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Sample records for adjacent compact bone

  1. The behaviour of microcracks in compact bone.

    PubMed

    O'brien, Fergal J; Hardiman, David A; Hazenberg, Jan G; Mercy, Matthew V; Mohsin, Sahar; Taylor, David; Lee, T Clive

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarises four separate studies carried out by our group over the past number of years in the area of bone microdamage. The first study investigated the manner by which microcracks accumulate and interact with bone microstructure during fatigue testing of compact bone specimens. In a series of fatigue tests carried out at four different stress ranges between 50 and 80 MPA, crack density increased with loading cycles at a rate determined by the applied stress. Variations in the patterns of microdamage accumulation suggest that that at low stress levels, larger amounts of damage can build up without failure occurring. In a second study using a series of four-pont bending tests carried out on ovine bone samples, it was shown that bone microstructure influenced the ability of microcracks to propagate, with secondary osteons acting as barriers to crack growth. In a third study, the manner by which crack growth disrupts the canalicular processes connecting osteocytes was investigated. Analysis of individual cracks showed that disruption of the canalicular processes connecting osteocytes occurred due to shear displacement at the face of propagating microcracks, suggesting that this may play some role in the mechanism that signals bone remodelling. In a fourth in vivo study, it was shown that altering the mechanical load applied to the long bones of growing rats causes microcrack formation. In vivo microdamage was present in rats subjected to hindlimb suspension with a higher microcrack density found in the humeri than the femora. Microdamage was also found in control animals. This is the first study to demonstrate in vivo microcracks in normally loaded bones in a rat model.

  2. Compact bone fatigue damage: a microscopic examination.

    PubMed

    Carter, D R; Hayes, W C

    1977-01-01

    Flexural fatigue tests of bovine bone specimens produced fracture surfaces that were transverse on the tension side and oblique on the compression side. Similar fracture patterns were produced by bending tests with a single applied loading. Microscopic examination of flexural fatigue specimens prior to complete established that fatigue fracture is caused by the progressive accumulation of diffuse structural damage. The microdamage observed on the tension side consisted primarily of separation (or debonding) at cement lines and interlamellar cement bands. Tensile cracks in interstitial bone were also observed. The major damage modes on the compression side were oblique cracking and longitudinal splitting. The fatigue fracture patterns observed for the bone specimens correspond to the types of fatigue fractures observed clinically. Compact bone fatigue fractures in areas of longitudinal tensile stresses are generally seen as transverse lesions, whereas fatigue fractures in areas of longitudinal compressive stresses are normally oblique fractures. The diffuse nature of the observed fatigue damage is consistent with the hypothesis that microdamage caused by mechanical loading may serve as a stimulus for in vivo bone remodeling.

  3. Evolutionary Patterns of Bone Histology and Bone Compactness in Xenarthran Mammal Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Straehl, Fiona R.; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Forasiepi, Analía M.; MacPhee, Ross D.; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  4. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    PubMed

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  5. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    PubMed

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness.

  6. Compact bone distribution and biomechanics of early hominid mandibles.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J; Grine, F E

    1991-11-01

    This investigation explores the effects of compact bone distribution on the biomechanical properties of the postcanine mandibular corpus of the fossil hominid taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus. The mandibles of extant great apes, modern humans, and the fossil hominids are examined by computed tomography (CT), and compact bone contours are used to calculate cross-sectional biomechanical properties (cortical area, second moments of area, and Bredt's formula for torsional strength). The relative amount of compact bone is comparable in the modern and fossil mandibles, but the mechanical properties of A. africanus and P. robustus jaws are distinct in terms of the ratio of minimum to maximum second moments of area. This difference most likely represents a structural response to elevated torsional moments in the fossil hominids. Although the relative amount of compact bone in cross-section does not differ significantly between taxa by statistical criteria, A. africanus utilizes less cortical bone than P. robustus in the same manner in which Pongo is separated from the condition in other extant large-bodied hominoids. It has been suggested that the phenomenon of mandibular "robusticity" (expressed as an index of corpus breadth/corpus height) may be an effect of postcanine megadontia and/or reduced canine size in the australopithecines. Results presented here, however, indicate that it is unlikely that either factor adequately accounts for mandibular size and shape variation in early hominids. PMID:1746641

  7. The fracture mechanics of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone.

    PubMed

    Wright, T M; Hayes, W C

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply the techniques of fracture mechanics to a study of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone. Small cracks parallel to the long axis of the bone were initiated in standardized specimens of bovine bone. Crack growth was achieved by cyclically loading these specimens. The rate of crack growth was determined from measurements of crack length versus cycles of loading. The stress intensity factor at the tip of the crack was calculated from knowledge of the applied load, the crack length, and the specimen geometry. A strong correlation was found between the experimentally determined crack growth rate and the applied stress intensity. The relationship takes the form of a power law similar to that for other materials. Visual observation and scanning electron microscopy revealed that crack propagation occurred by initiation of subcritical cracks ahead of the main crack.

  8. Osteogenetic activity in composite grafts of demineralized compact bone and marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Wittbjer, J.; Palmer, B.; Rohlin, M.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1983-03-01

    The effects of a composite graft of autologous marrow and demineralized autologous compact bone on the healing of a surgically created bone defect were observed in adult rabbits. A segment of the radius was bilaterally resected, demineralized, and replaced. On one side the bone graft was supplemented with autologous marrow. The new bone formation was measured 14 and 28 days after operation by roentgenography, including planimetry with scintigraphy and autoradiography using /sup 99m/Tc-labelled MDP. The composite graft, i.e., demineralized compact bone and marrow, had a significantly higher (p less than 0.01) bone formation rate 14 days after operation compared with the graft with demineralized compact bone in the opposite radius. At 28 days, however, there were no differences between the sides. Viable autologous marrow cells and demineralized autologous compact bone graft accelerate the rate of osteogenesis, but only at the beginning of the healing process.

  9. Aging of microstructural compartments in human compact bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkus, Ozan; Polyakova-Akkus, Anna; Adar, Fran; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2003-01-01

    Composition of microstructural compartments in compact bone of aging male subjects was assessed using Raman microscopy. Secondary mineralization of unremodeled fragments persisted for two decades. Replacement of these tissue fragments with secondary osteons kept mean composition constant over age, but at a fully mineralized limit. Slowing of remodeling may increase fracture susceptibility through an increase in proportion of highly mineralized tissue. In this study, the aging process in the microstructural compartments of human femoral cortical bone was investigated and related to changes in the overall tissue composition within the age range of 17-73 years. Raman microprobe analysis was used to assess the mineral content, mineral crystallinity, and carbonate substitution in fragments of primary lamellar bone that survived remodeling for decades. Tissue composition of the secondary osteonal population was investigated to determine the composition of turned over tissue volume. Finally, Raman spectral analysis of homogenized tissue was performed to evaluate the effects of unremodeled and newly formed tissue on the overall tissue composition. The chemical composition of the primary lamellar bone exhibited two chronological stages. Organic matrix became more mineralized and the crystallinity of the mineral improved during the first stage, which lasted for two decades. The mineral content and the mineral crystallinity did not vary during the second stage. The results for the primary lamellar bone demonstrated that physiological mineralization, as evidenced by crystal growth and maturation, is a continuous process that may persist as long as two decades, and the growth and maturation process stops after the organic matrix becomes "fully mineralized." The average mineral content and the average mineral crystallinity of the homogenized tissue did not change with age. It was also observed that the mineral content of the homogenized tissue was consistently greater than the

  10. Comparisons of mouse mesenchymal stem cells in primary adherent culture of compact bone fragments and whole bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yiting; Liu, Tianshu; Fang, Fang; Xiong, Chengliang; Shen, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    The purification of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) by using the standard method of whole bone marrow adherence to plastic still remains ineffective. An increasing number of studies have indicated compact bone as an alternative source of BMSCs. We isolated BMSCs from cultured compact bone fragments and investigated the proliferative capacity, surface immunophenotypes, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations of the cells after the first trypsinization. The fragment culture was based on the fact that BMSCs were assembled in compact bones. Thus, the procedure included flushing bone marrow out of bone cavity and culturing the fragments without any collagenase digestion. The cell yield from cultured fragments was slightly less than that from cultured bone marrow using the same bone quantity. However, the trypsinized cells from cultured fragments exhibited significantly higher proliferation and were accompanied with more CD90 and CD44 expressions and less CD45 expression. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of cells from cultured fragments were better than those of cells from bone marrow. The directly adherent culture of compact bone is suitable for mouse BMSC isolation, and more BMSCs with potentially improved proliferation capacity can be obtained in the primary culture.

  11. Does Metaphyseal Cement Augmentation in Fracture Management Influence the Adjacent Subchondral Bone and Joint Cartilage?

    PubMed Central

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R. Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage. Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests. Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24). The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage. PMID:25621690

  12. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  13. The Canalicular Structure of Compact Bone in the Rat at Different Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigenori; Yoshida, Shigemitsu; Ashrafi, Shahid H.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2002-04-01

    Osteocytes communicate through a canalicular system that maintains the vitality and mineral metabolism of bone. Casting the vascular canals and canaliculi of compact bone with methacrylate and viewing them with scanning electron microscopy shows their extent and relationships. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of the same specimen before corrosion establishes the degree of calcification of the different tissue components. These methods were used to compare basal with alveolar compact bone in the rat mandible at different ages. Sections of the mandibular molar region were placed in a methacrylate resin. After polymerization and study with confocal microscopy, the organic matrix was removed. Juvenile rats had large irregular central vascular canals and lacunae that were more concentric in the basal than the alveolar bone. Cast lacunae were round, and the canaliculi from these lacunae were short and thick in both bones. Adult rats had regular concentrically arranged lacunae in the basal bone. Cast lacunae were ellipsoid and flatter in the basal bone than in the alveolar bone. The intercommunicating canaliculi were increased and canaliculi had more branching than the juvenile rats. The aged rats had fewer vascular canals, lacunae, and canaliculi and had osteoporotic changes. The cast lacunae were slender and flat especially in the basal bone. The porosity of the mandible became more pronounced in the alveolar than in the basal bone with aging. The canaliculi of mandibular compact bone thinned and developed extensive branching with adulthood but decreased in size and number with advanced age. Lacunae proceed from the large circular structures of youth to the flat forms of the aged. These studies show that the internal structure of compact bone changes with age and mirrors its functional state.

  14. Effect of Microstructure on Fatigue Strength of Bovine Compact Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Heon; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Akahori, Toshikazu; Takeda, Junji; Toda, Hiroyuki

    Despite its clinical importance in developing artificial bone, limited information is available regarding the microstructure with respect to the fatigue characteristics of bones. In this study, the fatigue characteristics of the bovine humerus and femur were investigated with respect to microstructures. Fatigue tests were conducted on the bovine humerus and femur at a stress ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 10Hz. The fatigue strength of the plexiform bone is slightly greater than that of the haversian bone. This is because the volume fraction of voids in the haversian bone, which is the site of stress concentration, is higher than that of voids in the plexiform bone. Several microcracks are observed on the fatigue fracture surface of the haversian bone. The microcracks are short and their propagation directions are random. However, the number of the microcracks in the plexiform bone is very small. The microcracks are relatively long and their propagation directions are parallel to the longitudinal direction of the lamellar bone. Therefore, the crack requires relatively more energy to propagate across the lamella in the plexiform bone.

  15. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of compact bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiahau

    Bone is a composite composed mainly of organics, minerals and water. Most studies on the fracture toughness of bone have been conducted at room temperature. Considering that the body temperature of animals is higher than room temperature, and that bone has a high volumetric percentage of organics (generally, 35--50%), the effect of temperature on fracture toughness of bone should be studied. Single-edged V-shaped notched (SEVN) specimens were prepared to measure the fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib in water at 0, 10, 23, 37 and 50°C. The fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib were found to decrease from 7.0 to 4.3 MPa·m1/2 and from 5.5 to 4.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively, over a temperature range of 50°C. The decreases were attributed to inability of the organics to sustain greater stresses at higher temperatures. We studied the effects of water and organics on fracture toughness of bone using water-free and organics-free SEVN specimens at 23°C. Water-free and organics-free specimens were obtained by placing fresh bone specimen in a furnace at different temperatures. Water and organics significantly affected the fracture toughness of bone. Fracture toughness of the water-free specimens was 44.7% (bovine femur) and 32.4% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh-bone specimens. Fracture toughness of the organics-free specimens was 92.7% (bovine femur) and 91.5% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh bone specimens. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) is widely used to study bone. However, bone often has small to moderate scale yielding during testing. We used J integral, an elastic-plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, to study the fracture process of bone. The J integral of bovine femur increased from 6.3 KJ/mm2 at 23°C to 6.7 KJ/mm2 at 37°C. Although the fracture toughness of bovine bone decreases as the temperature increases, the J integral results show a contrary trend. The energy spent in advancing the crack beyond the linear

  16. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  17. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  18. Hardness, an indicator of the mechanical competence of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hodgskinson, R; Currey, J D; Evans, G P

    1989-01-01

    Hardness and calcium content in compact bone are strongly related. Variation in Young's modulus is produced mainly by variations in mineralisation. Therefore, there should be a relationship between hardness and Young's modulus. We demonstrate this. The calcium content of cancellous bone and adjacent compact bone in several species shows little difference, the cancellous bone having approximately 10% less calcium. The hardness of cancellous bone in Bos is approximately 12% less than that of adjacent compact bone, and the calcium is approximately 2% less. These lines of evidence make it unlikely that the Young modulus of cancellous bone material is much different from that of compact bone. Similar evidence suggests that the yield stress of cancellous bone is similar to that of adjacent compact bone.

  19. Research of mechanics of the compact bone microvolume and porous ceramics under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, T. V.; Buyakova, S. P.; Kul'kov, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    The research results of the mechanics are presented and the effective mechanical characteristics under uniaxial compression of the simulative microvolume of the compact bone are defined subject to the direction of the collagen-mineral fibers, porosity and mineral content. The experimental studies of the mechanics are performed and the effective mechanical characteristics of the produced porous zirconium oxide ceramics are defined. The recommendations are developed on the selection of the ceramic samples designed to replace the fragment of the compact bone of a definite structure and mineral content.

  20. Research of mechanics of the compact bone microvolume and porous ceramics under uniaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kolmakova, T. V. Buyakova, S. P. Kul’kov, S. N.

    2015-11-17

    The research results of the mechanics are presented and the effective mechanical characteristics under uniaxial compression of the simulative microvolume of the compact bone are defined subject to the direction of the collagen-mineral fibers, porosity and mineral content. The experimental studies of the mechanics are performed and the effective mechanical characteristics of the produced porous zirconium oxide ceramics are defined. The recommendations are developed on the selection of the ceramic samples designed to replace the fragment of the compact bone of a definite structure and mineral content.

  1. Microcracks in compact bone: a three-dimensional view.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, S; O'Brien, F J; Lee, T C

    2006-07-01

    Microcracks have been implicated in the loss of bone quality for osteoporosis. In order to detect and monitor their growth, and to use these data to predict fractures, it is essential to obtain quantitative data regarding their shape in three dimensions. Beam-shaped bone samples from sheep radii were prepared and stained with fluorochrome dyes and tested in cyclical fatigue under four-point bending in a servo-hydraulic fatigue-testing machine. Samples were tested at a frequency of 30 Hz under load control at a stress range of 100 MPa. Holes were drilled into bone samples and used as reference points for reconstructions. A series of thin longitudinal sections were cut using a sledge macrotome. A two-dimensional image of each section was examined using an epifluorescence microscope and images transferred to a PC via a CCD low-light colour video camera. A three-dimensional image of each microcrack was reconstructed using computer software, and its dimensions measured. Cracks were elliptical in shape, longer in the longitudinal direction and with a mean aspect ratio of 5.5 +/- 1.05. The mean (+/- SD) length and width of labelled microcracks were 488 +/- 151 and 88 +/- 21 microm, respectively.

  2. Interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone: Contributions of preferential heating at the bone surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Serena J.; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter D.; Cam, Richard N.; Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Preferential heating of bone due to high ultrasound attenuation may enhance thermal ablation performed with cathetercooled interstitial ultrasound applicators in or near bone. At the same time, thermally and acoustically insulating cortical bone may protect sensitive structures nearby. 3D acoustic and biothermal transient finite element models were developed to simulate temperature and thermal dose distributions during catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound ablation near bone. Experiments in ex vivo tissues and tissue-mimicking phantoms were performed to validate the models and to quantify the temperature profiles and ablated volumes for various distances between the interstitial applicator and the bone surface. 3D patient-specific models selected to bracket the range of clinical usage were developed to investigate what types of tumors could be treated, applicator configurations, insertion paths, safety margins, and other parameters. Experiments show that preferential heating at the bone surface decreases treatment times compared to when bone is absent and that all tissue between an applicator and bone can be ablated when they are up to 2 cm apart. Simulations indicate that a 5-7 mm safety margin of normal bone is needed to protect (thermal dose < 6 CEM43°C and T < 45°C) sensitive structures behind ablated bone. In 3D patient-specific simulations, tumors 1.0-3.8 cm (L) and 1.3-3.0 cm (D) near or within bone were ablated (thermal dose > 240 CEM43°C) within 10 min without damaging the nearby spinal cord, lungs, esophagus, trachea, or major vasculature. Preferential absorption of ultrasound by bone may provide improved localization, faster treatment times, and larger treatment zones in tumors in and near bone compared to other heating modalities.

  3. Basic fibroblast growth factor supports expansion of mouse compact bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and regeneration of bone from MSC in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Eiki; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Matsubara, Masakazu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Kita, Kenichiro; Takabatake, Kiyofumi; Mizukawa, Nobuyoshi; Kaneda, Yoshihiro; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Iida, Seiji

    2012-04-01

    Some progress has been made in development of methods to regenerate bone from cultured cells, however no method is put to practical use. Here, we developed methods to isolate, purify, and expand mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from mouse compact bone that may be used to regenerate bone in vivo. These cells were maintained in long-term culture and were capable of differentiating along multiple lineages, including chondrocyte, osteocyte, and adipocyte trajectories. We used standard cell isolation and culture methods to establish cell cultures from mouse compact bone and bone marrow. Cultures were grown in four distinct media to determine the optimal composition of culture medium for bone-derived MSCs. Putative MSCs were subjected to flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase assays, immunohistochemical staining, and several differentiation assays to assess cell identity, protein expression, and developmental potential. Finally, we used an in vivo bone formation assay to determine whether putative MSCs were capable of regenerating bone. We found that compact bone of mice was a better source of MCSs than the bone marrow, that growth in plastic flasks served to purify MSCs from hematopoietic cells, and that MSCs grown in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-conditioned medium were, based on multiple criteria, superior to those grown in leukemia inhibitory factor-conditioned medium. Moreover, we found that the MSCs isolated from compact bone and grown in bFGF-conditioned medium were capable of supporting bone formation in vivo. The methods and results described here have implications for understanding MSC biology and for clinical purpose.

  4. The temperature of cremation and its effect on the microstructure of the human rib compact bone.

    PubMed

    Absolonová, Karolina; Dobisiková, Miluse; Beran, Michal; Zocová, Jarmila; Velemínský, Petr

    2012-01-01

    The presented study deals with the effect of the cremation temperature on the microstructure and morphology of the human compact bone. The biological material consisted of samples from ribs of recent Central European origin belonging to individuals of known age, sex and cause of death. Each bone sample was divided into several sections. One section remained unburned and the rest were burned at 700, 800 and 1000 degrees C. A few samples were burned also at the temperature of 600 degrees C. The undecalcified unstained ground cross-sections were made from burned and unburned bones; photographed and analysed using the SigmaScan Pro 5 programme. During burning, both the macroscopic and microscopic dimensions of the bone shrink, including the measures of the individual microstructures. The percentual representation of the area of individual microstructures on the area of the cross-section decreases. The number of individual microstructures per mm2 of the compact bone cross-section increases. Most microstructural variables demonstrated statistically significant differences at the individual temperatures of cremation. The burned bones showed a large scale of the colours, especially at 700 degrees C.

  5. The temperature of cremation and its effect on the microstructure of the human rib compact bone.

    PubMed

    Absolonová, Karolina; Dobisiková, Miluse; Beran, Michal; Zocová, Jarmila; Velemínský, Petr

    2012-01-01

    The presented study deals with the effect of the cremation temperature on the microstructure and morphology of the human compact bone. The biological material consisted of samples from ribs of recent Central European origin belonging to individuals of known age, sex and cause of death. Each bone sample was divided into several sections. One section remained unburned and the rest were burned at 700, 800 and 1000 degrees C. A few samples were burned also at the temperature of 600 degrees C. The undecalcified unstained ground cross-sections were made from burned and unburned bones; photographed and analysed using the SigmaScan Pro 5 programme. During burning, both the macroscopic and microscopic dimensions of the bone shrink, including the measures of the individual microstructures. The percentual representation of the area of individual microstructures on the area of the cross-section decreases. The number of individual microstructures per mm2 of the compact bone cross-section increases. Most microstructural variables demonstrated statistically significant differences at the individual temperatures of cremation. The burned bones showed a large scale of the colours, especially at 700 degrees C. PMID:23350156

  6. Thermal contribution of compact bone to intervening tissue-like media exposed to planar ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Moros, Eduardo G; Novak, Petr; Straube, William L; Kolluri, Prashant; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Myerson, Robert J

    2004-03-21

    than fourfold) were induced in soft tissue-like phantom materials adjacent (within approximately 5 mm) to a bovine bone as compared to similar experiments without bone inclusions. For low-power long-exposure experiments, where thermal conduction effects are significant, the thermal impact of bone reached at distances > 10 mm from the bone surface (upstream of the bone). Therefore, we hypothesize that underlying bone exposed to planar ultrasound hyperthermia creates a high-temperature thermal boundary at depth that compensates for beam attenuation, thus producing more uniform temperature distribution in the intervening tissue layers. With appropriate technology, this finding may lead to improved thermal doses in superficial treatment sites such as the chest wall and the head/neck. PMID:15104313

  7. Thermal contribution of compact bone to intervening tissue-like media exposed to planar ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Eduardo G.; Novak, Petr; Straube, William L.; Kolluri, Prashant; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Myerson, Robert J.

    2004-03-01

    than fourfold) were induced in soft tissue-like phantom materials adjacent (within ~5 mm) to a bovine bone as compared to similar experiments without bone inclusions. For low-power long-exposure experiments, where thermal conduction effects are significant, the thermal impact of bone reached at distances >10 mm from the bone surface (upstream of the bone). Therefore, we hypothesize that underlying bone exposed to planar ultrasound hyperthermia creates a high-temperature thermal boundary at depth that compensates for beam attenuation, thus producing more uniform temperature distribution in the intervening tissue layers. With appropriate technology, this finding may lead to improved thermal doses in superficial treatment sites such as the chest wall and the head/neck.

  8. Bone remodeling adjacent to total hip replacements: A naturally occurring material design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Timothy P.; Hamilton, James J.

    1993-10-01

    The reaction of bone to orthopedic implants is an example of a self-adjusting material which changes from a ‘normal state’ to an altered state, based on the mechanical features of the implant and the loads applied to it. The changes in bone around cemented and uncemented femoral total hip components are well documented, and many numerical characterizations of the material reaction to stress have attempted to mimic the natural remodeling process. In this study we review the development of a simple material remodeling rule which yields a stable structure which is optimal and which allows a unique solution. We then use this algorithm to assess the effect of prosthesis stiffness and the presence of a compliant layer on bone remodeling around these implants. An axisymmetric model for axial loading is used to model changes in bone density through the thickness of the cancellous bone around the implants. With cortical remodeling left out of the simulation, the simulations showed density distributions that agreed in general with the results in the literature, and showed a marked difference in response if a compliant layer was added to the prosthesis.

  9. The Pyrolytic Profile of Lyophilized and Deep-Frozen Compact Part of the Human Bone

    PubMed Central

    Lodowska, Jolanta; Wolny, Daniel; Kurkiewicz, Sławomir; Węglarz, Ludmiła

    2012-01-01

    Background. Bone grafts are used in the treatment of nonunion of fractures, bone tumors and in arthroplasty. Tissues preserved by lyophilization or deep freezing are used as implants nowadays. Lyophilized grafts are utilized in the therapy of birth defects and bone benign tumors, while deep-frozen ones are applied in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to compare the pyrolytic pattern, as an indirect means of the analysis of organic composition of deep-frozen and lyophilized compact part of the human bone. Methods. Samples of preserved bone tissue were subjected to thermolysis and tetrahydroammonium-hydroxide- (TMAH-) associated thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Results. Derivatives of benzene, pyridine, pyrrole, phenol, sulfur compounds, nitriles, saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids (C12–C20) were identified in the pyrolytic pattern. The pyrolyzates were the most abundant in derivatives of pyrrole and nitriles originated from proteins. The predominant product in pyrolytic pattern of the investigated bone was pyrrolo[1,2-α]piperazine-3,6-dione derived from collagen. The content of this compound significantly differentiated the lyophilized graft from the deep-frozen one. Oleic and palmitic acid were predominant among fatty acids of the investigated samples. The deep-frozen implants were characterized by higher percentage of long-chain fatty acids than lyophilized grafts. PMID:22619606

  10. Approaches for modeling interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone: Theoretical and experimental evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter D.; Cam, Richard N.; Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to develop numerical models of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone, to evaluate model performance through theoretical analysis, and to validate the models and approximations used through comparison to experiments. Methods 3D transient biothermal and acoustic finite element models were developed, employing four approximations of 7 MHz ultrasound propagation at bone/soft tissue interfaces. The various approximations considered or excluded reflection, refraction, angle-dependence of transmission coefficients, shear mode conversion, and volumetric heat deposition. Simulations were performed for parametric and comparative studies. Experiments within ex vivo tissues and phantoms were performed to validate the models by comparison to simulations. Temperature measurements were conducted using needle thermocouples or MR temperature imaging (MRTI). Finite element models representing heterogeneous tissue geometries were created based on segmented MR images. Results High ultrasound absorption at bone/soft tissue interfaces increased the volumes of target tissue that could be ablated. Models using simplified approximations produced temperature profiles closely matching both more comprehensive models and experimental results, with good agreement between 3D calculations and MRTI. The correlation coefficients between simulated and measured temperature profiles in phantoms ranged from 0.852 to 0.967 (p-value < 0.01) for the four models. Conclusions Models using approximations of interstitial ultrasound energy deposition around bone/soft tissue interfaces produced temperature distributions in close agreement with comprehensive simulations and experimental measurements. These models may be applied to accurately predict temperatures produced by interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors near and within bone, with applications toward treatment planning. PMID:24102393

  11. Crestal bone changes on platform-switched implants and adjacent teeth when the tooth-implant distance is less than 1.5 mm.

    PubMed

    Vela, Xavier; Méndez, Víctor; Rodríguez, Xavier; Segalá, Maribel; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2012-04-01

    Because of the peri-implant bone resorption that occurs when a non-platform switched implant is exposed to the oral environment, it has been recommended to maintain 1.5 mm between the tooth and implant to preserve the bone adjacent to the teeth. Several studies have documented that platform-switched implants have less peri-implant bone resorption than matched implants. This retrospective radiographic analysis studied 70 platform-switched implants placed less than 1.5 mm from an adjacent tooth and with prostheses loaded for a minimum of 6 months. The mean distance between the implant and tooth was 0.99 mm (range, 0.20 to 1.49 mm); the mean horizontal and vertical bone resorption was 0.36 and 0.43 mm, respectively. The mean bone peak reduction was 0.37 mm. The results confirm that the use of platform-switched implants reduces bone resorption after two-piece implants have been uncovered and that it is possible to place this type of implant 1 mm from teeth while maintaining the bone level adjacent to them (the bone peak).

  12. Effects of holmium:YAG laser on equine articular cartilage and subchondral bone adjacent to traumatic lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael A.; Haugland, L. Mark; Bellamy, Janine; Johnson, Lanny L.; Rohrer, Michael D.; Walls, Robert C.; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of Ho:YAG laser energy on articular cartilage and subchondral bone adjacent to traumatically created cartilage lesions in a continuous weight-bearing model were investigated. The 2.1 micrometers wavelength was delivered in hand-controlled contact and near-contact hard tissue arthroscopic surgery in a saline medium. Bilateral arthroscopy was performed on normal antebrachiocarpal and intercarpal joints of four adult horses. One-hundred twenty traumatic lesions were created on three weight-bearing articular surfaces with a knife, curette, or a motorized burr. Depths of the lesions were partial and full thickness. Configurations of the lesions were lacerations, scrapes, and craters. Left limbs were used as controls. Right limb lesions were treated with various intensities of laser energy. Animals were sacrificed at intervals of 1, 3, and 8 weeks. Gross microscopic anatomy was documented, and tissue sections were subjected to blind review by a pathologist. Mankin grading for cellularity and proteoglycan content was used to qualitatively evaluate cartilage response. Cartilage adjacent to all lesions exposed to laser energy had better cellularity and proteoglycan content than corresponding controls by Mankin grading.

  13. Differential gene expression of bgp and mgp in trabecular and compact bone of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Krossøy, Christel; Ornsrud, Robin; Wargelius, Anna

    2009-12-01

    The tissue-specific gene expression of the vitamin K-dependent proteins bone gamma-carboxyglutamate-protein (BGP) and matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate-protein (MGP) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) was investigated. In previous studies, BGP, the most abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, was almost exclusively associated with bone, whereas the non-structural protein MGP has a more widespread tissue distribution. In-situ hybridization of juvenile Atlantic salmon ( approximately 40 g, fresh water) vertebrae demonstrated expression of bgp and mgp mRNA in osteoblasts lining the trabecular bone, whereas no staining was observed in the compact bone. By separating the trabecular and compact bone of both juvenile ( approximately 40 g, fresh water) and adult ( approximately 1000 g, sea water) Atlantic salmon, we observed that the two vertebral bone compartments displayed different levels of bgp, whereas no such differences were seen for mgp. Measurements of the mineral content and Ca/P molar ratio in adult salmon revealed no significant differences between trabecular and compact bone. In conclusion, the osteoblasts covering the salmon vertebrae have unique gene expression patterns and levels of bgp and mgp. Further, the study confirms the presence of mRNA from the vitamin K-dependent proteins BGP and MGP in the vertebrae, fin and gills of Atlantic salmon.

  14. Histological estimation of age at death using microradiographs of humeral compact bone.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Imaizumi, K; Miyasaka, S; Seta, S

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an age estimating method for skeletal remains using microradiographs of compact bone. Compact bones of the humerus were collected from 40 Japanese males ranging from 23 to 80 years of age. Microradiographs taken from cross-sections were histomorphometrically examined by using an image analyzer. Histological parameters used in this study included 10 items, that is, osteon number, double-zoned osteon number, type II osteon number, low-density osteon number, osteon fragment number, resorption space number, total and average osteon area, and total and average Haversian canal area. The osteon fragment number showed the highest correlation coefficient with advancing age (r = 0.786). The measurement data obtained from 10 histological parameters were subjected to multiple regression analysis for producing multiple regression equations for age estimation. In practice, 8 histological parameters were selected for the equation and its multiple correlation coefficient and standard error of estimate were 0.903 and 6.1, respectively.

  15. Systematical analysis for the mixed couplings of two adjacent modified split ring resonators and the application to compact microstrip bandpass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjun; Wen, Guangjun; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we synthesize a new kind of modified split ring resonator (SRR) and characterize its mixed couplings between two adjacent such SRRs with all the possible arrangements on one side of a conventional dielectric substrate. Based on the analysis of the mixed couplings, the compact microstrip bandpass filters composed of the proposed modified SRRs are systematically analyzed. We found that two designs out of all the cases have quite well bandpass filter characteristics, e.g., low insert loss within the wide passband, sharp reductions and transmission zeros out of the passband, and harmonic suppression characteristics for a wide frequency range. Both experimental demonstrations and numerical simulations are performed to verify the designed filters and the results agree well with each other. Such kind of filter design can be flexibly integrated in the miniaturized radio frequency/microwave circuits.

  16. Preliminary Testing of a Compact, Bone-Attached Robot for Otologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Neal P.; Balachandran, Ramya; dit Falisse, Antoine Motte; Wanna, George B.; Labadie, Robert F.; Withrow, Thomas J.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Otologic surgery often involves a mastoidectomy procedure, in which part of the temporal bone is milled away in order to visualize critical structures embedded in the bone and safely access the middle and inner ear. We propose to automate this portion of the surgery using a compact, bone-attached milling robot. A high level of accuracy is required to avoid damage to vital anatomy along the surgical path, most notably the facial nerve, making this procedure well-suited for robotic intervention. In this study, several of the design considerations are discussed and a robot design and prototype are presented. The prototype is a 4 degrees-of-freedom robot similar to a four-axis milling machine that mounts to the patient’s skull. A positioning frame, containing fiducial markers and attachment points for the robot, is rigidly attached to the skull of the patient, and a CT scan is acquired. The target bone volume is manually segmented in the CT by the surgeon and automatically converted to a milling path and robot trajectory. The robot is then attached to the positioning frame and is used to drill the desired volume. The accuracy of the entire system (image processing, planning, robot) was evaluated at several critical locations within or near the target bone volume with a mean free space accuracy result of 0.50 mm or less at all points. A milling test in a phantom material was then performed to evaluate the surgical workflow. The resulting milled volume did not violate any critical structures. PMID:25477726

  17. Preliminary testing of a compact bone-attached robot for otologic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Neal P.; Balachandran, Ramya; Motte dit Falisse, Antoine; Wanna, George B.; Labadie, Robert F.; Withrow, Thomas J.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-03-01

    Otologic surgery often involves a mastoidectomy procedure, in which part of the temporal bone is milled away in order to visualize critical structures embedded in the bone and safely access the middle and inner ear. We propose to automate this portion of the surgery using a compact, bone-attached milling robot. A high level of accuracy is required t o avoid damage to vital anatomy along the surgical path, most notably the facial nerve, making this procedure well-suited for robotic intervention. In this study, several of the design considerations are discussed and a robot design and prototype are presented. The prototype is a 4 degrees-of-freedom robot similar to a four-axis milling machine that mounts to the patient's skull. A positioning frame, containing fiducial markers and attachment points for the robot, is rigidly attached to the skull of the patient, and a CT scan is acquired. The target bone volume is manually segmented in the CT by the surgeon and automatically converted to a milling path and robot trajectory. The robot is then attached to the positioning frame and is used to drill the desired volume. The accuracy of the entire system (image processing, planning, robot) was evaluated at several critical locations within or near the target bone volume with a mean free space accuracy result of 0.50 mm or less at all points. A milling test in a phantom material was then performed to evaluate the surgical workflow. The resulting milled volume did not violate any critical structures.

  18. Preliminary Testing of a Compact, Bone-Attached Robot for Otologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Neal P; Balachandran, Ramya; Dit Falisse, Antoine Motte; Wanna, George B; Labadie, Robert F; Withrow, Thomas J; Fitzpatrick, J Michael; Webster, Robert J

    2014-03-12

    Otologic surgery often involves a mastoidectomy procedure, in which part of the temporal bone is milled away in order to visualize critical structures embedded in the bone and safely access the middle and inner ear. We propose to automate this portion of the surgery using a compact, bone-attached milling robot. A high level of accuracy is required to avoid damage to vital anatomy along the surgical path, most notably the facial nerve, making this procedure well-suited for robotic intervention. In this study, several of the design considerations are discussed and a robot design and prototype are presented. The prototype is a 4 degrees-of-freedom robot similar to a four-axis milling machine that mounts to the patient's skull. A positioning frame, containing fiducial markers and attachment points for the robot, is rigidly attached to the skull of the patient, and a CT scan is acquired. The target bone volume is manually segmented in the CT by the surgeon and automatically converted to a milling path and robot trajectory. The robot is then attached to the positioning frame and is used to drill the desired volume. The accuracy of the entire system (image processing, planning, robot) was evaluated at several critical locations within or near the target bone volume with a mean free space accuracy result of 0.50 mm or less at all points. A milling test in a phantom material was then performed to evaluate the surgical workflow. The resulting milled volume did not violate any critical structures.

  19. Dysplasia of the orbit and adjacent bone associated with plexiform neurofibroma and ocular disease in 42 NF-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Stelljes, Claudia; Hagel, Christian; Giese, Manfred; Scheuer, Hanna A

    2010-05-01

    Neurofibromas are the hallmark of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Interestingly, generalised and localised interference or dysfunction of bone is also a key element of the NF1 phenotype. In the skull, NF1-associated orbital dysplasia often results in a severe disfigurement of affected individuals. However, the underlying pathology of orbital dysplasia is a complex phenomenon and up to now poorly understood. This study was performed to describe the orbit in 42 NF1 patients with large, disfiguring soft-tissue tumour of the orbital/eyelid region (plexiform neurofibroma (PNF)). A dysplastic orbit on the affected side was diagnosed in 80.9%. Orbital PNF extension to adjacent regions revealed a significant correlation of orbit and temporal region (0.33, p<0.034), cheek and oral cavity (0.4, p>0.011), oral cavity and nose (0.35, p<0.026), and temporal region and cheek (0.46, p<0.003). Alterations of the optic nerve and adjacent structures were identified on MRI or CT in 14 patients. On plain skull radiographs, only sphenoid wing dysplasia and ipsilateral orbital enlargement were significantly correlated (0.528, p<0.01). This study reveals PNF as the main component of soft tissue affecting eyelids and orbit in those cases, which show a soft tissue mass in the affected orbital region. The oval-shaped orbital rim, typically seen on plain skull radiographs in sagittal projections, seems to be strongly associated with the (lateral and caudal) extension of a PNF and independent from sphenoid wing dysplasia. Several factors constitute the individual orbital dysplasia, including the growth of the invasive PNF.

  20. Evolution of bone compactness in extant and extinct moles (Talpidae): exploring humeral microstructure in small fossorial mammals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Talpids include forms with different degree of fossoriality, with major specializations in the humerus in the case of the fully fossorial moles. We studied the humeral microanatomy of eleven extant and eight extinct talpid taxa of different lifestyles and of two non-fossorial outgroups and examined the effects of size and phylogeny. We tested the hypothesis that bone microanatomy is different in highly derived humeri of fossorial taxa than in terrestrial and semi-aquatic ones, likely due to special mechanical strains to which they are exposed to during digging. This study is the first comprehensive examination of histological parameters in an ecologically diverse and small-sized mammalian clade. Results No pattern of global bone compactness was found in the humeri of talpids that could be related to biomechanical specialization, phylogeny or size. The transition zone from the medullary cavity to the cortical compacta was larger and the ellipse ratio smaller in fossorial talpids than in non-fossorial talpids. No differences were detected between the two distantly related fossorial clades, Talpini and Scalopini. Conclusions At this small size, the overall morphology of the humerus plays a predominant role in absorbing the load, and microanatomical features such as an increase in bone compactness are less important, perhaps due to insufficient gravitational effects. The ellipse ratio of bone compactness shows relatively high intraspecific variation, and therefore predictions from this ratio based on single specimens are invalid. PMID:23442022

  1. Influence of thread pitch, helix angle, and compactness on micromotion of immediately loaded implants in three types of bone quality: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pan; Xiong, Wei; Tan, Baosheng; Geng, Wei; Liu, Jiaqiang; Li, Weihong; Li, Dehua

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of thread pitch, helix angle, and compactness on micromotion in immediately loaded implants in bone of varying density (D2, D3, and D4). Five models of the three-dimensional finite element (0.8 mm pitch, 1.6 mm pitch, 2.4 mm pitch, double-threaded, and triple-threaded implants) in three types of bone were created using Pro/E, Hypermesh, and ABAQUS software. The study had three groups: Group 1, different pitches (Pitch Group); Group 2, same compactness but different helix angles (Angle Group); and Group 3, same helix angle but different compactness (Compact Group). Implant micromotion was assessed as the comprehensive relative displacement. We found that vertical relative displacement was affected by thread pitch, helix angle, and compactness. Under vertical loading, displacement was positively correlated with thread pitch and helix angle but negatively with compactness. Under horizontal loading in D2, the influence of pitch, helix angle, and compactness on implant stability was limited; however, in D3 and D4, the influence of pitch, helix angle, and compactness on implant stability is increased. The additional evidence was provided that trabecular bone density has less effect on implant micromotion than cortical bone thickness. Bone type amplifies the influence of thread pattern on displacement. PMID:25110716

  2. Vascular Spaces in Compact Bone: A Technique to Correct a Common Misinterpretation of Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, M.; Dean, Rob L.

    2003-01-01

    Old bones are often discolored by the grime that infiltrates spaces in the matrix once occupied by blood vessels. This suggested that allowing dry bone to absorb colorants might be a useful way to show the three dimensional complexity of bone vascularization. The authors have developed a simple way to show blood vessels spaces in bone at a glance…

  3. Does metaphyseal cement augmentation in fracture management influence the adjacent subchondral bone and joint cartilage?: an in vivo study in sheep stifle joints.

    PubMed

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage.Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests.Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24).The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage.

  4. A combined proximal and distal dislocation of two adjacent metatarsals: double floating metatarsal bones (second-third).

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, A; Ploumis, A; Terzidis, I; Koukoulidis, A

    2003-08-01

    A rare foot injury consisting of an irreducible, closed combined distal and proximal articulation dislocation of two adjacent metatarsals (second and third), called a "double floating metatarsal," was encountered in a 29-year-old man. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, and sequence of the surgical procedure are presented and discussed.

  5. Beneath the Minerals, a Layer of Round Lipid Particles Was Identified to Mediate Collagen Calcification in Compact Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Yu, Jianqing J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts lose 1–2% of their bone minerals per month during space flights. A systematic search for a countermeasure relies on a good understanding of the mechanism of bone formation at the molecular level. How collagen fibers, the dominant matrix protein in bones, are mineralized remains mysterious. Atomic force microscopy was carried out, in combination with immunostaining and Western blotting, on bovine tibia to identify unrecognized building blocks involved in bone formation and for an elucidation of the process of collagen calcification in bone formation. Before demineralization, tiles of hydroxyapatite crystals were found stacked along bundles of collagen fibers. These tiles were homogeneous in size and shape with dimensions 0.69 × 0.77 × 0.2 μm3. Demineralization dissolved these tiles and revealed small spheres with an apparent diameter around 145 nm. These spheres appeared to be lipid particles since organic solvents dissolved them. The parallel collagen bundles had widths mostly <2 μm. Composition analysis of compact bones indicated a high content of apolar lipids, including triglycerides and cholesterol esters. Apolar lipids are known to form lipid droplets or lipoproteins, and these spheres are unlikely to be matrix vesicles as reported for collagen calcification in epiphyseal cartilages. Results from this study suggest that the layer of round lipid particles on collagen fibers mediates the mineral deposition onto the fibers. The homogeneous size of these lipid particles and the presence of apolipoprotein in demineralized bone tissue suggest the possibility that these particles might be of lipoprotein origin. More studies are needed to verify the last claim and to exclude the possibility that they are secreted lipid droplets. PMID:16980361

  6. Cytotoxic Effects and Osteogenic Activity of Calcium Sulfate with and without Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 and Nano-Hydroxyapatite Adjacent to MG-63 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Abbaszadeh, Armin; Ghorbanzadeh, Atiyeh; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxic effects and osteogenic activity of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP2) and nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) adjacent to MG-63 cell line. Materials and Methods: To assess cytotoxicity, the 4,5-dimethyl thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteogenic activity were evaluated using Alizarin red and the von Kossa staining and analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results: The n-HA/calcium sulfate (CS) mixture significantly promoted cell growth in comparison to pure CS. Moreover, addition of rhBMP2 to CS (P=0.02) and also mixing CS with n-HA led to further increase in extracellular calcium production and ALP activity (P=0.03). Conclusion: This in vitro study indicates that a scaffold material in combination with an osteoinductive material is effective for bone matrix formation. PMID:26877731

  7. Functionally deficient mesenchymal stem cells reside in the bone marrow niche with M2-macrophages and amyloid-β protein adjacent to loose total joint implants.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Bryan S; DeBoyace, Sean D; Parsons, Adrienne M; Policastro, Connor G; Ee, Jessica S S; Damron, Timothy S

    2015-05-01

    We sought to demonstrate whether there is a difference in the local mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) niche obtained from patients undergoing their first total joint replacement surgery versus those patients undergoing a revision surgery for an failing total joint implant. Bone marrow aspirates collected from patients undergoing revision total joint arthroplasty were observed to be less clonal and the expression of PDGFRα, CD51, ALCAM, endoglin, CXCL12, nestin, and nucleostemin were decreased. Revision MSC were also less able to commit to an osteoblast-lineage or an adipocyte-lineage. Further, in revision MSC, OPG, and IL6 expression were increased. Monocytes, derived from revision whole marrow aspirates, were less capable of differentiating into osteoclasts, the cells implicated in the pathologic degradation of bone. Osteoclasts were also not observed in tissue samples collected adjacent to the implants of revision patients; however, the alternatatively activated M2-macrophage phenotype was observed in parallel with pathologic accumulations of amyloid-β, τ-protien and 3-nitrotyrosine. Despite the limited numbers of patients examined, our data suggest that nucleostemin may be a useful functional marker for MSC while the observation of M2-macrophage infiltration around the implant lays the foundation for future investigation into a novel mechanism that we propose is associated with loose total joint implants.

  8. Measuring the stopping power of α particles in compact bone for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, L.; Rodríguez, L. M.; Fregenal, D.; Bernardi, G.; Olivares, C.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; González, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The stopping power of α particles in thin films of decalcified sheep femur, in the range of 1.5 to 5.0 MeV incident energy, was measured by transmission of a backscattered beam from a heavy target. Additionally, the film elemental composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). These data will be used to measure boron concentration in thin films of bone using a spectrometry technique developed by the University of Pavia, since the concentration ratio between healthy tissue and tumor is of fundamental importance in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The present experimental data are compared with numerical simulation results and with tabulated stopping power data of non-decalcified human bone.

  9. Treatment of Symptomatic Osteoma on Eyebrow Using Adjacent Supraorbital Neuroperiosteal Flap.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Park, Jun Ho; Choi, Chang Yong

    2016-07-01

    Osteomas grow slowly, blocking or compressing adjacent structures, and frequently causing aesthetic deformity. Although most patients remain asymptomatic, development of facial pain and headaches due to compression of adjacent sensory nerves is not uncommon. Depending on the location of osteoma, many techniques were introduced to remove it. If the osteoma was located close to important structures such as nerves and vessels, surgeons can be concerned about damaging them resulting in unfavorable symptoms to patients. Osteoma is a benign slow-growing osteogenic lesion, composed of well-differentiated mature bone tissue, characterized by the proliferation of compact or cancellous bone, and found in the head and neck region. It is often slow growing and asymptomatic, diagnosed incidentally on radiographs. It can cause deformation of the bone and compression of the adjacent structures such as nerve compression. This case shows how symptomatic osteoma can be successfully extracted. PMID:27315313

  10. A model for fatigue crack propagation and remodelling in compact bone.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Prendergast, P J

    1997-01-01

    The process of fatigue in bone is of interest for a number of reasons. Fatigue damage in vivo can eventually lead to stress fracture, and may also act as a stimulus for bone remodelling and adaptation. The aim of this paper is to develop a theoretical model which describes the growth of fatigue cracks, especially of microcracks. The growth behaviour of microcracks is complicated by their interactions with the surrounding microstructure. This problem has been identified by researchers working on fatigue in engineering materials. Their work can be adapted to develop an equation in which the growth rate of cracks is related to applied stress conditions and also to a microstructural parameter, d, which is defined as the spacing of barriers to crack growth. The model can be used to generate stress/life data for comparison with in vitro fatigue experiments. It can also be used to investigate two hypotheses: that microcracking stimulates repair and that the level of fatigue damage can act as a signal to initiate adaptation processes of deposition or resorption.

  11. The study of in vivo quantification of aluminum (Al) in human bone with a compact DD generator-based neutron activation analysis (NAA) system.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Patrick; Mostafaei, Farshad; Liu, Yingzi; Blake, Scott P; Koltick, David; Nie, Linda H

    2016-05-01

    The feasibility and methodology of using a compact DD generator-based neutron activation analysis system to measure aluminum in hand bone has been investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to simulate the moderator, reflector, and shielding assembly and to estimate the radiation dose. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to detect the Al gamma ray signals. The minimum detectable limit (MDL) was found to be 11.13 μg g(-1) dry bone (ppm). An additional HPGe detector would improve the MDL by a factor of 1.4, to 7.9 ppm. The equivalent dose delivered to the irradiated hand was calculated by Monte Carlo to be 11.9 mSv. In vivo bone aluminum measurement with the DD generator was found to be feasible among general population with an acceptable dose to the subject.

  12. Monte-Carlo approach to the microdosimetry of /sup 224/Ra in murine compact and cancellous bone

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, E.R.; Humm, J.L.

    1988-06-01

    A method is described which allows dose calculations to be made to individual target cells in different regions of mouse bone marrow exposed to alpha particles emitted from bone. The method takes into account the variable rate of transfer of energy along the tracks of alpha particles and was applied to experiment-based values calculated for the concentration of /sup 224/Ra on bone surfaces after an injection of a leukemogenic amount of the nuclide. These calculations show a minimum dose of 11 Gy in small (less than 50-micron) marrow spaces and 10 Gy close to bone surface in the shaft of the femur. The results suggest that leukemogenic doses are likely to occur at some distance from bone surfaces in wide marrow spaces and that osteosarcoma is not likely to be induced directly in cells immediately aligning bone surfaces.

  13. Cement lines and interlamellar areas in compact bone as strain amplifiers - contributors to elasticity, fracture toughness and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Nobakhti, Sabah; Limbert, Georges; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-01-01

    Bone is multi-scale hierarchical composite material making the prediction of fragility, as well as pinning it to a certain cause, complicated. For proper mechanical simulation and reflection of bone properties in models, microscopic structural features of bone tissue need to be included. This study sets out to gain a mechanistic insight into the role of various microstructural features of bone tissue in particular cement lines and interlamellar areas. Further the hypothesis that compliant interlamellar areas and cement lines within osteonal bone act as strain amplifiers was explored. To this end, a series of experimentally-based micromechanical finite element models of bovine osteonal bone were developed. Different levels of detail for the bone microstructure were considered and combined with the results of physical three-point bending tests and an analytical composite model of a single osteon. The objective was to examine local and global effects of interface structures. The geometrical and microstructural characteristics of the bone samples were derived from microscopy imaging. Parametric finite element studies were conducted to determine optimal values of the elastic modulus of interstitial bone and interlamellar areas. The average isotropic elastic modulus of interfaces suggested in this study is 88.5MPa. Based on the modelling results, it is shown that interfaces are areas of accumulated strain in bone and are likely to act as potential paths for crack propagation. The strain amplification capability of interface structures in the order of 10 predicted by the models suggests a new explanation for the levels of strain required in bone homoeostasis for maintenance and adaptation.

  14. Cement lines and interlamellar areas in compact bone as strain amplifiers - contributors to elasticity, fracture toughness and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Nobakhti, Sabah; Limbert, Georges; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-01-01

    Bone is multi-scale hierarchical composite material making the prediction of fragility, as well as pinning it to a certain cause, complicated. For proper mechanical simulation and reflection of bone properties in models, microscopic structural features of bone tissue need to be included. This study sets out to gain a mechanistic insight into the role of various microstructural features of bone tissue in particular cement lines and interlamellar areas. Further the hypothesis that compliant interlamellar areas and cement lines within osteonal bone act as strain amplifiers was explored. To this end, a series of experimentally-based micromechanical finite element models of bovine osteonal bone were developed. Different levels of detail for the bone microstructure were considered and combined with the results of physical three-point bending tests and an analytical composite model of a single osteon. The objective was to examine local and global effects of interface structures. The geometrical and microstructural characteristics of the bone samples were derived from microscopy imaging. Parametric finite element studies were conducted to determine optimal values of the elastic modulus of interstitial bone and interlamellar areas. The average isotropic elastic modulus of interfaces suggested in this study is 88.5MPa. Based on the modelling results, it is shown that interfaces are areas of accumulated strain in bone and are likely to act as potential paths for crack propagation. The strain amplification capability of interface structures in the order of 10 predicted by the models suggests a new explanation for the levels of strain required in bone homoeostasis for maintenance and adaptation. PMID:24113298

  15. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  16. Compact DD generator-based neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to determine fluorine in human bone in vivo: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott P; Liu, Yingzi; Sowers, Daniel A; Nie, Linda H

    2015-10-01

    The subject of whether fluorine (F) is detrimental to human health has been controversial for many years. Much of the discussion focuses on the known benefits and detriments to dental care and problems that F causes in bone structure at high doses. It is therefore advantageous to have the means to monitor F concentrations in the human body as a method to directly assess exposure. F accumulates in the skeleton making bone a useful biomarker to assess long term cumulative exposure to F. This study presents work in the development of a non-invasive method for the monitoring of F in human bone. The work was based on the technique of in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA). A compact deuterium-deuterium (DD) generator was used to produce neutrons. A moderator/reflector/shielding assembly was designed and built for human hand irradiation. The gamma rays emitted through the (19)F(n,γ)(20)F reaction were measured using a HPGe detector. This study was undertaken to (i) find the feasibility of using DD system to determine F in human bone, (ii) estimate the F minimum detection limit (MDL), and (iii) optimize the system using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code in order to improve the MDL of the system. The F MDL was found to be 0.54 g experimentally with a neutron flux of 7   ×   10(8) n s(-1) and an optimized irradiation, decay, and measurement time scheme. The numbers of F counts from the experiment were found to be close to the (MCNPX) simulation results with the same irradiation and detection parameters. The equivalent dose to the irradiated hand and the effective dose to the whole body were found to be 0.9 mSv and 0.33 μSv, respectively. Based on these results, it is feasible to develop a compact DD generator based IVNAA system to measure bone F in a population with moderate to high F exposure.

  17. Relaxation time measurements of bone marrow protons in the calcaneus using a compact MRI system at 0.2 Tesla field strength.

    PubMed

    Tomiha, Sadanori; Iita, Nachiko; Okada, Fumi; Handa, Shinya; Kose, Katsumi

    2008-08-01

    Relaxation times (T(1) and T(2)) of the bone marrow protons and trabecular bone volume fraction (TBVF) in the calcaneus were measured for 100 female volunteers using a compact MRI system at 0.2 T field strength. The speed of sound (SOS) through the calcaneus was measured also for the same subjects using a quantitative ultrasound system. Both relaxation times were found to have positive correlations with age (R = 0.40; P < 0.0001 and R = 0.31; P < 0.002, respectively) and negative correlations with SOS (R = -0.38; P < 0.0001 and R = -0.38; P < 0.0001, respectively). Although TBVF had a fairly high positive correlation with the SOS (R = 0.67), neither T(1) nor T(2) were correlated with TBVF (R = -0.062 and -0.024, respectively). These results suggest that the age dependence of both T(1) and T(2) is caused by the microdynamic properties of the lipid molecules in bone marrow observed using acoustic or elastic modalities. PMID:18666107

  18. In vitro effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) using a 660 nm laser and malachite green dye in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms arranged on compact and cancellous bone specimens.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Nader, Sumaia Alves; Meira, Giselle Andrade; Viana, Magda Souza

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) using a 660 nm visible laser combined with malachite green (MG) dye in the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilms formed within compact and cancellous bone specimens. Specimens of 80 compact bones and 80 cancellous bones were contaminated with a standard suspension of S. aureus and incubated for 14 days at 37 °C to allow for the formation of biofilms. The specimens were divided into the following groups (n = 10) according to the treatment conditions: PS-L - (control - no treatment), PS+L - (only MG for 5 min), PS-L + 90 (only laser irradiation for 90 s), PS-L + 180 (only laser irradiation for 180 s), PS-L + 300 (only laser irradiation for 300 s), APDT90 (APDT for 90 s), APDT180 (APDT for 180 s), and APDT300 (APDT for 300 s). The findings were statistically analyzed using an ANOVA 5%. All of the experimental groups were significantly different from the control group for both the compact and cancellous bone specimens. The compact bone specimens that received APDT treatment (for either 90, 180, or 300 s) showed reductions in the log10 CFU/ml of S. aureus by a magnitude of 4 log10. Cancellous bone specimens treated with 300 s of APDT showed the highest efficacy, and these specimens had a reduction in S. aureus CFU/ml by a factor of 3 log10. APDT treatment using these proposed parameters in combination with MG was effective at inactivating S. aureus biofilms in compact and cancellous bone specimens.

  19. A compact DD neutron generator–based NAA system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingzi; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    A deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator–based neutron activation analysis (NAA) system has been developed to quantify metals, including manganese (Mn), in bone in vivo. A DD neutron generator with a flux of up to 3*109 neutrons/second was set up in our lab for this purpose. Optimized settings, including moderator, reflector, and shielding material and thickness, were selected based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations conducted in our previous work. Hand phantoms doped with different Mn concentrations were irradiated using the optimized DD neutron generator irradiation system. The Mn characteristic γ-rays were collected by an HPGe detector system with 100% relative efficiency. The calibration line of the Mn/calcium (Ca) count ratio versus bone Mn concentration was obtained (R2 = 0.99) using the hand phantoms. The detection limit (DL) was calculated to be about 1.05 μg/g dry bone (ppm) with an equivalent dose of 85.4 mSv to the hand. The DL can be reduced to 0.74 ppm by using two 100% HPGe detectors. The whole body effective dose delivered to the irradiated subject was calculated to be about 17 μSv. Given the average normal bone Mn concentration of 1 ppm in the general population, this system is promising for in vivo bone Mn quantification in humans. PMID:25154883

  20. A compact DD neutron generator-based NAA system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingzi; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H

    2014-09-01

    A deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator-based neutron activation analysis (NAA) system has been developed to quantify metals, including manganese (Mn), in bone in vivo. A DD neutron generator with a flux of up to 3*10(9) neutrons s(-1) was set up in our lab for this purpose. Optimized settings, including moderator, reflector, and shielding material and thickness, were selected based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations conducted in our previous work. Hand phantoms doped with different Mn concentrations were irradiated using the optimized DD neutron generator irradiation system. The Mn characteristic γ-rays were collected by an HPGe detector system with 100% relative efficiency. The calibration line of the Mn/calcium (Ca) count ratio versus bone Mn concentration was obtained (R(2) = 0.99) using the hand phantoms. The detection limit (DL) was calculated to be about 1.05 μg g(-1) dry bone (ppm) with an equivalent dose of 85.4 mSv to the hand. The DL can be reduced to 0.74 ppm by using two 100% HPGe detectors. The whole body effective dose delivered to the irradiated subject was calculated to be about 17 μSv. Given the average normal bone Mn concentration of 1 ppm in the general population, this system is promising for in vivo bone Mn quantification in humans.

  1. In vitro effectiveness of 455-nm blue LED to reduce the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans biofilms in compact bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Viana, Magda Souza; Meira, Giselle Andrade

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 455-nm blue light-emitting diode (LED), at different application times, to reduce the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans biofilms applied to compact bone tissue. The microorganisms S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and C. albicans (ATCC 18804) were used to form biofilms on 160 specimens of compact bones that had been divided into eight experimental groups (n = 10) for each microorganism, according to the times of application of the 455-nm blue LED (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 10 min) with an irradiance of 75 mW/cm2. After LED application, decimal dilutions of microorganisms were performed, plated on BHI or Sabouraud agar and incubated for 24 h/35 °C to obtain CFU/mL counts. The findings were statistically analyzed using a ANOVA 5 %. For the group of S. aureus biofilms, all groups of 455-nm LED application differ compared with the control group (p < 0.05), in which no treatment was given. The largest reduction was obtained in the group receiving LED for 10 min (p = 0.00); within this group, a 3.2 log reduction was observed. For the C. albicans biofilms, only those samples receiving 3, 7, and 10 min of LED application presented a significant difference compared with the control group (p < 0.00), indicating that longer application times are required to achieve efficacy. The results of this study show that 455-nm LED light was effective to reduce the load of S. aureus and C. albicans biofilms, especially during 10 min of application.

  2. Three years after transplants in human mandibles, histological and in-line holotomography revealed that stem cells regenerated a compact rather than a spongy bone: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Alessandra; Manescu, Adrian; Langer, Max; Rustichelli, Franco; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Paino, Francesca; De Rosa, Alfredo; Laino, Luigi; d'Aquino, Riccardo; Tirino, Virginia; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells deriving from dental pulp differentiate into osteoblasts capable of producing bone. In previous studies, we extensively demonstrated that, when seeded on collagen I scaffolds, these cells can be conveniently used for the repair of human mandible defects. Here, we assess the stability and quality of the regenerated bone and vessel network 3 years after the grafting intervention, with conventional procedures and in-line holotomography, an advanced phase-imaging method using synchrotron radiation that offers improved sensitivity toward low-absorbing structures. We found that the regenerated tissue from the graft sites was composed of a fully compact bone with a higher matrix density than control human alveolar spongy bone from the same patient. Thus, the regenerated bone, being entirely compact, is completely different from normal alveolar bone. Although the bone regenerated at the graft sites is not of the proper type found in the mandible, it does seem to have a positive clinical impact. In fact, it creates steadier mandibles, may well increase implant stability, and, additionally, may improve resistance to mechanical, physical, chemical, and pharmacological agents.

  3. Methodologies to determine forces on bones and muscles of body segments during exercise, employing compact sensors suitable for use in crowded space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    1995-01-01

    Work under this grant was carried out by the author and by a graduate research assistant. An instrumented bicycle ergometer was implemented focusing on the stated objective: to estimate the forces exerted by each muscle of the feet, calf, and thigh of an individual while bicycling. The sensors used were light and compact. These were probes to measure muscle EMG activity, miniature accelerometers, miniature load sensors, and small encoders to measure angular positions of the pedal. A methodology was developed and implemented to completely describe the kinematics of the limbs using data from the sensors. This work has been published as a Master's Thesis by the Graduate student supported by the grant. The instrumented ergometer along with the sensors and instrumentation were tested during a KC-135 Zero-Gravity flight in July, 1994. A complete description of the system and the tests performed have been published as a report submitted to NASA Johnson Space Center. The data collected during the KC-135 flight is currently being processed so that a kinematic description of the bicycling experiment will be soon determined. A methodology to estimate the muscle forces has been formulated based on previous work. The methodology involves the use of optimization concepts so that the individual muscle forces that represent variables in dynamic equations of motion may be estimated. Optimization of a criteria (goal) function such as minimization of energy will be used along with constraint equations defined by rigid body equations of motion. Use of optimization principles is necessary, because the equations of motion alone constitute an indeterminate system of equations with respect to the large amount of muscle forces which constitute the variables in these equations. The number of variables is reduced somewhat by using forces measured by the load cells installed on the pedal. These load cells measure pressure and shear forces on the foot. The author and his collaborators at NASA

  4. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    MedlinePlus

    ... amount of bone from one place (usually the hip, head, ribs, or leg) and placing it in ... adjacent teeth into the bone graft; 2) prosthetic replacement (dental bridge); or 3) dental metallic bone implants. ...

  5. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  6. Compaction-based VLSI layout

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiao-Ming.

    1989-01-01

    Generally speaking, a compaction based VLSI layout system consists of two major parts: (1) a symbolic editor which maintains explicit connectivity and structural information about the circuit; (2) a compactor which translates the high level description of a circuit to the detailed layout needed for fabrication and tries to make as compact a layout as Possible without violating any design rules. Instead of developing a complete compaction based VLSI layout system, this thesis presents some theoretical concepts and several new compaction techniques, such as scan line based approach, which can either cooperate with a symbolic editor to form a layout system or work as a post-process step to improve the results obtained by an existing layout system. Also, some compaction related problems are solved and proposed. Based on the special property of channel routing, the author presents a geometric method for channel compaction. For a given channel routing topology, the minimum channel height is always achieved with the incorporation of sliding contacts and automatically inserting necessary jogs. The geometric compaction approach is then generalized and applied to compact the entire VLSI chip at the building-block level. With a systematic way of automatic jog insertion, he proves that under the given layout topology and design rules, the lower bound of one dimensional compaction with automatic jog insertion is achieved by the geometric compaction algorithm. A new simultaneous two-dimensional compaction algorithm is developed primarily for placement refinement of building-block layout. The algorithm is based on a set of defined graph operations on a mixed adjacency graph for a given placement. The mixed-adjacency graph can be updated efficiently if the placement is represented by tiles in the geometric domain.

  7. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  8. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  9. Histomorphometric, fractal and lacunarity comparative analysis of sheep (Ovis aries), goat (Capra hircus) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) compact bone samples.

    PubMed

    Gudea, A I; Stefan, A C

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative and qualitative studies dealing with histomorphometry of the bone tissue play a new role in modern legal medicine/forensic medicine and archaeozoology nowadays. This study deals with the differences found in case of humerus and metapodial bones of recent sheep (Ovis aries), goat (Capra hircus) and roedeer (Capreolus capreolus) specimens, both from a qualitative point of view, but mainly from a quantitative perspective. A novel perspective given by the fractal analysis performed on the digital histological images is approached. This study shows that the qualitative assessment may not be a reliable one due to the close resemblance of the structures. From the quantitative perspective (several measurements performed on osteonal units and statistical processing of data),some of the elements measured show significant differences among 3 species(the primary osteonal diameter, etc.). The fractal analysis and the lacunarity of the images show a great deal of potential, proving that this type of analysis can be of great help in the separation of the material from this perspective. PMID:24068686

  10. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  11. 21 CFR 892.1170 - Bone densitometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... densitometer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure bone density and mineral content by x-ray or gamma ray transmission measurements through the bone and adjacent tissues. This generic type of...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1170 - Bone densitometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... densitometer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure bone density and mineral content by x-ray or gamma ray transmission measurements through the bone and adjacent tissues. This generic type of...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1170 - Bone densitometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... densitometer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure bone density and mineral content by x-ray or gamma ray transmission measurements through the bone and adjacent tissues. This generic type of...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1170 - Bone densitometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... densitometer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure bone density and mineral content by x-ray or gamma ray transmission measurements through the bone and adjacent tissues. This generic type of...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1170 - Bone densitometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... densitometer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure bone density and mineral content by x-ray or gamma ray transmission measurements through the bone and adjacent tissues. This generic type of...

  16. Methodologies to determine forces on bones and muscles of body segments during exercise, employing compact sensors suitable for use in crowded space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    1994-01-01

    A complete description of an instrumented ergometer system, including the sensors, the data acquisition system, and the methodologies to calculate the kinematic parameters were initially developed at Tulane University. This work was continued by the PI at NASA Johnson Space Center, where a flight ergometer was instrumented and tested during a KC-135 Zero-Gravity flight. The sensors that form part of the system include EMG probes and accelerometers mounted on the subject using the ergometer, load cells to measure pedal forces, and encoders to measure position and orientation of the pedal (foot). Currently, data from the flight test is being analyzed and processed to calculate the kinematic parameters of the individual. The formulation developed during the initial months of the grant will be used for this purpose. The system's components are compact (all sensors are very small). A salient feature of the system and associated methodology to determine the kinematics is that although it uses accelerometers, position is not determined by integration. Position is determined by determining the angle of two frames of reference for which acceleration at one point is known in coordinates of both frames.

  17. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  18. Large subarticular cysts (geodes) adjacent to the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carter, A R; Liyanage, S P

    1975-10-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis are described, who developed very large bone cysts or geodes adjacent to the knee-joint. The existence of cysts adjacent to joints involved by rheumatoid arthritis is well recognised, but the occurrence of very large cysts is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulties. Possible aetiological factors are discussed.

  19. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  20. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  1. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  3. TGF-β in cancer and bone: implications for treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Patricia; Guise, Theresa A

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced breast, prostate and lung cancer. Tumor cells co-opt bone cells to drive a feed-forward cycle which disrupts normal bone remodeling to result in abnormal bone destruction or formation and tumor growth in bone. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a major bone-derived factor, which contributes to this vicious cycle of bone metastasis. TGF-β released from bone matrix during osteoclastic resorption stimulates tumor cells to produce osteolytic factors further increasing bone resorption adjacent to the tumor cells. TGF-β also regulates 1) key components of the metastatic cascade such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis and immunosuppression as well as 2) normal bone remodeling and coupling of bone resorption and formation. Preclinical models demonstrate that blockade of TGF-β signaling is effective to treat and prevent bone metastases as well as to increase bone mass.

  4. Ultrasonic bone densitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A device, for measuring the density of a bone structure so as to monitor the calcium content, is described. A pair of opposed spaced ultrasonic transducers are held within a clamping apparatus closely adjacent the bone being analyzed. These ultrasonic transducers incude piezoelectric crystals shaped to direct signals through the bone encompassed in the heel and finger of the subject being tested. A pulse generator is coupled to one of the transducers and generates an electric pulse for causing the transducers to generate an ultrasonic sound wave which is directed through the bone structure to the other transducer. An electric circuit, including an amplifier and a bandpass filter couples the signals from the receiver transducer back to the pulse generator for retriggering the pulse generator at a frequency proportional to the duration that the ultrasonic wave takes to travel through the bone structure being examined.

  5. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  6. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  7. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  8. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  9. Frontal sinus osteoma removal with the ultrasonic bone aspirator.

    PubMed

    Ehieli, Eric; Chu, Jaemi; Gordin, Eli; Pribitkin, Edmund A

    2012-04-01

    Osteomas, the most common skull tumors, are typically excised through either an open or endoscopic ostectomy using a high-speed drill, a technically challenging procedure that can result in injury to adjacent soft tissue structures. Osteoma removal through ultrasonic bone emulsification and aspiration (UBA) offers the advantages of decreased blood loss, preservation of adjacent soft tissue structures, and precise bone removal. UBA was used to successfully remove a forehead osteoma without injury to adjacent nerves and with a satisfactory cosmetic outcome. We describe skull osteoma removal with an ultrasonic bone aspirator, which offers potential advantages over conventional bone removal techniques.

  10. Regional bone change in intramuscular haemangioma mimicking primary bone tumour.

    PubMed

    Shikhare, Sumer; Chacko, Julio K; Chuah, Khoon L

    2015-04-01

    Intramuscular haemangiomas are benign soft-tissue tumours, commonly located in the extremities. We present a right-leg intramuscular haemangioma with florid periosteal reaction in adjacent tibia, mimicking a primary bone tumour. Plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging features are illustrated with the surgical and histopathological findings. Radiologists need to be familiar with reactive bone changes secondary to deep-seated intramuscular haemangiomas to avoid potential misdiagnosis.

  11. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  12. The biomechanical effect of vertebroplasty on the adjacent vertebral body: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R K

    2006-05-01

    The increased use of vertebroplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has led to concerns that the technique may increase the risk of fracture in the adjacent vertebrae. The aim of this study was to simulate the biomechanical effects of vertebroplasty using an osteoporotic two-vertebrae finite element model. Following a simulated compression fracture, the model was augmented with one of three volumes of PMMA-based cement or left untreated. Upon reloading, an increase in segment stiffness was found with increasing volumes of cement. However, in all the treated models there was an increase in endplate deflection into the adjacent vertebra causing plastic failure of the surrounding trabecular bone. More damage was caused in the adjacent vertebra of the treated models than in the untreated model. The model results suggest that clinicians should be wary of using standard vertebroplasty cements to treat compression fractures in patients with highly osteoporotic bone.

  13. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  14. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  15. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Bone Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types of primary bone cancer are: • Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common primary bone cancer. It ... Any bone can be affected by this cancer. Multiple myeloma affects approximately six people per 100,000 each ...

  17. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  18. Imaging characteristics of bone graft materials.

    PubMed

    Beaman, Francesca D; Bancroft, Laura W; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Kransdorf, Mark J; Menke, David M; DeOrio, James K

    2006-01-01

    Bone graft materials are widely used in reconstructive orthopedic procedures to promote new bone formation and bone healing, provide a substrate and scaffolding for development of bone structure, and function as a means for direct antibiotic delivery. Bone graft materials include autografts, allografts, and synthetic substitutes. An autograft (from the patient's own bone) supplies both bone volume and osteogenic cells capable of new bone formation. The imaging appearance of an autograft depends on its type, composition, and age. Autografts often appear as osseous fragments at radiography. At computed tomography (CT), autografts appear similar to the adjacent cortical bone. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, however, autografts have a variable appearance as a consequence of the viable marrow inside them, a feature not present in other graft materials. An allograft (from cadaveric bone) has an appearance similar to that of cortical bone on radiographs and CT images. An allograft in the form of bone chips or morsels does not show those features on radiographs and CT images, but instead appears as a conglomerate with medium to high opacity and attenuation within the bone defect. In the immediate postoperative period, allografts appear hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images. Hematopoietic tissue replaces the normal fatty marrow in the later phases of graft incorporation. Synthetic bone substitutes are much more variable in imaging appearance. As the use of bone allografts and synthetic substitutes increases, familiarity with postoperative imaging features is essential for differentiation between grafts and residual or recurrent disease.

  19. Bone and bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Patricia M

    2009-01-01

    Children with cancer are exposed to multiple influences that may adversely affect bone health. Some treatments have direct deleterious effects on bone whilst others may have indirect effects mediated through various endocrine abnormalities. Most clinical outcome studies have concentrated on survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). There is now good evidence that earlier treatment protocols that included cranial irradiation with doses of 24 Gy or greater may result in growth hormone deficiency and low bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Under current protocols, BMD decreases during intensive chemotherapy and fracture risk increases. Although total body BMD may eventually return to normal after completion of chemotherapy, lumbar spine trabecular BMD may remain low for many years. The implications for long-term fracture risk are unknown. Risk factors for low BMD include high dose methotrexate, higher cumulative doses of glucocorticoids, male gender and low physical activity. BMD outcome in non-ALL childhood cancers has been less well studied but there is evidence that survivors of childhood brain or bone tumours, and survivors of bone marrow transplants for childhood malignancy, all have a high risk of long-term osteopenia. Long-term follow-up is required, with appropriate treatment of any endocrine abnormalities identified.

  20. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  1. Compact turbidity meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  2. Family 2 cystatins inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in calvarial bone explants.

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; Lerner, U H; Grubb, A; Beertsen, W; Nieuw Amerongen, A V; Everts, V

    2004-09-01

    Osteoclastic bone resorption depends on the activity of various proteolytic enzymes, in particular those belonging to the group of cysteine proteinases. Biochemical studies have shown that cystatins, naturally occurring inhibitors of these enzymes, inhibit bone matrix degradation. Since the mechanism by which cystatins exert this inhibitory effect is not completely resolved yet, we studied the effect of cystatins on bone resorption microscopically and by Ca-release measurements. Calvarial bone explants were cultured in the presence or absence of family 2 cystatins and processed for light and electron microscopic analysis, and the culture media were analyzed for calcium release. Both egg white cystatin and human cystatin C decreased calcium release into the medium significantly. Microscopic analyses of the bone explants demonstrated that in the presence of either inhibitor, a high percentage of osteoclasts was associated with demineralized non-degraded bone matrix. Following a 24-h incubation in the presence of cystatin C, 41% of the cells were adjacent to areas of demineralized non-degraded bone matrix, whereas in controls, this was only 6%. If bone explants were cultured with both PTH and cystatin C, 60% of the osteoclasts were associated with demineralized non-degraded bone matrix, compared to 27% for bones treated with PTH only (P < 0.01). Our study provides evidence that cystatins, the naturally occurring inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, reversibly inhibit bone matrix degradation in the resorption lacunae adjacent to osteoclasts. These findings suggest the involvement of cystatins in the modulation of osteoclastic bone degradation.

  3. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  4. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  5. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  6. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  7. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... may also be ordered to monitor the disease: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  8. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  9. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  10. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  11. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  12. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  15. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  16. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  17. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  18. Compact ultradense matter impactors.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Birrell, Jeremiah

    2013-03-15

    We study interactions of meteorlike compact ultradense objects (CUDO), having nuclear or greater density, with Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System as a possible source of information about novel forms of matter. We study the energy loss in CUDO puncture of the body and discuss differences between regular matter and CUDO impacts.

  19. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  20. Bone and Gallium scintigraphy in primary malignant and benign bone tumors of the extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Sepahdari, S.; Martin, W.B.; Ryan, J.; Simon, M.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    A six yer prospective evaluation of 129 patients suspected of having a primary bone tumor included Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy followed by Ga-67 imaging at 48-72 hours. Blood pool images were part of bone scintigraphy in nearly half of the patients. Extent and intensity of tracer uptake in tumor and adjacent bone and joints were recorded for each tracer by two observers blind to the diagnosis. Tissue samples obtained in every patient by biopsy or tumor excision after scintigraphy, revealed 72 malignant and 57 benign bone tumors. The bone scan was positive in 95% (69/72) of malignancies. The scintigraphic intensity of benign and malignant lesions was comparable with both Tc-99m MDP and Ga-67. On the other hand, bone scintigraphy showed 72% (52/72) of bone malignancies to have abnormal proximal and distal bone/joint uptake whereas the Ga-67 images revealed this in only 6% (4/65) of malignancies. Benign lesions manifested this enhanced contiguous bone/joint uptake on only 8% (5/55) of bone and 0% of Ga-67 scans. This study concludes positive bone, blood pool, or Ga-67 images have less specificity for malignancy than the presence of increased Tc-99m MDP deposition in a contiguous bone/joint, but negative scintigraphic results strongly favor a benign lesion. Ga-67 was more accurate than Tc-99m MDP in portraying intraosseous extent of malignant tumors; however, this is now preferably done with C.T.

  1. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  2. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  3. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  4. Compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R/sub 0/ = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R/sub 0/ approx. = 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  6. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  8. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  9. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  10. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  11. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  12. Geomechanical analysis of a welding salt layer and its effects on adjacent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Mahdi; Nikolinakou, Maria A.; Hudec, Michael R.; Flemings, Peter B.

    2016-06-01

    We simulate welding of the source layer of a salt diapir with a forward finite-element model and study stresses and deformation in the salt layer and the diapir, as well as in their adjacent sediments. Welded salt layers are abundant in mature salt basins, where most or all of the salt has withdrawn into diapirs. However, there is little understanding of the stress field in these layers and their adjacent sediments. We show that salt flow along the source layer leads to significant stress anomalies inside the layer and in adjacent sediments. In the source layer, salt pressure becomes higher than overburden stress in nearly welded areas and becomes lower than overburden stress in adjacent thicker areas. When the source layer welds, stresses increase significantly in sediments near the weld tip, which helps compaction of these sediments and possibly their fracturing and faulting. Our model illustrates that all sediments overlying the weld experience this stress increase and the associated material changes as the weld tip propagates along the weld. We present natural examples fitting our predictions and discuss the importance of our results for the exploration, characterization, and production of reservoirs near welded salt layers.

  13. Adjacent level spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Sreeramalingam, Rathinavelu

    2012-05-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is rare, but the same occurring at adjacent levels without disturbing the operated level is very rare. We report a case, with 5 year followup, who underwent ACDF from C5 to C7 for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. He showed neurological improvement after surgery but developed discharging sinus after 2 weeks, which healed with antibiotics. He improved on his preoperative symptoms well for the first 2 months. He started developing progressive neck pain and myelopathy after 3 months and investigations revealed spondylodiscitis at C3 and C4 with erosion, collapse, and kyphosis, without any evidence of implant failure or graft rejection at the operated level. He underwent reexploration and implant removal at the operated level (there was good fusion from C5 to C7) followed by debridement/decompression at C3, C4 along with iliac crest bone grafting and stabilization with plate and screws after maximum correction of kyphosis. The biopsy specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa and appropriate sensitive antibiotics (gentamycin and ciprofloxacin) were given for 6 weeks. He was under regular followup for 5 years his myelopathy resolved completely and he is back to work. Complete decompression of the cord and fusion from C2 to C7 was demonstrable on postoperative imaging studies without any evidence of implant loosening or C1/C2 instability at the last followup. PMID:22719127

  14. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  15. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  16. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  17. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  18. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  19. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  20. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  1. A compact SADM family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  2. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  3. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  4. HT-BONE: a graphical user interface for the identification of bone profiles in CT images via extended Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campi, Cristina; Perasso, Annalisa; Beltrametti, Mauro C.; Piana, Michele; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Massone, Anna Maria

    2016-03-01

    It has been recently proved that the computational analysis of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images allows clinicians to assess the alteration of compact bone asset due to hematological diseases. HT-BONE implements a new method, based on an extension of the Hough transform (HT) to a wide class of algebraic curves, for accurately measuring global and regional geometric properties of trabecular and compact bone districts. In the case of CT/PET analysis, the segmentation of the CT images provides masks for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data, extracting the metabolic activity in the region surrounded by compact bone tissue. HT-BONE offers an intuitive, user-friendly, Matlab-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) for all input/output procedures and the automatic managing of the segmentation process also from non-expert users: the CT/PET data can be loaded and browsed easily and the only pre-preprocessing required from the user is the drawing of Regions Of Interest (ROIs) around the bone districts under consideration. For each bone district, specific families of curves, whose reliability has been already tested in previous works, is automatically selected for the recognition task via HT. As output, the software returns masks of the segmented compact bone regions, images of the Standard Uptake Values (SUV) in the masked regions of PET slices, and the values of the parameters in the curve equations utilized in the HT procedure. This information can be used for all pathologies and clinical conditions for which the alteration of the compact bone asset or bone marrow distribution plays a crucial role.

  5. Bioceramic Implant Induces Bone Healing of Cranial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kihlström, Lars; Lundgren, Kalle; Trobos, Margarita; Engqvist, Håkan; Thomsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Autologous bone or inert alloplastic materials used in cranial reconstructions are techniques that are associated with resorption, infection, and implant exposure. As an alternative, a calcium phosphate–based implant was developed and previously shown to potentially stimulate bone growth. We here uncover evidence of induced bone formation in 2 patients. Histological examination 9 months postoperatively showed multinuclear cells in the central defect zone and bone ingrowth in the bone-implant border zone. An increased expression of bone-associated markers was detected. The other patient was investigated 50 months postoperatively. Histological examination revealed ceramic materials covered by vascularized compact bone. The bone regenerative effect induced by the implant may potentially improve long-term clinical outcome compared with conventional techniques, which needs to be verified in a clinical study. PMID:26495204

  6. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  7. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  8. Stimulation of bone marrow cells and bone formation by nacre: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Lamghari, M; Almeida, M J; Berland, S; Huet, H; Laurent, A; Milet, C; Lopez, E

    1999-08-01

    There is frequently a loss of vertebral bone due to disease or aging. Nacre (mother of pearl from the oyster Pinctada maxima) stimulates bone cell differentiation and bone formation in vitro and in vivo. Experimental bone defects were prepared in the vertebrae of sheep and used to test the suitability of nacre as an injectable osteogenic biomaterial for treating vertebral bone loss. Twenty-one cavities were prepared in the first four upper lumbar vertebrae of 11 sheep and filled with nacre powder. The lumbar vertebrae were removed after 1 to 12 weeks, embedded undecalcified in methacrylate, and processed for histological studies. The nacre slowly dissolved and the experimental cavities contained a large active cell population. By 12 weeks, the experimental cavity was occupied by newly matured bone trabeculae in contact with or adjacent to the dissolving nacre. The functional new bone trabeculae were covered with osteoid lined with osteoblasts, indicating continuing bone formation. The in vitro study on rat bone marrow explants cultured with a water-soluble extract of the nacre organic matrix also resulted in the stimulation of osteogenic bone marrow cells with enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity. Thus, both the in vivo and in vitro findings suggest that nacre contains one or more signal molecules capable of activating osteogenic bone marrow cells.

  9. Fracture toughness of human bone under tension.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1995-03-01

    The longitudinal fracture toughnesses of human cortical bone were compared to those of bovine cortical bone to test the hypothesis that although human osteonal bone is significantly weaker and more compliant than primary (plexiform) bone, it is not less tough than primary bone. The fracture toughness indices, critical strain energy release rate (Gc) and critical stress intensity factor (Kc), were determined for human Haversian bone and bovine bone under tension (Mode I) loading using the compact tension method. The effects of thickness, crack growth range and anisotropy on fracture indices for slow stable crack growth in cortical bone were determined. Plane strain assumptions required for application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to bone were investigated. Longitudinal oriented fracture toughness tests were used to assess the crack inhibiting effect of human bone microstructure on fracture resistance. Human bone Kc calculated from the stress concentration formula for 2 and 3 mm thick specimens equaled 4.32 and 4.05 MN m-3/2, respectively. Human bone Gc calculated from the compliance method equaled 827 N m-1 for 2 mm thick specimens and 595 N m-1 for 3 mm thick specimens. It was found that crack growth range, thickness and material assumptions affect fracture toughness. Kc calculated from Gc using an anisotropic relation provided the lowest estimate of Kc and equaled 3.31 MN m-3/2 for 2 mm thick specimens and 2.81 MN m-3/2 for 3 mm thick specimens. Both Kc and Gc were significantly reduced after being adjusted to ASTM standard thickness using ratios determined from bovine bone. The fracture toughness of bovine bone relative to human bone ranged from 1.08 to 1.66. This was compared to the longitudinal strength of bovine bone relative to the longitudinal strength of human bone which is approximately equal to 1.5. We found that even though human bone is significantly weaker than bovine bone, relative to its strength, the toughness of human and bovine bone

  10. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  11. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  12. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  14. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  17. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  18. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  19. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  20. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  1. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  2. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bočarov, Viktor; Čermák, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  5. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  6. Compact reactor design automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual compact reactor design automation experiment was performed using the real-time expert system G2. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the utility of an expert system in design; in particular, reactor design. The experiment consisted of the automation and integration of two design phases: reactor neutronic design and fuel pin design. The utility of this approach is shown using simple examples of formulating rules to ensure design parameter consistency between the two design phases. The ability of G2 to communicate with external programs even across networks provides the system with the capability of supplementing the knowledge processing features with conventional canned programs with possible applications for realistic iterative design tools.

  7. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  8. Cutaneous plasmacytoma adjacent to Bowenoid actinic keratosis on the scalp: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Mosea, A.; Millwaters, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cutaneous extramedullary plasmacytoma without bone marrow involvement is very rare. We present a plasmacytoma on the scalp with an adjacent Bowenoid disease. Presentation An 86 year old man presented to our unit with an ulcerated lump on the vertex of the scalp. Excisional biopsy showed plasmacytoma with adjacent Bowenoid actinic keratosis. Blood tests did not show any systemic multiple myeloma. However, skeletal survey showed possible osteolytic lesions in some areas. Sixteen months afterwards, the patient remains well on follow up. Discussion As far as we know, this is the first reported case of a cutaneous plasma cell tumour next to an area of Bowenoid actinic keratosis. Relevant literature is investigated here for possible correlation. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, solitary primary cutaneous plasmacytoma can be treated surgically with a favourable outcome. A hypothesis of correlation between Bowenoid actinic keratosis and plasmacytoma is investigated here. Further research is needed to confirm this finding. PMID:26930256

  9. Natural and Laboratory-Induced Compaction Bands in Aztec Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimson, B. C.; Lee, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Aztec sandstone used in this research is from the Valley of Fire State Park area, Nevada. This Jurassic aeolian sandstone is extremely weak (uniaxial compressive strength of 1-2 MPa); porosity averages 26%; grains are subrounded and have a bimodal size distribution (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm); its mineral composition (K. Sternlof, personal comm.) is 93% quartz, 5% k-spar, and 2% kaolinite, Fe carbonate and others; grain bonding is primarily through suturing. Sternlof et al. (EOS, November, 2001) observed substantial exposure of mainly compactive deformation bands in the Aztec sandstone. We studied an SEM image of a compaction band found in a hand sample of the Aztec sandstone. We also conducted a drilling test in a 130x130x180 mm prismatic specimen subjected to a preset far-field true triaxial stress condition (\\sigmah = 15 MPa, \\sigmav = 25 MPa, \\sigmaH = 40 MPa). Drilling of a 20 mm dia. vertical hole created a long fracture-like thin tabular breakout along the \\sigmah springline and perpendicular to \\sigmaH direction. SEM analysis of the zones ahead of the breakout tips revealed narrow bands of presumed debonded intact grains interspersed with grain fragments. We infer that the fragments were formed from multiple splitting or crushing of compacted grains in the band of high compressive stress concentration developed along the \\sigmah springline. SEM images away from the breakout tip surroundings showed no such fragments. SEM study of the natural compaction band showed a similar arrangement of mainly intact grains surrounded by grain fragments. Using the Optimas optical software package, we found the percentage of pore area within the band ahead of the breakout tips to average 17%; outside of this zone it was 23%. In the natural compaction band pore area occupied 8.5% of the band; in the host rock adjacent to the compaction band it averaged 19%. These readings strongly suggest porosity reduction due to compaction in both cases. The close resemblance between the

  10. Microcrack growth parameters for compact bone deduced from stiffness variations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D

    1998-07-01

    This paper shows how information on the fatigue behaviour of microcracks can be obtained by the analysis of stiffness changes measured during cyclic loading. Relationships between crack length, growth rate and cyclic stress intensity were deduced, and compared with previous empirical equations. Results show that the crack growth rate decreases rapidly with increasing length; this behaviour is typical of short-crack fatigue in many materials and is interpreted in terms of microstructural barriers to growth. Implications for the role of microcracks in remodelling and adaptation phenomena are discussed.

  11. MRI manifestations of soft-tissue haemangiomas and accompanying reactive bone changes

    PubMed Central

    Pourbagher, A; Pourbagher, M A; Karan, B; Ozkoc, G

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Soft tissue haemangiomas are common benign vascular lesions that can be accompanied by reactive changes in the adjacent bone structure. This study aimed to discuss the MRI features of soft-tissue haemangiomas with an emphasis on changes in bone. Methods The radiographic and MRI findings of 23 patients (9 males, 14 females; mean age 25 years; age range 2–46 years) with soft-tissue haemangiomas were analysed retrospectively. MR images were evaluated for location of the lesion, size, configuration, signal features, contrast patterns, proximity to adjacent bone and changes in the accompanying bone. Excisional biopsy was performed in 15 patients. Results Radiographs demonstrated phleboliths in 8 patients (34%) and reactive bone changes in 4 (19%). On MRI, T1 weighted images showed that most of the lesions were isointense or isohyperintense, as compared with muscle tissue; however, on T2 weighted images all lesions appeared as hyperintense. Following intravenous gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) administration, homogeneous enhancement was observed in 3 lesions and heterogeneous enhancement was seen in 19. No enhancement was observed in one patient. Bone atrophy adjacent to the lesion was observed in four patients. Conclusion MRI is the most valuable means of diagnosing deep soft-tissue haemangiomas. Bone changes can accompany deeply situated haemangiomas; in four of our patients, we found atrophy of the bone adjacent to the lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature regarding atrophy of the bone adjacent to a lesion. PMID:21123304

  12. Removal of bone in CT angiography by multiscale matched mask bone elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Streekstra, G. J.; Straten, M. van; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Heeten, G. J. den; Grimbergen, C. A.

    2007-10-15

    For clear visualization of vessels in CT angiography (CTA) images of the head and neck using maximum intensity projection (MIP) or volume rendering (VR) bone has to be removed. In the past we presented a fully automatic method to mask the bone [matched mask bone elimination (MMBE)] for this purpose. A drawback is that vessels adjacent to bone may be partly masked as well. We propose a modification, multiscale MMBE, which reduces this problem by using images at two scales: a higher resolution than usual for image processing and a lower resolution to which the processed images are transformed for use in the diagnostic process. A higher in-plane resolution is obtained by the use of a sharper reconstruction kernel. The out-of-plane resolution is improved by deconvolution or by scanning with narrower collimation. The quality of the mask that is used to remove bone is improved by using images at both scales. After masking, the desired resolution for the normal clinical use of the images is obtained by blurring with Gaussian kernels of appropriate widths. Both methods (multiscale and original) were compared in a phantom study and with clinical CTA data sets. With the multiscale approach the width of the strip of soft tissue adjacent to the bone that is masked can be reduced from 1.0 to 0.2 mm without reducing the quality of the bone removal. The clinical examples show that vessels adjacent to bone are less affected and therefore better visible. Images processed with multiscale MMBE have a slightly higher noise level or slightly reduced resolution compared with images processed by the original method and the reconstruction and processing time is also somewhat increased. Nevertheless, multiscale MMBE offers a way to remove bone automatically from CT angiography images without affecting the integrity of the blood vessels. The overall image quality of MIP or VR images is substantially improved relative to images processed with the original MMBE method.

  13. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  14. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  15. Histomorphometric evidence for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Taube, T; Elomaa, I; Blomqvist, C; Beneton, M N; Kanis, J A

    1994-01-01

    We studied bone biopsies from 65 normocalcaemic women with breast cancer and predominantly osteolytic bone metastases in order to examine the pathophysiology of bone destruction in metastatic bone disease. Quantitative histomorphometric measurements were made at sites of tumour involvement, at sites adjacent to tumour tissue and at sites distant from tumour tissue. There were no significant differences in bone volume or in indices of bone resorption or formation between biopsies taken from sites distant from tumour and the controls. Bone resorption, as judged by eroded surface, increased progressively from bone distant from tumour to tumour-laden bone. The number of osteoclasts was significantly increased in bone immediately adjacent to tumour and within metastases. There was no decrease in the ratio of osteoclast to eroded surface in breast cancer compared to controls suggesting that increased resorption in breast cancer was mainly osteoclast mediated and locally activated by the tumour. Two thirds of the biopsies taken from tumour involved regions showed osteosclerosis with woven bone formation. The volume of the pre-existing lamellar trabecular bone was lower than normal in 75% of these biopsies, suggesting that bone resorption must have been increased before the onset of woven bone formation. Since all patients were receiving hormonal treatment or chemotherapy, it is likely that osteosclerosis at sites of previous resorption mainly resulted from the basic cancer treatment as a sign of response to treatment. Osteoclastic bone resorption was, however, not completely inhibited by the active cancer treatment.

  16. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  17. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  18. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  19. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  20. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  1. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    DOEpatents

    Bench, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    A compact cyclone filter train for the removal of hazardous and radiologi particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

  2. Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments

    DOEpatents

    Bench, T.R.

    1998-04-28

    A compact cyclone filter train is disclosed for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium. This filter train permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired. 3 figs.

  3. Effects of spaceflight on trabecular bone in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Wronski, T. J.; Morey, E. R.; Kimmel, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    Alterations in trabecular bone were observed in growing male Wistar rats after 18.5 days of orbital flight on the COSMOS 1129 biosatellite. Spaceflight induced a decreased mass of mineralized tissue and an increased fat content of the bone marrow in the proximal tibial and humeral metaphyses. The osteoblast population appeared to decline immediately adjacent to the growth cartilage-metaphyseal junction, but osteoclast numbers were unchanged. These results suggested that bone formation may have been inhibited during spaceflight, but resorption remained constant. With the exception of trabecular bone mass in the proximal tibia, the observed skeletal changes returned to normal during a 29-day postflight period.

  4. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  5. Microtomographic imaging in the process of bone modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralph

    1999-09-01

    Micro-computed tomography ((mu) CT) is an emerging technique to nondestructively image and quantify trabecular bone in three dimensions. Where the early implementations of (mu) CT focused more on technical aspects of the systems and required equipment not normally available to the general public, a more recent development emphasized practical aspects of micro- tomographic imaging. That system is based on a compact fan- beam type of tomograph, also referred to as desktop (mu) CT. Desk-top (mu) CT has been used extensively for the investigation of osteoporosis related health problems gaining new insight into the organization of trabecular bone and the influence of osteoporotic bone loss on bone architecture and the competence of bone. Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by excessive bone loss and deterioration in bone architecture. The reduced quality of bone increases the risk of fracture. Current imaging technologies do not allow accurate in vivo measurements of bone structure over several decades or the investigation of the local remodeling stimuli at the tissue level. Therefore, computer simulations and new experimental modeling procedures are necessary for determining the long-term effects of age, menopause, and osteoporosis on bone. Microstructural bone models allow us to study not only the effects of osteoporosis on the skeleton but also to assess and monitor the effectiveness of new treatment regimens. The basis for such approaches are realistic models of bone and a sound understanding of the underlying biological and mechanical processes in bone physiology. In this article, strategies for new approaches to bone modeling and simulation in the study and treatment of osteoporosis and age-related bone loss are presented. The focus is on the bioengineering and imaging aspects of osteoporosis research. With the introduction of desk-top (mu) CT, a new generation of imaging instruments has entered the arena allowing easy and relatively inexpensive access to

  6. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  7. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  9. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands.

  10. [Bone transplant].

    PubMed

    San Julián, M; Valentí, A

    2006-01-01

    We describe the methodology of the Bone and Soft Tissue Bank, from extraction and storage until use. Since the year 1986, with the creation of the Bone Bank in the University Clinic of Navarra, more than 3,000 grafts have been used for very different types of surgery. Bone grafts can be classified into cortical and spongy; the former are principally used in surgery to save tumour patients, in large post-traumatic reconstructions and in replacement surgery where there are massive bone defects and a structural support is required. The spongy grafts are the most used due to their numerous indications; they are especially useful in filling cavities that require a significant quantity of graft when the autograft is insufficient, or as a complement. They are also of special help in treating fractures when there is bone loss and in the treatment of delays in consolidation and pseudoarthrosis in little vascularized and atrophic zones. They are also used in prosthetic surgery against the presence of cavity type defects. Allografts of soft tissues are specially recognised in multiple ligament injuries that require reconstructions. Nowadays, the most utilised are those employed in surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament although they can be used for filling any ligament or tendon defect. The principal difficulties of the cortical allografts are in the consolidation of the ends with the bone itself and in tumour surgery, given that these are patients immunodepressed by the treatment, the incidence of infection is increased with respect to spongy grafts and soft tissues, which is irrelevant. In short, the increasingly widespread use of allografts is an essential therapeutic weapon in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. It must be used by expert hands. PMID:16998521

  11. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  12. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  13. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-28

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  14. Mesoscale Simulations of Powder Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya.; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  15. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  17. Genetics of Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... study linked 32 novel genetic regions to bone mineral density. The findings may help researchers understand why ... or treating osteoporosis. Bones are made of a mineral and protein scaffold filled with bone cells. Bone ...

  18. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  19. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  20. Compact Optoelectronic Compass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Carl

    2004-01-01

    A compact optoelectronic sensor unit measures the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky. The data acquired by this chip are processed in an external processor to estimate the relative orientation of the axis of rotation of the Earth. Hence, the combination of this chip and the external processor finds the direction of true North relative to the chip: in other words, the combination acts as a solar compass. If the compass is further combined with a clock, then the combination can be used to establish a threeaxis inertial coordinate system. If, in addition, an auxiliary sensor measures the local vertical direction, then the resulting system can determine the geographic position. This chip and the software used in the processor are based mostly on the same design and operation as those of the unit described in Micro Sun Sensor for Spacecraft (NPO-30867) elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Like the unit described in that article, this unit includes a small multiple-pinhole camera comprising a micromachined mask containing a rectangular array of microscopic pinholes mounted a short distance in front of an image detector of the active-pixel sensor (APS) type (see figure). Further as in the other unit, the digitized output of the APS in this chip is processed to compute the centroids of the pinhole Sun images on the APS. Then the direction to the Sun, relative to the compass chip, is computed from the positions of the centroids (just like a sundial). In the operation of this chip, one is interested not only in the instantaneous direction to the Sun but also in the apparent path traced out by the direction to the Sun as a result of rotation of the Earth during an observation interval (during which the Sun sensor must remain stationary with respect to the Earth). The apparent path of the Sun across the sky is projected on a sphere. The axis of rotation of the Earth lies at the center of the projected circle on the sphere surface. Hence, true North (not magnetic

  1. BONE BANKS

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Vieira, Inácio Facó Ventura

    2015-01-01

    Bone banks are necessary for providing biological material for a series of orthopedic procedures. The growing need for musculoskeletal tissues for transplantation has been due to the development of new surgical techniques, and this has led to a situation in which a variety of hospital services have been willing to have their own source of tissue for transplantation. To increase the safety of transplanted tissues, standards for bone bank operation have been imposed by the government, which has limited the number of authorized institutions. The good performance in a bone bank depends on strict control over all stages, including: formation of well-trained harvesting teams; donor selection; conducting various tests on the tissues obtained; and strict control over the processing techniques used. Combination of these factors enables greater scope of use and numbers of recipient patients, while the incidence of tissue contamination becomes statistically insignificant, and there is traceability between donors and recipients. This paper describes technical considerations relating to how a bone bank functions, the use of grafts and orthopedic applications, the ethical issues and the main obstacles encountered. PMID:27026958

  2. The development of a composite bone model for training on placement of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Alkhodary, Mohamed Ahmed; Abdelraheim, Abdelraheim Emad Eldin; Elsantawy, Abd Elaleem Hassan; Al Dahman, Yousef Hamad; Al-Mershed, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It takes a lot of training on patients for both undergraduate to develop clinical sense as regards to the placement of dental implants in the jaw bones, also, the models provided by the dental implant companies for training are usually made of strengthened synthetic foams, which are far from the composition, and tactile sense provided by natural bone during drilling for clinical placement of dental implants. Methodology This is an in-vitro experimental study which utilized bovine femur bone, where the shaft of the femur provided the surface compact layer, and the head provided the cancellous bone layer, to provide a training model similar to jaw bones macroscopic anatomy. Both the compact and cancellous bone samples were characterized using mechanical compressive testing. Results The elastic moduli of the cancellous and cortical femur bone were comparable to those of the human mandible, and the prepared training model provided a more lifelike condition during the drilling and placement of dental implants. Conclusion The composite bone model developed simulated the macroscopic anatomy of the jaw bones having a surface layer of compact bone, and a core of cancellous bone, and provided a better and a more natural hands-on experience for placement of dental implants as compared to plastic models made of polyurethane. PMID:26309434

  3. Directional Oscillations, Concentrations, and Compensated Compactness via Microlocal Compactness Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler, Filip

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces microlocal compactness forms (MCFs) as a new tool to study oscillations and concentrations in L p -bounded sequences of functions. Decisively, MCFs retain information about the location, value distribution, and direction of oscillations and concentrations, thus extending at the same time the theories of (generalized) Young measures and H-measures. In L p -spaces oscillations and concentrations precisely discriminate between weak and strong compactness, and thus MCFs allow one to quantify the difference in compactness. The definition of MCFs involves a Fourier variable, whereby differential constraints on the functions in the sequence can also be investigated easily—a distinct advantage over Young measure theory. Furthermore, pointwise restrictions are reflected in the MCF as well, paving the way for applications to Tartar's framework of compensated compactness; consequently, we establish a new weak-to-strong compactness theorem in a "geometric" way. After developing several aspects of the abstract theory, we consider three applications; for lamination microstructures, the hierarchy of oscillations is reflected in the MCF. The directional information retained in an MCF is harnessed in the relaxation theory for anisotropic integral functionals. Finally, we indicate how the theory pertains to the study of propagation of singularities in certain systems of PDEs. The proofs combine measure theory, Young measures, and harmonic analysis.

  4. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  5. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  6. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  8. Bone resorption in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Maynard, J; Bumsted, R M; Huang, C C; Abramson, M

    1979-01-01

    Bone resorption is an important aspect of chronic otitis media contributing to many complications of this disease. It is postulated that the mechanism of this localized destructive process is chemical in origin. Collagenase, lysosomal enzymes, prostaglandins, and other cell mediators are thought to induce bone resorption, but the site of action and cellular origin of these substances remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate the location and attempt to delineate the cellular origin of two enzymes, collagenase and the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase in guinea pig temporal bones and human ossicles from ears containing chronic otitis media. Tissue localization of these enzymes identifies sites of active bone resorption and demonstrates the cells initiating this process. Using immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical techniques, collagenase was seen surrounding mononuclear inflammatory cells of granulation tissue at bone resorbing margins and at the periphery of osteocyte lacunae adjacent to resorbing areas. Electron microscopic data suggests that collagenase is an extracellular enzyme foun at the periphery of osteocytes. In addition, abundant acid phosphatase activity was seen in the same cells that exhibited collagenase staining, lending credence to the destructive function of these cells. The chronic inflammatory reaction found in chronic otitis media appears to activate bone destruction through the dynamic activity of mononuclear inflammatory cells and stimulates bone cells to increase their destructive biochemical functions.

  9. Knife and impact cutting of lamb bone.

    PubMed

    King, M J

    1999-05-01

    The forces and hence fracture energies required to cut bone are presented in this paper and the merits of cutting with a high speed blade are considered. A plain knife blade was used to cut cancellous and compact lamb bone using three different methods. A microtome was used to produce a range of cut thicknesses which enabled the fracture energy to be separated into friction, surface fracture and plastic deformation energies. A tensile test machine was used to produce thicker off-cuts so that the energy required to cut through full sections of bone could be determined. A high speed rail gun was used to cut at speeds up to 130 m/s. The energy required to cut bone did not change with blade speed. However, the energies measured during the cutting varied over a wide range. In situations in which the surface of the cut bone exhibited a very uneven surface high energy was required, whereas when the resulting cut surface was planar the cutting energy was low. A light weight blade which impacts the bone at high speed will transmit a small impulse to the carcass which may be absorbed without transmitting strain to the muscle/connective tissue. This may allow the development of a high speed knife which will cut bone without excessively damaging the meat surrounding the cut. PMID:22062140

  10. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  11. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  12. Repeated adjacent segment diseases and fractures in osteoporotic patients: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yao; Chen, Chiu-Liang; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pedicle screw instrumentation for treating spinal disorder is becoming increasingly widespread. Many studies have advocated its use to facilitate rigid fixation for spine; however, adjacent segmental disease is a known complication. Instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spines remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. Prophylactic vertebroplasty for adjacent vertebra has been reported to reduce the complications of junctional compression fractures but has raised a new problem of vertebral subluxation. This case report is a rare and an extreme example with many surgical complications caused by repeated instrumented fusion for osteoporotic spine in a single patient. This patient had various complications including adjacent segmental disease, vertebral subluxation, and junctional fractures on radiographs and magnetic resonance images. Case presentation An 81-year-old Taiwanese woman underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of L4-L5 in Taiwan 10 years ago. Due to degenerative spinal stenosis of L3-L4 and L2-L3, she had decompression with instrumented fusion from L5 to L1 at the previous hospital. However, catastrophic vertebral subluxations with severe neurologic compromise occurred, and she underwent salvage surgeries twice with prolonged instrumented fusion from L5 to T2. The surgeries did not resolve her problems of spinal instability and neurologic complications. Eventually, the patient remained with a Frankel Grade C spinal cord injury. Conclusion Adjacent segmental disease, junctional fracture, and vertebral subluxation are familiar complications following instrumented spinal fusion surgeries for osteoporotic spines. Neurologic injuries following long instrumentation are often serious and difficult to address with surgery alone. Conservative treatments should always be contemplated as an alternative method for patients with poor bone stock. PMID:27555778

  13. Bone image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Liew, H L; Clement, J G; Thomas, C D

    1999-05-01

    Characteristics of microscopic structures in bone cross sections carry essential clues in age determination in forensic science and in the study of age-related bone developments and bone diseases. Analysis of bone cross sections represents a major area of research in bone biology. However, traditional approaches in bone biology have relied primarily on manual processes with very limited number of bone samples. As a consequence, it is difficult to reach reliable and consistent conclusions. In this paper we present an image processing system that uses microstructural and relational knowledge present in the bone cross section for bone image segmentation. This system automates the bone image analysis process and is able to produce reliable results based on quantitative measurements from a large number of bone images. As a result, using large databases of bone images to study the correlation between bone structural features and age-related bone developments becomes feasible.

  14. Effect of groove on bone fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1992-12-01

    When testing for the effects of bone orientation on mode I fracture toughness, compact tension specimens are grooved with a V-notch to provide a crack guide. The effect of grooving on the expressions for the critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and the critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for mode I fracture toughness was investigated. Experiments were performed using grooved and ungrooved bovine compact tension specimens. The results indicate that the standard expression used to determine Kc for a compact tension specimen requires modification. The thickness (B) must be modified to account for the thickness between the grooves (Bn). The thickness used in the standard expression is replaced by an effective thickness written as (BBn)0.5. It was also found that the thickness between the grooves should be used in the standard formula for Gc. PMID:1491024

  15. Disease-specific clinical problems associated with the subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Pape, Dietrich; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elisaveta; van Dijk, C Niek; Madry, Henning

    2010-04-01

    The subchondral bone is involved in a variety of diseases affecting both the articular cartilage and bone. Osteochondral defects in distinct locations and of variable sizes are the final results of different etiologies. These include traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Traumatic osteochondral defects are caused by osteochondral fractures, separating an osteochondral fragment that includes articular cartilage and both subchondral and trabecular bone from the joint surface. In osteochondritis dissecans, the disease originates in the subchondral bone and secondarily affects the articular cartilage. Location, stage, size, and depth of osteochondral lesions play a role in the treatment of traumatic osteochondral defects and osteochondritis dissecans. Surgical options include fragment refixation, transplantation of osteochondral autografts, or bone restoration by impacted cancellous bone grafts combined with autologous chondrocyte transplantation. An insufficiency fracture of the subchondral bone may be the initiating factor of what was formerly believed to be a spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK). Recent histopathological studies suggest that each stage of SPONK reflects different types of bone repair reactions following a fracture of the subchondral bone plate. Osteoarthritis is a disease that does affect not only the articular cartilage, but also the subchondral bone. Reconstructive surgical techniques aim at preserving joint function, inducing fibrocartilaginous repair, and at correcting malalignment. This review summarizes the current status of the clinical treatment of traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis as they affect the subchondral bone region and its adjacent structures.

  16. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  17. Compaction Stress in Fine Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, A.J.; Kenkre, V.M.; Pease, E.A.; Scott, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    A vexing feature in granular materials compaction is density extrema interior to a compacted shape. Such inhomogeneities can lead to weaknesses and loss of dimensional control in ceramic parts, unpredictable dissolution of pharmaceuticals, and undesirable stress concentration in load-bearing soil. As an example, the centerline density in a cylindrical compact often does not decrease monotonically from the pressure source but exhibits local maxima and minima. Two lines of thought in the literature predict, respectively, diffusive and wavelike propagation of stress. Here, a general memory function approach has been formulated that unifies these previous treatments as special cases; by analyzing a convenient intermediate case, the telegrapher's equation, one sees that local density maxima arise via semidiffusive stress waves reflecting from the die walls and adding constructively at the centerline.

  18. Biomechanics and mechanobiology of trabecular bone: a review.

    PubMed

    Oftadeh, Ramin; Perez-Viloria, Miguel; Villa-Camacho, Juan C; Vaziri, Ashkan; Nazarian, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Trabecular bone is a highly porous, heterogeneous, and anisotropic material which can be found at the epiphyses of long bones and in the vertebral bodies. Studying the mechanical properties of trabecular bone is important, since trabecular bone is the main load bearing bone in vertebral bodies and also transfers the load from joints to the compact bone of the cortex of long bones. This review article highlights the high dependency of the mechanical properties of trabecular bone on species, age, anatomic site, loading direction, and size of the sample under consideration. In recent years, high resolution micro finite element methods have been extensively used to specifically address the mechanical properties of the trabecular bone and provide unique tools to interpret and model the mechanical testing experiments. The aims of the current work are to first review the mechanobiology of trabecular bone and then present classical and new approaches for modeling and analyzing the trabecular bone microstructure and macrostructure and corresponding mechanical properties such as elastic properties and strength.

  19. [Bone fusion algorithm: a new tool to support decision making].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Satoru; Murphy, Kieran J; Oka, Mayumi; Gailloud, Philippe

    2007-08-20

    Three dimensional angio (3D-Angio) is indispensable in neuroradiology, especially for examinations and interventions of cerebral-aneurysms. 3D-Angio has two modes, 3D-DSA and 3D-DA. The former mode is used to determine vessel structures in detail, and the latter is good at simultaneously determining relationships between vascular and osseous structures. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine these relationships with 3D-Angio if they are close together. The relationship between the skull base and adjacent aneurysm is an essential factor in determining treatment strategy. In order to make this determination, we have developed the Bone Fusion function, which reconstructs vessel and osseous structures separately from rotational DSA data and its mask sequence data, respectively, and two independent 3D data sets are fused in one 3D representation. There are three display modes: fusion, vessel only, and bone only, and those structures are clearly identified by different colors on the fusion images. The Bone Fusion function was applied to hundreds of clinical cases in which 3D-DSA and 3D-DA were used. The Bone Fusion provided important information to determine treatment strategy, although those factors were sometimes lost with 3D-DSA and 3D-DA when the studied vasculatures were adjacent to bone. It was especially useful to apply the Bone Fusion function to aneurysms or tumors adjacent to the skull base. PMID:17917348

  20. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  1. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  2. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  3. Oxygen-derived free radicals stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption in rodent bone in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, I R; Boyce, B F; Oreffo, R O; Bonewald, L; Poser, J; Mundy, G R

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms by which bone resorbing osteoclasts form and are activated by hormones are poorly understood. We show here that the generation of oxygen-derived free radicals in cultured bone is associated with the formation of new osteoclasts and enhanced bone resorption, identical to the effects seen when bones are treated with hormones such as parathyroid hormone (PTH) and interleukin 1 (IL-1). When free oxygen radicals were generated adjacent to bone surfaces in vivo, osteoclasts were also formed. PTH and IL-1-stimulated bone resorption was inhibited by both natural and recombinant superoxide dismutase, an enzyme that depletes tissues of superoxide anions. We used the marker nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) to identify the cells that were responsible for free radical production in resorbing bones. NBT staining was detected only in osteoclasts in cultures of resorbing bones. NBT staining in osteoclasts was decreased in bones coincubated with calcitonin, an inhibitor of bone resorption. We also found that isolated avian osteoclasts stained positively for NBT. NBT staining in isolated osteoclasts was increased when the cells were incubated with bone particles, to which they attach. We confirmed the formation of superoxide anion in isolated avian osteoclasts using ferricytochrome c reduction as a method of detection. The reduction of ferricytochrome c in isolated osteoclasts was inhibited by superoxide dismutase. Our results suggest that oxygen-derived free radicals, and particularly the superoxide anion, are intermediaries in the formation and activation of osteoclasts. Images PMID:2312718

  4. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  5. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  6. Generalized high order compact methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Kominiarczuk, Jakub

    2010-09-01

    The fundamental ideas of the high order compact method are combined with the generalized finite difference method. The result is a finite difference method that works on unstructured, nonuniform grids, and is more accurate than one would classically expect from the number of grid points employed.

  7. Upwind Compact Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.

    1985-07-01

    It was shown by Ciment, Leventhal, and Weinberg ( J. Comput. Phys.28 (1978), 135) that the standard compact finite difference scheme may break down in convection dominated problems. An upwinding of the method, which maintains the fourth order accuracy, is suggested and favorable numerical results are found for a number of test problems.

  8. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  9. Mesoscale simulations of powder compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-06-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to experimental match compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show evidence of hard-to-explain reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line, which have also been observed in the experiments. We found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations, since 2D results tend to underpredict stress levels for high-porosity powders regardless of material properties. We developed a process to extract macroscale information for the simulation which can be directly used in calibration of continuum model for heterogeneous media.

  10. Properties of dynamically compacted WIPP salt

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, N.S.; Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1996-07-01

    Dynamic compaction of mine-run salt is being investigated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), where compacted salt is being considered for repository sealing applications. One large-scale and two intermediate-scale dynamic compaction demonstrations were conducted. Initial fractional densities of the compacted salt range form 0.85 to 0.90, and permeabilities vary. Dynamically-compacted specimens were further consolidated in the laboratory by application of hydrostatic pressure. Permeability as a function of density was determined, and consolidation microprocesses were studied. Experimental results, in conjunction with modeling results, indicate that the compacted salt will function as a viable seal material.

  11. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  12. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  13. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  14. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  17. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  18. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  19. 2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. 7; THIS CONTROL GATE IS A 1980s RECONSTRUCTION. - Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lift Lock No. 7 & Control Gate, East side of DuPage River, Channahon, Will County, IL

  20. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  1. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  5. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  6. GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM DREY STREET PLANT, INSIDE WELCOME WALL - Chambers Window Glass Company, Warehouse & Shipping, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  7. 10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF REAR PORCH. SHED IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Butt Valley Dam, Gate Tender's House, Butt Valley Reservoir Road, Caribou, Plumas County, CA

  8. Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance of the northwest wing - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  9. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  10. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  12. 31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  14. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  15. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  16. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Herlin, Maria; Finnilä, Mikko A.J.; Zioupos, Peter; Aula, Antti; Risteli, Juha; Miettinen, Hanna M.; Jämsä, Timo; Tuukkanen, Juha; Korkalainen, Merja; Håkansson, Helen; Viluksela, Matti

    2013-11-15

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr{sup −/−}) and wild-type (Ahr{sup +/+}) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200 μg/kg bw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr{sup +/+} mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr{sup −/−} mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr{sup +/+} mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr{sup −/−} mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr{sup +/+} mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations. - Highlights: • TCDD disrupts bone remodeling resulting in altered cortical and trabecular bone. • In trabecular bone an anabolic effect is observed. • Cortical bone is thinner, more porous, harder, stiffer and mechanically weaker. • AHR ablation

  18. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  19. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation and reconstruction with an intravertebral mesh and morcelized bone graft.

    PubMed

    Chiu, John C; Stechison, Michael T

    2005-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebral augmentation (VA) and reconstruction with intravertebral polyethylene mesh sac (OptiMesh) and morcelized bone graft provided a minimally invasive efficacious and controlled delivery mechanism to stabilize and treat painful osteoporotic, traumatic and neoplastic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs), as well as avoided serious complications from Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) of Vertebroplasty and Kyphoplasty. Osteoconductive and osteoinductive and can be used to create biologic vertebral reconstruction. The adjacent vertebra integrity should be more protected by the construct with a similar elasticity and physical characteristics of the morcelized bone, more matched to that of adjacent bone than PMMA. The indications and surgical techniques are described herein.

  20. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Benign (noncancerous) bone tumors include: Bone cyst Fibroma Osteoblastoma Osteoid osteoma Cancerous tumors include: Ewing sarcoma Multiple myeloma Osteosarcoma Other types of cancer that may have spread to the bone Abnormal ...

  1. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... direct relationship between tobacco use and decreased bone density. Analyzing the impact of cigarette smoking on bone ... hard to determine whether a decrease in bone density is due to smoking itself or to other ...

  2. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  3. Facts about Broken Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... las fracturas de huesos Your bones are tough stuff — but even tough stuff can break. Like a wooden pencil, bones will ... that? Get a lot of physical activity, especially stuff like jumping and running. Feed your bones the ...

  4. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  5. Researches of mechanical behavior of bone tissues for development and selection of individual ceramic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, T. V.; Buyakova, S. P.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    The researches of mechanical behavior were conducted and the effective mechanical properties of model compact bone micro volumes under uniaxial compression were obtained taking into account the structural characteristics and the mineral content; experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior and the effective mechanical parameters of obtained porous zirconia ceramics were conducted. The comparison of obtained in paper calculated and experimental mechanical properties of bone and ceramics was carry out and the recommendations on the use the ceramics with certain porosity to replace the compact bone fragment with a certain structure and mineral content were suggested.

  6. Navigated Pin-Point Approach to Osteoid Osteoma Adjacent to the Facet Joint of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Masashi; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Nishizawa, Kazuya; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign osteoblastic tumor. Its curative treatment is complete removal of the nidus, where intraoperative localization of the nidus governs clinical results. However, treatment can be difficult since the lesion is often invisible over the bony surface. Accordingly, establishment of an ideal less invasive surgical strategy for spinal OO remains yet unsettled. We illustrate the efficacy of a computed tomography (CT)-based navigation system in excising OO located adjacent to the facet joint of spine. In our 2 cases, complete and pin-point removal of the nidus located close to the facet joint was successfully achieved, without excessive removal of the bone potentially leading to spinal instability and possible damage of nearby neurovascular structures. We advocate a less invasive approach to spinal OO, particularly in an environment with an available CT-based navigation system. PMID:26949472

  7. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  8. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  9. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  10. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  11. Bone and bone marrow involvement in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Yachoui, Ralph; Parker, Brian J; Nguyen, Thanhcuong T

    2015-11-01

    Bone and bone marrow involvement in sarcoidosis have been infrequently reported. We aimed to describe the clinical features, radiological descriptions, pathological examinations, and outcomes of three patients with osseous sarcoidosis and one patient with bone marrow sarcoidosis seen at our institution. Our case series included fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography descriptions in assessing the whole-body extent of sarcoidosis. In the era of advanced imaging, large bone and axial skeleton sarcoidosis lesions are more common than previously reported.

  12. 7 CFR 51.582 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.582 Fairly compact. Fairly compact means that the branches on the... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.582 Section 51.582 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  13. 7 CFR 51.572 - Compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.572 Compact. Compact means that the branches on the stalk are fairly... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compact. 51.572 Section 51.572 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  14. 7 CFR 51.572 - Compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.572 Compact. Compact means that the branches on the stalk are fairly... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compact. 51.572 Section 51.572 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  15. 7 CFR 51.582 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.582 Fairly compact. Fairly compact means that the branches on the... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.582 Section 51.582 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  16. Compact Low Frequency Radio Antenna

    DOEpatents

    Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2008-11-11

    An antenna is disclosed that comprises a pair of conductive, orthogonal arches and a pair of conductive annular sector plates, wherein adjacent legs of each arch are fastened to one of the annular sector plates and the opposite adjacent pair of legs is fastened to the remaining annular sector plate. The entire antenna structure is spaced apart from a conductive ground plane by a thin dielectric medium. The antenna is driven by a feed conduit passing through the conductive ground plane and dielectric medium and attached to one of the annular sector plates, wherein the two orthogonal arched act as a pair of crossed dipole elements. This arrangement of elements provides a radiation pattern that is largely omni-directional above the horizon.

  17. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  18. Compact torus studies: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1987-06-01

    The compact torus (CT) device has been proposed for use in some applications which are of interest in Laboratory programs in the areas of pulsed power and inertial confinement fusion. These applications involve compression and acceleration of CT plasmas. The RACE (Ring Accelerator Experiment) experimental program at Livermore has been initiated to study these applications. The work reported here involves studies of plasma physics and other aspects of these compact torus applications. The studies conducted identify specific problem areas associated with the CT device and examine these areas in some detail. This report contains studies of three particular problem areas of the CT applications. These three areas are: the general nonlinear properties of the CT as a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium, particle simulation of the compression of the CT, with a focus on the non-MHD effects, and nonlinear RF interaction problems in the CT.

  19. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  20. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  1. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  2. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  3. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  4. COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-06-01

    COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

  5. 78 FR 61384 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  6. 76 FR 20044 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  7. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  8. 75 FR 17161 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... purpose of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact)....

  9. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  10. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  11. [The pisiform bone: sesamoid or carpal bone?].

    PubMed

    May, O

    1996-01-01

    In man, the pisiform bone occupies an unusual place among the carpal bones. It is situated in an anterior plane to the other bones, sheathed within the tendon of the flexor carpi ulnaris, and ossifying almost four years the last of the carpal bones. Many theories have tried to explain the presence of this "exceptional" bone: the first theory, proposed by Flower and Mivart, suggested the possibility that this bone could be a sesamoid. The second theory supposes a polydactyl hand, assuming that polydactyly preceded pentadactyly; the pisiform would then be a post-minimus vestigial bone according to Bardeleben. Finally, Gegenbauer and Gillies, proposed a primary pentadactyl hand in which the carpus would be composed of three proximal elements, generally two central, and five distal. The pisiform would either be a derivative of the central series, or a distinct element in the carpus. This last theory appears to be the most likely. The primary carpus would therefore have consisted of 12 bones arranged in 3 distinct rows, a proximal row of 3 bones, a central row of 4 bones, and a distal row of 5 bones. According to this theory, the most ulnar of the central would have been displaced to the medial limit of the carpus, to become the pisiform. PMID:9026058

  12. Adjacent vertebral failure after vertebroplasty: a biomechanical study of low-modulus PMMA cement

    PubMed Central

    Heini, Paul; Windolf, Markus; Schneider, Erich

    2007-01-01

    PMMA is the most common bone substitute used for vertebroplasty. An increased fracture rate of the adjacent vertebrae has been observed after vertebroplasty. Decreased failure strength has been noted in a laboratory study of augmented functional spine units (FSUs), where the adjacent, non-augmented vertebral body always failed. This may provide evidence that rigid cement augmentation may facilitate the subsequent collapse of the adjacent vertebrae. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the decrease in failure strength of augmented FSUs can be avoided using low-modulus PMMA bone cement. In cadaveric FSUs, overall stiffness, failure strength and stiffness of the two vertebral bodies were determined under compression for both the treated and untreated specimens. Augmentation was performed on the caudal vertebrae with either regular or low-modulus PMMA. Endplate and wedge-shaped fractures occurred in the cranial and caudal vertebrae in the ratios endplate:wedge (cranial:caudal): 3:8 (5:6), 4:7 (7:4) and 10:1 (10:1) for control, low-modulus and regular cement group, respectively. The mean failure strength was 3.3 ± 1 MPa with low-modulus cement, 2.9 ± 1.2 MPa with regular cement and 3.6 ± 1.3 MPa for the control group. Differences between the groups were not significant (p = 0.754 and p = 0.375, respectively, for low-modulus cement vs. control and regular cement vs. control). Overall FSU stiffness was not significantly affected by augmentation. Significant differences were observed for the stiffness differences of the cranial to the caudal vertebral body for the regular PMMA group to the other groups (p < 0.003). The individual vertebral stiffness values clearly showed the stiffening effect of the regular cement and the lesser alteration of the stiffness of the augmented vertebrae using the low-modulus PMMA compared to the control group (p = 0.999). In vitro biomechanical study and biomechanical evaluation of the hypothesis state that the

  13. Bone grafts in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna; Vinitha, Belliappa; Fathima, Ghousia

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation. PMID:23946565

  14. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-10-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  15. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  16. Shell bone histology indicates terrestrial palaeoecology of basal turtles

    PubMed Central

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Sander, P.Martin

    2007-01-01

    The palaeoecology of basal turtles from the Late Triassic was classically viewed as being semi-aquatic, similar to the lifestyle of modern snapping turtles. Lately, this view was questioned based on limb bone proportions, and a terrestrial palaeoecology was suggested for the turtle stem. Here, we present independent shell bone microstructural evidence for a terrestrial habitat of the oldest and basal most well-known turtles, i.e. the Upper Triassic Proterochersis robusta and Proganochelys quenstedti. Comparison of their shell bone histology with that of extant turtles preferring either aquatic habitats or terrestrial habitats clearly reveals congruence with terrestrial turtle taxa. Similarities in the shell bones of these turtles are a diploe structure with well-developed external and internal cortices, weak vascularization of the compact bone layers and a dense nature of the interior cancellous bone with overall short trabeculae. On the other hand, ‘aquatic’ turtles tend to reduce cortical bone layers, while increasing overall vascularization of the bone tissue. In contrast to the study of limb bone proportions, the present study is independent from the uncommon preservation of appendicular skeletal elements in fossil turtles, enabling the palaeoecological study of a much broader range of incompletely known turtle taxa in the fossil record. PMID:17519193

  17. Shell bone histology indicates terrestrial palaeoecology of basal turtles.

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Sander, P Martin

    2007-08-01

    The palaeoecology of basal turtles from the Late Triassic was classically viewed as being semi-aquatic, similar to the lifestyle of modern snapping turtles. Lately, this view was questioned based on limb bone proportions, and a terrestrial palaeoecology was suggested for the turtle stem. Here, we present independent shell bone microstructural evidence for a terrestrial habitat of the oldest and basal most well-known turtles, i.e. the Upper Triassic Proterochersis robusta and Proganochelys quenstedti. Comparison of their shell bone histology with that of extant turtles preferring either aquatic habitats or terrestrial habitats clearly reveals congruence with terrestrial turtle taxa. Similarities in the shell bones of these turtles are a diploe structure with well-developed external and internal cortices, weak vascularization of the compact bone layers and a dense nature of the interior cancellous bone with overall short trabeculae. On the other hand, 'aquatic' turtles tend to reduce cortical bone layers, while increasing overall vascularization of the bone tissue. In contrast to the study of limb bone proportions, the present study is independent from the uncommon preservation of appendicular skeletal elements in fossil turtles, enabling the palaeoecological study of a much broader range of incompletely known turtle taxa in the fossil record. PMID:17519193

  18. Unified compaction curve model for tensile strength of tablets made by roller compaction and direct compression.

    PubMed

    Farber, Leon; Hapgood, Karen P; Michaels, James N; Fu, Xi-Young; Meyer, Robert; Johnson, Mary-Ann; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    A model that describes the relationship between roller-compaction conditions and tablet strength is proposed. The model assumes that compaction is cumulative during roller compaction and subsequent granule compaction, and compact strength (ribbon and tablet) is generated irreversibly as if strength is controlled by plastic deformation of primary particles only. Roller-compaction is treated as a compaction step where the macroscopic ribbon strength is subsequently destroyed in milling. This loss in strength is irreversible and tablets compressed from the resulting granulation are weaker than those compressed by direct compression at the same compression force. Roller-compacted ribbons were produced at a range of roll forces for three formulations and subsequently milled and compacted into tablets. Once the total compaction history is taken in account, the compaction behavior of the uncompacted blends and the roller-compacted granules ultimately follow a single master compaction curve--a unified compaction curve (UCC). The model successfully described the compaction behavior of DC grade starch and formulations of lactose monohydrate with 50% or more microcrystalline cellulose, and may be more generally applicable to systems containing significant proportions of any plastically deforming material, including MCC and starch. PMID:17689211

  19. Bone Health and Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lupsa, Beatrice C; Insogna, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to decreased bone strength and an increased risk of low-energy fractures. Central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements are the gold standard for determining bone mineral density. Bone loss is an inevitable consequence of the decrease in estrogen levels during and following menopause, but additional risk factors for bone loss can also contribute to osteoporosis in older women. A well-balanced diet, exercise, and smoking cessation are key to maintaining bone health as women age. Pharmacologic agents should be recommended in patients at high risk for fracture.

  20. Grouper: A Compact, Streamable Triangle Mesh Data Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Luffel, Mark; Gurung, Topraj; Lindstrom, Peter; Rossignac, Jarek

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present Grouper: an all-in-one compact file format, random-access data structure, and streamable representation for large triangle meshes. Similarly to the recently published SQuad representation, Grouper represents the geometry and connectivity of a mesh by grouping vertices and triangles into fixed-size records, most of which store two adjacent triangles and a shared vertex. Unlike SQuad, however, Grouper interleaves geometry with connectivity and uses a new connectivity representation to ensure that vertices and triangles can be stored in a coherent order that enables memory-efficient sequential stream processing. We also present a linear-time construction algorithm that allows streaming out Grouper meshes using a small memory footprint while preserving the initial ordering of vertices. In this construction, we show how the problem of assigning vertices and triangles to groups reduces to a well-known NP-hard optimization problem, and present a simple yet effective heuristic solution that performs well in practice. Our array-based Grouper representation also doubles as a triangle mesh data structure that allows direct access to vertices and triangles. Storing only about two integer references per triangle-i.e., less than the three vertex references stored with each triangle in a conventional indexed mesh format-Grouper answers both incidence and adjacency queries in amortized constant time. Our compact representation enables data-parallel processing on multicore computers, instant partitioning and fast transmission for distributed processing, as well as efficient out-of-core access. We demonstrate the versatility and performance benefits of Grouper using a suite of example meshes and processing kernels.

  1. On the Adjacent Eccentric Distance Sum Index of Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui; Cao, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    For a given graph G, ε(v) and deg(v) denote the eccentricity and the degree of the vertex v in G, respectively. The adjacent eccentric distance sum index of a graph G is defined as ξsv(G)=∑v∈V(G)ε(v)D(v)deg(v), where D(v)=∑u∈V(G)d(u,v) is the sum of all distances from the vertex v. In this paper we derive some bounds for the adjacent eccentric distance sum index in terms of some graph parameters, such as independence number, covering number, vertex connectivity, chromatic number, diameter and some other graph topological indices. PMID:26091095

  2. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Jason D; Lee, Monica D; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  3. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  4. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  5. Multiple congenital brachymetatarsia. A one-stage combined shortening and lengthening procedure without iliac bone graft.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Baek, G H; Chung, M S; Yoon, P W

    2004-09-01

    We performed nine metatarsal and three proximal phalangeal lengthenings in five patients with congenital brachymetatarsia of the first and one or two other metatarsal bones, by a one-stage combined shortening and lengthening procedure using intercalcary autogenous bone grafts from adjacent shortened metatarsal bones. Instead of the isolated lengthening of the first and the other metatarsal bones, we shortened the adjacent normal metatarsal and used the excised bone to lengthen the short toes, except for the great toe, to restore the normal parabola. One skin incision was used. All the operations were performed bilaterally and the patients were followed up for a mean period of 69.5 months (29 to 107). They all regained a nearly normal parabola and were satisfied with the cosmetic results. Our technique is straightforward and produces good cosmetic results. Satisfactory, bony union is achieved, morbidity is low, and no additional surgery is required for the removal of metal implants. PMID:15446529

  6. Does running strengthen bone?

    PubMed

    Boudenot, Arnaud; Achiou, Zahra; Portier, Hugues

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a living tissue needing mechanical stress to maintain strength. Traditional endurance exercises offer only modest effects on bone. Walking and running produce low impact but lead to bone fatigue. This article is specifically addressed to therapists and explains the mechanisms involved for the effects of exercise on bone. Intermittent exercise limits bone fatigue, and downhill exercises increase ground impact forces and involve eccentric muscle contractions, which are particularly osteogenic. PMID:26562001

  7. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  8. Hypoxic adipocytes pattern early heterotopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth; Gannon, Francis H; Ozen, Mustafa; Ittmann, Michael M; Gugala, Zbigniew; Hipp, John A; Moran, Kevin M; Fouletier-Dilling, Christine M; Schumara-Martin, Shannon; Lindsey, Ronald W; Heggeness, Michael H; Brenner, Malcolm K; Davis, Alan R

    2007-02-01

    The factors contributing to heterotopic ossification, the formation of bone in abnormal soft-tissue locations, are beginning to emerge, but little is known about microenvironmental conditions promoting this often devastating disease. Using a murine model in which endochondral bone formation is triggered in muscle by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), we studied changes near the site of injection of BMP2-expressing cells. As early as 24 hours later, brown adipocytes began accumulating in the lesional area. These cells stained positively for pimonidazole and therefore generated hypoxic stress within the target tissue, a prerequisite for the differentiation of stem cells to chondrocytes and subsequent heterotopic bone formation. We propose that aberrant expression of BMPs in soft tissue stimulates production of brown adipocytes, which drive the early steps of heterotopic endochondral ossification by lowering oxygen tension in adjacent tissue, creating the correct environment for chondrogenesis. Results in misty gray lean mutant mice not producing brown fat suggest that white adipocytes convert into fat-oxidizing cells when brown adipocytes are unavailable, providing a compensatory mechanism for generation of a hypoxic microenvironment. Manipulation of the transcriptional control of adipocyte fate in local soft-tissue environments may offer a means to prevent or treat development of bone in extraskeletal sites. PMID:17255330

  9. Spinal bone density following spinal fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, H.J.; Grubb, S.A.; Talmage, R.V.

    1989-04-01

    Spinal bone densities were assessed in 25 patients following lumbar fusion and bracing, in an attempt to study bone remodeling by noninvasive methods. Dual-photon densitometry was used to study specific areas of autologous bone grafts and adjacent vertebrae above the fusion mass. Measurements were made preoperatively and at 6-week intervals postoperatively. The data for the first 12 months postoperatively are reported here. In all patients there was at first a consistent loss in density in the vertebrae above the fusion mass, averaging 15.7%. This was followed by a gradual density increase such that by 1 year postoperatively, in 60% of the subjects, the density of these vertebrae was higher than the preoperative level. In the grafted areas, bone changes were cyclical, demonstrating a remodeling pattern consistent with that described in animal literature for graft healing and also consistent with modern bone remodeling theory. There was a general tendency toward a gradual increase in the density of the fusion mass.

  10. Carboxylation of osteocalcin may be related to bone quality: a possible mechanism of bone fracture prevention by vitamin K.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, T; Kawai, S

    2001-01-01

    Vitamin K is essential for the carboxylation of glutamic acid residues, such as osteocalcin. Recent studies have reported that vitamin K reduces vertebral and hip fractures without increasing bone mass in patients with osteoporosis, suggesting that vitamin K could affect bone quality. However, the mechanism is unknown. To investigate the involvement of the carboxylation of osteocalcin in bone quality, the present preliminary study examined serum bone markers and ultrasound velocity, a possible indicator of bone quality, in 14 healthy prepubertal children (eight boys and six girls) aged between 7 and 12 years. Venous blood was collected between 0800 and 0900 h after an overnight fast, and serum levels of intact, carboxylated and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and type I procollagen carboxyl extension peptide were measured. Speed of sound in the right tibia was measured using a SoundScan 2000 Compact (Myriad Ultrasound System, Rehovot, Israel). As a result, there was no significant correlation between the serum bone markers and the Z score for the speed of sound. In contrast, the ratio of serum carboxylated osteocalcin to serum intact osteocalcin was positively correlated with the Z score for the speed of sound (r = 0.621, P = 0.016). These findings suggest, for the first time, that carboxylation of osteocalcin is related to bone quality. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of carboxylation of osteocalcin in bone, and this will provide a new insight into the mechanism of vitamin K treatment in osteoporosis. PMID:11368299

  11. Bone histology in extant and fossil penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes).

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T; Werning, Sarah; Sclafani, Michelle; Boles, Zachary M

    2015-11-01

    Substantial changes in bone histology accompany the secondary adaptation to life in the water. This transition is well documented in several lineages of mammals and non-avian reptiles, but has received relatively little attention in birds. This study presents new observations on the long bone microstructure of penguins, based on histological sections from two extant taxa (Spheniscus and Aptenodytes) and eight fossil specimens belonging to stem lineages (†Palaeospheniscus and several indeterminate Eocene taxa). High bone density in penguins results from compaction of the internal cortical tissues, and thus penguin bones are best considered osteosclerotic rather than pachyostotic. Although the oldest specimens sampled in this study represent stages of penguin evolution that occurred at least 25 million years after the loss of flight, major differences in humeral structure were observed between these Eocene stem taxa and extant taxa. This indicates that the modification of flipper bone microstructure continued long after the initial loss of flight in penguins. It is proposed that two key transitions occurred during the shift from the typical hollow avian humerus to the dense osteosclerotic humerus in penguins. First, a reduction of the medullary cavity occurred due to a decrease in the amount of perimedullary osteoclastic activity. Second, a more solid cortex was achieved by compaction. In extant penguins and †Palaeospheniscus, most of the inner cortex is formed by rapid osteogenesis, resulting an initial latticework of woven-fibered bone. Subsequently, open spaces are filled by slower, centripetal deposition of parallel-fibered bone. Eocene stem penguins formed the initial latticework, but the subsequent round of compaction was less complete, and thus open spaces remained in the adult bone. In contrast to the humerus, hindlimb bones from Eocene stem penguins had smaller medullary cavities and thus higher compactness values compared with extant taxa. Although

  12. Bone histology in extant and fossil penguins (Aves: Sphenisciformes).

    PubMed

    Ksepka, Daniel T; Werning, Sarah; Sclafani, Michelle; Boles, Zachary M

    2015-11-01

    Substantial changes in bone histology accompany the secondary adaptation to life in the water. This transition is well documented in several lineages of mammals and non-avian reptiles, but has received relatively little attention in birds. This study presents new observations on the long bone microstructure of penguins, based on histological sections from two extant taxa (Spheniscus and Aptenodytes) and eight fossil specimens belonging to stem lineages (†Palaeospheniscus and several indeterminate Eocene taxa). High bone density in penguins results from compaction of the internal cortical tissues, and thus penguin bones are best considered osteosclerotic rather than pachyostotic. Although the oldest specimens sampled in this study represent stages of penguin evolution that occurred at least 25 million years after the loss of flight, major differences in humeral structure were observed between these Eocene stem taxa and extant taxa. This indicates that the modification of flipper bone microstructure continued long after the initial loss of flight in penguins. It is proposed that two key transitions occurred during the shift from the typical hollow avian humerus to the dense osteosclerotic humerus in penguins. First, a reduction of the medullary cavity occurred due to a decrease in the amount of perimedullary osteoclastic activity. Second, a more solid cortex was achieved by compaction. In extant penguins and †Palaeospheniscus, most of the inner cortex is formed by rapid osteogenesis, resulting an initial latticework of woven-fibered bone. Subsequently, open spaces are filled by slower, centripetal deposition of parallel-fibered bone. Eocene stem penguins formed the initial latticework, but the subsequent round of compaction was less complete, and thus open spaces remained in the adult bone. In contrast to the humerus, hindlimb bones from Eocene stem penguins had smaller medullary cavities and thus higher compactness values compared with extant taxa. Although

  13. New bone formation in nude mouse calvaria induced by canine prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Bruce E; Bahnson, Robert R; Rosol, Thomas J

    2002-11-29

    Osteoblastic metastases are common in patients with advanced prostate cancer. The pathophysiology of the new bone formation at metastatic sites is not currently known, but it is hypothesized that growth factors secreted by the prostate may be involved. Unfortunately, most rodent models of prostate cancer with metastasis to bone are osteolytic and not osteoblastic. Significant osteolysis by tumor cells at metastatic sites also may lead to fractures or bone instability. Misinterpretation of new periosteal bone due to bone instability as tumor-cell osteo-induction is another disadvantage of the osteolytic models. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a model system of new bone formation in the calvaria of nude mice stimulated by normal canine prostate tissue. Collagenase-digested normal prostate tissue was implanted adjacent to the calvaria of nude mice. Calvaria were examined at 2 weeks post-implantation for changes in the bone microenvironment by histology, calcein uptake at sites of bone mineralization, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining for osteoclasts. The prostate tissue remained viable and induced abundant new woven bone formation on the adjacent periosteal surface. In some cases new bone formation also was induced on the distant or concave calvarial periosteum. The new bone stained intensely with calcein, which demonstrated mineralization of the bone matrix. The new bone formation on prostate-implanted calvaria significantly increased (1.7-fold) the thickness of the calvaria compared with control calvaria. New bone formation was not induced in calvaria of mice implanted with normal canine kidney, urinary bladder, spleen, or skeletal muscle tissue, or mice with surgically-induced disruption of the periosteum. Osteoclast numbers in the medullary spaces and periosteum of calvaria were mildly increased (61%) in mice with implanted prostate tissue. In conclusion, this animal model will be useful for investigating the roles of prostate

  14. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy.

  15. Carpal bone analysis in bone age assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Kurkowska-Pospiech, Sylwia; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2006-03-01

    A computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method has been previously developed in our Laboratory based on features extracted from regions of interest (ROI) in phalanges in a digital hand atlas. Due to various factors, including, the diversity of size, shape and orientation of carpal bones, non-uniformity of soft tissue, low contrast between the bony structure and soft tissue, the automatic identification and segmentation of bone boundaries is an extremely challenging task. Past research work on carpal bone segmentation has been done utilizing dynamic thresholding. However, due to the discrepancy of carpal bones developments and the limitations of segmentation algorithms, carpal bone ROI has not been taken into consideration in the bone age assessment procedure. In this paper, we present a method for fully automatic carpal bone segmentation and feature analysis in hand X-ray radiograph. The purpose of this paper is to automatically segment the carpal bones by anisotropic diffusion and Canny edge detection techniques. By adding their respective features extracted from carpal bones ROI to the phalangeal ROI feature space, the accuracy of bone age assessment can be improved especially when the image processing in the phalangeal ROI fails in younger children.

  16. Compaction of Space Mission Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.

    2004-01-01

    The current solid waste management system employed on the International Space Station (ISS) consists of compaction, storage, and disposal. Wastes such plastic food packaging and trash are compacted manually and wrapped in duct tape footballs by the astronauts. Much of the waste is simply loaded either into the empty Russian Progress vehicle for destruction on reentry or into Shuttle for return to Earth. This manual method is wasteful of crew time and does not transition well to far term missions. Different wastes onboard spacecraft vary considerably in their characteristics and in the appropriate method of management. In advanced life support systems for far term missions, recovery of resources such as water from the wastes becomes important. However waste such as plastic food packaging, which constitutes a large fraction of solid waste (roughly 21% on ISS, more on long duration missions), contains minimal recoverable resource. The appropriate management of plastic waste is waste stabilization and volume minimization rather than resource recovery. This paper describes work that has begun at Ames Research Center on development of a heat melt compactor that can be used on near term and future missions, that can minimize crew interaction, and that can handle wastes with a significant plastic composition. The heat melt compactor takes advantage of the low melting point of plastics to compact plastic materials using a combination of heat and pressure. The US Navy has demonstrated successful development of a similar unit for shipboard application. Ames is building upon the basic approach demonstrated by the Navy to develop an advanced heat melt type compactor for space mission type wastes.

  17. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Ethan N

    2010-03-01

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the

  18. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  19. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  20. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  1. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  2. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  3. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  4. 4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side of bridge, taken from river level. Note entire east side and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  5. 12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO THE STEEL PLANT OFFICES. BAR AND BILLET MILLS AND, IN THE DISTANCE, THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES MAY BE SEEN. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. 8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking south. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead setting. Note laced vertical compression members, latticed portal strut, decorative strut bracing, and lightness of diagonal and lateral tension members. View to southeast through southeast portal from truss mid-span. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  8. 11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent Blacksmith Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to southwest (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  9. 1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN BUILDING (BASSIN'S RESTAURANT) (HABS No. DC-357), 501-511 14TH STREET (THE LOCKER ROOM) HABS No. DC-356) ON CORNER, AND MUNSEY BUILDING (HABS No. DC-358) - William J. Stone Building, 1345 E Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ENTRY TO NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON RIGHT, AND HOUSING AREA ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  16. 7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL CONVEYOR; IN THE DISTANCE IS THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SWITCH HOUSE NO. 1; LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  17. 4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN BUILDING PERIODS 1 AND 3. NOTE REUSED WOOD STRIP NAILED TO BUILDING PERIOD 1 POST INSCRIBED 'ST. LEONARD'. THERE ARE NO NAIL HOLES IN THE PERIOD 3 POST, THE FARRING STRIPS ADJUST FOR CLADDING - Charles' Gift, State Routes 2 & 4, Lusby, Calvert County, MD

  18. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  19. 12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE CANAL, LOOKING EAST. BARREN AREA IN FOREGROUND IS DECOMPOSING SAWDUST. DIRT PILE IN BACKGROUND IS THE EDGE OF THE SUMMIT COUNTY LANDFILL. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  20. LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ROOM; THE PIPES AT THE BOTTOM ARE PART OF THE RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM USED FOR HEATING THE FACTORY DURING COLD WEATHER. - Westmoreland Glass Company, Seventh & Kier Streets, Grapeville, Westmoreland County, PA

  1. How subaerial salt extrusions influence water quality in adjacent aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Razieh; Zarei, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ezzat

    2015-12-01

    Brines supplied from salt extrusions cause significant groundwater salinization in arid and semi-arid regions where salt rock is exposed to dissolution by episodic rainfalls. Here we focus on 62 of the 122 diapirs of Hormuz salt emergent in the southern Iran. To consider managing the degradation effect that salt extrusions have on the quality of adjoining aquifers, it is first necessary to understand how they influence adjacent water resources. We evaluate here the impacts that these diapirs have on adjacent aquifers based on investigating their geomorphologies, geologies, hydrologies and hydrogeologies. The results indicate that 28/62 (45%) of our sample of salt diapirs have no significant impact on the quality of groundwater in adjoining aquifers (namely Type N), while the remaining 34/62 (55%) degrade nearby groundwater quality. We offer simple conceptual models that account for how brines flowing from each of these types of salt extrusions contaminate adjacent aquifers. We identify three main mechanisms that lead to contamination: surface impact (Type A), subsurface intrusion (Type B) and indirect infiltration (Type C). A combination of all these mechanisms degrades the water quality in nearby aquifers in 19/62 (31%) of the salt diapirs studied. Having characterized the mechanism(s) by which each diapir affects the adjacent aquifer, we suggest a few possible remediation strategies to be considered. For instance, engineering the surface runoff of diapirs Types A and C into nearby evaporation basins would improve groundwater quality.

  2. The 3D structure of the collagen fibril network in human trabecular bone: relation to trabecular organization.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Natalie; Chase, Hila; Brumfeld, Vlad; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Trabecular bone is morphologically and functionally different from compact bone at the tissue level, but both are composed of lamellae at the micrometer-scale level. We present a three-dimensional study of the collagenous network of human trabecular lamellar bone from the proximal femur using the FIB-SEM serial surface view method. The results are compared to human compact lamellar bone of the femoral shaft, studied by the same method. Both demineralized trabecular and compact lamellar bone display the same overall structural organization, namely the presence of ordered and disordered materials and the confinement of the canalicular network to the disordered material. However, in trabecular bone lamellae a significant proportion of the ordered collagen fibril arrays is aligned with the long axis of the trabecula and, unlike in compact bone, is not related to the anatomical axis of the whole femur. The remaining ordered collagen fibrils are offset from the axis of a trabecula either by about 30° or 70°. Interestingly, at the tissue scale of millimeters, the most abundant angles between any two connected trabeculae - the inter-trabecular angles - center around 30° and 70°. This implies that within a framework of interconnected trabeculae the same lamellar structure will always have a significant component of the fibrils aligned with the long axes of connected trabeculae. This structural complementarity at different hierarchical levels presumably reflects an adaptation of trabecular bone to function.

  3. Bone disease in hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bart L

    2014-07-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a rare disorder that may be acquired or inherited. Postsurgical hypoparathyroidism is responsible for the majority of acquired hypoparathyroidism. Bone disease occurs in hypoparathyroidism due to markedly reduced bone remodeling due to the absence or low levels of parathyroid hormone. Chronically reduced bone turnover in patients with hypoparathyroidism typically leads to higher bone mass than in age- and sex-matched controls. Whether this increased bone density reduces fracture risk is less certain, because while increased bone mineralization may be associated with increased brittleness of bone, this does not appear to be the case in hypoparathyroidism. Treatment of hypoparathyroidism with recombinant parathyroid hormone may reduce bone mineral density but simultaneously strengthen the mechanical properties of bone.

  4. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  5. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  6. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. Manufacturability of compact synchrotron mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Gary M.

    1997-11-01

    While many of the government funded research communities over the years have put their faith and money into increasingly larger synchrotrons, such as Spring8 in Japan, and the APS in the United States, a viable market appears to exist for smaller scale, research and commercial grade, compact synchrotrons. These smaller, and less expensive machines, provide the research and industrial communities with synchrotron radiation beamline access at a portion of the cost of their larger and more powerful counterparts. A compact synchrotron, such as the Aurora-2D, designed and built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. of japan (SHI), is a small footprint synchrotron capable of sustaining 20 beamlines. Coupled with a Microtron injector, with 150 MeV of injection energy, an entire facility fits within a 27 meter [88.5 ft] square floorplan. The system, controlled by 2 personal computers, is capable of producing 700 MeV electron energy and 300 mA stored current. Recently, an Aurora-2D synchrotron was purchased from SHI by the University of Hiroshima. The Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations Beamline Optics Group was approached by SHI with a request to supply a group of 16 beamline mirrors for this machine. These mirrors were sufficient to supply 3 beamlines for the Hiroshima machine. This paper will address engineering issues which arose during the design and manufacturing of these mirrors.

  8. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred; Lewis, Irwin Charles

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

  9. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  10. A compact THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Å vigelj, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is the development of a compact low cost imaging THz system, usable for observation of the objects near to the system and also for stand-off detection. The performance of the system remains at the high standard of more expensive and bulkiest system on the market. It is easy to operate as it is not dependent on any fine mechanical adjustments. As it is compact and it consumes low power, also a portable system was developed for stand-off detection of concealed objects under textile or inside packages. These requirements rule out all optical systems like Time Domain Spectroscopy systems which need fine optical component positioning and requires a large amount of time to perform a scan and the image capture pixel-by-pixel. They are also almost not suitable for stand-off detection due to low output power. In the paper the antenna - bolometer sensor microstructure is presented and the THz system described. Analysis and design guidelines for the bolometer itself are discussed. The measurement results for both near and stand-off THz imaging are also presented.

  11. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik Teoman Turgut, O.

    2013-12-15

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  12. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  13. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  14. Cold compaction of water ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; McKinnon, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrostatic compaction of granulated water ice was measured in laboratory experiments at temperatures 77 K to 120 K. We performed step-wise hydrostatic pressurization tests on 5 samples to maximum pressures P of 150 MPa, using relatively tight (0.18-0.25 mm) and broad (0.25-2.0 mm) starting grain-size distributions. Compaction change of volume is highly nonlinear in P, typical for brittle, granular materials. No time-dependent creep occurred on the lab time scale. Significant residual porosity (???0.10) remains even at highest P. Examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a random configuration of fractures and broad distribution of grain sizes, again consistent with brittle behavior. Residual porosity appears as smaller, well-supported micropores between ice fragments. Over the interior pressures found in smaller midsize icy satellites and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), substantial porosity can be sustained over solar system history in the absence of significant heating and resultant sintering. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Y.

    2008-02-15

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential.

  16. Comparison of single- and dual-photon absorptiometry in postmenopausal bone mineral loss

    SciTech Connect

    Nilas, L.; Borg, J.; Gotfredsen, A.; Christiansen, C.

    1985-11-01

    The authors describe a single photon absorptiometric (SPA) technique, which enables differential estimation of the rates of loss from trabecular and cortical bone. Ten scans are obtained in the forearm: six in an area with about 7% trabecular bone and four scans in the adjacent distal area with a trabecular bone content of 25%. By comparing bone masses of these two sites in 19 postmenopausal and 53 premenopausal women, the postmenopausal trabecular bone loss was estimated to be approximately seven times greater than cortical loss within the first years of cessation of regular vaginal bleeding. On a group basis the bone loss at the distal forearm scan site (by SPA) corresponded closely to the spinal bone loss (by dual-photon absorptiometry). The reproducibility of the two scan sites in the forearm was 1-1.5% (CV%), which makes the method suitable for longitudinal studies. Corrections for variations in fatty tissue covering can be made without deterioration of the reproducibility.

  17. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  18. Determination of the biomechanical effect of an interspinous process device on implanted and adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a hybrid testing protocol: a finite-element study.

    PubMed

    Erbulut, Deniz U; Zafarparandeh, Iman; Hassan, Chaudhry R; Lazoglu, Ismail; Ozer, Ali F

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The authors evaluated the biomechanical effects of an interspinous process (ISP) device on kinematics and load sharing at the implanted and adjacent segments. METHODS A 3D finite-element (FE) model of the lumbar spine (L1-5) was developed and validated through comparison with published in vitro study data. Specifically, validation was achieved by a flexible (load-control) approach in 3 main planes under a pure moment of 10 Nm and a compressive follower load of 400 N. The ISP device was inserted between the L-3 and L-4 processes. Intact and implanted cases were simulated using the hybrid protocol in all motion directions. The resultant motion, facet load, and intradiscal pressure after implantation were investigated at the index and adjacent levels. In addition, stress at the bone-implant interface was predicted. RESULTS The hybrid approach, shown to be appropriate for adjacent-level investigations, predicted that the ISP device would decrease the range of motion, facet load, and intradiscal pressure at the index level relative to the corresponding values for the intact spine in extension. Specifically, the intradiscal pressure induced after implantation at adjacent segments increased by 39.7% and by 6.6% at L2-3 and L4-5, respectively. Similarly, facet loads at adjacent segments after implantation increased up to 60% relative to the loads in the intact case. Further, the stress at the bone-implant interface increased significantly. The influence of the ISP device on load sharing parameters in motion directions other than extension was negligible. CONCLUSIONS Although ISP devices apply a distraction force on the processes and prevent further extension of the index segment, their implantation may cause changes in biomechanical parameters such as facet load, intradiscal pressure, and range of motion at adjacent levels in extension.

  19. Mechanistic aspects of fracture and R-curve behavior in elk antler bone

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Chen, Po-Yu; McKittrick, Joanna; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-11-23

    Bone is an adaptative material that is designed for different functional requirements; indeed, bones have a variety of properties depending on their role in the body. To understand the mechanical response of bone requires the elucidation of its structure-function relationships. Here, we examine the fracture toughness of compact bone of elk antler which is an extremely fast growing primary bone designed for a totally different function than human (secondary) bone. We find that antler in the transverse (breaking) orientation is one of the toughest biological materials known. Its resistance to fracture is achieved during crack growth (extrinsically) by a combination of gross crack deflection/twisting and crack bridging via uncracked 'ligaments' in the crack wake, both mechanisms activated by microcracking primarily at lamellar boundaries. We present an assessment of the toughening mechanisms acting in antler as compared to human cortical bone, and identify an enhanced role of inelastic deformation in antler which further contributes to its (intrinsic) toughness.

  20. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma. PMID:26000310

  1. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  2. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  3. Structure based classification of μ-CT images of human trabecular bone using local Minkowski Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monetti, Roberto A.; Bauer, Jan; Sidorenko, Irina; Müller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst; Matsuura, Maiko; Eckstein, Felix; Lochmueller, Eva-Maria; Zysset, Philippe; Räth, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    We analyse μ-CT tomographic images of human trabecular bone in vitro. We consider a sample consisting of 201 bone specimens harvested from six different skeletal sites within a narrow range of bone fraction values. Using the characterization of the trabecular bone network given by local Minkowski Functionals, we apply classification algorithms in order to reveal structural similarities in the sample. Clusters show some interesting specific structural features, like compact, porous, and fragmented structures. The contribution of the different skeletal sites to these clusters indicate some variability due to intrinsic structural differences of the specific skeletal site.

  4. Rapid Sintering of Nano-Diamond Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, A.; Nauyoks, S; Zerda, T; Zaporozhets, O

    2009-01-01

    Diamond compacts were sintered from nano-size diamond crystals at high pressure, 8 GPa, and temperature above 1500 degrees C for very short times ranging from 5 to 11 s. Structure and mechanical properties of the compacts have been characterized. Although we have not completely avoided graphitization of diamonds, the amount of graphite produced was low, less than 2%, and despite relatively high porosity, the compacts were characterized by high hardness, bulk and Young moduli.

  5. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  6. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  7. Molecular and structural assessment of alveolar bone during tooth eruption and function in the miniature pig, Sus scrofa

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Dah; Popowics, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Summary The development of alveolar bone adjacent to the tooth root during tooth eruption is not well understood. This study tested the hypothesis that predominantly woven bone forms adjacent to tooth roots during tooth eruption, but that this immature structure transitions to lamellar bone when the tooth comes into function. Additionally, bone resorption was predicted to play a key role in transitioning immature bone to more mature, load-bearing tissue. Miniature pigs were compared at two occlusal stages, 13 weeks (n=3), corresponding with the mucosal penetration stage of M1 tooth eruption, and 23 weeks (n=3), corresponding with early occlusion of M1/M1. Bone samples for RNA extraction and qRT-PCR analysis were harvested from the diastema and adjacent to M1 roots on one side. Following euthanasia, bone samples for hematoxylin and eosin and TRAP staining were harvested from these regions on the other side. In contrast to expectations, both erupting and functioning molars had reticular fibrolamellar structure in alveolar bone adjacent to M1. However, the woven bone matrix in older pigs was thicker and had denser primary osteons. Gene expression data and osteoclast cell counts showed a tendency for more bone resorptive activity near the molars than at distant sites, but no differences between eruptive stages. Thus, although resorption does occur, it is not a primary mechanism in the transition in alveolar bone from eruption to function. Incremental growth of existing woven bone and filling in of primary osteons within the mineralized scaffold generated the fortification necessary to support an erupted and functioning tooth. PMID:21434979

  8. Hard fallow deer antler: a living bone till antler casting?

    PubMed

    Rolf, H J; Enderle, A

    1999-05-01

    Deer antlers are the only mammalian bone structures which regenerate completely every year. Once developed, antlers are cleaned of the velvet-like skin. Presently it is believed that due to velvet shedding the blood supply is interrupted in the solidifying antler bone. Histological examinations were made on different parts of fallow deer antlers investigated from the time of velvet shedding till the antler casting. The present study on hard (polished) antlers revealed living bone with regions presenting living osteocytes, active osteoblasts, osteoid seams and even early stages of trabecular microcallus formation, thus indicating to a continuous bone remodeling. A well developed vascular system was found despite the presence of hard antler bone. The pedicle bone exhibits a rich supply of capillaries and vessels connected to the spongy core of the main branch and the compact bone as well. There is evidence that hard fallow deer antlers possess a functioning vascular system that "keeps the antler moist" resulting in a high impact resistance when fights are most frequent. As late as 3 weeks prior to antler casting a large number of living cells were discovered within the antler core. As we have no doubt that parts of the polished fallow deer antler represent a living bone, we have concluded that a sufficient blood supply of the antler core is maintained almost till the time of antler casting by vessels passing through the antler base.

  9. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1, Glycation and Bone Fragility: Implications for Fracture Resistance of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sroga, Grażyna E.; Wu, Ping-Cheng; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Despite our extensive knowledge of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) action on the growing skeleton, its role in skeletal homeostasis during aging and age-related development of certain diseases is still unclear. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from glucose are implicated in osteoporosis and a number of diabetic complications. We hypothesized that because in humans and rodents IGF1 stimulates uptake of glucose (a glycation substrate) from the bloodstream in a dose-dependent manner, the decline of IGF1 could be associated with the accumulation of glycation products and the decreasing resistance of bone to fracture. To test the aforementioned hypotheses, we used human tibial posterior cortex bone samples to perform biochemical (measurement of IGF1, fluorescent AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) contents) and mechanical tests (crack initiation and propagation using compact tension specimens). Our results for the first time show a significant, age-independent association between the levels of IGF1 and AGEs. Furthermore, AGEs (fAGEs, PEN) predict propensity of bone to fracture (initiation and propagation) independently of age in human cortical bone. Based on these results we propose a model of IGF1-based regulation of bone fracture. Because IGF1 level increases postnatally up to the juvenile developmental phase and decreases thereafter with aging, we propose that IGF1 may play a protective role in young skeleton and its age-related decline leads to bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Our results may also have important implications for current understanding of osteoporosis- and diabetes-related bone fragility as well as in the development of new diagnostic tools to screen for fragile bones. PMID:25629402

  10. A model of trabecular bone and an application to osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Mohanty, Kishore K.; Wimalawansa, Sunil J.

    2002-11-01

    Large bones consists of an outer compact shaft and an inner porous segment, known as the trabecular architecture (TA). The TA is the principal load carrier in bones from older adults, and the aim of therapeutic interventions is to preserve their strength. It is argued that forms for broad-based diagnostic tools for osteoporosis can be identified through an analysis of simple model systems. A model based on elastic networks is introduced, and shows that weak networks can only utilize a small fraction of themselves for stress transmission. This observation is used to argue that the ratio of linear response of a network to DC and AC strain can be used as a surrogate for bone strength. We discuss the possibility of using this measure to identify osteoporotic bone and to monitor the efficacy of therapy.

  11. A compact versatile femtosecond spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Johnson, E.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W.; Windeler, R.

    2002-12-01

    A compact apparatus for femtosecond pump-probe experiments is described. The apparatus is based on a cavity-dumped titanium:sapphire laser. Probe pulses are generated by focusing weak (˜1 nJ) pulses into a microstructure fiber that produces broadband continuum pulses with high efficiency. With the pump pulses compressed and probe pulses uncompressed, the rise time of the pump-probe signals is <100 fs. The 830 nm pump pulses are also frequency doubled to generate light for excitation at 415 nm. The versatility of the spectrometer is demonstrated by exciting molecules at either 830 or 415 nm, and probing at wavelengths ranging from 500 to 950 nm. Some results on the green fluorescent protein are presented.

  12. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2015-10-01

    The conceptual design of a compact, photoinjector-based, facility for high precision measurements of wakefields is presented. This work is motivated by the need for a thorough understanding of beam induced wakefield effects for any future linear collider. We propose to use a high brightness photoinjector to generate (approximately) a 2 nC, 2 mm-mrad drive beam at 20 MeV to excite wakefields and a second photoinjector to generate a 5 MeV, variably delayed, trailing witness beam to probe both the longitudinal and transverse wakefields in the structure under test. Initial estimates show that we can detect a minimum measurable dipole transverse wake function of 0.1 V/pC/m/mm and a minimum measurable monopole longitudinal wake function of 2.5 V/pC/m. Simulations results for the high brightness photoinjector, calculations of the facility's wakefield measurement resolution, and the facility layout are presented.

  13. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  14. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  15. Compact hybrid particulate collector (COHPAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method for retrofit filtering of particulates in a flue gas from a combustion source having an existing conventional electrostatic precipitator connected thereto and a smoke stack connected to the precipitator. It comprises: removing at least one discharge electrode and collecting electrode from within the housing of the electrostatic precipitator; attaching a tubesheet within the housing; supporting a compact baghouse filter within the separate filter section by the tubesheet; whereby the remaining discharge electrodes and corresponding collecting electrodes in the electrostatis precipitator serve to remove a majority of particulates form the flue gas and impart a residual charge on remaining particulates discharged to the separate filter section, and the remaining particulates are collected by the baghouse filter before the residual electric charge substantially dissipates.

  16. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  17. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 {mu}s pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity.

  18. WNT16 Influences Bone Mineral Density, Cortical Bone Thickness, Bone Strength, and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Joel; Paternoster, Lavinia; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Bergström, Ulrica; Kähönen, Mika; Leo, Paul J.; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Viikari, Jorma; Ladouceur, Martin; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Prince, Richard L.; Sievanen, Harri; Leslie, William D.; Mellström, Dan; Eisman, John A.; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Goltzman, David; Hanley, David A.; Jones, Graeme; St. Pourcain, Beate; Xiao, Yongjun; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Reid, Ian R.; Ring, Susan M.; Sambrook, Philip N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Dennison, Elaine M.; Kemp, John P.; Danoy, Patrick; Sayers, Adrian; Wilson, Scott G.; Nethander, Maria; McCloskey, Eugene; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Eastell, Richard; Liu, Jeff; Spector, Tim; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Brommage, Robert; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Brown, Matthew A.; Ohlsson, Claes; Richards, J. Brent; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to identify genetic variants associated with cortical bone thickness (CBT) and bone mineral density (BMD) by performing two separate genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses for CBT in 3 cohorts comprising 5,878 European subjects and for BMD in 5 cohorts comprising 5,672 individuals. We then assessed selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for osteoporotic fracture in 2,023 cases and 3,740 controls. Association with CBT and forearm BMD was tested for ∼2.5 million SNPs in each cohort separately, and results were meta-analyzed using fixed effect meta-analysis. We identified a missense SNP (Thr>Ile; rs2707466) located in the WNT16 gene (7q31), associated with CBT (effect size of −0.11 standard deviations [SD] per C allele, P = 6.2×10−9). This SNP, as well as another nonsynonymous SNP rs2908004 (Gly>Arg), also had genome-wide significant association with forearm BMD (−0.14 SD per C allele, P = 2.3×10−12, and −0.16 SD per G allele, P = 1.2×10−15, respectively). Four genome-wide significant SNPs arising from BMD meta-analysis were tested for association with forearm fracture. SNP rs7776725 in FAM3C, a gene adjacent to WNT16, was associated with a genome-wide significant increased risk of forearm fracture (OR = 1.33, P = 7.3×10−9), with genome-wide suggestive signals from the two missense variants in WNT16 (rs2908004: OR = 1.22, P = 4.9×10−6 and rs2707466: OR = 1.22, P = 7.2×10−6). We next generated a homozygous mouse with targeted disruption of Wnt16. Female Wnt16−/− mice had 27% (P<0.001) thinner cortical bones at the femur midshaft, and bone strength measures were reduced between 43%–61% (6.5×10−13bone strength, and risk of fracture. PMID:22792071

  19. Bone resorption, metastasis, and diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiotherapy of Bone Lesions; Methodological Problems; Treatment of Bone Metastasis with Antiresorptive Drugs; Control of Bone Cancer Pain; and Chemotherapy of Bone Metastases.

  20. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic How is bone cancer staged? How is bone cancer diagnosed? A patient’s symptoms, physical exam, and results ... and other imaging tests. Imaging tests to detect bone cancer X-rays Most bone cancers show up on ...

  1. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  2. Ductile compaction in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Silicic magmas typically outgas through connected pore and crack networks with a high gas permeability without the need for decoupled movement of pores in the melt. It is the efficiency with which this process can occur which governs the pressure in the pore network. However, such a connected coupled network is generally mechanically unstable and will relax until volume equilibrium when the pores become smaller and isolated. Consequently, gas permeability can be reduced during densification. Cycles of outgassing events recorded in gas monitoring data show that permeable flow of volatiles is often transient, which is interpreted to reflect magma densification and the closing of pore-networks. Understanding the timescale over which this densification process occurs is critical to refining conduit models that seek to predict the pressure evolution in a pore-network leading to eruptions. We conduct uniaxial compaction experiments to parameterize non-linear creep and relaxation processes that occur in magmas with total pore fractions 0.2-0.85. We analyze our results by applying both viscous sintering and viscoelastic deformation theory to test the applicability of currently accepted models to flow dynamics in the uppermost conduit involving highly porous magmas. We show that purely ductile compaction can occur rapidly and that pore networks can close over timescales analogous to the inter-eruptive periods observed during classic cyclic eruptions such as those at Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, in 1997. At upper-conduit axial stresses (0.1-5 MPa) and magmatic temperatures (830-900 oC), we show that magmas can evolve to porosities analogous to dome lavas erupted at the same volcano. Such dramatic densification events over relatively short timescales and in the absence of brittle deformation show that permeable flow will be inhibited at upper conduit levels. We therefore propose that outgassing is a key feature at many silicic volcanoes and should be incorporated into

  3. Bone Loss in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  4. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  5. What Is Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a soft framework, and calcium phosphate is a mineral that adds strength and hardens the framework. This ... bone formation continues at a faster pace than removal until bone mass peaks during the third decade ...

  6. New adjacent Bis-tetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chou, Chi-Jung; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2003-03-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation led to the isolation of two new Annonaceous acetogenins, annocatacin A ( 1). and annocatacin B ( 2). from the seeds and the leaves, respectively, of Annona muricata. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first examples where the adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran ring system is located at C-15. The new structures were elucidated and characterized by spectral and chemical methods. Both Annonaceous acetogenins 1 and 2 showed significant in vitro cytotoxicity toward the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and 2,2,15, and were compared with the known adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran acetogenins, neoannonin ( 3). desacetyluvaricin ( 4). bullatacin ( 5). asimicin ( 6). annoglaucin ( 7). squamocin ( 8). and rollimusin ( 9).

  7. Embryonic expression of endogenous retroviral RNAs in somatic tissues adjacent to the Oikopleura germline

    PubMed Central

    Henriet, Simon; Sumic, Sara; Doufoundou-Guilengui, Carlette; Jensen, Marit Flo; Grandmougin, Camille; Fal, Kateryna; Thompson, Eric; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Chourrout, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Selective pressure to maintain small genome size implies control of transposable elements, and most old classes of retrotransposons are indeed absent from the very compact genome of the tunicate Oikopleura dioica. Nonetheless, two families of retrotransposons are present, including the Tor elements. The gene organization within Tor elements is similar to that of LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses. In addition to gag and pol, many Tor elements carry a third gene encoding viral envelope-like proteins (Env) that may mediate infection. We show that the Tor family contains distinct classes of elements. In some classes, env mRNA is transcribed from the 5′LTR as in retroviruses. In others, env is transcribed from an additional promoter located downstream of the 5′LTR. Tor Env proteins are membrane-associated glycoproteins which exhibit some features of viral membrane fusion proteins. Whereas some elements are expressed in the adult testis, many others are specifically expressed in embryonic somatic cells adjacent to primordial germ cells. Such embryonic expression depends on determinants present in the Tor elements and not on their surrounding genomic environment. Our study shows that unusual modes of transcription and expression close to the germline may contribute to the proliferation of Tor elements. PMID:25779047

  8. 38. VIEW OF COTTRELL MAGNETIC IMPULSE GENERATOR ADJACENT TO SIX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. VIEW OF COTTRELL MAGNETIC IMPULSE GENERATOR ADJACENT TO SIX GAP ROTARY RECTIFIER. THIS UNIT GENERATED A MAGNETIC PULSE WHICH WAS TRANSMITTED TO THE COLLECTION PLATES IN THE ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR CHAMBER. THESE PERIODIC PULSES VIBRATE THE PLATES AND CAUSE PRECIPITATED ARTICLES OF SMOKE AND FLY ASH TO FALL TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PRECIPITATOR CHAMBER. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  9. 20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent to Test Cell 9 in Component Test Laboratory (T-27), looking west. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, tanks, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  11. Jaw position uncertainty and adjacent fields in breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Emma; Bäck, Anna; Chakarova, Roumiana

    2015-11-08

    Locoregional treatment of breast cancer involves adjacent, half blocked fields matched at isocenter. The objective of this work is to study the dosimetric effects of the uncertainties in jaw positioning for such a case, and how a treatment planning protocol including adjacent field overlap of 1 mm affects the dose distribution. A representative treatment plan, involving 6 and 15 photon beams, for a patient treated at our hospital is chosen. Monte Carlo method (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc) is used to simulate the treatment. Uncertainties in jaw positioning of ± 1 mm are addressed, which implies extremes in reality of 2 mm field gap/overlap when planning adjacent fields without overlap and 1 mm gap or 3 mm overlap for a planning protocol with 1 mm overlap. Dosimetric parameters for PTV, lung and body are analyzed. Treatment planning protocol with 1 mm overlap of the adjacent fields does not considerably counteract possible underdosage of the target in the case studied. PTV-V95% is for example reduced from 95% for perfectly aligned fields to 90% and 91% for 2 mm and 1 mm gap, respectively. However, the risk of overdosage in PTV and in healthy soft tissue is increased when following the protocol with 1 mm overlap. A 3 mm overlap compared to 2 mm overlap results in an increase in maximum dose to PTV, PTV-D2%, from 113% to 121%. V120% for 'Body-PTV' is also increased from 5 cm(3) to 14 cm(3). A treatment planning protocol with 1 mm overlap does not considerably improve the coverage of PTV in the case of erroneous jaw positions causing gap between fields, but increases the overdosage in PTV and doses to healthy tissue, in the case of overlapping fields, for the case investigated.

  12. Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door at right. Projection area at center is equipped with automatic security drapes. Projection room uses a 45 degree mirror to reflect the image onto the frosted glass screen. Door on far left leads to display area senior battle staff viewing bridge, and the commander's quarters - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  13. Mutual Diffusional Interference Between Adjacent Stomata of a Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G. D.; Viskanta, R.

    1968-01-01

    The mutual diffusional interference between adjacent stomata in laminar flow over a leaf is shown to play a decisive role in determining overall transpiration. The magnitude of this interference varies with the interaction of the vapor diffusional shells forming above each stoma and the air flow over the leaf. The interference decreases with increasing incident radiation and wind velocity. The effect of interference on the stomatal resistance to diffusion plays a major role in the overall variations in transpiration. PMID:16656876

  14. The association of bone and osteoclasts with vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Han, Kum Hyun; Hennigar, Randolph A; O'Neill, W Charles

    2015-12-01

    The presence of bone tissue in calcified arteries may provide insights into the pathophysiology and potential reversibility of calcification, but the prevalence, distribution, and determinants of bone and osteoclasts in calcified arteries are unknown. Specimens of 386 arteries from lower limb amputations in 108 patients were examined retrospectively. Calcification was present in 282 arteries from 89 patients, which was medial in 64%, intimal in 9%, and both in 27%. Bone was present in 6% of arteries, essentially all of which were heavily calcified. Multiple sampling revealed that the true prevalence of bone in heavily calcified arteries was 25%. Bone was more common in medial rather than intimal calcifications (10% vs 3%, p=0.03) but did not vary with artery location (above vs below the knee). Heavily calcified arteries with bone were more likely to come from patients who were older (p=0.04), had diabetes (p=0.06), or were receiving warfarin (p=0.06), but there was no association with gender or renal failure. Bone was almost always adjacent to calcifications, along the periphery, but never within. Staining for the bone-specific proteins osteocalcin and osterix was noted in 20% and 45% of heavily calcified arteries without visible bone. Osteoclasts were present in 4.9% of arteries, all of which were heavily calcified and most of which contained bone. The frequent absence of bone in heavily calcified vessels and the histologic pattern strongly suggests a secondary rather than primary event. Recruitment of osteoclasts to vascular calcifications can occur but is rare, suggesting a limited capacity to reverse calcifications.

  15. Radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Webber, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging of the skeleton, now well established as the most important diagnostic procedure in detecting bone metastases, is also a reliable method for the evaluation of the progression or regression of metastatic bone disease. The article concentrates on the technetium-99m agents and the value of these agents in the widespread application of low-dose radioisotope scanning in such bone diseases as metastasis, osteomyelitis, trauma, osteonecrosis, and other abnormal skeletal conditions.

  16. Correlative analyses of isolated upper lumbar disc herniation and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Xin; Yang, Si-Dong; Wang, Bao-Lin; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper lumbar disc herniation (ULDH) is easy to be misdiagnosed due to its special anatomical and atypical clinical features. Few studies have identified the relationship between ULDH and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae (WSV). Hypothesis: WSV may have some indicative relations withULDH. Patients and methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 47 patients (27 males and 20 females; mean age, 41.2 years) with single-level ULDH (as study group) and 47 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (as control group) were studied by radiograph. The two groups were compared with respect to age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), kyphotic angle, and the proportion of WSV. Also, correlative analyses were conducted in the study group to investigate the relation between the kyphotic angle of target vertebrae and other factors including age, BMI, Cobb angle, JOA score and bone mineral density (BMD). Results: The average kyphotic angle in the study group was 11° (4°-22°), while the average kyphotic angle in the control group was 2° (0°-7°). Obviously, the mean kyphotic angle in the study group was statistically larger than that in the control group (t=13.797, P<0.001). The proportion of WSV in the study group was significantly larger than that in the control group (x2=36.380, P<0.0001). The correlations between kyphotic angles and other items (i.e., age, BMI, BMD, Cobb angle and JOA score) in the study group and the control group were low or uncorrelated. Conclusions: WSV are indicatively associated with adjacent ULDH. Thus, ULDH should be alerted when WSV are first found in radiograph and accompanied by clinical symptoms. PMID:25785106

  17. Fouling assemblages on offshore wind power plants and adjacent substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Dan; Malm, Torleif

    2008-09-01

    A significant expansion of offshore wind power is expected in the near future, with thousands of turbines in coastal waters, and various aspects of how this may influence the coastal ecology including disturbance effects from noise, shadows, electromagnetic fields, and changed hydrological conditions are accordingly of concern. Further, wind power plants constitute habitats for a number of organisms, and may locally alter assemblage composition and biomass of invertebrates, algae and fish. In this study, fouling assemblages on offshore wind turbines were compared to adjacent hard substrate. Influences of the structures on the seabed were also investigated. The turbines differed significantly from adjacent boulders in terms of assemblage composition of epibiota and motile invertebrates. Species number and Shannon-Wiener diversity were, also, significantly lower on the wind power plants. It was also indicated that the turbines might have affected assemblages of invertebrates and algae on adjacent boulders. Off shore wind power plant offer atypical substrates for fouling assemblages in terms of orientation, depth range, structure, and surface texture. Some potential ecological implications of the addition of these non-natural habitats for coastal ecology are discussed.

  18. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  19. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  20. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  1. [Benign bone forming tumors].

    PubMed

    Caufourier, C; Leprovost, N; Guillou-Jamard, M-R; Compère, J-F; Bénateau, H

    2009-09-01

    Benign bone forming tumors typically produce dense bone (osteoma, enostosis) or osteoid tissue (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma). Even though these four lesions have distinct characteristics, it is sometimes difficult to tell them apart and to rule out malignant bone forming lesions such as osteosarcoma. The first line treatment is surgical exeresis.

  2. Osteoporotic bone microstructure by collagenase etching.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, I G; Green, M; Clarke, H; Isaac, D H

    1989-01-01

    Collagenase etching has been used to show the microstructure of bone from patients suffering from primary osteoporosis. Both polished and unpolished surfaces of trabecular bone from femoral heads were treated with collagenase solution before study in the scanning electron microscope. The polished surfaces show the mineral component of this bone as small rounded units approximately 10-20 nm across, which aggregate to form a continuous phase of contiguous spheroidal particles approximately 100 nm across. Lamellations are clearly seen to be due to the removal of collagen fibres up to approximately 200 nm across, fibres in adjacent lamellae being arranged approximately perpendicular to each other. The unpolished surfaces also show small rounded units, which aggregate into rods of mineral approximately 100 nm across. Although these rods form a connected system, they are loosely packed, compatible with their being interspersed with the collagen fibres in vivo. This model for the detailed microstructure of bone is consistent with specimens from a number of other sources and shows no features unique to osteoporosis. Images PMID:2545170

  3. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  4. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  5. The non-compact Weyl equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Theodora

    2011-04-01

    A non-compact version of the Weyl equation is proposed, based on the infinite dimensional spin zero representation of the mathfrak{s}{mathfrak{l}_2} algebra. Solutions of the aforementioned equation are obtained in terms of the Kummer functions. In this context, we discuss the ADHMN approach in order to construct the corresponding non-compact BPS monopoles.

  6. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage.

  7. Oxytocin and bone

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone; Zallone, Alberta

    2014-01-01

    One of the most meaningful results recently achieved in bone research has been to reveal that the pituitary hormones have profound effect on bone, so that the pituitary-bone axis has become one of the major topics in skeletal physiology. Here, we discuss the relevant evidence about the posterior pituitary hormone oxytocin (OT), previously thought to exclusively regulate parturition and breastfeeding, which has recently been established to directly regulate bone mass. Both osteoblasts and osteoclasts express OT receptors (OTR), whose stimulation enhances bone mass. Consistent with this, mice deficient in OT or OTR display profoundly impaired bone formation. In contrast, bone resorption remains unaffected in OT deficiency because, even while OT stimulates the genesis of osteoclasts, it inhibits their resorptive function. Furthermore, in addition to its origin from the pituitary, OT is also produced by bone marrow osteoblasts acting as paracrine-autocrine regulator of bone formation modulated by estrogens. In turn, the power of estrogen to increase bone mass is OTR-dependent. Therefore, OTR−/− mice injected with 17β-estradiol do not show any effects on bone formation parameters, while the same treatment increases bone mass in wild-type mice. These findings together provide evidence for an anabolic action of OT in regulating bone mass and suggest that bone marrow OT may enhance the bone-forming action of estrogen through an autocrine circuit. This established new physiological role for OT in the maintenance of skeletal integrity further suggests the potential use of this hormone for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25209411

  8. [Prefabrication of bone transplants].

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Kokemüller, H; Jehn, P; Vogt, P; Gellrich, N-C; Krettek, C

    2015-03-01

    Prefabrication of bone transplants is a promising option for large defects of the long bones, especially if there is compromised vascularization of the defect. This is especially true for postinfection bone defects and other types of atrophic nonunion. The generation of a foreign body membrane (Masquelet's technique) has been investigated in order to ameliorate the response of the host tissue surrounding the defect. In an experimental animal study, a blood vessel within a bone construct could be used to generate customized, vascularized osteogenic constructs that can be used to treat large bone defects in the future.

  9. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, Judith R.; Anderson, Gerhard D.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  10. Pituitary diseases and bone.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Chiavistelli, Silvia; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary hormones have direct and indirect effects on bone remodeling, and skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of pituitary diseases. Fragility fractures may occur in many patients with prolactinomas, acromegaly, Cushing disease, and hypopituitarism. As in other forms of secondary osteoporosis, pituitary diseases generally affect bone quality more than bone quantity, and fractures may occur even in the presence of normal or low-normal bone mineral density, making difficult the prediction of fractures in these settings. Treatment of excess and defective pituitary hormone generally improves skeletal health, although some patients remain at high risk for fractures, necessitating treatment with bone-active drugs.

  11. Bone structure of the temporo-mandibular joint in the individuals aged 18-25.

    PubMed

    Parafiniuk, M; Gutsch-Trepka, A; Trepka, S; Sycz, K; Wolski, S; Parafiniuk, W

    1998-01-01

    Osteohistometric studies were performed in 15 female and 15 male cadavers aged 18-25. Condyloid process and right and left acetabulum of the temporo-mandibular joint have been studied. Density has been investigated using monitor screen linked with microscope (magnification 80x). Density in the spongy part of the condyloid process was 26.67-26.77%; in the subchondrial layer--72.13-72.72%, and in the acetabular wall 75.03-75.91%. Microscopic structure of the bones of the temporo-mandibular joint revealed no differences when compared with images of compact and cancellous bone shown in the histology textbooks. Sex and the side of the body had no influence on microscopic image and proportional bone density. Isles of chondrocytes in the trabeculae of the spongy structure of the condyloid process were found in 4 cases and isles of the condensed bone resembling the compact pattern in 7 cases.

  12. Bone scintiscanning updated.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Scott, J R; Jackson, F I

    1976-03-01

    Use of modern materials and methods has given bone scintiscanning a larger role in clinical medicine, The safety and ready availability of newer agents have led to its greater use in investigating both benign and malignant disease of bone and joint. Present evidence suggests that abnormal accumulation of 99mTc-polyphosphate and its analogues results from ionic deposition at crystal surfaces in immature bone, this process being facilitated by an increase in bone vascularity. There is, also, a component of matrix localization. These factors are in keeping with the concept that abnormal scintiscan sites represent areas of increased osteoblastic activity, although this may be an oversimplification. Increasing evidence shows that the bone scintiscan is more sensitive than conventional radiography in detecting focal disease of bone, and its ability to reflect the immediate status of bone further complements radiographic findings. The main limitation of this method relates to nonspecificity of the results obtained.

  13. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  14. Bone kidney interactions.

    PubMed

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Jamal, Sophie A

    2015-06-01

    The fact that bone disease and kidney disease co-exist is well known. Formally, this inter-relationship is called chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder or CKD-MBD. Traditionally, it was thought that bone played a passive role in CKD-MBD - specifically that kidney disease caused disordered mineral metabolism which resulted in bone disease and ultimately fractures. More recently however our understanding of bone function in general and the role that bone plays in CKD-MBD in particular, has changed. This chapter will briefly review epidemiology of fractures in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the roles that imaging and measuring markers of mineral metabolism can play in assessing fracture risk. We will then review more recent data consistent with the concept MBD occurs early in the course of CKD and, via the secretion of novel molecules and/or signalling pathways, the bone can influence other organ systems. PMID:26156535

  15. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  16. [Bone and Nutrition. Bone and phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidekazu; Sakuma, Masae

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus is necessary for bone mineralization. Although adequate phosphorus intake is essential for skeletal mineralization, it is reported that excessive phosphorus intake can induce deleterious effect on bone. Recently, since the Japanese diet has been westernized, phosphorus intake by the meat and dairy products has increased. Furthermore, along with the development of processed foods, excessive intake of inorganic phosphorus from food additives has become a problem. An adverse effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion from high phosphorus intake was seen only when calcium intake was inadequate. Dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio can be considered as one of the indicators that can predict the health of the bone.

  17. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  18. [Bone and Nutrition. Bone and phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidekazu; Sakuma, Masae

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus is necessary for bone mineralization. Although adequate phosphorus intake is essential for skeletal mineralization, it is reported that excessive phosphorus intake can induce deleterious effect on bone. Recently, since the Japanese diet has been westernized, phosphorus intake by the meat and dairy products has increased. Furthermore, along with the development of processed foods, excessive intake of inorganic phosphorus from food additives has become a problem. An adverse effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion from high phosphorus intake was seen only when calcium intake was inadequate. Dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio can be considered as one of the indicators that can predict the health of the bone. PMID:26119308

  19. A Novel Biomimetic Polymer Scaffold Design Enhances Bone Ingrowth

    PubMed Central

    Geffre, Chris P; Margolis, David S; Ruth, John T; DeYoung, Donald W; Tellis, Brandi C; Szivek, John A

    2009-01-01

    There has been recent interest in treating large bone defects with polymer scaffolds because current modalities such as autographs and allographs have limitations. Additionally, polymer scaffolds are utilized in tissue engineering applications to implant and anchor tissues in place, promoting integration with surrounding native tissue. In both applications, rapid and increased bone growth is crucial to the success of the implant. Recent studies have shown that mimicking native bone tissue morphology leads to increased osteoblastic phenotype and more rapid mineralization. The purpose of this study was to compare bone ingrowth into polymer scaffolds created with a biomimetic porous architecture to those with a simple porous design. The biomimetic architecture was designed from the inverse structure of native trabecular bone and manufactured using solid free form fabrication. Histology and μCT analysis demonstrated a 500-600% increase in bone growth into and adjacent to the biomimetic scaffold at five months post-op. This is in agreement with previous studies in which biomimetic approaches accelerated bone formation. It also supports the applicability of polymer scaffolds for the treatment of large tissue defects when implanting tissue-engineering constructs. PMID:19051300

  20. High-strength silk protein scaffolds for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Biman B.; Grinberg, Ariela; Seok Gil, Eun; Panilaitis, Bruce; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration represent a major focus of orthopedic research. However, only a handful of polymeric biomaterials are utilized today because of their failure to address critical issues like compressive strength for load-bearing bone grafts. In this study development of a high compressive strength (~13 MPa hydrated state) polymeric bone composite materials is reported, based on silk protein-protein interfacial bonding. Micron-sized silk fibers (10–600 µm) obtained utilizing alkali hydrolysis were used as reinforcement in a compact fiber composite with tunable compressive strength, surface roughness, and porosity based on the fiber length included. A combination of surface roughness, porosity, and scaffold stiffness favored human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation toward bone-like tissue in vitro based on biochemical and gene expression for bone markers. Further, minimal in vivo immunomodulatory responses suggested compatibility of the fabricated silk-fiber-reinforced composite matrices for bone engineering applications. PMID:22552231

  1. Electrospun fibers immobilized with bone forming peptide-1 derived from BMP7 for guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Hyeong-Jin; Kim, Hyung Keun; Yoon, Taek Rim; Shin, Heungsoo

    2013-07-01

    The development of ideal barrier membranes with appropriate porosity and bioactivity is essential for the guidance of new bone formation in orthopedic and craniomaxillofacial surgery. In this study, we developed bioactive electrospun fibers based on poly (lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by immobilizing bone-forming peptide 1 (BFP1) derived from the immature region of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7). We exploited polydopamine chemistry for the immobilization of BFP1; polydopamine (PD) was coated on the electrospun PLGA fibers, on which BFP1 was subsequently immobilized under weakly basic conditions. The immobilization of BFP1 was verified by characterizing the surface chemical composition and quantitatively measured by fluorescamine assay. The immobilization of BPF1 on the electrospun fibers supported the compact distribution of collagen I and the spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). SEM micrographs demonstrated the aggregation of globular mineral accretions, with significant increases in ALP activity and calcium deposition when hMSCs were cultured on fibers immobilized with BFP1 for 14 days. We then implanted the prepared fibers onto mouse calvarial defects and analyzed bone formation after 2 months. Semi-quantification of bone growth from representative X-ray images showed that the bone area was approximately 20% in the defect-only group, while the group implanted with PLGA fibers showed significant improvements of 44.27 ± 7.37% and 57.59 ± 15.24% in the groups implanted with PD-coated PLGA and with BFP1-coated PLGA, respectively. Based on these results, our approach may be a promising tool to develop clinically-applicable bioactive membranes for guided bone regeneration."

  2. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  3. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector.

  4. Compact drilling and sample system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Petercsak, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The Compact Drilling and Sample System (CDSS) was developed to drill into terrestrial, cometary, and asteroid material in a cryogenic, vacuum environment in order to acquire subsurface samples. Although drills were used by the Apollo astronauts some 20 years ago, this drill is a fraction of the mass and power and operates completely autonomously, able to drill, acquire, transport, dock, and release sample containers in science instruments. The CDSS has incorporated into its control system the ability to gather science data about the material being drilled by measuring drilling rate per force applied and torque. This drill will be able to optimize rotation and thrust in order to achieve the highest drilling rate possible in any given sample. The drill can be commanded to drill at a specified force, so that force imparted on the rover or lander is limited. This paper will discuss the cryo dc brush motors, carbide gears, cryogenic lubrication, quick-release interchangeable sampling drill bits, percussion drilling and the control system developed to achieve autonomous, cryogenic, vacuum, lightweight drilling.

  5. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  6. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector. PMID:27417510

  7. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  8. Adjacent channel interference degradation with minimum shift keyed modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulation results for degradation in signal-to-noise ratio for various values of bit error probability are given for minimum shift-keyed-type signaling in the presence of adjacent channel interference. A serial modulator structure which utilizes spectral shaping is characterized in terms of envelope deviation and bandwidth efficiency. This serial generation technique is convenient for implementation at high data rates and results in signal spectra with lower sidelobe levels than conventional minimum shift-keyed modulation at the expense of moderate envelope deviation. Because of the lower sidelobe levels, the resulting spectra allow denser channel packing than does ideal MSK.

  9. Synthesis of a Molecule with Four Different Adjacent Pnictogens.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Alexander; Schulz, Axel; Villinger, Alexander

    2016-08-22

    The synthesis of a molecule containing four adjacent different pnictogens was attempted by conversion of a Group 15 allyl analogue anion [Mes*NAsPMes*](-) (Mes*=2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl) with antimony(III) chloride. A suitable precursor is Mes*N(H)AsPMes* (1) for which several syntheses were investigated. The anions afforded by deprotonation of Mes*N(H)AsPMes* were found to be labile and, therefore, salts could not be isolated. However, the in situ generated anions could be quenched with SbCl3 , yielding Mes*N(SbCl2 )AsPMes* (4). PMID:27377437

  10. CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

  11. Interaction of Cracks Between Two Adjacent Indents in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental observations of the interaction behavior of cracks between two adjacent indents were made using an indentation technique in soda-lime glass. It was specifically demonstrated how one indent crack initiates and propagates in the vicinity of another indent crack. Several types of crack interactions were examined by changing the orientation and distance of one indent relative to the other. It was found that the residual stress field produced by elastic/plastic indentation has a significant influence on controlling the mode of crack interaction. The interaction of an indent crack with a free surface was also investigated for glass and ceramic specimens.

  12. Retroperitoneal multilocular bronchogenic cyst adjacent to adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Yang, S W; Linton, J A; Ryu, S J; Shin, D H; Park, C S

    1999-10-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are generally found in the mediastinum, particularly posterior to the carina, but they rarely occur in such unusual sites as the skin, subcutaneous tissue, pericardium, and even the retroperitoneum. A 30-year-old Korean man underwent surgery to remove a cystic adrenal mass incidentally discovered during routine physical checkup. At surgery, it proved to be a multilocular cyst located in the retroperitoneum adjacent to the left adrenal gland. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by respiratory epithelium over connective tissue with submucous glands, cartilage and smooth muscle, thereby histologically confirming bronchogenic cyst. This is the first reported case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst in an adult without other congenital anomalies in Korea.

  13. A compaction front in North Sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Dysthe, D. K.; Hartz, E. H.; Jamtveit, B.

    2012-04-01

    North Sea chalk from 18 wells shows a pronounced porosity drop, from ˜20% to less than 10% over a compaction front of less than 300 m. The position of the compaction frontis independent of stratigraphic position, temperature, and actual depth, but closely tied to an effective stress of ˜17 MPa. These observations require a strongly nonlinear rheology with a marked increase in compaction rate at a specific effective stress. Grain-scale observations demonstrate that the compaction front coincides with marked grain coarsening and recrystallization of fossils and fossil fragments. We propose that this nonlinear rheology is caused by stress-driven failure of the larger pores and the associated generation of reactive surface area by subcritical crack propagation away from these pores. Before the onset of this instability, compaction by pressure solution is slowed down by the inhibitory effect of organic compounds associated with the fossils. Although the compaction mechanism is mainly by pressure solution, the rheological response to burial may still be dominantly plastic and controlled by the (fracturing controlled) rate of exposure of reactive surface area. The nonlinear compaction of chalk has significant implications for the evolution of petroleum systems in the central North Sea, both with respect to sea-floor subsidence above hydrocarbon-producing chalk reservoirs and for the formation of low-porosity pressure seals within the chalk.

  14. A compaction front in North Sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Dysthe, D. K.; Hartz, E. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Yarushina, V. M.; Jamtveit, B.

    2011-11-01

    North Sea chalk from 18 wells shows a pronounced porosity drop, from ˜20% to less than 10% over a compaction front of less than 300 m. The position of the compaction front is independent of stratigraphic position, temperature, and actual depth, but closely tied to an effective stress (load stress minus fluid pressure) of ˜17 MPa. These observations require a strongly nonlinear rheology with a marked increase in compaction rate at a specific effective stress. Grain-scale observations demonstrate that the compaction front coincides with marked grain coarsening and recrystallization of fossils and fossil fragments. We propose that this nonlinear rheology is caused by stress-driven failure of the larger pores and the associated generation of reactive surface area by subcritical crack propagation away from these pores. Before the onset of this instability, compaction by pressure solution is slowed down by the inhibitory effect of organic compounds associated with the fossils. Although the compaction mechanism is mainly by pressure solution, the rheological response to burial may still be dominantly plastic and controlled by the (fracturing controlled) rate of exposure of reactive surface area. The nonlinear compaction of chalk has significant implications for the evolution of petroleum systems in the central North Sea, both with respect to sea-floor subsidence above hydrocarbon-producing chalk reservoirs and for the formation of low-porosity pressure seals within the chalk.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of compact formation; compaction, unloading, and ejection. I. Design and development of a compaction calorimeter and mechanical and thermal energy determinations of powder compaction.

    PubMed

    DeCrosta, M T; Schwartz, J B; Wigent, R J; Marshall, K

    2000-03-30

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and evaluate the thermodynamic properties, i.e. heat, work, and internal energy change, of the compaction process by developing a 'Compaction Calorimeter'. Compaction of common excipients and acetaminophen was performed by a double-ended, constant-strain tableting waveform utilizing an instrumented 'Compaction Simulator.' A constant-strain waveform provides a specific quantity of applied compaction work. A calorimeter, built around the dies, used a metal oxide thermistor to measure the temperature of the system. A resolution of 0.0001 degrees C with a sampling time of 5 s was used to monitor the temperature. An aluminum die within a plastic insulating die, in conjunction with fiberglass punches, comprised the calorimeter. Mechanical (work) and thermal (heat) calibrations of the elastic punch deformation were performed. An energy correction method was outlined to account for system heat effects and mechanical work of the punches. Compaction simulator transducers measured upper and lower punch forces and displacements. Measurements of the effective heat capacity of the samples were performed utilizing an electrical resistance heater. Specific heat capacities of the samples were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The calibration techniques were utilized to determine heat, work, and the change in internal energies of powder compaction. Future publications will address the thermodynamic evaluation of the tablet sub-processes of unloading and ejection. PMID:10722955

  16. The classification of 2 -compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Grodal, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We prove that any connected 2 -compact group is classified by its 2 -adic root datum, and in particular the exotic 2 -compact group operatorname{DI}(4) , constructed by Dwyer-Wilkerson, is the only simple 2 -compact group not arising as the 2 -completion of a compact connected Lie group. Combined with our earlier work with Mo/ller and Viruel for p odd, this establishes the full classification of p -compact groups, stating that, up to isomorphism, there is a one-to-one correspondence between connected p -compact groups and root data over the p -adic integers. As a consequence we prove the maximal torus conjecture, giving a one-to-one correspondence between compact Lie groups and finite loop spaces admitting a maximal torus. Our proof is a general induction on the dimension of the group, which works for all primes. It refines the Andersen-Grodal-Mo/ller-Viruel methods by incorporating the theory of root data over the p -adic integers, as developed by Dwyer-Wilkerson and the authors. Furthermore we devise a different way of dealing with the rigidification problem by utilizing obstruction groups calculated by Jackowski-McClure-Oliver in the early 1990s.

  17. Structural and cellular changes during bone growth in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, A M; Travers, R; Rauch, F; Glorieux, F H

    2000-10-01

    ; the new trabeculae filling this space arise from unresorbed cortical bone and represent cortical cancelization; (4) Lateral modeling drift of the inner cortex encroaches on the marrow cavity; some trabeculae are incorporated into the expanding cortex by compaction. (5) The net addition of 37 microm of new bone on each side of a trabecular plate results from a <5% difference between wall thickness and erosion depth and between bone formation and bone resorption rates; these small differences on the same surface are characteristic of bone remodeling. (6) Because the amount of bone added by each cycle of remodeling is so small, the rate of bone remodeling during growth must be high to accomplish the necessary trabecular hypertrophy.

  18. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  19. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  20. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  1. Compacting a Kentucky coal for quality logs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Li, Z.; Mao, S.

    1999-07-01

    A Kentucky coal was found more difficult to be compacted into large size strong logs. Study showed that compaction parameters affecting the strength of compacted coal logs could be categorized into three groups. The first group is coal inherent properties such as elasticity and coefficient of friction, the second group is machine properties such as mold geometry, and the third group is the coal mixture preparation parameters such as particle size distribution. Theoretical analysis showed that an appropriate backpressure can reduce surface cracks occurring during ejection. This has been confirmed by the experiments conducted.

  2. A CBCT atlas of buccal cortical bone thickness in interradicular spaces

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Patrick B.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Zhou, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide a road map of buccal cortical bone thickness in interradicular locations where miniscrew implants are commonly placed. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography images from 100 study quadrants (50 maxillary and 50 mandibular) were studied. Cortical bone thickness was measured at the most mesial point, the midpoint, and the most distal point in interradicular areas from the canine to the first molar in both arches at 4 mm and 6 mm from the alveolar ridge. Indicator variables of whether the cortical bone thickness was thinner than 1 mm and thicker than 1.5 mm were constructed and analyzed in a general linear mixed model. Results Buccal cortical bone was significantly thinner at a point bisecting two teeth than the bone adjacent to the teeth (P < .0001). The site with the greatest percentage of measurements <1 mm (20%) was at the midpoint bisecting the mandibular canine and the first premolar. The site with the highest percentage of measurements >1.5 mm (50%) was in the mandible adjacent to the first molar (distal to the midpoint of the second premolar and first molar) at 6 mm from the alveolar crest. Conclusion Cortical bone thickness is significantly thinner centrally between two teeth than in the areas adjacent to the roots. PMID:25760885

  3. Radiation dose to trabecular bone marrow stem cells from 3H, 14C and selected α-emitters incorporated in a bone remodeling compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Huiling; Richardson, Richard B.

    2009-02-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of repeated cubic units representing trabecular bone cavities in adult bone was employed to determine absorbed dose fractions evaluated for 3H, 14C and a set of α-emitters incorporated within a bone remodeling compartment (BRC). The BRC consists of a well-oxygenated vascular microenvironment located within a canopy of bone-lining cells. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) considers that an important target for radiation-induced bone cancer is the endosteum marrow layer adjacent to bone surface where quiescent bone stem cells reside. It is proposed that the active stem cells and progenitor cells located above the BRC canopy, the 'BRC stem cell niche', is a more important radiation-induced cancer target volume. Simulation results from a static model, where no remodeling occurs, indicate that the mean dose from bone and bone surface to the 50 µm quiescent bone stem cell niche, the current ICRP target, was substantially lower (two to three times lower) than that to the narrower and hypoxic 10 µm endosteum for 3H, 14C and α-particles with energy range 0.5-10 MeV. The results from a dynamic model indicate that the temporal α-radiation dose to active stem/progenitor cells located in the BRC stem cell niche from the material incorporated in and buried by forming bone was 9- to 111-fold greater than the dose to the quiescent bone stem cell niche. This work indicates that the remodeling portion of the bone surface, rather than the quiescent (endosteal) surface, has the greatest risk of radiation-induced bone cancer, particularly from short-range radiation, due to the elevated dose and the radiosensitizing oxygen effect.

  4. Methods and theory in bone modeling drift: comparing spatial analyses of primary bone distributions in the human humerus.

    PubMed

    Maggiano, Corey M; Maggiano, Isabel S; Tiesler, Vera G; Chi-Keb, Julio R; Stout, Sam D

    2016-01-01

    This study compares two novel methods quantifying bone shaft tissue distributions, and relates observations on human humeral growth patterns for applications in anthropological and anatomical research. Microstructural variation in compact bone occurs due to developmental and mechanically adaptive circumstances that are 'recorded' by forming bone and are important for interpretations of growth, health, physical activity, adaptation, and identity in the past and present. Those interpretations hinge on a detailed understanding of the modeling process by which bones achieve their diametric shape, diaphyseal curvature, and general position relative to other elements. Bone modeling is a complex aspect of growth, potentially causing the shaft to drift transversely through formation and resorption on opposing cortices. Unfortunately, the specifics of modeling drift are largely unknown for most skeletal elements. Moreover, bone modeling has seen little quantitative methodological development compared with secondary bone processes, such as intracortical remodeling. The techniques proposed here, starburst point-count and 45° cross-polarization hand-drawn histomorphometry, permit the statistical and populational analysis of human primary tissue distributions and provide similar results despite being suitable for different applications. This analysis of a pooled archaeological and modern skeletal sample confirms the importance of extreme asymmetry in bone modeling as a major determinant of microstructural variation in diaphyses. Specifically, humeral drift is posteromedial in the human humerus, accompanied by a significant rotational trend. In general, results encourage the usage of endocortical primary bone distributions as an indicator and summary of bone modeling drift, enabling quantitative analysis by direction and proportion in other elements and populations.

  5. Historical volcanoes of Armenia and adjacent areas: What is revisited?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanian, A.; Jrbashyan, R.; Trifonov, V.; Philip, H.; Arakelian, S.; Avagyan, A.; Baghdassaryan, H.; Davtian, V.

    2006-07-01

    The validity of some data in Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62] that are revisited by R. Haroutiunian is considered. A conclusion is made that the revisions suggested by Haroutiunian concern unessential parts of the content of work by Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62]. This article presents new evidence and re-proves the earlier conclusions that are disputed or revised by R. Haroutiunian.

  6. Stress Wave Interaction Between Two Adjacent Blast Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changping; Johansson, Daniel; Nyberg, Ulf; Beyglou, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Rock fragmentation by blasting is determined by the level and state of stress in the rock mass subjected to blasting. With the application of electronic detonators, some researchers stated that it is possible to achieve improved fragmentation through stress wave superposition with very short delay times. This hypothesis was studied through theoretical analysis in the paper. First, the stress in rock mass induced by a single-hole shot was analyzed with the assumptions of infinite velocity of detonation and infinite charge length. Based on the stress analysis of a single-hole shot, the stress history and tensile stress distribution between two adjacent holes were presented for cases of simultaneous initiation and 1 ms delayed initiation via stress superposition. The results indicated that the stress wave interaction is local around the collision point. Then, the tensile stress distribution at the extended line of two adjacent blast holes was analyzed for a case of 2 ms delay. The analytical results showed that the tensile stress on the extended line increases due to the stress wave superposition under the assumption that the influence of neighboring blast hole on the stress wave propagation can be neglected. However, the numerical results indicated that this assumption is unreasonable and yields contrary results. The feasibility of improving fragmentation via stress wave interaction with precise initiation was also discussed. The analysis in this paper does not support that the interaction of stress waves improves the fragmentation.

  7. Adjacent flaps for lower lip reconstruction after mucocele resection.

    PubMed

    Ying, Binbin

    2012-03-01

    Mucocele forms because of salivary gland mucous extravasation or retention and is usually related to trauma in the area of the lower lip. It is a common benign lesion in the oral region. Although there are many conservative treatments such as the creation of a pouch (marsupialization), freezing (cryosurgery), micromarsupialization, and CO2 laser vaporization, surgical resection is the most commonly used means. Generally speaking, an elliptic incision was made to fully enucleate the lesion along with the overlying mucosa and the affected glands, then direct suturing is adequate. However, in some cases, direct suturing could cause lower lip deformity, and adjacent flaps for lower lip reconstruction after mucocele resection might be quite necessary. Based on our experience, adjacent mucosal flaps could be used when lesions were close to or even break through the vermilion border or their diameters were much more than 1 cm. A-T advancement flaps and transposition flaps were the mostly applied ones. Follow-up showed that all patients realized primary healing after 1 week postoperatively with satisfactory lower lip appearance, and there was no sign of increasing incidence of relapse. PMID:22421867

  8. Bacterial community structure in the Sulu Sea and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Nishimura, Masahiko; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The deep waters of the Sulu Sea are characterized by relatively high and constant water temperatures and low oxygen concentrations. To examine the effect of these characteristics on the bacterial community structure, the culture-independent molecular method was applied to samples from the Sulu Sea and the adjacent areas. DNA was extracted from environmental samples, and the analysis was carried out on PCR-amplified 16S rDNA; fragments were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis. Stations in the Sulu Sea and the adjacent areas showed much more prominent vertical stratification of bacterial community structures than horizontal variation. As predominant sequences, cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria at 10 m depth, δ-proteobacteria at 100 m depth, and green nonsulfur bacteria below 1000 m depth were detected in all sampling areas. High temperatures and low oxygen concentrations are thought to be minor factors in controlling community structure; the quantity and quality of organic materials supplied by the sinking particles, and hydrostatic pressure are believed to be important.

  9. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  10. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  11. Deep Compaction Control of Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bałachowski, Lech; Kurek, Norbert

    2015-02-01

    Vibroflotation, vibratory compaction, micro-blasting or heavy tamping are typical improvement methods for the cohesionless deposits of high thickness. The complex mechanism of deep soil compaction is related to void ratio decrease with grain rearrangements, lateral stress increase, prestressing effect of certain number of load cycles, water pressure dissipation, aging and other effects. Calibration chamber based interpretation of CPTU/DMT can be used to take into account vertical and horizontal stress and void ratio effects. Some examples of interpretation of soundings in pre-treated and compacted sands are given. Some acceptance criteria for compaction control are discussed. The improvement factors are analysed including the normalised approach based on the soil behaviour type index.

  12. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  13. Diagnostics for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; D. Johnson; R. Feder; E. Fredrickson; H. Neilson; H. Takahashi; M. Zarnstorf; M. Cole; P. Goranson; E. Lazarus; B. Nelson

    2003-09-16

    The status of planning of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) diagnostics is presented, with the emphasis on resolution of diagnostics access issues and on diagnostics required for the early phases of operation.

  14. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  15. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2006-05-09

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  16. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  17. Cortical screw trajectory for instrumentation and fusion in the setting of osteopathic compression fracture allows for percutaneous kyphoplasty for adjacent level compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Donato; Kim, Irene; Wilson, Taylor A; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Spinal fixation in the osteoporotic patient can be challenging due to the poor trabecular bone quality of the vertebral body. Patients with osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures are at risk for future compression fractures at adjacent levels, especially after cement augmentation. The purpose of this technical report is to describe the utilization of a cortical screw trajectory along with kyphoplasty for a patient with an osteoporotic compression fracture as well as degenerative spinal disease. This trajectory allows for the possibility of percutaneous pedicle access in the event of future compression fractures. Our patient underwent a decompressive laminectomy and kyphoplasty at the level of an osteoporotic compression fracture. The fracture was stabilized with cortical screw instrumentation and fusion at a level above and a level below the fracture. Subsequently the patient developed an adjacent level fracture within the fusion construct. Due to the utilization of a cortical screw trajectory for the initial fusion, the traditional pedicle trajectory was still accessible. As a result, the new fracture was treated with a percutaneous kyphoplasty through a standard pedicle trajectory. In conclusion, the use of a cortical screw trajectory for stabilization of osteoporotic compression fractures provides for a stronger bone screw interface and avoids osteoporotic trabecular vertebral body bone. At the same time this trajectory allows for future percutaneous pedicular access in the event that the patient suffers future compression fractures.

  18. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  19. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  20. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, J.R.; Anderson, G.D.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1996-03-12

    The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  1. Genetics of aging bone.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas J; Rowe, David W; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L

    2016-08-01

    With aging, the skeleton experiences a number of changes, which include reductions in mass and changes in matrix composition, leading to fragility and ultimately an increase of fracture risk. A number of aspects of bone physiology are controlled by genetic factors, including peak bone mass, bone shape, and composition; however, forward genetic studies in humans have largely concentrated on clinically available measures such as bone mineral density (BMD). Forward genetic studies in rodents have also heavily focused on BMD; however, investigations of direct measures of bone strength, size, and shape have also been conducted. Overwhelmingly, these studies of the genetics of bone strength have identified loci that modulate strength via influencing bone size, and may not impact the matrix material properties of bone. Many of the rodent forward genetic studies lacked sufficient mapping resolution for candidate gene identification; however, newer studies using genetic mapping populations such as Advanced Intercrosses and the Collaborative Cross appear to have overcome this issue and show promise for future studies. The majority of the genetic mapping studies conducted to date have focused on younger animals and thus an understanding of the genetic control of age-related bone loss represents a key gap in knowledge.

  2. Autoinflammatory bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Stern, Sara M; Ferguson, Polly J

    2013-11-01

    Autoinflammatory bone disease is a new branch of autoinflammatory diseases caused by seemingly unprovoked activation of the innate immune system leading to an osseous inflammatory process. The inflammatory bone lesions in these disorders are characterized by chronic inflammation that is typically culture negative with no demonstrable organism on histopathology. The most common autoinflammatory bone diseases in childhood include chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO), synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis syndrome, Majeed syndrome, deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and cherubism. In this article, the authors focus on CNO and summarize the distinct genetic autoinflammatory bone syndromes.

  3. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Eikelder, H. M. M.; Bošnački, D.; Elevelt, A.; Donato, K.; Di Tullio, A.; Breuer, B. J. T.; van Wijk, J. H.; van Dijk, E. V. M.; Modena, D.; Yeo, S. Y.; Grüll, H.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  4. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  5. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  6. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    SciTech Connect

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  7. Age- and gender-related changes in the distribution of osteocalcin in the extracellular matrix of normal male and female bone. Possible involvement of osteocalcin in bone remodeling.

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R T; Park, Y K; Clarke, B L; Fitzpatrick, L A

    1994-01-01

    With increasing age, bone undergoes changes in remodeling that ultimately compromise the structural integrity of the skeleton. The presence of osteocalcin in bone matrix may alter bone remodeling by promoting osteoclast activity. Whether age- and/or gender-related differences exist in the distribution of osteocalcin within individual bone remodeling units is not known. In this study, we determined the immunohistochemical distribution of osteocalcin in the extracellular matrix of iliac crest bone biopsies obtained from normal male and female volunteers, 20-80 yr old. Four different distribution patterns of osteocalcin within individual osteons were arbitrarily defined as types I, II, III, or IV. The frequency of appearance of each osteon type was determined as a percent of the total osteons per histologic section. The proportion of osteons that stained homogeneously throughout the concentric lamellae (type I) decreased in females and males with increasing age. The proportion of osteons that lack osteocalcin in the matrix immediately adjacent to Haversian canals (type III) increased in females and males with age. Osteons staining intensely in the matrix adjacent to Haversian canals (type II) increased in females and was unchanged in aging males. Osteons that contained osteocalcin-positive resting lines (type IV) increased in bone obtained from males with increasing age but were unchanged in females. Sections of bone immunostained for osteopontin (SPP-I), osteonectin, and decorin did not reveal multiple patterns or alterations in staining with gender or increasing age. We suggest that the morphology of individual bone remodeling units is heterogeneous and the particular morphologic pattern of osteocalcin distribution changes with age and gender. These results suggest that differences in the distribution of osteocalcin in bone matrix may be responsible, in part, for the altered remodeling of bone associated with gender and aging. Images PMID:8132785

  8. DNA survival and physical and histological properties of heat-induced alterations in burnt bones.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, K; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, Y

    2014-05-01

    During forensic casework, it is vital to be able to obtain valuable information from burnt bone fragments to ascertain the identity of the victim. Here, we report the findings of an experimental study on burnt bovine compact bone segments. Compact bones were cut to size and heated in an electric furnace at a temperature range of 100–1,100 °C with 100 °C increments. Heat-induced alterations to the bone color,weight, volume, and density were monitored using gross morphology and micro-focus X-ray computed tomography.We found that the increase in temperature caused the color of the compact bones to change in order of yellow, brown, gray,and white. In contrast to the weight reduction that occurred immediately after burning, we measured no significant reduction in volume even at 600 °C; however, volume reduced drastically once the temperature reached 700 °C. Light microscopic histological observations of burnt bone revealed heat induced alterations such as cracking and separation of the osteons at higher temperatures. In addition to these findings,we sought to examine the survival of DNA in the burnt bones using polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial DNA. No amplification was found in the specimens burnt at 250 °C or higher, indicating the likely difficulty in testing the DNA of burnt bones from forensic casework. The results of this study will enable an estimation of the burning temperatures of burnt bones found in forensic cases and will provide an important framework with which to interpret data obtained during anthropological testing and DNA typing. PMID:24658641

  9. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    and still be able to maintain a stable operation under extreme radioactivity and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. In the following sections, the description is given for the design and performance of this new compact PPAC, for studying the neutron-induced reactions on actinides using DANCE at LANL.

  10. Stylolite compaction and stress models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Ebner, M.; Renard, F.; Toussaint, R.

    2009-04-01

    Stylolites are rough dissolution seams that develop during pressure solution in the Earth's crust. Especially in limestone quarries they exhibit a spectacular roughness with spikes and large columns. They are visible as dark lines of residual clays and other non-dissolvable components in the white limestone. The roughening phenomena seems to be universal since stylolites can also be found in quarzites, mylonites and all kinds of rocks that undergo pressure solution. The genesis of stylolites is not well understood even though they have been used to estimate compaction and to determine the direction of the main compressive stress. We have developed a numerical model to study the dynamic development of the roughness and its dependence on stress. Based on the model we present estimates of finite strain and depth of burial. The numerical stylolites are studied in two ways: the temporal evolution of the roughness on one hand and the fractal characteristics of the roughness on the other hand. In addition we vary the noise in the model and illustrate the importance of the grain size on the roughening process. Surface energies are dominant for small wavelengths and the initial stylolite growth is non-linear and as slow as a diffusive process. However, once a critical wavelength is reached the elastic regime becomes dominant and the growth is still non-linear but not as strong as in the surface energy dominated case. The growth of the roughness speeds up and teeth structures develop. Depending on the system size the growth will reach a third regime where saturation is reached and the roughness stays constant. We will present a scaling law based on these findings that can be used to estimate finite strain from natural stylolites. The roughness of the stylolite itself is self-affine with two different roughness exponents. The switch from one exponent to the other is dependent on stress. We show how stylolites can thus be used as palaeo-stress-gauges. A variation of the

  11. Interrelationship between bone aging traits and basic anthropometric characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid; Cohen, Zvi; Kobyliansky, Eugene; Livshits, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Using plain hand radiographs, the age dependence of various bone-aging traits (bone mineral density [BMD], cortical index [CI], osteoarthritis [OA], and osseographic [OSS] scores) was evaluated to test whether the correlation among these traits is an individual- or population-based phenomenon. In addition, the effect of anthropometric features on variation of bone-aging traits was estimated. The study included 1,295 individuals from Chuvasha, Russia, 18 to 89 years. BMD was measured from the compact compartment of the middle and distal phalanges of both 3(rd) fingers. The CI of the II-IV metacarpal bones and II-IV proximal phalanges was obtained. The development of OA was based on the standard Kellgren and Lawrence grading scheme for 28 hand joints. OSS score, a surrogate measure that takes into account different kinds of bone changes, was also obtained for each individual. Body weight and height, eight skinfold thicknesses on the trunk and extremities, and breadths of the long bones were measured. Sex-based univariate analyses and multivariate statistical analysis showed the following: 1) Age dependence was defined more strongly in "OA-linked" compared to "osteoporosis (OP)-linked" traits; 2) While "OP-linked" bone-aging traits correlated with age differently between sexes, "OA-linked" traits did not; 3) The strong interrelationship between OA-linked and OP-linked traits in both sexes became very weak and statistically insignificant (P > 0.10) after adjustment for age. Thus, OA and OP conditions in the same individual develop independently and probably reflect different underlying physiological mechanisms. 4) Anthropometric characteristics were significantly correlated with bone-aging traits, but correlations were low (r < 0.20). Thus, the contribution of anthropometric characteristics to the rate and pattern of bone aging of the hand was to relatively small.

  12. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  13. GOAT ROCKS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT ROADLESS AREAS, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Close, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Goat Rocks Wilderness and adjacent roadless areas are a rugged, highly forested, scenic area located on the crest of the Cascade Range in south-central Washington. Several mineral claims have been staked in the area. Mineral surveys were conducted. Geochemical, geophysical, and geologic investigations indicate that three areas have probable mineral-resource potential for base metals in porphyry-type deposits. Available data are not adequate to permit definition of the potential for oil and gas. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of other kinds of energy resources in the area. Evaluation of resource potential in the three areas identified as having probable mineral-resource potential could be improved by more detailed geochemical studies and geologic mapping.

  14. Scolopendromorpha of New Guinea and adjacent islands (Myriapoda, Chilopoda).

    PubMed

    Schileyko, Arkady A; Stoev, Pavel E

    2016-01-01

    The centipede fauna of the second largest island in the world, New Guinea, and its adjacent islands, is poorly known, with most information deriving from the first half of the 20th century. Here we present new data on the order Scolopendromorpha based on material collected in the area in the last 40 years, mainly by Bulgarian and Latvian zoologists. The collections comprise eleven species of six genera and three families. The diagnosis of Cryptops (Trigonocryptops) is emended in the light of the recent findings. The old and doubtful record of Scolopendra multidens Newport, 1844 from New Guinea is referred to S. subspinipes Leach, 1815 and the species is here excluded from the present day list of New Guinean scolopendromorphs. Cryptops nepalensis Lewis, 1999 is here recorded from New Guinea for the first time. An annotated list and an identification key to the scolopendromorphs of the studied region are presented. PMID:27515618

  15. Geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Dilamarter, R.C.

    1982-07-01

    The geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas in Indiana, Illinois and Tennessee is presented as a background for interpreters evaluating the present land surface using remotely sensed imagery. Eight physiographic units were analyzed and are briefly discussed with reference to topography and surface deposits. Great diversity was found to be characteristic of the region, the result of different structural influences and geomorphic processes. The landscape bears the marks of fluvial, glacial, eolian, lacustrine and karstic environments, so a regional geomorphic history was compiled from the literature as an aid to understanding the land surface. Three smaller zones in Kentucky were analyzed in greater detail regarding topography and geomorphic development because of their potential importance in subsurface exploration.

  16. Configuration optimization of dampers for adjacent buildings under seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Kasra; Hare, Warren; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2012-12-01

    Passive coupling of adjacent structures is known to be an effective method to reduce undesirable vibrations and structural pounding effects. Past results have shown that reducing the number of dampers can considerably decrease the cost of implementation and does not significantly decrease the efficiency of the system. The main objective of this study was to find the optimal arrangement of a limited number of dampers to minimize interstorey drift. Five approaches to solving the resulting bi-level optimization problem are introduced and examined (exhaustive search, inserting dampers, inserting floors, locations of maximum relative velocity and a genetic algorithm) and the numerical efficiency of each method is examined. The results reveal that the inserting damper method is the most efficient and reliable method, particularly for tall structures. It was also found that increasing the number of dampers does not necessarily increase the efficiency of the system. In fact, increasing the number of dampers can exacerbate the dynamic response of the system.

  17. Reconnaissance geologic map of Kodiak Island and adjacent islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.

    2013-01-01

    Kodiak Island and its adjacent islands, located on the west side of the Gulf of Alaska, contain one of the largest areas of exposure of the flysch and melange of the Chugach terrane of southern Alaska. However, in the past 25 years, only detailed mapping covering small areas in the archipelago has been done. This map and its associated digital files (Wilson and others, 2005) present the best available mapping compiled in an integrated fashion. The map and associated digital files represent part of a systematic effort to release geologic map data for the United States in a uniform manner. The geologic data have been compiled from a wide variety of sources, ranging from state and regional geologic maps to large-scale field mapping. The map data are presented for use at a nominal scale of 1:500,000, although individual datasets (see Wilson and others, 2005) may contain data suitable for use at larger scales.

  18. 38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA 1900 MICHIGAN MACHINERY MFG. CO. PUNCH PRESS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE FACTORY BUILDING. AT THE LEFT FOREGROUND IS A MOVABLE TIRE BENDER FOR SHAPING ELI WINDMILL WHEEL RIMS. AT THE CENTER IS A FLOOR-MOUNTED CIRCA 1900 SNAG GRINDER OF THE TYPE USED FOR SMOOTHING ROUGH CASTINGS. ON THE WHEELED WORK STATION IS A SUNNEN BUSHING GRINDER, BEHIND WHICH IS A TRIPOD CHAIN VICE. IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND IS A WOODEN CHEST OF DRAWERS WHICH CONTAINS A 'RAG DRAWER' STILL FILLED WITH CLOTH RAGS PLACED IN THE FACTORY BUILDING AT THE INSISTENCE OF LOUISE (MRS. ARTHUR) KREGEL FOR THE CONVENIENCE AND CLEANLINESS OF WORKERS. IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND IS A CIRCA 1900 CROSS-CUTOFF CIRCULAR SAW. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  19. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  20. An engineered dimeric protein pore that spans adjacent lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Shiksha; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Cheley, Stephen; Sharp, Thomas H.; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-01-01

    The bottom-up construction of artificial tissues is an underexplored area of synthetic biology. An important challenge is communication between constituent compartments of the engineered tissue and between the engineered tissue and additional compartments, including extracellular fluids, further engineered tissue and living cells. Here we present a dimeric transmembrane pore that can span two adjacent lipid bilayers and thereby allow aqueous compartments to communicate. Two heptameric staphylococcal α-hemolysin (αHL) pores were covalently linked in an aligned cap-to-cap orientation. The structure of the dimer, (α7)2, was confirmed by biochemical analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-channel electrical recording. We show that one of two β barrels of (α7)2 can insert into the lipid bilayer of a small unilamellar vesicle, while the other spans a planar lipid bilayer. (α7)2 pores spanning two bilayers were also observed by TEM. PMID:23591892

  1. Effect of Fluoridated Sealants on Adjacent Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cagetti, M.G.; Carta, G.; Cocco, F.; Sale, S.; Congiu, G.; Mura, A.; Strohmenger, L.; Lingström, P.; Campus, G.

    2014-01-01

    A double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed in 6- to 7-yr-old schoolchildren to evaluate, in a 30-mo period, whether the caries increment on the distal surface of the second primary molars adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with fluoride release compounds would be lower with respect to those adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with a nonfluoridated sealant. In sum, 2,776 subjects were enrolled and randomly divided into 3 groups receiving sealants on sound first molars: high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (GIC group); resin-based sealant with fluoride (fluoride-RB group); and a resin-based sealant without fluoride (RB group). Caries (D1 – D3 level) was recorded on the distal surface of the second primary molar, considered the unit of analysis including only sound surfaces at the baseline. At baseline, no differences in caries prevalence were recorded in the 3 groups regarding the considered surfaces. At follow-up, the prevalence of an affected unit of analysis was statistically lower (p = .03) in the GIC and fluoride-RB groups (p = .04). In the GIC group, fewer new caries were observed in the unit of analysis respect to the other 2 groups. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.68; p < .01) for GIC vs. RB and 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.04; p = .005) for fluoride-RB vs. RB. Caries incidence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic status (IRR = 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.42; p = .05). Dental sealant high-viscosity GIC and fluoride-RB demonstrated protection against dental caries, and there was evidence that these materials afforded additional protection for the tooth nearest to the sealed tooth (clinical trial registration NCT01588210). PMID:24846910

  2. Subduction initiation adjacent to a relic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although plate tectonics is well established, how subduction initiates over tectonic history has remained obscure. It has been proposed that passive margins may be a possible place for subduction initiation, but there is no obvious Cenozoic example of such a scenario, including along the passive margins of the Atlantic Ocean. With a computational method that follows the deformation of a visco-elasto-plastic medium, here we show that a favourable locale for subduction initiation is the juxtaposition of an old oceanic plate adjacent to a young, but relic arc. Significant density anomalies leading to subduction initiation arise from two major factors. One is the compositional difference between the relic arc crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle; the other is the thermal difference due to the age offset between the two plates. With such a setup, we observe spontaneous subduction initiation if the oceanic crust is significantly weakened by pore fluid pressure. If the oceanic crust is relatively strong, a small amount of plate convergence is required to induce subduction. The evidence that Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermedec subduction zones both initiate adjacent to a relic island arc support our conclusions. The initiation of both subduction zones at 51-52 Ma with commensurate compression on their respective overriding plates support a causal link between both subduction initiation events through a change in Pacific Plate motion. Our results provide an explanation for the rarity of subduction initiation at the passive margins. The continental lithosphere is typically old and cold. Consequently, the thermal effects cancel the compositional buoyancy contrast between the continental crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle, making subduction initiation difficult at passive margins.

  3. Prevention of enamel demineralization adjacent to glass ionomer filling materials.

    PubMed

    Forss, H; Seppä, L

    1990-04-01

    In order to study the release of fluoride and prevention of enamel demineralization by different filling materials, standardized cavities were prepared in 80 extracted human molars. The cavities were filled as follows: 1. Fuji II F; 2. Ketac-Fil; 3. Ketac-Silver; 4. Silar. Twenty molars were used as controls (no filling). Enamel slabs with the fillings were subjected to 9 days of demineralization (30 min daily) and remineralization (artificial saliva, replaced daily). Fluoride release in the saliva was determined on days 1, 3, 5, and 9. Enamel fluoride content adjacent to the cavities was determined initially and after the de-remineralization using the acid etch technique. On day 1, the largest amount of fluoride in the saliva was released by Fuji, but on day 9 the largest amount was released by Ketac-Fil. Ketac-Silver released significantly less fluoride than Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The average initial fluoride content of enamel was 2200 ppm. After the test period, fluoride contents adjusted for biopsy depth were 1822, 1690, 1693, 1337, and 888 ppm in groups 1-5, respectively. The amounts of phosphorus dissolved by the second acid etch were 28.9 (SE 2.6), 30.2 (2.0), 34.4 (2.8), 44.1 (2.7), and 42.2 (2.4) micrograms, respectively. Softening of surface enamel during the test period was clearly reduced in teeth filled with Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The results show that glass ionomer materials release considerable amounts of fluoride and prevent demineralization of the adjacent enamel in vitro. Fuji and Ketac-Fil seem to be more effective than Ketac-Silver.

  4. Significant forefoot varus deformity resulting in progressive stress fractures of all lesser metatarsal bones.

    PubMed

    van der Vlies, Cornelis H; Ponsen, Kees J; Besselaar, Philip P; Goslings, J Carel

    2007-01-01

    Stress fractures may occur in any bone, but appear most frequently in the metatarsal bones. Consecutive stress fractures of all lesser metatarsals in a short period are rare, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. We report an unusual case of a young man with consecutive stress fractures of four adjacent lesser metatarsal bones. The etiology was in all probability the fixed forefoot varus deformity. This foot deformity may impose increased mechanical loads across the lateral aspect of the foot that, in turn, may result in stress fractures involving the lesser metatarsals. In our patient conservative treatment finally resulted in a satisfactory outcome.

  5. [Reaction of bone tissue elements on synthetic bioresorbable materials based on lactic and glycolic acids].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, A A; Grigor'ian, A S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adverse effects of synthetic polymeric bioresorbable materials based on lactic and glycolic acids on the bone tissue. The study was carried-out on 40 Wister-line rats. Four types of bioresorbable polymeric materials were implanted: PolyLactide Glycolide Acid (PLGA), Poly-L-Lactide Acid (PLLA); Poly-96L/4D-Lactide Acid (96/4 PLDLA); Poly-70L/30D-Lactide Acid (70/30 PLDLA). The results showed connective tissue formation (fibrointegration) bordering bone adjacent to implanted materials. This proved the materials to cause pathogenic influence on the bone which mechanisms are described in the article.

  6. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and adjacent waters, Mass. 110.140 Section 110.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 35744, June 20, 2011. (a... adjacent waters, Mass. (a) * * * (2) Anchorage B. All waters bounded by a line beginning at 41°36′42.3″...

  7. Aneurysmal bone cyst involving the metacarpal bone in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor; Sohn, Eun Seok

    2015-03-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts associated with tubular bones of the hand occur rarely and require particular diagnostic and therapeutic management techniques. While optimal treatment has not been established, accepted treatments range from aggressive radical treatment, including en bloc resection and excision diaphysectomy with strut bone grafting, to relatively simple techniques, such as thorough curettage followed by bone graft. Aggressive treatment approaches may be optimal for the cases with articular surface involvement, full-bone invasion of the phalanx or metacarpal, or more than 1 recurrence. We report a monocentric case of aneurysmal bone cysts involving metacarpal bone in a child who achieved favorable outcome with curettage and morselized cancellous bone grafts. PMID:25750953

  8. CCR2 elimination in mice results in larger and stronger tibial bones but bone loss is not attenuated following ovariectomy or muscle denervation.

    PubMed

    Mader, Tara L; Novotny, Susan A; Lin, Angela S; Guldberg, Robert E; Lowe, Dawn A; Warren, Gordon L

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss due to age and disuse contributes to osteoporosis and increases fracture risk. It has been hypothesized that such bone loss can be attenuated by modulation of the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and/or its ligands. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of genetic elimination of CCR2 on cortical and trabecular bones in the mouse tibia and how bone loss was impacted following disuse and estrogen loss. Female CCR2 knockout (CCR2(-/-)) and wildtype mice underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or denervation of musculature adjacent to the tibia (DEN) to induce bone loss. Cortical and trabecular structural properties as well as mechanical properties (i.e., strength) of tibial bones were measured. Compared to wildtype mice, CCR2(-/-) mice had tibiae that were up to 9% larger and stronger; these differences could be explained mainly by the 17% greater body mass (P < 0.001) of CCR2(-/-) mice. The majority of the tibia's structural and functional responses to OVX and DEN were similar regardless of the lack or presence of CCR2, indicating that CCR2 is not protective against bone loss per se. These findings indicate that while CCR2(-/-) mice do have larger and stronger bones than do wildtype mice, there is minimal evidence that CCR2 elimination provides protection against bone loss during disuse and estrogen loss.

  9. Brucella abortus Invasion of Osteoblasts Inhibits Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common presentation of the active disease in humans. Loss of bone is a serious complication of localized bacterial infection of bones or the adjacent tissue, and brucellosis proved not to be the exception. The skeleton is a dynamic organ system which is constantly remodeled. Osteoblasts are responsible for the deposition of bone matrix and are thought to facilitate the calcification and mineralization of the bone matrix, and their function could be altered under infectious conditions. In this article, we describe immune mechanisms whereby Brucella abortus may invade and replicate within osteoblasts, inducing apoptosis, inhibiting mineral and organic matrix deposition, and inducing upregulation of RANKL expression. Additionally, all of these mechanisms contributed in different ways to bone loss. These processes implicate the activation of signaling pathways (mitogen-activated protein kinases [MAPK] and caspases) involved in cytokine secretion, expression of activating molecules, and cell death of osteoblasts. In addition, considering the relevance of macrophages in intracellular Brucella survival and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in response to infection, we also investigated the role of these cells as modulators of osteoblast survival, differentiation, and function. We demonstrated that supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages may also mediate osteoblast apoptosis and inhibit osteoblast function in a process that is dependent on the presence of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). These results indicate that B. abortus may directly and indirectly harm osteoblast function, contributing to the bone and joint destruction observed in patients with osteoarticular complications of brucellosis. PMID:22547546

  10. THE IMMUNE SYSTEM AND BONE

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    T cells and B cells produce large amounts of cytokines which regulate bone resorption and bone formation. These factors play a critical role in the regulation of bone turnover in health and disease. In addition, immune cells of the bone marrow regulate bone homeostasis by cross-talking with bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblastic cells via cell surface molecules. These regulatory mechanisms are particularly relevant for postmenopausal osteoporosis and hyperparathyroidism, two common forms of bone loss caused primarily by an expansion of the osteoclastic pool only partially compensated by a stimulation of bone formation. This article describes the cytokines and immune factors that regulate bone cells, the immune cells relevant to bone, examines the connection between T cells and bone in health and disease, and reviews the evidence in favor of a link between T cells and the mechanism of action of estrogen and PTH in bone. PMID:20599675

  11. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Bones Resources For Your Information Skeletal Bone Density and Dental Concerns The portion of the jawbone ... who do not have the disease. Low bone density in the jaw can result in other dental ...

  12. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  13. Combined bone scintigraphy and indium-111 leukocyte scans in neuropathic foot disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Park, H.M.; Burt, R.W.; Mock, B.H.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-10-01

    It is difficult to diagnose osteomyelitis in the presence of neurotrophic osteoarthropathy. We performed combined (99mTc)MDP bone scans and indium-111 (111In) leukocyte studies on 35 patients who had radiographic evidence of neuropathic foot disease and clinically suspected osteomyelitis. The (111In)leukocyte study determined if there was an infection and the bone scan provided the anatomic landmarks so that the infection could be localized to the bone or the adjacent soft tissue. Seventeen patients had osteomyelitis and all showed increased (111In)leukocyte activity localized to the bone, giving a sensitivity of 100%. Among the 18 patients without osteomyelitis, eight had no accumulation of (111In)leukocytes, seven had the (111In)leukocyte activity correctly localized to the soft tissue, two had (111In)leukocyte activity mistakenly attributed to the bone, and one had (111In)leukocyte accumulation in a proven neuroma which was mistakenly attributed to bone. These three false-positive results for osteomyelitis reduced the specificity to 83%. Considering only the 27 patients with a positive (111In)leukocyte study, the combined bone scan and (111In)leukocyte study correctly localized the infection to the soft tissues or bone in 89%. Uninfected neurotrophic osteoarthropathy does not accumulate (111In)leukocytes. We found the combined bone scan and (111In) leukocyte study useful for the detection and localization of infection to soft tissue or bone in patients with neuropathic foot disease.

  14. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures.

  15. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures. PMID:20176096

  16. Automated trabecular bone histomorphometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The toxicity of alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides and the relationship between bone tumor incidence and the local dosimetry of radionuclides in bone are investigated. The microdistributions of alpha-emitting radionuclides in the trabecular bone from the proximal humerus, distal humerus, proximal ulna, proximal femur, and distal femur of six young adult beagles injected with Am-241 (three with 2.8 micro-Ci/kg and three with 0.9 micro-Ci/kg) are estimated using a computer-controlled microscope photometer system; the components of the University of Utah Optical Track Scanner are described. The morphometric parameters for the beagles are calculated and analyzed. It is observed that the beagles injected with 0.9 micro-Ci of Am-241/kg showed an increase in the percentage of bone and trabecular bone thickness, and a reduction in the width of the bone marrow space and surface/volume ratio. The data reveal that radiation damage causes abnormal bone structure.

  17. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat. The heat helps kill any remaining tumor cells. This allows PMMA to be used without cryosurgery for some types of bone tumors. Surgical treatment of metastasis To be able to cure a bone cancer, it and any existing metastases must be removed ...

  18. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    PubMed

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  19. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Benign bone lesions are a broad category that demonstrates a spectrum of activities from latent to aggressive. Differentiating the various tumors is important in order to properly determine necessary intervention. This chapter focuses on the presentation, imaging, diagnostic features, and treatment of the most common benign bone tumors in order to help guide diagnosis and management. PMID:25070230

  20. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.