizontally acquired DNA methylation patterns can result in the selection for and against cells that have HGT. Findings from these proof-of-concept experiments have applications in synthetic biology and potentially broad implications for bacterial adaptation and evolution. PMID:27084942

  10. Capillary electrophoresis: Biotechnology for separation of DNA and chromosomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Electrophoresis has been used for the separation of particles, ions, and molecules for a number of years. The technology for separation and detection of the results has many applications in the life sciences. One of the major goals of the scientific community is to separate DNA molecules and intact chromosomes based upon their different lengths or number of base pairs. This may be achieved by using some of the commercially available and widely used methods, but these processes require a considerable amount of time. The challenge is to achieve separation of intact chromosomes in a short time, preferably in a matter of minutes.

  11. Phylogenetic relationships and the primitive X chromosome inferred from chromosomal and satellite DNA analysis in Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Heslop-Harrison, John S

    2005-10-01

    The early phylogeny of the 137 species in the Bovidae family is difficult to resolve; knowledge of the evolution and relationships of the tribes would facilitate comparative mapping, understanding chromosomal evolution patterns and perhaps assist breeding and domestication strategies. We found that the study of the presence and organization of two repetitive DNA satellite sequences (the clone pOaKB9 from sheep, a member of the 1.714 satellite I family and the pBtKB5, a 1.715 satellite I clone from cattle) on the X and autosomal chromosomes by in situ hybridization to chromosomes from 15 species of seven tribes, was informative. The results support a consistent phylogeny, suggesting that the primitive form of the X chromosome is acrocentric, and has satellite I sequences at its centromere. Because of the distribution of the ancient satellite I sequence, the X chromosome from the extant Tragelaphini (e.g. oryx), rather than Caprini (sheep), line is most primitive. The Bovini (cow) and Tragelaphini tribes lack the 1.714 satellite present in the other tribes, and this satellite is evolutionarily younger than the 1.715 sequence, with absence of the 1.714 sequence being a marker for the Bovini and Tragelaphini tribes (the Bovinae subfamily). In the other tribes, three (Reduncini, Hippotragini and Aepycerotini) have both 1.714 and 1.715 satellite sequences present on both autosomes and the X chromosome. We suggest a parallel event in two lineages, leading to X chromosomes with the loss of 1.715 satellite from the Bovini, and the loss of both 1.714 and 1.715 satellites in a monophyletic Caprini and Alcelaphini lineage. The presence and X chromosome distribution of these satellite sequences allow the seven tribes to be distributed to four groups, which are consistent with current diversity estimates, and support one model to resolve points of separation of the tribes. PMID:16191610

  12. Regulation of DNA Replication Timing on Human Chromosome by a Cell-Type Specific DNA Binding Protein SATB1

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Masako; Kanoh, Yutaka; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Masai, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    Background Replication timing of metazoan DNA during S-phase may be determined by many factors including chromosome structures, nuclear positioning, patterns of histone modifications, and transcriptional activity. It may be determined by Mb-domain structures, termed as “replication domains”, and recent findings indicate that replication timing is under developmental and cell type-specific regulation. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined replication timing on the human 5q23/31 3.5-Mb segment in T cells and non-T cells. We used two independent methods to determine replication timing. One is quantification of nascent replicating DNA in cell cycle-fractionated stage-specific S phase populations. The other is FISH analyses of replication foci. Although the locations of early- and late-replicating domains were common between the two cell lines, the timing transition region (TTR) between early and late domains were offset by 200-kb. We show that Special AT-rich sequence Binding protein 1 (SATB1), specifically expressed in T-cells, binds to the early domain immediately adjacent to TTR and delays the replication timing of the TTR. Measurement of the chromosome copy number along the TTR during synchronized S phase suggests that the fork movement may be slowed down by SATB1. Conclusions Our results reveal a novel role of SATB1 in cell type-specific regulation of replication timing along the chromosome. PMID:22879953

  13. DNA and chromosomal damage in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mohd Akbar; Mahajan, Naresh; Gandhi, Gursatej

    2013-01-01

    DNA and chromosomal damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) were investigated by using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay /comet and cytokinesis- block micronucleus (CBMN) assays, respectively. The case-control study comprised patients with CAD (n = 46; average age 53.0 ± 1.27 y) undergoing treatment at local hospitals, and healthy age-and sex-matched controls (n = 19; average age 54.21 ± 0.91 y) from the general population. The results of the comet assay revealed that the mean values of DNA damage were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in CAD patients than in controls (Tail DNA% 11.55 ± 0.38 vs. 5.31 ± 0.44; Tail moment 6.17 ± 0.31 vs. 2.93 ± 0.21 AU; Olive tail moment 3.52 ± 0.23 vs. 1.25 ± 0.11 AU). The mean values of chromosomal damage were also significantly higher (p < 0.001) in CAD patients than in controls (Binucleated cells with MN- 28.15 ± 1.18 vs. 18.16 ± 2.59; micronuclei 29.52 ± 1.21 vs. 18.68 ± 2.64, respectively) while nuclear division index (1.48 ± 0.01 vs. 1.63 ± 0.01) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in controls. The results of the present study indicate that coronary artery disease patients had increased levels of both, unrepaired (DNA) and repaired (chromosomal) genetic damage which may be a pathological consequence of the disease and/or the drug-treatment. This accumulation of DNA/chromosomal damage is of concern as it can lead to the development of cancer with increased chances of morbidity and mortality in the CAD patients. PMID:26535030

  14. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Matthews, L H; Ashurst, J; Burton, J; Gilbert, J G; Jones, M; Stavrides, G; Almeida, J P; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Barlow, K F; Bates, K N; Beard, L M; Beare, D M; Beasley, O P; Bird, C P; Blakey, S E; Bridgeman, A M; Brown, A J; Buck, D; Burrill, W; Butler, A P; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M; Clark, G; Clark, L N; Clark, S Y; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Cobley, V E; Collier, R E; Connor, R; Corby, N R; Coulson, A; Coville, G J; Deadman, R; Dhami, P; Dunn, M; Ellington, A G; Frankland, J A; Fraser, A; French, L; Garner, P; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths, M N; Gwilliam, R; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Heath, P D; Ho, S; Holden, J L; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Jekosch, K; Johnson, C M; Johnson, D; Kay, M P; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lehvaslaiho, M H; Leversha, M; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Lovell, J D; Marsh, V L; Martin, S L; McConnachie, L J; McLay, K; McMurray, A A; Milne, S; Mistry, D; Moore, M J; Mullikin, J C; Nickerson, T; Oliver, K; Parker, A; Patel, R; Pearce, T A; Peck, A I; Phillimore, B J; Prathalingam, S R; Plumb, R W; Ramsay, H; Rice, C M; Ross, M T; Scott, C E; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M L; Soderlund, C; Steward, C A; Sulston, J E; Swann, M; Sycamore, N; Taylor, R; Tee, L; Thomas, D W; Thorpe, A; Tracey, A; Tromans, A C; Vaudin, M; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; Whitehead, S L; Whittaker, P; Willey, D L; Williams, L; Williams, S A; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Hubbard, T; Durbin, R M; Bentley, D R; Beck, S; Rogers, J

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 20 comprises 59,187,298 base pairs (bp) and represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA. A single contig of 26 megabases (Mb) spans the entire short arm, and five contigs separated by gaps totalling 320 kb span the long arm of this metacentric chromosome. An additional 234,339 bp of sequence has been determined within the pericentromeric region of the long arm. We annotated 727 genes and 168 pseudogenes in the sequence. About 64% of these genes have a 5' and a 3' untranslated region and a complete open reading frame. Comparative analysis of the sequence of chromosome 20 to whole-genome shotgun-sequence data of two other vertebrates, the mouse Mus musculus and the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis, provides an independent measure of the efficiency of gene annotation, and indicates that this analysis may account for more than 95% of all coding exons and almost all genes. PMID:11780052

  15. Neutron energy-dependent initial DNA damage and chromosomal exchange.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Gajendiran, N; Endo, S; Komatsu, K; Hoshi, M; Kamada, N

    1999-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the biological effect of monoenergetic neutrons on human lymphocyte DNA and chromosomes. Monoenergetic neutrons of 2.3, 1.0, 0.79, 0.57, 0.37 and 0.186 MeV were generated, and 252Cf neutrons and 60Co gamma-rays were also used for comparison. Biological effect was evaluated two ways. The RBE values with the comet assay were estimated as 6.3 and 5.4 at 0.37 MeV and 0.57 MeV relative to that of 60Co gamma-rays, and chromosome aberration rates were also observed in these different levels of monoenergetic neutrons. The yield of chromosome aberrations per unit dose was high at lower neutron energies with a gradual decline with 0.186 MeV neutron energy. The RBE was increased to 10.7 at 0.57 MeV from 3.9 at 252Cf neutrons and reached 16.4 as the highest RBE at 0.37 MeV, but the value decreased to 11.2 at 0.186 MeV. The response patterns of initial DNA damage and chromosome exchange were quite similar to that of LET. These results show that the intensity of DNA damage and chromosomal exchange is LET dependent. RBE of low energy neutrons is higher than that of fission neutrons. Low energy neutrons containing Hiroshima atomic bomb radiation may have created a significantly higher incidence of biological effect in atomic bomb survivors. PMID:10804992

  16. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Grimwood, Jane; Gordon, Laurie A.; Olsen, Anne; Terry, Astrid; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lamerdin, Jane; Hellsten, Uffe; Goodstein, David; Couronne, Olivier; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Ashworth, Linda; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caenepeel, Sean; Carrano, Anthony; Caoile, Chenier; Chan, Yee Man; Christensen, Mari; Cleland, Catherine A.; Copeland, Alex; Dalin, Eileen; Dehal, Paramvir; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Garcia, Carmen; Georgescu, Anca M.; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eldelyn; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Ho, Issac; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Larionov, Vladimer; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McCready, Paula; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nelson, Kathryn; Nolan, Matt; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Popkie, Anthony P.; Predki, Paul; Quan, Glenda; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanine; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; She, Xinwei; Smith, Doug; Slezak, Tom; Solovyev, Victor; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wagner, Mark; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Xie, Gary; Yang, Joan; Dubchak, Inna; Furey, Terrence S.; DeJong, Pieter; Dickson, Mark; Gordon, David; Eichler, Evan E.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Richardson, Paul; Stubbs, Lisa; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan M.

    2003-09-15

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G1C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9 percent of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25 percent of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, a nd segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  17. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  18. Chromosomal directionality of DNA mismatch repair in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, A. M. Mahedi; Leach, David R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) result in elevated mutagenesis and in cancer predisposition. This disease burden arises because MMR is required to correct errors made in the copying of DNA. MMR is bidirectional at the level of DNA strand polarity as it operates equally well in the 5′ to 3′ and the 3′ to 5′ directions. However, the directionality of MMR with respect to the chromosome, which comprises parental DNA strands of opposite polarity, has been unknown. Here, we show that MMR in Escherichia coli is unidirectional with respect to the chromosome. Our data demonstrate that, following the recognition of a 3-bp insertion-deletion loop mismatch, the MMR machinery searches for the first hemimethylated GATC site located on its origin-distal side, toward the replication fork, and that resection then proceeds back toward the mismatch and away from the replication fork. This study provides support for a tight coupling between MMR and DNA replication. PMID:26170312

  19. Computer modelling of DNA structures involved in chromosome maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Eckdahl, T T; Anderson, J N

    1987-01-01

    Sequence-dependent DNA bending of synthetic and natural molecules was studied by computer analysis. Modelling of synthetic oligonucleotides and of 107 kb of natural sequences gave results which closely resembled published electrophoretic data, demonstrating the powerful predictive capacity of the procedure. The analysis was extended to the study of DNA structures involved in chromosome maintenance. Centromeric DNAs from yeast were found to have sequences in their functional elements which cause them to be unusually straight. Autonomous replicating sequences were found to have two structural domains, one consisting of unusually straight sequences surrounding the consensus and the other of bending elements in flanking DNA. In addition to a structural homology, centromeric and autonomous replicating sequences share common sequence elements. These observations show that computer modelling of natural sequences is a viable approach to the study of the biological implications of alternative DNA structures. PMID:3671091

  20. DNA Damage to a Single Chromosome End Delays Anaphase Onset*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Stambaugh, Jessica R.; Yokomori, Kyoko; Shah, Jagesh V.; Berns, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome ends contain nucleoprotein structures known as telomeres. Damage to chromosome ends during interphase elicits a DNA damage response (DDR) resulting in cell cycle arrest. However, little is known regarding the signaling from damaged chromosome ends (designated here as “TIPs”) during mitosis. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of DNA damage induced at a single TIP in mitosis. We used laser microirradiation to damage mitotic TIPs or chromosome arms (non-TIPs) in PtK2 kidney epithelial cells. We found that damage to a single TIP, but not a non-TIP, delays anaphase onset. This TIP-specific checkpoint response is accompanied by differential recruitment of DDR proteins. Although phosphorylation of H2AX and the recruitment of several repair factors, such as Ku70-Ku80, occur in a comparable manner at both TIP and non-TIP damage sites, DDR factors such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), MDC1, WRN, and FANCD2 are specifically recruited to TIPs but not to non-TIPs. In addition, Nbs1, BRCA1, and ubiquitin accumulate at damaged TIPs more rapidly than at damaged non-TIPs. ATR and 53BP1 are not detected at either TIPs or non-TIPs in mitosis. The observed delay in anaphase onset is dependent on the activity of DDR kinases ATM and Chk1, and the spindle assembly checkpoint kinase Mps1. Cells damaged at a single TIP or non-TIP eventually exit mitosis with unrepaired lesions. Damaged TIPs are segregated into micronuclei at a significantly higher frequency than damaged non-TIPs. Together, these findings reveal a mitosis-specific DDR uniquely associated with chromosome ends. PMID:24982423

  1. Partial purification and characterization of DNA from the human X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Schmeckpeper, B J; Smith, K D; Dorman, B P; Ruddle, F H; Talbot, C C

    1979-01-01

    Human X chromosome DNA was partially purified from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome, the X. Enrichment of such DNA was accomplished by two sequential reassociations of radiolabeled hybrid cell DNA with large excesses of mouse DNA. Unreassociated hybrid cell DNA was used as a probe for human X chromosome sequences. The human-specific fraction of probe DNA CONTAINED THREE COMPONENTS. Two of these reassociated to human DNAs at rates proportional to the number of X chromosomes present. These two components were thus localized to the X chromosome. One of these X-specific components, representing about 80% of human-specific probe DNA, consisted of single copy or very low order reiterated DNA. The second X-specific component, representing about 10% of human-specific probe DNA, was about 20-30 times more reiterated. The remaining 10% of human-specific probe DNA, although derived from the X chromosome, reassociated to human DNAs at a rate independent of the number of X chromosomes present. This component was thus homologous to autosomal as well as X chromosome DNA. The probe DNA accounts for approximately half of the human X chromosome, suggesting that the remainder may have homology with mouse DNA. PMID:293740

  2. A New Fractal Model of Chromosome and DNA Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouallegue, K.

    Dynamic chromosome structure remains unknown. Can fractals and chaos be used as new tools to model, identify and generate a structure of chromosomes?Fractals and chaos offer a rich environment for exploring and modeling the complexity of nature. In a sense, fractal geometry is used to describe, model, and analyze the complex forms found in nature. Fractals have also been widely not only in biology but also in medicine. To this effect, a fractal is considered an object that displays self-similarity under magnification and can be constructed using a simple motif (an image repeated on ever-reduced scales).It is worth noting that the problem of identifying a chromosome has become a challenge to find out which one of the models it belongs to. Nevertheless, the several different models (a hierarchical coiling, a folded fiber, and radial loop) have been proposed for mitotic chromosome but have not reached a dynamic model yet.This paper is an attempt to solve topological problems involved in the model of chromosome and DNA processes. By combining the fractal Julia process and the numerical dynamical system, we have finally found out four main points. First, we have developed not only a model of chromosome but also a model of mitosis and one of meiosis. Equally important, we have identified the centromere position through the numerical model captured below. More importantly, in this paper, we have discovered the processes of the cell divisions of both mitosis and meiosis. All in all, the results show that this work could have a strong impact on the welfare of humanity and can lead to a cure of genetic diseases.

  3. Human chromosome-specific DNA libraries: construction and availability

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.; Albright, K.L.; Allen, N.A.; Aubuchon, M.R.; Bartholdi, M.F.; Brown, N.C.; Campbell, E.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Clark, L.M.; Cram, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    The goal of the National Laboratory Gene Library Project at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories is the production of chromosome-specific human gene libraries and their distribution to the scientific community for studies of the molecular biology of genes and chromosomes, and for the study and diagnosis of genetic disease. The specific aim of Phase I of the project is the production of complete digest (4 kb average insert size) libraries from each of the 24 human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting. The bacteriophage vector is Charon 21A, which has both Eco R1 and Hind III insertion sites accommodating human DNA fragments up to 9.1 kb in size. Each laboratory has undertaken production of a complete set of chromosome-specific libraries, Los Alamos with Eco R1 and Livermore with Hind III; most of this task has now been accomplished. Close to 1200 library aliquots have been sent to about 300 laboratories world-wide through February 1986, at which time repository and distribution functions were transferred to the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Following Phase I, libraries will be constructed with large inserts in a more advanced, recently developed bacteriophage vector (about 20 kb inserts) or in a cosmid vector (about 40 kb inserts), and with characteristics better suited to basic studies of gene structure and function.

  4. The linear plastid chromosomes of maize: terminal sequences, structures, and implications for DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2016-05-01

    The structure of a chromosomal DNA molecule may influence the way in which it is replicated and inherited. For decades plastid DNA (ptDNA) was believed to be circular, with breakage invoked to explain linear forms found upon extraction from the cell. Recent evidence indicates that ptDNA in vivo consists of linear molecules with discrete termini, although these ends were not characterized. We report the sequences of two terminal regions, End1 and End2, for maize (Zea mays L.) ptDNA. We describe structural features of these terminal regions and similarities found in other plant ptDNAs. The terminal sequences are within inverted repeat regions (leading to four genomic isomers) and adjacent to origins of replication. Conceptually, stem-loop structures may be formed following melting of the double-stranded DNA ends. Exonuclease digestion indicates that the ends in maize are unobstructed, but tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ends may have a 5'-protein. If the terminal structure of ptDNA molecules influences the retention of ptDNA, the unprotected molecular ends in mature leaves of maize may be more susceptible to degradation in vivo than the protected ends in tobacco. The terminal sequences and cumulative GC skew profiles are nearly identical for maize, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), with less similarity among other plants. The linear structure is now confirmed for maize ptDNA and inferred for other plants and suggests a virus-like recombination-dependent replication mechanism for ptDNA. Plastid transformation vectors containing the terminal sequences may increase the chances of success in generating transplastomic cereals. PMID:26650613

  5. DNA Instability at Chromosomal Fragile Sites in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura W; Burrow, Allison A; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Human chromosomal fragile sites are specific genomic regions which exhibit gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes following conditions of partial replication stress. Fragile sites often coincide with genes that are frequently rearranged or deleted in human cancers, with over half of cancer-specific translocations containing breakpoints within fragile sites. But until recently, little direct evidence existed linking fragile site breakage to the formation of cancer-causing chromosomal aberrations. Studies have revealed that DNA breakage at fragile sites can induce formation of RET/PTC rearrangements, and deletions within the FHIT gene, resembling those observed in human tumors. These findings demonstrate the important role of fragile sites in cancer development, suggesting that a better understanding of the molecular basis of fragile site instability is crucial to insights in carcinogenesis. It is hypothesized that under conditions of replication stress, stable secondary structures form at fragile sites and stall replication fork progress, ultimately resulting in DNA breaks. A recent study examining an FRA16B fragment confirmed the formation of secondary structure and DNA polymerase stalling within this sequence in vitro, as well as reduced replication efficiency and increased instability in human cells. Polymerase stalling during synthesis of FRA16D has also been demonstrated. The ATR DNA damage checkpoint pathway plays a critical role in maintaining stability at fragile sites. Recent findings have confirmed binding of the ATR protein to three regions of FRA3B under conditions of mild replication stress. This review will discuss recent advances made in understanding the role and mechanism of fragile sites in cancer development. PMID:21286310

  6. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Results Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. Conclusions These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers. PMID:23937327

  7. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome microstructure in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ennafaa, Hajer; Fregel, Rosa; Khodjet-El-Khil, Houssein; González, Ana M; Mahmoudi, Hejer Abdallah El; Cabrera, Vicente M; Larruga, José M; Benammar-Elgaaïed, Amel

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome variation has been studied in Bou Omrane and Bou Saâd, two Tunisian Berber populations. In spite of their close geographic proximity, genetic distances between them were high and significant with both uniparental markers. A global analysis, including all previously studied Tunisian samples, confirmed the existence of a high female and male population structure in this country. Analyses of molecular variance analysis evidenced that this differentiation was not attributable to ethnic differences. Mantel test showed that, in all cases, Y-chromosome haplotypic distances correlated poorly with geography, whereas after excluding the more isolated samples of Bou Omrane and Bou Saâd, the mtDNA pattern of variation is significantly correlated with geography. Congruently, the N(m) ratio of males versus females pointed to a significant excess of female migration rate across localities, which could be explained by patrilocality, a common marriage system in rural Tunisia. In addition, it has been observed that cultural isolation in rural communities promotes, by the effect of genetic drift, stronger loss of diversity and larger genetic differentiation levels than those observed in urban areas as deduced from comparisons of their respective mean genetic diversity and their respective mean genetic distances among populations. It is likely that the permanent exodus from rural to urban areas will have important repercussions in the future genetic structure of this country. PMID:21833004

  8. Chromosomal location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites in Triportheus fish species (Characiformes, Characidae)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The location of 18S and 5S rDNA sites was determined in eight species and populations of the fish genus Triportheus by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The males and females of all species had 2n = 52 chromosomes and a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. A single 18S rDNA site that was roughly equivalent to an Ag-NOR was detected on the short arms of a submetacentric pair in nearly all species, and up to two additional sites were also observed in some species. In addition, another 18S rDNA cluster was identified in a distal region on the long arms of the W chromosome; this finding corroborated previous evidence that this cluster would be a shared feature amongst Triportheus species. In T. angulatus, a heterozygotic paracentric inversion involving the short arms of one homolog of a metacentric pair was associated with NORs. The 5S rDNA sites were located on the short arms of a single submetacentric chromosomal pair, close to the centromeres, except in T. auritus, which had up to ten 5S rDNA sites. The 18S and 5S rDNA sites were co-localized and adjacent on the short arms of a chromosomal pair in two populations of T. nematurus. Although all Triportheus species have a similar karyotypic macrostructure, the results of this work show that in some species ribosomal genes may serve as species-specific markers when used in conjunction with other putatively synapomorphic features. PMID:21637644

  9. cis-active elements from mouse chromosomal DNA suppress simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, M; Willnow, T; Fanning, E

    1990-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40)-containing DNA was rescued after the fusion of SV40-transformed VLM cells with permissive COS1 monkey cells and cloned, and prototype plasmid clones were characterized. A 2-kilobase mouse DNA fragment fused with the rescued SV40 DNA, and derived from mouse DNA flanking the single insert of SV40 DNA in VLM cells, was sequenced. Insertion of the intact rescued mouse sequence, or two nonoverlapping fragments of it, into wild-type SV40 plasmid DNA suppressed replication of the plasmid in TC7 monkey cells, although the plasmids expressed replication-competent T antigen. Rat cells were transformed with linearized wild-type SV40 plasmid DNA with or without fragments of the mouse DNA in cis. Although all of the rat cell lines expressed approximately equal amounts of T antigen and p53, transformants carrying SV40 DNA linked to either of the same two replication suppressor fragments produced significantly less free SV40 DNA after fusion with permissive cells than those transformed by SV40 DNA without a cellular insert or with a cellular insert lacking suppressor activity. The results suggest that two independent segments of cellular DNA act in cis to suppress SV40 replication in vivo, either as a plasmid or integrated in chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:2159549

  10. Physical chromosome mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: evidences for a differential distribution of repetitive elements in the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Irani A; Martins, Cesar

    2008-06-01

    Repetitive DNAs have been extensively applied as physical chromosome markers on comparative studies, identification of chromosome rearrangements and sex chromosomes, chromosome evolution analysis, and applied genetics. Here we report the characterization of repetitive DNA sequences from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) genome by construction and screening of plasmid library enriched with repetitive DNAs, analysis of a BAC-based physical map, and hybridization to chromosomes. The physical mapping of BACs enriched with repetitive sequences and C(o)t-1 DNA (DNA enriched for highly and moderately repetitive DNA sequences) to chromosomes using FISH showed a predominant distribution of repetitive elements in the centromeric and telomeric regions and along the entire length of the largest chromosome pair (X and Y sex chromosomes) of the species. The distribution of repetitive DNAs differed significantly between the p arm of X and Y chromosomes. These findings suggest that repetitive DNAs have had an important role in the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:17395473

  11. The role of recombination and RAD52 in mutation of chromosomal DNA transformed into yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Larionov, V; Graves, J; Kouprina, N; Resnick, M A

    1994-01-01

    While transformation is a prominent tool for genetic analysis and genome manipulation in many organisms, transforming DNA has often been found to be unstable relative to established molecules. We determined the potential for transformation-associated mutations in a 360 kb yeast chromosome III composed primarily of unique DNA. Wild-type and rad52 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were transformed with either a homologous chromosome III or a diverged chromosome III from S. carlsbergensis. The host strain chromosome III had a conditional centromere allowing it to be lost on galactose medium so that recessive mutations in the transformed chromosome could be identified. Following transformation of a RAD+ strain with the homologous chromosome, there were frequent changes in the incoming chromosome, including large deletions and mutations that do not lead to detectable changes in chromosome size. Based on results with the diverged chromosome, interchromosomal recombinational interactions were the source of many of the changes. Even though rad52 exhibits elevated mitotic mutation rates, the percentage of transformed diverged chromosomes incapable of substituting for the resident chromosome was not increased in rad52 compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that the mutator phenotype does not extend to transforming chromosomal DNA. Based on these results and our previous observation that the incidence of large mutations is reduced during the cloning of mammalian DNA into a rad52 as compared to a RAD+ strain, a rad52 host is well-suited for cloning DNA segments in which gene function must be maintained. Images PMID:7937151

  12. Multiple displacement amplification of the DNA from single flow-sorted plant chromosome.

    PubMed

    Cápal, Petr; Blavet, Nicolas; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-11-01

    A protocol is described for production of micrograms of DNA from single copies of flow-sorted plant chromosomes. Of 183 single copies of wheat chromosome 3B, 118 (64%) were successfully amplified. Sequencing DNA amplification products using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to 10× coverage and merging sequences from three separate amplifications resulted in 60% coverage of the chromosome 3B reference, entirely covering 30% of its genes. The merged sequences permitted de novo assembly of 19% of chromosome 3B genes, with 10% of genes contained in a single contig, and 39% of genes covered for at least 80% of their length. The chromosome-derived sequences allowed identification of missing genic sequences in the chromosome 3B reference and short sequences similar to 3B in survey sequences of other wheat chromosomes. These observations indicate that single-chromosome sequencing is suitable to identify genic sequences on particular chromosomes, to develop chromosome-specific DNA markers, to verify assignment of DNA sequence contigs to individual pseudomolecules, and to validate whole-genome assemblies. The protocol expands the potential of chromosome genomics, which may now be applied to any plant species from which chromosome samples suitable for flow cytometry can be prepared, and opens new avenues for studies on chromosome structural heterozygosity and haplotype phasing in plants. PMID:26400218

  13. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  14. Chromosomal localization of 5S rDNA in Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis): a chromosome-specific marker for chromosome identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Pin; Zhang, Xiaojun; Li, Fuhua; Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chengsong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2010-03-01

    Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis) is an economically important aquaculture species in China. However, cytogenetic and genomic data is limited in the organism partly because the chromosomes are difficult to isolate and analyze. In this study, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify the chromosomes of F. chinensis. The 5S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) of F. chinensis was isolated, cloned and then used as a hybridization probe. The results show that the 5S rDNA was located on one pair of homologous chromosomes in F. chinensis. In addition, triploid shrimp were used to evaluate the feasibility of chromosome identification using FISH and to validate the method. It was confirmed that 5S rDNA can be used as a chromosome-specific probe for chromosome identification in F. chinensis. The successful application of FISH in F. chinensis shows that chromosome-specific probes can be developed and this finding will facilitate further research on the chromosomes of penaeid shrimps.

  15. Nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) and chromosomal translocations in humans.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Michael R; Gu, Jiafeng; Lu, Haihui; Shimazaki, Noriko; Tsai, Albert G

    2010-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise in dividing cells about ten times per cell per day. Causes include replication across a nick, free radicals of oxidative metabolism, ionizing radiation, and inadvertent action by enzymes of DNA metabolism (such as failures of type II topoisomerases or cleavage by recombinases at off-target sites). There are two major double-strand break repair pathways. Homologous recombination (HR) can repair double-strand breaks, but only during S phase and typically only if there are hundreds of base pairs of homology. The more commonly used pathway is nonhomologous DNA end joining, abbreviated NHEJ. NHEJ can repair a DSB at any time during the cell cycle and does not require any homology, although a few nucleotides of terminal microhomology are often utilized by the NHEJ enzymes, if present. The proteins and enzymes of NHEJ include Ku, DNA-PKcs, Artemis, DNA polymerase mu (Pol micro), DNA polymerase lambda (Pol lambda), XLF (also called Cernunnos), XRCC4, and DNA ligase IV. These enzymes constitute what some call the classical NHEJ pathway, and in wild type cells, the vast majority of joining events appear to proceed using these components. NHEJ is present in many prokaryotes, as well as all eukaryotes, and very similar mechanistic flexibility evolved both convergently and divergently. When two double-strand breaks occur on different chromosomes, then the rejoining is almost always done by NHEJ. The causes of DSBs in lymphomas most often involve the RAG or AID enzymes that function in the specialized processes of antigen receptor gene rearrangement. PMID:20012587

  16. Interaction of chromosomal proteins with BrdU substituted DNA as determined by chromatin-DNA competition.

    PubMed Central

    Bick, M D; Devine, E A

    1977-01-01

    Chromatin-DNA competition has been utilized to examine the general nature of chromosomal proteins interacting more strongly with BrdU substituted DNA. When chromatin is incubated with an excess of purified DNA, a portion of the chromosomal proteins will exchange to the purified DNA. These two complexes can then be separated on Metrizamide gradients due to their differing protein/DNA ratios. Using this technique we observe that most nonhistone chromosomal proteins will exchange to a competitor DNA, the extent of exchange being directly dependent upon the competitor DNA being present in excess. While essentially the same proteins will migrate to either unsubstituted or BrdU substituted DNA, the substituted DNA is found to be a quantitatively better competitor and its effectiveness as a competitor is directly related to the level of BrdU substitution. Images PMID:593882

  17. Genomic organization of alpha satellite DNA on human chromosome 7: evidence for two distinct alphoid domains on a single chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Waye, J S; England, S B; Willard, H F

    1987-01-01

    A complete understanding of chromosomal disjunction during mitosis and meiosis in complex genomes such as the human genome awaits detailed characterization of both the molecular structure and genetic behavior of the centromeric regions of chromosomes. Such analyses in turn require knowledge of the organization and nature of DNA sequences associated with centromeres. The most prominent class of centromeric DNA sequences in the human genome is the alpha satellite family of tandemly repeated DNA, which is organized as distinct chromosomal subsets. Each subset is characterized by a particular multimeric higher-order repeat unit consisting of tandemly reiterated, diverged alpha satellite monomers of approximately 171 base pairs. The higher-order repeat units are themselves tandemly reiterated and represent the most recently amplified or fixed alphoid sequences. We present evidence that there are at least two independent domains of alpha satellite DNA on chromosome 7, each characterized by their own distinct higher-order repeat structure. We determined the complete nucleotide sequences of a 6-monomer higher-order repeat unit, which is present in approximately 500 copies per chromosome 7, as well as those of a less-abundant (approximately 10 copies) 16-monomer higher-order repeat unit. Sequence analysis indicated that these repeats are evolutionarily distinct. Genomic hybridization experiments established that each is maintained in relatively homogeneous tandem arrays with no detectable interspersion. We propose mechanisms by which multiple unrelated higher-order repeat domains may be formed and maintained within a single chromosomal subset. Images PMID:3561394

  18. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Mera, Paola E.; Kalogeraki, Virginia S.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation. PMID:25349407

  19. Natural Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii by Adsorbed Chromosomal DNA: Role of Adsorbed DNA Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, N.; Zilles, J.; Nguyen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Recent increases in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms and the accompanying public health concerns result both from the widespread use of antibiotics and from the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among microorganisms. To understand the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and identify efficient measures to minimize these transfers, an interdisciplinary approach was used to identify physical and chemical factors that control the fate and biological availability of extracellular DNA. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study extracellular DNA adsorption and the conformation of the adsorbed DNA on silica and natural organic matter (NOM) surfaces. Solution chemistry was varied systematically to investigate the role of adsorbed DNA conformation on transformation. Gene transfer was assessed under the same conditions using natural transformation of chromosomal DNA into the soil bacteria Azotobacter vinelandii. DNA adsorbed to both silica and NOM surfaces has a more compact and rigid conformation in the presence of Ca2+ compared to Na+. Extracellular DNA adsorbed on silica and NOM surfaces transformed A. vinelandii. The transformation efficiency of adsorbed DNA was up to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of dissolved DNA. Preliminary results suggest that the presence of Ca2+ in groundwater (e.g. hardness) reduces the availability of adsorbed DNA for transformation.

  20. Molecular Recognition of Platinated DNA from Chromosomal HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Rossetti, Giulia; Arnesano, Fabio; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Natile, Giovanni; Carloni, Paolo

    2014-08-12

    Cisplatin cures testicular and ovarian cancers with unprecedented potency. It induces its beneficial activity by covalently binding to DNA. Repair enzymes, which remove the platinated lesions from DNA, cause drug resistance. Chromosomal High Mobility Group Box proteins (HMGB) may interfere with this process by binding to platinated DNA. Using 8 μs multiple-walker well-tempered metadynamics simulations, here, we investigated the structural and the energetic determinants of one of the HMGB proteins (HMGB1A) in complex with the platinated oligonucleotide [Pt(NH3)2](2+)-d(CCUCTCTG*G*ACCTTCC)-d(GGAGAGACCTGGAAGG) (*G are platinated guanines), for which experimental structural information is available. The calculated affinity is in good agreement with experiment. The process is predicted to be enthalpy-driven, as found for other protein/DNA complexes. The Lys7 residue, whose side-chain was not resolved in the X-ray structure, is found to interact with the C4 5'-phosphate and this interaction emerges as a key facet for the molecular recognition process. In addition, our calculations provide a molecular basis for the experimentally measured decreased affinity of HMGB1A for platinated DNA, as a consequence of Cys22-Cys44 S-S bridge formation (such an oxidation cannot take place in some members of this protein family present in the testis, where the drug is particularly effective). This decrease is likely to be caused by a small yet significant rearrangement of helices H1 and H2 with consequent alteration of the Phe37 juxtaposition. PMID:26588321

  1. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B.; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC. PMID:26227968

  2. Highlighting chromosome loops in DNA-picked chromatin (DPC).

    PubMed

    Abbondanza, Ciro; De Rosa, Caterina; Ombra, Maria Neve; Aceto, Fabiana; Medici, Nicola; Altucci, Lucia; Moncharmont, Bruno; Puca, Giovanni Alfredo; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico Vittorio; Perillo, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Growing evidence supports the concept that dynamic intra- and inter-chromosomal links between specific loci contribute to the creation of cell-type specific gene expression profiles. Therefore, analysis of the establishment of peculiar functional correlations between sites, also distant on linear DNA, that govern the transcriptional process appears to be of fundamental relevance. We propose here an experimental approach showing that 17β-estradiol-induced transcription associates to formation of loops between the promoter and termination regions of hormone-responsive genes. This strategy reveals as a tool to be also suitably used, in conjunction with automated techniques, for an extensive analysis of sites shared by multiple genes for induced expression. PMID:21725198

  3. DNA damage response during mitosis induces whole chromosome mis-segregation

    PubMed Central

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Compton, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here we show that activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and Plk1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or Chk2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. PMID:25107667

  4. Delimiting the Origin of a B Chromosome by FISH Mapping, Chromosome Painting and DNA Sequence Analysis in Astyanax paranae (Teleostei, Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Duílio M. Z. de A.; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Cláudio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes have been shown to contain a wide variety of repetitive sequences. For this reason, fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) is a useful tool for ascertaining the origin of these genomic elements, especially when combined with painting from microdissected B chromosomes. In order to investigate the origin of B chromosomes in the fish species Astyanax paranae, these two approaches were used along with PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences obtained from the B chromosomes and its comparison with those residing in the A chromosomes. Remarkably, chromosome painting with the one-arm metacentric B chromosome probe showed hybridization signals on entire B chromosome, while FISH mapping revealed the presence of H1 histone and 18S rDNA genes symmetrically placed in both arms of the B chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that the B chromosome of A. paranae is an isochromosome. Additionally, the chromosome pairs Nos. 2 or 23 are considered the possible B chromosome ancestors since both contain syntenic H1 and 18S rRNA sequences. The analysis of DNA sequence fragments of the histone and rRNA genes obtained from the microdissected B chromosomes showed high similarity with those obtained from 0B individuals, which supports the intraspecific origin of B chromosomes in A. paranae. Finally, the population hereby analysed showed a female-biased B chromosome presence suggesting that B chromosomes in this species could influence sex determinism. PMID:24736529

  5. The FIS protein binds and bends the origin of chromosomal DNA replication, oriC, of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, H; Egan, J B; Roth, A; Messer, W

    1991-01-01

    The FIS protein (factor for inversion stimulation) is known to stimulate site-specific recombination processes, such as the inversion of the G segment of bacteriophage Mu, by binding to specific enhancer sequences. It has also been shown to activate transcription from rRNA promoters both in vitro and in vivo. We have identified a specific binding site for FIS in the center of the origin of chromosomal DNA replication, oriC. The DNA bends upon FIS binding. Occupation of the FIS site and binding of DnaA, the initiator protein, to its adjacent binding site (R3) are mutually exclusive. A fis mutant strain can not be efficiently transformed with plasmids which carry and replicate from oriC, suggesting that FIS is required for minichromosome replication. Images PMID:1870971

  6. Cell death caused by excision of centromeric DNA from a chromosome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akihiro; Yanamoto, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Takehiro; Hatano, Takushi; Matsuzaki, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    If genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are spread through the natural environment, it might affect the natural environment. To help prevent the spread of GMOs, we examined whether it is possible to introduce conditional lethality by excising centromeric DNA from a chromosome by site-specific recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model organism. First, we constructed haploid cells in which excision of the centromeric DNA from chromosome IV can occur due to recombinase induced by galactose. By this excision, cell death can occur. In diploid cells, cell death can also occur by excision from both homologous chromosomes IV. Furthermore, cell death can occur in the case of chromosome V. A small number of surviving cells appeared with excision of centromeric DNA, and the diploid showed greater viability than the haploid in both chromosomes IV and V. The surviving cells appeared mainly due to deletion of a recombination target site (RS) from the chromosome. PMID:24018677

  7. Transcripts of the MHM region on the chicken Z chromosome accumulate as non-coding RNA in the nucleus of female cells adjacent to the DMRT1 locus.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, M; Shimada, Y; Hori, T; Nakabayashi, O; Kikuchi, T; Macleod, T; Pym, R; Sheldon, B; Solovei, I; Macgregor, H; Mizuno, S

    2001-01-01

    The male hypermethylated (MHM) region, located near the middle of the short arm of the Z chromosome of chickens, consists of approximately 210 tandem repeats of a BamHI 2.2-kb sequence unit. Cytosines of the CpG dinucleotides of this region are extensively methylated on the two Z chromosomes in the male but much less methylated on the single Z chromosome in the female. The state of methylation of the MHM region is established after fertilization by about the 1-day embryonic stage. The MHM region is transcribed only in the female from the particular strand into heterogeneous, high molecular-mass, non-coding RNA, which is accumulated at the site of transcription, adjacent to the DMRT1 locus, in the nucleus. The transcriptional silence of the MHM region in the male is most likely caused by the CpG methylation, since treatment of the male embryonic fibroblasts with 5-azacytidine results in hypo-methylation and active transcription of this region. In ZZW triploid chickens, MHM regions are hypomethylated and transcribed on the two Z chromosomes, whereas MHM regions are hypermethylated and transcriptionally inactive on the three Z chromosomes in ZZZ triploid chickens, suggesting a possible role of the W chromosome on the state of the MHM region. PMID:11321370

  8. B-Chromosome Ribosomal DNA Is Functional in the Grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Cabrero, Josefa; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.

    2012-01-01

    B-chromosomes are frequently argued to be genetically inert elements, but activity for some particular genes has been reported, especially for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes whose expression can easily be detected at the cytological level by the visualization of their phenotypic expression, i.e., the nucleolus. The B24 chromosome in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans frequently shows a nucleolus attached to it during meiotic prophase I. Here we show the presence of rRNA transcripts that unequivocally came from the B24 chromosome. To detect these transcripts, we designed primers specifically anchoring at the ITS-2 region, so that the reverse primer was complementary to the B chromosome DNA sequence including a differential adenine insertion being absent in the ITS2 of A chromosomes. PCR analysis carried out on genomic DNA showed amplification in B-carrying males but not in B-lacking ones. PCR analyses performed on complementary DNA showed amplification in about half of B-carrying males. Joint cytological and molecular analysis performed on 34 B-carrying males showed a close correspondence between the presence of B-specific transcripts and of nucleoli attached to the B chromosome. In addition, the molecular analysis revealed activity of the B chromosome rDNA in 10 out of the 13 B-carrying females analysed. Our results suggest that the nucleoli attached to B chromosomes are actively formed by expression of the rDNA carried by them, and not by recruitment of nucleolar materials formed in A chromosome nucleolar organizing regions. Therefore, B-chromosome rDNA in E. plorans is functional since it is actively transcribed to form the nucleolus attached to the B chromosome. This demonstrates that some heterochromatic B chromosomes can harbour functional genes. PMID:22570730

  9. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  10. Positional dependence of transcriptional inhibition by DNA torsional stress in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ricky S; Piña, Benjamin; Roca, Joaquim

    2010-02-17

    How DNA helical tension is constrained along the linear chromosomes of eukaryotic cells is poorly understood. In this study, we induced the accumulation of DNA (+) helical tension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and examined how DNA transcription was affected along yeast chromosomes. The results revealed that, whereas the overwinding of DNA produced a general impairment of transcription initiation, genes situated at <100 kb from the chromosomal ends gradually escaped from the transcription stall. This novel positional effect seemed to be a simple function of the gene distance to the telomere: It occurred evenly in all 32 chromosome extremities and was independent of the atypical structure and transcription activity of subtelomeric chromatin. These results suggest that DNA helical tension dissipates at chromosomal ends and, therefore, provides a functional indication that yeast chromosome extremities are topologically open. The gradual escape from the transcription stall along the chromosomal flanks also indicates that friction restrictions to DNA twist diffusion, rather than tight topological boundaries, might suffice to confine DNA helical tension along eukaryotic chromatin. PMID:20057354

  11. Positional dependence of transcriptional inhibition by DNA torsional stress in yeast chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ricky S; Piña, Benjamin; Roca, Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    How DNA helical tension is constrained along the linear chromosomes of eukaryotic cells is poorly understood. In this study, we induced the accumulation of DNA (+) helical tension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and examined how DNA transcription was affected along yeast chromosomes. The results revealed that, whereas the overwinding of DNA produced a general impairment of transcription initiation, genes situated at <100 kb from the chromosomal ends gradually escaped from the transcription stall. This novel positional effect seemed to be a simple function of the gene distance to the telomere: It occurred evenly in all 32 chromosome extremities and was independent of the atypical structure and transcription activity of subtelomeric chromatin. These results suggest that DNA helical tension dissipates at chromosomal ends and, therefore, provides a functional indication that yeast chromosome extremities are topologically open. The gradual escape from the transcription stall along the chromosomal flanks also indicates that friction restrictions to DNA twist diffusion, rather than tight topological boundaries, might suffice to confine DNA helical tension along eukaryotic chromatin. PMID:20057354

  12. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae): emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE). Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed) carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens. PMID:23131070

  13. Quantification of the DNA content of structurally abnormal X chromosomes and X chromosome aneuploidy using high resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Nussbaum, R; Schwartz, C; Gray, J

    1990-01-01

    Quantification of the Hoechst and chromomycin A3 fluorescence intensities of mitotic human chromosomes isolated from karyotypically normal and abnormal cells was performed with a dual beam flow cytometer. The resultant flow karyotypes contain information about the relative DNA content and base composition of chromosomes and their relative frequencies in the mitotic cell sample. The relative copy number of X and Y chromosomes was determined for 38 normal males and females and 6 cell lines with X or Y chromosome aneuploidy. Flow karyotype diagnoses corresponded with conventional cytogenetic results in all cases. We show that chromosome DNA content can be derived from peak position in Hoechst vs. chromomycin flow karyotypes. These values are linearly related to propidium iodide staining intensity as measured with flow cytometry and to the binding of gallocyanin chrome alum to phosphate groups as measured with slide-based scanning photometry. Cell lines with deleted or dicentric X chromosomes ranging in length from 0.53 to 1.95 times normal were analyzed by using flow cytometry. The measured difference in DNA content between a normal X and each of the structurally abnormal chromosomes was linearly correlated to the difference predicted from cytogenetics and/or probe analyses. Deletions of 3-5 Mb, which were at and below the detection limits of conventional cytogenetics, could be quantified by flow karyotyping in individuals with X-linked diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, choroideremia, and ocular albinism/ichthyosis. The results show that the use of flow karyotyping to quantify the size of restricted regions of the genome can complement conventional cytogenetics and other physical mapping techniques in the study of genetic disorders. PMID:2106419

  14. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Chad; Zody, Michael C; Borowsky, Mark L; Kamal, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Taylor, Todd D; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Bugalter, Boris; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeCaprio, David; Engels, Reinhard; Garber, Manuel; Gnirke, Andreas; Hafez, Nabil; Hall, Jennifer L; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Itoh, Takehiko; Jaffe, David B; Kuroki, Yoko; Lehoczky, Jessica; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; Noguchi, Hideki; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Piqani, Bruno; Smith, Cherylyn L; Talamas, Jessica A; Topham, Kerri; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Wain, Hester M; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Fujiyama, Asao; Hattori, Masahira; Birren, Bruce W; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Lander, Eric S

    2005-09-22

    Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements. PMID:16177791

  15. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A.; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L.; Downs, Jessica A.; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein–DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein–DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin. PMID:26240319

  16. Radiation effects on DNA synthesis in a defined chromosomal replicon

    SciTech Connect

    Larner, J.M.; Lee, H.; Hamlin, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    It has recently been shown that the tumor suppressor p53 mediates a signal transduction pathway that responds to DNA damage by arresting cells in the late G[sub 1] period of the cell cycle. However, the operation of this pathway alone cannot explain the 50% reduction in the rate of DNA synthesis that occurs within 30 min of irradiation of an asynchronous cell population. The authors are using the amplified dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) domain in the methotrexate-resistance CHO cell line, CHOC 400, as a model replicon in which to study this acute radiation effect. They first show that the CHOC-400 cell line retains the classical acute-phase response but does not display the late G[sub 1] arrest that characterizes the p53-mediated checkpoint. Using a two-dimensional gel replicon-mapping method, they then show that when asynchronous cultures are irradiated with 900 cGy, initiation in the DHFR locus is completely inhibited within 30 min and does not resume for 3 to 4 h. Since initiation in this locus occurs throughout the first 2 h of the S period, this result implies the existence of a p53-independent S-phase damage-sensing pathway that functions at the level of individual origins. Results obtained with the replication inhibitor mimosine define a position near the G[sub 1]/S boundary beyond which cells are unable to prevent initiation at early-firing origins in response to irradiation. This is the first direct demonstration at a defined chromosomal origin that radiation quantitatively down-regulates initiation. 42 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Cell-Free Fetal DNA and Cell-Free Total DNA Levels in Spontaneous Abortion with Fetal Chromosomal Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Min Hyoung; Han, You Jung; Lee, Da Eun; Park, So Yeon; Han, Jung Yeol; Kim, Moon Young; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA) with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Methodology/Principal Findings A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both). The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001) than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002) and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037). The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852–0.945) and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903–0.975), respectively. Conclusions Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA with fetal

  18. Regions of the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila virilis carrying multiple dispersed p Dv 111 DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gubenko, I.S.; Evgen'ev, M.B.

    1986-09-01

    The cloned sequences of p Dv 111 DNA hybridized in situ with more than 170 regions of Drosophila virilis salivary gland chromosomes. Comparative autoradiography of in situ hybridization and the nature of pulse /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-deoxycytidine incorporation into the polytene chromosomes of D. virilis at the puparium formation stage showed that the hybridization sites of p Dv 111 are distributed not only in the heterochromatic regions but also in the euchromatic regions of the chromosomes that are not late replicating. Two distinct bands of hybridization of p Dv 111 /sup 3/H-DNA were observed in the region of the heat shock puff 20CD. The regions of the distal end of chromosome 2, in which breaks appeared during radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, hybridized with the p Dv 111 DNA.

  19. Isolation and mapping of human chromosome 21 cDNA: Progress in constructing a chromosome 21 expression map

    SciTech Connect

    Jan-Fang Cheng; Boyartchuk, V.; Zhu Y.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated 175 cDNA clones from a fetal brain library by direct cDNA selection using genomic DNA isolated from pools of human chromosome 21 (HC21) cosmids. DNA sequences have revealed that 16 of these cDNA clones contain overlapping sequences. Of the other 159 cDNA sequences, 10 match previously identified HC21 genes, and 9 match previously determined cDNA sequences, including the Wilms tumor related transcript (QM), the human testican cDNA, the mammalian calponin cDNA, and 6 anonymous expressed sequence tags. All isolated cDNAs were hybridized to their corresponding cosmids, which suggests that they originated from HC21. We have localized 92 cDNA clones to previously reported HC21q YACs. The remaining unmapped cDNAs contain either sequences not included in the isolated HC21q YACs or sequences that hybridize to yeast DNA. The cDNAs not included in the YACs should be useful in isolating new YACs to bridge the gaps. PCR primers were derived from 4 novel cDNA sequences that had been mapped to the YACs in the suspected Down syndrome region and used in RT-PCR analysis. All 4 primer sequences amplified RNA fragments with the expected sizes, suggesting that these sequences could be used for expression analysis. The construction of a chromosome 21 cDNA map not only is important in the refinement of physical maps, but also will identify a set of genes in the disease regions for detailed characterization. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Selection of chromosomal DNA libraries using a multiplex CRISPR system

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Owen W; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Maurer, Matthew J; Li, Xin; Tsai, Jordan C; Poddar, Snigdha; Lee, Michael E; DeLoache, Will; Dueber, John E; Arkin, Adam P; Cate, Jamie HD

    2014-01-01

    The directed evolution of biomolecules to improve or change their activity is central to many engineering and synthetic biology efforts. However, selecting improved variants from gene libraries in living cells requires plasmid expression systems that suffer from variable copy number effects, or the use of complex marker-dependent chromosomal integration strategies. We developed quantitative gene assembly and DNA library insertion into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome by optimizing an efficient single-step and marker-free genome editing system using CRISPR-Cas9. With this Multiplex CRISPR (CRISPRm) system, we selected an improved cellobiose utilization pathway in diploid yeast in a single round of mutagenesis and selection, which increased cellobiose fermentation rates by over 10-fold. Mutations recovered in the best cellodextrin transporters reveal synergy between substrate binding and transporter dynamics, and demonstrate the power of CRISPRm to accelerate selection experiments and discoveries of the molecular determinants that enhance biomolecule function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03703.001 PMID:25139909

  1. An Archaeal Immune System Can Detect Multiple Protospacer Adjacent Motifs (PAMs) to Target Invader DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Susan; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stoll, Britta; Brendel, Jutta; Fischer, Eike; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system provides adaptive and heritable immunity against foreign genetic elements in most archaea and many bacteria. Although this system is widespread and diverse with many subtypes, only a few species have been investigated to elucidate the precise mechanisms for the defense of viruses or plasmids. Approximately 90% of all sequenced archaea encode CRISPR/Cas systems, but their molecular details have so far only been examined in three archaeal species: Sulfolobus solfataricus, Sulfolobus islandicus, and Pyrococcus furiosus. Here, we analyzed the CRISPR/Cas system of Haloferax volcanii using a plasmid-based invader assay. Haloferax encodes a type I-B CRISPR/Cas system with eight Cas proteins and three CRISPR loci for which the identity of protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) was unknown until now. We identified six different PAM sequences that are required upstream of the protospacer to permit target DNA recognition. This is only the second archaeon for which PAM sequences have been determined, and the first CRISPR group with such a high number of PAM sequences. Cells could survive the plasmid challenge if their CRISPR/Cas system was altered or defective, e.g. by deletion of the cas gene cassette. Experimental PAM data were supplemented with bioinformatics data on Haloferax and Haloquadratum. PMID:22767603

  2. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found. PMID:26372604

  3. Identification of DNA double strand breaks at chromosome boundaries along the track of particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Atsuko; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Sekine, Ryota; Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Held, Kathryn D; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations arise from misrejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) between loci located on two chromosomes. One current model suggests that spatial proximity of potential chromosomal translocation partners influences translocation probability. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a potent inducer of translocations. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that particle irradiation more frequently causes translocations compared with X-ray irradiation. This observation has led to the hypothesis that the high frequency of translocations after particle irradiation may be due to the formation of DSBs at chromosome boundaries along the particle track, because such DSBs can be misrejoined between distinct chromosomes. In this study, we simultaneously visualized the site of IR-induced DSBs and chromosome position by combining Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Importantly, the frequency of γH2AX foci at the chromosome boundary of chromosome 1 after carbon-ion irradiation was >4-fold higher than that after X-ray irradiation. This observation is consistent with the idea that particle irradiation generates DSBs at the boundaries of two chromosomes along the track. Further, we showed that resolution of γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries is prevented by inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity, indicating that the DSB repair is NHEJ-dependent. Finally, we found that γH2AX foci at chromosome boundaries after carbon-ion irradiation contain DSBs undergoing DNA-end resection, which promotes repair utilizing microhomology mediated end-joining during translocation. Taken together, our study suggests that the frequency of DSB formation at chromosome boundaries is associated with the incidence of chromosomal translocations, supporting the notion that the spatial proximity between breaks is an important factor in translocation formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27113385

  4. Molecular cloaking of H2A.Z on mortal DNA chromosomes during nonrandom segregation.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yang Hoon; Sherley, James L

    2011-10-01

    Although nonrandom sister chromatid segregation is a singular property of distributed stem cells (DSCs) that are responsible for renewing and repairing mature vertebrate tissues, both its cellular function and its molecular mechanism remain unknown. This situation persists in part because of the lack of facile methods for detecting and quantifying nonrandom segregating cells and for identifying chromosomes with immortal DNA strands, the cellular molecules that signify nonrandom segregation. During nonrandom segregation, at each mitosis, asymmetrically self-renewing DSCs continuously cosegregate to themselves the set of chromosomes that contain immortal DNA strands, which are the oldest DNA strands. Here, we report the discovery of a molecular asymmetry between segregating sets of immortal chromosomes and opposed mortal chromosomes (i.e., containing the younger set of DNA template strands) that constitutes a new convenient biomarker for detection of cells undergoing nonrandom segregation and direct delineation of chromosomes that bear immortal DNA strands. In both cells engineered with DSC-specific properties and ex vivo-expanded mouse hair follicle stem cells, the histone H2A variant H2A.Z shows specific immunodetection on immortal DNA chromosomes. Cell fixation analyses indicate that H2A.Z is present on mortal chromosomes as well but is cloaked from immunodetection, and the cloaking entity is acid labile. The H2A.Z chromosomal asymmetry produced by molecular cloaking provides a first direct assay for nonrandom segregation and for chromosomes with immortal DNA strands. It also seems likely to manifest an important aspect of the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nonrandom sister chromatid segregation in DSCs. PMID:21905168

  5. A solution to release twisted DNA during chromosome replication by coupled DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Isabel; Georgescu, Roxana E.; O’Donnell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal replication machines contain coupled DNA polymerases that simultaneously replicate the leading and lagging strands1. However, coupled replication presents a largely unrecognized topological problem. Since DNA polymerase must travel a helical path during synthesis, the physical connection between leading and lagging strand polymerases causes the daughter strands to entwine, or produces extensive buildup of negative supercoils in the newly synthesized DNA2–4. How DNA polymerases maintain their connection during coupled replication despite these topological challenges is a mystery. Here, we examine the dynamics of the E. coli replisome, by ensemble and single-molecule methods that may solve this topological problem independent of topoisomerases. We find that the lagging strand polymerase frequently releases from an Okazaki fragment before completion, leaving single-strand gaps behind. Dissociation of the polymerase does not result in loss from the replisome due to its contact with the leading-strand polymerase. This behavior, referred to as “signal release”, had been thought to require a protein, possibly primase, to pry polymerase from incompletely extended DNA fragments5–7. However, we observe that signal release is independent of primase and does not appear to require a protein trigger at all. Instead, the lagging-strand polymerase is simply less processive in the context of a replisome. Interestingly, when the lagging-strand polymerase is supplied with primed DNA in trans, uncoupling it from the fork, high processivity is restored. Hence, we propose that coupled polymerases introduce topological changes, possibly by accumulation of superhelical tension in the newly synthesized DNA, that cause lower processivity and transient lagging-strand polymerase dissociation from DNA. PMID:23535600

  6. EVALUATION OF CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE AND DNA INTEGRITY IN SPERM: AN INVESTIGATION OF REMOTE SEMEN COLLECTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Home collection of ejaculated semen would facilitate participation rates and geographic diversity in reproductive epidemiology studies. Our study addressed concerns that home collection and overnight mail return might induce chromosome/DNA damage. We collected semen from 10 hea...

  7. The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S G; Barlow, K F; McLay, K E; Kaul, R; Swarbreck, D; Dunham, A; Scott, C E; Howe, K L; Woodfine, K; Spencer, C C A; Jones, M C; Gillson, C; Searle, S; Zhou, Y; Kokocinski, F; McDonald, L; Evans, R; Phillips, K; Atkinson, A; Cooper, R; Jones, C; Hall, R E; Andrews, T D; Lloyd, C; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Anderson, F; Andrew, R W; Ashwell, R I S; Aubin, K; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Beasley, H; Bethel, G; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, J Y; Brown, A J; Buckley, D; Burton, J; Bye, J; Carder, C; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C; Cobley, V; Collier, R E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Davies, J; Deadman, R; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M; Ellington, A G; Errington, H; Frankish, A; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gay, L; Ghori, M R J; Gibson, R; Gilby, L M; Gillett, W; Glithero, R J; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths-Jones, S; Grocock, R; Hammond, S; Harrison, E S I; Hart, E; Haugen, E; Heath, P D; Holmes, S; Holt, K; Howden, P J; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Hunter, G; Isherwood, J; James, R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Joy, A; Kay, M; Kershaw, J K; Kibukawa, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A J; Lad, H; Laird, G; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; Lush, M J; Lyne, R; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Matthews, N S W; McLaren, S; Milne, S; Mistry, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; O'Dell, C N; Oliver, K; Palmeiri, A; Palmer, S A; Parker, A; Patel, D; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phelps, K; Phillimore, B J; Plumb, R; Rajan, J; Raymond, C; Rouse, G; Saenphimmachak, C; Sehra, H K; Sheridan, E; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C; Subramanian, S; Sycamore, N; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Van Helmond, Z; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; White, S; Whitehead, S L; Wilkinson, J E; Willey, D L; Williams, H; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wu, Z; Coulson, A; Vaudin, M; Sulston, J E; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Wooster, R; Dunham, I; Carter, N P; McVean, G; Ross, M T; Harrow, J; Olson, M V; Beck, S; Rogers, J; Bentley, D R; Banerjee, R; Bryant, S P; Burford, D C; Burrill, W D H; Clegg, S M; Dhami, P; Dovey, O; Faulkner, L M; Gribble, S M; Langford, C F; Pandian, R D; Porter, K M; Prigmore, E

    2006-05-18

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome. PMID:16710414

  8. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, A.; Matthews, L. H.; Burton, J.; Ashurst, J. L.; Howe, K. L.; Ashcroft, K. J.; Beare, D. M.; Burford, D. C.; Hunt, S. E.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Jones, M. C.; Keenan, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Scott, C. E.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Andrews, D. T.; Ashwell, R. I. S.; Babbage, A. K.; Bagguley, C. L.; Bailey, J.; Bannerjee, R.; Barlow, K. F.; Bates, K.; Beasley, H.; Bird, C. P.; Bray-Allen, S.; Brown, A. J.; Brown, J. Y.; Burrill, W.; Carder, C.; Carter, N. P.; Chapman, J. C.; Clamp, M. E.; Clark, S. Y.; Clarke, G.; Clee, C. M.; Clegg, S. C. M.; Cobley, V.; Collins, J. E.; Corby, N.; Coville, G. J.; Deloukas, P.; Dhami, P.; Dunham, I.; Dunn, M.; Earthrowl, M. E.; Ellington, A. G.; Faulkner, L.; Frankish, A. G.; Frankland, J.; French, L.; Garner, P.; Garnett, J.; Gilbert, J. G. R.; Gilson, C. J.; Ghori, J.; Grafham, D. V.; Gribble, S. M.; Griffiths, C.; Hall, R. E.; Hammond, S.; Harley, J. L.; Hart, E. A.; Heath, P. D.; Howden, P. J.; Huckle, E. J.; Hunt, P. J.; Hunt, A. R.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.; Kay, M.; Kimberley, A. M.; King, A.; Laird, G. K.; Langford, C. J.; Lawlor, S.; Leongamornlert, D. A.; Lloyd, D. M.; Lloyd, C.; Loveland, J. E.; Lovell, J.; Martin, S.; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M.; McLaren, S. J.; McMurray, A.; Milne, S.; Moore, M. J. F.; Nickerson, T.; Palmer, S. A.; Pearce, A. V.; Peck, A. I.; Pelan, S.; Phillimore, B.; Porter, K. M.; Rice, C. M.; Searle, S.; Sehra, H. K.; Shownkeen, R.; Skuce, C. D.; Smith, M.; Steward, C. A.; Sycamore, N.; Tester, J.; Thomas, D. W.; Tracey, A.; Tromans, A.; Tubby, B.; Wall, M.; Wallis, J. M.; West, A. P.; Whitehead, S. L.; Willey, D. L.; Wilming, L.; Wray, P. W.; Wright, M. W.; Young, L.; Coulson, A.; Durbin, R.; Hubbard, T.; Sulston, J. E.; Beck, S.; Bentley, D. R.; Rogers, J.; Ross, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  9. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Dunham, A; Matthews, L H; Burton, J; Ashurst, J L; Howe, K L; Ashcroft, K J; Beare, D M; Burford, D C; Hunt, S E; Griffiths-Jones, S; Jones, M C; Keenan, S J; Oliver, K; Scott, C E; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Andrews, D T; Ashwell, R I S; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Bannerjee, R; Barlow, K F; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burrill, W; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M E; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S C M; Cobley, V; Collins, J E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Deloukas, P; Dhami, P; Dunham, I; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M E; Ellington, A G; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A G; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gilbert, J G R; Gilson, C J; Ghori, J; Grafham, D V; Gribble, S M; Griffiths, C; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E A; Heath, P D; Howden, P J; Huckle, E J; Hunt, P J; Hunt, A R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Laird, G K; Langford, C J; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Lloyd, C; Loveland, J E; Lovell, J; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; McLaren, S J; McMurray, A; Milne, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K M; Rice, C M; Searle, S; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C A; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thomas, D W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tubby, B; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; West, A P; Whitehead, S L; Willey, D L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wright, M W; Young, L; Coulson, A; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Sulston, J E; Beck, S; Bentley, D R; Rogers, J; Ross, M T

    2004-04-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  10. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  11. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  12. FISH analysis of the arrangement of chromosomes in interphase nuclei using telomeric, centromeric, and DNA painting probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajembashi, Shamci; Schmitt, Eberhard; Dittmar, Heike; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is used to study the arrangement of chromosomes in interphase nuclei of unsynchronized human lymphocytes. DNA probes specific for telomeric DNA, centromeric (alpha) -satellite DNA and whole chromosomes 2, 7, 9 and X are employed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the chromosome territories is variable in cycling cells, for example, close to the metaphase chromosome homologues are arranged pairwise. Furthermore, the relative arrangement of chromosome homologues to each other is not spatially defined. Also, the relative orientation of centromeres and telomeres within a chromosome domain is variable.

  13. The 5S rDNA in two Abracris grasshoppers (Ommatolampidinae: Acrididae): molecular and chromosomal organization.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Danilo; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Martí, Dardo Andrea; Mariguela, Tatiane Casagrande; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2016-08-01

    The 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are subject of dynamic evolution at chromosomal and molecular levels, evolving through concerted and/or birth-and-death fashion. Among grasshoppers, the chromosomal location for this sequence was established for some species, but little molecular information was obtained to infer evolutionary patterns. Here, we integrated data from chromosomal and nucleotide sequence analysis for 5S rDNA in two Abracris species aiming to identify evolutionary dynamics. For both species, two arrays were identified, a larger sequence (named type-I) that consisted of the entire 5S rDNA gene plus NTS (non-transcribed spacer) and a smaller (named type-II) with truncated 5S rDNA gene plus short NTS that was considered a pseudogene. For type-I sequences, the gene corresponding region contained the internal control region and poly-T motif and the NTS presented partial transposable elements. Between the species, nucleotide differences for type-I were noticed, while type-II was identical, suggesting pseudogenization in a common ancestor. At chromosomal point to view, the type-II was placed in one bivalent, while type-I occurred in multiple copies in distinct chromosomes. In Abracris, the evolution of 5S rDNA was apparently influenced by the chromosomal distribution of clusters (single or multiple location), resulting in a mixed mechanism integrating concerted and birth-and-death evolution depending on the unit. PMID:27106499

  14. Ribosomal DNA and Stellate gene copy number variation on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1989-01-01

    Multigene families on the Y chromosome face an unusual array of evolutionary forces. Both ribosomal DNA and Stellate, the two families examined here, have multiple copies of similar sequences on the X and Y chromosomes. Although the rate of sequence divergence on the Y chromosome depends on rates of mutation, gene conversion and exchange with the X chromosome, as well as purifying selection, the regulation of gene copy number may also depend on other pleiotropic functions, such as maintenance of chromosome pairing. Gene copy numbers were estimated for a series of 34 Y chromosome replacement lines using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster. Scans of autoradiographs of the same blots probed with the cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene, a single copy gene, served as internal standards. Copy numbers span a 6-fold range for ribosomal DNA and a 3-fold range for Stellate DNA. Despite this magnitude of variation, there was no association between copy number and segregation variation of the sex chromosomes. Images PMID:2494656

  15. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  16. A 6. 5-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig incorporating 33 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at Xq22

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrie, D.; Kendall, E.; Coffey, A.; Hassock, S.; Collins, J.; Todd, C.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. ); Lehrach, H. ); Harris, A. )

    1994-01-01

    The Xq22 region of the human X chromosome contains genes for a number of inherited disorders. Sixty-nine yeast artificial chromosome clones have been isolated and assembled into a 6.5-Mb contig that contains 33 DNA markers localized to this region. This contig extends distally from DXS366 to beyond DXS87 and includes the genes involved in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (btk), Fabry disease (GLA), and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP). The order of markers in this contig is consistent with the known genetic and physical mapping information of Xq22. This cloned material provides a source from which to isolate other genes located in this part of the X chromosome. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. DNA Profiling of B Chromosomes from the Yellow-necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    PubMed Central

    Tanić, Nikola; Dedović, Nasta; Vujos̆ević, Mladen; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2000-01-01

    Using AP-PCR-based DNA profiling we examined some structural features of B chromosomes from yellow-necked mice Apodemus flavicollis. Mice harboring one, two, or three or lacking B chromosomes were examined. Chromosomal structure was scanned for variant bands by using a series of arbitrary primers and from these, informative bands were selected. The selection criteria used were the ability to differentiate between individuals of the species, to detect markers common for both A and B chromosomes, and, importantly, to differentiate between A- and B-chromosome sets. In addition to primers, profiling conditions were found to be critical for meeting the selection criteria. Primers and analysis conditions that demonstrated structural characteristics unique to the B-chromosome set are described. These characteristics included variant bands as qualitative parameters and altered electrophoretic band intensities as quantitative distinctions estimated by integration of densitometric profiles of electrophoretograms. B chromosome-specific molecular markers are easy to detect by AP-PCR-based DNA profiling in the presence of a full set of A chromosomes. Models for the origin of yellow-necked mouse B chromosomes are discussed in the context of presented data. PMID:10645950

  18. SMC condensin entraps chromosomal DNA by an ATP hydrolysis dependent loading mechanism in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Larissa; Bürmann, Frank; Minnen, Anita; Shin, Ho-Chul; Toseland, Christopher P; Oh, Byung-Ha; Gruber, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Smc–ScpAB forms elongated, annular structures that promote chromosome segregation, presumably by compacting and resolving sister DNA molecules. The mechanistic basis for its action, however, is only poorly understood. Here, we have established a physical assay to determine whether the binding of condensin to native chromosomes in Bacillus subtilis involves entrapment of DNA by the Smc–ScpAB ring. To do so, we have chemically cross-linked the three ring interfaces in Smc–ScpAB and thereafter isolated intact chromosomes under protein denaturing conditions. Exclusively species of Smc–ScpA, which were previously cross-linked into covalent rings, remained associated with chromosomal DNA. DNA entrapment is abolished by mutations that interfere with the Smc ATPase cycle and strongly reduced when the recruitment factor ParB is deleted, implying that most Smc–ScpAB is loaded onto the chromosome at parS sites near the replication origin. We furthermore report a physical interaction between native Smc–ScpAB and chromosomal DNA fragments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06659.001 PMID:25951515

  19. The evolving male: spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) ecotypes are divergent at Y chromosome but not mtDNA or autosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Kimberly R; Perrin, William F; Oremus, Marc; Karczmarski, Leszek; Bowen, Brian W; Puritz, Jonathan B; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    The susceptibility of the Y chromosome to sexual selection may make this chromosome an important player in the formation of reproductive isolating barriers, and ultimately speciation. Here, we investigate the role of the Y chromosome in phenotypic divergence and reproductive isolation of spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) ecotypes. This species contains six known ecotypes (grouped into four subspecies) that exhibit striking differences in morphology, habitat and mating system, despite having adjacent or overlapping ranges and little genetic divergence at previously studied mtDNA and autosomal markers. We examined the phylogeographic structure for all six ecotypes across the species range (n = 261, 17 geographic locations) using DNA sequences from three Y chromosome markers, two maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) markers, and a biparentally inherited autosomal intron. mtDNA and autosomal analyses revealed low divergence (most Φ(ST) values <0.1) between ecotypes and geographic regions, concordant with previous studies. In contrast, Y intron analyses revealed fixed differences amongst the three most phenotypically divergent groups: S. l. longirostris vs. S. l. roseiventris vs. combined S. l. orientalis/S. l. centroamericana/Tres Marias ecotypes). Another ecotype (whitebelly), previously postulated to be a hybrid between the two phenotypically most divergent ecotypes, had Y haplotypes from both putative parent ecotypes, supporting a hybrid designation. Reduced introgression of the Y chromosome has previously been observed in other organisms ranging from insects to terrestrial mammals, and here we demonstrate this phenomenon in a marine mammal with high dispersal capabilities. These results indicate that reduced introgression of the Y chromosome occurs in a wide taxonomic range of organisms and support the growing body of evidence that rapid evolution of the Y chromosome is important in evolutionary diversification. PMID:23551274

  20. Chromosome alterations in breast carcinomas: frequent involvement of DNA losses including chromosomes 4q and 21q.

    PubMed Central

    Schwendel, A.; Richard, F.; Langreck, H.; Kaufmann, O.; Lage, H.; Winzer, K. J.; Petersen, I.; Dietel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to map DNA gains and losses in 39 invasive ductal breast carcinomas. Frequent abnormalities included gains on chromosomal regions 1q, 8q, 11q12-13, 16p, 19, 20q and X as well as frequent losses on 1p, 5q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 13q and 16q. Furthermore, frequent losses on 4q (20 cases) and 21q (14 cases) were found for the first time in this tumour type. High copy number amplifications were observed at 8q12-24, 11q11-13 and 20q13-ter. Highly differentiated tumours were associated with gains on 1q and 11q12-13 along with losses on 1p21-22, 4q, 13q, 11q21-ter. Undifferentiated breast carcinomas were characterized by additional DNA imbalances, i.e. deletions of 5q13-23, all of chromosome 9, the centromeric part of chromosome 13 including band 13q14 and the overrepresentation of chromosome X. We speculate that these changes are associated with tumour progression of invasive ductal breast cancer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9743305

  1. Chromosome painting in plants: in situ hybridization with a DNA probe from a specific microdissected chromosome arm of common wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Vega, M; Abbo, S; Feldman, M; Levy, A A

    1994-01-01

    We report here on the successful painting of a specific plant chromosome within its own genome. Isochromosomes for the long arm of chromosome 5 of the wheat B genome (5BL) were microdissected from first meiotic metaphase spreads of a monoisosomic 5BL line of the common wheat Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring. The dissected isochromosomes were amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR in a single tube reaction. The amplified DNA was used as a complex probe mixture for fluorescent in situ hybridization on first meiotic metaphase spreads of lines carrying 5BL as a distinctive marker. Hybridization signals were observed, specifically, along the entire 5BL. In some of the cells, labeling was also detected in two bivalents, presumably those of the 5B "homoeologues" (partial homologues) found in common wheat (5A and 5D). The probe also revealed discrete domains in tapetal nuclei at interphase, further supporting the probe's high specificity. These data suggest that chromosome and homoeologous group-specific sequences are more abundant in 5BL than genome-specific sequences. Chromosome-painting probes, such as the one described here for 5BL, can facilitate the study of chromosome evolution in polyploid wheat. Images PMID:7991581

  2. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents. PMID:16541075

  3. Alphoid satellite DNA is tightly associated with centromere antigens in human chromosomes throughout the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Masumoto, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Okazaki, Tuneko )

    1989-03-01

    In this study, the authors have examined a DNA element specific to the centromere domain of human chromosomes. Purified HeLa chromosomes were digested with the restriction enzyme Sau3AI and fractionated by sedimentation through a sucrose gradient. Fractions showing antigenicity to anticentromere (kinetochore) serum obtained from a scleroderma CREST patient were used to construct a DNA library. From this library they found one clone which has specifically hybridized to the centromere domain of metaphase chromosomes using a biotinylated probe DNA and FITC-conjugated avidin. The clone contained a stretch of alphoid DNA dimer. To determine precisely the relative location of the alphoid DNA stretch and the centromere antigen, a method was developed to carry out in situ hybridization of DNA and indirect immunofluorescent staining of antigen on the same cell preparation. Using this method, they have found perfect overlapping of the alphoid DNA sites with the centromere antigen in both metaphase chromosomes and nuclei at various stages in the cell cycle. They have also observed this exact correlation at the attachment sites of artificially extended sister chromatids. These results suggest the possibility that alphoid DNA repeats are a key component of kinetochore structure.

  4. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaA(ATP) is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  5. Multiple DNA Binding Proteins Contribute to Timing of Chromosome Replication in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. DnaA associated with either ATP or ADP binds to a set of strong DnaA binding sites in oriC, whereas only DnaAATP is capable of binding additional and weaker sites to promote initiation. Additional DNA binding proteins act to ensure that initiation occurs timely by affecting either the cellular mass at which DNA replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on oriC for modulation of its activity but also at additional regulatory sites to control the nucleotide bound status of DnaA. Here we review the contribution of key DNA binding proteins to the tight regulation of chromosome replication in E. coli cells. PMID:27446932

  6. Repair of chromosomal RAG-mediated DNA breaks by mutant RAG proteins lacking phosphatidylinositol 3-like kinase consensus phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Gapud, Eric J; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Mahowald, Grace K; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2011-08-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs) are members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-like family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate serines or threonines when positioned adjacent to a glutamine residue (SQ/TQ). Both kinases are activated rapidly by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulate the function of proteins involved in DNA damage responses. In developing lymphocytes, DSBs are generated during V(D)J recombination, which is required to assemble the second exon of all Ag receptor genes. This reaction is initiated through a DNA cleavage step by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which together comprise an endonuclease that generates DSBs at the border of two recombining gene segments and their flanking recombination signals. This DNA cleavage step is followed by a joining step, during which pairs of DNA coding and signal ends are ligated to form a coding joint and a signal joint, respectively. ATM and DNA-PKcs are integrally involved in the repair of both signal and coding ends, but the targets of these kinases involved in the repair process have not been fully elucidated. In this regard, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which each have several SQ/TQ motifs, have been implicated in the repair of RAG-mediated DSBs. In this study, we use a previously developed approach for studying chromosomal V(D)J recombination that has been modified to allow for the analysis of RAG1 and RAG2 function. We show that phosphorylation of RAG1 or RAG2 by ATM or DNA-PKcs at SQ/TQ consensus sites is dispensable for the joining step of V(D)J recombination. PMID:21742970

  7. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Roland; Eckenberg, Ralph; Petit, Jean-Louis; Fonknechten, Núria; Da Silva, Corinne; Cattolico, Laurence; Levy, Michaël; Barbe, Valérie; de Berardinis, Véronique; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Pelletier, Eric; Vico, Virginie; Anthouard, Véronique; Rowen, Lee; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Sun, Hui; Du, Hui; Pepin, Kymberlie; Artiguenave, François; Robert, Catherine; Cruaud, Corinne; Brüls, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Friedlander, Lucie; Samson, Gaelle; Brottier, Philippe; Cure, Susan; Ségurens, Béatrice; Anière, Franck; Samain, Sylvie; Crespeau, Hervé; Abbasi, Nissa; Aiach, Nathalie; Boscus, Didier; Dickhoff, Rachel; Dors, Monica; Dubois, Ivan; Friedman, Cynthia; Gouyvenoux, Michel; James, Rose; Madan, Anuradha; Mairey-Estrada, Barbara; Mangenot, Sophie; Martins, Nathalie; Ménard, Manuela; Oztas, Sophie; Ratcliffe, Amber; Shaffer, Tristan; Trask, Barbara; Vacherie, Benoit; Bellemere, Chadia; Belser, Caroline; Besnard-Gonnet, Marielle; Bartol-Mavel, Delphine; Boutard, Magali; Briez-Silla, Stéphanie; Combette, Stephane; Dufossé-Laurent, Virginie; Ferron, Carolyne; Lechaplais, Christophe; Louesse, Claudine; Muselet, Delphine; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Pateau, Emilie; Petit, Emmanuelle; Sirvain-Trukniewicz, Peggy; Trybou, Arnaud; Vega-Czarny, Nathalie; Bataille, Elodie; Bluet, Elodie; Bordelais, Isabelle; Dubois, Maria; Dumont, Corinne; Guérin, Thomas; Haffray, Sébastien; Hammadi, Rachid; Muanga, Jacqueline; Pellouin, Virginie; Robert, Dominique; Wunderle, Edith; Gauguet, Gilbert; Roy, Alice; Sainte-Marthe, Laurent; Verdier, Jean; Verdier-Discala, Claude; Hillier, LaDeana; Fulton, Lucinda; McPherson, John; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Wilson, Richard; Scarpelli, Claude; Gyapay, Gábor; Wincker, Patrick; Saurin, William; Quétier, Francis; Waterston, Robert; Hood, Leroy; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Chromosome 14 is one of five acrocentric chromosomes in the human genome. These chromosomes are characterized by a heterochromatic short arm that contains essentially ribosomal RNA genes, and a euchromatic long arm in which most, if not all, of the protein-coding genes are located. The finished sequence of human chromosome 14 comprises 87,410,661 base pairs, representing 100% of its euchromatic portion, in a single continuous segment covering the entire long arm with no gaps. Two loci of crucial importance for the immune system, as well as more than 60 disease genes, have been localized so far on chromosome 14. We identified 1,050 genes and gene fragments, and 393 pseudogenes. On the basis of comparisons with other vertebrate genomes, we estimate that more than 96% of the chromosome 14 genes have been annotated. From an analysis of the CpG island occurrences, we estimate that 70% of these annotated genes are complete at their 5' end. PMID:12508121

  8. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Chad; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Zody, Michael C; Asakawa, Shuichi; Taudien, Stefan; Garber, Manuel; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Schueler, Mary G; Shimizu, Atsushi; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Asakawa, Teruyo; Blechschmidt, Karin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dooley, Kathleen T; Dorris, Lester; Engels, Reinhard; Glöckner, Gernot; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hall, Jennifer L; Ishikawa, Sabine K; Jaffe, David B; Kamat, Asha; Kudoh, Jun; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Lokitsang, Tashi; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Charles D; Mauceli, Evan; Menzel, Uwe; Mihalev, Atanas H; Minoshima, Shinsei; Murayama, Yuji; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Parker, Stephen C J; Polley, Andreas; Raymond, Christina K; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rodriguez, Joseph; Sasaki, Takashi; Schilhabel, Markus; Siddiqui, Roman; Smith, Cherylyn L; Sneddon, Tam P; Talamas, Jessica A; Tenzin, Pema; Topham, Kerri; Venkataraman, Vijay; Wen, Gaiping; Yamazaki, Satoru; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Rosenthal, Andre; Birren, Bruce W; Platzer, Matthias; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Lander, Eric S

    2006-01-19

    The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) recently completed a sequence of the human genome. As part of this project, we have focused on chromosome 8. Although some chromosomes exhibit extreme characteristics in terms of length, gene content, repeat content and fraction segmentally duplicated, chromosome 8 is distinctly typical in character, being very close to the genome median in each of these aspects. This work describes a finished sequence and gene catalogue for the chromosome, which represents just over 5% of the euchromatic human genome. A unique feature of the chromosome is a vast region of approximately 15 megabases on distal 8p that appears to have a strikingly high mutation rate, which has accelerated in the hominids relative to other sequenced mammals. This fast-evolving region contains a number of genes related to innate immunity and the nervous system, including loci that appear to be under positive selection--these include the major defensin (DEF) gene cluster and MCPH1, a gene that may have contributed to the evolution of expanded brain size in the great apes. The data from chromosome 8 should allow a better understanding of both normal and disease biology and genome evolution. PMID:16421571

  9. Maternal and paternal chromosomes 7 show differential methylation of many genes in lymphoblast DNA.

    PubMed

    Hannula, K; Lipsanen-Nyman, M; Scherer, S W; Holmberg, C; Höglund, P; Kere, J

    2001-04-01

    Genomic imprinting, the differential expression of paternal and maternal alleles, involves many chromosomal regions and plays a role in development and growth. Differential methylation of maternal and paternal alleles is a hallmark of imprinted genes, and thus methylation assays are widely used to support the identification of novel imprinted genes. Either blood or lymphoblast DNAs are most often used in these assays, even though methylation levels may change in cell culture. We undertook a systematic survey of parent-of-origin-specific methylation of chromosome 7 genes and ESTs by comparing DNA samples from cases of maternal and paternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 using DNA from fresh blood and lymphoblast cell lines. Our results revealed that up to 41% of genes and ESTs show parent-of-origin-specific methylation differences in lymphoblast DNA after only a short time in culture, whereas methylation differences were not seen in blood DNA. The methylation changes occurred most commonly on paternal chromosome 7, whereas alterations on maternal chromosome 7 were more infrequent and weaker. These findings indicate that methylation patterns may change significantly during cell culture in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and suggest that methylation is maintained differently on maternal and paternal chromosomes 7. PMID:11352560

  10. Mapping of 262 DNA markers into 24 intervals on human chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigami, Akira; Tokino, Takashi; Takiguchi, Shuya; Mori, Masaki; Nakamura, Yusuke ); Glaser, T. ); Park, J.W.; Jones, C. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have extended the authors mapping effort on human chromosome 11 to encompass a total of 262 DNA markers, which have been mapped into 24 intervals on chromosome 11; 123 of the markers reveal RFLPs. Theses clones are scattered throughout the chromosome, although some clustering occurs in R-positive bands (p15.1, p11.2,q13, and q23.3). Fifty-two of the markers were found to contain DNA sequences conserved in Chinese hamster, and some of these 52 also cross-hybridized with DNA from other mammals and/or chicken. As the length of chromosome 11 is estimated at nearly 130 cM, the average distance between RFLP markers is roughly 1 cM. The large panel of DNA markers on their map should contribute to investigations of hereditary diseases on this chromosome, and it will also provide reagents for constructing either fine-scale linkage and physical maps or contig maps of cosmids or yeast artificial chromosomes.

  11. Marker chromosomes lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA: A new intriguing class of abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L.A.; Zinn, A.B.; Stallard, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have implicated {alpha}-satellite DNA as an integral part of the centromere and important for the normal segregation of chromosomes. We analyzed four supernumerary marker chromosomes in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could detect neither pancentromeric or chromosome specific {alpha}-satellite DNA. Mosaicism of the markers existed, but each was present in the majority of cells indicating that they segregated normally. FISH with chromosome-specific libraries identified the origins of these markers as chromosomes 13 (1 case) and 15 (3 cases). High resolution analysis, combined with hybridization of a series of cosmid probes, revealed that each marker was a symmetrical duplication of the terminal long arm of the parent chromosome. Telomeric sequences were detected by FISH indicating linear structures. Breakpoint heterogeneity, as defined by cosmid probes, was demonstrated in the three cases involving chromosome 15. No pericentromeric satellite III DNA could be detected on three markers. Studies with anti-centromere antibodies are in progress to assay for centromeric antigens on the markers, as expected at functional centromeric sites. Our results demonstrate that the precise structural identification and heterogeneity of these markers can be easily elucidated using FISH with unique sequence cosmid probes. We conclude from our studies and others in the literature: (1) there is a newly defined class of markers lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA and containing duplications of terminal sequences; (2)neither {alpha}-satellite nor satellite III DNA at levels detectable by FISH is necessary for fidelity in the normal segregation of chromosomes; and (3) these markers were most likely formed by recombination of the long arms during meiosis.

  12. A designed DNA binding motif that recognizes extended sites and spans two adjacent major grooves†

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Jéssica; Mosquera, Jesús; García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rational design of a DNA-binding peptide construct composed of the DNA-contacting regions of two transcription factors (GCN4 and GAGA) linked through an AT-hook DNA anchor. The resulting chimera, which represents a new, non-natural DNA binding motif, binds with high affinity and selectivity to a long composite sequence of 13 base pairs (TCAT-AATT-GAGAG). PMID:27252825

  13. DNA methylation epigenetically silences crossover hot spots and controls chromosomal domains of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yelina, Nataliya E.; Lambing, Christophe; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Zhao, Xiaohui; Santos, Bruno; Henderson, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which is typically concentrated in narrow hot spots that are controlled by genetic and epigenetic information. Arabidopsis chromosomes are highly DNA methylated in the repetitive centromeres, which are also crossover-suppressed. Here we demonstrate that RNA-directed DNA methylation is sufficient to locally silence Arabidopsis euchromatic crossover hot spots and is associated with increased nucleosome density and H3K9me2. However, loss of CG DNA methylation maintenance in met1 triggers epigenetic crossover remodeling at the chromosome scale, with pericentromeric decreases and euchromatic increases in recombination. We used recombination mutants that alter interfering and noninterfering crossover repair pathways (fancm and zip4) to demonstrate that remodeling primarily involves redistribution of interfering crossovers. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we show that crossover remodeling is driven by loss of CG methylation within the centromeric regions. Using cytogenetics, we profiled meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci in met1 and found them unchanged relative to wild type. We propose that met1 chromosome structure is altered, causing centromere-proximal DSBs to be inhibited from maturation into interfering crossovers. These data demonstrate that DNA methylation is sufficient to silence crossover hot spots and plays a key role in establishing domains of meiotic recombination along chromosomes. PMID:26494791

  14. The DNA Sequence And Comparative Analysis Of Human Chromosome5

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, Steve; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie,Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black,Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan,Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner,Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou,Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar,Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers,Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang,Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, SusanM.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-08-01

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes and contains numerous intrachromosomal duplications, yet it has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting that they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-coding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families. We also completely sequenced versions of the large chromosome-5-specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and probably have a mechanistic role in human physiological variation, as deletions in these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy.

  15. Multiple rDNA units distributed on all chromosomes of Nosema bombycis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Handeng; Pan, Guoqing; Song, Shihong; Xu, Jinshan; Li, Tian; Deng, Yanbo; Zhou, Zeyang

    2008-10-01

    Among Microsporidia, Nosema bombycis has a novel arrangement of LSUrRNA, SSUrRNA, ITS, IGS and 5SrRNA. To determine the distribution of rDNA among the chromosomes, we performed genome-wide screening and Southern blotting with three probes (SSU, ITS and IGS). Southern blotting revealed that ribosomal RNA genes are distributed on all chromosomes of N. bombycis, which is contrary to the previous result, which concluded that the N. bombycis rRNA genes were limited to a single chromosome. This wide distribution is similar to that of the rDNA unit of Encephalitozoon cuniculi. Screening of the N. bombycis genome detected 53 LSUrRNA elements, 43 SSUrRNA elements and 36 5SrRNA elements. However, it is still difficult to determine their loci on the chromosomes as the genomic map is unfinished. PMID:18640121

  16. Chromosome fission associated with growth of ribosomal DNA in Neodiprion abietis (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae).

    PubMed Central

    Rousselet, J; Monti, L; Auger-Rozenberg, M A; Parker, J S; Lemeunier, F

    2000-01-01

    The haploid complement consists of seven metacentric chromosomes in most diprionid species but has evolved to n = 8 by fission in Neodiprion abietis. This fission generated a small telocentric chromosome and a large pseudoacrocentric chromosome with a short arm carrying a satellite. In situ hybridization indicated that the location of the rRNA gene cluster corresponds to the whole short arm. This suggests that (i) the breaking point was located close to an rRNA gene cluster, and (ii) fission was associated with growth of rDNA. These results suggest rDNA as a preferential breaking point but with a role in the healing of naked chromosome ends. PMID:11052531

  17. Y chromosomal DNA variation and the peopling of Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, M F; Horai, S

    1995-01-01

    Four loci mapping to the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome were genotyped in Japanese populations from Okinawa, the southernmost island of Japan; Shizuoka and Aomori on the main island of Honshu; and a small sample of Taiwanese. The Y Alu polymorphic (YAP) element is present in 42% of the Japanese and absent in the Taiwanese, confirming the irregular distribution of this polymorphism in Asia. Data from the four loci were used to determine genetic distances among populations, construct Y chromosome haplotypes, and estimate the degree of genetic diversity in each population and on different Y chromosome haplotypes. Evolutionary analysis of Y haplotypes suggests that polymorphisms at the YAP (DYS287) and DXYS5Y loci originated a single time, whereas restriction patterns at the DYS1 locus and microsatellite alleles at the DYS19 locus arose more than once. Genetic distance analysis indicated that the Okinawans are differentiated from Japanese living on Honshu. The data support the hypotheses that modern Japanese populations have resulted from distinctive genetic contributions involving the ancient Jomon people and Yayoi immigrants from Korea or mainland China, with Okinawans experiencing the least amount of admixture with the Yayoi. It is suggested that YAP+ chromosomes migrated to Japan with the Jomon people > 10,000 years ago and that a large infusion of YAP- chromosomes entered Japan with the Yayoi migration starting 2,300 years ago. Different degrees of genetic diversity carried by these two ancient chromosomal lineages may be explained by the different life-styles (hunter-gatherer versus agriculturalist). of the migrant groups, the size of the founding populations, and the antiquities of the founding events. Images Figure 1 PMID:7717406

  18. Y chromosomal DNA variation and the peopling of Japan.

    PubMed

    Hammer, M F; Horai, S

    1995-04-01

    Four loci mapping to the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome were genotyped in Japanese populations from Okinawa, the southernmost island of Japan; Shizuoka and Aomori on the main island of Honshu; and a small sample of Taiwanese. The Y Alu polymorphic (YAP) element is present in 42% of the Japanese and absent in the Taiwanese, confirming the irregular distribution of this polymorphism in Asia. Data from the four loci were used to determine genetic distances among populations, construct Y chromosome haplotypes, and estimate the degree of genetic diversity in each population and on different Y chromosome haplotypes. Evolutionary analysis of Y haplotypes suggests that polymorphisms at the YAP (DYS287) and DXYS5Y loci originated a single time, whereas restriction patterns at the DYS1 locus and microsatellite alleles at the DYS19 locus arose more than once. Genetic distance analysis indicated that the Okinawans are differentiated from Japanese living on Honshu. The data support the hypotheses that modern Japanese populations have resulted from distinctive genetic contributions involving the ancient Jomon people and Yayoi immigrants from Korea or mainland China, with Okinawans experiencing the least amount of admixture with the Yayoi. It is suggested that YAP+ chromosomes migrated to Japan with the Jomon people > 10,000 years ago and that a large infusion of YAP- chromosomes entered Japan with the Yayoi migration starting 2,300 years ago. Different degrees of genetic diversity carried by these two ancient chromosomal lineages may be explained by the different life-styles (hunter-gatherer versus agriculturalist). of the migrant groups, the size of the founding populations, and the antiquities of the founding events. PMID:7717406

  19. Fragile Sites of 'Valencia' Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in 'Valencia' C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of 'Valencia' C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid 'Valencia' C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in 'Valencia' sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in 'Valencia' sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites. PMID:26977938

  20. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  1. Initiation of chromosome replication in dnaA and dnaC mutants of Escherichia coli B/r F.

    PubMed Central

    Helmstetter, C E; Krajewski, C A

    1982-01-01

    Regulatory aspects of chromosome replication were investigated in dnaA5 and dnaC2 mutants of the Escherichia coli B/r F. When cultures growing at 25 degrees C were shifted to 41 degrees C for extended periods and then returned to 25 degrees C, the subsequent synchronous initiations of chromosome replication were spaced at fixed intervals. When chloramphenicol was added coincident with the temperature downshift, the extend of chromosome replication in the dnaA mutant was greater than that in the dnaC mutant, but the time intervals between initiations were the same in both mutants. Furthermore, the time interval between the first two initiation events was unaffected by alterations in the rate of rifampin-sensitive RNA synthesis or cell mass increase. In the dnaC2 mutant, the capacities for both initiations were achieved in the absence of extensive DNA replication at 25 degrees C as long as protein synthesis was permitted, but the cells did not progress toward the second initiation at 25 degrees C when both protein synthesis and DNA replication were prevented. Cells of the dnaA5 mutant did not achieve the capacity for the second initiation event in the absence of extensive chromosome replication, although delayed initiation may have taken place. A plausible hypothesis to explain the data is that the minimum interval is determined by the time required for formation of a supercoiled, membrane-attached structure in the vicinity of oriC which is required for initiation of DNA synthesis. PMID:6173377

  2. Insertion of host DNA into PVL-encoding phages of the Staphylococcus aureus lineage ST80 by intra-chromosomal recombination.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Christiane; Witte, Wolfgang; Wolz, Christiane; Goerke, Christiane

    2010-10-25

    Temperate bacteriophages play a critical role in the pathogenicity of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus by mediating positive lysogenic conversion for different virulence factors such as Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) or by interrupting chromosomal virulence genes. PVL-encoding phages are integrated in the S. aureus genome within a conserved ORF which is surrounded by a cluster of tandemly repeated genes. Here we demonstrate that in S. aureus clonal complex ST80 strains PVL-phage induction led to the acquisition of host DNA into the phage genome probably due to a homologous recombination event between direct repeats of the two paralogous genes adjacent to the phage integration site. Phage excision was accompanied by an additional chromosomal deletion in this region. This so far unrecognized mechanism of DNA uptake into the phage genome may play an important role in the co-evolution of phages and bacteria. PMID:20708208

  3. DNA methylation and heterochromatinization in the male-specific region of the primitive Y chromosome of papaya

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Xiue; Yu, Qingyi; Ming, Ray; Jiang, Jiming

    2008-01-01

    Sex chromosomes evolved from autosomes. Recombination suppression in the sex-determining region and accumulation of deleterious mutations lead to degeneration of the Y chromosomes in many species with heteromorphic X/Y chromosomes. However, how the recombination suppressed domain expands from the sex-determining locus to the entire Y chromosome remains elusive. The Y chromosome of papaya (Carica papaya) diverged from the X chromosome approximately 2–3 million years ago and represents one of the most recently emerged Y chromosomes. Here, we report that the male-specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY) spans ∼13% of the papaya Y chromosome. Interestingly, the centromere of the Y chromosome is embedded in the MSY. The centromeric domain within the MSY has accumulated significantly more DNA than the corresponding X chromosomal domain, which leads to abnormal chromosome pairing. We observed four knob-like heterochromatin structures specific to the MSY. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the DNA sequences associated with the heterochromatic knobs are highly divergent and heavily methylated compared with the sequences in the corresponding X chromosomal domains. These results suggest that DNA methylation and heterochromatinization play an important role in the early stage of sex chromosome evolution. PMID:18593814

  4. v-Src Causes Chromosome Bridges in a Caffeine-Sensitive Manner by Generating DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Honda, Takuya; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Src activity is commonly observed in epithelial cancers. Aberrant activation of the kinase activity is associated with malignant progression. However, the mechanisms that underlie the Src-induced malignant progression of cancer are not completely understood. We show here that v-Src, an oncogene that was first identified from a Rous sarcoma virus and a mutant variant of c-Src, leads to an increase in the number of anaphase and telophase cells having chromosome bridges. v-Src increases the number of γH2AX foci, and this increase is inhibited by treatment with PP2, a Src kinase inhibitor. v-Src induces the phosphorylation of KAP1 at Ser824, Chk2 at Thr68, and Chk1 at Ser345, suggesting the activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Caffeine decreases the number of cells having chromosome bridges at a concentration incapable of inhibiting Chk1 phosphorylation at Ser345. These results suggest that v-Src induces chromosome bridges via generation of DNA damage and the subsequent DNA damage response, possibly by homologous recombination. A chromosome bridge gives rise to the accumulation of DNA damage directly through chromosome breakage and indirectly through cytokinesis failure-induced multinucleation. We propose that v-Src-induced chromosome bridge formation is one of the causes of the v-Src-induced malignant progression of cancer cells. PMID:27271602

  5. v-Src Causes Chromosome Bridges in a Caffeine-Sensitive Manner by Generating DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Honda, Takuya; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Src activity is commonly observed in epithelial cancers. Aberrant activation of the kinase activity is associated with malignant progression. However, the mechanisms that underlie the Src-induced malignant progression of cancer are not completely understood. We show here that v-Src, an oncogene that was first identified from a Rous sarcoma virus and a mutant variant of c-Src, leads to an increase in the number of anaphase and telophase cells having chromosome bridges. v-Src increases the number of γH2AX foci, and this increase is inhibited by treatment with PP2, a Src kinase inhibitor. v-Src induces the phosphorylation of KAP1 at Ser824, Chk2 at Thr68, and Chk1 at Ser345, suggesting the activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Caffeine decreases the number of cells having chromosome bridges at a concentration incapable of inhibiting Chk1 phosphorylation at Ser345. These results suggest that v-Src induces chromosome bridges via generation of DNA damage and the subsequent DNA damage response, possibly by homologous recombination. A chromosome bridge gives rise to the accumulation of DNA damage directly through chromosome breakage and indirectly through cytokinesis failure-induced multinucleation. We propose that v-Src-induced chromosome bridge formation is one of the causes of the v-Src-induced malignant progression of cancer cells. PMID:27271602

  6. Prompt repair of hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA lesions prevents catastrophic chromosomal fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahaseth, Tulip; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative DNA damage in vivo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, HP) induces copious single-strand(ss)-breaks and base modifications. HP also causes infrequent double-strand DNA breaks, whose relationship to the cell killing is unclear. Since hydrogen peroxide only fragments chromosomes in growing cells, these double-strand breaks were thought to represent replication forks collapsed at direct or excision ss-breaks and to be fully reparable. We have recently reported that hydrogen peroxide kills Escherichia coli by inducing catastrophic chromosome fragmentation, while cyanide (CN) potentiates both the killing and fragmentation. Remarkably, the extreme density of CN+HP-induced chromosomal double-strand breaks makes involvement of replication forks unlikely. Here we show that this massive fragmentation is further amplified by inactivation of ss-break repair or base-excision repair, suggesting that unrepaired primary DNA lesions are directly converted into double-strand breaks. Indeed, blocking DNA replication lowers CN+HP-induced fragmentation only ∼2-fold, without affecting the survival. Once cyanide is removed, recombinational repair in E. coli can mend several double-strand breaks, but cannot mend ∼100 breaks spread over the entire chromosome. Therefore, double-strand breaks induced by oxidative damage happen at the sites of unrepaired primary one-strand DNA lesions, are independent of replication and are highly lethal, supporting the model of clustered ss-breaks at the sites of stable DNA-iron complexes. PMID:27078578

  7. DNA rearrangements in Euplotes crassus coincide with discrete periods of DNA replication during the polytene chromosome stage of macronuclear development.

    PubMed Central

    Frels, J S; Jahn, C L

    1995-01-01

    Macronuclear development in Euplotes crassus begins with polytenization of micronuclear chromosomes and is accompanied by highly precise excision of DNA sequences known as internal eliminated sequences and transposon-like elements (Tecs). Quantitation of radiolabeled-precursor incorporation into DNA indicates that DNA synthesis during formation of polytene chromosomes is not continuous and occurs during two distinct periods. We demonstrate that the timing of Tec excision coincides with these replication periods and that excision can occur during both periods even at a single locus. We also show that Tec and internal eliminated sequence excisions are coincident in the second replication period, thus providing further evidence for similarity in their excision mechanism. Inhibition of DNA synthesis with hydroxyurea diminishes Tec element excision, indicating that replication is an important aspect of the excision process. PMID:8524213

  8. Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Faye R.; Kovtun, Irina V.; Smadbeck, James; Multinu, Francesco; Jatoi, Aminah; Kosari, Farhad; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Murphy, Stephen J.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mariani, Andrea; Vasmatzis, George

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of a liquid biopsy has shown promise in monitoring tumor burden. While point mutations have been extensively studied, chromosomal rearrangements have demonstrated greater tumor specificity. Such rearrangements can be identified in the tumor and subsequently detected in the plasma of patients using quantitative PCR (qPCR). In this study we used a whole-genome mate-pair protocol to characterize a landscape of genomic rearrangements in the primary tumors of ten ovarian cancer patients. Individualized tumor-specific primer panels of aberrant chromosomal junctions were identified for each case and detected by qPCR within the cell-free DNA. Selected chromosomal junctions were detected in pre-surgically drawn blood in eight of the ten patients. Of these eight, three demonstrated the continued presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) post-surgery, consistent with their documented presence of disease, and in five ctDNA was undetectable in the post-surgical blood collection, consistent with their lack of detectable disease. The ctDNA fraction was calculated using a novel algorithm designed for the unique challenges of quantifying ctDNA using qPCR to allow observations of real-time tumor dynamics. In summary, a panel of individualized junctions derived from tumor DNA could be an effective way to monitor cancer patients for relapse and therapeutic efficacy using cfDNA. PMID:27436510

  9. High similarity of U2 snDNA sequence between A and B chromosomes in the grasshopper Abracris flavolineata.

    PubMed

    Menezes-de-Carvalho, Nahanna Zimmermann; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio Manuel; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti

    2015-10-01

    B chromosomes are frequently enriched for a wide variety of repetitive DNAs. Among grasshoppers in the species Abracris flavolineata (Ommatolampidinae) the B chromosomes are submetacentric, C-negative and harbor repetitive DNAs such as, U2 snDNA, C 0 t-1 DNA, two Mariner-like elements and some microsatellites. Here, we provide evidence showing the intragenome similarity between the B chromosome and the A complement in A. flavolineata, combining analysis of microdissection and chromosome painting and B chromosome-specific amplification through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of U2 snDNA. Chromosome painting revealed signals spread through the C-negative regions, including the A and B chromosomes. Moreover, significant clustered signals forming bands were observed in some A chromosomes, and for the B chromosome, significant signals were located on both arms, which could be caused by accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences. The C-positive regions did not reveal any signals. Sequence comparison of U2 snDNA between that obtained from a genome without the B chromosome and that from µB-DNA revealed high similarity with the occurrence of four shared haplotypes, one of them (i.e., Hap1) being highly prevalent and putatively ancestral. The highest divergence from Hap1 was observed for Hap3, which was caused by only six mutational steps. These data support an intraspecific origin of the B chromosome in A. flavolineata that is highly similar with the A complement, and the low U2 snDNA sequence diversity observed in the B chromosome could be related to its recent origin, besides intrachromosomal concerted evolution for U2 snDNA repeats in the B chromosome. PMID:25846962

  10. Dynamic distribution patterns of ribosomal DNA and chromosomal evolution in Paphiopedilum, a lady's slipper orchid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paphiopedilum is a horticulturally and ecologically important genus of ca. 80 species of lady's slipper orchids native to Southeast Asia. These plants have long been of interest regarding their chromosomal evolution, which involves a progressive aneuploid series based on either fission or fusion of centromeres. Chromosome number is positively correlated with genome size, so rearrangement processes must include either insertion or deletion of DNA segments. We have conducted Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) studies using 5S and 25S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes to survey for rearrangements, duplications, and phylogenetically-correlated variation within Paphiopedilum. We further studied sequence variation of the non-transcribed spacers of 5S rDNA (5S-NTS) to examine their complex duplication history, including the possibility that concerted evolutionary forces may homogenize diversity. Results 5S and 25S rDNA loci among Paphiopedilum species, representing all key phylogenetic lineages, exhibit a considerable diversity that correlates well with recognized evolutionary groups. 25S rDNA signals range from 2 (representing 1 locus) to 9, the latter representing hemizygosity. 5S loci display extensive structural variation, and show from 2 specific signals to many, both major and minor and highly dispersed. The dispersed signals mainly occur at centromeric and subtelomeric positions, which are hotspots for chromosomal breakpoints. Phylogenetic analysis of cloned 5S rDNA non-transcribed spacer (5S-NTS) sequences showed evidence for both ancient and recent post-speciation duplication events, as well as interlocus and intralocus diversity. Conclusions Paphiopedilum species display many chromosomal rearrangements - for example, duplications, translocations, and inversions - but only weak concerted evolutionary forces among highly duplicated 5S arrays, which suggests that double-strand break repair processes are dynamic and ongoing. These results make the genus

  11. Distribution of 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of plants: Structural and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 45S rDNA sites are the most widely documented chromosomal regions in eukaryotes. The analysis of the distribution of these sites along the chromosome in several genera has suggested some bias in their distribution. In order to evaluate if these loci are in fact non-randomly distributed and what is the influence of some chromosomal and karyotypic features on the distribution of these sites, a database was built with the position and number of 45S rDNA sites obtained by FISH together with other karyotypic data from 846 plant species. Results In angiosperms the most frequent numbers of sites per diploid karyotype were two and four, suggesting that in spite of the wide dispersion capacity of these sequences the number of rDNA sites tends to be restricted. The sites showed a preferential distribution on the short arms, mainly in the terminal regions. Curiously, these sites were frequently found on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes where they usually occupy the whole arm. The trend to occupy the terminal region is especially evident in holokinetic chromosomes, where all of them were terminally located. In polyploids there is a trend towards reduction in the number of sites per monoploid complement. In gymnosperms, however, the distribution of rDNA sites varied strongly among the sampled families. Conclusions The location of 45S rDNA sites do not vary randomly, occurring preferentially on the short arm and in the terminal region of chromosomes in angiosperms. The meaning of this preferential location is not known, but some hypotheses are considered and the observed trends are discussed. PMID:23181612

  12. Detection of Y Chromosome DNA as Evidence of Semen in Cervicovaginal Secretions of Sexually Active Women

    PubMed Central

    Chomont, Nicolas; Grésenguet, Gérard; Lévy, Michel; Hocini, Hakim; Becquart, Pierre; Matta, Mathieu; Tranchot-Diallo, Juliette; Andreoletti, Laurent; Carreno, Marie-Paule; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Bélec, Laurent

    2001-01-01

    The detection of traces of semen in cervicovaginal secretions (CVS) from sexually active women practicing unprotected sex is a prerequisite for the accurate study of cervicovaginal immunity. Two semen markers, the prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) and the Y chromosome, were detected in parallel in CVS obtained by a standardized vaginal washing of consecutive women attending the principal medical center for sexually transmitted diseases of Bangui, Central African Republic. PSA was detected by immunoenzymatic capture assay in the cell-free fraction of CVS, and the Y chromosome was detected by a single PCR assay of DNA extracted by silica from the cell fraction (Y PCR). Fifty (19%) cell-free fractions of the 264 β-globin-positive CVS samples were positive for PSA, and 100 (38%) cell fractions of the CVS samples were positive for the Y chromosome. All the 50 (19%) PSA-containing CVS samples were also positive for the Y chromosome. Fifty (19%) CVS samples were positive only for the Y chromosome, with no detectable PSA. The remaining 164 (62%) CVS samples were both PSA and Y chromosome negative. These findings demonstrate that CVS from sexually active women may contain cell-associated semen residues unrecognized by conventional immunoenzymatic assays used to detect semen components. The detection of cell-associated male DNA with a highly sensitive and specific procedure such as Y PCR constitutes a method of choice to detect semen traces in female genital secretions. PMID:11527810

  13. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  14. The origin of Eastern European Jews revealed by autosomal, sex chromosomal and mtDNA polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aims to establish the likely origin of EEJ (Eastern European Jews) by genetic distance analysis of autosomal markers and haplogroups on the X and Y chromosomes and mtDNA. Results According to the autosomal polymorphisms the investigated Jewish populations do not share a common origin, and EEJ are closer to Italians in particular and to Europeans in general than to the other Jewish populations. The similarity of EEJ to Italians and Europeans is also supported by the X chromosomal haplogroups. In contrast according to the Y-chromosomal haplogroups EEJ are closest to the non-Jewish populations of the Eastern Mediterranean. MtDNA shows a mixed pattern, but overall EEJ are more distant from most populations and hold a marginal rather than a central position. The autosomal genetic distance matrix has a very high correlation (0.789) with geography, whereas the X-chromosomal, Y-chromosomal and mtDNA matrices have a lower correlation (0.540, 0.395 and 0.641 respectively). Conclusions The close genetic resemblance to Italians accords with the historical presumption that Ashkenazi Jews started their migrations across Europe in Italy and with historical evidence that conversion to Judaism was common in ancient Rome. The reasons for the discrepancy between the biparental markers and the uniparental markers are discussed. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Damian Labuda (nominated by Jerzy Jurka), Kateryna Makova and Qasim Ayub (nominated by Dan Graur). PMID:20925954

  15. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Polakova, Silvia; Molnarova, Lucia; Hyppa, Randy W; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  16. Genetic linkage analysis of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using human chromosome 21 microsatellite DNA markers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Sapp, P.; O`Regan, J.; McKenna-Yasek, D.; Schlumpf, K.S.; Haines, J.L.; Gusella, J.F.; Horvitz, H.R.; Brown, R.H. Jr.

    1994-05-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; Lou Gehrig`s Disease) is a lethal neurodegenerative disease of upper and lower motorneurons in the brain and spinal cord. We previously reported linkage of a gene for familial ALS (FALS) to human chromosome 21 using 4 restriction fragment length polymorphism DNA markers and identified disease-associated mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1 gene in some ALS families. We report here the genetic linkage data that led us to examine the SOD-1 gene for mutations. We also report a new microsatellite DNA marker for D21S63, derived from the cosmid PW517. Ten microsatellite DNA markers, including the new marker D21S63, were used to reinvestigate linkage of FALS to chromosome 21. Genetic linkage analysis performed with 13 ALS familes for these 10 DNA markers confirmed the presence of a FALS gene on chromosome 21. The highest total 2-point LOD score for all families was 4.33, obtained at a distance of 10 cM from the marker D21S223. For 5 ALS families linked to chromosome 21, a peak 2-point LOD score of 5.94 was obtained at the DNA marker D21S223. A multipoint score of 6.50 was obtained with the markers D21S213, D21S223, D21S167, and FALS for 5 chromosome 21-linked ALS families. The haplotypes of these families for the 10 DNA markers reveal recombination events that further refined the location of the FALS gene to a segment of approximately 5 megabases (Mb) between D21S213 and D21S219. The only characterized gene within this segment was SOD-1, the structural gene for Cu, Zn SOD. 30 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. DNA topology in chromosomes: a quantitative survey and its physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Wong, Hua; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Using a simple geometric model, we propose a general method for computing the linking number of the DNA embedded in chromatin fibers. The relevance of the method is reviewed through the single molecule experiments that have been performed in vitro with magnetic tweezers. We compute the linking number of the DNA in the manifold conformational states of the nucleosome which have been evidenced in these experiments and discuss the functional dynamics of chromosomes in the light of these manifold states. PMID:23179130

  18. Roles of nonhomologous DNA end joining, V(D)J recombination, and class switch recombination in chromosomal translocations.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Michael R; Yu, Kefei; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2006-09-01

    When a single double-strand break arises in the genome, nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for its repair. When double-strand breaks arise at two nonhomologous sites in the genome, NHEJ also appears to be a major pathway by which the translocated ends are joined. The mechanism of NHEJ is briefly summarized, and alternative enzymes are also discussed. V(D)J recombination and class switch recombination are specialized processes designed to create double-strand DNA breaks at specific locations in the genomes of lymphoid cells. Sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma and myelomas can arise due to translocation of the c-myc gene into the Ig heavy chain locus during class switch recombination. In other lymphoid neoplasms, the RAG complex can create double-strand breaks that result in a translocation. Such RAG-generated breaks occur at very specific nucleotides that are directly adjacent to sequences that resemble canonical heptamer/nonamer sequences characteristic of normal V(D)J recombination. This occurs in some T cell leukemias and lymphomas. The RAG complex also appears capable of recognizing regions for their altered DNA structure rather than their primary sequence, and this may account for the action by RAGs at some chromosomal translocation sites, such as at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region in the follicular lymphomas that arise in B lymphocytes. PMID:16793349

  19. Recent common ancestry of human Y chromosomes: Evidence from DNA sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Russell; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Shen, Peidong; Oefner, Peter J.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a data set of DNA sequence variation at three Y chromosome genes (SMCY, DBY, and DFFRY) in a worldwide sample of human Y chromosomes. Between 53 and 70 chromosomes were fully screened for sequence variation at each locus by using the method of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. The sum of the lengths of the three genes is 64,120 bp. We have used these data to study the ancestral genealogy of human Y chromosomes. In particular, we focused on estimating the expected time to the most recent common ancestor and the expected ages of certain mutations with interesting geographic distributions. Although the geographic structure of the inferred haplotype tree is reminiscent of that obtained for other loci (the root is in Africa, and most of the oldest non-African lineages are Asian), the expected time to the most recent common ancestor is remarkably short, on the order of 50,000 years. Thus, although previous studies have noted that Y chromosome variation shows extreme geographic structure, we estimate that the spread of Y chromosomes out of Africa is much more recent than previously was thought. We also show that our data indicate substantial population growth in the effective number of human Y chromosomes. PMID:10861004

  20. Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories

    PubMed Central

    Mahy, Nicola L.; Perry, Paul E.; Gilchrist, Susan; Baldock, Richard A.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2002-01-01

    The position of genes within the nucleus has been correlated with their transcriptional activity. The interchromosome domain model of nuclear organization suggests that genes preferentially locate at the surface of chromosome territories. Conversely, high resolution analysis of chromatin fibers suggests that chromosome territories do not present accessibility barriers to transcription machinery. To clarify the relationship between the organization of chromosome territories and gene expression, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to analyze the spatial organization of a contiguous ∼1 Mb stretch of the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation syndrome region of the human genome and the syntenic region in the mouse. These regions contain constitutively expressed genes, genes with tissue-restricted patterns of expression, and substantial regions of intergenic DNA. We find that there is a spatial organization within territories that is conserved between mouse and humans: certain sequences do preferentially locate at the periphery of the chromosome territories in both species. However, we do not detect genes necessarily at the periphery of chromosome territories or at the surface of subchromosomal domains. Intraterritory organization is not different among cell types that express different combinations of the genes under study. Our data demonstrate that transcription of both ubiquitous and tissue-restricted genes is not confined to the periphery of chromosome territories, suggesting that the basal transcription machinery and transcription factors can readily gain access to the chromosome interior. PMID:11994314

  1. Condensin targets and reduces unwound DNA structures associated with transcription in mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Sutani, Takashi; Sakata, Toyonori; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Masuda, Koji; Ishibashi, Mai; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hirano, Tatsuya; Bando, Masashige; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome condensation is a hallmark of mitosis in eukaryotes and is a prerequisite for faithful segregation of genetic material to daughter cells. Here we show that condensin, which is essential for assembling condensed chromosomes, helps to preclude the detrimental effects of gene transcription on mitotic condensation. ChIP-seq profiling reveals that the fission yeast condensin preferentially binds to active protein-coding genes in a transcription-dependent manner during mitosis. Pharmacological and genetic attenuation of transcription largely rescue bulk chromosome segregation defects observed in condensin mutants. We also demonstrate that condensin is associated with and reduces unwound DNA segments generated by transcription, providing a direct link between an in vitro activity of condensin and its in vivo function. The human condensin isoform condensin I also binds to unwound DNA regions at the transcription start sites of active genes, implying that our findings uncover a fundamental feature of condensin complexes. PMID:26204128

  2. Integration of hepatitis B virus DNA in chromosome-specific satellite sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Shaul, Y.; Garcia, P.D.; Schonberg, S.; Rutter, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    The authors previously reported the cloning and detailed analysis of the integrated hepatitis B virus sequences in a human hepatoma cell line. They report here the integration of at least one of hepatitis B virus at human satellite DNA sequences. The majority of the cellular sequences identified by this satellite were organized as a multimeric composition of a 0.6-kilobase EcoRI fragment. This clone hybridized in situ almost exclusively to the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1 and 16 and to a lower extent to chromosome 2 and to the heterochromatic region of the Y chromosome. The immediate flanking host sequence appeared as a hierarchy of repeating units which were almost identical to a previously reported human satellite III DNA sequence.

  3. FLP-mediated DNA mobilization to specific target sites in Drosophila chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Golic, M M; Rong, Y S; Petersen, R B; Lindquist, S L; Golic, K G

    1997-01-01

    The ability to place a series of gene constructs at a specific site in the genome opens new possibilities for the experimental examination of gene expression and chromosomal position effects. We report that the FLP- FRT site-specific recombination system of the yeast 2mu plasmid can be used to integrate DNA at a chromosomal FRT target site in Drosophila. The technique we used was to first integrate an FRT- flanked gene by standard P element-mediated transformation. FLP was then used to excise the FRT- flanked donor DNA and screen for FLP-mediated re-integration at an FRT target at a different chromosome location. Such events were recovered from up to 5% of the crosses used to screen for mobilization and are easily detectable by altered linkage of a white reporter gene or by the generation of a white + gene upon integration. PMID:9278488

  4. Steep variation in mitochondrial DNA and B chromosomes among natural populations of Eyprepocnemis plorans (Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Clemente, M; Garma, C; De Sola, B G; Henriques-Gil, N

    2001-01-01

    Restriction enzyme analysis of the mitochondrial DNA of Eyprepocnemis plorans with 9 restriction enzymes revealed low variability--only EcoRI revealed any variability with 3 distinguishable digestion patterns, here named types I, II and III. The samples studied were collected from regions where different types of B chromosome exist. The demes from the central area show the B1 type (as a relict of a probably once continuous distribution) and also mtDNA type II. These show a parallel substitution towards the SW neighbouring demes by other Bs and mtDNA type I. However, the latter mtDNA type had a wider distribution and is predominant, or even the only one found in most other samples where other Bs exist. Considering the mtDNA as a marker unlinked with the Bs, some genetic differences should exist among areas defined by the B chromosomes. Our results support the hypothesis that in the central region the B chromosomes and the mtDNA are involved in two different events of substitution, but these do not necessarily occur in the same way. PMID:11732849

  5. Gyramides Prevent Bacterial Growth by Inhibiting DNA Gyrase and Altering Chromosome Topology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division. PMID:24712739

  6. EFFECTS OF INGESTED ARSENIC ON DNA AND CHROMOSOME IN HUMAN EXFOLIATED EPITHELIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Ingested Arsenic on DNA and Chromosome in Human Exfoliated Epithelia

    Judy L. Mumford, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

    Arsenic...

  7. U1 snDNA clusters in grasshoppers: chromosomal dynamics and genomic organization

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, A; Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Camacho, J P M; Loreto, V; Cabrero, J; de Souza, M J; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-01-01

    The spliceosome, constituted by a protein set associated with small nuclear RNA (snRNA), is responsible for mRNA maturation through intron removal. Among snRNA genes, U1 is generally a conserved repetitive sequence. To unveil the chromosomal/genomic dynamics of this multigene family in grasshoppers, we mapped U1 genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 70 species belonging to the families Proscopiidae, Pyrgomorphidae, Ommexechidae, Romaleidae and Acrididae. Evident clusters were observed in all species, indicating that, at least, some U1 repeats are tandemly arrayed. High conservation was observed in the first four families, with most species carrying a single U1 cluster, frequently located in the third or fourth longest autosome. By contrast, extensive variation was observed among Acrididae, from a single chromosome pair carrying U1 to all chromosome pairs carrying it, with occasional occurrence of two or more clusters in the same chromosome. DNA sequence analysis in Eyprepocnemis plorans (species carrying U1 clusters on seven different chromosome pairs) and Locusta migratoria (carrying U1 in a single chromosome pair) supported the coexistence of functional and pseudogenic lineages. One of these pseudogenic lineages was truncated in the same nucleotide position in both species, suggesting that it was present in a common ancestor to both species. At least in E. plorans, this U1 snDNA pseudogenic lineage was associated with 5S rDNA and short interspersed elements (SINE)-like mobile elements. Given that we conclude in grasshoppers that the U1 snDNA had evolved under the birth-and-death model and that its intragenomic spread might be related with mobile elements. PMID:25248465

  8. U1 snDNA clusters in grasshoppers: chromosomal dynamics and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Anjos, A; Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Camacho, J P M; Loreto, V; Cabrero, J; de Souza, M J; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-02-01

    The spliceosome, constituted by a protein set associated with small nuclear RNA (snRNA), is responsible for mRNA maturation through intron removal. Among snRNA genes, U1 is generally a conserved repetitive sequence. To unveil the chromosomal/genomic dynamics of this multigene family in grasshoppers, we mapped U1 genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 70 species belonging to the families Proscopiidae, Pyrgomorphidae, Ommexechidae, Romaleidae and Acrididae. Evident clusters were observed in all species, indicating that, at least, some U1 repeats are tandemly arrayed. High conservation was observed in the first four families, with most species carrying a single U1 cluster, frequently located in the third or fourth longest autosome. By contrast, extensive variation was observed among Acrididae, from a single chromosome pair carrying U1 to all chromosome pairs carrying it, with occasional occurrence of two or more clusters in the same chromosome. DNA sequence analysis in Eyprepocnemis plorans (species carrying U1 clusters on seven different chromosome pairs) and Locusta migratoria (carrying U1 in a single chromosome pair) supported the coexistence of functional and pseudogenic lineages. One of these pseudogenic lineages was truncated in the same nucleotide position in both species, suggesting that it was present in a common ancestor to both species. At least in E. plorans, this U1 snDNA pseudogenic lineage was associated with 5S rDNA and short interspersed elements (SINE)-like mobile elements. Given that we conclude in grasshoppers that the U1 snDNA had evolved under the birth-and-death model and that its intragenomic spread might be related with mobile elements. PMID:25248465

  9. Alterations in Chromosomal Synapses and DNA Repair in Apoptotic Spermatocytes of Mus m. Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Ayarza, E.; González, M.; López, F.; Fernández-Donoso, R.; Page, J.; Berrios, S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether apoptotic spermatocytes from the mouse Mus m. domesticus presented alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair. To enrich for apoptotic spermatocytes, the scrotum’s temperature was raised by partially exposing animals for 15 min to a 42ºC water bath. Spermatocytes in initial apoptosis were identified in situ by detecting activated caspase-9. SYCP1 and SYCP3 were markers for evaluating synapses or the structure of synaptonemal complexes and Rad51 and γH2AX for detecting DNA repair and chromatin remodeling. Apoptotic spermatocytes were concentrated in spermatogenic cycle stages III-IV (50.3%), XI-XII (44.1%) and IX-X (4.2%). Among apoptotic spermatocytes, 48% were in middle pachytene, 44% in metaphase and 6% in diplotene. Moreover, apoptotic spermatocytes showed several structural anomalies in autosomal bivalents, including splitting of chromosomal axes and partial asynapses between homologous chromosomes. γH2AX and Rad51 were atypically distributed during pachytene and as late as diplotene and associated with asynaptic chromatin, single chromosome axes or discontinuous chromosome axes. Among apoptotic spermatocytes at pachytene, 70% showed changes in the structure of synapses, 67% showed changes in γH2AX and Rad51 distribution and 50% shared alterations in both synapses and DNA repair. Our results showed that apoptotic spermatocytes from Mus m. domesticus contain a high frequency of alterations in chromosomal synapses and in the recruitment and distribution of DNA repair proteins. Together, these observations suggest that these alterations may have been detected by meiotic checkpoints triggering apoptosis. PMID:27349323

  10. Alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair in apoptotic spermatocytes of Mus m. domesticus.

    PubMed

    Ayarza, E; González, M; López, F; Fernández-Donoso, R; Page, J; Berrios, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether apoptotic spermatocytes from the mouse Mus m. domesticus presented alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair. To enrich for apoptotic spermatocytes, the scrotum's temperature was raised by partially exposing animals for 15 min to a 42ºC water bath. Spermatocytes in initial apoptosis were identified in situ by detecting activated Caspase-9.  SYCP1 and SYCP3 were markers for evaluating synapses or the structure of synaptonemal complexes and Rad51 and γH2AX for detecting DNA repair and chromatin remodeling. Apoptotic spermatocytes were concentrated in spermatogenic cycle stages III-IV (50.3%), XI-XII (44.1%) and IX-X (4.2%). Among apoptotic spermatocytes, 48% were in middle pachytene, 44% in metaphase and 6% in diplotene. Moreover, apoptotic spermatocytes showed several structural anomalies in autosomal bivalents, including splitting of chromosomal axes and partial asynapses between homologous chromosomes. gH2AX and Rad51 were atypically distributed during pachytene and as late as diplotene and associated with asynaptic chromatin, single chromosome axes or discontinuous chromosome axes. Among apoptotic spermatocytes at pachytene, 70% showed changes in the structure of synapses, 67% showed changes in gH2AX and Rad51 distribution and 50% shared alterations in both synapses and DNA repair. Our results showed that apoptotic spermatocytes from Mus m. domesticus contain a high frequency of alterations in chromosomal synapses and in the recruitment and distribution of DNA repair proteins. Together, these observations suggest that these alterations may have been detected by meiotic checkpoints triggering apoptosis. PMID:27349323

  11. Protospacer Adjacent Motif (PAM)-Distal Sequences Engage CRISPR Cas9 DNA Target Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ethier, Sylvain; Schmeing, T. Martin; Dostie, Josée; Pelletier, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided nuclease that has been widely adapted for genome editing in eukaryotic cells. However, the in vivo target specificity of Cas9 is poorly understood and most studies rely on in silico predictions to define the potential off-target editing spectrum. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), we delineate the genome-wide binding panorama of catalytically inactive Cas9 directed by two different single guide (sg) RNAs targeting the Trp53 locus. Cas9:sgRNA complexes are able to load onto multiple sites with short seed regions adjacent to 5′NGG3′ protospacer adjacent motifs (PAM). Yet among 43 ChIP-seq sites harboring seed regions analyzed for mutational status, we find editing only at the intended on-target locus and one off-target site. In vitro analysis of target site recognition revealed that interactions between the 5′ end of the guide and PAM-distal target sequences are necessary to efficiently engage Cas9 nucleolytic activity, providing an explanation for why off-target editing is significantly lower than expected from ChIP-seq data. PMID:25275497

  12. Conformational Variants of Duplex DNA Correlated with Cytosine-rich Chromosomal Fragile Sites*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Albert G.; Engelhart, Aaron E.; Hatmal, Ma'mon M.; Houston, Sabrina I.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Haworth, Ian S.; Lieber, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    We found that several major chromosomal fragile sites in human lymphomas, including the bcl-2 major breakpoint region, bcl-1 major translocation cluster, and c-Myc exon 1-intron 1 boundary, contain distinctive sequences of consecutive cytosines exhibiting a high degree of reactivity with the structure-specific chemical probe bisulfite. To assess the inherent structural variability of duplex DNA in these regions and to determine the range of structures reactive to bisulfite, we have performed bisulfite probing on genomic DNA in vitro and in situ; on duplex DNA in supercoiled and linearized plasmids; and on oligonucleotide DNA/DNA and DNA/2′-O-methyl RNA duplexes. Bisulfite is significantly more reactive at the frayed ends of DNA duplexes, which is expected given that bisulfite is an established probe of single-stranded DNA. We observed that bisulfite also distinguishes between more subtle sequence/structural differences in duplex DNA. Supercoiled plasmids are more reactive than linear DNA; and sequences containing consecutive cytosines, namely GGGCCC, are more reactive than those with alternating guanine and cytosine, namely GCGCGC. Circular dichroism and x-ray crystallography show that the GGGCCC sequence forms an intermediate B/A structure. Molecular dynamics simulations also predict an intermediate B/A structure for this sequence, and probe calculations suggest greater bisulfite accessibility of cytosine bases in the intermediate B/A structure over canonical B- or A-form DNA. Electrostatic calculations reveal that consecutive cytosine bases create electropositive patches in the major groove, predicting enhanced localization of the bisulfite anion at homo-C tracts over alternating G/C sequences. These characteristics of homo-C tracts in duplex DNA may be associated with DNA-protein interactions in vivo that predispose certain genomic regions to chromosomal fragility. PMID:19106104

  13. Toxicogenomic evaluation of chemically induced chromosomal imbalance using DNA image analysis.

    PubMed

    Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Terzoudi, Georgia I; Spiliopoulou, Chara A; Stefanidou, Maria E

    2013-06-01

    The study of carcinogenic potential of a variety of chemical agents such as food additives and drugs of abuse via the application of various in vitro methodologies constitutes the first step for the evaluation of their toxicogenomic profile. Considering the chromosomal theories of carcinogenesis, where it is stated that aneuploidy and chromosomal imbalance (instability) are among the main causes of carcinogenesis, chemicals capable to induce such changes in the cells could be considered as potential carcinogens. Chromosomal imbalance and aneuploidy directly affect the overall DNA content of the exposed cell as well as other cellular morpho- and densitometric features. These features can be measured by means of computerized DNA image analysis technologies and include DNA content (DNA Index), Proliferation Index, Ploidy Balance, Degree of Aneuploidy, Skewness and Kurtosis. Considering the enormous number of untested chemicals and drugs of abuse that follow non-genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis, the establishment of a reliable technology for the estimation of chemically induced chromosomal imbalance is of particular importance in toxicogenomic studies. In the present article and based on our previously published work, we highlight the advantages of the applications of DNA image analysis technology in an easy-to-use experimental model for the evaluation of the potential risk of various chemicals. The use of this technology for the detection of chemically induced chromosomal instability will contribute to the development of safer regulatory directives concerning the use of chemicals in food and pharmaceutical industry, as well as in the clarification of mechanisms of action of drugs of abuse. PMID:23215871

  14. Preparation of high molecular weight gDNA and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries in plants.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Siddanagouda S; Nie, Xiaojun; Feng, Kewei; Weining, Song

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries are extremely valuable large-insert DNA libraries for physical mapping, positional cloning, comparative genomic analysis, complete genome sequencing, and evolutionary studies. Due to their stability and relative simplicity BAC libraries are most preferred over other approaches for cloning large genomic DNA fragments for large-insert libraries. Isolation of intact high molecular weight (HMW) DNA is a critical step underlying the success of large-insert genomic DNA library construction. It requires the isolation of purified nuclei, embedding them into LMP agarose plugs, restriction digestion of the plugs, and quite often size selection using PFGE and electro-elution of insert DNA. The construction of BAC libraries is complex and challenging for most molecular laboratories. To facilitate the construction of BAC libraries, we present a step-by-step protocol for isolation of HMW DNA and construction of plant BAC libraries. PMID:24243195

  15. Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling dictates the chromosomal arrangement of bacterial genes

    PubMed Central

    Sobetzko, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Over the recent decade, the central importance of DNA supercoiling in chromosome organization and global gene regulation of bacteria became more and more visible. With a regulon comprising more than 2000 genes in Escherichia coli, DNA supercoiling is among the most influential regulators of gene expression found in bacteria so far. However, the mechanism creating thousands of diverse temporal gene expression patterns coordinated by DNA supercoiling remains unclear. In this study we show that a specific chromosomal arrangement of genes modulates the local levels of DNA supercoiling at gene promoters via transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) in the model organism E. coli. Our findings provide a consistent explanation for the strong positive coupling of temporal gene expression patterns of neighboring genes. Using comparative genomics we are furthermore able to provide evidence that TCDS is a driving force for the evolution of chromosomal gene arrangement patterns in other Enterobacteriaceae. With the currently available data of promoter supercoiling sensitivity we prove that the same principle is applicable also for the evolutionary distant gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, our findings are fully consistent with recent investigations concerning the regulatory impact of TCDS on gene pairs in eukaryots underpinning the broad applicability of our analysis. PMID:26783203

  16. First Polish DNA "manhunt"--an application of Y-chromosome STRs.

    PubMed

    Dettlaff-Kakol, A; Pawlowski, R

    2002-10-01

    This study presents the application of Y-chromosomal STR polymorphisms to male identification in the case of a serial rapist and woman murderer in Poland. Since August 1996 a rapist from Swinoujscie (northwest Poland) committed at least 14 rapes. In the year 2000 he brutally raped 8 young girls and murdered a 22-year-old girl. DNA profiles obtained from semen stains left at the scenes of crime gave information that one and the same man had committed all the rapes. The Y-chromosome haplotype (9 loci) obtained was used for the elimination process of 421 suspects. One man was found who had an identical DNA profile in all Y-chromosome STR loci analysed and possessed common alleles in 9 out of 10 autosomal loci, strongly suggesting that the real rapist and the typed man were closely related males. Analysis of reference DNA obtained from the man's brother revealed an identical DNA STR profile to that identified at the crime scenes. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case in Poland and probably in Eastern Europe where DNA typing of a large population was used to identify the offender. PMID:12376840

  17. Evidence for a DNA-relay mechanism in ParABS-mediated chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong Chuin; Surovtsev, Ivan Vladimirovich; Beltran, Bruno Gabriel; Huang, Fang; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The widely conserved ParABS system plays a major role in bacterial chromosome segregation. How the components of this system work together to generate translocation force and directional motion remains uncertain. Here, we combine biochemical approaches, quantitative imaging and mathematical modeling to examine the mechanism by which ParA drives the translocation of the ParB/parS partition complex in Caulobacter crescentus. Our experiments, together with simulations grounded on experimentally-determined biochemical and cellular parameters, suggest a novel 'DNA-relay' mechanism in which the chromosome plays a mechanical function. In this model, DNA-bound ParA-ATP dimers serve as transient tethers that harness the elastic dynamics of the chromosome to relay the partition complex from one DNA region to another across a ParA-ATP dimer gradient. Since ParA-like proteins are implicated in the partitioning of various cytoplasmic cargos, the conservation of their DNA-binding activity suggests that the DNA-relay mechanism may be a general form of intracellular transport in bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02758.001 PMID:24859756

  18. mtDNA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in four Native American populations from southern Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Chen, Yu.S.; Lott, M.T.; Wallace, D.C. ); Semino, O.; Santachiara-Beneceretti, A.S. ); Scott, C.R. ); Winter, M. )

    1994-02-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was examined in 60 Native Americans (Mixtecs from the Alta, Mixtecs from the Baja, Valley Zapotecs, and Highland Mixe) from southern Mexico by PCR amplification and high-resolution restriction endonuclease analysis. Four groups of mtDNA haplotypes (haplogroups A,B,C, and D) characterize Amerind populations. The comparison of their mtDNA variation with that observed in other populations from Mexico and Central America permits a clear distinction among the different Middle American tribes and raises questions about some of their linguistic affiliations. The males of these population samples were also analyzed for Y-chromosome RFLPs with the probes 49a, 49f, and 12f2. This analysis suggests that certain Y-chromosome haplotypes were brought from Asia during the colonization of the Americas, and a differential gene flow was introduced into Native American populations from European males and females. 31 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. A non-B DNA can replace heptamer of V(D)J recombination when present along with a nonamer: implications in chromosomal translocations and cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishana, Mayilaadumveettil; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-11-15

    The RAG (recombination-activating gene) complex is responsible for the generation of antigen receptor diversity by acting as a sequence-specific nuclease. Recent studies have shown that it also acts as a structure-specific nuclease. However, little is known about the factors regulating this activity at the genomic level. We show in the present study that the proximity of a V(D)J nonamer to heteroduplex DNA significantly increases RAG cleavage and binding efficiencies at physiological concentrations of MgCl(2). The position of the nonamer with respect to heteroduplex DNA was important, but not orientation. A spacer length of 18 bp between the nonamer and mismatch was optimal for RAG-mediated DNA cleavage. Mutations to the sequence of the nonamer and deletion of the nonamer-binding domain of RAG1 reinforced the role of the nonamer in the enhancement in RAG cleavage. Interestingly, partial mutation of the nonamer did not significantly reduce RAG cleavage on heteroduplex DNA, suggesting that even cryptic nonamers were sufficient to enhance RAG cleavage. More importantly, we show that the fragile region involved in chromosomal translocations associated with BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) can be cleaved by RAGs following a nonamer-dependent mechanism. Hence our results from the present study suggest that a non-B DNA can replace the heptamer of RSS (recombination signal sequence) when present adjacent to nonamers, explaining the generation of certain chromosomal translocations in lymphoid malignancies. PMID:22891626

  20. Assessing genetic diversity of Brazilian reef fishes by chromosomal and DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Galetti, Pedro Manoel; Molina, Wagner Franco; Affonso, Paulo Roberto A M; Aguilar, Cecília Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Little is known on genetics of Brazilian coral reef fish and most of this information is limited to chromosome characterization of major representative species. The diploid chromosome number in marine fish varies from 2n= 22-26 to 2n = 240-260. Despite of this apparent diversity, most studied marine species have a diploid complement with 48 acrocentric chromosomes. This latter trend is mostly observed among Perciformes, an important major taxon of coral reef fishes. Studies in the families Pomacentridae, Pomacanthidae and Chaetodontidae, for example, have shown a common karyotype pattern entirely formed by 48 uniarmed chromosomes. However, rare numerical and structural chromosome polymorphisms and cryptic chromosome rearrangements involving heterochromatin segments and/or nucleolar organizing sites have been reported among such fishes. Although new chromosome forms can contribute to the establishment of genetically isolated populations, their role in reef fish speciation at marine realm still is an open question. More recently, genomic DNA analyses using RAPD and microsatellites, and sequencing and RFLP of mitochondrial DNA have increasingly been used in Atlantic reef fish species. Genetic homogeneity over wide geographical ranges has been reported for different fish groups, in contrast to several cases of population substructuring related to environmental constraints or evolutionary history. Amazonas outflow and upwelling on the Southeastern coast of Brazil are believed to be strong barriers to dispersal of some reef species. Moreover, it is suggested that the pattern of speciation and population structure at South Atlantic is quite distinctive from Pacific Ocean, even when comparing closely related taxa. Further genetic studies are strongly encouraged in Brazilian reef fishes in order to provide a reliable scenario of the genetic structure in this important and diverse fish group. PMID:16502093

  1. Introducing the Algerian Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Profiles into the North African Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Bekada, Asmahan; Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M.; Larruga, José M.; Pestano, José; Benhamamouch, Soraya; González, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    North Africa is considered a distinct geographic and ethnic entity within Africa. Although modern humans originated in this Continent, studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome genealogical markers provide evidence that the North African gene pool has been shaped by the back-migration of several Eurasian lineages in Paleolithic and Neolithic times. More recent influences from sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean Europe are also evident. The presence of East-West and North-South haplogroup frequency gradients strongly reinforces the genetic complexity of this region. However, this genetic scenario is beset with a notable gap, which is the lack of consistent information for Algeria, the largest country in the Maghreb. To fill this gap, we analyzed a sample of 240 unrelated subjects from a northwest Algeria cosmopolitan population using mtDNA sequences and Y-chromosome biallelic polymorphisms, focusing on the fine dissection of haplogroups E and R, which are the most prevalent in North Africa and Europe respectively. The Eurasian component in Algeria reached 80% for mtDNA and 90% for Y-chromosome. However, within them, the North African genetic component for mtDNA (U6 and M1; 20%) is significantly smaller than the paternal (E-M81 and E-V65; 70%). The unexpected presence of the European-derived Y-chromosome lineages R-M412, R-S116, R-U152 and R-M529 in Algeria and the rest of the Maghreb could be the counterparts of the mtDNA H1, H3 and V subgroups, pointing to direct maritime contacts between the European and North African sides of the western Mediterranean. Female influx of sub-Saharan Africans into Algeria (20%) is also significantly greater than the male (10%). In spite of these sexual asymmetries, the Algerian uniparental profiles faithfully correlate between each other and with the geography. PMID:23431392

  2. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  3. Tandem Repeats in Extrachromosomal Ribosomal DNA of Dictyostelium Discoideum, Resulting from Chromosomal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cole, R. A.; Williams, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA in the simple eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum is readily separated from chromosomal DNA by orthogonal field electrophoresis (OFAGE), forming a prominent band in the 110-kb region of the gel. Here we show that mutations in at least two chromosomal genes give rise to a ladder of rDNA bands increasing in size up to about 300 kb. One of these mutations, the rrcA350 allele, which is recessive to wild type and maps to the centromere-proximal region of linkage group II, has an unstable phenotype; spontaneous revertants, which no longer exhibit the rDNA ladder, have been recovered. Another mutation rrc-351, provisionally mapped to linkage group IV, is dominant to wild type. The rDNA ladder is caused by concatamerization of a 34-kb fragment in the nontranscribed central spacer region of the 88-kb linear rDNA palindrome. Restriction enzyme analysis has revealed that each concatamer is generated by crossovers between two rDNA molecules. PMID:1582557

  4. RNA FISH, DNA FISH and Chromosome Painting of Chicken Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Guioli, Silvana; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a molecular cytogenetic technique. It identifies the location of DNA loci and RNAs, including nascent RNAs in the process of being transcribed, within individual cells. Great advances in fluorescent dye technology and technique sensitivity, combined with developments in light microscopy and imaging software have made it widely accessible and have expanded the range of applications in basic research as well as in diagnostics. Being able to perform RNA hybridization, DNA hybridization, and protein immunofluorescence consecutively on the same sample is an invaluable tool to study RNA expression in relation to their gene loci and to map RNA and DNA in relation to nuclear or cellular structures. This has contributed to enormous progress in understanding basal mechanisms of male and female meiosis in different animal model systems. In this chapter we describe in detail the protocols for FISH based techniques applied to study gene expression dynamics and nuclear architecture of chicken oocytes during meiotic prophase I. These techniques can be easily performed in any molecular and cell biology laboratory and be adapted to different systems and to different phases of gametogenesis. PMID:27557582

  5. CGG repeats associated with DNA instability and chromosome fragility form structures that block DNA synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Usdin, K; Woodford, K J

    1995-01-01

    A large increase in the length of a CGG tandem array is associated with a number of triplet expansion diseases, including fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of heritable mental retardation in humans. Expansion results in the appearance of a fragile site on the X chromosome in the region of the CGG array. We show here that CGG repeats readily form a series of barriers to DNA synthesis in vitro. There barriers form only when the (CGG)n strand is used as the template, are K(+)-dependent, template concentration-independent, and involve hydrogen bonding between guanines. Chemical modification experiments suggest these blocks to DNA synthesis result from the formation of a series of intrastrand tetraplexes. A number of lines of evidence suggest that both triplet expansion and chromosome fragility are the result of replication defects. Our data are discussed in the light of such evidence. Images PMID:7479085

  6. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  7. Fragile Sites of ‘Valencia’ Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis) Chromosomes Are Related with Active 45s rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hong; Chen, Chun-Li; Miao, Yin; Yu, Chang-Xiu; Guo, Wen-Wu; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Citrus sinensis chromosomes present a morphological differentiation of bands after staining by the fluorochromes CMA and DAPI, but there is still little information on its chromosomal characteristics. In this study, the chromosomes in ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using telomere DNA and the 45S rDNA gene as probes combining CMA/DAPI staining, which showed that there were two fragile sites in sweet orange chromosomes co-localizing at distended 45S rDNA regions, one proximally locating on B-type chromosome and the other subterminally locating on D-type chromosome. While the chromosomal CMA banding and 45S rDNA FISH mapping in the doubled haploid line of ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis indicated six 45S rDNA regions, four were identified as fragile sites as doubled comparing its parental line, which confirmed the cytological heterozygosity and chromosomal heteromorphisms in sweet orange. Furthermore, Ag-NOR identified two distended 45S rDNA regions to be active nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in diploid ‘Valencia’ C. sinensis. The occurrence of quadrivalent in meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange further confirmed it was a chromosomal reciprocal translocation line. We speculated this chromosome translocation was probably related to fragile sites. Our data provide insights into the chromosomal characteristics of the fragile sites in ‘Valencia’ sweet orange and are expected to facilitate the further investigation of the possible functions of fragile sites. PMID:26977938

  8. An autosomal locus predisposing to multiple deletions of mtDNA on chromosome 3p

    SciTech Connect

    Kaukonen, J.A.; Suomalainen, A.; Peltonen, L.; Amati, P.; Zeviani, M.

    1996-04-01

    Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) is a disorder characterized by ptosis, progressive weakness of the external eye muscles, and general muscle weakness. The patients have multiple deletions of mtDNA on Southern blots or in PCR analysis of muscle DNA and a mild deficiency of one or more respiratory-chain enzymes carrying mtDNA-encoded subunits. The pattern of inheritance indicates a nuclear gene defect predisposing to secondary mtDNA deletions. Recently, in one Finnish family, we assigned an adPEO locus to chromosome 10q23.3-24.3 but also excluded linkage to this same locus in two Italian adPEO families with a phenotype closely resembling the Finnish one. We applied a random mapping approach to informative non-10q-linked Italian families to assign the second locus for adPEO and found strong evidence for linkage on chromosome 3p14.1-21.2 in three Italian families, with a maximum two-point lod score of 4.62 at a recombination fraction of .0. However, in three additional families, linkage to the same chromosomal region was clearly absent, indicating further genetic complexity of the adPEO trait. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Unusual chromosomal distribution of a major satellite DNA from Discoglossus pictus (Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Amor, N; Odierna, G; Chinali, G; Said, K; Picariello, O

    2009-01-01

    A new highly abundant satellite DNA from Discoglossus pictus (Dp-sat1) was isolated and characterized. The repetitive unit (0.51 kb) has 2 HindIII sites and only one SpeI site: digestion of genomic DNA with HindIII produces 3 fragments: HA (0.17 kb), HB (0.34 kb), and HC = HA + HB (0.51 kb), while digestion with SpeI produces the whole repetitive unit (0.51 kb) that contains both HindIII sites. Sequence analysis of cloned repeats indicates an average A + T content of 71%, with many A- and T-runs. Southern blot analysis shows an arrangement of multiple bands of the 0.51 kb monomer in SpeI-digested DNA, while HindIII-digested DNA shows a ladder composed of all the possible combinations of the 3 digested fragments. Quantitative dot-blot indicates that Dp-sat1 accounts for about 6% of the D. pictus genome: this value represents about 1.5 x 10(6) copies of repetitive units per nucleus. This satellite DNA is also a major repetitive DNA in 4 other Discoglossus species, in which the repetitive unit presents the same size and restriction sites except in D. montalentii where it contains a unique HindIII site. This satellite DNA was absent in all the other tested archaeo- and neo-bratrachian species, as well as non-amphibian species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis shows that Dp-sat1 is localized only in peri- and/or para-centromeric areas of the 7 small chromosome pairs, while no labeling was observed in the 7 large chromosome pairs. Remarkably, Dp-sat1 heterochromatin is found only at one pole of the nucleus, suggesting that during interphase all 7 small chromosome pairs are located in the same nuclear region. PMID:20110657

  10. High Performance DNA Probes for Perinatal Detection of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Kalistyn H; Weier, Jingly F; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a tightly controlled process of stepwise evolution with multiple, mostly yet unknown milestones and checkpoints. Healthy halpoid gametes have to be produced by the parents, which will fuse to form the diploid zygote that implants in the female uterus and grows to become first an embryo, then a fetus and finally matures into a newborn. There are several known risk factors that interfere with normal production of gametes, spermatocytes or oocytes, and often cause embryonic mortality and fetal demise at an early stage. Yet some embryos with chomosomal abnormalities can develop beyond the critical first trimester of pregnancy and, while those with supernumary chromosomes in their hyperdiploid cells will be spontaneously aborted, a small fraction of fetuses with an extra chromosome continues to grow to term and will be delivered as a liveborn baby. While minor clinical symptoms displayed by children with trisomies are manageable for many parents, the burden of caring for a child with numerical chromosome abnormalities can be overwhelming to partners or individual families. It also poses a significant financial burden to the society and poses ethical dilemma. In this communication, we will review the progress that has been made in the development of molecular techniques to test individual fetal cells for chromosomal imbalances. We will focus our discussion on the direct visualization of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in live or fixed specimens using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and, more specifically, talk about the groundbreaking progress that in recent years has been achieved towards an improved diagnosis with novel, chromosome-specific DNA probes. PMID:26855976

  11. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  12. Evolutionary Dynamics of rDNA Clusters in Chromosomes of Five Clam Species Belonging to the Family Veneridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Concepción; Hurtado, Ninoska S.; Morán, Paloma; Pasantes, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal changes accompanying bivalve evolution are an area about which few reports have been published. To improve our understanding on chromosome evolution in Veneridae, ribosomal RNA gene clusters were mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosomes of five species of venerid clams (Venerupis corrugata, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ruditapes decussatus, Dosinia exoleta, and Venus verrucosa). The results were anchored to the most comprehensive molecular phylogenetic tree currently available for Veneridae. While a single major rDNA cluster was found in each of the five species, the number of 5S rDNA clusters showed high interspecies variation. Major rDNA was either subterminal to the short arms or intercalary to the long arms of metacentric or submetacentric chromosomes, whereas minor rDNA signals showed higher variability. Major and minor rDNAs map to different chromosome pairs in all species, but in R. decussatus one of the minor rDNA gene clusters and the major rDNA cluster were located in the same position on a single chromosome pair. This interspersion of both sequences was confirmed by fiber FISH. Telomeric signals appeared at both ends of every chromosome in all species. FISH mapping data are discussed in relation to the molecular phylogenetic trees currently available for Veneridae. PMID:24967400

  13. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by {sup 123}I-estrogen in CHO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Mustafi, R.; Hughes, A.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope I-123, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the {sup 123}I-estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.2. The corresponding ratio with {sup 60}Co gamma rays was 15.6. The dose-response was biphasic suggesting that either receptor sites are saturated at high does, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the {sup 123}I-estrogen. The {sup 123}I-estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1,000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of {sup 123}I-estrogen for these cells suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that {sup 123}I-estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F-ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 {plus_minus} 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high LET radiations. Their results suggest that I-123 bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, that the cytotoxic damage produced by I-123 bound to estrogen is very like high LET-induced damage, and the I-123 in the estrogen-receptor-DNA complex is probably in close proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA.

  14. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by iodine-123-labeled estrogen in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Mustafi, R.; Hughes, A.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope {sup 123}I, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen receptor-positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.8. The corresponding ratio with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays was 15.6. The dose response was biphasic, suggesting either that receptor sites are saturated at high doses, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen. The {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen for these cells, suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 {+-} 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high-LET radiations. Our results suggest that {sup 123}I bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, the cytotoxic damage produced by {sup 123}I bound to estrogen is very like damage induced by high-LET radiation, and the {sup 123}I in the estrogen receptor-DNA complex is probably in proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  16. Stress induced gene expression drives transient DNA methylation changes at adjacent repetitive elements

    PubMed Central

    Secco, David; Wang, Chuang; Shou, Huixia; Schultz, Matthew D; Chiarenza, Serge; Nussaume, Laurent; Ecker, Joseph R; Whelan, James; Lister, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (mC) is a genome modification that can regulate the expression of coding and non-coding genetic elements. However, little is known about the involvement of mC in response to environmental cues. Using whole genome bisulfite sequencing to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of mC in rice grown under phosphate starvation and recovery conditions, we identified widespread phosphate starvation-induced changes in mC, preferentially localized in transposable elements (TEs) close to highly induced genes. These changes in mC occurred after changes in nearby gene transcription, were mostly DCL3a-independent, and could partially be propagated through mitosis, however no evidence of meiotic transmission was observed. Similar analyses performed in Arabidopsis revealed a very limited effect of phosphate starvation on mC, suggesting a species-specific mechanism. Overall, this suggests that TEs in proximity to environmentally induced genes are silenced via hypermethylation, and establishes the temporal hierarchy of transcriptional and epigenomic changes in response to stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09343.001 PMID:26196146

  17. Nonhomologous DNA end joining and chromosome aberrations in human embryonic lung fibroblasts treated with environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Rossnerova, Andrea; Beskid, Olena; Tabashidze, Nana; Libalova, Helena; Uhlirova, Katerina; Topinka, Jan; Sram, Radim J

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of a representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and PAH-containing complex mixtures to induce double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) and repair of damaged DNA in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469 cells), we investigated the effect of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles <2.5μm (PM2.5) on nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) and induction of stable chromosome aberrations (CAs). PM2.5 was collected in winter and summer 2011 in two Czech cities differing in levels and sources of air pollutants. The cells were treated for 24h with the following concentrations of tested chemicals: B[a]P: 1μM, 10μM, 25μM; EOMs: 1μg/ml, 10μg/ml, 25μg/ml. We tested several endpoints representing key steps leading from DSBs to the formation of CAs including histone H2AX phosphorylation, levels of proteins Ku70, Ku80 and XRCC4 participating in NHEJ, in vitro ligation activity of nuclear extracts of the HEL12469 cells and the frequency of stable CAs assessed by whole chromosome painting of chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and 17 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results show that 25μM of B[a]P and most of the tested doses of EOMs induced DSBs as indicated by H2AX phosphorylation. DNA damage was accompanied by induction of XRCC4 expression and an increased frequency of CAs. Translocations most frequently affected chromosome 7. We observed only a weak induction of Ku70/80 expression as well as ligation activity of nuclear extracts. In summary, our data suggest the induction of DSBs and NHEJ after treatment of human embryonic lung fibroblasts with B[a]P and complex mixtures containing PAHs. PMID:24694657

  18. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  19. Polymorphism of t-specific DNA elements of the proximal part of Mus mouse chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Shustrova, I.V.; Tokarskaya, O.N.; Chekunova, A.I.

    1995-05-01

    To study structural organization and polymorphism of the proximal part of chromosome 17, a hybridization analysis of DNA from mice of different origin was carried out using four t-specific probes. Results of the analysis allow us to conclude that the DNA element copy number is quantitatively unstable and differs in distribution in both newly formed recombinant haplotypes and in wild-type chromosome 17. Probe Tu66 was used to study D17Leh66-element organization of Mus abbotti and Mus hortulanus mice. Three types of D17Leh66-elements were identified in the genomes of these species. The copy number of each type of DNA element varied in the genome of each of four studied species. Homologs to t-specific Tu66 and Tu119 probes were found in the genome of Rattus norvegicus rat. The data obtained are discussed with respect to the evolution of the proximal part of Mus mouse chromosome 17. 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Fragile DNA Motifs Trigger Mutagenesis at Distant Chromosomal Loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Natalie; Zhang, Yu; Nishida, Yuri; Sheng, Ziwei; Choudhury, Shilpa; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Lobachev, Kirill S.

    2013-01-01

    DNA sequences capable of adopting non-canonical secondary structures have been associated with gross-chromosomal rearrangements in humans and model organisms. Previously, we have shown that long inverted repeats that form hairpin and cruciform structures and triplex-forming GAA/TTC repeats induce the formation of double-strand breaks which trigger genome instability in yeast. In this study, we demonstrate that breakage at both inverted repeats and GAA/TTC repeats is augmented by defects in DNA replication. Increased fragility is associated with increased mutation levels in the reporter genes located as far as 8 kb from both sides of the repeats. The increase in mutations was dependent on the presence of inverted or GAA/TTC repeats and activity of the translesion polymerase Polζ. Mutagenesis induced by inverted repeats also required Sae2 which opens hairpin-capped breaks and initiates end resection. The amount of breakage at the repeats is an important determinant of mutations as a perfect palindromic sequence with inherently increased fragility was also found to elevate mutation rates even in replication-proficient strains. We hypothesize that the underlying mechanism for mutagenesis induced by fragile motifs involves the formation of long single-stranded regions in the broken chromosome, invasion of the undamaged sister chromatid for repair, and faulty DNA synthesis employing Polζ. These data demonstrate that repeat-mediated breaks pose a dual threat to eukaryotic genome integrity by inducing chromosomal aberrations as well as mutations in flanking genes. PMID:23785298

  1. Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA characterization of Pasiegos, a human isolate from Cantabria (Spain).

    PubMed

    Maca-Meyer, N; Sánchez-Velasco, P; Flores, C; Larruga, J-M; González, A-M; Oterino, A; Leyva-Cobián, F

    2003-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences and Y chromosome haplotypes were characterized in Pasiegos, a human isolate from Cantabria, and compared with those of other Cantabrian and neighbouring Northern Spain populations. Cantabria appears to be a genetically heterogeneous community. Whereas Lebaniegos do not differ from their eastern Basque and western Asturian and Galician neighbours, Pasiegos and other non-Lebaniego Cantabrians show significant differences with all of them. Pasiegos are peculiar for their high frequencies of Y chromosomal markers (E-M81) with North African assignation, and Y chromosomal (R-SRY2627) and mtDNA (V, I, U5) markers related to northern European populations. This dual geographic contribution is more in agreement with the complex demographic history of this isolate, as opposed to recent drift effects. The high incidence in Cantabrians with pre-V and V mtDNA haplotypes, considered as a signal of Postglacial recolonization in Europe from south-western refugees, points to such refugees as a better candidate population than Basques for this expansion. However, this does not discount a conjoint recolonization. PMID:12914567

  2. Chromosomal aneuploidies and DNA fragmentation of human spermatozoa from patients exposed to perfluorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Governini, L; Guerranti, C; De Leo, V; Boschi, L; Luddi, A; Gori, M; Orvieto, R; Piomboni, P

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated chromosomal aneuploidies and DNA damage in spermatozoa from male patients contaminated by perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in whole blood and seminal plasma. Sperm aneuploidy and diploidy rate for chromosomes 18, X and Y were evaluated by FISH; sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling technique coupled to flow cytometry. Our results indicated that PFC contamination was present in 58% of subjects included in the study. A significant increase in alterations of sperm parameters was observed in PFC-positive subjects compared to PFC-negative subjects. As regards the sperm aneuploidy, both disomy and diploidy rates resulted significantly increased in subjects positive for PFC contamination compared to PFC-negative samples. In addition, sperm DNA fragmentation index resulted significantly increased in PFC-contaminated subjects compared to PFC-non-contaminated subjects, with a significant increased level of dimmer DNA fragmentation index. Our results clearly indicate that PFC contamination may detrimentally affect spermatogenesis, disturbing both meiotic segregation and DNA integrity. We could therefore suggest cautions to reduce or eliminate any contact with these compounds because the long-term effects of PFC accumulation in the body are not predictable. PMID:25382683

  3. Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA studies on the population structure of the Christmas Island community.

    PubMed

    Wise, Cheryl A; Sullivan, Sheena G; Black, Michael L; Erber, Wendy N; Bittles, Alan H

    2005-11-01

    Christmas Island is a remote Australian territory located close to the main Indonesian island of Java. Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers were used to investigate the genetic structure of the population, which comprises communities of mixed ethnic origin. Analysis of 12 Y-chromosome biallelic polymorphisms revealed a high level of gene diversity and haplotype frequencies that were consistent with source populations in southern China and Southeast Asia. mtDNA hypervariable segment I (HVS-I) sequences displayed high levels of haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity that were comparable to various Asian populations. Genetic distances revealed extremely low mtDNA differentiation among Christmas Islanders and Asian populations. This was supported by the relatively high proportion of sequence types shared among these populations. The most common mtDNA haplogroups were M* and B, followed by D and F, which are prevalent in East/Southeast Asia. Christmas Islanders of European descent were characterized by the Eurasian haplogroup R*, and a limited degree of admixture was observed. In general, analysis of the genetic data indicated population affinities to southern Chinese (in particular from the Yunnan Province) and Southeast Asia (Thailand, Malaysia, and Cambodia), which was consistent with historical records of settlement. The combined use of these different marker systems provides a useful and appropriate model for the study of contemporary populations derived from different ethnic origins. PMID:15864813

  4. Visualizing the entire DNA from a chromosome in a single frame

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, C.; Noble, C.; Fritzsche, J.; Persson, F.; Reiter-Schad, M.; Nilsson, A. N.; Granéli, A.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Mir, K. U.; Tegenfeldt, J. O.

    2015-01-01

    The contiguity and phase of sequence information are intrinsic to obtain complete understanding of the genome and its relationship to phenotype. We report the fabrication and application of a novel nanochannel design that folds megabase lengths of genomic DNA into a systematic back-and-forth meandering path. Such meandering nanochannels enabled us to visualize the complete 5.7 Mbp (1 mm) stained DNA length of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe chromosome in a single frame of a CCD. We were able to hold the DNA in situ while implementing partial denaturation to obtain a barcode pattern that we could match to a reference map using the Poland-Scheraga model for DNA melting. The facility to compose such long linear lengths of genomic DNA in one field of view enabled us to directly visualize a repeat motif, count the repeat unit number, and chart its location in the genome by reference to unique barcode motifs found at measurable distances from the repeat. Meandering nanochannel dimensions can easily be tailored to human chromosome scales, which would enable the whole genome to be visualized in seconds. PMID:26392826

  5. Rapid and early determination of sex using trophoblast biopsy specimens and Y chromosome specific DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Vergnaud, G; Kaplan, L; Weissenbach, J; Dumez, Y; Berger, R; Tiollais, P; Guellaen, G

    1984-07-14

    The feasibility of determining sex by analysing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with two probes specific for Y chromosomes was shown using DNA obtained from samples of blood from 30 non-related males and females of different ethnic origin. The DNA was spotted on nitrocellulose filters and hybridised with both a repetitive (P1) and a unique (49f) sequence specific for the human Y chromosome. A strong positive signal with both probes indicated the presence of male DNA. The sex of 12 fetuses was then similarly determined by molecular characterisation of DNA from trophoblast biopsy specimens. Chorionic samples were obtained in seven cases before termination of pregnancy in the first trimester and the aborted embryos subjected to karyotyping and sex chromatin analysis. In the five other cases samples were obtained from placentas obtained during caesarean section. Results of hybridisation were compared with those from cytogenic studies and actual sex at birth. The sex of all 12 fetuses was determined correctly by hybridisation. PMID:6428684

  6. [Determination of fetal sex by amplification of Y-chromosome-specific DNA].

    PubMed

    Huang, S Z

    1989-08-01

    This paper describes a rapid and highly sensitive method for determination of fetal sex. Y-chromosome-specific sequences as well as Alu-specific sequences were amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then fetal sex was determined by comparison of the two amplified DNA sequences. Polymerase chain reaction can be performed on lysed amniotic fluid cells or chorionic villus samples or dried blood spots on filter paper blot without prior DNA extraction. The analysis of the amplified DNA was performed immediately by agarose gel electrophoresis without DNA hybridization with radioactive probe. By using this method, determination of sex was performed on 3 fetuses at risk for DMD, and on 2 fetuses at risk for hemophilia, prenatal detection was confirmed by examination of the neonates. PMID:2620273

  7. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  8. A comparative analysis of Y chromosome and mtDNA phylogenies of the Hylobates gibbons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolutionary relationships of closely related species have long been of interest to biologists since these species experienced different evolutionary processes in a relatively short period of time. Comparison of phylogenies inferred from DNA sequences with differing inheritance patterns, such as mitochondrial, autosomal, and X and Y chromosomal loci, can provide more comprehensive inferences of the evolutionary histories of species. Gibbons, especially the genus Hylobates, are particularly intriguing as they consist of multiple closely related species which emerged rapidly and live in close geographic proximity. Our current understanding of relationships among Hylobates species is largely based on data from the maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs). Results To infer the paternal histories of gibbon taxa, we sequenced multiple Y chromosomal loci from 26 gibbons representing 10 species. As expected, we find levels of sequence variation some five times lower than observed for the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome). Although our Y chromosome phylogenetic tree shows relatively low resolution compared to the mtgenome tree, our results are consistent with the monophyly of gibbon genera suggested by the mtgenome tree. In a comparison of the molecular dating of divergences and on the branching patterns of phylogeny trees between mtgenome and Y chromosome data, we found: 1) the inferred divergence estimates were more recent for the Y chromosome than for the mtgenome, 2) the species H. lar and H. pileatus are monophyletic in the mtgenome phylogeny, respectively, but a H. pileatus individual falls into the H. lar Y chromosome clade. Conclusions Based on the ~6.4 kb of Y chromosomal DNA sequence data generated for each of the 26 individuals in this study, we provide molecular inferences on gibbon and particularly on Hylobates evolution complementary to those from mtDNA data. Overall, our results illustrate the utility of comparative studies of loci with

  9. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Natalia D. M.; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O.; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by Cot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by Cot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using Cot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, Cot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of Cot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position. PMID:27551343

  10. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by C ot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by C ot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using C ot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, C ot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of C ot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position. PMID:27551343

  11. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  12. Intermittency as a universal characteristic of the complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes: From protozoa to human genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalko, S.; Larionov, S.; Poptsova, M.; Loskutov, A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dynamical properties of complete chromosome DNA sequences of eukaryotes are considered. Using the proposed deterministic models with intermittency and symbolic dynamics we describe a wide spectrum of large-scale patterns inherent in these sequences, such as segmental duplications, tandem repeats, and other complex sequence structures. It is shown that the recently discovered gene number balance on the strands is not of a random nature, and certain subsystems of a complete chromosome DNA sequence exhibit the properties of deterministic chaos.

  13. Cytogenetic and Sequence Analyses of Mitochondrial DNA Insertions in Nuclear Chromosomes of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Ashley N.; Faries, Kaitlyn M.; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Hussain, Abid; Roark, Leah M.; Langewisch, Tiffany L.; Backes, Teresa; Kremling, Karl A. G.; Jiang, Jiming; Birchler, James A.; Newton, Kathleen J.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into nuclear genomes is a regularly occurring process that has been observed in many species. Few studies, however, have focused on the variation of nuclear-mtDNA sequences (NUMTs) within a species. This study examined mtDNA insertions within chromosomes of a diverse set of Zea mays ssp. mays (maize) inbred lines by the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization. A relatively large NUMT on the long arm of chromosome 9 (9L) was identified at approximately the same position in four inbred lines (B73, M825, HP301, and Oh7B). Further examination of the similarly positioned 9L NUMT in two lines, B73 and M825, indicated that the large size of these sites is due to the presence of a majority of the mitochondrial genome; however, only portions of this NUMT (∼252 kb total) were found in the publically available B73 nuclear sequence for chromosome 9. Fiber-fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis estimated the size of the B73 9L NUMT to be ∼1.8 Mb and revealed that the NUMT is methylated. Two regions of mtDNA (2.4 kb and 3.3 kb) within the 9L NUMT are not present in the B73 mitochondrial NB genome; however, these 2.4-kb and 3.3-kb segments are present in other Zea mitochondrial genomes, including that of Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, a progenitor of domesticated maize. PMID:26333837

  14. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome diversity in East Adriatic sheep.

    PubMed

    Ferencakovic, M; Curik, I; Pérez-Pardal, L; Royo, L J; Cubric-Curik, V; Fernández, I; Alvarez, I; Kostelic, A; Sprem, N; Krapinec, K; Goyache, F

    2013-04-01

    Variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplotypes was analysed in nine domestic sheep breeds (159 rams) and 21 mouflon (Ovis musimon) sampled in the East Adriatic. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed a high frequency of type B haplotypes, predominantly in European breeds, and a very low frequency of type A haplotypes, which are more frequent in some Asian breeds. Mitochondrial haplotype Hmt-3 was the most frequent (26.4%), and 37.1%, 20.8% and 7.6% of rams had haplotypes one, two and three mutations remote from Hmt-3 respectively. In contrast, Y-chromosome analyses revealed extraordinary paternal allelic richness: HY-6, 89.3%; HY-8, 5.0%; HY-18, 3.1%; HY-7, 1.3%; and HY-5, 1.3%. In fact, the number of haplotypes observed is comparable to the number found in Turkish breeds and greater than the number found in European breeds so far. Haplotype HY-18 (A-oY1/135-SRYM18), identified here for the first time, provides a link between the haplotype HY-12 (A-oY1/139-SRYM18) found in a few rams in Turkey and haplotype HY-9 (A-oY1/131-SRYM18) found in one ram in Ethiopia. All mouflons had type B mtDNA haplotypes, including the private haplotype (Hmt-55), and all were paternally monomorphic for haplotype HY-6. Our data support a quite homogeneous maternal origin of East Adriatic sheep, which is a characteristic of European breeds. At the same time, the high number of haplotypes found was surprising and intriguing, and it begs for further analysis. Simultaneous analysis of mtDNA and Y-chromosome information allowed us to detect a large discrepancy between maternal and paternal lineages in some populations. This is most likely the result of breeder efforts to 'upgrade' local populations using rams with different paternal origins. PMID:22762153

  15. Multicolor FISHs for simultaneous detection of genes and DNA segments on human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Asai, Satoko; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a convenient multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (five-, four-, three-, and two-color FISHs) for detecting specific genes/DNA segments on the human chromosomes. As a foundation of multicolor FISH, we first isolated 80 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes that specifically detect the peri-centromeres (peri-CEN) and subtelomeres (subTEL) of 24 different human chromosomes (nos. 1~22, X, and Y) by screening our homemade BAC library (Keio BAC library) consisting of 200,000 clones. Five-color FISH was performed using human DNA segments specific for peri-CEN or subTEL, which were labeled with five different fluorescent dyes [7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC): blue, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC): green, rhodamine 6G (R6G): yellow, TexRed: red, and cyanine5 (Cy5): purple]. To observe FISH signals under a fluorescence microscope, five optic filters were carefully chosen to avoid overlapping fluorescence emission. Five-color FISH and four-color FISH enabled us to accurately examine the numerical anomaly of human chromosomes. Three-color FISH using two specific BAC clones, that distinguish 5' half of oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from its 3' half, revealed the amplification and truncation of EGFR in EGFR-overproducing cancer cells. Moreover, two-color FISH readily detected a fusion gene in leukemia cells such as breakpoint cluster region (BCR)/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue (ABL) on the Philadelphia (Ph') chromosome with interchromosomal translocation. Some other successful cases such as trisomy 21 of Down syndrome are presented. Potential applications of multicolor FISH will be discussed. PMID:25947045

  16. Cloning of DNA sequences localized on proximal fluorescent chromosome bands by microdissection in Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc.

    PubMed

    Hizume, M; Shibata, F; Maruyama, Y; Kondo, T

    2001-09-01

    Japanese red pine, Pinus densiflora, has 2n=24 chromosomes, of which most carry chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) bands at their centromere-proximal regions. It was proposed that these regions contain highly repetitive DNA. The DNA localized in the proximal fluorescent bands was isolated and characterized. In P. densiflora, centromeric and neighboring segments of the somatic chromosomes were dissected with a manual micromanipulator. The centromeric DNA was amplified from the DNA contained in dissected centromeric segments by degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) and a cloned DNA library was constructed. Thirty-one clones carrying highly repetitive DNA were selected by colony hybridization using Cot-1 DNA from this species as a probe, and their chromosomal localization was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clone PDCD501 was localized to the proximal CMA band of 20 chromosomes. This clone contained tandem repeats, comprising a 27 bp repeat unit, which was sufficient to provide the proximal FISH signal, with a 52.3% GC content. The repetitive sequence was named PCSR (proximal CMA band-specific repeat). Clone PDCD159 was 1700 bp in length, with a 61.7% AT content, and produced FISH signals at the proximal DAPI band of the remaining four chromosomes. Four clones hybridized strongly to the secondary constriction and gave weak signals at the centromeric region of several chromosomes. Clone PDCD537, one of the four clones, was homologous to the 26S rRNA gene. A PCR experiment using microdissected centromeric regions suggested that the centromeric region contains 18S and 26S rDNA. Another 24 clones hybridized to whole chromosome arms, with varying intensities and might represent dispersed repetitive DNA. PMID:11685534

  17. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization.

    PubMed

    Gosálvez, J; Crespo, F; Vega-Pla, J L; López-Fernández, C; Cortés-Gutiérrez, E I; Devila-Rodriguez, M I; Mezzanotte, R

    2010-01-01

    The genome of stallion (Spanish breed) and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés) were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH) technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome. PMID:20353909

  18. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gosálvez, J.; Crespo, F.; Vega-Pla, J.L.; López-Fernández, C.; Cortés-Gutiérrez, E.I.; Devila-Rodriguez, M.I.; Mezzanotte, R.

    2010-01-01

    The genome of stallion (Spanish breed) and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés) were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH) technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome. PMID:20353909

  19. Development of an in situ loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique for chromosomal localization of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoting; Bao, Zhenmin

    2013-01-01

    In situ loop-mediated isothermal amplification (in situ LAMP) combines in situ hybridization and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) techniques for chromosomal localization of DNA sequences. In situ LAMP is a method that is generally more specific and sensitive than conventional techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), primed in situ labeling (PRINS), and cycling primed in situ labeling (C-PRINS). Here, we describe the development and application of in situ LAMP to identify the chromosomal localization of DNA sequences. To benchmark this technique, we successfully applied this technique to localize the major ribosomal RNA gene on the chromosomes of the Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri).

  20. Modular sequence elements associated with origin regions in eukaryotic chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, D L; Shaiu, W L; Benbow, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have postulated that chromosomal replication origin regions in eukaryotes have in common clusters of certain modular sequence elements (Benbow, Zhao, and Larson, BioEssays 14, 661-670, 1992). In this study, computer analyses of DNA sequences from six origin regions showed that each contained one or more potential initiation regions consisting of a putative DUE (DNA unwinding element) aligned with clusters of SAR (scaffold associated region), and ARS (autonomously replicating sequence) consensus sequences, and pyrimidine tracts. The replication origins analyzed were from the following loci: Tetrahymena thermophila macronuclear rDNA gene, Chinese hamster ovary dihydrofolate reductase amplicon, human c-myc proto-oncogene, chicken histone H5 gene, Drosophila melanogaster chorion gene cluster on the third chromosome, and Chinese hamster ovary rhodopsin gene. The locations of putative initiation regions identified by the computer analyses were compared with published data obtained using diverse methods to map initiation sites. For at least four loci, the potential initiation regions identified by sequence analysis aligned with previously mapped initiation events. A consensus DNA sequence, WAWTTDDWWWDHWGWHMAWTT, was found within the potential initiation regions in every case. An additional 35 kb of combined flanking sequences from the six loci were also analyzed, but no additional copies of this consensus sequence were found. Images PMID:8041609

  1. Action of citrinin on bacterial chromosomal and plasmid DNA in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, W; Lorkowski, G; Creppy, E E; Dirheimer, G; Röschenthaler, R

    1986-01-01

    Citrinin, a mycotoxin of Penicillium citrinum and other species of the genera Penicillium and Aspergillus, caused the following effects at different concentrations in Escherichia coli. In vivo at 100 micrograms/ml single-strand breaks were caused in the chromosomal DNA. In the presence of 100 micrograms/ml, UV (254 nm)-induced DNA damage was repaired in the bacterial cells without need for a complete growth medium. At 300 micrograms/ml lambda ts prophage was induced in a lysogenic E. coli strain. In an E. coli strain carrying a F' lac plasmid, 4.7% of the cells displayed the Lac- phenotype after treatment with 200 micrograms of citrinin per ml, suggesting elimination of the F' factor. In vitro, DNA repair synthesis was observed at 5 micrograms of citrinin per ml in permeabilized cells, and replicative DNA synthesis was inhibited at 200 micrograms/ml. In these systems synthesis of stable RNAs was slightly diminished at 300 micrograms/ml, and protein synthesis was not affected at concentrations up to 450 micrograms/ml. Lambda and ColE1 plasmid DNA were cleaved in vitro when small amounts of copper ions were present. This DNA-attacking activity was prevented by NADPH, catalase, and superoxide dismutase and by higher concentrations of hydroxyl radical scavengers, suggesting the involvement of free radicals in the mechanism of action of citrinin on DNA. Images PMID:2947539

  2. Evolutionary dynamics of Anolis sex chromosomes revealed by sequencing of flow sorting-derived microchromosome-specific DNA.

    PubMed

    Kichigin, Ilya G; Giovannotti, Massimo; Makunin, Alex I; Ng, Bee L; Kabilov, Marsel R; Tupikin, Alexey E; Barucchi, Vincenzo Caputo; Splendiani, Andrea; Ruggeri, Paolo; Rens, Willem; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2016-10-01

    Squamate reptiles show a striking diversity in modes of sex determination, including both genetic (XY or ZW) and temperature-dependent sex determination systems. The genomes of only a handful of species have been sequenced, analyzed and assembled including the genome of Anolis carolinensis. Despite a high genome coverage, only macrochromosomes of A. carolinensis were assembled whereas the content of most microchromosomes remained unclear. Most of the Anolis species have homomorphic XY sex chromosome system. However, some species have large heteromorphic XY chromosomes (e.g., A. sagrei) and even multiple sex chromosomes systems (e.g. A. pogus), that were shown to be derived from fusions of the ancestral XY with microautosomes. We applied next generation sequencing of flow sorting-derived chromosome-specific DNA pools to characterize the content and composition of microchromosomes in A. carolinensis and A. sagrei. Comparative analysis of sequenced chromosome-specific DNA pools revealed that the A. sagrei XY sex chromosomes contain regions homologous to several microautosomes of A. carolinensis. We suggest that the sex chromosomes of A. sagrei are derived by fusions of the ancestral sex chromosome with three microautosomes and subsequent loss of some genetic content on the Y chromosome. PMID:27431992

  3. Actinophage R4 integrase-based site-specific chromosomal integration of non-replicative closed circular DNA.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takamasa; Nishizawa, Akito; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Asayama, Munehiko; Shirai, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    The actinophage R4 integrase (Sre)-based molecular genetic engineering system was developed for the chromosomal integration of multiple genes in Escherichia coli. A cloned DNA fragment containing two attP sites, green fluorescent protein (gfp) as a first transgene, and an antibiotic resistance gene as a selection marker was self-ligated to generate non-replicative closed circular DNA (nrccDNA) for integration. nrccDNA was introduced into attB-inserted E. coli cells harboring the plasmid expressing Sre by electroporation. The expressed Sre catalyzed site-specific integration between one of the two attP sites on nrccDNA and the attB site on the E. coli chromosome. The integration frequency was affected by the chromosomal location of the target site. A second nrccDNA containing two attB sites, lacZα encoding the alpha fragment of β-galactosidase as a transgene, and another antibiotic resistance gene was integrated into the residual attP site on the gfp-integrated E. coli chromosome via one of the two attB sites according to reiterating site-specific recombination. The integrants clearly exhibited β-galactosidase activity and green fluorescence, suggesting the simultaneous expression of multiple recombinant proteins in E. coli. The results of the present study showed that a step-by-step integration procedure using nrccDNA achieved the chromosomal integration of multiple genes. PMID:26870903

  4. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A T; van Zeeland, A A; Zwanenburg, T S

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, we have measured the influence of 3AB on DNA repair following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. Both acentric fragments and exchanges increase indicating that the presence of 3AB slows down the repair of DNA strand breaks (probably DNA double strand breaks), thus making breaks available for interaction with each other to give rise to exchanges. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. Most 3AB induced SCEs occur during the second cell cycle, in which DNA containing bromouridine (BU) is used as template for replication. BU containing DNA appears to be prone to errors during replication. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs by 3AB is correlated with the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of the cells. The frequencies of spontaneously occurring DNA single strand breaks in cells grown in BrdUrd containing medium are higher than in the cells grown in normal medium and this increase depends on the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of these cells. We have studied the extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the

  5. Structural damage to meiotic chromosomes impairs DNA recombination and checkpoint control in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Höög, Christer

    2006-05-22

    Meiosis in human oocytes is a highly error-prone process with profound effects on germ cell and embryo development. The synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3) transiently supports the structural organization of the meiotic chromosome axis. Offspring derived from murine Sycp3(-)(/)(-) females die in utero as a result of aneuploidy. We studied the nature of the proximal chromosomal defects that give rise to aneuploidy in Sycp3(-)(/)(-) oocytes and how these errors evade meiotic quality control mechanisms. We show that DNA double-stranded breaks are inefficiently repaired in Sycp3(-)(/)(-) oocytes, thereby generating a temporal spectrum of recombination errors. This is indicated by a strong residual gammaH2AX labeling retained at late meiotic stages in mutant oocytes and an increased persistence of recombination-related proteins associated with meiotic chromosomes. Although a majority of the mutant oocytes are rapidly eliminated at early postnatal development, a subset with a small number of unfinished crossovers evades the DNA damage checkpoint, resulting in the formation of aneuploid gametes. PMID:16717125

  6. Method for isolating chromosomal DNA in preparation for hybridization in suspension

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. Chromosomal DNA in a sample containing cell debris is prepared for hybridization in suspension by treating the mixture with RNase. The treated DNA can also be fixed prior to hybridization.

  7. BRIT1 regulates early DNA damage response, chromosomal integrity,and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Rekha; Dai, Hui; Multani, Asha S.; Li, Kaiyi; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe; Lahad, John P.; Liang, Jiyong; Mills, Gordon B.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2006-08-24

    BRIT1, initially identified as an hTERT repressor, hasadditional functions at DNA damage checkpoints. Here, we demonstratedthat BRIT1 formed nuclear foci minutes after irradiation. The foci ofBRIT1 co-localized with 53BP1, MDC1, NBS1, ATM, RPA, and ATR. BRIT1 wasrequired for activation of these elements, indicating that BRIT1 is aproximal factor in the DNA damage response pathway. Depletion of BRIT1increased the accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. In addition,decreased levels of BRIT1 were detected in several types of human cancerwith BRIT1 expression being inversely correlated with genomic instabilityand metastasis. These results identify BRIT1 as a crucial DNA damageregulator in the ATM/ATR pathways and suggest that it functions as atumor suppressor gene.

  8. Chromosomal localization of 18S rDNA and telomere sequence in the aye-aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarisoa, G; Hirai, Y; Go, Y; Kawamoto, Y; Shima, T; Koyama, N; Randrianjafy, A; Mora, R; Hirai, H

    2000-10-01

    Chromosomal localization of 18S rDNA and telomere sequence was attempted on the chromosomes of the aye-aye (2n = 30) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and primed in situ labeling (PRINS), respectively. The rDNA was localized at the tip or whole of the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes 13 and 14 in all spreads observed. However, post-FISH silver-nitrate (Ag) staining showed that transcriptional activity of the rRNA genes was variable, particularly in chromosome 14, which was most frequently negative in one homologue carrying the smaller copy number of rDNA. This observation supports, at the molecular cytogenetic level, previous data concerning the relationship between the copy number of rDNA and its trancriptional activity. On the other hand, telomere sequence was localized only at the telomeric region of all chromosomes, the so-called telomere-only pattern, a characteristic similar to that of the greater bushbaby. These data may provide information on the chromosomal evolution of the lemur, because locations of rDNA and telomere sequences frequently offer important clues in reconstruction of karyotype differentiation. PMID:11245223

  9. Identifying X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm by DNA content: retrospective perspectives and prospective opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.; Pinkel, D.; Garner, D.L.

    1982-03-05

    Theoretically, since DNA should be the most constant component, quantitatively, of normal sperm, then genotoxic agents arising from energy production and consumption, and chemical and physical mutagens, could be identified by measuring variability in the DNA content of individual sperm from exposed men or test animals. The difference between the DNA content of X and Y sperm seemed a biologically significant benchmark for the measurement technology. Several methods are available for determining the genetic activity of agents in male germ cells, but these tests are generally laborious. Sperm-based methods provide an attractive alternate since they are not invasive, and are directly applicable to the study of human exposure. Slide-based assay of DNA content suggests that human sperm with X, Y, or YY chromosome constitutions can be distinguished by their fluorescence with quinacrine. Subsequent measurement of the dry mass of human sperm heads is performed. Dry mass is proportional to DNA content. While the study showed that human sperm with none and one quinacrine-fluorescent spot are X- and Y-bearing, respectively, the dry mass measurements indicated that many of the sperm with two quinacrine-fluorescent spots are not YY-bearing. While several reports on the initial application of flow cytometry of sperm to the investigation of mammalian infertility have appeared recently, emphasis here has been on the development of an in vivo sperm-based flow cytometric bioassay for mutations, and has not centered on andrological applications. In this review, the ability to differentiate between two equally sized populations of sperm, one bearing X and the other Y chromosomes with mean DNA content differing by about 3 to 4% is described. It has direct application to the preselection of sex of offspring, and could likely have a profound impact on animal improvement. (ERB)

  10. The nuclear apparatus and chromosomal DNA of the microsporidian Nosema antheraeae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshan; Wang, Lijun; Tang, Fahui; Huang, Wei; Zhou, Zeyang

    2011-01-01

    The microsporidian Nosema antheraeae is a pathogen of the Chinese oak silkmoth Antheraea pernyi, the molecular karyotype of which is still poorly understood. Here the diplokaryon of N. antheraeae strain NP-YY has been visualized both by fluorescence and electron microscopy. In addition, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that the haploid genome of N. antheraeae is approximately 9.3-9.5 million base pairs organized into 15 chromosomal bands. The mean fluorescence intensity of N. antheraeae and Nosema bombycis DNA measured by flow cytometry confirmed that the genome size of these two species was congruent with measurements obtained by PFGE. These initial results on the chromosome organization of N. antheraeae provide a foundation for the comparative genomics of N. antheraeae with other species of Nosema. PMID:21382124

  11. Modes of integration of heterologous plasmid DNA into the chromosome of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, G.; Guild, W.R.

    1985-03-01

    The authors compared the efficiencies of two different processes that can direct integration of plasmids into chromosomes of recipient cells during transformation. A donor-recipient system was constructed to allow a single donor plasmid to use either flanking homology, involving an apparent double crossover, or the insertion duplication process that has been described as due to a Campbell-like single crossover between the chromosome and a circular duplex. The latter process gave 600-fold fewer insertions that did the former, confirming expectations from prior work showing that insertion of heterologous DNA by use of flanking homology is highly efficient. It has some advantages for cloning and mapping purposes and can be exploited once it is recognized.

  12. DNA linkage analysis of X chromosome-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Baehner, R L; Kunkel, L M; Monaco, A P; Haines, J L; Conneally, P M; Palmer, C; Heerema, N; Orkin, S H

    1986-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a disorder of phagocytes that is usually inherited as an X chromosome-linked trait. Previous family studies suggested that the CGD locus resides on the distal short arm (Xp22-Xpter). Using cloned, polymorphic DNA probes we have performed a linkage analysis within CGD families that suggests a more proximal location (Xp21). In addition, the CGD locus is proximal to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus and lies within a broad region of Xp in which recombination appears to be greater than anticipated on the basis of physical distance between markers. Regional localization of the X chromosome CGD locus should facilitate molecular cloning of the CGD gene and molecular dissection of the phagocyte oxidase system. Images PMID:3010296

  13. Species-diagnostic and species-specific DNA sequences evenly distributed throughout pine and spruce chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mehes-Smith, Melanie; Michael, Paul; Nkongolo, Kabwe

    2010-10-01

    Genome organization in the family Pinaceae is complex and largely unknown. The main purpose of the present study was to develop and physically map species-diagnostic and species-specific molecular markers in pine and spruce. Five RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) and one ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat) species-diagnostic or species-specific markers for Picea mariana, Picea rubens, Pinus strobus, or Pinus monticola were identified, cloned, and sequenced. In situ hybridization of these sequences to spruce and pine chromosomes showed the sequences to be present in high copy number and evenly distributed throughout the genome. The analysis of centromeric and telomeric regions revealed the absence of significant clustering of species-diagnostic and species-specific sequences in all the chromosomes of the four species studied. Both RAPD and ISSR markers showed similar patterns. PMID:20962883

  14. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Joanne H.; Zeng, Hui; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Polyzos, Aris A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; O’Brien, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols. PMID:23344021

  15. Separation of chromosomal DNA molecules from yeast by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Carle, G F; Olson, M V

    1984-01-01

    A simple agarose-gel apparatus has been developed that allows the separation of DNA molecules in the size range from 50 kb to well over 750 kb, the largest size for which size standards were available. The apparatus is based on the recent discovery that large DNA molecules are readily fractionated on agarose gels if they are alternately subjected to two approximately orthogonal electric fields. The switching time, which was on the order of 20-50 sec in our experiments, can be adjusted to optimize fractionation in a given size range. The resolution of the technique is sufficient to allow the fractionation of a sample of self-ligated lambda DNA into a ladder of approximately 15 bands, spaced at 50 kb intervals. We have applied the technique to the fractionation of yeast DNA into 11 distinct bands, several of which have been shown by DNA-DNA hybridization to hybridize uniquely to different chromosome-specific hybridization probes. In this paper, we describe the design of the apparatus, the electrophoretic protocol, and the sample-handling procedures that we have employed. Images PMID:6379602

  16. Chromosome Model reveals Dynamic Redistribution of DNA Damage into Nuclear Sub-domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, Sylvain V.; Ponomarev, Artem; Chen, James L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Barcellos-Hoff, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage is induced. To test this assumption, we analyzed the spatial distribution of 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and gammaH2AX RIF in cells irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIF obtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) were non-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random pattern can be further characterized by relative DNA image measurements. This novel imaging approach shows that RIF were located preferentially at the interface between high and low DNA density regions, and were more frequent in regions with lower density DNA than predicted. This deviation from random behavior was more pronounced within the first 5 min following irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while gammaH2AX and 53BP1 RIF showed very pronounced deviation up to 30 min after exposure. These data suggest the existence of repair centers in mammalian epithelial cells. These centers would be nuclear sub-domains where DNA lesions would be collected for more efficient repair.

  17. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  18. Topology of chromosome centromeres in human sperm nuclei with high levels of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wiland, Ewa; Fraczek, Monika; Olszewska, Marta; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the 'poor' sperm DNA quality appears to be an important factor affecting male reproductive ability. In the case of sperm cells from males with the correct somatic karyotype but with deficient spermatogenesis, resulting in a high degree of sperm DNA fragmentation, we observed changes in the preferential topology of the chromosome 7, 9, 15, 18, X and Y centromeres. The changes occurred in radial localization and may have been directly linked to the sperm chromatin damage. This conclusion is mainly based on a comparison of FISH signals that were observed simultaneously in the TUNEL-positive and TUNEL-negative sperm cells. The analyzed cells originated from the same ejaculated sample and FISH was performed on the same slides, after in situ TUNEL reaction. Based on the observed changes and previous data, it appears that the sperm nucleus architecture can be disrupted by a variety of factors and has a negative influence on spermatogenesis at the same time. Often, these factors coexist (e.g. chromosomal translocations, aneuploidies, a higher DNA fragmentation, abnormal seminology), but no direct correlations between the factors were observed. PMID:27558650

  19. mtDNA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in four Native American populations from southern Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A.; Chen, Y. S.; Semino, O.; Santachiara-Beneceretti, A. S.; Scott, C. R.; Lott, M. T.; Winter, M.; Wallace, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was examined in 60 Native Americans (Mixtecs from the Alta, Mixtecs from the Baja, Valley Zapotecs, and Highland Mixe) from southern Mexico by PCR amplification and high-resolution restriction endonuclease analysis. Four groups of mtDNA haplotypes (haplogroups A, B, C, and D) characterize Amerind populations, but only three (haplogroups A, B, and C) were observed in these Mexican populations. The comparison of their mtDNA variation with that observed in other populations from Mexico and Central America permits a clear distinction among the different Middle American tribes and raises questions about some of their linguistic affiliations. The males of these population samples were also analyzed for Y-chromosome RFLPs with the probes 49a, 49f, and 12f2. This analysis suggests that certain Y-chromosome haplotypes were brought from Asia during the colonization of the Americas, and a differential gene flow was introduced into Native American populations from European males and females. Images Figure 4 PMID:8304347

  20. Topology of chromosome centromeres in human sperm nuclei with high levels of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Wiland, Ewa; Fraczek, Monika; Olszewska, Marta; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the ‘poor’ sperm DNA quality appears to be an important factor affecting male reproductive ability. In the case of sperm cells from males with the correct somatic karyotype but with deficient spermatogenesis, resulting in a high degree of sperm DNA fragmentation, we observed changes in the preferential topology of the chromosome 7, 9, 15, 18, X and Y centromeres. The changes occurred in radial localization and may have been directly linked to the sperm chromatin damage. This conclusion is mainly based on a comparison of FISH signals that were observed simultaneously in the TUNEL-positive and TUNEL-negative sperm cells. The analyzed cells originated from the same ejaculated sample and FISH was performed on the same slides, after in situ TUNEL reaction. Based on the observed changes and previous data, it appears that the sperm nucleus architecture can be disrupted by a variety of factors and has a negative influence on spermatogenesis at the same time. Often, these factors coexist (e.g. chromosomal translocations, aneuploidies, a higher DNA fragmentation, abnormal seminology), but no direct correlations between the factors were observed. PMID:27558650

  1. HERC2 coordinates ubiquitin-dependent assembly of DNA repair factors on damaged chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie; Fugger, Kasper; Gromova, Irina; Nerstedt, Annika; Lukas, Claudia; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory ubiquitylation is emerging as an important mechanism to protect genome integrity in cells exposed to DNA damage. However, the spectrum of known ubiquitin regulators of the DNA damage response (DDR) is limited and their functional interplay is poorly understood. Here, we identify HERC2 as a factor that regulates ubiquitin-dependent retention of repair proteins on damaged chromosomes. In response to ionising radiation (IR), HERC2 forms a complex with RNF8, a ubiquitin ligase involved in the DDR. The HERC2-RNF8 interaction requires IR-inducible phosphorylation of HERC2 at Thr 4827, which in turn binds to the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain of RNF8. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that HERC2 facilitates assembly of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13 with RNF8, thereby promoting DNA damage-induced formation of Lys 63-linked ubiquitin chains. We also show that HERC2 interacts with, and maintains the levels of, RNF168, another ubiquitin ligase operating downstream of RNF8 (Refs 7, 8). Consequently, knockdown of HERC2 abrogates ubiquitin-dependent retention of repair factors such as 53BP1, RAP80 and BRCA1. Together with the increased radiosensitivity of HERC2-depleted cells, these results uncover a regulatory layer in the orchestration of protein interactions on damaged chromosomes and they underscore the role of ubiquitin-mediated signalling in genome maintenance. PMID:20023648

  2. Reconstructing genome mixtures from partial adjacencies.

    PubMed

    Mahmoody, Ahmad; Kahn, Crystal L; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Many cancer genome sequencing efforts are underway with the goal of identifying the somatic mutations that drive cancer progression. A major difficulty in these studies is that tumors are typically heterogeneous, with individual cells in a tumor having different complements of somatic mutations. However, nearly all DNA sequencing technologies sequence DNA from multiple cells, thus resulting in measurement of mutations from a mixture of genomes. Genome rearrangements are a major class of somatic mutations in many tumors, and the novel adjacencies (i.e. breakpoints) resulting from these rearrangements are readily detected from DNA sequencing reads. However, the assignment of each rearrangement, or adjacency, to an individual cancer genome in the mixture is not known. Moreover, the quantity of DNA sequence reads may be insufficient to measure all rearrangements in all genomes in the tumor. Motivated by this application, we formulate the k-minimum completion problem (k-MCP). In this problem, we aim to reconstruct k genomes derived from a single reference genome, given partial information about the adjacencies present in the mixture of these genomes. We show that the 1-MCP is solvable in linear time in the cases where: (i) the measured, incomplete genome has a single circular or linear chromosome; (ii) there are no restrictions on the chromosomal content of the measured, incomplete genome. We also show that the k-MCP problem, for k ≥ 3 in general, and the 2-MCP problem with the double-cut-and-join (DCJ) distance are NP-complete, when there are no restriction on the chromosomal structure of the measured, incomplete genome. These results lay the foundation for future algorithmic studies of the k-MCP and the application of these algorithms to real cancer sequencing data. PMID:23282028

  3. Growth inhibition and chromosomal instability of cultured marsupial (opossum) cells after treatment with DNA polymerase α inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu; Kazama, Tomoko; Sakuma, Kurumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Oshima, Teruyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The DNA replication mechanism has been well established for eutherian mammals (placental mammals such as humans, mice, and cattle), but not, to date, for metatherian mammals (marsupials such as kangaroos, koalas, and opossums). In this study, we found that dehydroaltenusin, a selective inhibitor of mammalian (eutherian) DNA polymerase α, clearly suppressed the growth of metatherian (opossum and rat kangaroo) cultured cells. In cultured opossum (OK) cells, dehydroaltenusin also suppressed the progression of DNA replication. These results suggest that dehydroaltenusin inhibits metatherian as well as eutherian DNA replication. Dehydroaltenusin treatment of OK cells engendered fluctuations in the numbers of chromosomes in the OK cells as well as inhibition of cell growth and DNA replication. This suggests that partial inhibition of DNA replication by dehydroaltenusin causes chromosomal instability in cultured cells. PMID:21737927

  4. Preparations of meiotic pachytene chromosomes and extended DNA fibers from cotton suitable for fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Renhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  5. Preparations of Meiotic Pachytene Chromosomes and Extended DNA Fibers from Cotton Suitable for Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has become one of the most important techniques applied in plant molecular cytogenetics. However, the application of this technique in cotton has lagged behind because of difficulties in chromosome preparation. The focus of this article was FISH performed not only on cotton pachytene chromosomes, but also on cotton extended DNA fibers. The cotton pollen mother cells (PMCs) instead of buds or anthers were directly digested in enzyme to completely breakdown the cell wall. Before the routine acetic acid treatment, PMCs were incubated in acetic acid and enzyme mixture to remove the cytoplasm and clear the background. The method of ice-cold Carnoy's solution spreading chromosome was adopted instead of nitrogen removed method to avoid chromosomes losing and fully stretch chromosome. With the above-improved steps, the high-quality well-differentiated pachytene chromosomes with clear background were obtained. FISH results demonstrated that a mature protocol of cotton pachytene chromosomes preparation was presented. Intact and no debris cotton nuclei were obtained by chopping from etiolation cotyledons instead of the conventional liquid nitrogen grinding method. After incubating the nuclei with nucleus lysis buffer on slide, the parallel and clear background DNA fibers were acquired along the slide. This method overcomes the twist, accumulation and fracture of DNA fibers compared with other methods. The entire process of DNA fibers preparation requires only 30 min, in contrast, it takes 3 h with routine nitrogen grinding method. The poisonous mercaptoethanol in nucleus lysis buffer is replaced by nonpoisonous dithiothreitol. PVP40 in nucleus isolation buffer is used to prevent oxidation. The probability of success in isolating nuclei for DNA fiber preparation is almost 100% tested with this method in cotton. So a rapid, safe, and efficient method for the preparation of cotton extended DNA fibers suitable for FISH was established

  6. Mini-chromosome maintenance complexes form a filament to remodel DNA structure and topology

    PubMed Central

    Slaymaker, Ian M.; Fu, Yang; Toso, Daniel B.; Ranatunga, Nimna; Brewster, Aaron; Forsburg, Susan L.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Chen, Xiaojiang S.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins is associated with genomic instability and cancer. MCM complexes are recruited to replication origins for genome duplication. Paradoxically, MCM proteins are in excess than the number of origins and are associated with chromatin regions away from the origins during G1 and S phases. Here, we report an unusually wide left-handed filament structure for an archaeal MCM, as determined by X-ray and electron microscopy. The crystal structure reveals that an α-helix bundle formed between two neighboring subunits plays a critical role in filament formation. The filament has a remarkably strong electro-positive surface spiraling along the inner filament channel for DNA binding. We show that this MCM filament binding to DNA causes dramatic DNA topology change. This newly identified function of MCM to change DNA topology may imply a wider functional role for MCM in DNA metabolisms beyond helicase function. Finally, using yeast genetics, we show that the inter-subunit interactions, important for MCM filament formation, play a role for cell growth and survival. PMID:23361460

  7. Identification of RNase-resistant RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts: Separation from chromosomal DNA by selective precipitation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Malczewskyj, Eric T; Cabiya, Joshua M; Lewis, L Kevin; Maeder, Corina

    2016-01-01

    High-quality chromosomal DNA is a requirement for many biochemical and molecular biological techniques. To isolate cellular DNA, standard protocols typically lyse cells and separate nucleic acids from other biological molecules using a combination of chemical and physical methods. After a standard chemical-based protocol to isolate chromosomal DNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then treatment with RNase A to degrade RNA, two RNase-resistant bands persisted when analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, such resistant bands did not appear in preparations of Escherichia coli bacterial DNA after RNase treatment. Several enzymatic, chemical, and physical methods were employed in an effort to remove the resistant RNAs, including use of multiple RNases and alcohol precipitation, base hydrolysis, and chromatographic methods. These experiments resulted in the development of a new method for isolation of S. cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. This method utilizes selective precipitation of DNA in the presence of a potassium acetate/isopropanol mixture and produces high yields of chromosomal DNA without detectable contaminating RNAs. PMID:26416692

  8. Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric (TTAGG)n repeats in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) with low and high chromosome numbers

    PubMed Central

    Vershinina, Alisa O.; Anokhin, Boris A.; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal DNA clusters and telomeric repeats are important parts of eukaryotic genome. However, little is known about their organization and localization in karyotypes of organisms with holocentric chromosomes. Here we present first cytogenetic study of these molecular structures in seven blue butterflies of the genus Polyommatus Latreille, 1804 with low and high chromosome numbers (from n=10 to n=ca.108) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe showed the presence of two different variants of the location of major rDNA clusters in Polyommatus species: with one or two rDNA-carrying chromosomes in haploid karyotype. We discuss evolutionary trends and possible mechanisms of changes in the number of ribosomal clusters. We also demonstrate that Polyommatus species have the classical insect (TTAGG)n telomere organization. This chromosome end protection mechanism probably originated de novo in small chromosomes that evolved via fragmentations. PMID:26140159

  9. Identification and regional localization of DNA markers on chromosome 7 for the cloning of the cystic fibrosis gene

    PubMed Central

    Rommens, Johanna M.; Zengerling, Stefanie; Burns, Julie; Melmer, Georg; Kerem, Bat-sheva; Plavsic, Natasa; Zsiga, Martha; Kennedy, Dara; Markiewicz, Danuta; Rozmahel, Richard; Riordan, Jack R.; Buchwald, Manuel; Tsui, Lap-chee

    1988-01-01

    To facilitate mapping of the cystic fibrosis locus (CF) and to isolate the corresponding gene, we have screened a flow-sorted chromosome 7–specific library for additional DNA markers in the 7q31-q32 region. Unique (“single-copy”) DNA segments were selected from the library and used in hybridization analysis with a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing various portions of human chromosome 7 and patient cell lines with deletion of this chromosome. A total of 258 chromosome 7–specific single-copy DNA segments were identified, and most of them localized to subregions. Fifty three of these corresponded to DNA sequences in the 7q31-q32 region. Family and physical mapping studies showed that two of the DNA markers, D7S122 and D7S340, are in close linkage with CF. The data also showed that D7S122 and D7S340 map between MET and D7S8, the two genetic markers known to be on opposite sides of CF. The study thus reaffirms the general strategy in approaching a disease locus on the basis of chromosome location. ImagesFigure 2Figure 5 PMID:2903665

  10. DistAMo: A Web-Based Tool to Characterize DNA-Motif Distribution on Bacterial Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Jelonek, Lukas; Strickert, Marc; Han, Wenxia; Goesmann, Alexander; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Short DNA motifs are involved in a multitude of functions such as for example chromosome segregation, DNA replication or mismatch repair. Distribution of such motifs is often not random and the specific chromosomal pattern relates to the respective motif function. Computational approaches which quantitatively assess such chromosomal motif patterns are necessary. Here we present a new computer tool DistAMo (Distribution Analysis of DNA Motifs). The algorithm uses codon redundancy to calculate the relative abundance of short DNA motifs from single genes to entire chromosomes. Comparative genomics analyses of the GATC-motif distribution in γ-proteobacterial genomes using DistAMo revealed that (i) genes beside the replication origin are enriched in GATCs, (ii) genome-wide GATC distribution follows a distinct pattern, and (iii) genes involved in DNA replication and repair are enriched in GATCs. These features are specific for bacterial chromosomes encoding a Dam methyltransferase. The new software is available as a stand-alone or as an easy-to-use web-based server version at http://www.computational.bio.uni-giessen.de/distamo. PMID:27014208

  11. DistAMo: A Web-Based Tool to Characterize DNA-Motif Distribution on Bacterial Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sobetzko, Patrick; Jelonek, Lukas; Strickert, Marc; Han, Wenxia; Goesmann, Alexander; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Short DNA motifs are involved in a multitude of functions such as for example chromosome segregation, DNA replication or mismatch repair. Distribution of such motifs is often not random and the specific chromosomal pattern relates to the respective motif function. Computational approaches which quantitatively assess such chromosomal motif patterns are necessary. Here we present a new computer tool DistAMo (Distribution Analysis of DNA Motifs). The algorithm uses codon redundancy to calculate the relative abundance of short DNA motifs from single genes to entire chromosomes. Comparative genomics analyses of the GATC-motif distribution in γ-proteobacterial genomes using DistAMo revealed that (i) genes beside the replication origin are enriched in GATCs, (ii) genome-wide GATC distribution follows a distinct pattern, and (iii) genes involved in DNA replication and repair are enriched in GATCs. These features are specific for bacterial chromosomes encoding a Dam methyltransferase. The new software is available as a stand-alone or as an easy-to-use web-based server version at http://www.computational.bio.uni-giessen.de/distamo. PMID:27014208

  12. Physical Modeling of Chromosome Segregation in Escherichia coli Reveals Impact of Force and DNA Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Lampo, Thomas J.; Kuwada, Nathan J.; Wiggins, Paul A.; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The physical mechanism by which Escherichia coli segregates copies of its chromosome for partitioning into daughter cells is unknown, partly due to the difficulty in interpreting the complex dynamic behavior during segregation. Analysis of previous chromosome segregation measurements in E. coli demonstrates that the origin of replication exhibits processive motion with a mean displacement that scales as t0.32. In this work, we develop a model for segregation of chromosomal DNA as a Rouse polymer in a viscoelastic medium with a force applied to a single monomer. Our model demonstrates that the observed power-law scaling of the mean displacement and the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function is captured by accounting for the relaxation of the polymer chain and the viscoelastic environment. We show that the ratio of the mean displacement to the variance of the displacement during segregation events is a critical metric that eliminates the compounding effects of polymer and medium dynamics and provides the segregation force. We calculate the force of oriC segregation in E. coli to be ∼0.49 pN. PMID:25564861

  13. Linkage of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome with polymorphic DNA sequences from the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Siminovitch, K.A.

    1987-05-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is one of several human immunodeficiency diseases inherited as an X-linked trait. The location of WAS on the X chromosome is unknown. The authors have studied 10 kindreds segregating for WAS for linkage with cloned, polymorphic DNA markers and have demonstrated significant linkage between WAS and two loci, DXS14 and DXS7, that map to the proximal short arm of the X chromosome. Maximal logarithm of odds (lod scores) for WAS-DXS14 and WAS-DWS7 were 4.29 (at 0 = 0.03) and 4.12 (at 0 = 0.00), respectively. Linkage data between WAS and six markers loci indicate the order of the loci to be (DXYS1-DXS1)-WAS-DXS14-DXS7-(DXS84-OTC). These results suggest that the WAS locus lies within the pericentric region of the X chromosome and provide an initial step toward identifying the WAS gene and improving the genetic counselling WAS families.

  14. Analysis of Plasmid and Chromosomal DNA of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi from Asia

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, S.; Kariuki, S.; Mamun, K. Z.; Beeching, N. J.; Hart, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular analysis of chromosomal DNA from 193 multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates from 1990 to 1995 from Pakistan, Kuwait, Malaysia, Bangladesh, and India produced a total of five major different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Even within a particular country MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi DNA was found to be in different PFGE groups. Similar self-transferable 98-MDa plasmids belonging to either incompatibility group incHI1 or incHI1/FIIA were implicated in the MDR phenotype in S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates from all the locations except Quetta, Pakistan, where the majority were of incFIA. A total of five different PFGE genotypes with six different plasmids, based on incompatibility and restriction endonuclease analysis groups, were found among these MDR S. enterica serovar Typhi isolates. PMID:10747124

  15. The homologous chromosome is an effective template for the repair of mitotic DNA double-strand breaks in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yikang S; Golic, Kent G

    2003-01-01

    In recombinational DNA double-strand break repair a homologous template for gene conversion may be located at several different genomic positions: on the homologous chromosome in diploid organisms, on the sister chromatid after DNA replication, or at an ectopic position. The use of the homologous chromosome in mitotic gene conversion is thought to be limited in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells. In contrast, by studying the repair of double-strand breaks generated by the I-SceI rare-cutting endonuclease, we find that the homologous chromosome is frequently used in Drosophila melanogaster, which we suggest is attributable to somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes in mitotic cells of Drosophila. We also find that Drosophila mitotic cells of the germ line, like yeast, employ the homologous recombinational repair pathway more often than imperfect nonhomologous end joining. PMID:14704169

  16. Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) with YAC/BAC-based probes and region-specific microdissection DNA libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Liehr, T.; Weise, A.; Heller, A.; Starke, H.; Mrasek, K.; Kuechler, A.; Weier, H.-U.G.; Claussen, U.

    2003-06-23

    Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) allows the delineation of chromosomal regions with a resolution of a few mega base pairs, i.e., slightly below the size of most visible chromosome bands. Based on the hybridization of over lapping region-specific probe libraries, chromosomal subregions are hybridized with probes that fluoresce in distinct wave length intervals, so they can be assigned predefined pseudo-colors during the digital imaging and visualization process. The present study demonstrates how MCB patterns can be produced by region-specific micro dissection derived (mcd) libraries as well as collections of yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes (YACs and BACs, respectively). We compared the efficiency of an mcd library based approach with the hybridization of collections of locus-specific probes (LSP) for fluorescent banding of three rather differently sized human chromosomes, i.e., chromosomes 2, 13, and 22. The LSP sets were comprised of 107 probes specific for chromosome 2, 82 probes for chromosome 13, and 31 probes for chromosome 22. The results demonstrated a more homogeneous coverage of chromosomes and thus, more desirable banding patterns using the microdissection library-based MCB. This may be related to the observation that chromosomes are difficult to cover completely with YAC and/or BAC clones as single-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments showed. Mcd libraries, on the other hand, provide high complexity probes that work well as region specific paints, but do not readily allow positioning of break points on genetic or physical maps as required for the positional cloning of genes. Thus, combinations of mcd libraries and locus-specific large insert DNA probes appear to be the most efficient tools for high-resolution cytogenetic analyses.

  17. Chromosome specific DNA hybridization in suspension for flow cytometric detection of chimerism in bone marrow transplantation and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Arkesteijn, G.J.A.; Erpelinck, S.L.A.; Martens, A.C.M.; Hagenbeek, A.

    1995-04-01

    Flow cytometry was used to measure the fluorescence intensity of nuclei that were subjected to fluorescent in situ hybridization in suspension with chromosome specific DNA probes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed nuclei were protein digested with trypsin and hybridized simultaneously with a biotin- and DIG labeled probe specific for chromosome 8 and the biotin labeled Y chromosome probe. Y chromosome positive or negative nuclei were sorted onto microscope slides and subsequently classified as being leukemic or not by fluorescence microscopy, on the basis of the presence of a trisomy for chromosome 8. A 120-fold enrichment could be achieved when 300 Y positive nuclei were sorted from a mixture originally containing 0.5% leukemia cells. Given the specificity of the flow cytometry and FISH procedure, the combination of the two methods can reach a lower detection level of 1 per 250,000. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Finocchiaro, G; Taroni, F; Rocchi, M; Martin, A L; Colombo, I; Tarelli, G T; DiDonato, S

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPTase; palmitoyl-CoA:L-carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.21), an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH2-terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH2-terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Images PMID:1988962

  19. Male meiosis, heterochromatin characterization and chromosomal location of rDNA in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Hammacerinae)

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, María Georgina; Bressa, María José; Papeschi, Alba Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the present work, we analysed the male meiosis, the content and distribution of heterochromatin and the number and location of nucleolus organizing regions in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900) by means of standard technique, C- and fluorescent bandings, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with an 18S rDNA probe. This species is the second one cytogenetically analysed within the Hammacerinae. Its male diploid chromosome number is 31 (2n=28+X1X2Y), including a minute pair of m-chromosomes. The diploid autosomal number and the presence of m-chromosomes are similar to those reported in Microtomus conspicillaris (Drury, 1782) (2n=28+XY). However, Microtomus lunifer has a multiple sex chromosome system X1X2Y (male) that could have originated by fragmentation of the ancestral X chromosome. Taking into account that Microtomus conspicillaris and Microtomus lunifer are the only two species within Reduviidae that possess m-chromosomes, the presence of this pair could be a synapomorphy for the species of this genus. C- and fluorescent bandings showed that the amount of heterochromatin in Microtomus lunifer was small, and only a small CMA3 bright band was observed in the largest autosomal pair at one terminal region. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe demonstrated that ribosomal genes were terminally placed on the largest autosomal pair. Our present results led us to propose that the location of rDNA genes could be associated with variants of the sex chromosome systems in relation with a kind of the sex chromosome systems within this family. Furthermore, the terminal location of NOR in the largest autosomal pair allowed us to use it as a chromosome marker and, thus, to infer that the kinetic activity of both ends is not a random process, and there is an inversion of this activity. PMID:24260616

  20. A novel relaxase homologue is involved in chromosomal DNA processing for type IV secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Jain, Samta; Turner, Nicholas; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2007-11-01

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae type IV secretion system secretes chromosomal DNA that acts in natural transformation. To examine the mechanism of DNA processing for secretion, we made mutations in the putative relaxase gene traI and used nucleases to characterize the secreted DNA. The nuclease experiments demonstrated that the secreted DNA is single-stranded and blocked at the 5' end. Mutation of traI identified Tyr93 as required for DNA secretion, while substitution of Tyr201 resulted in intermediate levels of DNA secretion. TraI exhibits features of relaxases, but also has features that are absent in previously characterized relaxases, including an HD phosphohydrolase domain and an N-terminal hydrophobic region. The HD domain residue Asp120 was required for wild-type levels of DNA secretion. Subcellular localization studies demonstrated that the TraI N-terminal region promotes membrane interaction. We propose that Tyr93 initiates DNA processing and Tyr201 is required for termination or acts in DNA binding. Disruption of an inverted-repeat sequence eliminated DNA secretion, suggesting that this sequence may serve as the origin of transfer for chromosomal DNA secretion. The TraI domain architecture, although not previously described, is present in 53 uncharacterized proteins, suggesting that the mechanism of TraI function is a widespread process for DNA donation. PMID:17927698

  1. Cooperation of the prs and dnaA gene products for initiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Y

    1993-01-01

    A new Escherichia coli mutant allele, named dnaR, that causes thermosensitive initiation of chromosome replication has been identified to be an allele of the prs gene, the gene for phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (Y. Sakakibara, J. Mol. Biol. 226:979-987, 1992; Y. Sakakibara, J. Mol. Biol. 226:989-996, 1992). The dnaR mutant became temperature resistant by acquisition of a mutation in the dnaA gene that did not affect the intrinsic activity for the initiation of replication. The suppressor mutant was capable of initiating replication from oriC at a high temperature restrictive for the dnaR single mutant. The thermoresistant DNA synthesis was inhibited by the presence of the wild-type dnaA allele at a high but not a low copy number. The synthesis was also inhibited by an elevated dose of a mutant dnaR allele retaining dnaR activity. Therefore, thermoresistant DNA synthesis in the suppressor mutant was dependent on both the dnaA and the dnaR functions. On the basis of these results, I conclude that the initiation of chromosome replication requires cooperation of the prs and dnaA products. PMID:8396119

  2. Chromosome Synapsis Alleviates Mek1-Dependent Suppression of Meiotic DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; MacQueen, Amy J.; Vader, Gerben; Shinohara, Miki; Sanchez, Aurore; Borde, Valérie; Shinohara, Akira; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Faithful meiotic chromosome segregation and fertility require meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes rather than the equally available sister chromatid, a bias that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Mek1 is thought to mediate repair template bias by specifically suppressing sister-directed repair. Instead, we found that when Mek1 persists on closely paired (synapsed) homologues, DNA repair is severely delayed, suggesting that Mek1 suppresses any proximal repair template. Accordingly, Mek1 is excluded from synapsed homologues in wild-type cells. Exclusion requires the AAA+-ATPase Pch2 and is directly coupled to synaptonemal complex assembly. Stage-specific depletion experiments further demonstrate that DNA repair in the context of synapsed homologues requires Rad54, a repair factor inhibited by Mek1. These data indicate that the sister template is distinguished from the homologue primarily by its closer proximity to inhibitory Mek1 activity. We propose that once pairing or synapsis juxtaposes homologues, exclusion of Mek1 is necessary to avoid suppression of all templates and accelerate repair progression. PMID:26870961

  3. Cohesin Is Limiting for the Suppression of DNA Damage–Induced Recombination between Homologous Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Covo, Shay; Westmoreland, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair through homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin) is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage–induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G2/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G2/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage–induced recombinants in G2/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer. PMID:20617204

  4. Physical mapping of DNA markers in the q13-q22 region of the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, C.; Chery, M.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S. ); Cremers, F.P.M.; Bach, I.; Ropers, H.H. )

    1993-07-01

    DNA probe screening of somatic cell hybrids derived from females with X; autosome translocations has enabled definition of eight new breakpoints within the Xq13-q22 region. Together with other X-chromosome rearrangements that have been described earlier, these breakpoints subdivide the Xq21-q22 region into 20 intervals. This panel refines the physical assignment of 40 probes in the Xq21-q22 segment. Thus, these X-chromosome rearrangements are useful tools for ordering X-linked markers and genes on the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  6. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations. PMID:19414523

  7. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and the Evolution of Robertsonian Chromosomal Races of House Mice, Mus Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M. W.; Boyer, S. N.; Searle, J. B.; Aquadro, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    The house mouse, Mus domesticus, includes many distinct Robertsonian (Rb) chromosomal races with diploid numbers from 2n = 22 to 2n = 38. Although these races are highly differentiated karyotypically, they are otherwise indistinguishable from standard karyotype (i.e., 2n = 40) mice, and consequently their evolutionary histories are not well understood. We have examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation from the control region and the ND3 gene region among 56 M. domesticus from Western Europe, including 15 Rb populations and 13 standard karyotype populations, and two individuals of the sister species, Mus musculus. mtDNA exhibited an average sequence divergence of 0.84% within M. domesticus and 3.4% between M. domesticus and M. musculus. The transition/transversion bias for the regions sequenced is 5.7:1, and the overall rate of sequence evolution is approximately 10% divergence per million years. The amount of mtDNA variation was as great among different Rb races as among different populations of standard karyotype mice, suggesting that different Rb races do not derive from a single recent maternal lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA sequences resulted in a parsimony tree which contained six major clades. Each of these clades contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice, consistent with the hypothesis that Rb races have arisen independently multiple times. Discordance between phylogeny and geography was attributable to ancestral polymorphism as a consequence of the recent colonization of Western Europe by mice. Two major mtDNA lineages were geographically localized and contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice. The age of these lineages suggests that mice have moved into Europe only within the last 10,000 years and that Rb populations in different geographic regions arose during this time. PMID:8005418

  9. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: a general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1993-01-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here I describe and analyze a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, approximately 50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomeres should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. PMID:8352277

  10. Centromeric satellite DNA in the newt Triturus cristatus karelinii and related species: its distribution and transcription on lampbrush chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, L; Macgregor, H C

    1985-01-01

    Two abundant satellite DNA sequences have been identified in and cloned from the DNA of Triturus cristatus karelinii. The smaller of these with a repeat unit of 33 base pairs (bp) is designated TkS1, the larger with 68 bp is designated TkS2. These satellites are also present in DNA from T.c. cristatus, T.c. carnifex and T. marmoratus but in substantially lower copy number. In situ hybridisations to lampbrush chromosomes of T.c. karelinii and T.c. cristatus have shown that the satellites are concentrated in the heterochromatic centromere bars of T.c. karelinii and in a region around the centromere granule in T.c. cristatus. The satellites also bind specifically to the centromere regions of mitotic metaphase chromosomes. They do not bind to the heteromorphic arms of chromosome 1, which have previously been shown to be rich in highly repeated DNA. DNA/RNA-transcript in situ hybrids to lampbrush chromosomes with TkS1 suggest that this sequence is occasionally transcribed on lampbrush loops near the centromeres. PMID:2988877

  11. Analysis of 5S rDNA arrays in Arabidopsis thaliana: physical mapping and chromosome-specific polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Cloix, C; Tutois, S; Mathieu, O; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Picard, G; Tourmente, S

    2000-05-01

    A physical map of a pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 containing a 5S rDNA locus and spanning approximately 1000 kb was established using the CIC YAC clones. Three 5S rDNA arrays were resolved in this YAC contig by PFGE analysis and we have mapped different types of sequences between these three blocks. 5S rDNA units from each of these three arrays of chromosome 5, and from chromosomes 3 and 4, were isolated by PCR. A total of 38 new DNA sequences were obtained. Two types of 5S rDNA repeated units exist: the major variant with 0.5-kb repeats and one with short repeats (251 bp) only detected on YAC 11A3 from chromosome 3. Although the 38 sequences displayed noticeable heterogeneity, we were able to group them according to their 5S array origin. The presence of 5S array-specific variants was confirmed with the restriction polymorphism study of all the YACs carrying 5S units. PMID:10810091

  12. Comparative genomic in situ hybridization (cGISH) analysis on plant chromosomes revealed by labelled Arabidopsis DNA.

    PubMed

    Zoller, J F; Yang, Y; Herrmann, R G; Hohmann, U

    2001-01-01

    A new approach for comparative cytogenetic banding analysis of plant chromosomes has been established. The comparative GISH (cGISH) technique is universally applicable to various complex genomes of Monocotyledonae (Triticum aestivum, Agropyron elongatum, Secale cereale, Hordeum vulgare, Allium cepa, Muscari armenaticum and Lilium longiflorum) and Dicotyledonae (Vicia faba, Beta vulgaris, Arabidopsis thaliana). Labelled total genomic DNA of A. thaliana generates signals at conserved chromosome regions. The nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) containing the majority of tandemly repeated rDNA sequences, N-band regions containing satellite DNA, conserved homologous sequences at telomeres and additional chromosome-characteristic markers were detected in heterologous FISH experiments. Multicolour FISH analysis with repetitive DNA probes simultaneously revealed the chromosome assignment of 56 cGISH signals in rye and 61 cGISH signals in barley. Further advantages of this technique are: (1) the fast and straightforward preparation of the probe; (2) the generation of signals with high intensity and reproducibility even without signal amplification; and (3) no requirement of species-specific sequences suitable for molecular karyotype analysis. Hybridization can be performed without competitive DNA. Signal detection without significant background is possible under low stringency conditions. The universal application of this fast and simple one-step fluorescence banding technique for plant cytogenetic and plant genome evolution is discussed. PMID:11448038

  13. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  14. Chromosome site for Epstein-Barr virus DNA in a Burkitt tumor cell line and in lymphocytes growth-transformed in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, A; Ripley, S; Heller, M; Kieff, E

    1983-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome stably persists in latently infected Burkitt tumor cells and growth-transformed B lymphocytes. These cells usually contain multiple copies of episomal viral DNA. Cytological hybridization of recombinant viral DNA fragments to metaphase chromosomes of two latently infected cell lines demonstrates that viral DNA localizes to both chromatids of one homologue of chromosome 1 in Namalwa, a Burkitt tumor cell line, and to both chromatids of one homologue of chromosome 4 in IB4, a cell line with transformed growth properties in vitro. The site of chromosome association remains stable in a clone of IB4 cells. Probes from five separate regions of the EBV genome hybridize to the same chromosome regions. A previously undescribed achromatic site is identified within the region of EBV chromosome cytological hybridization. These observations suggest that most or all of the EBV genome is integrated into the chromosomal DNA of Namalwa and IB4 cells. Although the chromosomal sites of EBV DNA association are among those regions with homology to the EBV IR3 repeated DNA sequence, EBV IR3 did not mediate recombination between EBV and chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:6300885

  15. Y chromosome and HIV DNA Detection in Vaginal Swabs as Biomarkers of Semen and HIV Exposure in Women

    PubMed Central

    Penrose, Kerri J.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Besson, Guillaume; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Herold, Betsy C.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mellors, John; Parikh, Urvi M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The inability to quantify sexual exposure to HIV limits the power of HIV prevention trials of vaccines, microbicides and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in women. We investigated detection of HIV-1 and Y chromosomal (Yc) DNA in vaginal swabs from 83 participants in the HPTN 035 microbicide trial as biomarkers of HIV exposure and unprotected sexual activity. Methods 143 vaginal swabs from 85 women were evaluated for the presence of Y chromosomal DNA (Quantifiler Duo DNA quantification kit, Applied Biosystems) and total HIV-1 DNA (single copy in-house qPCR assay). Y DNA detection was paired with self-reported behavioral data with regard to recent coitus (≤ 1 week prior to collection) and condom usage (100% vs. <100% compliance). Results Yc DNA was detected in 62/143 (43%) swabs. For the 126 visits at which both behavioral data and swabs were collected, Yc DNA was significantly more frequent in women reporting <100% condom usage (OR 10.69; 95% confidence interval: 2.27 – 50.32; p=0.003). Notably, 27 of 83 (33%) swabs from women reporting 100% condom usage were positive for Yc DNA. HIV DNA was only detected in swabs collected post-seroconversion. Conclusions The use of Yc DNA in HIV prevention trials could reliably identify sub-groups of women who have unprotected sexual activity and could provide valuable exposure-based estimates of efficacy. PMID:25299415

  16. Rapid construction of a Bacterial Artificial Chromosomal (BAC) expression vector using designer DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhao, Xinqing; Jin, Yingyu; Zhao, Zongbao Kent; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomal (BAC) vectors are increasingly being used in cloning large DNA fragments containing complex biosynthetic pathways to facilitate heterologous production of microbial metabolites for drug development. To express inserted genes using Streptomyces species as the production hosts, an integration expression cassette is required to be inserted into the BAC vector, which includes genetic elements encoding a phage-specific attachment site, an integrase, an origin of transfer, a selection marker and a promoter. Due to the large sizes of DNA inserted into the BAC vectors, it is normally inefficient and time-consuming to assemble these fragments by routine PCR amplifications and restriction-ligations. Here we present a rapid method to insert fragments to construct BAC-based expression vectors. A DNA fragment of about 130 bp was designed, which contains upstream and downstream homologous sequences of both BAC vector and pIB139 plasmid carrying the whole integration expression cassette. In-Fusion cloning was performed using the designer DNA fragment to modify pIB139, followed by λ-RED-mediated recombination to obtain the BAC-based expression vector. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this method by rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector with an insert of about 120 kb that contains the entire gene cluster for biosynthesis of immunosuppressant FK506. The empty BAC-based expression vector constructed in this study can be conveniently used for construction of BAC libraries using either microbial pure culture or environmental DNA, and the selected BAC clones can be directly used for heterologous expression. Alternatively, if a BAC library has already been constructed using a commercial BAC vector, the selected BAC vectors can be manipulated using the method described here to get the BAC-based expression vectors with desired gene clusters for heterologous expression. The rapid construction of a BAC-based expression vector facilitates

  17. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    PubMed

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  18. Clonability and gene distribution on human chromosome 21: reflections of junk DNA content?

    PubMed

    Gardiner, K

    1997-12-31

    Data from transcriptional mapping of human chromosome 21 have been compiled from a number of sources. Regardless of the gene identification technique used, a consistent picture has developed: the centromere proximal half of 21q, which contains 50% of the DNA (20 Mb), harbors only 10% of the expressed sequences. Because of the variety of gene isolation techniques used, this result is unlikely to arise simply from methodological artefacts, biases in clonability or tissue specificity of expression. This region is known to be AT-rich and to contain APP, the largest gene (spanning 300 kb) currently analyzed on 21q. Interesting preliminary data from analysis of the Fugu rubripes homolog of APP has shown an unusually high, 50-fold, compaction of intron size, raising the intriguing possibility that >90% of the DNA in the human gene may be functionless. Thus, data from a variety of approaches suggest that a large part of 21q very likely has neither coding capacity nor associated regulatory function. By these criteria, it is a good candidate for a repository of junk DNA. PMID:9461378

  19. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal stratification in Iran: relationship between Iran and the Arabian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Terreros, Maria C; Rowold, Diane J; Mirabal, Sheyla; Herrera, Rene J

    2011-03-01

    Modern day Iran is strategically located in the tri-continental corridor uniting Africa, Europe and Asia. Several ethnic groups belonging to distinct religions, speaking different languages and claiming divergent ancestries inhabit the region, generating a potentially diverse genetic reservoir. In addition, past pre-historical and historical events such as the out-of-Africa migrations, the Neolithic expansion from the Fertile Crescent, the Indo-Aryan treks from the Central Asian steppes, the westward Mongol expansions and the Muslim invasions may have chiseled their genetic fingerprints within the genealogical substrata of the Persians. On the other hand, the Iranian perimeter is bounded by the Zagros and Albrez mountain ranges, and the Dasht-e Kavir and Dash-e Lut deserts, which may have restricted gene flow from neighboring regions. By utilizing high-resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers and reanalyzing our previously published Y-chromosomal data, we have found a previously unexplored, genetic connection between Iranian populations and the Arabian Peninsula, likely the result of both ancient and recent gene flow. Furthermore, the regional distribution of mtDNA haplogroups J, I, U2 and U7 also provides evidence of barriers to gene flow posed by the two major Iranian deserts and the Zagros mountain range. PMID:21326310

  20. Chromatin dynamics during repair of chromosomal DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manisha; Peterson, Craig L

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of a eukaryotic genome is often challenged by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Even a single, unrepaired DSB can be a lethal event, or such unrepaired damage can result in chromosomal instability and loss of genetic information. Furthermore, defects in the pathways that respond to and repair DSBs can lead to the onset of several human pathologic disorders with pleiotropic clinical features, including age-related diseases and cancer. For decades, studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved in recognizing, signaling and repairing DSBs within eukaryotic cells. The majority of biochemical and genetic studies have used simple, DNA substrates, whereas only recently efforts have been geared towards understanding how the repair machinery deals with DSBs within chromatin fibers, the nucleoprotein complex that packages DNA within the eukaryotic nucleus. The aim of this review is to discuss our recent understanding of the relationship between chromatin structure and the repair of DSBs by homologous recombination. In particular, we discuss recent studies implicating specialized roles for several, distinct ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in facilitating multiple steps within the homologous recombination process. PMID:20495614

  1. Nucleotide sequence heterogeneity of alpha satellite repetitive DNA: a survey of alphoid sequences from different human chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1987-01-01

    The human alpha satellite DNA family is composed of diverse, tandemly reiterated monomer units of approximately 171 basepairs localized to the centromeric region of each chromosome. These sequences are organized in a highly chromosome-specific manner with many, if not all human chromosomes being characterized by individually distinct alphoid subsets. Here, we compare the nucleotide sequences of 153 monomer units, representing alphoid components of at least 12 different human chromosomes. Based on the analysis of sequence variation at each position within the 171 basepair monomer, we have derived a consensus sequence for the monomer unit of human alpha satellite DNA which we suggest may reflect the monomer sequence from which different chromosomal subsets have evolved. Sequence heterogeneity is evident at each position within the consensus monomer unit and there are no positions of strict nucleotide sequence conservation, although some regions are more variable than others. A substantial proportion of the overall sequence variation may be accounted for by nucleotide changes which are characteristic of monomer components of individual chromosomal subsets or groups of subsets which have a common evolutionary history. PMID:3658703

  2. Chromosomal localization and molecular characterization of three different 5S ribosomal DNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Fabio; Bellavia, Daniele; Clemente, Ann Maria; Sisino, Giorgia; Barbieri, Rainer

    2007-09-01

    In this paper the chromosomal localization and molecular cloning and characterization of three 5S rDNA clusters of 700 bp (base pairs), 900 bp, and 950 bp in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus are reported. Southern blot hybridization demonstrated the existence of three 5S rDNA repeats of differing length in the P. lividus genome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, performed in parallel on both haploid and diploid metaphases and interphase nuclei using different 5S rDNA units as probes, localized these 5S rDNA clusters in 3 different pairs of P. lividus chromosomes. This is the first complete gene mapping not only in a sea urchin but also in the phylum of echinoderms as a whole. PMID:17893727

  3. Expression of accumulated capacity for initiation of chromosome and minichromosome replication in dnaA mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    LaDuca, R J; Helmstetter, C E

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome and minichromosome replication were examined in temperature-sensitive dnaA mutants of Escherichia coli growing at temperatures between permissive and nonpermissive. Periodicities in [14C]thymidine uptake were detected as cultures incubated at intermediate temperatures approached late exponential-early stationary phase of growth. Exposure of the cultures to a nutritional shift-up caused a stimulation of chromosome replication associated with a rapid initiation of new rounds of replication, very similar to that observed after exposure to chloramphenicol. Addition of rifampin also caused a stimulation, but to a much lesser extent. The induced initiations of chromosome replication took place in two waves, as was the case when the cultures were simply shifted to permissive temperature. Minichromosomes were also stimulated to replicate by the addition of chloramphenicol at intermediate temperatures, providing further evidence that the chromosomal region which responded to the chloramphenicol treatment was in the vicinity of oriC. The findings are consistent with the conclusion that the initiations induced by chloramphenicol are consequences of the involvement of the dnaA gene product in a transcriptional step at initiation, as suggested by Orr et al. The results also suggest that the activity of the dnaA gene product is not normally involved in controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication. PMID:6304012

  4. Spatial Positioning of All 24 Chromosomes in the Lymphocytes of Six Subjects: Evidence of Reproducible Positioning and Spatial Repositioning following DNA Damage with Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultraviolet B

    PubMed Central

    Kandukuri, Lakshmi; Quadri, Ameer; Becerra, Victor; Simpson, Joe Leigh

    2015-01-01

    The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1) More peripheral radial organization; 2) Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3) More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively). Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:25756782

  5. Spatial positioning of all 24 chromosomes in the lymphocytes of six subjects: evidence of reproducible positioning and spatial repositioning following DNA damage with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Kandukuri, Lakshmi; Quadri, Ameer; Becerra, Victor; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Tempest, Helen G

    2015-01-01

    The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1) More peripheral radial organization; 2) Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3) More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively). Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:25756782

  6. A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Hamer, D H; Hu, S; Magnuson, V L; Hu, N; Pattatucci, A M

    1993-07-16

    The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0 (P = 10(-5), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced. PMID:8332896

  7. A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamer, D.H.; Hu, S.; Magnuson, V.L.; Hu, N.; Pattatucci, A.M.L.

    1993-07-16

    The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0(P = 10[sup [minus]5]), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced.

  8. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  9. Arabidopsis CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY 7 (AtCTF7/ECO1) is required for DNA repair, mitosis and meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños-Villegas, Pablo; Yang, Xiaohui; Wang, Huei-Jing; Juan, Chien-Ta; Chuang, Min-Hsiang; Makaroff, Christopher A; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    The proper transmission of DNA in dividing cells is crucial for the survival of eukaryotic organisms. During cell division, faithful segregation of replicated chromosomes requires their tight attachment, known as sister chromatid cohesion, until anaphase. Sister chromatid cohesion is established during S-phase in a process requiring an acetyltransferase that in yeast is known as Establishment of cohesion 1 (Eco1). Inactivation of Eco1 typically disrupts chromosome segregation and homologous recombination-dependent DNA repair in dividing cells, ultimately resulting in lethality. We report here the isolation and detailed characterization of two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for the Arabidopsis thaliana Eco1 homolog, CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY 7/ESTABLISHMENT OF COHESION 1 (CTF7/ECO1), called ctf7-1 and ctf7-2. Mutants exhibited dwarfism, poor anther development and sterility. Analysis of somatic tissues by flow cytometry, scanning electron microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR identified defects in DNA repair and cell division, including an increase in the area of leaf epidermal cells, an increase in DNA content and the upregulation of genes involved in DNA repair including BRCA1 and PARP2. No significant change was observed in the expression of genes that influence entry into the endocycle. Analysis of meiocytes identified changes in chromosome morphology and defective segregation; the abundance of chromosomal-bound cohesion subunits was also reduced. Transcript levels for several meiotic genes, including the recombinase genes DMC1 and RAD51C and the S-phase licensing factor CDC45 were elevated in mutant anthers. Taken together our results demonstrate that Arabidopsis CTF7/ECO1 plays important roles in the preservation of genome integrity and meiosis. PMID:23750584

  10. Low-pass DNA sequencing of 1200 Sardinians reconstructs European Y-chromosome phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Francalacci, Paolo; Morelli, Laura; Angius, Andrea; Berutti, Riccardo; Reinier, Frederic; Atzeni, Rossano; Pilu, Rosella; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Zara, Ilenia; Sanna, Daria; Useli, Antonella; Urru, Maria Francesca; Marcelli, Marco; Cusano, Roberto; Oppo, Manuela; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Pitzalis, Maristella; Deidda, Francesca; Porcu, Eleonora; Poddie, Fausto; Kang, Hyun Min; Lyons, Robert; Tarrier, Brendan; Gresham, Jennifer Bragg; Li, Bingshan; Tofanelli, Sergio; Alonso, Santos; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Mulas, Antonella; Whalen, Michael B; Uzzau, Sergio; Jones, Chris; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Cucca, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Genetic variation within the male-specific portion of the Y chromosome (MSY) can clarify the origins of contemporary populations, but previous studies were hampered by partial genetic information. Population sequencing of 1204 Sardinian males identified 11,763 MSY single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 6751 of which have not previously been observed. We constructed a MSY phylogenetic tree containing all main haplogroups found in Europe, along with many Sardinian-specific lineage clusters within each haplogroup. The tree was calibrated with archaeological data from the initial expansion of the Sardinian population ~7700 years ago. The ages of nodes highlight different genetic strata in Sardinia and reveal the presumptive timing of coalescence with other human populations. We calculate a putative age for coalescence of ~180,000 to 200,000 years ago, which is consistent with previous mitochondrial DNA-based estimates. PMID:23908240

  11. Mating patterns amongst Siberian reindeer herders: inferences from mtDNA and Y-chromosomal analyses.

    PubMed

    Pakendorf, Brigitte; Novgorodov, Innokentij N; Osakovskij, Vladimir L; Stoneking, Mark

    2007-07-01

    The Evenks and Evens, who speak closely related languages belonging to the Northern Tungusic branch of the Tungusic family, are nomadic reindeer herders and hunters. They are spread over an immense territory in northeastern Siberia, and consequently different subgroups are in contact with diverse peoples speaking Samoyedic, Turkic, Mongolic, Chukotka-Kamchatkan, and Yukaghir languages. Nevertheless, the languages and culture of the Evenks and Evens are similar enough for them to have been classified as a single ethnic group in the past. This linguistic and cultural similarity indicates that they may have spread over their current area of habitation relatively recently, and thus may be closely related genetically. On the other hand, the great distances that separate individual groups of Evens and Evenks from each other might have led to preferential mating with geographic neighbors rather than with linguistically related peoples. In this study, we assess the correlation between linguistic and genetic relationship in three different subgroups of Evenks and Evens, respectively, via mtDNA and Y-chromosomal analyses. The results show that there is some evidence of a common origin based on shared mtDNA lineages and relatively similar Y-haplogroup frequencies amongst most of the Evenk and Even subgroups. However, there is little sharing of Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes, indicating that males within Evenk and Even subgroups have remained relatively isolated. There is further evidence of some female admixture in different Even subgroups with their respective geographic neighbors. However, the Tungusic groups, and especially the Evenks, show signs of genetic drift, making inferences about their prehistory difficult. PMID:17492671

  12. Proximal chromosome 3p harbors a DNA segment frequently deleted in small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.; Drabkin, H.A.; Gemmill, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that potential tumor suppressor genes involved in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) reside at three separate locations on human chromosome 3p including 3p25, 3p21.3 and 3p14-cen. The most proximal region (3p14-cen) was first identified by a homozygous deletion of 7-10 Mb found in a SCLC cell line U2020. Daly et al. (1991) reported allele loss in a tumor sample from the 3p14-cen region in an SCLC tumor sample which retained heterozygosity distally and this same segment has been implicated in both sporadic and familial kidney cancer. Other evidence suggests that deletion of this proximal region may be an early event in SCLC development. Our analysis of 31 SCLC cell lines with 26 microsatellite repeat DNA markers (most of which fall into the region 3p14-cen) indicates that the majority of SCLC samples lose an entire copy of 3p. However, from those cell lines which retain distal heterozygosity, there is evidence for potential regions of loss in 3p13 and 3p14. Analysis of matched pairs of normal/tumor samples from SCLC patients has confirmed nearly complete loss of 3p in most cases and has provided further evidence of loss in the region 3p14-cen. All samples that retain heterozygosity at the distal markers are being analyzed with the complete set of 3p markers in order to refine the location of any potential tumor suppressor gene(s). This information along with the DNA contig physical map we have constructed of this portion of the chromosome should allow rapid isolation of potential tumor suppressor loci involved in SCLC and possibly other forms of cancer.

  13. Comparative molecular phylogeny and evolution of sex chromosome DNA sequences in the family Canidae (Mammalia: Carnivora).

    PubMed

    Tsubouchi, Ayako; Fukui, Daisuke; Ueda, Miya; Tada, Kazumi; Toyoshima, Shouji; Takami, Kazutoshi; Tsujimoto, Tsunenori; Uraguchi, Kohji; Raichev, Evgeniy; Kaneko, Yayoi; Tsunoda, Hiroshi; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the molecular phylogeny and evolution of the family Canidae, nucleotide sequences of the zinc-finger-protein gene on the Y chromosome (ZFY, 924-1146 bp) and its homologous gene on the X chromosome (ZFX, 834-839 bp) for twelve canid species were determined. The phylogenetic relationships among species reconstructed by the paternal ZFY sequences closely agreed with those by mtDNA and autosomal DNA trees in previous reports, and strongly supported the phylogenetic affinity between the wolf-like canids clade and the South American canids clade. However, the branching order of some species differed between phylogenies of ZFY and ZFX genes: Cuon alpinus and Canis mesomelas were included in the wolf-like canid clades in the ZFY tree, whereas both species were clustered in a group of Chrysocyon brachyurus and Speothos venaticus in the ZFX tree. The topology difference between ZFY and ZFX trees may have resulted from the two-times higher substitution rate of the former than the latter, which was clarified in the present study. In addition, two types of transposable element sequence (SINE-I and SINE-II) were found to occur in the ZFY final intron of the twelve canid species examined. Because the SINE-I sequences were shared by all the species, they may have been inserted into the ZFY of the common ancestor before species radiation in Canidae. By contract, SINE-II found in only Canis aureus could have been inserted into ZFY independently after the speciation. The molecular diversity of SINE sequences of Canidae reflects evolutionary history of the species radiation. PMID:22379982

  14. Effect of lead chromate on chromosome aberration, sister-chromatid exchange and DNA damage in mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Douglas, G R; Bell, R D; Grant, C E; Wytsma, J M; Bora, K C

    1980-02-01

    Possible mutagenic activity of lead chromate in mammalian cells was studied using assays for chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges in cultured human lymphocytes, and DNA fragmentation as detected by alkaline-sucrose gradient sedimentation in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Lead chromate caused dose-related increases in chromosome aberration and sister-chromatid exchange in human lymphocytes. No increase in DNA damage was observed in CHO cells, possibly due to the relative insensitivity of the CHO cells and the limited solubility of lead chromate in tissue culture medium. The mutagenicity of lead chromate in human lymphocytes appears to be entirely due to the chromate ion since chromosome aberrations were induced by potassium chromate but not lead chloride. PMID:7374664

  15. Variability of 18rDNA loci in four lace bug species (Hemiptera, Tingidae) with the same chromosome number

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Natalia V.; Golub, Viktor B.; Kuznetsova, Valentina G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male karyotypes of Elasmotropis testacea (Herrich-Schaeffer, 1835), Tingis cardui (Linnaeus, 1758), Tingis crispata (Herrich-Schaeffer, 1838), and Agramma femorale Thomson, 1871 (Heteroptera, Cimicomorpha, Tingidae) were analyzed using conventional chromosome staining and FISH with 18S rDNA and (TTAGG)n telomeric probes. The FISH technique was applied for the first time in the Tingidae. In spite of the fact that all species showed the same chromosome number (2n = 12 + XY), they have significant differences in the number and position of rDNA loci. FISH with the classical insect (TTAGG)n probe produced no signals on chromosomes suggesting telomeres in lace bugs to be of some other molecular composition. Tingidae share absence of the (TTAGG)n telomeric sequence with all so far studied taxa of the advanced true bug infraorders Cimicomorpha and Pentatomomorpha. PMID:26753071

  16. The Papaya Y Chromosome Evolved Recently and Shows Gene Paucity and DNA Sequence Expansion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants, in contrast to those in animals, evolved relatively recently and only a few are heteromorphic. At cytological level, the sex chromosomes of papaya appear homomorphic, nevertheless, we are finding the papaya Y chromosome shows features of incipient sex chromosome ...

  17. Landscape of DNA methylation on the X chromosome reflects CpG density, functional chromatin state and X-chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Allison M.; Price, E. Magda; Jones, Meaghan J.; Balaton, Bradley P.; Kobor, Michael S.; Brown, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) achieves dosage compensation between males and females through the silencing of the majority of genes on one of the female X chromosomes. Thus, the female X chromosomes provide a unique opportunity to study euchromatin and heterochromatin of allelic regions within the same nuclear environment. We examined the interplay of DNA methylation (DNAm) with CpG density, transcriptional activity and chromatin state at genes on the X chromosome using over 1800 female samples analysed with the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip. DNAm was used to predict an inactivation status for 63 novel transcription start sites (TSSs) across 27 tissues. There was high concordance of inactivation status across tissues, with 62% of TSSs subject to XCI in all 27 tissues examined, whereas 9% escaped from XCI in all tissues, and the remainder showed variable escape from XCI between females in subsets of tissues. Inter-female and twin data supported a model of predominately cis-acting influences on inactivation status. The level of expression from the inactive X relative to the active X correlated with the amount of female promoter DNAm to a threshold of ∼30%, beyond which genes were consistently subject to inactivation. The inactive X showed lower DNAm than the active X at intragenic and intergenic regions for genes subject to XCI, but not at genes that escape from inactivation. Our categorization of genes that escape from X inactivation provides candidates for sex-specific differences in disease. PMID:25381334

  18. Isolation and characterization of 21 novel expressed DNA sequences from the distal region of human chromosome 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Yoshikazu; Hadano, Shinji; Nagayama, Tomiko

    1994-07-15

    The authors have established an approach to the isolation of expressed DNA sequences from a defined region of the human chromosome. The method relies on the direct screening of cDNA libraries using pooled single-copy microclones generated by a laser chromosome microdissection in conjunction with a single unique primer polymerase chain reaction (SUP-PCR) procedure. They applied this method to the distal region of human chromosome 4p (4p15-4pter), which contains the Huntington disease (HD) and the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) loci. Twenty-one nonoverlapping and region-specific cDNA clones encoding novel genes were isolated in this manner. Ten of 21 clones were subregionally assigned to 4p16.1-4pter, and the remainder mapped to the region proximal to 4p16.1. Northern blot and reverse transcription followed by the PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that 16 of these 21 clones detected transcripts in total RNA from human tissues. The method is applicable to other chromosomal regions and is a powerful approach to the isolation of region-specific cDNA clones. 44 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Comparison of chromosomal aberrations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with clinical parameters, DNA ploidy and Ki 67 expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y.; Igawa, M.; Shiina, H.; Shigeno, K.; Yokogi, H.; Urakami, S.; Yoneda, T.; Maruyama, R.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of chromosomal aberrations in renal cell carcinoma, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine its prevalence and correlation with clinical parameters of malignancy. In addition, correlation of chromosomal aberration with Ki 67 expression was analysed. We performed FISH with chromosome-specific DNA probes, and the signal number of pericentromeric sequences on chromosomes 3, 7, 9 and 17 was detected within interphase nuclei in touch preparations from tumour specimen. The incidence of loss of chromosome 3 was significantly higher than those of chromosomes 7, 9 and 17 (P < 0.001, P = 0.03 and P < 0.001 respectively). Hyperdiploid aberration of chromosomes 3 and 17 was significantly correlated with tumour stage (P = 0.03, P = 0.02 respectively), whereas hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 9 was associated with nuclear grade (P = 0.04). Disomy of chromosome 7 was correlated with venous involvement (P = 0.04). Ki 67 expression was significantly associated with hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 17 (P = 0.01), but not with aberration of chromosome 3. There was a significant relationship between hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 7 and Ki 67 expression (P = 0.01). In conclusions, gain of chromosome 17 may reflect tumour development, and aberration of chromosome 7 may affect metastatic potential of malignancy, whereas loss of chromosome 3 may be associated with early stage of tumour development in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:9667682

  20. Construction and analysis of an hn-cDNA library derived from the p-arm of pig chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Anderson Dear, D V; Miller, J R

    1996-09-01

    Our aim is to find unidentified genes on specific pig chromosomes or chromosome fragments. Our approach has involved the construction of a heterogeneous nuclear complementary (hn-c) DNA library of the p-arm of pig Chromosome (Chr) 12, the only pig chromosome present in the pig x hamster hybrid cell line 8990. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and first-strand synthesis of hn-cDNA carried out with random and oligo dT primers. Pig hn-cDNA was isolated by amplification of first-strand synthesized hn-cDNA with primers specific for Short Interspersed Repeat Elements (SINEs) via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hn-cDNAs were size selected and cloned in E. coli XL-1 blue cells with PCR-Script as the vector. The library consisted of 6000 clones. Clone inserts were amplified by PCR with vector-specific primers, and randomly picked inserts greater than 600 bp were sequenced. Homology searches were carried out with the FASTA search program on the GenEmbl database. Thirty clones were sequenced, and of these three showed strong homologies to GenEmbl sequences: (1) to sheep, mouse, human, and rat mammary gland factor (MGF); (2) to MLN-50, a gene that is amplified in human familial breast cancer and is present on human Chr 17; the latter is homologous to pig chromosome 12; (3) to a family of unassigned overlapping human ESTs. Of the other sequenced clones, seven were over 80% homologous with pig SINE sequences; three were over 75% homologous to human LINE sequences; six displayed open reading frames over a mean distance equivalent to 50 amino acids, although these showed no significant similarities with sequences in the databases. Using this approach, we have been able to identify several new genes on the p-arm of pig Chr 12. This is the first report of gene isolation from a library derived from a pig chromosome fragment. PMID:8703117

  1. Use of laser microdissection for the construction of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 (Cannabaceae) sex chromosome-specific DNA library and cytogenetics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yakovin, Nickolay A.; Divashuk, Mikhail G.; Razumova, Olga V.; Soloviev, Alexander A.; Karlov, Gennady I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dioecy is relatively rare among plant species, and distinguishable sex chromosomes have been reported in few dioecious species. The multiple sex chromosome system (XX/XY1Y2) of Humulus japonicus Siebold et Zuccarini, 1846 differs from that of other members of the family Cannabaceae, in which the XX/XY chromosome system is present. Sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus were isolated from meiotic chromosome spreads of males by laser microdissection with the P.A.L.M. MicroLaser system. The chromosomal DNA was directly amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR). Fast fluorescence in situ hybridization (FAST-FISH) using a labeled, chromosome-specific DOP-PCR product as a probe showed preferential hybridization to sex chromosomes. In addition, the DOP-PCR product was used to construct a short-insert, Humulus japonicus sex chromosomes-specific DNA library. The randomly sequenced clones showed that about 12% of them have significant homology to Humulus lupulus and 88% to Cannabis sativa Linnaeus, 1753 sequences from GenBank database. Forty-four percent of the sequences show homology to plant retroelements. It was concluded that laser microdissection is a useful tool for isolating the DNA of sex chromosomes of Humulus japonicus and for the construction of chromosome-specific DNA libraries for the study of the structure and evolution of sex chromosomes. The results provide the potential for identifying unique or sex chromosome-specific sequence elements in Humulus japonicus and could aid in the identification of sex chromosome-specific repeat and coding regions through chromosome isolation and genome complexity reduction. PMID:25610546

  2. Increased levels of chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in a group of workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange; Carvalho, Sandra; Costa, Carla; Coelho, Patrícia; Silva, Susana; Santos, Luís S; Gaspar, Jorge F; Porto, Beatriz; Laffon, Blanca; Teixeira, João P

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a commonly used chemical in anatomy and pathology laboratories as a tissue preservative and fixative. Because of its sensitising properties, irritating effects and cancer implication, FA accounts probably for the most important chemical-exposure hazard concerning this professional group. Evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting, particularly in regard to the ability of inhaled FA to induce toxicity on other cells besides first contact tissues, such as buccal and nasal cells. To evaluate the effects of exposure to FA in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, a group of 84 anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed occupationally to FA and 87 control subjects were tested for chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and DNA damage (comet assay). The level of exposure to FA in the workplace air was evaluated. The association between genotoxicity biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic-metabolising and DNA repair enzymes were also assessed. The estimated mean level of FA exposure was 0.38±0.03 ppm. All cytogenetic endpoints assessed by CAs test and comet assay % tail DNA (%TDNA) were significantly higher in FA-exposed workers compared with controls. Regarding the effect of susceptibility biomarkers, results suggest that polymorphisms in CYP2E1 and GSTP1 metabolic genes, as well as, XRCC1 and PARP1 polymorphic genes involved in DNA repair pathways are associated with higher genetic damage in FA-exposed subjects. Data obtained in this study show a potential health risk situation of anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed to FA (0.38 ppm). Implementation of security and hygiene measures may be crucial to decrease risk. The obtained information may also provide new important data to be used by health care programs and by governmental agencies responsible for occupational health and safety. PMID:25711496

  3. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome diversity and the peopling of the Americas: evolutionary and demographic evidence.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Theodore G; Sherry, Stephen T

    2004-01-01

    A number of important insights into the peopling of the New World have been gained through molecular genetic studies of Siberian and Native American populations. While there is no complete agreement on the interpretation of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome (NRY) data from these groups, several generalizations can be made. To begin with, the primary migration of ancestral Asians expanded from south-central Siberia into the New World and gave rise to ancestral Amerindians. The initial migration seems to have occurred between 20,000-15,000 calendar years before present (cal BP), i.e., before the emergence of Clovis lithic sites (13,350-12,895 cal BP) in North America. Because an interior route through northern North America was unavailable for human passage until 12,550 cal BP, after the last glacial maximum (LGM), these ancestral groups must have used a coastal route to reach South America by 14,675 cal BP, the date of the Monte Verde site in southern Chile. The initial migration appears to have brought mtDNA haplogroups A-D and NRY haplogroups P-M45a and Q-242/Q-M3 to the New World, with these genetic lineages becoming widespread in the Americas. A second expansion that perhaps coincided with the opening of the ice-free corridor probably brought mtDNA haplogroup X and NRY haplogroups P-M45b, C-M130, and R1a1-M17 to North and Central America. Finally, populations that formerly inhabited Beringia expanded into northern North America after the LGM, and gave rise to Eskimo-Aleuts and Na-Dené Indians. PMID:15214060

  4. The SUMO Isopeptidase Ulp2p Is Required to Prevent Recombination-Induced Chromosome Segregation Lethality following DNA Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Ta; Bakir, Abla A.; Nguyen, Kristen N.; Bachant, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    SUMO conjugation is a key regulator of the cellular response to DNA replication stress, acting in part to control recombination at stalled DNA replication forks. Here we examine recombination-related phenotypes in yeast mutants defective for the SUMO de-conjugating/chain-editing enzyme Ulp2p. We find that spontaneous recombination is elevated in ulp2 strains and that recombination DNA repair is essential for ulp2 survival. In contrast to other SUMO pathway mutants, however, the frequency of spontaneous chromosome rearrangements is markedly reduced in ulp2 strains, and some types of rearrangements arising through recombination can apparently not be tolerated. In investigating the basis for this, we find DNA repair foci do not disassemble in ulp2 cells during recovery from the replication fork-blocking drug methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), corresponding with an accumulation of X-shaped recombination intermediates. ulp2 cells satisfy the DNA damage checkpoint during MMS recovery and commit to chromosome segregation with similar kinetics to wild-type cells. However, sister chromatids fail to disjoin, resulting in abortive chromosome segregation and cell lethality. This chromosome segregation defect can be rescued by overproducing the anti-recombinase Srs2p, indicating that recombination plays an underlying causal role in blocking chromatid separation. Overall, our results are consistent with a role for Ulp2p in preventing the formation of DNA lesions that must be repaired through recombination. At the same time, Ulp2p is also required to either suppress or resolve recombination-induced attachments between sister chromatids. These opposing defects may synergize to greatly increase the toxicity of DNA replication stress. PMID:21483811

  5. Glutathione Depletion and Carbon Ion Radiation Potentiate Clustered DNA Lesions, Cell Death and Prevent Chromosomal Changes in Cancer Cells Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Hanot, Maïté; Boivin, Anthony; Malésys, Céline; Beuve, Michaël; Colliaux, Anthony; Foray, Nicolas; Douki, Thierry; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Poor local control and tumor escape are of major concern in head-and-neck cancers treated by conventional radiotherapy or hadrontherapy. Reduced glutathione (GSH) is suspected of playing an important role in mechanisms leading to radioresistance, and its depletion should enable oxidative stress insult, thereby modifying the nature of DNA lesions and the subsequent chromosomal changes that potentially lead to tumor escape. This study aimed to highlight the impact of a GSH-depletion strategy (dimethylfumarate, and l-buthionine sulfoximine association) combined with carbon ion or X-ray irradiation on types of DNA lesions (sparse or clustered) and the subsequent transmission of chromosomal changes to the progeny in a radioresistant cell line (SQ20B) expressing a high endogenous GSH content. Results are compared with those of a radiosensitive cell line (SCC61) displaying a low endogenous GSH level. DNA damage measurements (γH2AX/comet assay) demonstrated that a transient GSH depletion in resistant SQ20B cells potentiated the effects of irradiation by initially increasing sparse DNA breaks and oxidative lesions after X-ray irradiation, while carbon ion irradiation enhanced the complexity of clustered oxidative damage. Moreover, residual DNA double-strand breaks were measured whatever the radiation qualities. The nature of the initial DNA lesions and amount of residual DNA damage were similar to those observed in sensitive SCC61 cells after both types of irradiation. Misrepaired or unrepaired lesions may lead to chromosomal changes, estimated in cell progeny by the cytome assay. Both types of irradiation induced aberrations in nondepleted resistant SQ20B and sensitive SCC61 cells. The GSH-depletion strategy prevented the transmission of aberrations (complex rearrangements and chromosome break or loss) in radioresistant SQ20B only when associated with carbon ion irradiation. A GSH-depleting strategy combined with hadrontherapy may thus have considerable advantage in the

  6. Taiwan Y-chromosomal DNA variation and its relationship with Island Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Much of the data resolution of the haploid non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplogroup O in East Asia are still rudimentary and could be an explanatory factor for current debates on the settlement history of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). Here, 81 slowly evolving markers (mostly SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats were used to achieve higher level molecular resolution. Our aim is to investigate if the distribution of NRY DNA variation in Taiwan and ISEA is consistent with a single pre-Neolithic expansion scenario from Southeast China to all ISEA, or if it better fits an expansion model from Taiwan (the OOT model), or whether a more complex history of settlement and dispersals throughout ISEA should be envisioned. Results We examined DNA samples from 1658 individuals from Vietnam, Thailand, Fujian, Taiwan (Han, plain tribes and 14 indigenous groups), the Philippines and Indonesia. While haplogroups O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 follow a decreasing cline from Taiwan towards Western Indonesia, O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 decline northward from Western Indonesia towards Taiwan. Compared to the Taiwan plain tribe minority groups the Taiwanese Austronesian speaking groups show little genetic paternal contribution from Han. They are also characterized by low Y-chromosome diversity, thus testifying for fast drift in these populations. However, in contrast to data provided from other regions of the genome, Y-chromosome gene diversity in Taiwan mountain tribes significantly increases from North to South. Conclusion The geographic distribution and the diversity accumulated in the O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 haplogroups on one hand, and in the O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 haplogroups on the other, support a pincer model of dispersals and gene flow from the mainland to the islands which likely started during the late upper Paleolithic, 18,000 to 15

  7. Intermittency and Changing Stability of Oxidative Activity of DNA in Chromosomes Inside Living Cells for Medical Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galich, N. E.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the experimental data on fluorescence of DNA complexes inside neutrophils in flow cytometry with nanometer spatial resolution. Fluorescence visualizes oxidative activity of DNA and unusual statistics for DNA complex of full set of chromosomes. The exponential increasing of high-order central moments for fluctuations of fluorescence intensity characterizes the existence of intermittency in oxidative activity of DNA. Intermittency depends on the scales (on rank) of DNA networks in given cells. In the large-scale networks (with the scales >12% size of the cells), here occurs the switching to the exponential decreasing of high-order central moments for fluctuations intensity, i.e. stable oxidative activity of DNA as it is assumed for small-scale gene networks. Distributions of Hölder’s averages and high-order moments for fluctuations intensity depend on the health status and can be used for high sensitive diagnostics of health. Intermittency of large-scale correlations reflects general natural property of DNA activity and immune response on various perturbations. Intermittency reflects the mutual actions of all large-scale correlations in dense fractal networks for DNA activity and synchronization of all excitations and correlations of all chromosomes in the cells.

  8. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  9. Identification of a tumor marker chromosome by flow sorting, DNA amplification in vitro, and in situ hybridization of the amplified product

    SciTech Connect

    Boschman, G.; Rens, W.; Slater, R.; Aten, J. ); Buys, C.; Veen, A. van der; Osinga, J. )

    1993-01-01

    A method combining flow sorting and molecular cytogenetic techniques was used to identify an unknown marker chromosome in the bladder tumor cell line J82. The marker chromosome was isolated by dual parameter sorting after staining with Hoechst 33258 and chromomycin [Lambda]3. DNA amplification of 300 isolated chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction using the Alu-primer Bk33 and the Lines-primer LH5 was carried out. The DNA was labelled using Bio-11-dUTP and applied to human lymphocyte metaphase cells in a suppressive in situ hybridization procedure. Fluorescence was visible over chromosome 20 and over the distal one-half of 6p. Together the fluorescent regions accounted for only 60% of the marker length, indicating a possible duplication of chromosome 20 material. This was subsequently confirmed by applying bicolor in-situ hybridization using chromosome 6- and 20-specific DNA libraries to metaphase cells of the J82 culture.

  10. Rapid detection of chromosome 18 copy number in buccal smears using DNA probes and FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Nunez, M.; Giraldez, R.

    1994-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis of trisomy 18 in newborns is often critical to clinical management decisions that must be made in a minimum of time. DNA probes combined with FISH can be used to accurately to determine the copy number of chromosome 18 in interphase cells. We have used the D18Z1 alpha satellite DNA probe to determine signal frequency in normal, previously karyotyped subjects, 12 females and 6 males. We also present one clinical case of trisomy 18, confirmed by karyotype, for comparison to the results obtained from normal subjects. Buccal smears, unlike cytogenetic preparations from peripheral blood, are quite resistant to penetration of probes and detection reagents resulting in higher levels of false monosomy. We have studied 19 individuals and have obtained consistent FISH results, ranging from 64 to 90% disomy. False monosomy rates ranged from 10 to 36%, while false trisomy or tetrasomy was less than 1% in all samples. High rates of false monosomy make this test questionable for detection of low order mosaicism for monosomy, but the extremely low false hyperploidy rate suggests that this is a dependable procedure for detection of trisomy 18, enabling the use of buccal epithelium which can be collected easily from even premature and tiny infants.

  11. Detection of obesity QTLs on mouse chromosomes 1 and 7 by selective DNA pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.A.; Phillips, S.J.

    1996-06-15

    The inheritance of obesity has been analyzed in an intercross between the lean 129/Sv mouse strain and the obesity-prone EL/Suz mouse strain. The weights of three major fat pads were determined on 4-month-old mice, and the sum of these weights, divided by body weight, was used as an adiposity index. The strategy of selective DNA pooling was used as a primary screen to identify putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting adiposity index. DNA pools representing the leanest 15% and fattest 15% of the F2 progeny were compared for differential allelic enrichment using widely dispersed microsatellite variants. To evaluate putative QTLs, individual genotyping and interval mapping were employed to estimate QTL effects and assess statistical significance. One QTL affecting adiposity index, which accounted for 12.3% of phenotypic variance in gender-merged data, was mapped to the central region of Chromosome (Chr) 7. The QTL allele inherited from EL conferred increased adiposity. A second QTL that accounts for 6.3% of phenotypic variance was identified on Chr 1 near D1Mitt211. At both QTLs, the data are consistent with dominant inheritance of the allele contributing to obesity. The possible relationships between these QTLs and previously described obesity QYLs, major obesity mutations, and candidate genes are discussed. 42 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Interaction of Chk1 with Treslin Negatively Regulates the Initiation of Chromosomal DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cai; Kumagai, Akiko; Schlacher, Katharina; Shevchenko, Anna; Shevchenko, Andrej; Dunphy, William G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Treslin helps to trigger the initiation of DNA replication by promoting integration of Cdc45 into the replicative helicase. Treslin is a key positive-regulatory target of cell cycle control mechanisms; activation of Treslin by cyclin-dependent kinase is essential for the initiation of replication. Here we demonstrate that Treslin is also a critical locus for negative regulatory mechanisms that suppress initiation. We found that the checkpoint-regulatory kinase Chk1 associates specifically with a C-terminal domain of Treslin (designated TRCT). Mutations in the TRCT domain abolish binding of Chk1 to Treslin and thereby eliminate Chk1-catalyzed phosphorylation of Treslin. Significantly, abolition of the Treslin-Chk1 interaction results in elevated initiation of chromosomal DNA replication during an unperturbed cell cycle, which reveals a function for Chk1 during a normal S-phase. This increase is due to enhanced loading of Cdc45 onto potential replication origins. These studies provide important insights into how vertebrate cells orchestrate proper initiation of replication. PMID:25557548

  13. Zinc chromate induces chromosome instability and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hong; Holmes, Amie L.; Young, Jamie L.; Qin Qin; Joyce, Kellie; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Peng Cheng; Wise, Sandra S.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Wallace, William T.; Hammond, Dianne; Wise, John Pierce E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu

    2009-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory toxicant and carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potential. Zinc chromate, a water insoluble or 'particulate' Cr(VI) compound, has been shown to be carcinogenic in epidemiology studies and to induce tumors in experimental animals, but its genotoxicity is poorly understood. Our study shows that zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, chromosome damage and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells. In response to zinc chromate-induced breaks, MRE11 expression was increased and ATM and ATR were phosphorylated, indicating that the DNA double strand break repair system was initiated in the cells. In addition, our data show that zinc chromate-induced double strand breaks were only observed in the G2/M phase population, with no significant amount of double strand breaks observed in G1 and S phase cells. These data will aid in understanding the mechanisms of zinc chromate toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  14. Microsatellite DNA markers detects 95% of chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, D.; Cormier-Daire, V.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S.

    1997-01-20

    Cono-truncal cardiac malformations account for some 50% of congenital heart defects in newborn infants. Recently, hemizygosity for chromosome 22q11.2 was reported in patients with the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial syndromes (DGS/VCFS) and causally related disorders. We have explored the potential use of microsatellite DNA markers for rapid detection of 22q11 deletions in 19 newborn infants referred for cono-truncal heart malformations with associated DGS/VCFS anomalies. A failure of parental inheritance was documented in 84.2% of cases (16/19). PCR-based genotyping using microsatellite DNA markers located within the commonly deleted region allowed us either to confirm or reject a 22q11 microdeletion in 94.3% of cases (18/19) within 24 hours. This test is now currently performed in the infants referred to us for a cono-truncal heart malformation as a first intention screening for 22q11 microdeletion. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Geographic distribution of chromosome and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms in Oncorhynchus mykiss native to western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome studies of native populations of Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead and rainbow trout) in western Washington and southern British Columbia revealed the presence of two evolutionarily distinct chromosome lineages. Populations between, and including, the Elwha River, Washington, and Chilliwack River, British Columbia, contained 2n = 60 chromosomes. Populations on the central Washington coast contained 2n = 58 chromosomes. The north Washington coast and western Strait of Juan de Fuca contained individuals with 58, 59, or 60 chromosomes, suggesting this is a transition zone between 58 and 60 chromosome groups. The differences in chromosomal structure between 2n = 58 and 2n = 60 groups are presumably a Robertsonian rearrangement and an inversion. Allelic variation at three microsatellite loci (One ??6, One ??11 and Omy 77) also was examined, and no significant variation was detected among the 58 and 60 chromosome races. A hypothesis is presented concerning the origin of the 60 chromosome lineage.

  16. A perfect palindrome in the Escherichia coli chromosome forms DNA hairpins on both leading- and lagging-strands.

    PubMed

    Azeroglu, Benura; Lincker, Frédéric; White, Martin A; Jain, Devanshi; Leach, David R F

    2014-12-01

    DNA palindromes are hotspots for DNA double strand breaks, inverted duplications and intra-chromosomal translocations in a wide spectrum of organisms from bacteria to humans. These reactions are mediated by DNA secondary structures such as hairpins and cruciforms. In order to further investigate the pathways of formation and cleavage of these structures, we have compared the processing of a 460 base pair (bp) perfect palindrome in the Escherichia coli chromosome with the same construct interrupted by a 20 bp spacer to form a 480 bp interrupted palindrome. We show here that the perfect palindrome can form hairpin DNA structures on the templates of the leading- and lagging-strands in a replication-dependent reaction. In the presence of the hairpin endonuclease SbcCD, both copies of the replicated chromosome containing the perfect palindrome are cleaved, resulting in the formation of an unrepairable DNA double-strand break and cell death. This contrasts with the interrupted palindrome, which forms a hairpin on the lagging-strand template that is processed to form breaks, which can be repaired by homologous recombination. PMID:25389268

  17. Probabilities of radiation-induced inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges and their dependence on the DNA content of the chromosome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Yang, T. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A biophysical model has been developed that is based on the assumptions that an interphase chromosome occupies a spherical territory and that chromosome exchanges are formed by the misrejoining of two DNA double-strand breaks induced within a defined interaction distance. The model is used to explain the relative frequencies of inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges and the relationship between radiation-induced aberrations in individual chromosomes and the DNA content of the chromosome. Although this simple model predicts a higher ratio of inter- to intrachromosomal exchanges for low-LET radiation than for high-LET radiation, as has been suggested by others, we argue that the comparison of the prediction of the model with experimental results is not straightforward. With the model, we also show that the probability of the formation of interchromosomal exchanges is proportional to the "surface area" of the chromosome domain plus a correction term. The correction term is small if the interaction distance is less than 1 microm for both low- and high-LET radiations.

  18. Cytogenetic Analysis and Chromosomal Characteristics of the Polymorphic 18S rDNA of Haliotis discus hannai from Fujian, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haishan; Luo, Xuan; You, Weiwei; Dong, Yunwei; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel chromosomal characteristics of Haliotis discus hannai from a breeding population at Fujian, China. The karyotypes of H. discus hannai we obtained from an abalone farm include a common type 2n = 36 = 10M + 8SM (82%) and two rare types 2n = 36 = 11M + 7SM (14%) and 2n = 36 = 10M + 7SM + 1ST (4%). The results of silver staining showed that the NORs of H. discus hannai were usually located terminally on the long arms of chromosome pairs 14 and 17, NORs were also sometimes located terminally on the short arms of other chromosomes, either metacentric or submetacentric pairs. The number of Ag-nucleoli ranged from 2 to 8, and the mean number was 3.61 ± 0.93. Among the scored interphase cells, 41% had 3 detectable nucleoli and 37% had 4 nucleoli. The 18S rDNA FISH result is the first report of the location of 18S rDNA genes in H. discus hannai. The 18S rDNA locations were highly polymorphic in this species. Copies of the gene were observed in the terminal of long or/and short arms of submetacentric or/and metacentric chromosomes. Using FISH with probe for vertebrate-like telomeric sequences (CCCTAA)3 displayed positive green FITC signals at telomere regions of all analyzed chromosome types. We found about 7% of chromosomes had breaks in prophase. A special form of nucleolus not previously described from H. discus hannai was observed in some interphase cells. It consists of many small silver-stained nucleoli gathered together to form a larger nucleolus and may correspond to prenucleolar bodies. PMID:25699679

  19. Encephalitozoon cuniculi (Microspora) genome: physical map and evidence for telomere-associated rDNA units on all chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Brugère, Jean-François; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Méténier, Guy; Bensimon, Aaron; Vivarès, Christian P.

    2000-01-01

    A restriction map of the 2.8-Mb genome of the unicellular eukaryote Encephalitozoon cuniculi (phylum Microspora), a mammal-infecting intracellular parasite, has been constructed using two restriction enzymes with 6 bp recognition sites (BssHII and MluI). The fragments resulting from either single digestions of the whole molecular karyotype or double digestions of 11 individual chromosomes have been separated by two-dimensional pulsed field gel electrophoresis (2D-PFGE) procedures. The average distance between successive restriction sites is ~19 kb. The terminal regions of the chromosomes show a common pattern covering ~15 kb and including one 16S–23S rDNA unit. Results of hybridisation and molecular combing experiments indicate a palindromic-like orientation of the two subtelomeric rDNA copies on each chromosome. We have also located 67 DNA markers (clones from a partial E.cuniculi genomic library) by hybridisation to restriction fragments. Partial or complete sequencing has revealed homologies with known protein-coding genes for 32 of these clones. Evidence for two homologous chromosomes III, with a size difference (3 kb) related to a subtelomeric deletion/insertion event, argues for diploidy of E.cuniculi. The physical map should be useful for both the whole genome sequencing project and studies on genome plasticity of this widespread parasite. PMID:10773069

  20. Expression of the gene encoded by a family of macronuclear chromosomes generated by alternative DNA processing in Oxytricha fallax.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K R; Herrick, G

    1991-01-01

    Hypotrichous ciliated protozoa, such as Oxytricha fallax, produce tiny chromosomes during generation of the transcriptionally active macronucleus. The 81-MAC family of macronuclear chromosomes is produced by alternative DNA processing, such that the chromosomes share a common region of 1.6 kbp. Transcription of a 1.3 kb mRNA from the common region has been analyzed. Transcription starts very near the telomere (34 bp), in a 23 bp region of pure A + T DNA. Polyadenylation sites are very near the other telomere (26 bp), also in a region of nearly pure A + T DNA. Three introns are clustered in the first third of the gene. Intron removal can follow polyadenylation, and the order of removal is not fixed. All three known sequence versions of the 81-MAC chromosomes are represented in the mRNA pool, with no evidence of any further versions. The A + T sequences surrounding the transcription starts and polyadenylation sites are conserved among versions. Introns have conserved 5' and 3' ends and a putative branch-point sequence (YYRAT), but otherwise are highly diverged and are AT-rich. A single long open reading frame, interrupted by the three introns, encodes a homolog of known mitochondrial solute carriers, and contains the codon TAA, which does not encode 'stop,' but a conserved glutamine; TAG appears also to encode glutamine. The results significantly enlarge the small data set of transcription start and polyadenylation sites, of intron features, and of translation signals for hypotrichs. Images PMID:1909784

  1. Chloroplast DNA Phylogeography Reveals Repeated Range Expansion in a Widespread Aquatic Herb Hippuris vulgaris in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and Adjacent Areas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shan-Shan; Gituru, Robert Wahiti; Wang, Qing-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) is one of the most extensive habitats for alpine plants in the world. Climatic oscillations during the Quaternary ice age had a dramatic effect on species ranges on the QTP and the adjacent areas. However, how the distribution ranges of aquatic plant species shifted on the QTP in response to Quaternary climatic changes remains almost unknown. Methodology and Principal Findings We studied the phylogeography and demographic history of the widespread aquatic herb Hippuris vulgaris from the QTP and adjacent areas. Our sampling included 385 individuals from 47 natural populations of H. vulgaris. Using sequences from four chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) non-coding regions, we distinguished eight different cpDNA haplotypes. From the cpDNA variation in H. vulgaris, we found a very high level of population differentiation (GST = 0.819) but the phylogeographical structure remained obscure (NST = 0.853>GST = 0.819, P>0.05). Phylogenetic analyses revealed two main cpDNA haplotype lineages. The split between these two haplotype groups can be dated back to the mid-to-late Pleistocene (ca. 0.480 Myr). Mismatch distribution analyses showed that each of these had experienced a recent range expansion. These two expansions (ca. 0.12 and 0.17 Myr) might have begun from the different refugees before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Conclusions/Significance This study initiates a research on the phylogeography of aquatic herbs in the QTP and for the first time sheds light on the response of an alpine aquatic seed plant species in the QTP to Quaternary climate oscillations. PMID:23565290

  2. Differential genetic interactions between Sgs1, DNA-damage checkpoint components and DNA repair factors in the maintenance of chromosome stability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome instability is associated with human cancers and chromosome breakage syndromes, including Bloom's syndrome, caused by inactivation of BLM helicase. Numerous mutations that lead to genome instability are known, yet how they interact genetically is poorly understood. Results We show that spontaneous translocations that arise by nonallelic homologous recombination in DNA-damage-checkpoint-defective yeast lacking the BLM-related Sgs1 helicase (sgs1Δ mec3Δ) are inhibited if cells lack Mec1/ATR kinase. Tel1/ATM, in contrast, acts as a suppressor independently of Mec3 and Sgs1. Translocations are also inhibited in cells lacking Dun1 kinase, but not in cells defective in a parallel checkpoint branch defined by Chk1 kinase. While we had previously shown that RAD51 deletion did not inhibit translocation formation, RAD59 deletion led to inhibition comparable to the rad52Δ mutation. A candidate screen of other DNA metabolic factors identified Exo1 as a strong suppressor of chromosomal rearrangements in the sgs1Δ mutant, becoming even more important for chromosomal stability upon MEC3 deletion. We determined that the C-terminal third of Exo1, harboring mismatch repair protein binding sites and phosphorylation sites, is dispensable for Exo1's roles in chromosomal rearrangement suppression, mutation avoidance and resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Conclusions Our findings suggest that translocations between related genes can form by Rad59-dependent, Rad51-independent homologous recombination, which is independently suppressed by Sgs1, Tel1, Mec3 and Exo1 but promoted by Dun1 and the telomerase-inhibitor Mec1. We propose a model for the functional interaction between mitotic recombination and the DNA-damage checkpoint in the suppression of chromosomal rearrangements in sgs1Δ cells. PMID:22040455

  3. Comparative Anatomy of Chromosomal Domains with Imprinted and Non-Imprinted Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L.; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  4. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM. PMID:24009515

  5. FISH to mitotic chromosomes and extended DNA fibres of Beta procumbens in a series of monosomic additions to beet (B. vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Mesbah, M; Wennekes-Van Eden, J; De Jong, J H; De Bock, T S; Lange, W

    2000-01-01

    The physical localization and organization of a Procumbentes-specific repetitive DNA sequence, PB6-4, on the chromosomes of Beta procumbens (2n = 18) were studied, using FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) to mitotic chromosomes and extended DNA fibres. The chromosomes of B. procumbens were studied in metaphase complements of the species itself, as well as in preparations of a series of eight different B. procumbens-derived monosomic additions to B. vulgaris (2n = 18). FISH to chromosome spreads of B. procumbens revealed that PB6-4 hybridizes to all chromosomes, predominantly in the pericentromeric regions, but with differences in size and brightness of the signals. Hybridization of PB6-4 to metaphase complements of B. vulgaris revealed no signals, indicating that cross-hybridization with the genome of this species was negligible. Consequently, hybridization of PB6-4 to metaphase complements of the monosomic additions yielded fluorescent signals on the alien chromosomes only. The previously observed differences in size and brightness of the fluorescent spots were confirmed using the single alien chromosomes. FISH of PB6-4 to extended DNA fibres of the monosomic additions indicated differences in the fluorescent track lengths between the alien chromosomes. Measurements of the fluorescent tracts allowed classification into discrete groups, varying from one to three groups per B. procumbens chromosome. The data revealed that the brightness or size of the signal at mitotic metaphase and the length of the fluorescent tracks on the DNA fibres were correlated. PMID:10919719

  6. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation in Urban and Indigenous Populations of Mexico: Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Lineages.

    PubMed

    González-Sobrino, Blanca Z; Pintado-Cortina, Ana P; Sebastián-Medina, Leticia; Morales-Mandujano, Fabiola; Contreras, Alejandra V; Aguilar, Yasnaya E; Chávez-Benavides, Juan; Carrillo-Rodríguez, Aurelio; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Medrano-González, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Aside from the admixture between indigenous people and people from overseas, populations in Mexico changed drastically after the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth century, forming an intricate history that has been underutilized in understanding the genetic population structure of Mexicans. To infer historical processes of isolation, dispersal, and assimilation, we examined the phylogeography of mitochondrial (mt) DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in 3,026 individuals from 10 urban and nine indigenous populations by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms. A geographic array with a predominance of Amerindian lineages was observed for mtDNA, with northern indigenous populations being divergent from the central and southern indigenous populations; urban populations showed low differentiation with isolation by distance. Y-chromosome variation distinguished urban and indigenous populations through the Amerindian haplogroup Q frequency. The MtDNA and the Y-chromosome together primarily distinguished urban and indigenous populations, with different geographic arrays for both. Gene flow across geographical distance and between the urban and indigenous realms appears to have altered the pre-Hispanic phylogeography in central and southern Mexico, mainly by displacement of women, while maintaining the indigenous isolation in the north, southeast, and Zapotec regions. Most Amerindian mtDNA diversity currently occurs in urban populations and appears to be reduced among indigenous people. PMID:27050033

  7. RNF138 interacts with RAD51D and is required for DNA interstrand crosslink repair and maintaining chromosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Yard, Brian D; Reilly, Nicole M; Bedenbaugh, Michael K; Pittman, Douglas L

    2016-06-01

    The RAD51 family is integral for homologous recombination (HR) mediated DNA repair and maintaining chromosome integrity. RAD51D, the fourth member of the family, is a known ovarian cancer susceptibility gene and required for the repair of interstrand crosslink DNA damage and preserving chromosomal stability. In this report, we describe the RNF138 E3 ubiquitin ligase that interacts with and ubiquitinates the RAD51D HR protein. RNF138 is a member of an E3 ligase family that contains an amino-terminal RING finger domain and a putative carboxyl-terminal ubiquitin interaction motif. In mammalian cells, depletion of RNF138 increased the stability of the RAD51D protein, suggesting that RNF138 governs ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of RAD51D. However, RNF138 depletion conferred sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, reduced RAD51 focus formation, and increased chromosomal instability. Site-specific mutagenesis of the RNF138 RING finger domain demonstrated that it was necessary for RAD51D ubiquitination. Presence of RNF138 also enhanced the interaction between RAD51D and a known interacting RAD51 family member XRCC2 in a yeast three-hybrid assay. Therefore, RNF138 is a newly identified regulatory component of the HR mediated DNA repair pathway that has implications toward understanding how ubiquitination modifies the functions of the RAD51 paralog protein complex. PMID:27161866

  8. Resistance of Spiroplasma citri Lines to the Virus SVTS2 Is Associated with Integration of Viral DNA Sequences into Host Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Y.; Melcher, U.; Davis, R. E.; Fletcher, J.

    1995-01-01

    Spiroplasmavirus SVTS2, isolated from Spiroplasma melliferum TS2, produces plaques when inoculated onto lawns of Spiroplasma citri M200H, a derivative of the type strain Maroc R8A2. S. citri strains MR2 and MR3, originally selected as colonies growing within plaques on a lawn of M200H inoculated with SVTS2, were resistant to SVTS2. Genomic DNA fingerprints and electrophoretic protein profiles of M200H, MR2, and MR3 were similar, but three proteins present in M200H were missing or significantly reduced in both resistant lines. None of these three polypeptides reacted with antiserum against S. citri membrane proteins, indicating that they probably are not surface-located virus receptors. Electroporation with SVTS2 DNA produced 1.5 x 10(sup5) transfectants per (mu)g of DNA in M200H but none in MR2 or MR3, suggesting that resistance may result from inhibition of viral replication. The digestion patterns of the extrachromosomal double-stranded (ds) DNA of these lines were similar. Three TaqI fragments of MR2 extrachromosomal DNA that were not present in M200H extrachromosomal DNA hybridized strongly to an SVTS2 probe, and two of these fragments plus an additional one hybridized with the MR3 extrachromosomal DNA, indicating that a fragment of SVTS2 DNA was present in the extrachromosomal ds DNA of MR2 and MR3 but not of M200H. When the restricted genomes of all three lines were probed with SVTS2 DNA, strong hybridization to two EcoRI fragments of chromosomal MR2 and MR3 DNA but not M200H DNA indicated that SVTS2 DNA had integrated into the genomes of MR2 and MR3 but not of M200H. When MR3 extrachromosomal ds DNA containing a 2.1-kb SVTS2 DNA fragment was transfected into M200H, the transformed spiroplasmas were resistant to SVTS2. These results suggest that SVTS2 DNA fragments, possibly integrated into the chromosomal or extrachromosomal DNA of a previously susceptible spiroplasma, may function as viral incompatibility elements, providing resistance to superinfection by

  9. Rapid Evolution of Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Xylose Fermentation through Formation of Extra-chromosomal Circular DNA

    PubMed Central

    Demeke, Mekonnen M.; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circular DNA elements are involved in genome plasticity, particularly of tandem repeats. However, amplifications of DNA segments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reported so far involve pre-existing repetitive sequences such as ribosomal DNA, Ty elements and Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs). Here, we report the generation of an eccDNA, (extrachromosomal circular DNA element) in a region without any repetitive sequences during an adaptive evolution experiment. We performed whole genome sequence comparison between an efficient D-xylose fermenting yeast strain developed by metabolic and evolutionary engineering, and its parent industrial strain. We found that the heterologous gene XylA that had been inserted close to an ARS sequence in the parent strain has been amplified about 9 fold in both alleles of the chromosomal locus of the evolved strain compared to its parent. Analysis of the amplification process during the adaptive evolution revealed formation of a XylA-carrying eccDNA, pXI2-6, followed by chromosomal integration in tandem arrays over the course of the evolutionary adaptation. Formation of the eccDNA occurred in the absence of any repetitive DNA elements, probably using a micro-homology sequence of 8 nucleotides flanking the amplified sequence. We isolated the pXI2-6 eccDNA from an intermediate strain of the evolutionary adaptation process, sequenced it completely and showed that it confers high xylose fermentation capacity when it is transferred to a new strain. In this way, we have provided clear evidence that gene amplification can occur through generation of eccDNA without the presence of flanking repetitive sequences and can serve as a rapid means of adaptation to selection pressure. PMID:25738959

  10. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  11. The R-Operon: A Model of Repetitive DNA-Organized Transcriptional Compartmentation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes for Coordinated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to coordinate the activity of genes that function together to fulfill the same biological processes. Genomic organization likely plays a key role in coordinating transcription of different genes. However, little is known about how co-regulated genes are organized in the cell nucleus and how the chromosomal organization facilitates the co-regulation of different genes. I propose that eukaryotic genomes are organized into repeat assembly (RA)-based structural domains (“R-operons”) in the nuclear space. R-operons result from the interaction of homologous DNA repeats. In an R-operon, genes in different loci of the linear genome are brought into spatial vicinity and co-regulated by the same pool of transcription factors. This type of large-scale chromosomal organization may provide a mechanism for functional compartmentation of chromosomes to facilitate the transcriptional coordination of gene expression. PMID:27110825

  12. The R-Operon: A Model of Repetitive DNA-Organized Transcriptional Compartmentation of Eukaryotic Chromosomes for Coordinated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to coordinate the activity of genes that function together to fulfill the same biological processes. Genomic organization likely plays a key role in coordinating transcription of different genes. However, little is known about how co-regulated genes are organized in the cell nucleus and how the chromosomal organization facilitates the co-regulation of different genes. I propose that eukaryotic genomes are organized into repeat assembly (RA)-based structural domains ("R-operons") in the nuclear space. R-operons result from the interaction of homologous DNA repeats. In an R-operon, genes in different loci of the linear genome are brought into spatial vicinity and co-regulated by the same pool of transcription factors. This type of large-scale chromosomal organization may provide a mechanism for functional compartmentation of chromosomes to facilitate the transcriptional coordination of gene expression. PMID:27110825

  13. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. In conclusion, these findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.

  14. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widelymore » used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. In conclusion, these findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.« less

  15. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. These findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus. PMID:25567288

  16. DNA sequence analysis of a 5.27-kb direct repeat occurring adjacent to the regions of S-episome homology in maize mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Houchins, J P; Ginsburg, H; Rohrbaugh, M; Dale, R M; Schardl, C L; Hodge, T P; Lonsdale, D M

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the 5270-bp repeated DNA element from the mitochondrial genome of the fertile cytoplasm of maize has been determined. The repeat is a major site of recombination within the mitochondrial genome and sequences related to the R1(S1) and R2(S2) linear episomes reside immediately adjacent to the repeat. The terminal inverted repeats of the R1 and R2 homologous sequences form one of the two boundaries of the repeat. Frame-shift mutations have introduced 11 translation termination codons into the transcribed S2/R2 URFI gene. The repeated sequence, though recombinantly active, appears to serve no biological function. Images Fig. 7. PMID:3792299

  17. Chromosomal assignment of human DNA fingerprint sequences by simultaneous hybridization to arbitrarily primed PCR products from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Jun; Sekiya, Takao; Navarro, J.M.

    1996-05-15

    We have developed a technique for the simultaneous chromosomal assignment of multiple human DNA sequences from DNA fingerprints obtained by the arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Radioactively labeled human AP-PCR products are hybridized to DNA fingerprints generated with the same arbitrary primer from human/rodent monochromosome cell hybrids after electroblotting to a nylong membrane. Human-specific hybridization bands in the human/rodent fingerprints unambiguously determine their chromosome of origin. We named this method simultaneous hybridization of arbitrarily primed PCR DNA fingerprinting products (SHARP). Using this approach, we determined the chromosomal origins of most major bands of human AP-PCR fingerprints obtained with two arbitrary primers. Altogether, the chromosomal localization of near 50 DNA fragments, comprehensive of all human chromosomes except chromosomes 21 and Y, was achieved in this simple manner. Chromosome assignment of fingerprint bands is essential for molecular karyotyping of cancer by AP-PCR DNA fingerprinting. The SHARP method provides a convenient and powerful tool for this purpose. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Temporal Fluctuation in North East Baltic Sea Region Cattle Population Revealed by Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal DNA Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Marianna; Bläuer, Auli; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Harjula, Janne; Nyström Edmark, Veronica; Rannamäe, Eve; Lõugas, Lembi; Sajantila, Antti; Lidén, Kerstin; Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Ancient DNA analysis offers a way to detect changes in populations over time. To date, most studies of ancient cattle have focused on their domestication in prehistory, while only a limited number of studies have analysed later periods. Conversely, the genetic structure of modern cattle populations is well known given the undertaking of several molecular and population genetic studies. Results Bones and teeth from ancient cattle populations from the North-East Baltic Sea region dated to the Prehistoric (Late Bronze and Iron Age, 5 samples), Medieval (14), and Post-Medieval (26) periods were investigated by sequencing 667 base pairs (bp) from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 155 bp of intron 19 in the Y-chromosomal UTY gene. Comparison of maternal (mtDNA haplotypes) genetic diversity in ancient cattle (45 samples) with modern cattle populations in Europe and Asia (2094 samples) revealed 30 ancient mtDNA haplotypes, 24 of which were shared with modern breeds, while 6 were unique to the ancient samples. Of seven Y-chromosomal sequences determined from ancient samples, six were Y2 and one Y1 haplotype. Combined data including Swedish samples from the same periods (64 samples) was compared with the occurrence of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in modern cattle (1614 samples). Conclusions The diversity of haplogroups was highest in the Prehistoric samples, where many haplotypes were unique. The Medieval and Post-Medieval samples also show a high diversity with new haplotypes. Some of these haplotypes have become frequent in modern breeds in the Nordic Countries and North-Western Russia while other haplotypes have remained in only a few local breeds or seem to have been lost. A temporal shift in Y-chromosomal haplotypes from Y2 to Y1 was detected that corresponds with the appearance of new mtDNA haplotypes in the Medieval and Post-Medieval period. This suggests a replacement of the Prehistoric mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplotypes by new types of cattle. PMID:25992976

  19. Kid, a novel kinesin-like DNA binding protein, is localized to chromosomes and the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Tokai, N; Fujimoto-Nishiyama, A; Toyoshima, Y; Yonemura, S; Tsukita, S; Inoue, J; Yamamota, T

    1996-02-01

    Microtubule-associated motor proteins are thought to be involved in spindle formation and chromosome movements in mitosis/meiosis. We have molecularly cloned cDNAs for a gene that codes for a novel member of the kinesin family of proteins. Nucleotide sequencing reveals that the predicted gene product is a 73 kDa protein and is related to some extent to the Drosophila node gene product, which is involved in chromosomal segregation during meiosis. A sequence similar to the microtubule binding motor domain of kinesin is present in the N-terminal half of the protein, and its ability to bind to microtubules is demonstrated. Furthermore we show that its C-terminal half contains a putative nuclear localization signal similar to that of Jun and is able to bind to DNA. Accordingly, the protein was termed Kid (kinesin-like DNA binding protein). Indirect immunofluorescence studies show that Kid colocalizes with mitotic chromosomes and that it is enriched in the kinetochore at anaphase. Thus, we propose that Kid might play a role(s) in regulating the chromosomal movement along microtubules during mitosis. PMID:8599929

  20. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Villa, Mateo Andres; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Aguiar; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Chaveerach, Arunrat

    2015-01-01

    Channid fishes, commonly referred to as "snakeheads", are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes. PMID:26067030

  1. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K.; Wilkerson, C.; Meisner, L. |

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA Elements and Its Implications for the Chromosomal Evolution of Channid Fishes (Actinopterygii, Perciformes)

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Villa, Mateo Andres; de Oliveira, Ezequiel Aguiar; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Chaveerach, Arunrat

    2015-01-01

    Channid fishes, commonly referred to as “snakeheads”, are currently very important in Asian fishery and aquaculture due to the substantial decline in natural populations because of overexploitation. A large degree of chromosomal variation has been found in this family, mainly through the use of conventional cytogenetic investigations. In this study, we analyzed the karyotype structure and the distribution of 7 repetitive DNA sequences in several Channa species from different Thailand river basins. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosomal differentiation among species and populations to improve upon the knowledge of its biodiversity and evolutionary history. Rearrangements, such as pericentric inversions, fusions and polyploidization, appear to be important events during the karyotypic evolution of this genus, resulting in the chromosomal diversity observed among the distinct species and even among populations of the same species. In addition, such variability is also increased by the genomic dynamism of repetitive elements, particularly by the differential distribution and accumulation of rDNA sequences on chromosomes. This marked diversity is likely linked to the lifestyle of the snakehead fishes and their population fragmentation, as already identified for other fish species. The karyotypic features highlight the biodiversity of the channid fishes and justify a taxonomic revision of the genus Channa, as well as of the Channidae family as a whole, as some nominal species may actually constitute species complexes. PMID:26067030

  3. Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2008-07-01

    The use of carbon ions for the treatment of certain tumour types, especially radioresistant tumours, is becoming more frequent due to the carbon-ion dose localization and high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the Bragg peak region. Human beings can also be exposed to heavy ions in space, since galactic cosmic rays are a mixed field consisting of not only high-energy protons and He ions, but also heavier ions including iron. Due to their high linear energy transfer (LET), heavy ions have peculiar track structures, characterized by a high level of energy deposition clustering. Furthermore, high-energy ions produce energetic secondary electrons ('delta rays') which can give rise to energy depositions several micrometres away from the core of the primary particle track. Also in view of hadron therapy and space radiation applications, it is therefore important to characterize heavy-ion tracks from a physical and biophysical point of view. In this framework, herein we will discuss the main physical features of heavy-ion track structure, as well as heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks, which are regarded as one of the most important initial radiobiological lesions and chromosome aberrations, which are correlated both with cell death and with cell conversion to malignancy.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA and chromosomal studies of wild mice (Mus) from Turkey and Iran.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, I; Tez, C; Malikov, V; Vaziri, A; Polyakov, A V; Searle, J B

    2000-04-01

    Complete D-loop sequences of 20 Mus from three localities in Turkey and seven in Iran were characterized. These countries are thought to be close to the place of origin of the subspecies Mus musculus domesticus. Five new M. m. domesticus haplotypes were added to the nine already known for the region. Four of these 14 haplotypes were very similar to the consensus D-loop sequence for western Europe defined by Nachman et al. (1994), which may represent the ancestral condition for M. m. domesticus. A divergent mtDNA lineage is found in various parts of Turkey and northern Iran; it has spread into western Europe, but other European lineages were not found in either Turkey or Iran. The other Mus D-loop sequences were of M. m. castaneus and Mus macedonicus and confirmed M. macedonicus as a monotypic species with low nucleotide diversity. The prevalence of the standard 40-chromosome complement in this region is particularly interesting with regards M. m. domesticus, as it is consistent with the in situ origin of Robertsonian karyotypic races (2n < 40) in western Europe. PMID:10849070

  5. In situ hybridization to cytogenetic bands of yeast artificial chromosomes covering 50% of human Xq24-Xq28 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Vittorio; Casamassimi, Amelia; D'Urso, Michele; Yoon, Jae-Young; Freije, Wadiha; Schlessinger, David; Muenke, Maximilian; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Saccone, Salvatore; Maugeri, Silvana; Santoro, Anna Maria; Motta, Salvatore; Della Valle, Giuliano

    1991-01-01

    From the collection described by Abidi et al., 102 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) with human DNA inserts more than 300 kb in length were assigned to chromosomal band positions on early metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization using the biotin-avidin method. All the YACs hybridized within the Xq24-Xqter region, supporting the origin of the vast majority of the YACs from single human X-chromosomal sites. With assignments precise to ±0.5 bands, YACs were distributed among cytogenetic bands to roughly equal extents. Thus, there is no gross bias in the cloning of DNA from different bands into large YACs. To test band assignments further, hybridizations were carried out blind, and band positions were then compared with (1) probe localizations in cases in which a reported location was present in one of the YACs; (2) cross-hybridization of a labeled YAC with others in the collection; and (3) hybridization to a panel of DNAs from a series of hybrid cells containing Xq DNA truncated at various regions. Of 31 cases in which YACs contained a probe with a previously reported location, 28 in situ assignments were in agreement, and 14 other assignments, including one of the three discordant with probe localization, were confirmed by YAC cross-hybridization studies. Results with a group of nine YACs were further confirmed with a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNAs from that region. Five YACs hybridized both to Xq25 and to a second site (four in Xq27 and one in Xq28), suggestive of some duplication of DNA of the hybrid cell and perhaps in normal X chromosomes. The in situ assignments are thus sufficient to place YACs easily and systematically within bins of about 7–10 Mb and to detect some possible anomalies. Furthermore, on the basis of expectations for random cloning of DNA in YACs, the assigned YACs probably cover more than 50% of the total Xq24-Xq28 region. This provides one way to initiate the assembly of YAC contigs over extended chromosomal regions. Images

  6. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  7. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: A general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, A.O.M.

    1993-09-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here the author describes and analyzes a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, [approximately]50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomers should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. 73 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Bacterial Transposons Are Co-Transferred with T-DNA to Rice Chromosomes during Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Ryul; An, Gynheung

    2012-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is widely utilized for delivering a foreign gene into a plant’s genome. We found the bacterial transposon Tn5393 in transgenic rice plants. Analysis of the flanking sequences of the transferred-DNA (T-DNA) identified that a portion of the Tn5393 sequence was present immediately next to the end of the T-DNA. Because this transposon was present in A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404, but not in EHA105 and GV3101, our findings indicated that Tn5393 was transferred from LBA4404 into the rice genome during the transformation process. We also noted that another bacterial transposon, Tn5563, is present in transgenic plants. Analyses of 331 transgenic lines revealed that 26.0% carried Tn5393 and 2.1% contained Tn5563. In most of the lines, an intact transposon was integrated into the T-DNA and transferred to the rice chromosome. More than one copy of T-DNA was introduced into the plants, often at a single locus. This resulted in T-DNA repeats of normal and transposon-carrying T-DNA that generated deletions of a portion of the T-DNA, joining the T-DNA end to the bacterial transposon. Based on these data, we suggest that one should carefully select the appropriate Agrobacterium strain to avoid undesirable transformation of such sequences. PMID:22570148

  9. A new mutation in the CFTR gene, composed of two adjacent DNA alterations, is a common cause of cystic fibrosis among Georgian Jews

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, T.; Berkun, Y.; Yahav, Y.; Augarten, A.; Bashan, N.; Rivlin, Y.; Gazit, E.; Sereth, H.; Kerem, E.; Kerem, B.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Five Jewish cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from four unrelated families, all of whom emigrated from what was Soviet Georgia were studied. The parents in two of the families are first-degree relatives. The clinical phenotype of the patients seems to be associated with a severe disease, as reflected by early age of diagnosis (before the age of 1 year), high sweat chloride level (105-140 meq/liter), and pancreatic insufficiency. The pulmonary function and nutritional status of these patients are normal. These patients were tested for [Delta]F508 by analysis of heteroduplex DNA (4). None of the CF chromosomes was found to carry the [Delta]F508 mutation. Subsequently, PCR-amplified genomic DNA samples from two of these patients were subjected to direct sequencing (5) of regions containing exons 7, 9-12, an 19-21 of the CF gene using the oligonucleotides previously described (3, 6). In exon 7, two DNA alterations 3 bp apart were identified in both patients. The first alteration in a C [yields] A transversion at nucleotide position 1207, changing the glutamine codon to lysine (Q359K). The second DNA alteration is a C [yields] A transversion at nucleotide position 1211 changing the threonine codon to lysine (T360K). The two DNA alterations cause nonconservative amino acid substitutions, changing each of the two uncharged polar amino acids (glutamine and threonine) to a basic amino acid, lysine. The Q359K substitution destroys an Rsal recognition site and can be detected by PCR amplification of exon 7 using 7i-5 and 7i-3 oligonucleotides (6), followed by Rsal digestion and electrophoresis on 10% polyacrylamide gels. Two Rsal sites are found in a normal amplified DNA fragment, resulting in three restriction fragments of 292, 68, and 50 bp. Digestion of the PCR fragment of an individual homozygous for this substitution resulted in only two fragments of 342 and 68 bp. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Decreased Expression of a Gene Caused by a T-DNA Insertion in an Adjacent Gene in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Kentaro; Kawabayashi, Takenori; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    ALADIN is a component of the nuclear pore complex in higher eukaryotes. An Arabidopsis knockout line that had a T-DNA insertion in the ALADIN gene was defective in plant growth and thylakoid development and had reduced photosynthetic activity resulting from lower chlorophyll accumulation. The mutation appeared to decrease the level of chloroplast RuBisCO subunits and PSBA and PGL35 proteins. Unexpectedly, the T-DNA insertion in the ALADIN gene decreased the expression of the neighboring gene PSRP5, which functions in translation in chloroplasts. The mutant phenotype was rescued by expressing PSRP5, but not by expressing ALADIN. The abnormal phenotypes were also detected in an artificial microRNA (amiRNA)-mediated PSRPS5 knockdown, but not in an amiRNA-mediated ALADIN knockdown line. Thus, users of T-DNA insertions should be aware that a T-DNA insertion in one gene can have effects on the expression of neighboring genes. PMID:26828726

  11. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    Kashiani, Pedram; Saleh, Ghizan; Panandam, Jothi Malar; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay; Selamat, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon’s information index (I) and Nei’s gene diversity coefficient (Nei), Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703), while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456). Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10. PMID:23055801

  12. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Kashiani, Pedram; Saleh, Ghizan; Panandam, Jothi Malar; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay; Selamat, Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon's information index (I) and Nei's gene diversity coefficient (Nei), Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703), while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456). Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10. PMID:23055801

  13. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization with centromeric DNA probes as a new approach to distinguish chromosome breakage from aneuploidy in interphase cells and micronuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Eastmond, D.A.; Rupa, D.S.; Chen, H.W.; Hasegawa, L.

    1993-12-31

    Chromosomal abnormalities are believed to contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, carcinogenesis and other pathophysiological conditions. For example, approximately 15% of recognized pregnancies terminate in spontaneous abortion, and of these approximately 30% have been shown to be chromosomally abnormal. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to early embryonic and fetal death appears to decrease with gestational age, suggesting that as many as 67% of the aborted embryos in early embryonic deaths are chromosomally abnormal. Furthermore, clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities can also be found to be present in approximately 0.58 to 0.67% of live births. These figures indicate that within a given year, hundreds of thousands of chromosomally abnormal babies will be born throughout the world and additional millions of chromosomally abnormal embryos will have been spontaneously aborted. For the past several years, our research has focused on utilizing new molecular cytogenetic techniques to develop assays for detecting aneuploidy-inducing agents in mammalian cells. One approach that we have sucessfully employed involves the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes to determine the number of copies of a representative chromosome present within the nucleus following chemical exposure. DNA sequences (probes) which hybridize to blocks of repetitive centromeric DNA on specific chromosomes have been developed for most of the human chromosomes. In situ hybridization with these probes results in the staining of a compact chromosomal region which can be easily detected in interphase nuclei. The presence of 3 (or more) hybridization domains in an interphase nucleus indicates the presence of three centromeric regions and has been presumed to indicate that three copies of the entire chromosome were present in the nucleus.

  14. Restriction maps of the regions coding for methicillin and tobramycin resistances on chromosomal DNA in methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, K; Nonoguchi, R; Matsuhashi, M; Song, M D; Konno, M

    1989-01-01

    Chromosomal BamHI DNA fragments containing both the mecA gene encoding the penicillin-binding protein responsible for methicillin resistance and the aadD gene encoding 4',4"-adenylyltransferase responsible for tobramycin resistance were cloned from three methicillin- and tobramycin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Physical maps of the fragments were similar, suggesting their unique origin. Images PMID:2817861

  15. Structural basis of X chromosome DNA recognition by the MSL2 CXC domain during Drosophila dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sanduo; Villa, Raffaella; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yingang; Wang, Jinfeng; Becker, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The male-specific lethal dosage compensation complex (MSL-DCC) selectively assembles on the X chromosome in Drosophila males and activates gene transcription by twofold through histone acetylation. An MSL recognition element (MRE) sequence motif nucleates the initial MSL association, but how it is recognized remains unknown. Here, we identified the CXC domain of MSL2 specifically recognizing the MRE motif and determined its crystal structure bound to specific and nonspecific DNAs. The CXC domain primarily contacts one strand of DNA duplex and employs a single arginine to directly read out dinucleotide sequences from the minor groove. The arginine is flexible when bound to nonspecific sequences. The core region of the MRE motif harbors two binding sites on opposite strands that can cooperatively recruit a CXC dimer. Specific DNA-binding mutants of MSL2 are impaired in MRE binding and X chromosome localization in vivo. Our results reveal multiple dynamic DNA-binding modes of the CXC domain that target the MSL-DCC to X chromosomes. PMID:25452275

  16. Regulation of chromosomal replication initiation by oriC-proximal DnaA-box clusters in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Hajime; Yoshimura, Mika; Ueki, Mikako; Oshima, Taku; Ogasawara, Naotake; Ishikawa, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial chromosome replication is initiated by binding of DnaA to a DnaA-box cluster (DBC) within the replication origin (oriC). In Bacillus subtilis, six additional DBCs are found outside of oriC and some are known to be involved in transcriptional regulation of neighboring genes. A deletion mutant lacking the six DBCs (Δ6) initiated replication early. Further, inactivation of spo0J in Δ6 cells yielded a pleiotropic phenotype, accompanied by severe growth inhibition. However, a spontaneous suppressor in soj or a deletion of soj, which stimulates DnaA activity in the absence of Spo0J, counteracted these effects. Such abnormal phenotypic features were not observed in a mutant background in which replication initiation was driven by a plasmid-derived replication origin. Moreover, introduction of a single DBC at various ectopic positions within the Δ6 chromosome partly suppressed the early-initiation phenotype, but this was dependent on insertion location. We propose that DBCs negatively regulate replication initiation by interacting with DnaA molecules and play a major role, together with Spo0J/Soj, in regulating the activity of DnaA. PMID:21911367

  17. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries. PMID:27353572

  18. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysed ex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20–67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation. PMID:25678531

  19. The Application of DNA Barcodes for the Identification of Marine Crustaceans from the North Sea and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Barco, Andrea; Steinke, Dirk; Beermann, Jan; Laakmann, Silke; Mohrbeck, Inga; Neumann, Hermann; Kihara, Terue C.; Pointner, Karin; Radulovici, Adriana; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Wesse, Christina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    During the last years DNA barcoding has become a popular method of choice for molecular specimen identification. Here we present a comprehensive DNA barcode library of various crustacean taxa found in the North Sea, one of the most extensively studied marine regions of the world. Our data set includes 1,332 barcodes covering 205 species, including taxa of the Amphipoda, Copepoda, Decapoda, Isopoda, Thecostraca, and others. This dataset represents the most extensive DNA barcode library of the Crustacea in terms of species number to date. By using the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), unique BINs were identified for 198 (96.6%) of the analyzed species. Six species were characterized by two BINs (2.9%), and three BINs were found for the amphipod species Gammarus salinus Spooner, 1947 (0.4%). Intraspecific distances with values higher than 2.2% were revealed for 13 species (6.3%). Exceptionally high distances of up to 14.87% between two distinct but monophyletic clusters were found for the parasitic copepod Caligus elongatus Nordmann, 1832, supporting the results of previous studies that indicated the existence of an overlooked sea louse species. In contrast to these high distances, haplotype-sharing was observed for two decapod spider crab species, Macropodia parva Van Noort & Adema, 1985 and Macropodia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1761), underlining the need for a taxonomic revision of both species. Summarizing the results, our study confirms the application of DNA barcodes as highly effective identification system for the analyzed marine crustaceans of the North Sea and represents an important milestone for modern biodiversity assessment studies using barcode sequences. PMID:26417993

  20. From adjacent activation in Escherichia coli and DNA cyclization to eukaryotic enhancers: the elements of a puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Amouyal, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid cyclization, Escherichia coli lac repressor binding to two spaced lac operators and repression enhancement can be successfully used for a better understanding of the conditions required for interaction between eukaryotic enhancers and the machinery of transcription initiation. Chronologically, the DNA looping model has first accounted for the properties initially defining enhancers, i.e., independence of action with distance or orientation with respect to the start of transcription. It has also predicted enhancer activity or its disruption at short distance (site orientation, alignment between promoter and enhancer sites), with high-order complexes of protein, or with transcription factor concentrations close or different from the wild-type situation. In another step, histones have been introduced into the model to further adapt it to eukaryotes. They in fact favor DNA cyclization in vitro. The resulting DNA compaction might explain the difference counted in base pairs in the distance of action between eukaryotic transcription enhancers and prokaryotic repression enhancers. The lac looping system provides a potential tool for analysis of this discrepancy and of chromatin state directly in situ. Furthermore, as predicted by the model, the contribution of operators O2 and O3 to repression of the lac operon clearly depends on the lac repressor level in the cell and is prevented in strains overproducing lac repressor. By extension, gene regulation especially that linked to cell fate, should also depend on transcription factor levels, providing a potential tool for cellular therapy. In parallel, a new function of the O1–O3 loop completes the picture of lac repression. The O1–O3 loop would at the same time ensure high efficiency of repression, inducibility through the low-affinity sites and limitation of the level of repressor through self-repression of the lac repressor. Last, the DNA looping model can be successfully adapted to the enhancer

  1. DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage.

    PubMed

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Adams, David J; Sharpe, Ted; Harrow, Jennifer; Lupski, James R; Nicholson, Christine; Searle, Steven M; Wilming, Laurens; Young, Sarah K; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Bi, Weimin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Bugalter, Boris E; Butler, Jonathan; Chang, Jean L; Chen, Chao-Kung; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; Cuomo, Christina A; de Jong, Pieter J; DeCaprio, David; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael; Gilbert, James; Gibson, Richard; Gnerre, Sante; Goldstein, Steven; Grafham, Darren V; Grocock, Russell; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hart, Elizabeth; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Humphray, Sean; Jaffe, David B; Jones, Matt; Kamal, Michael; Khodiyar, Varsha K; LaButti, Kurt; Laird, Gavin; Lehoczky, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Loveland, Jane; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Lucy; Mauceli, Evan; McCarroll, Steven A; Mihalev, Atanas H; Mudge, Jonathan; Nguyen, Cindy; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Schwartz, David C; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steward, Charles; Swarbreck, David; Venkataraman, Vijay; Whittaker, Charles A; Yang, Xiaoping; Zimmer, Andrew R; Bradley, Allan; Hubbard, Tim; Birren, Bruce W; Rogers, Jane; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-04-20

    Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome. PMID:16625196

  2. Genetic relationships of Asians and Northern Europeans, revealed by Y-chromosomal DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Zerjal, T; Dashnyam, B; Pandya, A; Kayser, M; Roewer, L; Santos, F R; Schiefenhövel, W; Fretwell, N; Jobling, M A; Harihara, S; Shimizu, K; Semjidmaa, D; Sajantila, A; Salo, P; Crawford, M H; Ginter, E K; Evgrafov, O V; Tyler-Smith, C

    1997-01-01

    We have identified a new T-->C transition on the human Y chromosome. C-allele chromosomes have been found only in a subset of the populations from Asia and northern Europe and reach their highest frequencies in Yakut, Buryats, and Finns. Examination of the microsatellite haplotypes of the C-allele chromosomes suggests that the mutation occurred recently in Asia. The Y chromosome thus provides both information about population relationships in Asia and evidence for a substantial paternal genetic contribution of Asians to northern European populations such as the Finns. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9150165

  3. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish Squalius lucumonis and three other Italian leuciscines using chromosome banding and FISH with rDNA probes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anna Rita; Milana, Valentina; Hett, Anne Kathrin; Tancioni, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Karyotype and other chromosomal characteristics of the Appenine endemic cyprinid fish, Toscana stream chub Squalius lucumonis, were analysed using conventional banding and FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA probes. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 50) and karyotype characteristics including pericentromeric heterochromatic blocks and GC-rich CMA(3)-positive sites corresponding to both positive Ag-NORs and 45S rDNA loci on the short arms of a single medium-sized submetacentric chromosome pair were consistent with those found in most European leuciscine cyprinids. On other hand, 5S rDNA FISH in the Toscana stream chub and three other Italian leuciscines, S. squalus, Rutilus rubilio and Telestes muticellus, revealed a species-specific hybridization pattern, i.e. signals on four (S. lucumonis), three (S. squalus and R. rubilio) and two (T. muticellus) chromosome pairs. Whereas all the species shared the 5S rDNA loci on the largest subtelocentric chromosome pair, a "leuciscine" cytotaxonomic marker, S. lucumonis showed both classes of rDNA loci tandem aligned on the short arms of chromosome pair No. 12. The present findings suggest that the observed high variability of 5S rDNA loci provides a powerful tool for investigation of karyotype differentiation in karyologically conservative leuciscine fishes. PMID:23238894

  4. Configurational statistics of the DNA duplex: extended generator matrices to treat the rotations and translations of adjacent residues.

    PubMed

    Marky, N L; Olson, W K

    1994-01-01

    The base-to-base virtual bond treatment of nucleic acids used in statistical mechanical calculations of polynucleotide chain properties has been refined by incorporating the six parameters that relate the positions and orientations of sequential rigid bodies. The scheme allows for the sequence-dependent bending, twisting, and displacement of base pairs as well as for asymmetry in the angular and translational fluctuations of individual residues. Expressions are developed for the generator matrices required for the computation, as a function of chain length, of various parameters measuring the overall mean extension and shape of the DNA. Quantities of interest include the end-to-end vector r, the square of the end-to-end distance r2, the square radius of gyration s2, the center-of-gravity vector g, the second moments of inertia Sx2, and the higher moments of r and g. The matrix expressions introduced in the 1960s by Flory and co-workers for the determination of configuration-dependent polymer chain averages are decomposed into their translational and orientational contributions so that the methods can be extended to the rigid body analysis of chemical moieties. The new expressions permit, for the first time, examination of the effects of sequence-dependent translations, such as the lateral sliding of residues in A- and B-helices and the vertical opening of base pairs in drug-DNA complexes, on the average extension and shape of the long flexible double helix. The approach is in the following paper using conformational energy estimates of the base sequence-dependent flexibility of successive B-DNA base pairs. PMID:8110963

  5. Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression protects transformed human cells against DNA-damaging agents, and increases tolerance to chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, H B; Hukezalie, K R; Thompson, C A H; Au-Yeung, T T T; Ludlow, A T; Zhao, C R; Wong, J M Y

    2016-01-14

    Reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression is found in more than 85% of human cancers. The remaining cancers rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a recombination-based mechanism for telomere-length maintenance. Prevalence of TERT reactivation over the ALT mechanism was linked to secondary TERT function unrelated to telomere length maintenance. To characterize this non-canonical function, we created a panel of ALT cells with recombinant expression of TERT and TERT variants: TERT-positive ALT cells showed higher tolerance to genotoxic insults compared with their TERT-negative counterparts. We identified telomere synthesis-defective TERT variants that bestowed similar genotoxic stress tolerance, indicating that telomere synthesis activity is dispensable for this survival phenotype. TERT expression improved the kinetics of double-strand chromosome break repair and reduced DNA damage-related nuclear division abnormalities, a phenotype associated with ALT tumors. Despite this reduction in cytological abnormalities, surviving TERT-positive ALT cells were found to have gross chromosomal instabilities. We sorted TERT-positive cells with cytogenetic changes and followed their growth. We found that the chromosome-number changes persisted, and TERT-positive ALT cells surviving genotoxic events propagated through subsequent generations with new chromosome numbers. Our data confirm that telomerase expression protects against double-strand DNA (dsDNA)-damaging events, and show that this protective function is uncoupled from its role in telomere synthesis. TERT expression promotes oncogene-transformed cell growth by reducing the inhibitory effects of cell-intrinsic (telomere attrition) and cell-extrinsic (chemical- or metabolism-induced genotoxic stress) challenges. These data provide the impetus to develop new therapeutic interventions for telomerase-positive cancers through simultaneous targeting of multiple telomerase activities. PMID

  6. DNA sequence variation in a non-coding region of low recombination on the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kaessmann, H; Heissig, F; von Haeseler, A; Pääbo, S

    1999-05-01

    DNA sequence variation has become a major source of insight regarding the origin and history of our species as well as an important tool for the identification of allelic variants associated with disease. Comparative sequencing of DNA has to date focused mainly on mitochondrial (mt) DNA, which due to its apparent lack of recombination and high evolutionary rate lends itself well to the study of human evolution. These advantages also entail limitations. For example, the high mutation rate of mtDNA results in multiple substitutions that make phylogenetic analysis difficult and, because mtDNA is maternally inherited, it reflects only the history of females. For the history of males, the non-recombining part of the paternally inherited Y chromosome can be studied. The extent of variation on the Y chromosome is so low that variation at particular sites known to be polymorphic rather than entire sequences are typically determined. It is currently unclear how some forms of analysis (such as the coalescent) should be applied to such data. Furthermore, the lack of recombination means that selection at any locus affects all 59 Mb of DNA. To gauge the extent and pattern of point substitutional variation in non-coding parts of the human genome, we have sequenced 10 kb of non-coding DNA in a region of low recombination at Xq13.3. Analysis of this sequence in 69 individuals representing all major linguistic groups reveals the highest overall diversity in Africa, whereas deep divergences also exist in Asia. The time elapsed since the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is 535,000+/-119,000 years. We expect this type of nuclear locus to provide more answers about the genetic origin and history of humans. PMID:10319866

  7. DNA repair and crossing over favor similar chromosome regions as discovered in radiation hybrid of Triticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The uneven distribution of recombination across the length of chromosomes results in inaccurate estimates of genetic to physical distances. In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 3B, it has been estimated that 90% of the cross over occurs in distal sub-telomeric regions representing 40% of the...

  8. Alternative model for chromatin organization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA plasmid TRP1 RI circle (YARp1).

    PubMed Central

    Long, C M; Brajkovich, C M; Scott, J F

    1985-01-01

    TRP1 RI circle (now designated YARp1, yeast acentric ring plasmid 1) is a 1,453-base-pair artificial plasmid composed exclusively of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. It contains both the TRP1 gene and ARS1 (a DNA sequence that permits extrachromosomal maintenance of recombinant plasmids). This high-copy-number, relatively stable plasmid was shown to be organized into nucleosomes comparable to typical yeast chromatin, containing a possible maximum of nine nucleosomes per circle. Therefore, YARp1 can be used to examine the structure of chromatin of both a chromosomally derived replicator and a functional gene. By mapping regions of micrococcal nuclease cleavage in chromatin versus purified DNA, we located the positions of protected regions on the circle with reference to six unique restriction sites. Measurements made on patterns of early digestion products indicated that a region of approximately 300 base pairs in the vicinity of ARS1 was strongly resistant to micrococcal nuclease. The remainder of the plasmid appeared to be associated with five positioned nucleosomes and two nonnucleosomal, partially protected regions on the bulk of the molecules. After similar extents of digestion, naked DNA did not exhibit an equivalent pattern, although some hypersensitive cleavage sites matched sites found in the chromatin. These results are consistent with the interpretation that the protected domains are aligned with respect to a specific site or sites on the small circular chromatin. Images PMID:3018502

  9. Chromosome mapping of 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA by dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization in the half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Jiang, J; Liu, J; Yuan, J; Chen, Y; Zhang, Q; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) is an important aquaculture flatfish in China. Cytogenetic analysis has revealed that its sex determination system is female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW). The W chromosome is morphologically larger and has been considered evolutionarily younger than any other chromosome in the set. However, the genetic origin and evolution process of this neo-chromosome remains unclear. In this study, 2 tandem arrays of rRNA genes were chosen to address this question. Both the major rDNA (18S rDNA) and the minor rDNA (5S rDNA) were located on the C. semilaevis chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six 18S rDNA signals were observed on the centromeric regions of 3 pairs of autosomes in both males and females. In females, there was an additional 18S rDNA signal mapping to the telomeric region of the W chromosome long arm. With respect to the 5S rDNA, 12 signals were mapped to the centromeric regions of six pairs of autosomes. Two-color FISH further confirmed that the two pairs of the 5S rDNA signals were correspondingly located at the same positions of the same autosomes as those of the 18S rDNA signals. These results allowed us to speculate about the evolution process of the W chromosome. Chromosome fusions and repetitive sequence accumulations might have occurred in C. semilaevis. The synteny and non-synteny of C. semilaevis 18S rDNA and 5S rDNA might imply the original and evolutionary characteristics of this species. These findings will facilitate studies on karyotype evolution of the order Pleuronectiformes. PMID:25526196

  10. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Epstein-Barr-based episomal chromosomes shuttle 100 kb of self-replicating circular human DNA in mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Z.T.; Fu, H.; Livanos, E.; Wendelburg, B.; Gulino, S.; Vos, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the microcell fusion transfer of 100--200 kb self-replicating circular human minichromosomes from human into mouse cells. This experimental approach is illustrated through the shuttling of the latent 170 kb double-stranded DNA genome from the human herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, into nonpermissive rodent cells. Using this interspecies transfer strategy, circular episomes carrying 95--105 kb of human DNA were successfully established at low copy number in mouse A9 cells. Selected episomes were stably maintained for 6 months, and unselected episomes were characterized by a 95% episomal retention per cell division. The establishment of a mouse artificial episomal chromosome system should facilitate evolutionary and therapeutic studies of large human DNA in rodent genetic backgrounds.

  12. Genetic Networks Required to Coordinate Chromosome Replication by DNA Polymerases α, δ, and ε in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dubarry, Marion; Lawless, Conor; Banks, A Peter; Cockell, Simon; Lydall, David

    2015-10-01

    Three major DNA polymerases replicate the linear eukaryotic chromosomes. DNA polymerase α-primase (Pol α) and DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) replicate the lagging-strand and Pol α and DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) the leading-strand. To identify factors affecting coordination of DNA replication, we have performed genome-wide quantitative fitness analyses of budding yeast cells containing defective polymerases. We combined temperature-sensitive mutations affecting the three replicative polymerases, Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε with genome-wide collections of null and reduced function mutations. We identify large numbers of genetic interactions that inform about the roles that specific genes play to help Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε function. Surprisingly, the overlap between the genetic networks affecting the three DNA polymerases does not represent the majority of the genetic interactions identified. Instead our data support a model for division of labor between the different DNA polymerases during DNA replication. For example, our genetic interaction data are consistent with biochemical data showing that Pol ε is more important to the Pre-Loading complex than either Pol α or Pol δ. We also observed distinct patterns of genetic interactions between leading- and lagging-strand DNA polymerases, with particular genes being important for coupling proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading/unloading (Ctf18, Elg1) with nucleosome assembly (chromatin assembly factor 1, histone regulatory HIR complex). Overall our data reveal specialized genetic networks that affect different aspects of leading- and lagging-strand DNA replication. To help others to engage with these data we have generated two novel, interactive visualization tools, DIXY and Profilyzer. PMID:26297725

  13. Genetic Networks Required to Coordinate Chromosome Replication by DNA Polymerases α, δ, and ε in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Dubarry, Marion; Lawless, Conor; Banks, A. Peter; Cockell, Simon; Lydall, David

    2015-01-01

    Three major DNA polymerases replicate the linear eukaryotic chromosomes. DNA polymerase α-primase (Pol α) and DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) replicate the lagging-strand and Pol α and DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) the leading-strand. To identify factors affecting coordination of DNA replication, we have performed genome-wide quantitative fitness analyses of budding yeast cells containing defective polymerases. We combined temperature-sensitive mutations affecting the three replicative polymerases, Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε with genome-wide collections of null and reduced function mutations. We identify large numbers of genetic interactions that inform about the roles that specific genes play to help Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε function. Surprisingly, the overlap between the genetic networks affecting the three DNA polymerases does not represent the majority of the genetic interactions identified. Instead our data support a model for division of labor between the different DNA polymerases during DNA replication. For example, our genetic interaction data are consistent with biochemical data showing that Pol ε is more important to the Pre-Loading complex than either Pol α or Pol δ. We also observed distinct patterns of genetic interactions between leading- and lagging-strand DNA polymerases, with particular genes being important for coupling proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading/unloading (Ctf18, Elg1) with nucleosome assembly (chromatin assembly factor 1, histone regulatory HIR complex). Overall our data reveal specialized genetic networks that affect different aspects of leading- and lagging-strand DNA replication. To help others to engage with these data we have generated two novel, interactive visualization tools, DIXY and Profilyzer. PMID:26297725

  14. Construction and Characterization of a Repetitive DNA Library in Parodontidae (Actinopterygii: Characiformes): A Genomic and Evolutionary Approach to the Degeneration of the W Sex Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jordana Inácio Nascimento; Nogaroto, Viviane; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive DNA sequences, including tandem and dispersed repeats, comprise a large portion of eukaryotic genomes and are important for gene regulation, sex chromosome differentiation, and karyotype evolution. In Parodontidae, only the repetitive DNAs WAp and pPh2004 and rDNAs were previously studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study aimed to build a library of repetitive DNA in Parodontidae. We isolated 40 clones using Cot-1; 17 of these clones exhibited similarity to repetitive DNA sequences, including satellites, minisatellites, microsatellites, and class I and class II transposable elements (TEs), from Danio rerio and other organisms. The physical mapping of the clones to chromosomes revealed the presence of a satellite DNA, a Helitron element, and degenerate short interspersed element (SINE), long interspersed element (LINE), and tc1-mariner elements on the sex chromosomes. Some clones exhibited dispersed signals; other sequences were not detected. The 5S rDNA was detected on an autosomal pair. These elements likely function in the molecular degeneration of the W chromosome in Parodontidae. Thus, the location of these elements on the chromosomes is important for understanding the function of these repetitive DNAs and for integrative studies with genome sequencing. The presented data demonstrate that an intensive invasion of TEs occurred during W sex chromosome differentiation in the Parodontidae. PMID:25122415

  15. [Chromosomal aberrations and genetic polymorphism in genes of the xenobiotic detoxification and DNA repair enzymes in thermoelectric power plant employers].

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Ia A; Minina, V I; Bakanova, M L

    2012-01-01

    The results of the investigation of the interrelationship between frequency of chromosomal aberrations and detoxification enzymes (GSTM1, GSTT1) and DNA repair (hOGG1, XPD) genes in the employees of fuel energy complex in Kemerovo are presented In the group of the workers frequency of metaphases with aberrations (3,9 +/- 0,2%: n = 288) was shown to be significantly higher than in the comparison group (2,1 0, 2%: n = +/- 141). In the group of workers and control donors statistically significant differences were revealed in the frequency of distribution of the GSTT1 and hOGG1 genes. The level of chromosomal aberrations was established to be higher in patients with GSTM1 genotype "0/0" in the group of control donors. PMID:23458003

  16. Modification of some biological properties of HeLa cells containing adeno-associated virus DNA integrated into chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Walz, C; Schlehofer, J R

    1992-01-01

    Parvoviruses are known to interfere with cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. Since infecting adeno-associated virus (AAV) frequently integrates its DNA into the cellular genome, we analyzed whether this integration influences the transformed phenotype of the human tumor cell line HeLa. Analysis of three independent HeLa cell clones with integrated AAV DNA (HA-3x, HA-16, and HA-28) revealed the following phenotypic changes of these cells: (i) reduced growth rate, (ii) increased serum requirement, (iii) reduced capacity for colony formation in soft agar, (iv) reduced cloning efficiency on plastic, (v) elevated sensitivity to genotoxic agents (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, human tumor necrosis factor alpha, UV irradiation [256 nm], and heat [42 degrees C]), and (vi) reduced sensitivity to the cytolytic effect of parvovirus H-1. Reduced growth rate and enhanced sensitivity to gamma irradiation were also observed in vivo when tumors from AAV DNA-containing HeLa cells were transplanted into nude mice. This alteration of the biological properties of HeLa cells was independent of the number of AAV genomes integrated, the physical structure of integrated AAV DNA, and the transcription of AAV genes. Integration of AAV DNA was found to occur preferentially on the long arm of chromosome 17 in the three HeLa cell clones analyzed. These findings demonstrate that genomic integration of AAV DNA can alter the biological properties of human tumor cells. Images PMID:1313913

  17. Nuclear DNA Variation, Chromosome Numbers and Polyploidy in the Endemic and Indigenous Grass Flora of New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    MURRAY, B. G.; DE LANGE, P. J.; FERGUSON, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Little information is available on DNA C-values for the New Zealand flora. Nearly 85 % of the named species of the native vascular flora are endemic, including 157 species of Poaceae, the second most species-rich plant family in New Zealand. Few C-values have been published for New Zealand native grasses, and chromosome numbers have previously been reported for fewer than half of the species. The aim of this research was to determine C-values and chromosome numbers for most of the endemic and indigenous Poaceae from New Zealand. • Scope To analyse DNA C-values from 155 species and chromosome numbers from 55 species of the endemic and indigenous grass flora of New Zealand. • Key Results The new C-values increase significantly the number of such measurements for Poaceae worldwide. New chromosome numbers were determined from 55 species. Variation in C-value and percentage polyploidy were analysed in relation to plant distribution. No clear relationship could be demonstrated between these variables. • Conclusions A wide range of C-values was found in the New Zealand endemic and indigenous grasses. This variation can be related to the phylogenetic position of the genera, plants in the BOP (Bambusoideae, Oryzoideae, Pooideae) clade in general having higher C-values than those in the PACC (Panicoideae, Arundinoideae, Chloridoideae + Centothecoideae) clade. Within genera, polyploids typically have smaller genome sizes (C-value divided by ploidy level) than diploids and there is commonly a progressive decrease with increasing ploidy level. The high frequency of polyploidy in the New Zealand grasses was confirmed by our additional counts, with only approximately 10 % being diploid. No clear relationship between C-value, polyploidy and rarity was evident. PMID:16243852

  18. On the origin of the eukaryotic chromosome: the role of noncanonical DNA structures in telomere evolution.

    PubMed

    Garavís, Miguel; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The transition of an ancestral circular genome to multiple linear chromosomes was crucial for eukaryogenesis because it allowed rapid adaptive evolution through aneuploidy. Here, we propose that the ends of nascent linear chromosomes should have had a dual function in chromosome end protection (capping) and chromosome segregation to give rise to the "proto-telomeres." Later on, proper centromeres evolved at subtelomeric regions. We also propose that both noncanonical structures based on guanine-guanine interactions and the end-protection proteins recruited by the emergent telomeric heterochromatin have been required for telomere maintenance through evolution. We further suggest that the origin of Drosophila telomeres may be reminiscent of how the first telomeres arose. PMID:23699225

  19. On the Origin of the Eukaryotic Chromosome: The Role of Noncanonical DNA Structures in Telomere Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Garavís, Miguel; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The transition of an ancestral circular genome to multiple linear chromosomes was crucial for eukaryogenesis because it allowed rapid adaptive evolution through aneuploidy. Here, we propose that the ends of nascent linear chromosomes should have had a dual function in chromosome end protection (capping) and chromosome segregation to give rise to the “proto-telomeres.” Later on, proper centromeres evolved at subtelomeric regions. We also propose that both noncanonical structures based on guanine–guanine interactions and the end-protection proteins recruited by the emergent telomeric heterochromatin have been required for telomere maintenance through evolution. We further suggest that the origin of Drosophila telomeres may be reminiscent of how the first telomeres arose. PMID:23699225

  20. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H F; Fousteri, Maria I

    2007-07-20

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIalpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Lig3 and DNA polymerase delta colocalize and interact with NER components in a UV- and incision-dependent manner throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase epsilon are recruited to UV-damage sites only in proliferating cells. This study reveals an unexpected and key role for XRCC1-Lig3 in maintenance of genomic integrity by NER in both dividing and nondividing cells and provides evidence for cell-cycle regulation of NER-mediated repair synthesis in vivo. PMID:17643379

  1. Chromosomal Locations of 5S and 45S rDNA in Gossypium Genus and Its Phylogenetic Implications Revealed by FISH

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yimei; Liu, Fang; Chen, Dan; Wu, Qiong; Qin, Qin; Wang, Chunying; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Xiangdi; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Kunbo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the locations of 5S and 45S rDNA in Gossypium diploid A, B, D, E, F, G genomes and tetraploid genome (AD) using multi-probe fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for evolution analysis in Gossypium genus. The rDNA numbers and sizes, and synteny relationships between 5S and 45S were revealed using 5S and 45S as double-probe for all species, and the rDNA-bearing chromosomes were identified for A, D and AD genomes with one more probe that is single-chromosome-specific BAC clone from G. hirsutum (A1D1). Two to four 45S and one 5S loci were found in diploid-species except two 5S loci in G. incanum (E4), the same as that in tetraploid species. The 45S on the 7th and 9th chromosomes and the 5S on the 9th chromosomes seemed to be conserved in A, D and AD genomes. In the species of B, E, F and G genomes, the rDNA numbers, sizes, and synteny relationships were first reported in this paper. The rDNA pattern agrees with previously reported phylogenetic history with some disagreements. Combined with the whole-genome sequencing data from G. raimondii (D5) and the conserved cotton karyotype, it is suggested that the expansion, decrease and transposition of rDNA other than chromosome rearrangements might occur during the Gossypium evolution. PMID:23826377

  2. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of species-specific repetitive DNA sequences from Beta corolliflora, a wild relative of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Schmidt, T; Jung, C

    2000-12-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences have been isolated from a Sau3AI plasmid library of tetraploid Beta corolliflora (2n = 4x = 36), a wild relative of sugar beet (B. vulgaris). The library was screened by differential hybridization with genomic DNA of B. corolliflora and B. vulgaris. When used as probes for Southern hybridization of genomic DNA, six clones were determined to represent highly repetitive DNA families present only in the B. corolliflora genome. Five other sequences were highly repetitive in B. corolliflora and low or single copy in B. vulgaris. The insert size varied between 43 bp and 448 bp. Two sequences pBC1279 and pBC1944 displayed strong homology to a previously cloned satellite DNA from B. nana. With one exception, sequences are tandemly arranged as revealed by a typical ladder pattern after genomic Southern hybridization. The chromosomal distribution of five probes was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of mitotic metaphases from B. corolliflora and a triploid hybrid between B. vulgaris and B. corolliflora. Three sequences were spread along all chromosome arms of B. corolliflora while one sequence was present on only six chromosomes. The chromosome-specific sequence pBC216 was found in close vicinity to the 5S rDNA located on B. corolliflora chromosome IV. This set of species-specific sequences has the potential to be used as probes for the identification of monosomic alien addition lines and for marker-assisted gene transfer from wild beet to cultivated beet. PMID:11195340

  3. Location of the unique integration site on an Escherichia coli chromosome by bacteriophage lambda DNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2014-05-20

    The search for specific sequences on long genomes is a key process in many biological contexts. How can specific target sequences be located with high efficiency, within physiologically relevant times? We addressed this question for viral integration, a fundamental mechanism of horizontal gene transfer driving prokaryotic evolution, using the infection of Escherichia coli bacteria with bacteriophage λ and following the establishment of a lysogenic state. Following the targeting process in individual live E. coli cells in real time revealed that λ DNA remains confined near the entry point of a cell following infection. The encounter between the 15-bp-long target sequence on the chromosome and the recombination site on the viral genome is facilitated by the directed motion of bacterial DNA generated during chromosome replication, in conjunction with constrained diffusion of phage DNA. Moving the native bacterial integration site to different locations on the genome and measuring the integration frequency in these strains reveals that the frequencies of the native site and a site symmetric to it relative to the origin are similar, whereas both are significantly higher than when the integration site is moved near the terminus, consistent with the replication-driven mechanism we propose. This novel search mechanism is yet another example of the exquisite coevolution of λ with its host. PMID:24799672

  4. Bub3–BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box–dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3–BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes. PMID:26553926

  5. Chromosomal meiotic segregation, embryonic developmental kinetics and DNA (hydroxy)methylation analysis consolidate the safety of human oocyte vitrification.

    PubMed

    De Munck, N; Petrussa, L; Verheyen, G; Staessen, C; Vandeskelde, Y; Sterckx, J; Bocken, G; Jacobs, K; Stoop, D; De Rycke, M; Van de Velde, H

    2015-06-01

    Oocyte vitrification has been introduced into clinical settings without extensive pre-clinical safety testing. In this study, we analysed major safety aspects of human oocyte vitrification in a high security closed system: (i) chromosomal meiotic segregation, (ii) embryonic developmental kinetics and (iii) DNA (hydroxy)methylation status. Fresh and vitrified sibling oocytes from young donors after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were compared in three different assays. Firstly, the chromosomal constitution of the fertilized zygotes was deduced from array comparative genomic hybridization results obtained from both polar bodies biopsied at Day 1. Secondly, embryo development up to Day 3 was analysed by time-lapse imaging. Ten specific time points, six morphokinetic time intervals and the average cell number on Day 3 were recorded. Thirdly, global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation patterns were analysed by immunostaining on Day 3 embryos. The nuclear fluorescence intensity was measured by Volocity imaging software. Comprehensive chromosomal screening of the polar bodies demonstrated that at least half of the zygotes obtained after ICSI of fresh and vitrified oocytes were euploid. Time-lapse analysis showed that there was no significant difference in cleavage timings, the predictive morphokinetic time intervals nor the average cell number between embryos developed from fresh and vitrified oocytes. Finally, global DNA (hydroxy)methylation patterns were not significantly different between Day 3 embryos obtained from fresh and from vitrified oocytes. Our data further consolidate the safety of the oocyte vitrification technique. Nevertheless, additional testing in young and older sub-fertile/infertile patients and sound follow-up studies of children born after oocyte cryopreservation remain mandatory. PMID:25833840

  6. Comparative Study of Biosafety, DNA, and Chromosome Damage of Different-Materials-Modified Fe3O4 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dong-Lin; Chen, Yan-Pei; Chen, Chao; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Xiao-dong; He, Hong; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2015-11-01

    The increasing use of modified Fe3O4 magnetic microparticles has raised safety concerns regarding their use and effect on human health. This study assessed the in vivo biosafety, DNA, and chromosome damage of modified Fe3O4 microparticles such as Au@Fe3O4, Ag@Fe3O4, Cs@Fe3O4, Pt@Fe3O4, and CdS@Fe3O4, using spleen-deficient rats. Spleen-deficient rats treated with naked and modified (Au, Cs, Pt) Fe3O4 microparticles (5000 mg/kg) displayed low toxicity. Only treatment with Cds@Fe3O4 resulted in elevated toxicity and death in rats. Au-, Ag-, and Pt-modified Fe3O4 increased the rate of hemolysis in rats relative to treatment with naked Fe3O4. Despite this, Au- and Pt-modified Fe3O4 increased the biocompatibility and reduced DNA and chromosome damage in rats relative to naked Fe3O4. While Cs@Fe3O4 microparticles displayed a higher biocompatibility than naked Fe3O4, they displayed no significant reduction in DNA and chromosome damage. In summary, Au and Pt surface-modified Fe3O4 microparticles display elevated in vivo biosafety compared to unmodified particles. The precious metal material, with good biological compatibility, surface modification of Fe3O4 is an effective strategy to improve the overall safety and potential therapeutic utility of these magnetic materials. PMID:26329888

  7. Origins of domestic dog in Southern East Asia is supported by analysis of Y-chromosome DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Z-L; Oskarsson, M; Ardalan, A; Angleby, H; Dahlgren, L-G; Tepeli, C; Kirkness, E; Savolainen, P; Zhang, Y-P

    2012-01-01

    Global mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data indicates that the dog originates from domestication of wolf in Asia South of Yangtze River (ASY), with minor genetic contributions from dog–wolf hybridisation elsewhere. Archaeological data and autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism data have instead suggested that dogs originate from Europe and/or South West Asia but, because these datasets lack data from ASY, evidence pointing to ASY may have been overlooked. Analyses of additional markers for global datasets, including ASY, are therefore necessary to test if mtDNA phylogeography reflects the actual dog history and not merely stochastic events or selection. Here, we analyse 14 437 bp of Y-chromosome DNA sequence in 151 dogs sampled worldwide. We found 28 haplotypes distributed in five haplogroups. Two haplogroups were universally shared and included three haplotypes carried by 46% of all dogs, but two other haplogroups were primarily restricted to East Asia. Highest genetic diversity and virtually complete phylogenetic coverage was found within ASY. The 151 dogs were estimated to originate from 13–24 wolf founders, but there was no indication of post-domestication dog–wolf hybridisations. Thus, Y-chromosome and mtDNA data give strikingly similar pictures of dog phylogeography, most importantly that roughly 50% of the gene pools are shared universally but only ASY has nearly the full range of genetic diversity, such that the gene pools in all other regions may derive from ASY. This corroborates that ASY was the principal, and possibly sole region of wolf domestication, that a large number of wolves were domesticated, and that subsequent dog–wolf hybridisation contributed modestly to the dog gene pool. PMID:22108628

  8. Kinship and Y-Chromosome Analysis of 7th Century Human Remains: Novel DNA Extraction and Typing Procedure for Ancient Material

    PubMed Central

    Vanek, Daniel; Saskova, Lenka; Koch, Hubert

    2009-01-01

    Aim To develop novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for DNA identification of the 7th century human remains, determine the familiar relationship between the individuals, estimate the Y-chromosome haplogroup, and compare the Y-chromosome haplotype with the contemporary populations. Methods DNA from preserved femur samples was extracted using the modified silica-based extraction technique. Polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using human identification kits MiniFiler, Identifiler, and Y-filer and also laboratory-developed and validated Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) pentaplexes with short amplicons. Results For 244A, 244B, 244C samples, full autosomal DNA profiles (15 STR markers and Amelogenin) and for 244D, 244E, 244F samples, MiniFiler profiles were produced. Y-chromosome haplotypes consisting of up to 24 STR markers were determined and used to predict the Y-chromosome haplogroups and compare the resulting haplotypes with the current population. Samples 244A, 244B, 244C, and 244D belong to Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b and the samples 244E and 244F to haplogroup G2a. Comparison of ancient haplotypes with the current population yielded numerous close matches with genetic distance bellow 2. Conclusion Application of forensic genetics in archaeology enables retrieving new types of information and helps in data interpretation. The number of successfully typed autosomal and Y-STR loci from ancient specimens in this study is one of the largest published so far for aged samples. PMID:19480023

  9. Sister chromatid telomere fusions, but not NHEJ-mediated inter-chromosomal telomere fusions, occur independently of DNA ligases 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Liddiard, Kate; Ruis, Brian; Takasugi, Taylor; Harvey, Adam; Ashelford, Kevin E.; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Baird, Duncan M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres shorten with each cell division and can ultimately become substrates for nonhomologous end-joining repair, leading to large-scale genomic rearrangements of the kind frequently observed in human cancers. We have characterized more than 1400 telomere fusion events at the single-molecule level, using a combination of high-throughput sequence analysis together with experimentally induced telomeric double-stranded DNA breaks. We show that a single chromosomal dysfunctional telomere can fuse with diverse nontelomeric genomic loci, even in the presence of an otherwise stable genome, and that fusion predominates in coding regions. Fusion frequency was markedly increased in the absence of TP53 checkpoint control and significantly modulated by the cellular capacity for classical, versus alternative, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We observed a striking reduction in inter-chromosomal fusion events in cells lacking DNA ligase 4, in contrast to a remarkably consistent profile of intra-chromosomal fusion in the context of multiple genetic knockouts, including DNA ligase 3 and 4 double-knockouts. We reveal distinct mutational signatures associated with classical NHEJ-mediated inter-chromosomal, as opposed to alternative NHEJ-mediated intra-chromosomal, telomere fusions and evidence for an unanticipated sufficiency of DNA ligase 1 for these intra-chromosomal events. Our findings have implications for mechanisms driving cancer genome evolution. PMID:26941250

  10. Rapid and correct identification of intestinal Bacteroides spp. with chromosomal DNA probes by whole-cell dot blot hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi, M.; Ohno, T.; Mutai, M.

    1988-05-01

    A dot blot hybridization procedure with /sup 32/P-labeled whole chromosomal DNA of the type strains as probes was developed as a rapid and simple method for identification of intestinal Bacteroides species. Bacterial cells were fixed onto membrane filters by slight suction, treated with 0.5 N NaOH, and hybridized with these probes. Of 65 Bacteroides strains isolated from 19 human fecal specimens, which were identified as B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus, B. caccae, B. uniformis, B. stercoris, B. vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. merdae by conventional phenotypic characterization, 62 (95%) were correctly identified with this hybridization procedure.

  11. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of the crucian carp, Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae), using chromosome staining and fluorescence in situ hybridisation with rDNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Spoz, Aneta; Boron, Alicja; Porycka, Katarzyna; Karolewska, Monika; Ito, Daisuke; Abe, Syuiti; Kirtiklis, Lech; Juchno, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The crucian carp Carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) is a species with restricted and decreasing distribution in Europe. Six males and six females of the species from the Baltic Sea basin in Poland were examined to show sequentially CMA3/AgNO3 staining pattern, DAPI staining, and, for the first time in literature, molecular cytogenetic analysis using double-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with 28S and 5S rDNA probes. The karyotype consisted of 20 m, 36 sm and 44 sta chromosomes, NF=156. The AgNO3 stained NORs were most frequently located terminally in the short arms of two sm and two sta elements, and CMA3-positive sites were also observed suggesting abundant GC-rich repetitive DNA in the regions. Other CMA3-positive sites in the short arms of six to ten sm and sta chromosomes were detected. The results based on 28S rDNA FISH confirmed the location of rDNA sites. DAPI-negative staining of NORs suggested the scarcity of AT-rich DNA in the regions. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed 8–14 loci (ten and 12 in respectively 49 and 29% of metaphases). They were located in two sm and eight to ten sta chromosomes and six of them were larger than others. Simultaneously, mapping of the two rDNA families on the chromosomes of C. carassius revealed that both 28S and 5S rDNA probes were located in different chromosomes. Molecular cytogenetic data of C. carassius presented here for the first time give an important insight into the structure of chromosomes of this polyploid and declining species and may be useful in its systematics. PMID:25349674

  12. Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15.

    PubMed

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Sharpe, Ted; Young, Sarah K; Rowen, Lee; O'Neill, Keith; Whittaker, Charles A; Kamal, Michael; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Abbasi, Nissa; Abouelleil, Amr; Arachchi, Harindra M; Baradarani, Lida; Birditt, Brian; Bloom, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Burke, Jeremy; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dorris, Lester; Dors, Monica; Eichler, Evan E; Engels, Reinhard; Fahey, Jessica; Fleetwood, Peter; Friedman, Cynthia; Gearin, Gary; Hall, Jennifer L; Hensley, Grace; Johnson, Ericka; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kaur, Amardeep; Locke, Devin P; Madan, Anuradha; Munson, Glen; Jaffe, David B; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Naylor, Jerome W; Nesbitt, Ryan; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Ratcliffe, Amber; Rounsley, Steven; She, Xinwei; Sneddon, Katherine M B; Stewart, Sandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Stone, Sabrina M; Topham, Kerri; Vincent, Dascena; Wang, Shunguang; Zimmer, Andrew R; Birren, Bruce W; Hood, Leroy; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-03-30

    Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome. PMID:16572171

  13. Mapping of DNA markers linked to the cystic fibrosis locus on the long arm of chromosome 7.

    PubMed Central

    Zengerling, S; Tsui, L C; Grzeschik, K H; Olek, K; Riordan, J R; Buchwald, M

    1987-01-01

    We have used a panel of eight human/mouse somatic-cell hybrids, each containing various portions of human chromosome 7, and three patient cell lines with interstitial deletions on chromosome 7 for localization of six DNA markers linked to the cystic fibrosis locus. Our data suggest that D7S15 is located in the region 7 cen----q22, that MET is located in 7q22----31, and that D7S8 and 7C22 are located in q22----q32. The hybridization results for COL1A2 and TCRB are consistent with their previous assignment to 7q21----q22 and 7q32, respectively. Given the location of these six markers and their linkage relationships, it is probable that the cystic fibrosis locus is in either the distal region of band q22 or the proximal region of q31. Using the same set of cell lines, we have also examined the location of another chromosome 7 marker PGY1. The data show that PGY1 is located in the region 7cen----q22, a position very different from its previous assignment. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3472464

  14. Phylogeny and chromosomal variations in East Asian Carex, Siderostictae group (Cyperaceae), based on DNA sequences and cytological data.

    PubMed

    Yano, Okihito; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Jin, Xiao-Feng; Hoshino, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Carex (Cyperaceae) is one of the largest genera of the flowering plants, and comprises more than 2,000 species. In Carex, section Siderostictae with broader leaves distributed in East Asia is thought to be an ancestral group. We aimed to clarify the phylogenetic relationships and chromosomal variations within the section Siderostictae, and to examine the relationship of broad-leaved species of the sections Hemiscaposae and Surculosae from East Asia, inferred from DNA sequences and cytological data. Our results indicate that a monophyletic Siderostictae clade, including the sections Hemiscaposae, Siderostictae and Surculosae, as the earliest diverging group in the tribe Cariceae. Low chromosome numbers, 2n = 12 or 24, with large sizes were observed in these three sections. Our results suggest that the genus Carex might have originated or relictly restricted in the East Asia. Geographical distributions of diploid species are restricted in narrower areas, while those of tetraploid species are wider in East Asia. It is concluded that chromosomal variations in Siderostictae clade may have been caused by polyploidization and that tetraploid species may have been able to exploit their habitats by polyploidization. PMID:23857080

  15. Mitochondrial DNA and Y Chromosome Variation Provides Evidence for a Recent Common Ancestry between Native Americans and Indigenous Altaians

    PubMed Central

    Dulik, Matthew C.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Askapuli, Ayken; Gau, Lydia; Gokcumen, Omer; Rubinstein, Samara; Schurr, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    The Altai region of southern Siberia has played a critical role in the peopling of northern Asia as an entry point into Siberia and a possible homeland for ancestral Native Americans. It has an old and rich history because humans have inhabited this area since the Paleolithic. Today, the Altai region is home to numerous Turkic-speaking ethnic groups, which have been divided into northern and southern clusters based on linguistic, cultural, and anthropological traits. To untangle Altaian genetic histories, we analyzed mtDNA and Y chromosome variation in northern and southern Altaian populations. All mtDNAs were assayed by PCR-RFLP analysis and control region sequencing, and the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome was scored for more than 100 biallelic markers and 17 Y-STRs. Based on these data, we noted differences in the origin and population history of Altaian ethnic groups, with northern Altaians appearing more like Yeniseian, Ugric, and Samoyedic speakers to the north, and southern Altaians having greater affinities to other Turkic speaking populations of southern Siberia and Central Asia. Moreover, high-resolution analysis of Y chromosome haplogroup Q has allowed us to reshape the phylogeny of this branch, making connections between populations of the New World and Old World more apparent and demonstrating that southern Altaians and Native Americans share a recent common ancestor. These results greatly enhance our understanding of the peopling of Siberia and the Americas. PMID:22281367

  16. A group of chromosomal proteins is specifically released by spermine and loses DNA-binding activity upon phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Van den Broeck, D; Van der Straeten, D; Van Montagu, M; Caplan, A

    1994-01-01

    Biologically relevant concentrations as low as 500 microM spermine led to the specific release of chromatin-associated proteins from nuclei of rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings. Using a southwestern technique, it was shown that several of these proteins bind DNA. This affinity was lost upon in organello phosphorylation by an endogenous kinase. The effect of spermine was very specific. Spermidine was far less effective and putrescine was essentially ineffective in releasing these proteins. The most abundant spermine-released protein was shown to be homologous to the maize HMG1 protein. Our results suggest that spermine induces the release of spermine-released proteins by changing DNA conformation. Binding of these proteins might be sensitive to long-range changes in chromosome structure caused by torsional stress. PMID:7991684

  17. Role of Fanconi Anemia FANCG in Preventing Double-Strand Breakage and Chromosomal Rearrangement during DNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Tebbs, R S; Hinz, J M; Yamada, N A; Wilson, J B; Jones, N J; Salazar, E P; Thomas, C B; Jones, I M; Thompson, L H

    2003-10-04

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins overlap with those of homologous recombination through FANCD1/BRCA2, but the biochemical functions of other FA proteins are unknown. By constructing and characterizing a null fancg mutant of hamster CHO cells, we present several new insights for FA. The fancg cells show a broad sensitivity to genotoxic agents, not supporting the conventional concept of sensitivity to only DNA crosslinking agents. The aprt mutation rate is normal, but hprt mutations are reduced, which we ascribe to the lethality of large deletions. CAD and dhfr gene amplification rates are increased, implying excess chromosomal breakage during DNA replication, and suggesting amplification as a contributing factor to cancer-proneness in FA patients. In S-phase cells, both spontaneous and mutagen-induced Rad51 nuclear foci are elevated. These results support a model in which FancG protein helps to prevent collapse of replication forks by allowing translesion synthesis or lesion bypass through homologous recombination.

  18. Patterns of Y and X chromosome DNA sequence divergence during the Felidae radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Pecon Slattery, J; O'Brien, S J

    1998-01-01

    The 37 species of modern cats have evolved from approximately eight phylogenetic lineages within the past 10 to 15 million years. The Felidae family has been described with multiple measures of morphologic and molecular evolutionary methods that serve as a framework for tracking gene divergence during brief evolutionary periods. In this report, we compare the mode and tempo of evolution of noncoding sequences of a large intron within Zfy (783 bp) and Zfx (854 bp), homologous genes located on the felid Y and X chromosomes, respectively. Zfy sequence variation evolves at about twice the rate of Zfx, and both gene intron sequences track feline hierarchical topologies accurately. As homoplasies are infrequent in patterns of nucleotide substitution, the Y chromosome sequence displays a remarkable degree of phylogenetic consistency among cat species and provides a highly informative glimpse of divergence of sex chromosome sequences in Felidae. PMID:9539439

  19. Sensing DNA damage: A role for chromosome communication in aneuploidy induction

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Mitotic cells of all organisms examined exhibit the capability for recombination based on the physical or genetic detection of exchange or the isolation of enzymes involved in recombination such as strand exchange protein. However, evidence demonstrating interactions between chromosomes is generally lacking except with smaller eukaryotes. In humans there are abundant examples of homozygosis for disease genes, particularly tumor suppressors, thereby demonstrating the relevance of interchromosomal interactions. The appearance in Bloom`s syndrome of symmetrical quadriradials between the sister chromatids in homologous chromosomes further implies that interchromosomal exchange can occur in mitotic cells of humans. With the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae it has been possible to examine the importance of mitotic interchromosomal interactions not only for the purpose of understanding mechanisms of mitotic recombination but also to examine its general biological importance. Unlike meiosis, homologous recombination does not play a role in the distribution of chromosomes in mitosis.

  20. Cloning human herpes virus 6A genome into bacterial artificial chromosomes and study of DNA replication intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Ronen; Frenkel, Niza

    2009-01-01

    Cloning of large viral genomes into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) facilitates analyses of viral functions and molecular mutagenesis. Previous derivations of viral BACs involved laborious recombinations within infected cells. We describe a single-step production of viral BACs by direct cloning of unit length genomes, derived from circular or head-to-tail concatemeric DNA replication intermediates. The BAC cloning is independent of intracellular recombinations and DNA packaging constraints. We introduced the 160-kb human herpes virus 6A (HHV-6A) genome into BACs by digesting the viral DNA replicative intermediates with the Sfil enzyme that cleaves the viral genome in a single site. The recombinant BACs contained also the puromycin selection gene, GFP, and LoxP sites flanking the BAC sequences. The HHV-6A-BAC vectors were retained stably in puromycin selected 293T cells. In the presence of irradiated helper virus, supplying most likely proteins enhancing gene expression they expressed early and late genes in SupT1 T cells. The method is especially attractive for viruses that replicate inefficiently and for viruses propagated in suspension cells. We have used the fact that the BAC cloning “freezes” the viral DNA replication intermediates to analyze their structure. The results revealed that HHV-6A-BACs contained a single direct repeat (DR) rather than a DR-DR sequence, predicted to arise by circularization of parental genomes with a DR at each terminus. HHV-6A DNA molecules prepared from the infected cells also contained DNA molecules with a single DR. Such forms were not previously described for HHV-6 DNA. PMID:19858479

  1. Isolation and characterization of transcribed sequences from a chromosome 16 hn-cDNA library and the physical mapping of genes and transcribed sequences using a high-resolution somatic cell panel of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, S.A.; Apostolou, S.; Lane, S.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Phillips, H.A.; Richards, R.I.; Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F. )

    1994-03-15

    A hn-cDNA (heteronuclear complementary DNA) library was constructed from a mouse/human somatic cell hybrid, CY18, which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. Hexamer primers constructed from consensus 5[prime]intron splice sequences were used to generate cDNA from the immature unspliced mRNA. The resulting cDNA library was screened with a total human DNA probe to identify potential human clones. Rescreening was necessary, and use of a mouse-derived clone with homology to 7SL RNA proved successful in eliminating the majority of mouse clones. Thirteen clones had open reading frames, and of those, five showed homology to human sequences in Gen-Bank. Two clones had homology to random partially sequenced cDNAs, one clone was likely to be a GRP78 pseudogene, one clone mapped the PHKG2 gene to 16p11.2-16p12.1, and one clone had homology to human S-13 ribosomal protein. All clones except the latter were mapped to a high-resolution somatic cell panel. Although isolation of human chromosome 16 genes from this library was successful, it was apparent that cDNA synthesis was initiated at sites other than intron splice sites, presumably by mispairing of the hexamers. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of a 15,500 bp fragment near the left telomere of chromosome XV from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals a putative sugar transporter, a carboxypeptidase homologue and two new open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Gamo, F J; Lafuente, M J; Casamayor, A; Ariño, J; Aldea, M; Casas, C; Herrero, E; Gancedo, C

    1996-06-15

    We report the sequence of a 15.5 kb DNA segment located near the left telomere of chromosome XV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sequence contains nine open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 300 bp. Three of them are internal to other ones. One corresponds to the gene LGT3 that encodes a putative sugar transporter. Three adjacent ORFs were separated by two stop codons in frame. These ORFs presented homology with the gene CPS1 that encodes carboxypeptidase S. The stop codons were not found in the same sequence derived from another yeast strain. Two other ORFs without significant homology in databases were also found. One of them, O0420, is very rich in serine and threonine and presents a series of repeated or similar amino acid stretches along the sequence. PMID:8810044

  3. Evaluation of two new fluorochromes, TOTO and YOYO, for DNA content analysis in cells and chromosomes by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hirons, G.T.; Crissman, H.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The fluorochromes TOTO and YOYO were evaluated for their effectiveness in staining for DNA content analysis by flow cytometry (FCM). The dyes are dimers of thiazole orange (TO) and yellow oxazole (YO), respectively (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR), and both have a very high quantum efficiency. Spectrofluorometric analysis showed that TOTO and YOYO had little fluorescence until bound to DNA or RNA. YOYO, the brighter of the two dyes, had an emission peak at [approximately]510 nm and TOTO at [approximately]530 nm. Analysis by flow cytometry indicated that cells stained with either dye at a concentration of [approximately]4.0 [mu]M could be preferentially excited at either 457 or 488 nm. Unfixed nuclei and fixed cells both treated with RNase, stained with either TOTO or YOYO, and analyzed by FCM yielded coefficients of variation (CV) comparable to CVs obtained for the same samples stained with mithramycin (MI) when excited at 457 nm and propidium iodide (PI) when excited at 488 nm. Both TOTO and YOYO are also being evaluated for their effectiveness in staining Chinese hamster embryo chromosomes; these results are being compared with results obtained with PI stained chromosomes.

  4. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: Chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair. PMID:11459990

  5. Characterization and chromosome location of satellite DNA in the leaf beetle Chrysolina americana (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Lorite, P; Palomeque, T; Garnería, I; Petitpierre, E

    2000-01-01

    This paper is the first record of the satellite DNA of the specialized phytophagous genus Chrysolina. The satellite DNA of Chrysolina americana is organized in a tandem repeat of monomers 189 bp long, has a A + T content of 59.6% and presents direct and inverted internal repeats. Restriction analysis of the total DNA with methylation sensitive enzymes suggests that this repetitive DNA is undermethylated. In siti hybridization with a biotinylated probe of the satellite DNA showed the pericentromeric localization of these sequences in all meiotic bivalents. The presence of this repetitive DNA in other species of the genus was also tested by Southern analysis. The results showed that this satellite DNA sequence is specific to the C. americana genome and has not been found in three other species of Chrysolina with a different choice of host plants than in the former. PMID:11678504

  6. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  7. Karyotyping and in situ chromosomal localization of rDNA sites in black cumin Bunium persicum (Boiss) B. Fedtsch,1915 (Apiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Chahota, R. K.; Mukai, Y.; Chaudhary, H.K.; Kishore, Naval; Sharma, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique has been applied to somatic chromosomes in the medicinally important species, Bunium persicum, to elucidate its karyotypes. The bicolour FISH technique involving 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes as probes was used to assign physical localization and measurement of rDNA sites on homologous pairs of chromosomes. The two 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene sites were at the terminal regions of the short arms of the chromosomes 1 and 2 involving NOR region of chromosome 1. The 5S rDNA sites were found on subtelomeric region of the long arm of the chromosome number 5 and at interstitial regions of the short arm of chromosome 7. Based on direct visual analysis of chromosome length, morphology and position of FISH signals, a pioneer attempt has been made to construct metaphase karyotype in Bunium persicum, an endangered medicinal plant of North Western Himalayas. PMID:24260640

  8. Molecular and Cytogenetic Analysis of the Heterochromatin-Euchromatin Junction Region of the Drosophila Melanogaster X Chromosome Using Cloned DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, M. T.; Mitchelson, A.; Tudor, M.; O'Hare, K.; Davies, J. A.; Miklos, GLG.

    1990-01-01

    We have used three cloned DNA sequences consisting of (1) part of the suppressor of forked transcription unit, (2) a cloned 359-bp satellite, and (3), a type I ribosomal insertion, to examine the structure of the base of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster where different chromatin types are found in juxtaposition. A DNA probe from the suppressor of forked locus hybridizes exclusively to the very proximal polytenized part of division 20, which forms part of the β-heterochromatin of the chromocenter. The cloned 359-bp satellite sequence, which derives from the proximal mitotic heterochromatin between the centromere and the ribosomal genes, hybridizes to the under replicated α-heterochromatin of the chromocenter. The type I insertion sequence, which has major locations in the ribosomal genes and in the distal mitotic heterochromatin of the X chromosome, hybridizes as expected to the nucleolus but does not hybridize to the β-heterochromatic division 20 of the polytene X chromosome. Our molecular data reveal that the suppressor of forked locus, which on cytogenetic grounds is the most proximal ordinary gene on the X chromosome, is very close to the junction of the polytenized and non-polytenized region of the X chromosome. The data have implications for the structure of β-heterochromatin-α-heterochromatin junction zones in both mitotic and polytene chromosomes, and are discussed with reference to models of chromosome structure. PMID:2118871

  9. Differential DNA sequence deletions from chromosomes 3, 11, 13, and 17 in squamous-cell carcinoma, large-cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the human lung

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, A.; Willey, J.C.; Modali, R.; Sugimura, H.; McDowell, E.M.; Resau, J.; Light, B.; Haugen, A.; Mann, D.L.; Trump, B.F.; Harris, C.C. )

    1989-07-01

    Activation of protooncogens and inactivation of putative tumor suppressor genes are genetic lesions considered to be important in lung carcinogenesis. Fifty-four cases of non-small-cell lung cancer (23 adenocarcinomas, 23 squamous-cell carcinomas, and 8 large-cell carcinomas) were examined for loss of DNA sequences at 13 polymorphic genetic loci. Loss of heterozygosity was seen more frequently in squamous-cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma. The loss of DNA sequences from the short arm of chromosome 17 (D17S1 locus) was detected in 8 of 9 heterozygous cases of squamous-cell carcinoma and in only 2 of 11 heterozygous cases of adenocarcinomas. Loss of DNA sequences from chromosome 3 was seen in 16 of 31 cases where the constitutive DNA was heterozygous-i.e., informative. Loss of heterozygosity at the chromosome 13q locus, D13S3, was seen in 9 of 21 informative cases, and in 2 cases, both adenocarcinomas, duplication of the intact DNA sequences suggested the possibility that mitotic recombination had occurred. Frequent DNA sequence deletions, including those from chromosome 17, in squamous-cell carcinomas may reflect the extensive mutagenic and clastogenic effects of tobacco smoke that may lead to inactivation of putative tumor-suppressor genes.

  10. A Predominantly Neolithic Origin for Y-Chromosomal DNA Variation in North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Arredi, Barbara; Poloni, Estella S.; Paracchini, Silvia; Zerjal, Tatiana; Fathallah, Dahmani M.; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Pascali, Vincenzo L.; Novelletto, Andrea; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2004-01-01

    We have typed 275 men from five populations in Algeria, Tunisia, and Egypt with a set of 119 binary markers and 15 microsatellites from the Y chromosome, and we have analyzed the results together with published data from Moroccan populations. North African Y-chromosomal diversity is geographically structured and fits the pattern expected under an isolation-by-distance model. Autocorrelation analyses reveal an east-west cline of genetic variation that extends into the Middle East and is compatible with a hypothesis of demic expansion. This expansion must have involved relatively small numbers of Y chromosomes to account for the reduction in gene diversity towards the West that accompanied the frequency increase of Y haplogroup E3b2, but gene flow must have been maintained to explain the observed pattern of isolation-by-distance. Since the estimates of the times to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCAs) of the most common haplogroups are quite recent, we suggest that the North African pattern of Y-chromosomal variation is largely of Neolithic origin. Thus, we propose that the Neolithic transition in this part of the world was accompanied by demic diffusion of Afro-Asiatic–speaking pastoralists from the Middle East. PMID:15202071

  11. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation

  12. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA Damage Checkpoint Promotes Androgen Induced Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Liu, Ji; Tang, Kaidun; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2012-01-01

    The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR) to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:23272087

  13. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  14. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment.

    PubMed

    Funk, C D; Funk, L B; Kennedy, M E; Pong, A S; Fitzgerald, G A

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A2, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide-derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human--hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and its gene regulation. PMID:1907252

  15. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  16. New approach data in electric fish (Teleostei: Gymnotus): sex chromosome evolution and repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maelin; Matoso, Daniele Aparecida; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Feldberg, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    Antagonist sexual selection is the driving force behind the origin and diversification of sex chromosomes such as XX/XY and ZZ/ZW. However, chromosome mobility, mainly in fishes, may result in the formation of chromosomes of recent origin, a process known as turnover. The family Gymnotidae, which is composed of the genera Electrophorus+Gymnotus, presents a multiple system of the type X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, which has been described for Gymnotus pantanal. This article describes the karyotype of three Amazon Gymnotus species, revealing the presence of both simple and multiple systems: Gymnotus carapo "Catalão" 2n=40 XX/XY, Gymnotus coropinae 2n=49♂/50♀ X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y, and Gymnotus sp. "Negro" 2n=50 XX/XY. Our hypothesis is that the simple system present in G. carapo "Catalão" is ancestral in relation to G. pantanal's multiple system and that the diversification of the subsequent multiple system occurred after the final separation of the Amazon and Paraná basins. Moreover, G. coropinae's multiple system may have originated from the simple system present in Gymnotus sp. "Negro." The distant position between the species in the Gymnotidae family's phylogeny in addition to differences in sex chromosome formula and number between Clade G1 G. coropinae and G. sp. "Negro" species and "Carapo" Clade. G. carapo and G. pantanal species suggest that both sequences of sexual systems occurred independently, supporting other proposed models and highlighting the fact that species of the genus Gymnotus may serve as a model for studying sex chromosome turnover. PMID:25264714

  17. Population genetic diversity of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) in China based on the mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aiguo; Zhuo, Xiaolei; Zou, Qing; Chen, Jintao; Zou, Jixing

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variation and population structure of northern snakehead (Channa argus) from eight locations in China were investigated using mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences. Sequence analysis showed that there were 105 haplotypes in 260 individuals, 48 unique haplotypes and 57 shared haplotypes, but no common haplotype shared by all populations. As a whole, the haplotype diversity was high (h=0.989), while the nucleotide diversity was low (π=0.00482). AMOVA analysis detected significant genetic differentiation among all eight populations (FST=0.328, p<0.01) and 66.17% of the total variance was resulted from intra-population differentiation. UPGMA analysis indicated that the eight populations could be divided into four major clusters, which was consistent with that the eight sampled locations were belonged to four isolated river systems. The neutrality and mismatch distribution tests suggested that the eight populations of C. argus in the sampling locations underwent recent population expansion. Among the eight populations, the Erhai Lake population may represent a unique genetic resource and therefore needs to be conserved. PMID:24724976

  18. Chromosomal localization of 45S rDNA, sex-specific C values, and heterochromatin distribution in Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Biplab Kumar; Yamamoto, Masashi; Jha, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Coccinia grandis is a widely distributed dioecious cucurbit in India, with heteromorphic sex chromosomes and X-Y sex determination mode. The present study aids in the cytogenetic characterization of four native populations of this plant employing distribution patterns of 45S rDNA on chromosomes and guanine-cytosine (GC)-rich heterochromatin in the genome coupled with flow cytometric determination of genome sizes. Existence of four nucleolar chromosomes could be confirmed by the presence of four telomeric 45S rDNA signals in both male and female plants. All four 45S rDNA sites are rich in heterochromatin evident from the co-localization of telomeric chromomycin A (CMA)(+ve) signals. The size of 45S rDNA signal was found to differ between the homologues of one nucleolar chromosome pair. The distribution of heterochromatin is found to differ among the male and female populations. The average GC-rich heterochromatin content of male and female populations is 23.27 and 29.86 %, respectively. Moreover, the male plants have a genome size of 0.92 pg/2C while the female plants have a size of 0.73 pg/2C, reflecting a huge genomic divergence between the genders. The great variation in genome size is owing to the presence of Y chromosome in the male populations, playing a multifaceted role in sexual divergence in C. grandis. PMID:25795278

  19. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Rahul; Vasudevan, Sona; Patil, Digvijay; Ashoura, Norah; Grimwade, Julia E.; Crooke, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vicinity of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Upon limited proteolysis with trypsin or chymotrypsin ADP-DnaA, but not ATP-DnaA generated relatively stable proteolytic fragments of various sizes. Examined sites of limited protease susceptibility that differ between ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA largely reside in the amino terminal half of DnaA. The concentration of adenine nucleotide needed to induce conformational changes, as detected by these protease susceptibilities of DnaA, coincides with the conversion of an inactive bacterial origin recognition complex (bORC) to a replication efficient pre-replication complex (pre-RC) at the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). PMID:26610483

  20. Nucleotide-Induced Conformational Changes in Escherichia coli DnaA Protein Are Required for Bacterial ORC to Pre-RC Conversion at the Chromosomal Origin.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rahul; Vasudevan, Sona; Patil, Digvijay; Ashoura, Norah; Grimwade, Julia E; Crooke, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    DnaA oligomerizes when bound to origins of chromosomal replication. Structural analysis of a truncated form of DnaA from Aquifex aeolicus has provided insight into crucial conformational differences within the AAA+ domain that are specific to the ATP- versus ADP- bound form of DnaA. In this study molecular docking of ATP and ADP onto Escherichia coli DnaA, modeled on the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaA, reveals changes in the orientation of amino acid residues within or near the vicinity of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Upon limited proteolysis with trypsin or chymotrypsin ADP-DnaA, but not ATP-DnaA generated relatively stable proteolytic fragments of various sizes. Examined sites of limited protease susceptibility that differ between ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA largely reside in the amino terminal half of DnaA. The concentration of adenine nucleotide needed to induce conformational changes, as detected by these protease susceptibilities of DnaA, coincides with the conversion of an inactive bacterial origin recognition complex (bORC) to a replication efficient pre-replication complex (pre-RC) at the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). PMID:26610483

  1. Hybridization between multiple fence lizard lineages in an ecotone: locally discordant variation in mitochondrial DNA, chromosomes, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Leaché, Adam D; Cole, Charles J

    2007-03-01

    We investigated a hybrid zone between two major lineages of fence lizards (Sceloporus cowlesi and Sceloporus tristichus) in the Sceloporus undulatus species complex in eastern Arizona. This zone occurs in an ecotone between Great Basin Grassland and Conifer Woodland habitats. We analysed spatial variation in mtDNA (N=401; 969 bp), chromosomes (N=217), and morphology (N=312; 11 characters) to characterize the hybrid zone and assess species limits. A fine-scale population level phylogenetic analysis refined the boundaries between these species and indicated that four nonsister mtDNA clades (three belonging to S. tristichus and one to S. cowlesi) are sympatric at the centre of the zone. Estimates of cytonuclear disequilibria in the population closest to the centre of the hybrid zone suggest that the S. tristichus clades are randomly mating, but that the S. cowlesi haplotype has a significant nonrandom association with nuclear alleles. Maximum-likelihood cline-fitting analyses suggest that the karyotype, morphology, and dorsal colour pattern clines are all coincident, but the mtDNA cline is skewed significantly to the south. A temporal comparison of cline centres utilizing karyotype data collected in the early 1970s and in 2002 suggests that the cline may have shifted by approximately 1.5 km to the north over a 30-year period. The recent northward expansion of juniper trees into the Little Colorado River Basin resulting from intense cattle overgrazing provides a plausible mechanism for a shifting hybrid zone and the introgression of the mtDNA haplotypes, which appear to be selectively neutral. It is clear that complex interactions are operating simultaneously in this contact zone, including the formation of hybrids between populations within S. tristichus having diagnostic mtDNA, morphology, karyotypes, and dorsal colour patterns, and secondary contact between these and a distantly related yet morphologically cryptic mtDNA lineage (S. cowlesi). PMID:17305859

  2. Comparability of multiple data types from the Bering Strait region: cranial and dental metrics and nonmetrics, mtDNA, and Y-chromosome DNA.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Brianne; Hanihara, Tsunehiko; Godde, Kanya

    2014-07-01

    Different data types have previously been shown to have the same microevolutionary patterns in worldwide data sets. However, peopling of the New World studies have shown a difference in migration paths and timings using multiple types of data, spurring research to understand why this is the case. This study was designed to test the degree of similarity in evolutionary patterns by using cranial and dental metric and nonmetric data, along with Y-chromosome DNA and mtDNA. The populations used included Inuits from Alaska, Canada, Siberia, Greenland, and the Aleutian Islands. For comparability, the populations used for the cranial and molecular data were from similar geographic regions or had a shared population history. Distance, R and kinship matrices were generated for use in running Mantel tests, PROTEST analyses, and Procrustes analyses. A clear patterning was seen, with the craniometric data being most highly correlated to the mtDNA data and the cranial nonmetric data being most highly correlated with the Y-chromosome data, while the phenotypic data were also linked. This patterning is suggestive of a possible male or female inheritance, or the correlated data types are affected by the same or similar evolutionary forces. The results of this study indicate cranial traits have some degree of heritability. Moreover, combining data types leads to a richer knowledge of biological affinity. This understanding is important for bioarchaeological contexts, in particular, peopling of the New World studies where focusing on reconciling the results from comparing multiple data types is necessary to move forward. PMID:24643445

  3. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  4. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  5. Human paternal and maternal demographic histories: insights from high-resolution Y chromosome and mtDNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparisons of maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and paternally-inherited non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) variation have provided important insights into the impact of sex-biased processes (such as migration, residence pattern, and so on) on human genetic variation. However, such comparisons have been limited by the different molecular methods typically used to assay mtDNA and NRY variation (for example, sequencing hypervariable segments of the control region for mtDNA vs. genotyping SNPs and/or STR loci for the NRY). Here, we report a simple capture array method to enrich Illumina sequencing libraries for approximately 500 kb of NRY sequence, which we use to generate NRY sequences from 623 males from 51 populations in the CEPH Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP). We also obtained complete mtDNA genome sequences from the same individuals, allowing us to compare maternal and paternal histories free of any ascertainment bias. Results We identified 2,228 SNPs in the NRY sequences and 2,163 SNPs in the mtDNA sequences. Our results confirm the controversial assertion that genetic differences between human populations on a global scale are bigger for the NRY than for mtDNA, although the differences are not as large as previously suggested. More importantly, we find substantial regional variation in patterns of mtDNA versus NRY variation. Model-based simulations indicate very small ancestral effective population sizes (<100) for the out-of-Africa migration as well as for many human populations. We also find that the ratio of female effective population size to male effective population size (Nf/Nm) has been greater than one throughout the history of modern humans, and has recently increased due to faster growth in Nf than Nm. Conclusions The NRY and mtDNA sequences provide new insights into the paternal and maternal histories of human populations, and the methods we introduce here should be widely applicable for further such studies. PMID

  6. Y-Chromosome and mtDNA Genetics Reveal Significant Contrasts in Affinities of Modern Middle Eastern Populations with European and African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Badro, Danielle A.; Youhanna, Sonia C.; Salloum, Angélique; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Johnsrud, Brian; Khazen, Georges; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Soria-Hernanz, David F.; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Platt, Daniel E.; Zalloua, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Middle Eastern populations. In this study 5,174 mtDNA and 4,658 Y-chromosome samples were investigated using PCA, MDS, mean-linkage clustering, AMOVA, and Fisher exact tests of FST's, RST's, and haplogroup frequencies. Geographic differentiation in affinities of Middle Eastern populations with Africa and Europe showed distinct contrasts between mtDNA and Y-chromosome data. Specifically, Lebanon's mtDNA shows a very strong association to Europe, while Yemen shows very strong affinity with Egypt and North and East Africa. Previous Y-chromosome results showed a Levantine coastal-inland contrast marked by J1 and J2, and a very strong North African component was evident throughout the Middle East. Neither of these patterns were observed in the mtDNA. While J2 has penetrated into Europe, the pattern of Y-chromosome diversity in Lebanon does not show the widespread affinities with Europe indicated by the mtDNA data. Lastly, while each population shows evidence of connections with expansions that now define the Middle East, Africa, and Europe, many of the populations in the Middle East show distinctive mtDNA and Y-haplogroup characteristics that indicate long standing settlement with relatively little impact from and movement into other populations. PMID:23382925

  7. Determination of population origin: a comparison of autosomal SNPs, Y-chromosomal and mtDNA haplogroups using a Malagasy population as example.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, Micaela; Wiegand, Aline; Harder, Melanie; Blöhm, Rowena; Rakotomavo, Noel; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms have been used for population studies for a long time. However, there is another possibility to define the origin of a population: autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose allele frequencies differ considerably in different populations. In an attempt to compare the usefulness of these approaches we studied a population from Madagascar using all the three mentioned approaches. Former investigations of Malagasy maternal (mtDNA) and paternal (Y chromosome) lineages have led to the assumption that the Malagasy are an admixed population with an African and Asian-Indonesian heritage. Our additional study demonstrated that more than two-third of the Malagasy investigated showed clearly a West African genotype regarding only the autosomal SNPs despite the fact that 64% had an Asian mtDNA and more than 70% demonstrated an Asian-Indonesian heritage in either mtDNA or Y-chromosomal haplogroup or both. Nonetheless, the admixture of the Malagasy could be confirmed. A clear African or Asian-Indonesian heritage according to all the three DNA approaches investigated was only found in 14% and 1% of male samples, respectively. Not even the European or Northern African influences, detected in 9% of males (Y-chromosomal analysis) and 11% of samples (autosomal SNPs) were consistent. No Malagasy in our samples showed a European or Northern African origin in both categories. So, the analysis of autosomal SNPs could confirm the admixed character of the Malagasy population, even if it pointed to a greater African influence as detectable by Y-chromosomal or mtDNA analysis. PMID:23612573

  8. Fragile sites of 45S rDNA of Lolium multiflorum are not hotspots for chromosomal breakages induced by X-ray.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Laiane Corsini; Mittelmann, Andrea; Houben, Andreas; Techio, Vânia Helena

    2016-07-01

    Sites of 45S rDNA of Lolium are regions denominated fragile sites (FSs), constituting regions slightly stained with DAPI due to increased DNA unpacking in metaphasic chromosomes. Considered to be fragile regions in the genome, the FSs might be more responsive to induced breaks and result in chromosomal fragments and rearrangements, unless repairing mechanisms such as recombination or de novo telomere formation play a role at the break site of the DNA. Thus, this study aimed at investigating if SFs from Lolium are hotspots for the occurrence of breakages induced by X-ray and if they are regions favorable to synthesize new telomeres, using Hordeum vulgare as a comparative model. Lolium multiflorum and H. vulgare seedlings were irradiated with 20 and 50 Gy X-ray and evaluated one day following the irradiation and at 7-days intervals for a 28-days period, using FISH technique with 45S rDNA and Arabidopsis-type telomere probes in order to investigate the presence of chromosomal breakages and new telomere formation. H. vulgare did not survive after a few days of irradiation due to the increased rate of abnormalities. L. multiflorum also exhibited chromosomal abnormalities following the exposure, yet over the 28-days trial it had a decrease in the chromosomal damage rate and formation of de novo telomere has not been detected along this time. Despite being considered to be fragile regions in the genome, the 45S rDNA sites of Lolium are not hotspots to chromosomal breakages after the induction of breakages. PMID:27174104

  9. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu-Ping; Gan, Hai-Yan; Li, Fen-Xia; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Rong-Liang; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure. Methods Artificial DNA mixture samples (360), with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction. Results A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B. Conclusion A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability. PMID:26765738

  10. Chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins prevents hyperactivation of DNA damage-induced signaling upon replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Ricard, Étienne; Weber, Sandra; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wong, Lai Hong; Sellam, Adnane; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Raymond, Martine; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes five sirtuins (Sir2 and Hst1–4), which constitute a conserved family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. Cells lacking any individual sirtuin display mild growth and gene silencing defects. However, hst3Δ hst4Δ double mutants are exquisitely sensitive to genotoxins, and hst3Δ hst4Δ sir2Δ mutants are inviable. Our published data also indicate that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuins prevents growth of several fungal pathogens, although the biological basis is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide fitness assays conducted with nicotinamide (NAM), a pan-sirtuin inhibitor. Our data indicate that NAM treatment causes yeast to solicit specific DNA damage response pathways for survival, and that NAM-induced growth defects are mainly attributable to inhibition of Hst3 and Hst4 and consequent elevation of histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac). Our results further reveal that in the presence of constitutive H3K56ac, the Slx4 scaffolding protein and PP4 phosphatase complex play essential roles in preventing hyperactivation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in response to spontaneous DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Overall, our data support the concept that chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins is critical to mitigate growth defects caused by endogenous genotoxins. PMID:26748095

  11. Chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins prevents hyperactivation of DNA damage-induced signaling upon replicative stress.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Antoine; Ricard, Étienne; Weber, Sandra; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wong, Lai Hong; Sellam, Adnane; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Raymond, Martine; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes five sirtuins (Sir2 and Hst1-4), which constitute a conserved family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. Cells lacking any individual sirtuin display mild growth and gene silencing defects. However, hst3Δ hst4Δ double mutants are exquisitely sensitive to genotoxins, and hst3Δ hst4Δ sir2Δmutants are inviable. Our published data also indicate that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuins prevents growth of several fungal pathogens, although the biological basis is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide fitness assays conducted with nicotinamide (NAM), a pan-sirtuin inhibitor. Our data indicate that NAM treatment causes yeast to solicit specific DNA damage response pathways for survival, and that NAM-induced growth defects are mainly attributable to inhibition of Hst3 and Hst4 and consequent elevation of histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac). Our results further reveal that in the presence of constitutive H3K56ac, the Slx4 scaffolding protein and PP4 phosphatase complex play essential roles in preventing hyperactivation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in response to spontaneous DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Overall, our data support the concept that chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins is critical to mitigate growth defects caused by endogenous genotoxins. PMID:26748095

  12. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis. PMID:23990328

  13. Sequence-specific microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at satellite repeats in individual cell nuclei and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Miyanari, Yusuke; Shirane, Kenjiro; Nitta, Hirohisa; Kubota, Takeo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Methylation-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (MeFISH) was developed for microscopic visualization of DNA methylation status at specific repeat sequences in individual cells. MeFISH is based on the differential reactivity of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine in target DNA for interstrand complex formation with osmium and bipyridine-containing nucleic acids (ICON). Cell nuclei and chromosomes hybridized with fluorescence-labeled ICON probes for mouse major and minor satellite repeats were treated with osmium for crosslinking. After denaturation, fluorescent signals were retained specifically at satellite repeats in wild-type, but not in DNA methyltransferase triple-knockout (negative control) mouse embryonic stem cells. Moreover, using MeFISH, we successfully detected hypomethylated satellite repeats in cells from patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome and 5-hydroxymethylated satellite repeats in male germ cells, the latter of which had been considered to be unmethylated based on anti-5-methylcytosine antibody staining. MeFISH will be suitable for a wide range of applications in epigenetics research and medical diagnosis. PMID:23990328

  14. Synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  15. The telomeric region of the human X chromosome long arm: presence of a highly polymorphic DNA marker and analysis of recombination frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Oberlé, I; Drayna, D; Camerino, G; White, R; Mandel, J L

    1985-01-01

    A DNA fragment (named St14) derived from the human X chromosome reveals a small family of related sequences that have been mapped to the Xq26-Xq28 region by using a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. The probe detects in human DNA digested by Taq I a polymorphic system defined by a series of at least eight allelic fragments with a calculated heterozygosity in females of 80%. With Msp I, we found three additional restriction fragment length polymorphisms, each of them being defined by two alleles. These polymorphisms are also common in Caucasian populations. The genetic locus defined by probe St14 has been localized more precisely to the distal end of the X chromosome (in band q28) by linkage analysis to other polymorphic DNA markers. The results obtained suggest that the frequency of recombination is distributed very unevenly in the q27-qter region of the X chromosome, with a cluster of seven tightly linked loci in q28 showing about 30% recombination with the gene for coagulation factor IX located in the neighboring q27 band. Probe St14 reveals one of the most polymorphic loci known to date in the human genome, and 17 different genotypes have already been observed. It constitutes the best marker on the X chromosome and should be of great use for the genetic study of three important diseases: hemophilia A, mental retardation with a fragile X chromosome, and adrenoleukodystrophy. Images PMID:2986139

  16. Molecular genetic evidence for the human settlement of the Pacific: analysis of mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome and HLA markers.

    PubMed Central

    Hagelberg, E; Kayser, M; Nagy, M; Roewer, L; Zimdahl, H; Krawczak, M; Lió, P; Schiefenhövel, W

    1999-01-01

    Present-day Pacific islanders are thought to be the descendants of Neolithic agriculturalists who expanded from island South-east Asia several thousand years ago. They speak languages belonging to the Austronesian language family, spoken today in an area spanning half of the circumference of the world, from Madagascar to Easter Island, and from Taiwan to New Zealand. To investigate the genetic affinities of the Austronesian-speaking peoples, we analysed mitochondrial DNA, HLA and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in individuals from eight geographical locations in Asia and the Pacific (China, Taiwan, Java, New Guinea highlands, New Guinea coast, Trobriand Islands, New Britain and Western Samoa). Our results show that the demographic expansion of the Austronesians has left a genetic footprint. However, there is no simple correlation between languages and genes in the Pacific. PMID:10091254

  17. Induction of transcription within chromosomal DNA loops flanked by MAR elements causes an association of loop DNA with the nuclear matrix

    PubMed Central

    Iarovaia, Olga V.; Akopov, Sergey B.; Nikolaev, Lev G.; Sverdlov, Eugene D.; Razin, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of an ∼170 kb region of human chromosome 19, including CD22 and GPR40–GPR43 genes, was studied using in situ hybridization of a set of cosmid and PAC probes with nuclear halos prepared from proliferating and differentiated HL60 cells. The whole region under study was found to be looped out into the nuclear halo in proliferating cells. It is likely that the loop observed was attached to the nuclear matrix via MAR elements present at the flanks of the area under study. Upon dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiation of the cells the looped fragment became associated with the nuclear matrix. This change in the spatial organization correlated with the activation of transcription of at least two (CD22 and GPR43) genes present within the loop. The data obtained are discussed in the framework of the hypothesis postulating that the spatial organization of chromosomal DNA is maintained via constitutive (basic) and facultative (transcription-related) interactions of the latter with the nuclear matrix. PMID:16049024

  18. Induction of transcription within chromosomal DNA loops flanked by MAR elements causes an association of loop DNA with the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Iarovaia, Olga V; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Razin, Sergey V

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of an approximately 170 kb region of human chromosome 19, including CD22 and GPR40-GPR43 genes, was studied using in situ hybridization of a set of cosmid and PAC probes with nuclear halos prepared from proliferating and differentiated HL60 cells. The whole region under study was found to be looped out into the nuclear halo in proliferating cells. It is likely that the loop observed was attached to the nuclear matrix via MAR elements present at the flanks of the area under study. Upon dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiation of the cells the looped fragment became associated with the nuclear matrix. This change in the spatial organization correlated with the activation of transcription of at least two (CD22 and GPR43) genes present within the loop. The data obtained are discussed in the framework of the hypothesis postulating that the spatial organization of chromosomal DNA is maintained via constitutive (basic) and facultative (transcription-related) interactions of the latter with the nuclear matrix. PMID:16049024

  19. Anti-genotoxic effect of the Sargassum dentifolium extracts: prevention of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei, and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Abo-Zeid, Mona A M; Ahmed, Eman F

    2013-01-01

    The alga Sargassum dentifolium (Turner) C. Agardh, belongs to Sargassaceae, is a brown seaweed in red sea shores in Egypt. This work aimed to extract different water-soluble polysaccharide extracts (E1, E2, and E3) from S. dentifolium and to investigate their protective effect against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced genotoxicity. Mice bone marrow cells (BMCs) were collected and analyzed for the chromosomal aberration, micronucleated BMCs (MN-BMCs), the mitotic index, DNA fragmentation by comet assay, and histone deacetylases (HDACs), and radical scavenging capacity of extracts was evaluated by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. The results indicated that E2 and E3 significantly inhibited CP-induced multiple chromosomal aberrations, where E1 and E3 significantly suppressed the number of CP-induced formation of tetraploidy. The extracts prohibited the cytotoxic effect of CP and recovered the mitotic activity, whereas E1 possessed the highest recovery and mitosis. In absence of MN, CP induced formation of bi- and poly-nucleated BMCs. E1 prohibited CP-induced formation of bi-nucleated BMCs, while E2 and E3 prohibited CP-induced formation of poly-nucleated BMCs. CP-induced MN-BMCs were accompanied with mono-, bi- and poly-nucleated cells. E1 and E3 remarkably suppressed mono-nucleated MN-BMCs, while E2 inhibited bi-nucleated MN-BMCs. All the extracts significantly inhibited the CP-induced formation of poly-nucleated MN-BMCs. CP-induced DNA fragmentation was inhibited by all extracts, where E1 was the strongest inhibitor as concluded from the comet tail moment. All the extracts were strong OH scavengers, while only E3 was ROO scavenger. The results revealed a drastic decline in HDACs activity by E1 and E3. In conclusion, S. dentifolium polysaccharide extracts E1 and E3 possessed a potential anti-genotoxic and a promising anti-mutagenic activity. PMID:21652192

  20. Gene identification and DNA sequence analysis in the GC-poor 20 megabase region of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Tong, S; Shen, Y; Kao, F T

    1997-06-24

    In contrast to the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 21, the proximal half of approximately 20 megabases of DNA, including 21q11-21 bands, is low in GC content, CpG islands, and identified genes. Despite intensive searches, very few genes and cDNAs have been found in this region. Since the 21q11-21 region is associated with certain Down syndrome pathologies like mental retardation, the identification of relevant genes in this region is important. We used a different approach by constructing microdissection libraries specifically for this region and isolating unique sequence microclones for detailed molecular analysis. We found that this region is enriched with middle and low-copy repetitive sequences, and is also heavily methylated. By sequencing and homology analysis, we identified a significant number of genes/cDNAs, most of which appear to belong to gene families. In addition, we used unique sequence microclones in direct screening of cDNA libraries and isolated 12 cDNAs for this region. Thus, although the 21q11-21 region is gene poor, it is not completely devoid of genes/cDNAs. The presence of high proportions of middle and low-copy repetitive sequences in this region may have evolutionary significance in the genome organization and function of this region. Since 21q11-21 is heavily methylated, the expression of genes in this region may be regulated by a delicate balance of methylation and demethylation, and the presence of an additional copy of chromosome 21 may seriously disturb this balance and cause specific Down syndrome anomalies including mental retardation. PMID:9192657

  1. Linkage analysis of two cloned DNA sequences flanking the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus on the short arm of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K E; Pearson, P L; Harper, P S; Murray, J M; O'Brien, T; Sarfarazi, M; Williamson, R

    1983-01-01

    The inheritance of two restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) on the short arm of the human X chromosome has been studied relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This provides a partial genetic map of the short arm of the human X chromosome between Xp110 and Xp223. The data were derived from the segregation between a RFLP located at Xp21-Xp223, the DMD locus, and a RFLP located at Xp110-Xp113. The genetic distance from Xp110 to Xp223 was found to be approximately 40 centimorgans (cM). This provides experimental confirmation that 1cM corresponds to approximately 1,000 kilobase pairs of DNA for this region of the human X chromosome. Our data confirm that the DMD mutation lies between Xp223 and Xp110. The availability of flanking probes surrounding the DMD locus will assist in the ordering of further DNA sequences relative to the mutation. Images PMID:6304647

  2. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  3. Physical organization of the 1.709 satellite IV DNA family in Bovini and Tragelaphini tribes of the Bovidae: sequence and chromosomal evolution.

    PubMed

    Adega, F; Chaves, R; Guedes-Pinto, H; Heslop-Harrison, J S

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive DNA in the mammalian genome is a valuable record and marker for evolution, providing information about the order and driving forces related to evolutionary events. The evolutionarily young 1.709 satellite IV DNA family is present near the centromeres of many chromosomes in the Bovidae. Here, we isolated 1.709 satellite DNA sequences from five Bovidae species belonging to Bovini: Bos taurus (BTA, cattle), Bos indicus (BIN, zebu), Bubalus bubalis (BBU, water buffalo) and Tragelaphini tribes: Taurotragus oryx (TOR, eland) and Tragelaphus euryceros (TEU, bongo). Its presence in both tribes shows the sequence predates the evolutionary separation of the two tribes (more than 10 million years ago), and primary sequence shows increasing divergence with evolutionary distance. Genome organization (Southern hybridization) and physical distribution (in situ hybridization) revealed differences in the molecular organization of these satellite DNA sequences. The data suggest that the sequences on the sex chromosomes and the autosomes evolve as relatively independent groups, with the repetitive sequences suggesting that Bovini autosomes and the Tragelaphini sex chromosomes represent the more primitive chromosome forms. PMID:16825766

  4. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Haiming Chen; Lalioti, M.D.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1996-07-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family and is homologous to Drosophila w (and to 2 genes from other species) and to a lesser extent to Drosophila brown (bw) and scarlet (st) genes that are all involved in the transport of eye pigment precursor molecules. A DNA polymorphism with 62% heterozygosity due to variation of a poly (T) region in the 3{prime} UTR of the hW has been identified and used for the incorporation of this gene to the genetic map of chromosome 21. The hW is located at 21q22.3 between DNA markers D21S212 and D21S49 in a P1 clone that also contains marker BCEI. The gene is expressed at various levels in many human tissues. The contributions of this gene to the Down syndrome phenotypes, to human eye color, and to the resulting phenotypes of null or missense mutations are presently unknown. 56 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Patterns of DNA sequence polymorphism along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tenaillon, Maud I.; Sawkins, Mark C.; Long, Anthony D.; Gaut, Rebecca L.; Doebley, John F.; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2001-01-01

    We measured sequence diversity in 21 loci distributed along chromosome 1 of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.). For each locus, we sequenced a common sample of 25 individuals representing 16 exotic landraces and nine U.S. inbred lines. The data indicated that maize has an average of one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) every 104 bp between two randomly sampled sequences, a level of diversity higher than that of either humans or Drosophila melanogaster. A comparison of genetic diversity between the landrace and inbred samples showed that inbreds retained 77% of the level of diversity of landraces, on average. In addition, Tajima's D values suggest that the frequency distribution of polymorphisms in inbreds was skewed toward fewer rare variants. Tests for selection were applied to all loci, and deviations from neutrality were detected in three loci. Sequence diversity was heterogeneous among loci, but there was no pattern of diversity along the genetic map of chromosome 1. Nonetheless, diversity was correlated (r = 0.65) with sequence-based estimates of the recombination rate. Recombination in our sample was sufficient to break down linkage disequilibrium among SNPs. Intragenic linkage disequilibrium declines within 100–200 bp on average, suggesting that genome-wide surveys for association analyses require SNPs every 100–200 bp. PMID:11470895

  6. Lack of evidence for association of meiotic nondisjunction with particular DNA haplotypes on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, N; Gusella, J F; Perroni, L; Bricarelli, F D; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis of a predisposition to meiotic nondisjunction for chromosome 21 carrying a specific molecular haplotype has been tested. The haplotype in question is defined by the restriction fragment length polymor