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Sample records for adjacent control sites

  1. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  2. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  3. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 7. WALKWAY/ENTRANCE TO ADMINSITRATIVE SITE ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE ROAD AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WALKWAY/ENTRANCE TO ADMINSITRATIVE SITE ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE ROAD AND INTERNAL POLICE POST, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Manzanar War Relocation Center, Owens Valley off U.S. Highway 395, 6 miles South of Independence, Independence, Inyo County, CA

  5. Localized arteriole formation directly adjacent to the site of VEGF-induced angiogenesis in muscle.

    PubMed

    Springer, Matthew L; Ozawa, Clare R; Banfi, Andrea; Kraft, Peggy E; Ip, Tze-Kin; Brazelton, Timothy R; Blau, Helen M

    2003-04-01

    We have shown previously that implantation of myoblasts constitutively expressing the VEGF-A gene into nonischemic mouse skeletal muscle leads to overgrowth of capillary-like blood vessels and hemangioma formation. These aberrant effects occurred directly at the implantation site. We show here that these regions result from angiogenic capillary growth and involve a change in capillary growth pattern and that smooth muscle-coated vessels similar to arterioles form directly adjacent to the implantation site. Myoblasts genetically engineered to produce VEGF were implanted into mouse leg muscles. Implantation sites were surrounded by a zone of dense capillary-sized vessels, around which was a second zone of muscle containing larger, smooth-muscle-covered vessels but few capillaries, and an outer zone of muscle exhibiting normal capillary density. The lack of capillaries in the middle region suggests that the preexisting capillaries adjacent to the implantation site underwent enlargement and/or fusion and recruited a smooth muscle coat. Capillaries at the implantation site were frequently wrapped around VEGF-producing muscle fibers and were continuous with the circulation and were not observed to include bone-marrow-derived endothelial cells. In contrast with the distant arteriogenesis resulting from VEGF delivery described in previous studies, we report here that highly localized arterioles also form adjacent to the site of delivery.

  6. Fibrosarcoma adjacent to the site of microchip implantation in a cat.

    PubMed

    Daly, Meighan K; Saba, Corey F; Crochik, Sonia S; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Kosarek, Carrie E; Cornell, Karen K; Roberts, Royce E; Northrup, Nicole C

    2008-04-01

    A 14-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat presented with an interscapular mass. A computed tomography scan, biopsy, and histological examination revealed a fibrosarcoma adjacent to a pet identification microchip. Because the cat was previously vaccinated at this site, it is not possible to establish definitive causation of the fibrosarcoma, but this is the first report of a tumor in the vicinity of a microchip in a cat. Microchip-associated tumors have been reported in rodents and dogs. Veterinarians should be aware that because inflammation may predispose felines to tumor formation, separation and observation of vaccination and implantation sites are indicated. Adherence to American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) vaccination guidelines and monitoring of microchip implantation sites are recommended.

  7. River bank geomorphology controls groundwater arsenic concentrations in aquifers adjacent to the Red River, Hanoi Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Mason O.; Harvey, Charles F.; van Geen, Alexander; Sun, Jing; Thi Kim Trang, Pham; Mai Lan, Vi; Mai Phuong, Thao; Hung Viet, Pham; Bostick, Benjamin C.

    2016-08-01

    Many aquifers that are highly contaminated by arsenic in South and Southeast Asia are in the floodplains of large river networks. Under natural conditions, these aquifers would discharge into nearby rivers; however, large-scale groundwater pumping has reversed the flow in some areas so that rivers now recharge aquifers. At a field site near Hanoi Vietnam, we find river water recharging the aquifer becomes high in arsenic, reaching concentrations above 1000 µg/L, within the upper meter of recently (< ˜10 years) deposited riverbed sediments as it is drawn into a heavily pumped aquifer along the Red River. Groundwater arsenic concentrations in aquifers adjacent to the river are largely controlled by river geomorphology. High (>50 µg/L) aqueous arsenic concentrations are found in aquifer regions adjacent to zones where the river has recently deposited sediment and low arsenic concentrations are found in aquifer regions adjacent to erosional zones. High arsenic concentrations are even found adjacent to a depositional river reach in a Pleistocene aquifer, a type of aquifer sediment which generally hosts low arsenic water. Using geochemical and isotopic data, we estimate the in situ rate of arsenic release from riverbed sediments to be up to 1000 times the rates calculated on inland aquifer sediments in Vietnam. Geochemical data for riverbed porewater conditions indicate that the reduction of reactive, poorly crystalline iron oxides controls arsenic release. We suggest that aquifers in these regions may be susceptible to further arsenic contamination where riverine recharge drawn into aquifers by extensive groundwater pumping flows through recently deposited river sediments before entering the aquifer.

  8. 15 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and... SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 922—Dredged Material Disposal Sites Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National...

  9. Using a triad approach in the assessment of hazardous waste site leaching from a Superfund site to an adjacent stream

    SciTech Connect

    Leppanen, C.J.; Blanner, P.M.; Allan, R.S.; Maier, K.J.; Benson, W.H.

    1998-10-01

    A triad approach was used in the evaluation of sediment in the Wolf River adjacent to the North Hollywood Dump, a federally listed Superfund site. Chemical analyses were done for 18 organochlorine pesticides, 21 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, and 10 metals. Sediment toxicity was evaluated with freshwater invertebrates. Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca. Benthic macroinvertebrate diversity and abundance were assessed with a family-level biotic index. Mean Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in sediments collected in the spring. Both spring and fall sediments exhibited toxicity downstream from, adjacent to, and upstream from the dump, with toxicity significantly higher in fall sediments; however, a consistent trend was not observed. Toxicity was typically greater in the fall, and metal concentrations were typically higher in spring sediments, suggesting that metals were not responsible for the toxicity. Sediment-associated organochlorine pesticide and PCB congener concentrations were all below detectable limits, suggesting that these potential contaminants are not contributing to the observed toxicity. No differences were found in benthic macroinvertebrate community structure, which was composed of predominantly pollution-tolerant families, among seasons or river reaches, which appear to be limited by the physical characteristics of the river. Sediments in urban reaches of the Wolf River appear to be degraded; the North Hollywood Dump cannot be isolated as a source of toxicity in this study. In situ testing, sediment toxicity identification and evaluation testing, acid-volatile sulfide analyses, or artificial substrate work would be appropriate to follow.

  10. Evaluation of fall chinook salmon spawning adjacent to the In-Situ Redox Manipulation treatability test site, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.P.; Geist, D.R.

    1998-10-02

    The In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) experiment is being evaluated as a potential method to remove contaminants from groundwater adjacent to the Columbia River near the 100-D Area. The ISRM experiment involves using sodium dithionate (Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}S{sub 2}) to precipitate chromate from the groundwater. The treatment will likely create anoxic conditions in the groundwater down-gradient of the ISRM treatability test site; however, the spatial extent of this anoxic plume is not exactly known. Surveys were conducted in November 1997, following the peak spawning of fall chinook salmon. Aerial surveys documented 210 redds (spawning nests) near the downstream island in locations consistent with previous surveys. Neither aerial nor underwater surveys documented fall chinook spawning in the vicinity of the ISRM treatability test site. Based on measurements of depth, velocity, and substrate, less than 1% of the study area contained suitable fall chinook salmon spawning habitat, indicating low potential for fall chinook salmon to spawn in the vicinity of the ISRM experiment.

  11. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R

    2015-10-15

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC.

  12. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B.; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC. PMID:26227968

  13. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B.; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Engen, John R.; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    , multipoint binding of ubiquitin chains. The structures of the T1 site in its free state and complexed with monoubiquitin or K48-linked diubiquitin were solved, revealing that three neighboring outer helices from the T1 toroid engage two ubiquitins. This binding mode leads to a preference for certain ubiquitin chain types, especially K6- and K48-linked chains, in a distinct configuration that can position substrates close to the entry port of the proteasome. The fate of proteasome-docked ubiquitin conjugates is determined by a competition between deubiquitination and substrate degradation. We find that proximal to the T1 site within the Rpn1 toroid is a second UBL-binding site, T2, that does not assist in ubiquitin chain recognition, but rather in chain disassembly, by binding to the UBL domain of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6. Importantly, the UBL interactors at T1 and T2 are distinct, assigning substrate localization to T1 and substrate deubiquitination to T2. CONCLUSION A ligand-binding hotspot was identified in the Rpn1 toroid, consisting of two adjacent receptor sites, T1 and T2. The Rpn1 toroid represents a novel class of binding domains for ubiquitin and UBL proteins. This study thus defines a novel two-site recognition domain intrinsic to the proteasome that uses homologous ubiquitin/UBL-class ligands to assemble substrates, substrate shuttling factors, and a deubiquitinating enzyme in close proximity. A ligand-binding hotspot in the proteasome for assembling substrates and cofactors Schematic (top) and model structure (bottom, left) mapping the UBL-binding Rpn1 T1 (indigo) and T2 (orange) sites. (Bottom, right) Enlarged region of the proteasome to illustrate the Rpn1 T1 and T2 sites bound to a ubiquitin chain (yellow) and deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6 (green), respectively. PDB 4CR2 and 2B9R were used for this figure. Hundreds of pathways for degradation converge at ubiquitin recognition by proteasome. Here we found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors

  14. 15 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dredged Material Disposal Sites Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and... SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. D Appendix D...

  15. Assessment of the hydrologic interaction between Imikpuk Lake and the adjacent airstrip site near Barrow, Alaska, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Solin, Gary L.; Trabant, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Imikpuk Lake serves as the drinking water source for the Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation-National Arctic Research Laboratory (UIC-NARL), formerly known as the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory, near Barrow, Alaska. During the 1970's and 1980's, accidental releases of more than 1,300 cubic meters of various types of fuel occurred at the airstrip site adjacent to the lake. To aid an assessment of the potential risk 10 the quality of water in the lake posed by fuel remaining in the subsurface, the hydrologic interaction between the lake and ground water at the airstrip site was examined. The study area lies within the region of continuous permafrost where hydrologic processes are largely controlled by the short annual thaw season and the presence of near-surface permafrost. Runoff occurs for only a short period each year, typically from early or mid-June to late September, and a shallow ground- water system develops during approximately the same period as a result of shallow thawing of the subsurface. During the spring and summer of 1993, snowpack and surface-water data were collected throughout the Imikpuk Lake basin, and subsurface- flow-system data were collected at the airstrip site. The total annual inflow to the lake was estimated 10 be approximately 300,000 cubic meters per year, based on four methods of estimation. The ground-water flow system at the airstrip site is complex, primarily because of variations in local land-surface topography. Subsurface frost-elevation data indicate that a permafrost ridge exists beneath one of the elevated building pads at the site. Similar ridges beneath elevated roadways at the site may act as impediments to ground-water flow, reducing the flux of subsurface water to Imikpuk Lake. However, on the basis of the assumption that such impediments do not reduce flux substantially, the ground-water flux from the airstrip site was estimated to be approximately 173 cubic meters per year--less than 0.1 percent of the estimated annual

  16. Remodelling of periodontal tissues adjacent to sites treated according to the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR).

    PubMed

    Brägger, U; Hämmerle, C H; Mombelli, A; Bürgin, W; Lang, N P

    1992-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the remodelling of alveolar bone adjacent to periodontal sites following therapy according to the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) using computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA), and to compare the radiographic results to traditional clinical parameters. As required for digital subtraction analyses, periodically reproducible radiographs were obtained using a modification of the Rinn System and individual acrylic bite blocks for periodical identical radiographs. Ideally, a digital subtraction image from a site where absolutely no change in density had occurred would show a perfect cancellation of the structures. An average grey level value of 128 (the middle of the digitizer grey level range set by software) would show up at each pixel. Areas with grey levels < 128 in the subtraction image would indicate loss in density and grey levels > 128 would indicate increase in density. Within the subtraction images, areas were defined using the cursor to draw "regions of interest" (ROI) projected on the bony defect exposed to GTR covering the crestal bone as well as the region of potential "bonefill". The mean, median, the standard deviation and range of the grey levels of pixels within a particular ROI were calculated. Similarly sized ROI were drawn in bone areas not exposed to the GTR procedure serving as controls. The differences in the mean grey levels of all pixels within a particular ROI between the baseline, 3 and 12 months images were calculated for documentation of gain or loss in density. From 14 patients, standardized radiographs were available from baseline, 3 months and 12 months postsurgically, depicting one infraosseous defect before and after treatment according to the principles of GTR. The densitometric changes observed in these defects were compared to the clinically assessed changes measured at the site with the deepest baseline pocket depth. A mean clinical attachment gain of 2.36 mm

  17. Voltage-Controlled Spin-Wave Coupling in Adjacent Ferromagnetic-Ferroelectric Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Grachev, A. A.; Beginin, E. N.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally study the spin-wave coupling in adjacent ferrimagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures. By using the space-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy, we perform a systematic study of the coupling of waves propagating in both a magnetic and a ferroelectric layer. We demonstrate the voltage-controlled transfer of the spin-wave energy between the adjacent bilayers. Our results show, that the coupling efficiency of the proposed laterally coupled multiferroics can be tuned by independent variation of the applied magnetic and electric field, which opens exciting prospects for an emerging field of magnonics.

  18. Gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban, adjacent coastal, and continental background sites of western Greece.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Eleni; Samara, Constantini

    2004-10-01

    Particle- and gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected from an urban, an adjacent coastal, and a continental background site located in Eordea basin, western Greece, to investigate their gas/ particle distributions. Thirteen two- to six-ring PAHs, included in the U.S. EPA priority pollutant list, were determined in 24-h integrated glass fiber filters and polyurethane foam samples. At the prevailing ambient temperature levels, the three-ringed species (phenanthrene, anthracene) and the four-ringed fluoranthene and pyrene were primarily found in the gas phase. Conversely, the five- and six-ring PAHs were mainly associated with the particle phase. Gas/particle partitioning coefficients, Kp, were calculated, and their relationship with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure p degrees L of individual PAHs was investigated. Despite the large variability among samples, a good linear relationship between log Kp and log p degrees L was obtained for all sampling sites following the equation log Kp = m(r) log p degrees L + b(r). In the majority of sampling events, particularly in the adjacent coastal and the continental background sites, slopes (m(r)) were found to be shallower than the value of -1, which has been suggested as reflecting equilibrium partitioning. The deviations from predicted aerosol behavior observed in the present study may be attributed to several reasons, such as the presence of nonexchangeable PAH fraction, nonequilibrium as well as different particle characteristics.

  19. Evaluation of spatial variability of soil arsenic adjacent to a disused cattle-dip site, using model-based geostatistics.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Nabeel K; Bishop, Thomas F A; Singh, Balwant

    2011-12-15

    This study investigated the spatial variability of total and phosphate-extractable arsenic (As) concentrations in soil adjacent to a cattle-dip site, employing a linear mixed model-based geostatistical approach. The soil samples in the study area (n = 102 in 8.1 m(2)) were taken at the nodes of a 0.30 × 0.35 m grid. The results showed that total As concentration (0-0.2 m depth) and phosphate-extractable As concentration (at depths of 0-0.2, 0.2-0.4, and 0.4-0.6 m) in soil adjacent to the dip varied greatly. Both total and phosphate-extractable soil As concentrations significantly (p = 0.004-0.048) increased toward the cattle-dip. Using the linear mixed model, we suggest that 5 samples are sufficient to assess a dip site for soil (As) contamination (95% confidence interval of ±475.9 mg kg(-1)), but 15 samples (95% confidence interval of ±212.3 mg kg(-1)) is desirable baseline when the ultimate goal is to evaluate the effects of phytoremediation. Such guidelines on sampling requirements are crucial for the assessment of As contamination levels at other cattle-dip sites, and to determine the effect of phytoremediation on soil As.

  20. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A H; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G; Engen, John R; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J

    2016-02-19

    Hundreds of pathways for degradation converge at ubiquitin recognition by a proteasome. Here, we found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors in yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition and identified a sixth receptor, Rpn1. A site ( T1: ) in the Rpn1 toroid recognized ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like ( UBL: ) domains of substrate shuttling factors. T1 structures with monoubiquitin or lysine 48 diubiquitin show three neighboring outer helices engaging two ubiquitins. T1 contributes a distinct substrate-binding pathway with preference for lysine 48-linked chains. Proximal to T1 within the Rpn1 toroid is a second UBL-binding site ( T2: ) that assists in ubiquitin chain disassembly, by binding the UBL of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6. Thus, a two-site recognition domain intrinsic to the proteasome uses distinct ubiquitin-fold ligands to assemble substrates, shuttling factors, and a deubiquitinating enzyme.

  1. Zone of Interaction Between Hanford Site Groundwater and Adjacent Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Robert E.; Connelly, Michael P.

    2001-10-23

    This report describes the FY 2000 results of a Science and Technology investigation of the groundwater/river interface at the Hanford Site. The investigation focused on (1) a 2-D simulation of water flowpaths beneath the shoreline region under the influence of a transient river stage, and (2) mixing between groundwater and river water.

  2. Benthic Resources Assessment Technique Evaluation of Disposal Sites in Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    of potential impacts to demersal fish feeding habitat. sites. 2. One aspect of benthic habitat quality is the relative amount of trophic support that...a given benthic habitat provides demersal bottom- feeding fishes. Analytical procedures have been developed at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways...suspend the larger material and to allow fine sands, silts and clays to pass through the screens. Residual material was 2 I! Ii placeL a cloth bags that

  3. Hybrid control approach for seismic coupling of two similar adjacent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwan-Soon; Ok, Seung-Yong

    2015-08-01

    This study describes an optimal hybrid control approach of two similar adjacent buildings for seismic performance improvement, for which the passive dampers are used as link members between the two parallel buildings and the active control devices are installed as tendon-type devices between two successive floors in the buildings. Throughout this configuration, the passive coupling dampers modulate the relative responses between the two buildings and the active control devices modulate the inter-story responses of each building. In order to achieve global optimal control performance, genetic algorithm is employed to perform an integrated design approach for the system of buildings and hybrid control devices. Through the optimization process, the passive and active devices are optimally distributed along the floors and, simultaneously, their damping capacities and active controllers are configured in accordance with the distribution. The proposed approach is demonstrated in comparison with typical active control system which consists of two independent active systems without any connections between two buildings, each being optimal for one particular building. The numerical simulation results for a system of 20-story and 16-story buildings reveal that the proposed system can guarantee the competent control performance over the typical independent active system with less control forces and powers. As a result, it is proved that the proposed approach enables the simultaneous optimization of the control performance and the control cost.

  4. Copper(II) and nickel(II) binding sites of peptide containing adjacent histidyl residues.

    PubMed

    Grenács, Ágnes; Sanna, Daniele; Sóvágó, Imre

    2015-10-01

    Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of the terminally protected nonapeptide Ac-SGAEGHHQK-NH2 modeling the metal binding sites of the (8-16) domain of amyloid-β have been studied by potentiometric, UV-vis, CD and ESR spectroscopic methods. The studies on the mutants containing only one of the histidyl residues (Ac-SGAEGAHQK-NH2, Ac-SGAEGHAQK-NH2) have also been performed. The formation of imidazole and amide coordinated mononuclear complexes is characteristic of all systems with a preference of nickel(II) binding to the His14 site, while the involvement of both histidines in metal binding is suggested in the corresponding copper(II) complexes. The formation of bis(ligand) and dinuclear complexes has also been observed in the copper(II)-Ac-SGAEGHHQK-NH2 system. The results provide further support for the copper(II) binding ability of the (8-16) domain of amyloid-β and support the previous assumptions that via the bis(ligand) complex formation copper(II) ions may promote the formation of the oligomers of amyloid-β.

  5. Discovery of Allosteric Modulators of Factor XIa by Targeting Hydrophobic Domains Adjacent to its Heparin-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Karuturi, Rajesh; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    To discover promising sulfated allosteric modulators (SAMs) of glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins (GBPs), such as human factor XIa (FXIa), we screened a library of 26 synthetic, sulfated quinazolin-4(3H)-ones (QAOs) resulting in the identification of six molecules that reduced the VMAX of substrate hydrolysis without influencing the KM. Mutagenesis of residues of the heparin-binding site of FXIa introduced a nearly 5-fold loss in inhibition potency supporting recognition of an allosteric site. Fluorescence studies showed a sigmoidal binding profile indicating highly cooperative binding. Competition with a positively-charged, heparin-binding polymer did not fully nullify inhibition suggesting importance of hydrophobic forces to binding. This discovery suggest the operation of a dual-element recognition process, which relies on an initial Coulombic attraction of anionic SAMs to the cationic HBS of FXIa that forms a locked complex through tight interaction with an adjacent hydrophobic patch. The dual-element strategy may be widely applicable for discovering SAMs of other GBPs. PMID:23451707

  6. Atmospheric and Adjacency Correction of Landsat-8 Imagery of Inland and Coastal Waters Near AERONET-OC Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cazzaniga, Ilaria; Manzo, Ciro; Bresciani, Mariano; Braga, Federica; Giardino, Claudia; Schroeder, Thomas; Kratzer, Susanne; Brando, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary results of a new algorithm for the atmospheric correction of OLI imagery acquired over coastal and inland water are presented. The algorithm was based on the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV) radiative transfer model and the atmopheric contribution was simulated by using the microphysical properties of the aerosol, their size distribution and refractive index, available from the AERONET stations located in the study area. The SeaDAS software was also applied to the OLI data to compare the results obtained by OLI@CRI algorithm with the standard procedure for atmospheric correction of remotely data. Furthermore, the adjacency effect was removed by the well-known empirical formula as well as a new empirical formula to assess any possible improvement of the atmospheric correction products using the diffuse fraction of the total atmospheric transmission as weight for averaged reflectance removal. To validate the results and assess its accuracy, the above-water data acquired at AERONET- OC sites were used. A coastal area and a lake are considered, where AERONET and AERONET-OC data are available. These sites cover a significant range of both atmospheric (from boreal to tropics) and water quality conditions.

  7. 24 CFR 583.320 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Site control. 583.320 Section 583... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Program Requirements § 583.320 Site control. (a) Site control. (1) Where grant funds will be used for acquisition, rehabilitation, or new...

  8. 24 CFR 583.320 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Site control. 583.320 Section 583... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Program Requirements § 583.320 Site control. (a) Site control. (1) Where grant funds will be used for acquisition, rehabilitation, or new...

  9. 24 CFR 583.320 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Site control. 583.320 Section 583... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Program Requirements § 583.320 Site control. (a) Site control. (1) Where grant funds will be used for acquisition, rehabilitation, or new...

  10. 24 CFR 583.320 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Site control. 583.320 Section 583... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Program Requirements § 583.320 Site control. (a) Site control. (1) Where grant funds will be used for acquisition, rehabilitation, or new...

  11. 24 CFR 578.25 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Site control. 578.25 Section 578.25... COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONTINUUM OF CARE PROGRAM Application and Grant Award Process § 578.25 Site control. (a... has site control within the time frame established in section § 578.21 before HUD will execute a...

  12. 24 CFR 578.25 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Site control. 578.25 Section 578.25... COMMUNITY FACILITIES CONTINUUM OF CARE PROGRAM Application and Grant Award Process § 578.25 Site control. (a... has site control within the time frame established in section § 578.21 before HUD will execute a...

  13. 24 CFR 583.320 - Site control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Site control. 583.320 Section 583... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAM Program Requirements § 583.320 Site control. (a) Site control. (1) Where grant funds will be used for acquisition, rehabilitation, or new...

  14. The North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) cart site begins operation: Collaboration with SHEBA and FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, D. B.; Church, H.; Ivey, M.; Yellowhorse, L.; Zirzow, J.; Widener, K. B.; Rhodes, P.; Turney, C.; Koontz, A.; Stamnes, K.; Storvold, R.; Eide, H. A.; Utley, P.; Eagan, R.; Cook, D.; Hart, D.; Wesely, M.

    2000-04-04

    Since the 1997 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting, the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site has come into being. Much has happened even since the 1998 Science Team Meeting at which this paper was presented. To maximize its usefulness, this paper has been updated to include developments through July 1998.

  15. High breast milk levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) among four women living adjacent to a PCB-contaminated waste site.

    PubMed Central

    Korrick, S A; Altshul, L

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of contamination by effluents from local electronics manufacturing facilities, the New Bedford Harbor and estuary in southeastern Massachusetts is among the sites in the United States that are considered the most highly contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Since 1993, measures of intrauterine PCB exposure have been obtained for a sample of New Bedford area infants. Among 122 mother-infant pairs, we identified four milk samples with total PCB levels that were significantly higher than the rest, with estimated total PCBs ranging from 1,100 to 2,400 ng/g milk fat compared with an overall mean of 320 ng/g milk fat for the 122 women. The congener profile and history of one case was consistent with past occupational PCB exposures. Otherwise, the source of PCB exposures in these cases was difficult to specify. Environmental exposures including those from fish consumption were likely, whereas residence adjacent to a PCB-contaminated site was considered an unlikely exposure source. In all four cases, the infants were full-term, healthy newborns. Because the developing nervous system is believed to be particularly susceptible to PCBs (for example, prenatal PCB exposures have been associated with prematurity, decrements in birth weight and gestation time, and behavioral and developmental deficits in later infancy and childhood, including decrements in IQ), it is critical to ascertain if breast-feeding is a health risk for the women's infants. Despite the potential for large postnatal PCB exposures via breast milk, there is limited evidence of significant developmental toxicity associated with the transmission of moderate PCB concentrations through breast milk. Breast-feeding is associated with substantial health benefits including better cognitive skills among breast-fed compared with formula-fed infants. We conclude, based on evidence from other studies, that the benefits of breast-feeding probably outweigh any risk from PCB exposures via breast

  16. Correspondence of ectomycorrhizal diversity and colonisation of willows (Salix spp.) grown in short rotation coppice on arable sites and adjacent natural stands.

    PubMed

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Toljander, Ylva K; Baum, Christel; Fransson, Petra M A; Taylor, Andy F S; Weih, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are mycorrhizal tree species sometimes cultivated as short rotation coppice (SRC) on arable sites for energy purposes; they are also among the earliest plants colonising primary successional sites in natural stands. The objective of this study was to analyse the degree of colonisation and diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities on willows grown as SRC in arable soils and their adjacent natural or naturalized stands. Arable sites usually lack ectomycorrhizal host plants before the establishment of SRC, and adjacent natural or naturalized willow stands were hypothesized to be a leading source of ectomycorrhizal inoculum for the SRC. Three test sites including SRC stands (Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados, and Salix schwerinii) and adjacent natural or naturalized (Salix caprea, Salix fragilis, and Salix × mollissima) stands in central Sweden were investigated on EM colonisation and morphotypes, and the fungal partners of 36 of the total 49 EM fungi morphotypes were identified using molecular tools. The frequency of mycorrhizas in the natural/naturalized stands was higher (two sites) or lower (one site) than in the corresponding cultivated stands. Correspondence analysis revealed that some EM taxa (e.g. Agaricales) were mostly associated with cultivated willows, while others (e.g. Thelephorales) were mostly found in natural/naturalized stands. In conclusion, we found strong effects of sites and willow genotype on EM fungi formation, but poor correspondence between the EM fungi abundance and diversity in SRC and their adjacent natural/naturalized stands. The underlying mechanism might be selective promotion of some EM fungi species by more effective spore dispersal.

  17. Development and precise characterization of phospho-site-specific antibody of Ser(357) of IRS-1: elimination of cross reactivity with adjacent Ser(358).

    PubMed

    Waraich, Rizwana Sanaullah; Zaidi, Nousheen; Moeschel, Klaus; Beck, Alexander; Weigert, Cora; Voelter, Wolfgang; Kalbacher, Hubert; Lehmann, Rainer

    2008-11-07

    Antibodies that recognize specifically phosphorylated sites on proteins are widely utilized for studying the regulation and biological function of phosphoproteins. The proposed strategy is a powerful, analytical tool allowing the generation of phospho-site specific antibodies albeit adjacent phosphorylation sites are present. Here, we demonstrate the assessment and elimination of cross reactivity of phospho-site-specific-Ser(357) IRS-1 antibody. While determining the specificity of p-Ser(357) antiserum we came across the cross reactivity of the antiserum with adjacent Ser(358) which was successfully abolished by an improved immuno-purification method. The specificity of the purified antiserum was then verified by indirect ELISA, results of ELISA were also mirrored in the experiments carried out in BHK-IR cells using different mutants of IRS-1 carrying mutations at either Ser(357)/Ser(358)/Ser(357/358). Immuno-purified-p-Ser(357) did not react with IRS-1 Ala(357) and IRS-1 Ala(357/358). In conclusion, the present study describes generation and characterization of p-Ser(357) IRS-1 antibody, which reacts with IRS-1 in site specific and phosphorylation state-dependent manner without showing cross reactivity to adjacent Ser(358). This antibody can be effectively used to further clarify the inhibitory role of Ser(357) in insulin signal transduction.

  18. Stability control in underground working adjacent an in situ oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect

    Ricketts, Th. E.

    1985-07-30

    In situ oil shale retorts are formed in spaced-apart rows, with adjacent rows of such retorts being separated by load-bearing inter-retort pillars of unfragmented formation sufficiently strong for preventing substantial subsidence. Each retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. An air level drift is excavated in formation directly above the inter-retort pillar so that the roof and/or floor of the air level drift is spaced above the upper boundaries of the retorts in such adjacent rows. This causes the roof of the air level drift to be in compression, rather than in tension, which stabilizes the roof and avoids dangerous rock falls. During retorting operations, air is introduced at the upper edge of each retort through lateral air inlet passages sloping downwardly from the air level drift. Off gas and liquid products are withdrawn from each retort through a production level passage at the bottom of each report at the edge opposite the air inlet. The production level passages connect to a main production level drift extending between adjacent rows of retors. The roof of the main production level drift is excavated in fgormation directly below the inter-retort pillar so that the roof of of the production level drift is spaced below the lower boundaries of the retorts in adjacent rows. This places the roof of the production level drift in compression, avoiding the likelihood of rock falls.

  19. 15 CFR Appendix D to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Adjacent to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary D Appendix D to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. D Appendix D...

  20. Control of a brain-computer interface using stereotactic depth electrodes in and adjacent to the hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusienski, D. J.; Shih, J. J.

    2011-04-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device that enables severely disabled people to communicate and interact with their environments using their brain waves. Most research investigating BCI in humans has used scalp-recorded electroencephalography or intracranial electrocorticography. The use of brain signals obtained directly from stereotactic depth electrodes to control a BCI has not previously been explored. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) recorded from bilateral stereotactic depth electrodes implanted in and adjacent to the hippocampus were used to control a P300 Speller paradigm. The ERPs were preprocessed and used to train a linear classifier to subsequently predict the intended target letters. The classifier was able to predict the intended target character at or near 100% accuracy using fewer than 15 stimulation sequences in the two subjects tested. Our results demonstrate that ERPs from hippocampal and hippocampal adjacent depth electrodes can be used to reliably control the P300 Speller BCI paradigm.

  1. Radioecology of Vertebrate Animals in the Area Adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Site in 1986-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, E. B.; Gashchak, S. P.; Makliuk, Y. A.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    A widespread environmental contamination of the areas adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) site attracted a great deal of publicity to the biological consequences of the ChNPP catastrophe. However, only a few studies focused on a detailed analysis of radioactive contamination of the local wild fauna and most of them were published in Eastern European languages, making them poorly accessible for Western scientists. In addition, evaluation of this information appears difficult due to significant differences in raw data acquisition and analysis methodologies and final data presentation formats. Using an integrated approach to assessment of all available information, the International Radioecology Laboratory scientists showed that the ChNPP accident had increased the average values of the animals 137Cs and 90Sr contamination by a factor of thousands, followed by its decrease by a factor of tens, primarily resulting from a decrease in the biological accessibility of the radionuclides. However, this trend depended on many factors. Plant and bottom feeding fish species were the first to reach the maximum contamination levels. No data are available on other vertebrates, but it can be assumed that the same trend was true for all plant feeding animals and animals searching for food on the soil surface. The most significant decrease of the average values occurred during the first 3-5 years after the accident and it was the most pronounced for elks and plant and plankton feeding fish. Their diet included elements “alienated” from the major radionuclide inventory; for example, upper soil layers and bottom deposits where the fallout that had originally precipitated on plants, water and soils gradually migrated. Further radionuclide penetration into deeper layers of soils and its bonding with their mineral components intensified decontamination of the fauna. It took a while for the contamination of predatory fish and mammals (wolves) to reach the maximum

  2. Soil chemistry adjacent to roads treated with dust control products at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunz, Bethany K.

    2016-01-01

    The health of soils along roadways is critical for maximizing habitat quality and minimizing negative ecological effects of roads. Adjacent to unpaved roads, soil chemistry may be altered by the deposition of dust, as well as by road treatment with dust suppressants or soil stabilizer products. If present in roadside soils, these product residues may be available to plants, terrestrial invertebrates, or small mammals. Unfortunately, very few studies have attempted to track the transport of dust suppressants after application. As part of a larger ongoing study on the environmental effects of dust suppressant products on roadside plants and animals, we sampled roadside soils at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Replicated road sections at Squaw Creek NWR had been previously treated with two road products—calcium chloride-based durablend-C™ and synthetic iso-alkane EnviroKleen®. In order to quantify the effect of dust suppressant treatment on roadside soils, we took replicated composite soil samples one year after treatment at 1m and 4m from the road’s edge, and analyzed samples for a suite of soil chemistry variables (pH, conductivity, NO3-N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na and S). We also assessed dust suppressant product residues in the soil. For durablend-C™, we used soil conductivity as an indicator. For EnviroKleen®, we developed a method for extraction and isolation, followed by analysis with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to look for a specific EnviroKleen® signature. Surprisingly, soil conductivity was not elevated adjacent to road sections treated with durablend-C™, relative to other sections. EnviroKleen® was detectable at both 1m and 4m from treated sections at concentrations from 1 to 1500 mg/kg, and was non-detectable in soils adjacent to the untreated section. The most notable characteristic of soils across all treated and untreated sections at 1m was elevated calcium (up to 30,000 mg/kg), likely as a result of dust deposition from the

  3. Evaluation of the physical process controlling beach changes adjacent to nearshore dredge pits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedet, L.; List, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical modeling of a beach nourishment project is conducted to enable a detailed evaluation of the processes associated with the effects of nearshore dredge pits on nourishment evolution and formation of erosion hot spots. A process-based numerical model, Delft3D, is used for this purpose. The analysis is based on the modification of existing bathymetry to simulate "what if" scenarios with/without the bathymetric features of interest. Borrow pits dredged about 30??years ago to provide sand for the nourishment project have a significant influence on project performance and formation of erosional hot spots. It was found that the main processes controlling beach response to these offshore bathymetric features were feedbacks between wave forces (roller force or alongshore component of the radiation stress), pressure gradients due to differentials in wave set-up/set-down and bed shear stress. Modeling results also indicated that backfilling of selected borrow sites showed a net positive effect within the beach fill limits and caused a reduction in the magnitude of hot spot erosion. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Pit-1 Binding Site Adjacent to E-box133 in the Rat PRL Promoter is Necessary for Pulsatile Gene Expression Activity.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sudeep; Ganguly, Surajit; Kumar, Sachin; Boockfor, Fredric R

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence reveals that prolactin gene expression (PRL-GE) in mammotropes occurs in pulses, but the molecular process(es) underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. Earlier, we have identified an E-box (E-box133) in the rat PRL promoter that binds several circadian elements and is critical for this dynamic process. Preliminary analysis revealed a Pit-1 binding site (P2) located immediately adjacent to this E-box133 raising the possibility that some type of functional relationship may exist between these two promoter regions. In this study, using serum shocked GH3 cell culture system to synchronize PRL-GE activity, we determined that Pit-1 gene expression occurred in pulses with time phases similar to that for PRL. Interestingly, EMSA analysis not only confirmed Pit-1 binding to the P2 site, but also revealed an interaction with factor(s) binding to the adjacent E-box133 promoter element. Additionally, down-regulation of Pit-1 by siRNA reduced PRL levels during pulse periods. Thus, using multiple evidences, our results demonstrate clearly that the Pit-1 P2 site is necessary for PRL-GE elaboration. Furthermore, the proximity of this critical Pit-1 binding site (P2) and the E-box133 element coupled with the evidences of a site-to-site protein interactions suggest that the process of PRL-GE pulse activity might involve more dynamic and intricate cross-talks between promoter elements that may span some, or all, of the proximal region of the PRL promoter in driving its pulsatile expression.

  5. HIGH BREAST MILK LEVELS OF POLYCHLORINATEDE BIPHENYLS (PCBS) AMONG FOUR WOMEN LIVING ADJACENT TO A PCB-CONTAMINATED WASTE SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a consequence of contamination by effluents from local electronics manufacturing facilities, the New Bedford Harbor and estuary in southeastern Massachusetts is among the sites in the United States that are considered the most highly contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (...

  6. Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent genes.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunming; Zhao, Lifeng; Niu, Baixiao; Su, Jing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yuanling; Zhang, Qunyu; Guo, Jingxin; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Mei, Mantong; Xia, Jixing; Wang, Lan; Wu, Haibin; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2008-12-02

    Sterility is common in hybrids between divergent populations, such as the indica and japonica subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa). Although multiple loci for plant hybrid sterility have been identified, it remains unknown how alleles of the loci interact at the molecular level. Here we show that a locus for indica-japonica hybrid male sterility, Sa, comprises two adjacent genes, SaM and SaF, encoding a small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase-like protein and an F-box protein, respectively. Most indica cultivars contain a haplotype SaM(+)SaF(+), whereas all japonica cultivars have SaM(-)SaF(-) that diverged by nucleotide variations in wild rice. Male semi-sterility in this heterozygous complex locus is caused by abortion of pollen carrying SaM(-). This allele-specific gamete elimination results from a selective interaction of SaF(+) with SaM(-), a truncated protein, but not with SaM(+) because of the presence of an inhibitory domain, although SaM(+) is required for this male sterility. Lack of any one of the three alleles in recombinant plants does not produce male sterility. We propose a two-gene/three-component interaction model for this hybrid male sterility system. The findings have implications for overcoming male sterility in inter-subspecific hybrid rice breeding.

  7. Dual GTPase regulation of the GCC185 Golgin: Communication between adjacent Rab6 and Arl1 binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Burguete, Alondra Schweizer; Fenn, Timothy D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary GCC185 is a large coiled coil protein at the trans Golgi network that is required for receipt of transport vesicles inbound from late endosomes, and for anchoring non-centrosomal microtubules that emanate from the Golgi. Here we demonstrate that recruitment of GCC185 to the Golgi is mediated by two Golgi-localized small GTPases of the Rab and Arl families. GCC185 binds Rab6 and mutation of residues needed for Rab binding abolishes Golgi localization. The crystal structure of Rab6 bound to the GCC185 Rab binding domain reveals that Rab6 recognizes a two-fold symmetric surface on a coiled coil immediately adjacent to a C-terminal GRIP domain. Unexpectedly, Rab6 binding promotes association of Arl1 with the GRIP domain. We present a structure-derived model for dual GTPase membrane attachment that highlights the potential ability of Rab GTPases to reach binding partners at a significant distance from the membrane via their unstructured and membrane-anchored, hypervariable domains. PMID:18243103

  8. Geohydrologic and drill-hole data for test well USW H-1, adjacent to Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rush, F. Eugene; Thordarson, William; Bruckheimer, Laura

    1983-01-01

    This report presents data collected to determine the hydraulic characteristics of rocks penetrated in test well USW H-1. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in a program conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Data on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, hydrologic monitoring, core analysis, ground-water chemistry and pumping and injection tests for well USW H-1 are contained in this report.

  9. Charge-patterning phase transition on a surface lattice of titratable sites adjacent to an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel; Thurston, George

    We discuss a model for a charge-patterning phase transition on a two-dimensional square lattice of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed on a square lattice in a dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and an aqueous salt solution. Within Debye-Huckel theory, the analytical form of the electrostatic repulsion between protonated sites exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease beyond short distances. The problem can thus be mapped onto the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Ising model with this longer-range interaction, which we study with Monte Carlo simulations. As we increase pH, the occupation probability of a site decreases from 1 at low pH to 0 at high pH. For sufficiently-strong interaction strengths, a phase transition occurs as the occupation probability of 1/2 is approached: the charges arrange themselves into a checkerboard pattern. This ordered phase persists over a range of pH until a transition occurs back to a disordered state. This state is the analogue of the Neel state in the antiferromagnetic Ising spin model. More complicated ordered phases are expected for sufficiently strong interactions (with occupation probabilities of 1/4 and 3/4) and if the lattice is triangular rather than square. This work was supported by NIH EY018249 (GMT).

  10. Changes in nematode communities in different physiographic sites of the condor seamount (north-East atlantic ocean) and adjacent sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Bongiorni, Lucia; Serrão Santos, Ricardo; Vanreusel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Several seamounts are known as 'oases' of high abundances and biomass and hotspots of biodiversity in contrast to the surrounding deep-sea environments. Recent studies have indicated that each single seamount can exhibit a high intricate habitat turnover. Information on alpha and beta diversity of single seamount is needed in order to fully understand seamounts contribution to regional and global biodiversity. However, while most of the seamount research has been focused on summits, studies considering the whole seamount structure are still rather poor. In the present study we analysed abundance, biomass and diversity of nematodes collected in distinct physiographic sites and surrounding sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, North-East Atlantic Ocean). Our study revealed higher nematode biomass in the seamount bases and values 10 times higher in the Condor sediments than in the far-field site. Although biodiversity indices did not showed significant differences comparing seamount sites and far-field sites, significant differences were observed in term of nematode composition. The Condor summit harboured a completely different nematode community when compared to the other seamount sites, with a high number of exclusive species and important differences in term of nematode trophic diversity. The oceanographic conditions observed around the Condor Seamount and the associated sediment mixing, together with the high quality of food resources available in seamount base could explain the observed patterns. Our results support the hypothesis that seamounts maintain high biodiversity through heightened beta diversity and showed that not only summits but also seamount bases can support rich benthic community in terms of standing stocks and diversity. Furthermore functional diversity of nematodes strongly depends on environmental conditions link to the local setting and seamount structure. This finding should be considered in future studies on seamounts, especially in

  11. Changes in Nematode Communities in Different Physiographic Sites of the Condor Seamount (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Adjacent Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Bongiorni, Lucia; Serrão Santos, Ricardo; Vanreusel, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Several seamounts are known as ‘oases’ of high abundances and biomass and hotspots of biodiversity in contrast to the surrounding deep-sea environments. Recent studies have indicated that each single seamount can exhibit a high intricate habitat turnover. Information on alpha and beta diversity of single seamount is needed in order to fully understand seamounts contribution to regional and global biodiversity. However, while most of the seamount research has been focused on summits, studies considering the whole seamount structure are still rather poor. In the present study we analysed abundance, biomass and diversity of nematodes collected in distinct physiographic sites and surrounding sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, North-East Atlantic Ocean). Our study revealed higher nematode biomass in the seamount bases and values 10 times higher in the Condor sediments than in the far-field site. Although biodiversity indices did not showed significant differences comparing seamount sites and far-field sites, significant differences were observed in term of nematode composition. The Condor summit harboured a completely different nematode community when compared to the other seamount sites, with a high number of exclusive species and important differences in term of nematode trophic diversity. The oceanographic conditions observed around the Condor Seamount and the associated sediment mixing, together with the high quality of food resources available in seamount base could explain the observed patterns. Our results support the hypothesis that seamounts maintain high biodiversity through heightened beta diversity and showed that not only summits but also seamount bases can support rich benthic community in terms of standing stocks and diversity. Furthermore functional diversity of nematodes strongly depends on environmental conditions link to the local setting and seamount structure. This finding should be considered in future studies on seamounts, especially in

  12. Controls on bacterial gas accumulations in thick Tertiary coal beds and adjacent channel sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. )

    1991-03-01

    Coal beds, as much as 250 ft thick, and adjacent sandstones in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation are reservoirs for coal-derived natural gas in the Powder River basin. The discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs about 3 mi{sup 2} in size, adjoining networks of fluvial channels infilled by sand. Coal-bed thickness was controlled by basin subsidence and depositional environments. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub o} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Although the coals are relatively low rank, they display fracture systems. Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amount of Co{sub 2} ({lt}10%). The methane is isotopically light and enriched in deuterium. The gases are interpreted to be generated by bacterial processes and the fermentation pathway, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. Large amounts of bicarbonate water generated during early stages of coalification will have to be removed from the fracture porosity in the coal beds before desorption and commercial gas production can take place. Desorbed amounts of methane-rich, bacterial gas in the Powder River basin are relatively low ({lt}60 Scf/ton) compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases (hundreds of Scf/ton) from other Rocky Mountain basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource in both the coal beds and the adjacent sandstones is considered to be large (as much as 40 Tcf) because of the vast coal resources (as much as 1.3 trillion tons).

  13. Snail control in urban sites in Brazil with slow-release hexabutyldistannoxane and pentachlorophenol*

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, J. V.; Da Silva, C. S. Monteiro; Bulhões, M. S.; Leme, L. A. Paes; Netto, J. A. Da Silva; Gilbert, B.

    1976-01-01

    Slow release formulations of hexabutyldistannoxane (TBTO) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were tested for the control of Biomphalaria tenagophila in 52 urban sites in Rio de Janeiro. TBTO acted faster and lasted longer than PCP and at 15 g/m2 it eliminated snails from 76% of the treated sites for 1 year. Water pollution and rate of flow had no significant influence on the molluscicidal properties of either compound, but alkalinity lowered the activity of TBTO. Failure to control snail populations was due mainly to human interference and to the non-treatment of adjacent breeding sites that were temporarily dry and therefore overlooked. PMID:1088356

  14. Spatial distribution and controlling factors of sedimentary bodies in Jiaozhou Bay and Adjacent Sea Areas, Qingdao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Heping; Li, Guangxue; Li, Shuanglin; Li, Shaoquan; Li, Chun

    2011-06-01

    The distributions of thickness of unconsolidated Quaternary sedimentary layers in Jiaozhou Bay and Qingdao offshore area were studied by using 1079-km high-resolution shallow seismic profiles and drilling core data, and the factors controlling the Quaternary evolution were discussed. The results show that such thickness distributions resulted from the coactions of geologic structures and marine hydrodynamic conditions since the Holocene. The geologic structures controlled the slope deposit, proluvial and fluvial fillings since the late Pleistocene. Holocene marine hydrodynamics eroded away sediments at the bay mouth, and tides carried these eroded materials to the sides of the bay mouth and released them there, forming channel-ridge-alternating geomorphic features. During transgressive processes, the sea level rose rapidly, and insufficient sediment supply and tidal actions yielded the relict sediments in the east of Qingdao offshore area.

  15. Mixed Inhibition of cPEPCK by Genistein, Using an Extended Binding Site Located Adjacent to Its Catalytic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cPEPCK) is a critical enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis and cataplerosis. cPEPCK converts oxaloacetic acid (OAA) into phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) in the presence of GTP. cPEPCK is known to be associated with type 2 diabetes. Genistein is an isoflavone compound that shows anti-diabetic and anti-obesitic properties. Experimental studies have shown a decrease in the blood glucose level in the presence of genistein by lowering the functional activity of cPEPCK, an enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Using computational techniques such as molecular modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations, we identified cPEPCK as a direct target of genistein. We studied the molecular interactions of genistein with three possible conformations of cPEPCK—unbound cPEPCK (u_cPEPCK), GTP bound cPEPCK (GTP_cPEPCK) and GDP bound cPEPCK (GDP_cPEPCK). Binding of genistein was also compared with an already known cPEPCK inhibitor. We analyzed the interactions of genistein with cPEPCK enzyme and compared them with its natural substrate (OAA), product (PEP) and known inhibitor (3-MPA). Our results demonstrate that genistein uses the mechanism of mixed inhibition to block the functional activity of cPEPCK and thus can serve as a potential anti-diabetic and anti-obesity drug candidate. We also identified an extended binding site in the catalytic cleft of cPEPCK which is used by 3-MPA to inhibit cPEPCK non-competitively. We demonstrate that extended binding site of cPEPCK can further be exploited for designing new drugs against cPEPCK. PMID:26528723

  16. End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Swany, Douglas Martin

    2014-08-12

    This project researched extending the control plane for dynamic networks into end sites like campuses and laboratories. Key aspects of consideration were signaling over local area network technologies, application integration and monitoring. We studied design considerations for such environments and developed and demonstrated a useful proof of concept implementation and documented implementation strategies for heterogeneous networks.

  17. Electrical control of Co/Ni magnetism adjacent to gate oxides with low oxygen ion mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y. N.; Zhou, X. J.; Li, F.; Cui, B.; Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, G. Y.; Pan, F.; Song, C.

    2015-09-21

    We investigate the electrical manipulation of Co/Ni magnetization through a combination of ionic liquid and oxide gating, where HfO{sub 2} with a low O{sup 2−} ion mobility is employed. A limited oxidation-reduction process at the metal/HfO{sub 2} interface can be induced by large electric field, which can greatly affect the saturated magnetization and Curie temperature of Co/Ni bilayer. Besides the oxidation/reduction process, first-principles calculations show that the variation of d electrons is also responsible for the magnetization variation. Our work discloses the role of gate oxides with a relatively low O{sup 2−} ion mobility in electrical control of magnetism, and might pave the way for the magneto-ionic memory with low power consumption and high endurance performance.

  18. Mutagenesis of 8-oxoguanine adjacent to an abasic site in simian kidney cells: tandem mutations and enhancement of G-->T transversions.

    PubMed

    Kalam, M Abul; Basu, Ashis K

    2005-08-01

    Clustered DNA damages are well-established characteristics of ionizing radiation. As a model clustered lesion in the same strand of DNA, we have evaluated the mutagenic potential of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adjacent to a uracil in simian kidney cells using a phagemid vector. The uracil residue would be excised by the enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase in vivo generating an abasic site (AP site). A solitary uracil in either GUGTC or GTGUC sequence context provided >60% progeny containing GTGTC indicating that dAMP incorporation opposite the AP site or uracil occurred, but a >30% population showed replacement of U by A, C, or G, which suggests that dTMP, dGMP, or dCMP incorporation also occurred, respectively, opposite the AP site. While the preference for targeted base substitutions at the GUG site was T > C > A > G, the same at the GUC site was T > A > C > G. We conclude that base incorporation opposite an AP site is sequence-dependent. For 8-oxoG, as compared to 23-24% G-->T mutants from a single 8-oxoG in a TG(8-oxo)T sequence context, the tandem lesions UG(8-oxo)T and TG(8-oxo)U generated approximately 60 and >85% progeny, respectively, that did not contain the TGT sequence. A significant fraction of tandem mutations were detected when uracil was adjacent to 8-oxoG. What we found most interesting is that the total targeted G(8-oxo)-->T transversions that included both single and tandem mutations at the TG(8-oxo)U site was nearly 60% relative to about 30% at the UG(8-oxo)T site. A higher mutational frequency at the TG(8-oxo)U sequence may arise from a change in DNA polymerase that is more error prone. Thermal melting experiments showed that the Tm for the 8-oxoG:C pair in the TG(8-oxo)(AP*) sequence in a 12-mer was lower than the same in a (AP*)G(8-oxo)T 12-mer with deltadeltaG 0.8 kcal/mol (where AP* represents tetrahydrofuran, the model abasic site). When the 8-oxoG:C pair in each sequence was compared with a 8-oxoG:A pair, the former was found to be more stable than

  19. Nucleotide sequence composition adjacent to intronic splice sites improves splicing efficiency via its effect on pre-mRNA local folding in fungi.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Zohar; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-10-01

    RNA splicing is the central process of intron removal in eukaryotes known to regulate various cellular functions such as growth, development, and response to external signals. The canonical sequences indicating the splicing sites needed for intronic boundary recognition are well known. However, the roles and evolution of the local folding of intronic and exonic sequence features adjacent to splice sites has yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, focusing on four fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus nidulans, and Candida albicans), we performed for the first time a comprehensive high-resolution study aimed at characterizing the encoding of intronic splicing efficiency in pre-mRNA transcripts and its effect on intron evolution. Our analysis supports the conjecture that pre-mRNA local folding strength at intronic boundaries is under selective pressure, as it significantly affects splicing efficiency. Specifically, we show that in the immediate region of 12-30 nucleotides (nt) surrounding the intronic donor site there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding; similarly, in the region of 15-33 nt surrounding the acceptor and branch sites there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding. We also show that in most cases there is a preference for strong pre-mRNA folding further away from intronic splice sites. In addition, we demonstrate that these signals are not associated with gene-specific functions, and they correlate with splicing efficiency measurements (r = 0.77, P = 2.98 × 10(-21)) and with expression levels of the corresponding genes (P = 1.24 × 10(-19)). We suggest that pre-mRNA folding strength in the above-mentioned regions has a direct effect on splicing efficiency by improving the recognition of intronic boundaries. These new discoveries are contributory steps toward a broader understanding of splicing regulation and intronic/transcript evolution.

  20. Post-traumatic caspase-3 expression in the adjacent areas of growth plate injury site: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio; Pichler, Karin; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2013-07-29

    The epiphyseal plate is a hyaline cartilage plate that sits between the diaphysis and the epiphysis. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an injury in the growth plate chondrocytes through the study of histological morphology, immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1, and levels of the inflammatory cytokines, Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), in order to acquire more information about post-injury reactions of physeal cell turnover. In our results, morphological analysis showed that in experimental bones, neo-formed bone trabeculae-resulting from bone formation repair-invaded the growth plate and reached the metaphyseal bone tissue (bone bridge), and this could result in some growth arrest. We demonstrated, by ELISA, increased expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. Immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 showed that the physeal apoptosis rate of the experimental bones was significantly higher than that of the control ones. In conclusion, we could assume that the inflammation process causes stress to chondrocytes that will die as a biological defense mechanism, and will also increase the survival of new chondrocytes for maintaining cell homeostasis. Nevertheless, the exact stimulus leading to the increased apoptosis rate, observed after injury, needs additional research to understand the possible contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis to growth disturbance.

  1. Post-Traumatic Caspase-3 Expression in the Adjacent Areas of Growth Plate Injury Site: A Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Loreto, Carla; Castorina, Sergio; Pichler, Karin; Weinberg, Annelie Martina

    2013-01-01

    The epiphyseal plate is a hyaline cartilage plate that sits between the diaphysis and the epiphysis. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an injury in the growth plate chondrocytes through the study of histological morphology, immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1, and levels of the inflammatory cytokines, Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), in order to acquire more information about post-injury reactions of physeal cell turnover. In our results, morphological analysis showed that in experimental bones, neo-formed bone trabeculae—resulting from bone formation repair—invaded the growth plate and reached the metaphyseal bone tissue (bone bridge), and this could result in some growth arrest. We demonstrated, by ELISA, increased expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. Immunohistochemistry, histomorphometry and Western Blot analyses of the caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 showed that the physeal apoptosis rate of the experimental bones was significantly higher than that of the control ones. In conclusion, we could assume that the inflammation process causes stress to chondrocytes that will die as a biological defense mechanism, and will also increase the survival of new chondrocytes for maintaining cell homeostasis. Nevertheless, the exact stimulus leading to the increased apoptosis rate, observed after injury, needs additional research to understand the possible contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis to growth disturbance. PMID:23899790

  2. Quantifying the uncertainty in site amplification modeling and its effects on site-specific seismic-hazard estimation in the upper Mississippi embayment and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Mississippi embayment, located in the central United States, and its thick deposits of sediments (over 1 km in places) have a large effect on earthquake ground motions. Several previous studies have addressed how these thick sediments might modify probabilistic seismic-hazard maps. The high seismic hazard associated with the New Madrid seismic zone makes it particularly important to quantify the uncertainty in modeling site amplification to better represent earthquake hazard in seismic-hazard maps. The methodology of the Memphis urban seismic-hazard-mapping project (Cramer et al., 2004) is combined with the reference profile approach of Toro and Silva (2001) to better estimate seismic hazard in the Mississippi embayment. Improvements over previous approaches include using the 2002 national seismic-hazard model, fully probabilistic hazard calculations, calibration of site amplification with improved nonlinear soil-response estimates, and estimates of uncertainty. Comparisons are made with the results of several previous studies, and estimates of uncertainty inherent in site-amplification modeling for the upper Mississippi embayment are developed. I present new seismic-hazard maps for the upper Mississippi embayment with the effects of site geology incorporating these uncertainties.

  3. Geology, hydrogeology, and potential of intrinsic bioremediation at the National Park Service Dockside II site and adjacent areas, Charleston, South Carolina, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, B.G.; Petkewich, M.D.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    A long history of industrial and commercial use of the National Park Service property and adjacent properties located in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, has caused extensive contamination of the shallow subsurface soils and water-table aquifer. The National Park Service property is located adjacent to a former manufactured-gas plant site, which is the major source of the contamination. Contamination of this shallow water-table aquifer is of concern because shallow ground water discharges to the Cooper River and contains contaminants, which may affect adjacent wildlife or human populations. The geology of the National Park Service property above the Ashley Formation of the Cooper Group consists of two Quaternary lithostratigraphic marine units, the Wando Formation and Holocene deposits, overlain by artificial fill. The Wando Formation overlies the Ashley Formation, a sandy calcareous clay, and consists of soft, organic clay overlain by gray sand. The Holocene deposits are composed of clayey to silty sand and soft organic-rich clay. The artificial fill, which was placed at the site to create dry land where salt marsh existed previously, is composed of sand, silt, and various scrap materials. The shallow hydrogeology of the National Park Service property overlying the Ashley Formation can be subdivided into two sandy aquifers separated by a leaky, black, organic-rich clay. The unconfined upper surficial aquifer is primarily artificial fill. The lower surficial aquifer consists of the Wando sand unit and is confined by the leaky organic-rich clay. Aquifer tests performed on the wells screened in these aquifers resulted in hydraulic conductivities from 0.1 to 10 feet per day for the upper surficial aquifer, and 16 feet per day for the lower surficial aquifer. Vertical hydraulic gradients at the site are typically low. A downward gradient from the upper surficial aquifer to the lower surficial aquifer occurs throughout most of the year. A brick-lined storm

  4. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Control site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots with identical towers, measurements at the US-ARc unburned plot are used as the experimental control. The second plot, US-Arb, was burned on 2005/03/08. Measurement comparisons between the control and burn plot are used to address questions regarding the effects of burning activities on carbon fluxes. The region evaded burning activities for at least 15 years. Current disturbances consist of only light grazing activities.

  5. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of

  6. Controlling factors of summer phytoplankton community in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and adjacent East China Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhibing; Chen, Jianfang; Zhou, Feng; Shou, Lu; Chen, Quanzhen; Tao, Bangyi; Yan, Xiaojun; Wang, Kui

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed the composition and distribution of phytoplankton in relation to physicochemical factors in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) Estuary and adjacent East China Sea shelf in June and August 2009. Diatoms and dinoflagellates dominated the community, particularly in eutrophic inshore waters controlled by the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW), coastal current, and upwelling. However, high densities of cyanobacteria and cryptophytes were observed in the oligotrophic offshore waters influenced by the Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) and Kuroshio. In June, the northeastward CDW plume combined with the Yellow Sea Coastal Current induced algal bloom in the northern part of the CE. In August, the enhanced CDW formed two narrow, low-salinity tongues that extended eastward and southward (associated with the upwelling and coastal current), resulting in phytoplankton blooms off the CE and in the Zhejiang coastal waters, respectively. Phytoplankton abundance in August was considerably higher than in June, with increased solar radiation, CDW, and upwelling. The maximum abundance occurred on the surface in inshore turbid waters and on the subsurface (5-30 m) in offshore clear waters with increased stratification. Based on multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis, we found appreciable spatio-temporal variations in algal community composition. Different ecological groups corresponded with hydrographic distributions. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that nutrients, salinity, temperature, and suspended particulate matter were the main variables associated with community distribution. We suggest that the variations in summer phytoplankton community are highly correlated with the significant monthly and spatial variability in physicochemical properties, which are primarily controlled by the CDW and TWC.

  7. By-products of a former phenol manufacturing site in a small lake adjacent to a Superfund site in the Aberjona watershed.

    PubMed Central

    Wick, L Y; Gschwend, P M

    1998-01-01

    Benzene, diphenyl sulfone (DPS), para-hydroxybiphenyl (PPP), ortho-hydroxybiphenyl (OPP), higher hydroxybiphenyls, and alkylated benzenes were found in a small lake receiving contaminated groundwater discharge from the Industri-Plex Superfund site (Woburn, MA) in the Aberjona watershed in eastern Massachusetts. All of these chemicals may derive from the former phenol manufacturing activities present at the Industri-Plex site during World War I. Concentrations up to 1660 microgram/l benzene, 450 micro/l DPS, 230 microgram/l PPP, and 100 microgram/l OPP were detected in the hypolimnion. Epilimnetic concentrations of the chemicals were significantly lower (normally < 5 microgram/l). DPS showed a distinct seasonal behavior: It was readily biodegradable during warm periods. No biodegradation was observed in the winter, leaving export to the Aberjona River as the major removal mechanism. Although benzene is known to be toxic and a human carcinogen, our results indicate that DPS, OPP, and PPP are not mutagenic in tests using human MCL-5 and h1A1v2 cell lines. Images Figure 1 PMID:9703495

  8. Metal content of biopsies adjacent to dental cast alloys.

    PubMed

    Garhammer, Pauline; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K-A; Reitinger, T

    2003-06-01

    Single case reports indicate that components of dental alloys accumulate in the adjacent soft tissue of the oral cavity. However, data on a wider range of dental alloys and patient groups are scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the metal content of oral tissues adjacent to dental alloys showing persisting signs of inflammation or other discoloration (affected sites) and of healthy control sites with no adjacent metal restoration in 28 patients. The composition of the adjacent alloys was analyzed and compared to the alloy components in the affected sites. Tissue analysis was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Alloy analysis was performed with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. In the affected sites, the metals Ag, Au, Cu, and Pd prevailed compared to control sites, reflecting the frequency distribution of single metals in the adjacent alloys. In most cases (84%), at least one of the analyzed metals was a component of the alloy and also detected in the tissue. Metal components from almost all dental cast alloys can be detected in adjacent tissue.

  9. Allosteric modulation of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 association site by adjacent gp120 variable region 1 (V1) N-glycans linked to neutralization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Heidi E; Hill, Melissa K; Maerz, Anne L; Wood, Stephanie; Ramsland, Paul A; Mak, Johnson; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 gp120-gp41 complex, which mediates viral fusion and cellular entry, undergoes rapid evolution within its external glycan shield to enable escape from neutralizing antibody (NAb). Understanding how conserved protein determinants retain functionality in the context of such evolution is important for their evaluation and exploitation as potential drug and/or vaccine targets. In this study, we examined how the conserved gp120-gp41 association site, formed by the N- and C-terminal segments of gp120 and the disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of gp41, adapts to glycan changes that are linked to neutralization sensitivity. To this end, a DSR mutant virus (K601D) with defective gp120-association was sequentially passaged in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to select suppressor mutations. We reasoned that the locations of suppressors point to structural elements that are functionally linked to the gp120-gp41 association site. In culture 1, gp120 association and viral replication was restored by loss of the conserved glycan at Asn¹³⁶ in V1 (T138N mutation) in conjunction with the L494I substitution in C5 within the association site. In culture 2, replication was restored with deletion of the N¹³⁹INN sequence, which ablates the overlapping Asn¹⁴¹-Asn¹⁴²-Ser-Ser potential N-linked glycosylation sequons in V1, in conjunction with D601N in the DSR. The 136 and 142 glycan mutations appeared to exert their suppressive effects by altering the dependence of gp120-gp41 interactions on the DSR residues, Leu⁵⁹³, Trp⁵⁹⁶ and Lys⁶⁰¹. The 136 and/or 142 glycan mutations increased the sensitivity of HIV-1 pseudovirions to the glycan-dependent NAbs 2G12 and PG16, and also pooled IgG obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals. Thus adjacent V1 glycans allosterically modulate the distal gp120-gp41 association site. We propose that this represents a mechanism for functional adaptation of the gp120-gp41 association site to an evolving glycan shield in a

  10. Evaluation of geophysical logs and video surveys in boreholes adjacent to the Berkley Products Superfund Site, West Cocalico Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Low, Dennis J.; Conger, Randall W.

    1998-01-01

    Between February 1998 and April 1998, geophysical logs were collected in nine boreholes adjacent to the Berkley Products Superfund Site, West Cocalico Township, Lancaster County, Pa. Video surveys were conducted on four of the nine boreholes. The boreholes range in depth from 320 to 508 feet below land surface, are completed open holes, have ambient vertical flow of water, and penetrate a series of interbedded siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate units. The purpose of collecting geophysical-log data was to help determine horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected sources and to aid in the placement of permanent borehole packers. The primary contaminants were derived from paint waste that included pigment sludges and wash solvents. The chlorinated volatile organic compounds probably originated from the wash solvents. Caliper logs and video surveys were used to locate fractures; inflections on fluid-resistivity and fluid-temperature logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to verify the locations of water-producing or water-receiving zones and to measure rates of flow between water-bearing fractures. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video surveys, and driller's logs, permanent multiple-packer systems were installed in each borehole to obtain depth specific water samples from one or more water-bearing fractures in each borehole.

  11. Tamoxifen increases nuclear respiratory factor 1 transcription by activating estrogen receptor beta and AP-1 recruitment to adjacent promoter binding sites.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Margarita M; Luken, Kristen H; Zimmer, Amber S; Lenzo, Felicia L; Smith, Ryan J; Arteel, Maia W; Kollenberg, Tara J; Mattingly, Kathleen A; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about endogenous estrogen receptor β (ERβ) gene targets in human breast cancer. We reported that estradiol (E(2)) induces nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcription through ERα in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Here we report that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), with an EC(50) of ~1.7 nM, increases NRF-1 expression by recruiting ERβ, cJun, cFos, CBP, and RNA polymerase II to and dismissing NCoR from the NRF1 promoter. Promoter deletion and transient transfection studies showed that the estrogen response element (ERE) is essential and that an adjacent AP-1 site contributes to maximal 4-OHT-induced NRF-1 transcription. siRNA knockdown of ERβ revealed that ERβ inhibits basal NRF-1 expression and is required for 4-OHT-induced NRF-1 transcription. An AP-1 inhibitor blocked 4-OHT-induced NRF-1 expression. The 4-OHT-induced increase in NRF-1 resulted in increased transcription of NRF-1 target CAPNS1 but not CYC1, CYC2, or TFAM despite increased NRF-1 coactivator PGC-1α protein. The absence of TFAM induction corresponds to a lack of Akt-dependent phosphorylation of NRF-1 with 4-OHT treatment. Overexpression of NRF-1 inhibited 4-OHT-induced apoptosis and siRNA knockdown of NRF-1 increased apoptosis, indicating an antiapoptotic role for NRF-1. Overall, NRF-1 expression and activity is regulated by 4-OHT via endogenous ERβ in MCF-7 cells.

  12. Strategy to Ensure Institutional Control Implementation at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document sets forth EPA’s strategy (Strategy) for ensuring that institutional controls (ICs) are successfully implemented at Superfund sites, with an emphasis on evaluating ICs at sites where all construction of all remedies is complete (construction complete sites).

  13. Conceptual design report for site drainage control

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The Mound Plant (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety & Health (ES&H) Upgrades Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by facility activities. The first project of this multiphase program is now in the final stages of construction, and the second project is currently under design. Four additional projects, one of which is presented in this report, are in the conceptual design stage. At Mound, 22 soil zones have become contaminated with radioactive material. These zones cover approximately 20 percent of the total area of developed property at the site. During a storm event, the rainwater washes contaminated soil from these zones into the storm sewer system. These radioactive contaminants may then be discharged along with the stormwater into the Great Miami River via the Miami Erie Canal. This conceptual design report (CDR), Site Drainage Control, the fourth project in the ES&H program, describes a project that will provide improvements and much needed repairs to inadequate and deteriorating portions of the storm drainage system on the developed property. The project also will provide a stormwater retention facility capable of storing the stormwater runoff, from the developed property, resulting from a 100-year storm event. These improvements will permit the effective control and monitoring of stormwater to prevent the spread of radioactive contaminants from contaminated soil zones and will provide a means to collect and contain accidental spills of hazardous substances.

  14. 38 CFR 61.17 - Site control for capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., unless the site is in a building or on land owned by VA. Such site control must be demonstrated within 1... change the site to a new site meeting the requirements of this part subject to VA approval under § 61.62... any additional costs resulting from the change in site. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 501, 2002, 2011,...

  15. 19. PANORAMIC VIEW OF RADAR SITE, CONTROL ROOM, AND HELIPORT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PANORAMIC VIEW OF RADAR SITE, CONTROL ROOM, AND HELIPORT, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Los Pinetos Nike Missile Site, Santa Clara Road, Los Angeles National Forest, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. [Odor pollution from landfill sites and its control: a review].

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Ding, Ying; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Hu, Bei-Gang; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2010-03-01

    Landfill sites are the major sources of offensive odor in urban public facilities. With the progress of urbanization and the residents' demands for a higher living environment quality, the odor emission from landfill sites has become a severe pollution problem, and the odor control at landfill sites has been one of the research hotspots. This paper summarized the main components and their concentrations of the odor from landfill sites, and expatiated on the research progress in the in-situ control of the odor. The further research directions in in-situ control of the odor from landfill sites were prospected.

  17. Policy on management of post-removal site control. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-03

    The directive transmits the OSWER policy on management of post-removal site control for Fund-financed removal activities and communicating decisions to States on the use of institutional controls. It provides procedures to ensure that, when necessary and to the extent practicable, provision for post-removal site control at both National Priorities List (NPL) and non-NPL sites is made prior to initiation of a Fund-financed removal action. Procedures are also provided for communicating decisions to States on the use of institutional controls when waste is left on-site following a removal action.

  18. 23. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL INTERFACE "RCL NO. 2" WITH COMPUTER CONTROL DISC DRIVE UNITS IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. Institutional Controls at Air Force Superfund Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The Superfund environmental cleanup program has made great strides in cleaning up our nation’s deadliest contaminated sites. However, this success...has come at a tremendous price. Congress and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have been examining ways to make the Superfund cleanup process...to best develop future land use assumptions. The EPA has provided guidance on implementing future anticipated land use assumptions in the Superfund

  20. 13. Missile site control building, third and fourth floor interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Missile site control building, third and fourth floor interior, showing east corner and former electrical equipment area, room #306. This building was salvaged and sealed in the 1970's; the lower floors also suffered flooding - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  1. 38 CFR 61.17 - Site control for capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Site control for capital grants. 61.17 Section 61.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM Capital Grants § 61.17 Site control for...

  2. 38 CFR 61.17 - Site control for capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Site control for capital grants. 61.17 Section 61.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM Capital Grants § 61.17 Site control for...

  3. 38 CFR 61.17 - Site control for capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Site control for capital grants. 61.17 Section 61.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.17 Site control for capital grants. (a)...

  4. 38 CFR 61.17 - Site control for capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Site control for capital grants. 61.17 Section 61.17 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.17 Site control for capital grants. (a)...

  5. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Southern Funeral Mountains and Adjacent Ground-Water Discharge Sites, Inyo County, California, and Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fridrich, Christopher J.; Thompson, Ren A.; Slate, Janet L.; Berry, M.E.; Machette, Michael N.

    2008-01-01

    This map covers the southern part of the Funeral Mountains, and adjacent parts of four structural basins - Furnace Creek, Amargosa Valley, Opera House, and central Death Valley. It extends over three full 7.5-minute quadrangles, and parts of eleven others - a total area of about 950 square kilometers. The boundaries of this map were drawn to include all of the known proximal hydrogeologic features that may affect the flow of ground water that discharges from the springs of the Furnace Creek wash area, in the west-central part of the map. These springs provide the major potable water supply for Death Valley National Park.

  6. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

    2009-10-01

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  7. A tectogenetic mechanism controlling the evolution of the Texel-IJsselmeer High (northern Netherlands) and adjacent basins

    SciTech Connect

    Rijkers, R.; Geluk, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Geological studies around the Texel-IJsselmeer High have been carried out for the regional subsurface mapping project of the Geological Survey of The Netherlands. The Texel-IJsselmeer High, in the northern part of the Netherlands, is a northwest-southeast-trending structural unit, slightly tilted to the northeast. The geological evolution of the Texel-IJsselmeer High and the adjacent areas can be linked to an extensional tectonic regime during which several Jurassic basins in the Netherlands originated. During the Late Jurassic, the southern border of the Texel-IJsselmeer High was characterized by normal faulting. Main faults are dipping southwest and are generally part of a half-graben structure. Faulting is accompanied by subsidence of the hanging wall (Jurassic basin area), while the footwall (the Texel-IJsselmeer High) is isostatically uplifted and eroded. The proposed model is based on thinning of the lower crust beneath the basins during Jurassic extension by pure shear. This mechanism is coupled locally with shear zones (simple shear) as a result of lower crustal failure. The model is supported by observations on deep regional seismics at the southern margin of the basin area. During the Late Cretaceous/early Tertiary, transpressional intraplate stresses reactivated the structural weakness zones in the lower and upper crust in a reversed way (inversion). During this tectonic inversion the northwest-southeast-trending Texel-IJsselmeer High acted as a buffer zone perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress. Paleogeographical studies and geohistory analysis support the proposed tectogenetic model of the Texel-IJsselmeer High.

  8. The CpG Dinucleotide Adjacent to a κB Site Affects NF-κB Function through Its Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Li, Jinge; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Li; Che, Qiuru; Sun, Xiuming; Dai, Yumeng; Sun, Wei; Bao, Meiying; Wang, Xiaochun; Yang, Liquan; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    NF-κB is an important transcription factor that plays critical roles in cell survival, proliferation, inflammation, and cancers. Although the majority of experimentally identified functional NF-κB binding sites (κB sites) match the consensus sequence, there are plenty of non-functional NF-κB consensus sequences in the genome. We analyzed the surrounding sequences of the known κB sites that perfectly match the GGGRNNYYCC consensus sequence and identified the nucleotide at the -1 position of κB sites as a key contributor to the binding of the κB sites by NF-κB. We demonstrated that a cytosine at the -1 position of a κB site (-1C) could be methylated, which thereafter impaired NF-κB binding and/or function. In addition, all -1C κB sites are located in CpG islands and are conserved during evolution only when they are within CpG islands. Interestingly, when there are multiple NF-κB binding possibilities, methylation of -1C might increase NF-κB binding. Our finding suggests that a single nucleotide at the -1 position of a κB site could be a critical factor in NF-κB functioning and could be exploited as an additional manner to regulate the expression of NF-κB target genes. PMID:28257066

  9. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O'neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  10. 1. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) of universal missile building. Note earth mounding. On the far right can be seen the exit tunnel; the small "boxes" on top are the roof ventilators. This building was salvaged and sealed after site inactivation - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Universal Missile Building, Between Tactical Road South & Patrol Road, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  11. 35. SITE BUILDING 004 ELECTRIC POWER STATION CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. SITE BUILDING 004 - ELECTRIC POWER STATION - CONTROL ROOM OF ELECTRIC POWER STATION WITH DIESEL ENGINE POWERED ELECTRIC GENERATION EQUIPMENT IN BACKGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. OVERALL VIEW OF THE SITE, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL TANKS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF THE SITE, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL TANKS IN FOREGROUND, ROCKET TEST STAND IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 2. View from missile site control building (south to north) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View from missile site control building (south to north) of missile launch area, showing warhead handling building in background - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Launch Area, Within Exclusion Area, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  14. 22. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING RADAR CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - RADAR CONTROL ROOM. RECEIVER EQUIPMENT ON RIGHT WITH RF RADIATION MONITOR CABINET. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. 1. Northeast face of missile site control building, commonly known ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Northeast face of missile site control building, commonly known as the missile site radar building, showing open blast door #BD2. This emergency escape, at stair no. 12, is NEMP/RFI-shielded and 16" thick. The large circle in the center is the radar face, also known as the antennae array aperture. The small circle to the right of the radar face is the "Q" channel. The antennae atop the turret provided lightning protection for the building - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  16. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  17. The distribution and hydrogeological controls of fluoride in the groundwater of central Ethiopian rift and adjacent highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayenew, Tenalem

    2008-05-01

    Occurrence of fluoride (F) in groundwater has drawn worldwide attention, since it has considerable impact on human health. In Ethiopia high concentrations of F in groundwaters used for community water supply have resulted in extensive dental and skeletal fluorosis. As a part of a broader study, the distribution of F in groundwater has been investigated, and compared with bedrock geology and pertinent hydrochemical variables. The result indicates extreme spatial variations. High F concentration is often associated with active and sub-active regional thermal fields and acidic volcanics within high temperature rift floor. Variations in F can also be related to changes in calcium concentration resulting from dissolution of calcium minerals and mixing with waters of different chemical composition originated from variable hydrogeological environment across the rift valley. The concentration of F dramatically declines from the rift towards the highlands with the exception of scattered points associated with thermal springs confined in local volcanic centers. There are also interactions of F-rich alkaline lakes and the surrounding groundwater. Meteoric waters recharging volcanic aquifers become enriched with respect to F along the groundwater flow path from highland recharge areas to rift discharge areas. Locally wells drilled along large rift faults acting as conduits of fresh highland waters show relatively lower F. These areas are likely to be possible sources of better quality waters within the rift. The result of this study has important implications on site selection for water well drilling.

  18. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shore, Joel D; Thurston, George M

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (pH-pK,W) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of pH-pK and W, and 1/W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √74 lattice constants), first validating simulations through

  19. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel D.; Thurston, George M.

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (p H-p K ,W ) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of p H-p K and W , and 1 /W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √{74 } lattice constants), first validating simulations

  20. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn; Kirchhoff, F.

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  1. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage. IMPORTANCE The conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of different antibody lineages to this site

  2. Subsurface-controlled geological maps for the Y-12 plant and adjacent areas of Bear Creek Valley

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.L.; Haase, C.S.

    1987-04-01

    Bear Creek Valley in the vicinity of the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant is underlain by Middle to Late Cambrian strata of the Conasauga Group. The group consists of interbedded limestones, shales, mudstones, and siltstones, and it can be divided into six discrete formations. Bear Creek Valley is bordered on the north by Pine Ridge, which is underlain by sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Rome Formation, and on the south by Chestnut Ridge, which is underlain by dolostones of the Knox Group. Subsurface-controlled geological maps illustrating stratigraphic data and formational contacts for the formations within the Conasauga Group have been prepared for the Y-12 Plant vicinity and selected areas in Bear Creek Valley westward from the plant. The maps are consistent with all available surface and subsurface data for areas where sufficient data exist to make map construction feasible. 13 refs.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR STRONTIUM TITANATE IN SWSA 7 AND ADJACENT PARCELS IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST SITE BOUNDARY DEFINITION PROGRAM OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2011-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office requested support from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract to delineate the extent of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) contamination in and around Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7 as part of the Oak Ridge National Priorities List Site boundary definition program. The study area is presented in Fig. 1.1 relative to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The investigation was executed according to Sampling and Analysis Plan/Quality Assurance Project Plan (SAP/QAPP) (DOE 2011) to supplement previous investigations noted below and to determine what areas, if any, have been adversely impacted by site operations.

  4. Status report on the geology of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site and adjacent areas. Volume I. Text and appendices A-E

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Puchlik, K.P.; Ramirez, A.L.; Wagoner, J.L.; Knauss, K.G.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1980-10-01

    In April, 1979, geoscience personnel at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) initiated comprehensive geologic, seismologic, and hydrologic investigations of the LLNL site and nearby areas. These investigations have two objectives: 1. to obtain data for use in preparing a Final Environmental Impact Report for LLNL, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act; 2. to obtain data for use in improving the determination of a design basis earthquake for structural analysis of LLNL facilities. The first phases of these investigations have been completed. Work completed to date includes a comprehensive literature review, analyses of three sets of aerial photographs, reconnaissance geophysical surveys, examination of existing LLNL site borehole data, and the logging of seven exploratory trenches, segments of two sewer trenches, a deep building foundation excavation, a road cut, and an enlarged creek bank exposure. One absolute age date has been obtained by the /sup 14/C method and several dates of pedogenic carbonate formation have been obtained by the /sup 230/Th//sup 234/U method. A seismic monitoring network has been established, and planning for a site hydrologic monitoring program and strong motion instrument network has been completed. The seismologic and hydrologic investigations are beyond the scope of this report and will be discussed separately in future documents.

  5. Off-site control of repolarization alternans in cardiac fibers

    PubMed Central

    Karma, Alain; Riccio, Mark L.; Jordan, Peter N.; Christini, David J.; Gilmour, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Repolarization alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration, has been putatively linked to the onset of cardiac reentry. Anti-alternans control strategies can eliminate alternans in individual cells by exploiting the rate dependence of action potential duration. The same approach, when applied to a common measuring/stimulating site at one end of a cardiac fiber, has been shown to have limited spatial efficacy. As a first step toward spatially distributed electrode control systems, we investigated “off-site” control in canine Purkinje fibers, in which the recording and control sites are different. We found experimentally that alternans can be eliminated at, or very near, the recording site, and that varying the location of the recording site along the fiber causes the node (the location with no alternans) to move along the fiber in close proximity to the recording site. Theoretical predictions based on an amplitude equation [B. Echebarria and A. Karma, Chaos 12, 923 (2002)] show that those findings follow directly from the wave nature of alternans: the most unstable mode of alternans along the fiber is a wave solution of a one-dimensional Helmholtz equation with a node position that only deviates slightly from the recording site by an amount dependent on electrotonic coupling. Computer simulations using a Purkinje fiber model confirm these theoretical and experimental results. Although off-site alternans control does not suppress alternans along the entire fiber, our results indicate that placing the node away from the stimulus site reduces alternans amplitude along the fiber, and may therefore have implications for antiarrhythmic strategies based on alternans termination. PMID:20365407

  6. Hanford Site surface soil radioactive contamination control plan, March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mix, P.D.; Winship, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    The Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Program is responsible to the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office, for the safe and cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 closures at the Hanford Site. This program also manages the Radiation Area Remedial Action that includes the surveillance, maintenance, decontamination, and/or interim stabilization of inactive burial grounds, cribs, ponds, trenches, and unplanned release sites. This plan addresses only the Radiation Area Remedial Action activity requirements for managing and controlling the contaminated surface soil areas associated with these inactive sites until they are remediated as part of the Hanford Site environmental restoration process. All officially numbered Radiation Area Remedial Action and non-Radiation Area Remedial Action contaminated surface soil areas are listed in this document so that a complete list of the sites requiring remediation is contained in one document.

  7. Geologic and hydrologic data collected during 1976-1983 at the Sheffield low-level radioactive waste disposal site and adjacent areas, Sheffield, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, J.B.; Garklavs, George; Mackey, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogeologic studies were conducted at the low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois, from 1976-84. Data in this report include water levels in wells, lake stages, inorganic, organic, and radiometric chemical analyses of ground and surface water, hydraulic conductivities of glacial materials, grain-size distribution, clay and carbonate mineralogy, and cation exchange capacities of the glacial materials. Also included are results of petrographic analyses, physical measurements of wells, stratigraphy and lithology of cores collected from test wells, and horizontal coordinates of wells.

  8. We are in need of sampling the sedimentary cover and bedrock in the Amerasia Basin. (Suggested site locations in the Makarov Basin, the Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges and adjacent areas.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, N. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Amerasia Basin has a complex origin; alone, the geophysical data can support very different hypotheses. For understanding the tectonic evolution of the Basin and origin of the ridges and troughs it is important to collect geological samples. Based on analyzed seismic data (NP-28 and 26, HOTRAX, Arctic-2000 and TransArctic) over the Makarov Basin, the Mendeleev and Lomonosov ridges and adjacent areas, numbers of key drill sites are proposed. All proposed sites in combinations with other geophysical research of the area are fit well with most of the Site Survey Data Requirements (IODP) for a drilling site. Bedrock samples from key locations are especially needed, with full video or photo documentation of the sampling for avoiding later debates about whether bedrock or ice-drift was collected. Due to close locations to a sea bottom, bedrock can be sampled by gravity piston-cores or shallow drilling. Full stratigraphic sections though the Cenozoic and older sedimentary successions are needed at other proposed key locations for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Amerasia Basin. The depositional environment of the key reflections related to Cenozoic shallow water environments, as recorded in the ACEX drillholes, needs to be investigated in other locations. We will then be able to define better the nature of particular morphological features and construct more reliable tectonic models of the Amerasia Basin, in general.

  9. SHARAD detections of subsurface reflectors near RSL sites on the Tharsis Plateau immediately adjacent to the canyon rim of Valles Marineris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. B.; Stillman, D. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Forget, F.; Mellon, M. T.; Spiga, A.; Putzig, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are very exciting features that exhibit evidence for water flow on the Martian surface. The number of RSL sites has risen to ~100 since their first detection in 2011. Those sites extend over a large portion of the Valles Marineris margin and nearby smaller canyons, but no source for this flowing water has been identified. Two possible sources exist for water near the Martian equator: the atmospheric and the subsurface. At low latitudes, atmospheric water vapor abundance is extremely low, and condensation of water from the air is unlikely. Furthermore, subsurface water ice is unlikely to remain stable in the long term, but scenarios for retaining ice on shorter timescales have not been fully tested. The Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has successfully probed the subsurface of Mars to locate dielectric interfaces that delineate volcanic boundaries, layers within the polar ice caps, and ice-rock boundaries. Using the same technique of searching for dielectric contrasts at lower latitudes, we have found several detections at the highest elevations of the Tharsis Plateau, near the cliffs that form Valles Marineris at depths ranging from 30 to 80 m, depending on the dielectric properties of the overlying material. These reflectors are located near the canyon rim and slope towards the canyon, potentially crossing geologic boundaries mapped from surface data. Because of the proximity of the reflectors to RSL and the geometry of the reflections, we hypothesize that SHARAD may be detecting an ice or water reservoir that can act as a source for flowing water on the surface. We test this hypothesis by employing a one-dimensional thermal model to estimate the stability of ground ice over a wide range of durations at this latitude, including recent epochs of high obliquity, when ice would be more stable at low latitudes and for longer periods.

  10. Exposure Controls for Nanomaterials at Three Manufacturing Sites

    PubMed Central

    Heitbrink, William A.; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    Because nanomaterials are thought to be more biologically active than their larger parent compounds, careful control of exposures to nanomaterials is recommended. Field studies were conducted at three sites to develop information about the effectiveness of control measures including process changes, a downflow room, a ventilated enclosure, and an enclosed reactor. Aerosol mass and number concentrations were measured during specific operations with a photometer and an electrical mobility particle sizer to provide concentration measurements across a broad range of sizes (from 5.6 nm to 30 μm). At site A, the dust exposure and during product harvesting was eliminated by implementing a wait time of 30 minutes following process completion. And, the dust exposure attributed to process tank cleaning was reduced from 0.7 to 0.2 mg/m3 by operating the available process ventilation during this task. At site B, a ventilated enclosure was used to control dust generated by the manual weigh-out and manipulation of powdered nanomaterials inside of a downflow room. Dust exposures were at room background (under 0.04 mg/m3 and 500 particles/cm3) during these tasks however, manipulations conducted outside of the enclosure were correlated with a transient increase in concentration measured at the source. At site C, a digitally controlled reactor was used to produce aligned carbon nanotubes. This reactor was a closed system and the ventilation functioned as a redundant control measure. Process emissions were well controlled by this system with the exception of increased concentrations measured during the unloading the product. However, this emission source could be easily controlled through increasing cabinet ventilation. The identification and adoption of effective control technologies is an important first step in reducing the risk associated with worker exposure to engineered nanoparticles. Properly designing and evaluating the effectiveness of these controls is a key component in

  11. Reforestation sites show similar and nested AMF communities to an adjacent pristine forest in a tropical mountain area of South Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Haug, Ingeborg; Setaro, Sabrina; Suárez, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae are important for growth and survival of tropical trees. We studied the community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a tropical mountain rain forest and in neighbouring reforestation plots in the area of Reserva Biológica San Francisco (South Ecuador). The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were analysed with molecular methods sequencing part of the 18 S rDNA. The sequences were classified as Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). We found high fungal species richness with OTUs belonging to Glomerales, Diversisporales and Archaeosporales. Despite intensive sampling, the rarefaction curves are still unsaturated for the pristine forest and the reforestation plots. The communities consisted of few frequent and many rare species. No specific interactions are recognizable. The plant individuals are associated with one to ten arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and mostly with one to four. The fungal compositions associated with single plant individuals show a great variability and variety within one plant species. Planted and naturally occurring plants show high similarities in their fungal communities. Pristine forest and reforestation plots showed similar richness, similar diversity and a significantly nested structure of plant-AMF community. The results indicate that small-scale fragmentation presently found in this area has not destroyed the natural AMF community, at least yet. Thus, the regeneration potential of natural forest vegetation at the tested sites is not inhibited by a lack of appropriate mycobionts.

  12. Institutional Controls: A Guide to Preparing Institutional Control Implementation and Assurance Plans at Contaminated Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to the EPA Regions for developing Institutional Control Implementation and Assurance Plans (ICIAPs) at contaminated sites where the response action includes an institutional controls (ICs) component.

  13. DMD and IL1RAPL1: two large adjacent genes localized within a common fragile site (FRAXC) have reduced expression in cultured brain tumors.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, S; Ganapathiraju, S; Perez, D S; James, C D; Smith, D I

    2007-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are large regions of profound genomic instability found in all individuals. Spanning the center of the two most frequently expressed CFS regions, FRA3B (3p14.3) and FRA16D (16q23.2), are the 1.5 Mb FHIT gene and the 1.0 Mb WWOX gene. These genes are frequently deleted and/or altered in many different cancers. Both FHIT and WWOX have been demonstrated to function as tumor suppressors, both in vitro and in vivo. A number of other large CFS genes have been identified and are also frequently inactivated in multiple cancers. Based on these data, several additional very large genes were tested to determine if they were derived from within CFS regions, but DCC and RAD51L1 were not. However, the 2.0 Mb DMD gene and its immediately distal neighbor, the 1.8 Mb IL1RAPL1 gene are CFS genes contained within the FRAXC CFS region (Xp21.2-->p21.1). They are abundantly expressed in normal brain but were dramatically underexpressed in every brain tumor cell line and xenograft (derived from an intracranial model of glioblastoma multiforme) examined. We studied the expression of eleven other large CFS genes in the same panel of brain tumor cell lines and xenografts and found reduced expression of multiple large CFS genes in these samples. In this report we show that there is selective loss of specific large CFS genes in different cancers that does not appear to be mediated by the relative instability within different CFS regions. Further, the inactivation of multiple large CFS genes in xenografts and brain tumor cell lines may help to explain why this type of cancer is highly aggressive and associated with a poor clinical outcome.

  14. Thyroid abnormality trend over time in northeastern regions of Kazakstan, adjacent to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site: a case review of pathological findings for 7271 patients.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Z; Gusev, B I; Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Kimura, A; Hayakawa, N; Takeichi, N

    2000-03-01

    From 1949 through 1989 nuclear weapons testing carried out by the former Soviet Union at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) resulted in local fallout affecting the residents of Semipalatinsk, Ust-Kamenogorsk and Pavlodar regions of Kazakstan. To investigate the possible relationship between radiation exposure and thyroid gland abnormalities, we conducted a case review of pathological findings of 7271 urban and rural patients who underwent surgery from 1966-96. Of the 7271 patients, 761 (10.5%) were men, and 6510 (89.5%) were women. The age of the patients varied from 15 to 90 years. Overall, a diagnosis of adenomatous goiter (most frequently multinodular) was found in 1683 patients (63.4%) of Semipalatinsk region, in 2032 patients (68.6%) of Ust-Kamenogorsk region and in 1142 patients (69.0%) of Pavlodar region. In the period 1982-96, as compared before, there was a noticeable increase in the number of cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer. Among histological forms of thyroid cancer, papillary (48.1%) and follicular (33.1%) predominated in the Semipalatinsk region. In later periods (1987-96), an increased frequency of abnormal cases occurred among patients less than 40 years of age, with the highest proportion among patients below 20 in Semipalatinsk and Ust-Kamenogorsk regions of Kazakstan. Given the positive findings of a significant cancer-period interaction, and a significant trend for the proportion of cancer to increase over time, we recommend more detailed and etiologic studies of thyroid disease among populations exposed to radiation fallout from the SNTS in comparison to non-exposed population.

  15. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  16. 3. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) of missile launch area showing universal missile building on left and warhead handling building in background. - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Launch Area, Within Exclusion Area, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals in transplanted lichen (Pseudovernia furfuracea) at sites adjacent to a solid-waste landfill in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Protano, C; Guidotti, M; Owczarek, M; Fantozzi, L; Blasi, G; Vitali, M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the airborne contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some heavy metals (arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], nickel [Ni], lead [Pb], and zinc [Zn]) of different pollution scenarios around a solid-waste landfill in central Italy using the lichen Pseudovernia furfuracea as a monitoring tool. For this purpose, eight stations around a landfill characterized by different air pollution sources (industrial, agricultural, residential areas, and roads with different traffic intensities), together with three stations far from the landfill (control areas), were monitored using a set of 22 lichen samples (11 samples analysed for PAHs and metals after 4 months, and 11 samples analysed for metals after 8 months). After 4 months of exposure, the lichen content of all of the analysed elements was greater than that in the pre-exposed lichens. In addition, the Cu and Pb concentration after 8 months was greater than the level after 4 months. The order of metal concentration was Zn > Pb > Cu (or Cu > Pb) > Cr > Ni > As > Cd in all cases. The range of ∑11PAHs concentration was 634-1,371 ng/g dw (three to seven times greater than the amount in the pre-exposed lichens). The ∑11PAHs were dominated (>70 %) by compounds with three aromatic rings. The comparison of the levels of air pollutants among the monitored stations shows nonrelevant spatial patterns between the landfill stations and the control areas; the levels of PAHs and metals found in the lichen samples around the landfill seemed to be more related to the general diffusion of these pollutants in that area.

  18. Cre/ lox site-specific recombination controls the excision of a transgene from the rice genome.

    PubMed

    Hoa, T. T. C.; Bong, B. B.; Huq, E.; Hodges, T. K.

    2002-03-01

    The Cre/ lox site-specific recombination controls the excision of a target DNA segment by recombination between two loxsites flanking it, mediated by the Cre recombinase. We have studied the functional expression of the Cre/ lox system to excise a transgene from the rice genome. We developed transgenic plants carrying the target gene, hygromycin phosphotransferase ( hpt) flanked by two lox sites and transgenic plants harboring the Cre gene. Each lox plant was crossed with each Cre plant reciprocally. In the Cre /lox hybrid plants, the Cre recombinase mediates recombination between two lox sites, resulting in excision of the hpt gene. The recombination event could be detected because it places the CaMV 35S promoter of the hpt gene adjacent to a promoterless gusA gene; as a result the gusA gene is activated and its expression could be visualized. In 73 Cre /lox hybrid plants from various crosses of T0 transgenic plants, 19 expressed GUS, and in 132 Cre /lox hybrid plants from crosses of T2 transgenic plants, 77 showed GUS expression. Molecular data proved the excision event occurred in all the GUS(+) plants. Recombination occurred with high efficiency at the early germinal stage, or randomly during somatic development stages.

  19. Near-Surface Geologic Units Exposed Along Ares Vallis and in Adjacent Areas: A Potential Source of Sediment at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1997-01-01

    A sequence of layers, bright and dark, is exposed on the walls of canyons, impact craters and mesas throughout the Ares Vallis region, Chryse Planitia, and Xanthe Terra, Mars. Four layers can be seen: two pairs of alternating dark and bright albedo. The upper dark layer forms the top surface of many walls and mesas. The upper dark-bright pair was stripped as a unit from many streamlined mesas and from the walls of Ares Valles, leaving a bench at the top of the lower dark layer, approximately 250 m below the highland surface on streamlined islands and on the walls of Ares Vallis itself. Along Ares Vallis, the scarp between the highlands surface and this bench is commonly angular in plan view (not smoothly curving), suggesting that erosion of the upper dark-bright pair of layers controlled by planes of weakness, like fractures or joints. These near-surface layers in the Ares Vallis area have similar thicknesses, colors, and resistances to erosion to layers exposed near the tops of walls in Valles Marineris (Treiman et al.) and may represent the same pedogenic hardpan units. From this correlation, and from analogies with hardpans on Earth, the light-color layers may be cemented by calcite or gypsum. The dark layers are likely cemented by an iron-bearing mineral. Mars Pathfinder instruments should permit recognition and useful analyses of hardpan fragments, provided that clean uncoated surfaces are accessible. Even in hardpan-cemented materials, it should be possible to determine the broad types of lithologies in the Martian highlands. However, detailed geochemical modeling of highland rocks and soils may be compromised by the presence of hardpan cement minerals.

  20. Chemical modification of the RTEM-1 thiol beta-lactamase by thiol-selective reagents: evidence for activation of the primary nucleophile of the beta-lactamase active site by adjacent functional groups.

    PubMed

    Knap, A K; Pratt, R F

    1989-01-01

    The RTEM-1 thiol beta-lactamase (Sigal, I.S., Harwood, B.G., Arentzen, R., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79:7157-7160, 1982) is inactivated by thiol-selective reagents such as iodoacetamide, methyl methanethiosulfonate, and 4,4'-dipyridyldisulfide, which modify the active site thiol group. The pH-rate profiles of these inactivation reactions show that there are two nucleophilic forms of the enzyme, EH2 and EH, both of which, by analogy with the situation with cysteine proteinases, probably contain the active site nucleophile in the thiolate form. The pKa of the active site thiol is therefore shown by the data to be below 4.0. This low pKa is thought to reflect the presence of adjacent functionality which stabilizes the thiolate anion. The low nucleophilicity of the thiolate in both EH2 and EH, with respect to that of cysteine proteinases and model compounds, suggests that the thiolate of the thiol beta-lactamase is stabilized by two hydrogen-bond donors. One of these, of pKa greater than 9.0, is suggested to be the conserved and essential Lys-73 ammonium group, while the identity of the other group, of pKa around 6.7, is less clear, but may be the conserved Glu-166 carboxylic acid. beta-Lactamase activity is associated with the EH2 form, and thus the beta-lactamase active site is proposed to contain one basic or nucleophilic group (the thiolate in the thiol beta-lactamase) and two acidic (hydrogen-bond donor) groups (one of which is likely to be the above-mentioned lysine ammonium group).

  1. Design control for the Savannah River Site Consolidated Incineration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.E.; Rider, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    The initiation, development, and control of the design for the Consolidated Incineration Facility at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site has been, from the inception, a precisely and formally controlled process. A plan was developed and implemented to ensure output properly aligned with approved design criteria and conformed to applicable regulations throughout the design process. The key element of design control was the technical baseline which established the benchmark against which all changes to the design was evaluated. During the conceptual design phase of the project, design criteria were written to reflect the project objectives and functional requirements. Governmental regulations were reviewed to determine permitting and licensing actions required. Hazards assessments were performed to establish design classifications. The resulting design criteria, permitting requirements, and facility classifications were incorporated into the design plan which provided the basis for subsequent design activities. As the project proceeded through the various design phases, design control was maintained according to the design plan. Review of all design products was performed by the project team routinely. Formal independent design reviews were accomplished prior to releasing the design for construction. Alignment between criteria and design output was verified periodically throughout the design process. A formal design change control board was invoked to effect design changes impacting technical baselines. All changes to design initiated following issue for construction also were subject to procedural control.

  2. Design control for the Savannah River Site Consolidated Incineration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.E.; Rider, R.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The initiation, development, and control of the design for the Consolidated Incineration Facility at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site has been, from the inception, a precisely and formally controlled process. A plan was developed and implemented to ensure output properly aligned with approved design criteria and conformed to applicable regulations throughout the design process. The key element of design control was the technical baseline which established the benchmark against which all changes to the design was evaluated. During the conceptual design phase of the project, design criteria were written to reflect the project objectives and functional requirements. Governmental regulations were reviewed to determine permitting and licensing actions required. Hazards assessments were performed to establish design classifications. The resulting design criteria, permitting requirements, and facility classifications were incorporated into the design plan which provided the basis for subsequent design activities. As the project proceeded through the various design phases, design control was maintained according to the design plan. Review of all design products was performed by the project team routinely. Formal independent design reviews were accomplished prior to releasing the design for construction. Alignment between criteria and design output was verified periodically throughout the design process. A formal design change control board was invoked to effect design changes impacting technical baselines. All changes to design initiated following issue for construction also were subject to procedural control.

  3. Controlled overflowing of data-intensive jobs from oversubscribed sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfiligoi, I.; Wuerthwein, F.; Bockelman, B.; Bradley, D. C.; Tadel, M.; Bloom, K.; Letts, J.; Mrak Tadel, A.

    2012-12-01

    The CMS analysis computing model was always relying on jobs running near the data, with data allocation between CMS compute centers organized at management level, based on expected needs of the CMS community. While this model provided high CPU utilization during job run times, there were times when a large fraction of CPUs at certain sites were sitting idle due to lack of demand, all while Terabytes of data were never accessed. To improve the utilization of both CPU and disks, CMS is moving toward controlled overflowing of jobs from sites that have data but are oversubscribed to others with spare CPU and network capacity, with those jobs accessing the data through real time Xrootd streaming over WAN. The major limiting factor for remote data access is the ability of the source storage system to serve such data, so the number of jobs accessing it must be carefully controlled. The CMS approach to this is to implement the overflowing by means of glideinWMS, a Condor based pilot system, and by providing the WMS with the known storage limits and let it schedule jobs within those limits. This paper presents the detailed architecture of the overflow-enabled glideinWMS system, together with operational experience of the past 6 months.

  4. Erosion control at construction sites on red clay soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemly, A. Dennis

    1982-07-01

    Five single-treatment methods used to stabilize seeded areas at urban and highway construction sites (asphalt-tacked straw, jute netting, mulch blanket, wood chips, excelsior blanket) were tested for their ability to control erosion of red clay soils by comparisons with exposed sites and multiple treatments. Sediment in runoff from experimental plots was characterized during low and high intensity precipitation from natural rainfall episodes during April, May, and June. Reductions in the total sediment concentration of runoff ranged from 28 percent (asphalt-tacked straw, 50 percent slope) to 90 percent (multiple treatments, 40 percent slope), with ≥85 percent of the eroded material composed of particles <0.04 mm in diameter. Larger size fractions were effectively reduced by all treatments tested regardless of slope (≥70 percent decrease). Established grass cover exceeded 90 percent on all plots after 60 days, but sediment release remained similar, attributable to high intensity rainfall, poor establishment of root systems, and piping on plots treated with tacked straw or jute netting. Results indicate that current stabilization methods shift sediment compostion toward a smaller particle size, causing single treatments to be minimally effective for controlling erosion of the major component of red clay soils. Because small particles have the greatest direct effect on aquatic biota, certain impacts of sedimentation may not be measurably lessened by single treatments in regions where red clays predominate even though the total sediment load is reduced by as much as 75 percent. Clearly, a multiple-treatment approach offers significantly greater control of erosion on red clay soils, however, current economic and construction policy represents a substantial deterrent to implementation.

  5. Control of Eolian soil erosion from waste site surface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1994-11-01

    Physical models were tested in a wind tunnel to determine optimum surface-ravel admixtures for protecting silt-loam soil from erosion by, wind and saltating, sand stresses. The tests were performed to support the development of a natural-material surface barrier for and waste sites. Plans call for a 2-m deep silt-loam soil reservoir to retain infiltrating water from rainfall and snowmelt. The objective of the study was to develop a gravel admixture that would produce an erosion-resistant surface layer during, periods of extended dry climatic stress. Thus, tests were performed using simulated surfaces representing dry, unvegetated conditions present just after construction, after a wildfire, or during an extended drought. Surfaces were prepared using silt-loam soil mixed with various grades of sand and Travel. Wind-induced surface shear stresses were controlled over the test surfaces, as were saltating, sand mass flow rates and intensities. Tests were performed at wind speeds that approximated and exceeded local 100-year peak gust intensities. Surface armors produced by pea gravel admixtures were shown to provide the best protection from wind and saltating sand stresses. Compared with unprotected silt-loam surfaces, armored surfaces reduced erosion rates by more than 96%. Based in part on wind tunnel results, a pea gravel admixture of 15% will be added to the top 1 in of soil in a prototype barrier under construction in 1994. Field tests are planned at the prototype site to provide data for comparison with wind tunnel results.

  6. Temporally-controlled site-specific recombination in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hans, Stefan; Kaslin, Jan; Freudenreich, Dorian; Brand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Conventional use of the site-specific recombinase Cre is a powerful technology in mouse, but almost absent in other vertebrate model organisms. In zebrafish, Cre-mediated recombination efficiency was previously very low. Here we show that using transposon-mediated transgenesis, Cre is in fact highly efficient in this organism. Furthermore, temporal control of recombination can be achieved by using the ligand-inducible CreER(T2). Site-specific recombination only occurs upon administration of the drug tamoxifen (TAM) or its active metabolite, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT). Cre-mediated recombination is detectable already 4 or 2 hours after administration of TAM or 4-OHT, demonstrating fast recombination kinetics. In addition, low doses of TAM allow mosaic labeling of single cells. Combined, our results show that conditional Cre/lox will be a valuable tool for both, embryonic and adult zebrafish studies. Furthermore, single copy insertion transgenesis of Cre/lox constructs suggest a strategy suitable also for other organisms.

  7. Optical properties of individual site-controlled Ge quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Grydlik, Martyna E-mail: martyna.grydlik@jku.at; Brehm, Moritz E-mail: martyna.grydlik@jku.at; Tayagaki, Takeshi; Langer, Gregor; Schäffler, Friedrich; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-06-22

    We report photoluminescence (PL) experiments on individual SiGe quantum dots (QDs) that were epitaxially grown in a site-controlled fashion on pre-patterned Si(001) substrates. We demonstrate that the PL line-widths of single QDs decrease with excitation power to about 16 meV, a value that is much narrower than any of the previously reported PL signals in the SiGe/Si heterosystem. At low temperatures, the PL-intensity becomes limited by a 25 meV high potential-barrier between the QDs and the surrounding Ge wetting layer (WL). This barrier impedes QD filling from the WL which collects and traps most of the optically excited holes in this type-II heterosystem.

  8. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  9. On-site formation of emulsions by controlled air plugs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowen; Hui, Wenli; Hao, Chonglei; Yue, Wanqing; Yang, Mengsu; Cui, Yali; Wang, Zuankai

    2014-02-26

    Air plugs are usually undesirable in microfluidic systems because of their detrimental effect on the system's stability and integrity. By controlling the wetting properties as well as the topographical geometry of the microchannel, it is reported herein that air plugs can be generated in pre-defined locations to function as a unique valve, allowing for the on-site formation of various emulsions including single-component droplets, composite droplets with droplet-to-droplet concentration gradient, blood droplets, paired droplets, as well as bubble arrays without the need for precious flow control, a difficult task with conventional droplet microfluidics. Moreover, the self-generated air valve can be readily deactivated (turned off) by the introduction of an oil phase, allowing for the on-demand release of as-formed droplets for downstream applications. It is proposed that the simple, yet versatile nature of this technique can act as an important method for droplet microfluidics and, in particular, is ideal for the development of affordable lab-on-a-chip systems without suffering from scalability and manufacturing challenges that typically confound the conventional droplet microfluidics.

  10. Bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in young-of-the-year bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) in the vicinity of a Superfund Site in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, and in the adjacent waters.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Ashok D; Dockum, Bruce W; Cleary, Thomas; Farrington, Cameron; Wieczorek, Daniel

    2013-07-15

    Spatial gradients of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides were examined in the young-of-the-year (YOY) bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) in the vicinity of a PCB Superfund Site in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, and in the adjacent waters. PCB concentrations in bluefish varied between different locations, and also among fish from a given location. A generally decreasing gradient in PCB concentrations was evident as the bluefish were collected away from the Superfund Site. The average sum of PCB concentrations were highest for bluefish collected in the Upper Harbor between Interstate-195 Bridge and Coggeshall Street Bridge (Upper Harbor), followed by bluefish in Lower Harbor from north of Popes Island Bridge (Lower Harbor), and bluefish from Outer Harbor south of Hurricane Barrier (Outer Harbor). The levels of PCBs in bluefish from Clarks Cove and PCBs in bluefish from Buzzards Bay were similar and lowest among all bluefish specimens analyzed in the present study. Pesticide concentrations were about one order of magnitude or lower than the PCB concentrations, and the gradient of pesticide concentrations generally followed the gradient of PCB concentrations. Some of the commonly detected pesticides in the order of decreasing concentrations included DDTs and metabolites, heptachlor epoxide, endosulfan sulfate, and α-chlordane. Distribution of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides were examined in the tissues of YOY bluefish from Clarks Cove. PCBs and lipids in the brain samples of YOY bluefish were generally numerically greater than PCBs in the liver samples, but these differences were not statistically significant. PCBs and lipids in hypaxial muscle samples were numerically greater than PCBs in epaxial muscle samples, although these two groups of tissues were not statistically different. Despite the higher susceptibility of lighter PCB homologs to geophysical and biogeochemical weathering processes, the relative dominance of lighter homologs

  11. Institutional Controls: A Guide to Planning, Implementing, Maintaining, and Enforcing Institutional Controls at Contaminated Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide provides information and recommendations that should be useful for planning, implementing, maintaining, and enforcing institutional controls (ICs) for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, or Superfund); Brownfields; federal facility; underground storage tank (UST); and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) site cleanups.

  12. Novel acetylcholinesterase target site for malaria mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2006-12-20

    Current anticholinesterase pesticides were developed during World War II and are toxic to mammals because they target a catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterases (AChEs) in insects and in mammals. A sequence analysis of AChEs from 73 species and a three-dimensional model of a malaria-carrying mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) AChE (AgAChE) reported here show that C286 and R339 of AgAChE are conserved at the opening of the active site of AChEs in 17 invertebrate and four insect species, respectively. Both residues are absent in the active site of AChEs of human, monkey, dog, cat, cattle, rabbit, rat, and mouse. The 17 invertebrates include house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, German cockroach, Florida lancelet, rice leaf beetle, African bollworm, beet armyworm, codling moth, diamondback moth, domestic silkworm, honey bee, oat or wheat aphid, the greenbug, melon or cotton aphid, green peach aphid, and English grain aphid. The four insects are house mosquito, Japanese encephalitis mosquito, African malaria mosquito, and German cockroach. The discovery of the two invertebrate-specific residues enables the development of effective and safer pesticides that target the residues present only in mosquito AChEs rather than the ubiquitous serine residue, thus potentially offering an effective control of mosquito-borne malaria. Anti-AgAChE pesticides can be designed to interact with R339 and subsequently covalently bond to C286. Such pesticides would be toxic to mosquitoes but not to mammals.

  13. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  14. Surgical site infections in breast surgery: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Compte, Diana; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Robles-Vidal, Carlos; Volkow, Patricia

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of surgical site infections (SSIs) and identify associated risk factors for each type of breast surgery at a cancer hospital. We used a nested case-control design. Between February 1, 2000 and July 31, 2000, all breast surgeries performed were recorded on a daily basis. After hospital discharge, we evaluated patients simultaneously with surgeons three times a week for 30 days or longer. The odds ratio (OR) was estimated using logistic regression analysis. The study followed 280 patients (298 wounds). Altogether, 77 SSIs were detected, for an overall SSI rate of 25.8% (77/298). For excisions, conservative surgery, and radical mastectomies the SSI rates were 1.4%, 18.0%, and 38.3%, respectively. Excisions were excluded ( n = 68) for risk factor analysis. After multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with SSIs were obesity [OR 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.3], concomitant chemotherapy and radiation (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.3), radical surgery (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-8.6), insertion of a second drain during the late postoperative period (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.8-7.8), and drainage duration > or = 19 days (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The bacteria most frequently isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( n = 18 ), Serratia sp. ( n = 18), Staphylococcus aureus ( n = 10), and Staphylococcus epidermidis ( n = 10). Poor compliance with infection control practices and wound management was detected throughout the study period. The overall frequency of SSIs for mastectomies was higher than the reported rates, which was principally related to the more radical surgery required for advanced-stage disease, preoperative irradiation, and inadequate wound and drain care.

  15. Report on the audit of the Savannah River Site`s quality control program for groundwater sampling

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-20

    The Savannah River Site`s groundwater remediation program was managed by the Department of Energy`s (Department) management and operating contractor for the site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse). One component of the remediation program was the quality control program. The goal of the groundwater quality control program was to ensure that the results of laboratory analyses of groundwater samples were accurate and precise so that they could be relied upon for making remediation decisions. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Westinghouse acquired the minimal number of laboratory analyses required to ensure that groundwater sampling results met this criteria.

  16. Site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO/sub 2/ content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate.

  17. 10. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  18. VSG gene expression site control in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, G; Blundell, P A; Taylor, M C; Kieft, R; Borst, P

    1994-11-15

    When the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is taken up from mammals by a tse-tse fly, it replaces its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat by a procyclin coat. Transcription of VSG genes stops in the fly, but transcription of sequences derived from the promoter area of the VSG expression site(s) remains high. Whether this is due to continuing high activity of one promoter or to low activity of many promoters was unclear. We have used the small differences between the sequences of different expression sites to show that multiple expression site promoters are active in insect form trypanosomes. This is confirmed by the low expression of single copy marker genes introduced into the transcribed area. However, if the expression site promoter is removed from the genomic location of the expression site and inserted in the non-transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), it is derepressed. Derepression of transcription can also be accomplished by replacing the promoter of an expression site by an rDNA promoter. We conclude that the down-regulation of VSG gene expression site promoters in insect form trypanosomes is affected by both the DNA sequence of the promoter and the genomic context in which it resides.

  19. Stable fly control in cattle winter feeding sites with Novaluron

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mixture of wasted feed with manure and urine residues at livestock winter feeding sites provides an excellent substrate for the development of immature stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Such sites are primary sources of early summer stable flies in the central United States and limited opt...

  20. Characterization of Hydraulically Significant Discontinuities in Mudrocks at the Waste Control Specialists (WCS) Site, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuszmaul, J. S.; Holt, R. M.; Powers, D. W.; Beauheim, R.; Pickens, J. F.; grisak, G. E.; Hughes, E.; Cook, S.

    2011-12-01

    Triassic mudrocks of the Dockum Group (Cooper Canyon Formation) host four, below-grade landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WSC) site in Andrews County, Texas, including: a hazardous waste landfill and three radioactive waste landfills. At many radioactive waste disposal facilities, the long-term performance of the facility may be influenced by the transport of radionuclides through interconnected fracture networks. WCS developed an integrated geologic mapping and hydraulic testing program to evaluate the hydraulic significance of discontinuities within Dockum rocks. At the WCS site, the Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. Rock discontinuities, including fractures, were mapped during the excavation of the WCS radioactive waste landfills along vertical faces prepared by the construction contractor. Face locations were selected to insure nearly complete vertical coverage for each landfill. Individual discontinuities were mapped and their strike, dip, length, roughness, curvature, staining, and evidence of displacement were described. In the three radioactive waste disposal landfills, over 1750 discontinuities across 35 excavated faces were mapped and described, where each face was nominally 8 to 10 ft tall and 50 to 100 ft long. On average, the orientation of the discontinuities was horizontal, and no other significant trends were observed. Mapping within the landfill excavations shows that most discontinuities within Dockum rocks are horizontal, concave upward, slickensided surfaces that developed in the depositional environment, as repeated wetting and drying cycles led to shrinking and swelling of floodplain vertisols. Fractures

  1. Neuronal Competition for Action Potential Initiation Sites in a Circuit Controlling Simple Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Georgina E.; Sahley, Christie L.; Muller, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. Little is known at the network level about mechanisms of behavioral sensitization. The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. In sensitized preparations the strength of shortening is related to S-cell firing, which itself is the result of impulses initiating in several S-cells. Because the S-cells, as independent initiation sites, all contribute to activity in the chain, it was hypothesized that during sensitization, increased multi-site activity increased the chain's firing rate. However, it was found that during sensitization, the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity. PMID:17644266

  2. 10 CFR 960.5-2-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.5-2-2 Section 960.5-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Preclosure Radiological Safety § 960.5-2-2 Site...

  3. 10 CFR 960.4-2-8-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.4-2-8-2 Section 960.4-2-8-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES... required in order that potential surface and subsurface activities as the site will not be likely to...

  4. 10 CFR 960.4-2-8-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.4-2-8-2 Section 960.4-2-8-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES... required in order that potential surface and subsurface activities as the site will not be likely to...

  5. 10 CFR 960.5-2-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.5-2-2 Section 960.5-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Preclosure Radiological Safety § 960.5-2-2 Site...

  6. 10 CFR 960.4-2-8-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.4-2-8-2 Section 960.4-2-8-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES... required in order that potential surface and subsurface activities as the site will not be likely to...

  7. 10 CFR 960.5-2-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.5-2-2 Section 960.5-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Preclosure Radiological Safety § 960.5-2-2 Site...

  8. 10 CFR 960.5-2-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.5-2-2 Section 960.5-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Preclosure Radiological Safety § 960.5-2-2 Site...

  9. 10 CFR 960.4-2-8-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.4-2-8-2 Section 960.4-2-8-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES... required in order that potential surface and subsurface activities as the site will not be likely to...

  10. 10 CFR 960.5-2-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.5-2-2 Section 960.5-2-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Preclosure Radiological Safety § 960.5-2-2 Site...

  11. 10 CFR 960.4-2-8-2 - Site ownership and control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Site ownership and control. 960.4-2-8-2 Section 960.4-2-8-2 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES... required in order that potential surface and subsurface activities as the site will not be likely to...

  12. 21 CFR 1304.50 - Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disclosure requirements for Web sites of... REGISTRANTS Online Pharmacies § 1304.50 Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled substances by means of the Internet. For a Web site to identify itself...

  13. 21 CFR 1304.50 - Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disclosure requirements for Web sites of... REGISTRANTS Online Pharmacies § 1304.50 Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled substances by means of the Internet. For a Web site to identify itself...

  14. 21 CFR 1304.50 - Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disclosure requirements for Web sites of... REGISTRANTS Online Pharmacies § 1304.50 Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled substances by means of the Internet. For a Web site to identify itself...

  15. Crossover-site sequence and DNA torsional stress control strand interchanges by the Bxb1 site-specific serine recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Grindley, Nigel D.F.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Marko, John F.

    2016-01-01

    DNA segment exchange by site-specific serine recombinases (SRs) is thought to proceed by rigid-body rotation of the two halves of the synaptic complex, following the cleavages that create the two pairs of exchangeable ends. It remains unresolved how the amount of rotation occurring between cleavage and religation is controlled. We report single-DNA experiments for Bxb1 integrase, a model SR, where dynamics of individual synapses were observed, using relaxation of supercoiling to report on cleavage and rotation events. Relaxation events often consist of multiple rotations, with the number of rotations per relaxation event and rotation velocity sensitive to DNA sequence at the center of the recombination crossover site, torsional stress and salt concentration. Bulk and single-DNA experiments indicate that the thermodynamic stability of the annealed, but cleaved, crossover sites controls ligation efficiency of recombinant and parental synaptic complexes, regulating the number of rotations during a breakage-religation cycle. The outcome is consistent with a ‘controlled rotation’ model analogous to that observed for type IB topoisomerases, with religation probability varying in accord with DNA base-pairing free energies at the crossover site. Significantly, we find no evidence for a special regulatory mechanism favoring ligation and product release after a single 180° rotation. PMID:27550179

  16. Fine Control over Site and Substrate Selectivity in Hydrogen Atom Transfer-Based Functionalization of Aliphatic C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Bietti, Massimo

    2016-10-07

    The selective functionalization of unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds over intrinsically more reactive ones represents an ongoing challenge of synthetic chemistry. Here we show that in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the aliphatic C-H bonds of alkane, ether, alcohol, amide, and amine substrates to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) fine control over site and substrate selectivity is achieved by means of acid-base interactions. Protonation of the amines and metal ion binding to amines and amides strongly deactivates the C-H bonds of these substrates toward HAT to CumO(•), providing a powerful method for selective functionalization of unactivated or intrinsically less reactive C-H bonds. With 5-amino-1-pentanol, site-selectivity has been drastically changed through protonation of the strongly activating NH2 group, with HAT that shifts to the C-H bonds that are adjacent to the OH group. In the intermolecular selectivity studies, trifluoroacetic acid, Mg(ClO4)2, and LiClO4 have been employed in a orthogonal fashion for selective functionalization of alkane, ether, alcohol, and amide (or amine) substrates in the presence of an amine (or amide) one. Ca(ClO4)2, that promotes deactivation of amines and amides by Ca(2+) binding, offers, moreover, the opportunity to selectively functionalize the C-H bonds of alkane, ether, and alcohol substrates in the presence of both amines and amides.

  17. [On-site quality control of acupuncture randomized controlled trial: design of content and checklist of quality control based on PICOST].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Jiao; He, Li-Yun; Liu, Zhi-Shun; Sun, Ya-Nan; Yan, Shi-Yan; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Ye; Liu, Bao-Yan

    2014-02-01

    To effectively guarantee quality of randomized controlld trial (RCT) of acupuncture and develop reasonable content and checklist of on-site quality control, influencing factors on quality of acupuncture RCT are analyzed and scientificity of quality control content and feasibility of on-site manipulation are put into overall consideration. Based on content and checklist of on-site quality control in National 11th Five-Year Plan Project Optimization of Comprehensive Treatment Plan for TCM in Prevention and Treatment of Serious Disease and Clinical Assessment on Generic Technology and Quality Control Research, it is proposed that on-site quality control of acupuncture RCT should be conducted with PICOST (patient, intervention, comparison, out come, site and time) as core, especially on quality control of interveners' skills and outcome assessment of blinding, and checklist of on-site quality control is developed to provide references for undertaking groups of the project.

  18. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  19. Control of Pteridium aquilinum: Meta-analysis of a Multi-site Study in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Gavin; Cox, Emma; Le Duc, Mike; Pakeman, Robin; Pullin, Andrew; Marrs, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims A great deal of money is spent controlling invasive weeds as part of international and national policies. It is essential that the funded treatments work across the region in which the policies operate. We argue that experiments across multiple sites are required to validate these programs as results from single sites may be misleading. Here, the control of Pteridium aquilinum (bracken) is used as a test example to address the following four questions. (1) Does the effectiveness of P. aquilinum-control treatments vary across sites? (2) Is the best treatment identified in previous research (cutting twice per year) consistent at all sites, and if not why not? (3) Is treatment performance related to P. aquilinum rhizome mass, litter cover or litter depth at the various sites? (4) Does successful P. aquilinum control influence species richness? Methods Pteridium aquilinum‐control treatments were monitored for 10 years using six replicated experiments and analysed using meta-analysis. Meta-regressions were used to explore heterogeneity between sites. Key Results The effectiveness of treatments varied between sites depending on the measure used to assess P. aquilinum performance. In general, cutting twice per year was the most successful treatment but on some sites other, less expensive treatments were as good. The effectiveness of treatments at different sites was not related to rhizome mass, but the effectiveness of most applied treatments were inversely related to post-control litter. Effective treatment was also associated with high species richness. Conclusions It is concluded that successful development of national weed control programs requires multi-site experimental approaches. Here, meta-analyses demonstrate that variation in effectiveness between sites could be explained in part by pre-specified variables. Reliance on data from a single site for policy formulation is therefore clearly dangerous. PMID:18337356

  20. Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

  1. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  2. Large-scale control site selection for population monitoring: an example assessing Sage-grouse trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedy, Bradley C.; O'Donnell, Michael; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2015-01-01

    Human impacts on wildlife populations are widespread and prolific and understanding wildlife responses to human impacts is a fundamental component of wildlife management. The first step to understanding wildlife responses is the documentation of changes in wildlife population parameters, such as population size. Meaningful assessment of population changes in potentially impacted sites requires the establishment of monitoring at similar, nonimpacted, control sites. However, it is often difficult to identify appropriate control sites in wildlife populations. We demonstrated use of Geographic Information System (GIS) data across large spatial scales to select biologically relevant control sites for population monitoring. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hearafter, sage-grouse) are negatively affected by energy development, and monitoring of sage-grouse population within energy development areas is necessary to detect population-level responses. Weused population data (1995–2012) from an energy development area in Wyoming, USA, the Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA), and GIS data to identify control sites that were not impacted by energy development for population monitoring. Control sites were surrounded by similar habitat and were within similar climate areas to the ARPA. We developed nonlinear trend models for both the ARPA and control sites and compared long-term trends from the 2 areas. We found little difference between the ARPA and control sites trends over time. This research demonstrated an approach for control site selection across large landscapes and can be used as a template for similar impact-monitoring studies. It is important to note that identification of changes in population parameters between control and treatment sites is only the first step in understanding the mechanisms that underlie those changes. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Hedgerow restoration promotes pollinator populations and exports native bees to adjacent fields.

    PubMed

    Morandin, Lora A; Kremen, Claire

    2013-06-01

    In intensive agricultural landscapes, restoration within farms could enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services such as pollination by native pollinators. Although governments and conservation groups are promoting small-scale restoration on working farms, there are few studies that assess whether these practices enhance pollinator communities in restored areas. Further, there is no information on whether floral enhancements will deplete pollinators in adjacent fields by concentrating ambient populations or whether they result in a net increase in abundance in adjacent farm fields. We investigated whether field edges restored with native perennial plants in California's Central Valley agricultural region increased floral abundance and potential bee nesting sites, and native bee and syrphid fly abundance and diversity, in comparison to relatively unmanaged edges. Native bees and syrphid flies collected from flowers were more abundant, species-rich, and diverse at hedgerow sites than in weedy, unmanaged edges. Abundance of bees collected passively in pan traps was negatively correlated with floral abundance, was significantly different from communities captured by net sampling from flowers, and did not distinguish between site types; we therefore focused on the results of net samples and visual observations. Uncommon species of native bees were sevenfold more abundant on hedgerow flowers than on flowers at weedy, unmanaged edges. Of the species on flowers at hedgerows, 40% were exclusive to hedgerow sites, but there were no species exclusively found on flowers at control sites. Hedgerows were especially important for supporting less-common species of native bees in our intensive agricultural landscape. Hedgerows did not concentrate ambient native bee, honey bee, or syphid fly populations, and they acted as net exporters of native bees into adjacent fields. Within-farm habitat restoration such as hedgerow creation may be essential for enhancing native pollinator

  4. Controlling the site density of multiwall carbon nanotubes via growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegal, M. P.; Overmyer, D. L.; Kaatz, F. H.

    2004-06-01

    We present two complementary methods for controlling the site density of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly as a function of growth conditions from 1011to107CNTs/cm2. Several potential applications require significant spacing between individual CNTs. The first method shows that the site density varies with the heat of formation of the hydrocarbon gas used during CNT growth by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The second method demonstrates that the site density decreases with increasing residual stress of the metal catalyst/diffusion barrier layers. These methods are combined for wide-range control of CNT site density.

  5. Remote controlled tool systems for nuclear sites have subsea applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, B.; Yemington, C.; Kuhta, B.

    1995-10-01

    Remotely operated underwater tool systems designed to operate in Nuclear Fuel Storage Basins can be applied to deep water, subsea oilfield applications. Spent nuclear fuel rods re stored underwater in large indoor swimming pool-like facilities where the water cover shields the workers from the radiation. This paper describes three specialized tooling systems that were designed and built by Sonsub for work at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. The Door Seal Tool removed an existing seal system, cleaned a 20 ft. tall, carbon steel, underwater hatch and installed a new stainless steel gasket surface with underwater epoxy. The Concrete Sampling Tool was built to take core samples from the vertical, concrete walls of the basins. The tool has three hydraulic drills with proprietary hollow core drill bits to cut and retrieve the concrete samples. The Rack Saw remotely attached itself to a structure, cut a variety of steel shapes and pipes, and retained the cut pieces for retrieval. All of these systems are remotely operated with onboard video cameras and debris collection systems. The methods and equipment proven in this application are available to refurbish sealing surfaces and to drill or sample concrete in offshore oil field applications.

  6. Physical and chemical control of released microorganisms at field sites

    SciTech Connect

    Donegan, K.; Seidler, R.; Matyac, C.

    1991-01-01

    An important consideration in the environmental release of a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) is the capability for reduction or elimination of GEM populations once their function is completed or if adverse environmental effects are observed. The decontamination treatments of burning and biocide application, alone and in combination with tilling, were evaluated for their ability to reduce populations of bacteria released on the phylloplane. Field plots of bush beans sprayed with the bacterium Erwinia herbicola, received the following treatments: (1) control, (2) control + till, (3) burn, (4) burn + till, (5) Kocide (cupric hydroxide), (6) Kocide + till, (7) Agri-strep (streptomycin sulfate), and (8) Agri-strept + till. Leaves and soil from the plots were sampled -1, 1, 5, 8, 12, 15, 19, and 27 days after application of the decontamination treatments. Burning produced a significant and persistent reduction in the number of bacteria whereas tilling, alone or in combination with the biocide treatments, stimulated a significant and persistent reduction in the number of bacteria, whereas tilling, alone or in combination with the biocide treatments, stimulated a significant increase in bacterial populations that persisted for several weeks.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations and controlling factors of sediment accumulation in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent sea area in the Holocene, especially in the Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhibing; Liu, Baohua; Zhao, Yuexia; Li, Xishuang; Jiang, Li; Si, Shaokun

    2016-08-01

    The sub-bottom and collected borehole data provide insight into the transport and accumulation processes of the Yangtze-derived sediment in the study area since ~11 kyr BP. Five seismic units were identified according to six major acoustic surfaces. The sedimentary strata consist of fluvial, estuarine and deltaic systems from the bottom up, characterized by two different trends in sediment accumulation rates, i.e., low-high-low, and high-low-high. On the inner shelf of the East China Sea, the terrain with trough and ridge was formed by the Early Holocene transgression strata (formed in ~10 to 12 kyr BP) scoured by the later rectilinear tidal current due to postglacial sea-level transgression, and the sharply protruding seismic units are interpreted to be bedrocks outcropping on the seafloor. An analysis of the sedimentary characteristics in the boreholes and such factors as difference in accumulation rates, and tectonic subsidence led us to conclude that the paleo-coastline was located not far away from and to the east of Core ZK09 at ~9 kyr BP, and the southern bank of the Yangtze River estuary was located to the south of Core ZK09. At ~9 kyr BP, the Yangtze-derived sediments were transported eastwards along the southern bank of the Yangtze River and the barrier due to the influence of the paleo-coastal current from the north, the direction of the Yangtze-derived sediment transport was split on the northeast of the Zhoushan archipelago, and the sediments covered the terrain with trough and ridge. During the high sea level period (7 kyr BP-present), the eastward migration of paleo-coastline had resulted in the increase in accumulation rate. We also conclude that the sharp increase in accumulation rate near the Yangtze River estuary after ~2 kyr BP was not primarily caused by human activities. The position shifts of the estuary caused by the paleo-coastline migration and sea level oscillations since the Holocene is the main cause controlling the Yangtze

  8. [Research advances in control of N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill sites].

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuan-Yu; Li, Bo; Lü, Hao-Hao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2012-05-01

    Landfill is one of the main approaches for municipal solid waste treatment, and landfill site is a main emission source of greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). As a high-efficient trace greenhouse gas, N2O has a very high warming potential, with a warming capacity 296 times of CO2, and has a long-term stability in atmosphere, giving greater damage to the ozone layer. Aiming at the researches in the control of N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill sites, this paper summarized the characteristics and related affecting factors of the N2O emission from the landfill sites, and put forward a series of the measures adaptable to the N2O emission control of present municipal solid waste landfill sites in China. Some further research focuses on the control of N2O emission from the landfill sites were also presented.

  9. An analysis of two island groups as potential sites for trials of transgenic mosquitoes for malaria control.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Cornel, Anthony; Lee, Yoosook; Sanford, Michelle R; Norris, Laura C; Goodell, Parker B; Nieman, Catelyn C; Han, Sarah; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Denis, Joao; Ouledi, Ahmed; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2013-06-01

    Considerable technological advances have been made towards the generation of genetically modified mosquitoes for vector control. In contrast, less progress has been made towards field evaluations of transformed mosquitoes which are critical for evaluating the success of, and hazards associated with, genetic modification. Oceanic islands have been highlighted as potentially the best locations for such trials. However, population genetic studies are necessary to verify isolation. Here, we used a panel of genetic markers to assess for evidence of genetic isolation of two oceanic island populations of the African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s. We found no evidence of isolation between the Bijagós archipelago and mainland Guinea-Bissau, despite separation by distances beyond the known dispersal capabilities of this taxon. Conversely, the Comoros Islands appear to be genetically isolated from the East African mainland, and thus represent a location worthy of further investigation for field trials. Based on assessments of gene flow within and between the Comoros islands, the island of Grande Comore was found to be genetically isolated from adjacent islands and also exhibited local population structure, indicating that it may be the most suitable site for trials with existing genetic modification technologies.

  10. Efficacy of cyromazine to control immature stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in winter hay feeding sites.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D B; Friesen, K; Zhu, J J; Sievert, K

    2012-04-01

    Hay mixed with manure and urine residues at sites where hay has been provided as supplemental winter feed for cattle provide an excellent substrate for the development of immature stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Such sites are primary sources of early summer stable flies in the central United States and no effective measures are currently available to control fly development in them. A single application of granular cyromazine in May provided 97% reduction in the number of adult stable flies emerging from hay feeding sites. Stable fly control did not decline during the 12 wk season. A small decline in control was observed relative to anthomyiid, sarcophagid, and syrphid flies developing in the hay feeding sites. However, none of those flies are considered to be pests and > or = 50% control of those flies was maintained for 65 d after application. Cyromazine offers a safe and affordable option for the control of immature stable flies developing in winter hay feeding sites. Controlling those flies should reduce the estimated $2 billion per year of lost production in U.S. cattle industries attributable to stable flies.

  11. Tuning the optical properties of dilute nitride site controlled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Juska, G.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Mereni, L. O.; Gocalinska, A.; Pelucchi, E.

    2013-12-04

    We show that deterministic control of the properties of pyramidal site-controlled quantum dots (QD) could be achieved by exposing the QD layer to nitrogen precursor unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMHy). The properties that could be tuned include an expected emission reduction in dilute nitride materials, excitonic pattern (biexciton binding energy) and improved carrier confinement potential symmetry (reduced fine-structure splitting)

  12. A sequence-specific DNA-binding factor (VF1) from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cells binds to three adjacent sites in the xisA upstream region.

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, C J; Brusca, J S; Ramasubramanian, T S; Wei, T F; Golden, J W

    1990-01-01

    A DNA-binding factor (VF1) partially purified from Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 vegetative cell extracts by heparin-Sepharose chromatography was found to have affinity for the xisA upstream region. The xisA gene is required for excision of an 11-kilobase element from the nifD gene during heterocyst differentiation. Previous studies of the xisA upstream sequences demonstrated that deletion of this region is required for the expression of xisA from heterologous promoters in vegetative cells. Mobility shift assays with a labeled 250-base-pair fragment containing the binding sites revealed three distinct DNA-protein complexes. Competition experiments showed that VF1 also bound to the upstream sequences of the rbcL and glnA genes, but the rbcL and glnA fragments showed only single complexes in mobility shift assays. The upstream region of the nifH gene formed a weak complex with VF1. DNase footprinting and deletion analysis of the xisA binding site mapped the binding to a 66-base-pair region containing three repeats of the consensus recognition sequence ACATT. Images PMID:2118506

  13. 11. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site, including Pier No. 4. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  14. 12. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site, including Pier No. 4. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  15. Malaria vectors in Lake Victoria and adjacent habitats in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Noboru; Dida, Gabriel O; Sonye, George O; Futami, Kyoko; Njenga, Sammy M

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of malaria among the residents of the Lake Victoria basin remains high. The environment associated with the lake may maintain a high number of malaria vectors. Lake habitats including water hyacinths have been suspected to be the source of vectors. This study investigated whether malaria vectors breed in the lake habitats and adjacent backwater pools. Anopheline larvae were collected within the littoral zone of the lake and adjacent pools located along approximately 24.3 km of the lakeshore in western Kenya, and their breeding sites characterized. Three primary vector species, Anopheles arabiensis, Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles funestus s.s., and three potential vectors, were found in the lake habitats. Unexpectedly, An. arabiensis was the most dominant vector species in the lake sampling sites. Its habitats were uncovered or covered with short grass. A potential secondary malaria vector, Anopheles rivulorum, dominated the water hyacinths in the lake. Most breeding sites in the lake were limited to areas that were surrounded by tall emergent plants, including trees, and those not exposed to waves. Nearly half of adjacent habitats were lagoons that were separated from the lake by sand bars. Lagoons contained a variety of microhabitats. Anopheles arabiensis dominated open habitats, whereas An. funestus s.s. was found mainly in vegetated habitats in lagoons. The current study confirmed that several breeding sites are associated with Lake Victoria. Given that Lake Victoria is the second largest lake in the world, the lake related habitats must be extensive; therefore, making targeted vector control difficult. Further exploration is necessary to estimate the effects of lake associated habitats on malaria transmission so as to inform a rational decision-making process for vector control.

  16. Assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon input to urban wetlands in relation to adjacent land use.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, K L; Dickhut, R M

    2006-11-01

    The relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wetland surface sediments and adjacent land use was assessed in the Elizabeth River, VA, an urbanized sub-estuary of the Chesapeake Bay. Significant differences (p<0.05) in surface sediment PAH concentration between sites indicated adjacent land use had a substantial influence on PAH concentration in wetland sediments. Wetlands adjacent to parking lots and petroleum industrial sites exhibited the highest PAH concentrations of all wetlands examined. Overall, commercial land uses had the highest PAH concentrations and automotive sources dominated (52-69%) PAH input to wetland surface sediments irrespective of adjacent land use.

  17. Engineering geomorphology at the cutting edge of land disturbance: erosion and sediment control on construction sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbor, Jon

    1999-12-01

    Construction site management, traditionally dominated by professional engineers, provides an important opportunity for engineers and geomorphologists to work together in minimizing the environmental impacts of land disturbance. Areas disturbed for construction activity have soil erosion rates from 2 to 40,000 times greater than pre-construction conditions, and are important components of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution that degrades surface water quality. Despite significant local-to-watershed-scale environmental and economic impacts, the lack of an individual economic incentive for land developers to control erosion has limited voluntary adoption of erosion and sediment control measures. However, increased regulatory requirements, combined with efforts to identify and publicize the benefits of erosion control, are increasing the number of construction sites on which erosion control efforts are being implemented. Geomorphologists have the opportunity to play an active role in erosion and sediment control by implementing knowledge of erosion and sedimentation processes and of the variables that effect these processes. Pre-project geomorphological site assessments allow project designers to work around areas with high erosion potential, and to stage and schedule land disturbing activities to minimize erosion potential. Combined engineering and geomorphological analyses can increase the likelihood that streams and drainage channels are stable under altered hydrologic conditions, both during and after land use change, and can be used to design a drainage plan that minimizes surface water flow through disturbed areas. A variety of temporary measures to reduce erosion and to trap sediment on site can be designed and implemented, such as temporary surface covers, silt fence, and sedimentation basins. However, design and implementation of these measures require an understanding of erosion and sedimentation processes, and in many cases incorrect installation and maintenance

  18. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  19. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  20. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  1. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  2. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  3. CTnDOT Integrase Interactions with Attachment Site DNA and Control of Directionality of the Recombination Reaction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Margaret M.; DiChiara, Jeanne M.; Yoneji, Sumiko; Gardner, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    IntDOT is a tyrosine recombinase encoded by the conjugative transposon CTnDOT. The core binding (CB) and catalytic (CAT) domains of IntDOT interact with core-type sites adjacent to the regions of strand exchange, while the N-terminal arm binding (N) domain interacts with arm-type sites distal to the core. Previous footprinting experiments identified five arm-type sites, but how the arm-type sites participate in the integration and excision of CTnDOT was not known. In vitro integration assays with substrates containing arm-type site mutants demonstrated that attDOT sequences containing mutations in the L1 arm-type site or in the R1 and R2 or R1 and R2′ arm-type sites were dramatically defective in integration. Substrates containing mutations in the L1 and R1 arm-type sites showed a 10- to 20-fold decrease in detectable in vitro excision, but introduction of multiple arm-type site mutations in attR did not have an effect on the excision frequency. A sixth arm-type site, the R1′ site, was also identified and shown to be required for integration and important for efficient excision. These results suggest that intramolecular IntDOT interactions are required for integration, while the actions of accessory factors are more important for excision. Gel shift assays performed in the presence of core- and arm-type site DNAs showed that IntDOT affinity for the attDOT core was enhanced when IntDOT was simultaneously bound to arm-type site DNA. PMID:20511494

  4. Case-control analysis in highway safety: Accounting for sites with multiple crashes.

    PubMed

    Gross, Frank

    2013-12-01

    There is an increased interest in the use of epidemiological methods in highway safety analysis. The case-control and cohort methods are commonly used in the epidemiological field to identify risk factors and quantify the risk or odds of disease given certain characteristics and factors related to an individual. This same concept can be applied to highway safety where the entity of interest is a roadway segment or intersection (rather than a person) and the risk factors of interest are the operational and geometric characteristics of a given roadway. One criticism of the use of these methods in highway safety is that they have not accounted for the difference between sites with single and multiple crashes. In the medical field, a disease either occurs or it does not; multiple occurrences are generally not an issue. In the highway safety field, it is necessary to evaluate the safety of a given site while accounting for multiple crashes. Otherwise, the analysis may underestimate the safety effects of a given factor. This paper explores the use of the case-control method in highway safety and two variations to account for sites with multiple crashes. Specifically, the paper presents two alternative methods for defining cases in a case-control study and compares the results in a case study. The first alternative defines a separate case for each crash in a given study period, thereby increasing the weight of the associated roadway characteristics in the analysis. The second alternative defines entire crash categories as cases (sites with one crash, sites with two crashes, etc.) and analyzes each group separately in comparison to sites with no crashes. The results are also compared to a "typical" case-control application, where the cases are simply defined as any entity that experiences at least one crash and controls are those entities without a crash in a given period. In a "typical" case-control design, the attributes associated with single-crash segments are weighted

  5. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: pneumatic controllers.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Pacsi, Adam P; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-06

    Emissions from 377 gas actuated (pneumatic) controllers were measured at natural gas production sites and a small number of oil production sites, throughout the United States. A small subset of the devices (19%), with whole gas emission rates in excess of 6 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h), accounted for 95% of emissions. More than half of the controllers recorded emissions of 0.001 scf/h or less during 15 min of measurement. Pneumatic controllers in level control applications on separators and in compressor applications had higher emission rates than controllers in other types of applications. Regional differences in emissions were observed, with the lowest emissions measured in the Rocky Mountains and the highest emissions in the Gulf Coast. Average methane emissions per controller reported in this work are 17% higher than the average emissions per controller in the 2012 EPA greenhouse gas national emission inventory (2012 GHG NEI, released in 2014); the average of 2.7 controllers per well observed in this work is higher than the 1.0 controllers per well reported in the 2012 GHG NEI.

  6. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol

  7. Use of antibacterial sutures for skin closure in controlling surgical site infections: a systematic review of published randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Muhammad S.; Craciunas, L.; Sains, P.; Singh, K.K.; Baig, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to systematically analyse the randomized, controlled trials that compare the use of antibacterial sutures (ABS) for skin closure in controlling surgical site infections. Methods: Randomized, controlled trials on surgical patients comparing the use of ABS for skin closure in controlling the surgical site infections were analysed systematically using RevMan® and combined outcomes were expressed as odds ratios (OR) and standardized mean differences (SMD). Results: Seven randomized, controlled trials evaluating 1631 patients were retrieved from electronic databases. There were 760 patients in the ABS group and 871 patients in the simple suture group. There was moderate heterogeneity among trials (Tau2 = 0.12; chi2 = 8.40, df = 6 [P < 0.01]; I2 = 29%). Therefore in the random-effects model, the use of ABS for skin closure in surgical patients was associated with a reduced risk of developing surgical site infections (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.37, 0.99; z = 2.02; P < 0.04) and postoperative complications (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.32, 0.98 z = 2.04; P = 0.04). The durations of operation and lengths of hospital stay were similar following the use of ABS and SS for skin closure in patients undergoing various surgical procedures. Conclusion: Use of ABS for skin closure in surgical patients is effective in reducing the risk of surgical site infection and postoperative complications. ABS is comparable with SS in terms of length of hospital stay and duration of operation. PMID:24759666

  8. The Healthy Worker Project: a work-site intervention for weight control and smoking cessation.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, R W; Forster, J L; French, S A; Kelder, S H; Lando, H A; McGovern, P G; Jacobs, D R; Baxter, J E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. A randomized trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a work-site health promotion program in reducing obesity and the prevalence of cigarette smoking. METHODS. Thirty-two work sites were randomized to treatment or no treatment for 2 years. Treatment consisted of health education classes combined with a payroll-based incentive system. Evaluation was based on cohort and cross-sectional surveys. RESULTS. Of 10,000 total employees in treatment work sites, 2041 and 270 participated in weight control and smoking cessation programs, respectively. Weight losses averaged 4.8 lbs, and 43% of smoking participants quit. Net 2-year reductions in smoking prevalence in treatment vs control work sites were 4.0% and 2.1% in cross-sectional and cohort surveys, respectively. No treatment effect was found for weight. Treatment effects for smoking prevalence and weight were both positively correlated with participation rates in the intervention programs (r = .45 for smoking and r = .55 for weight). CONCLUSIONS. This work-site health promotion program was effective in reducing smoking prevalence at a cost that is believed to make the investment worthwhile. PMID:8438979

  9. Automated Design of Synthetic Ribosome Binding Sites to Precisely Control Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Salis, Howard M.; Mirsky, Ethan A.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial engineering often requires fine control over protein expression; for example, to connect genetic circuits 1-7 or control flux through a metabolic pathway 8-13. We have developed a predictive design method for synthetic ribosome binding sites that enables the rational control of a protein's production rate on a proportional scale. Experimental validation of over 100 predictions in Escherichia coli shows that the method is accurate to within a factor of 2.3 over a range of 100,000-fold. The design method also correctly predicts that reusing a ribosome binding site sequence in different genetic contexts can result in different protein expression levels. We demonstrate the method's utility by rationally optimizing a protein's expression level to connect a genetic sensor to a synthetic circuit. The proposed forward engineering approach will accelerate the construction and systematic optimization of large genetic systems. PMID:19801975

  10. Corrosion Control Measures For Liquid Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks At The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B. J.; Subramanian, K. H.

    2012-11-27

    The Savannah River Site has stored radioactive wastes in large, underground, carbon steel tanks for approximately 60 years. An assessment of potential degradation mechanisms determined that the tanks may be vulnerable to nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Controls on the solution chemistry and temperature of the wastes are in place to mitigate these mechanisms. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented in this paper.

  11. Biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Thein Aung; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Yoshikawa, Takamasa; Inaba, Tadashi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    Various biomechanical investigations have attempted to clarify the aetiology of adjacent segment disease (ASD). However, no biomechanical study has examined in detail the deformation behaviour of the adjacent segments when both pure torque and an angular displacement load are applied to the vertebrae along multiple segments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments. Ten cadaveric lumbar spines (L2-L5) of boars were used. Control and fusion models were prepared by disc damage and pedicle screw fixation of each specimen, and then, bending and rotation tests were performed using a six-axis material tester. In the biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, the range of motion (ROM) of the cranial and caudal adjacent segments in antero-posterior flexion and lateral bending was increased by about 20 % (p < 0.05), and the maximal torque in the fusion model was about threefold (p < 0.05) that in the control model. And in axial rotation, the ROM of cranial and caudal adjacent segments was increased by about 100 % (p < 0.001), and the maximal torque was about sixfold (p < 0.01) that in the control model. The ROM of adjacent segments was significantly increased after pedicle screw fixation as assessed by biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, but not in those regulated by torque. We present the results of biomechanical tests regulated by torque and angular displacement and show that the maximum torque of the fusion model was larger than that of the control model in the biomechanical test regulated by an angular displacement load, suggesting that mechanical stress on the segments adjacent to the fused segment is large. We think that ASD arises after spinal fusion surgery as a mechanism to compensate for the ROM lost due to excessive fusion by pedicle screw fixation, so that a large torque may be applied to adjacent segments within a physiologically

  12. Innovations: Alcohol & drug abuse: Narcotics on the net: the availability of Web sites selling controlled substances.

    PubMed

    Forman, Robert F

    2006-01-01

    The Internet is not only a vital medium for communication, entertainment, and commerce, but it is also an outlet for illicit drug sales. Although the U.S. Controlled Substances Act regulates access to certain drugs by requiring prescriptions, unique characteristics of the Internet create significant challenges for the enforcement of U.S. drug policies. In the late 1990s "no prescription Web sites" (NPWs) began to emerge, which allow persons to purchase drugs, such as opiates, without a prescription. Given the likely role of NPWs in increasing prescription drug abuse, health care professionals must develop and disseminate strategies for helping patients who are affected by these Web sites.

  13. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon.

  14. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS--SITE 2 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Blythe; S. Miller; C. Richardson; K. Searcy

    2000-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests are being conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit is being used to test the activity of four different catalysts for a period of up to six months at each of three utility sites. Catalyst testing at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, was completed in December 1998. Testing at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, was completed in the fall of 1999, and testing at the third site, which fires a high-sulfur bituminous coal, will begin in early 2000. This technical note reports results from Site 2; results from Site 1 were reported in a previous technical note. At Site 2, catalysts were tested in several forms, including powders dispersed in sand bed reactors and in more commercially viable forms such as extruded beads and coated honeycomb structures. This technical note presents results from Site 2 for both the sand bed reactors and commercial catalyst forms. Site 3 results are not yet available, but should be available late in the year 2000. Field testing is being supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and to investigate methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results related to the

  15. The independent relationship between trouble controlling Facebook use, time spent on the site and distress

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Fredrick; Hayes, Marie; Kuerbis, Alexis; Shao, Sijing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is an emerging literature base on the relationship between maladaptive traits and “addiction” to social networking sites. These studies have operationalized addiction as either spending excessive amounts of time on social networking sites (SNS) or trouble controlling SNS use, but have not assessed the unique contribution of each of these constructs on outcomes in the same models. Moreover, these studies have exclusively been conducted with younger people rather than a heterogeneous sample. This study examined the independent relationship of a brief Facebook addiction scale, time spent on Facebook, and Facebook checking on positive and negative social domains, while controlling for self-esteem and social desirability. Methods Participants were recruited using e-mail, SNS posts and through Amazon’s MTurk system. The sample included 489 respondents ages from 18 to approximately 70, who completed a 10–15 minute survey. Results Results indicate that neither time spent on Facebook nor Facebook checking was significantly associated with either self-esteem, fear of negative social evaluation or social comparison, while SNS addiction symptoms were each independently associated with Facebook usage. Neither time spent on Facebook nor SNS addiction symptoms were associated with positive social relationships. Discussion Overall results suggest that time on SNS and trouble controlling use should be considered independent constructs and that interventions should target underlying loss of control as the primary intervention target above ego syntonic time spent on the site. PMID:26551906

  16. Binding of bovine thyrotropin to specific sites in thyroid tissue from control and hemithyroidectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, O.H.; Lambert, W.R.; Amir, S.M.; Ingbar, S.H.

    1985-12-01

    The binding of 125I-bovine thyrotropin to thyroid particulate fractions from sham-operated (control) and hemithyroidectomized rats was compared to determine if a change in either the number of bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone (bTSH) binding sites or their affinity for bTSH occurs in physiological situations that evoke changes in the intensity of thyroid stimulation. Following hemithyroidectomy serum TSH levels increase and the remnant thyroid lobe enlarges. Because of compensatory thyroid hypertrophy the concentration of TSH binding sites in the thyroid glands from hemithyroidectomized and control rats was related to particulate protein concentration, to the degree of thyroid cellularity as indicated by DNA concentration, and to the concentration of the plasma membrane markers, 5'-nucleotidase and magnesium-dependent ATPase. In each of four experiments, saturation studies revealed that the maximum specific binding of TSH per unit particulate protein and per thyroid lobe was greater in particulates from remnant than from control thyroid lobes. When related to DNA concentration, the concentration of TSH binding sites in remnant lobes was approximately twice that in control lobes. Because of an increase in plasma membrane markers per lobe after hemithyroidectomy, however, there was no difference in the number of TSH binding sites when related to the concentrations of the membrane marker enzymes in the particulate fractions. As judged from Scatchard analysis, the affinity of TSH binding was lower in remnant than in control lobes. This was partially but not completely due to the increased concentration of particulate protein in the remnant thyroid. These experiments demonstrate that the increase in serum TSH levels after hemithyroidectomy in the rat is associated with alterations in TSH receptor capacity and affinity.

  17. Control sites in the sequence at the beginning of T7 gene 1.

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, D J

    1979-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the fragment Hind.30, 378 bases long, from the beginning of gene 1 of T7 is presented. It contains the C promoter, two in vitro transcriptional terminator sites and a sequence of 171 bases which probably codes for the N terminus of the T7 RNA polymerase. The sequence also codes for the RNase III cleavage site before gene 1. The overlaps with the transcriptional terminators, The RNA transcript of the sequence about the terminators can be arranged in a set of alternative double-stranded hairpin structures. It is suggested that conversion between these structures may have a role in termination; this may be influenced by interactions with ribosomes and RNase III. The region of the C promoter between genes 0.7 and 1 thus contains several sites which may be involved in the control of transcription and translation. Images PMID:493111

  18. Air strippers and their emissions control at Superfund sites. Technical report, February-April 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Blaney, B.L.; Branscome, M.

    1988-08-01

    Air stripping, a traditional means of making slightly contaminated ground water potable, is being applied increasingly to more-severe groundwater pollution at remedial action sites. Concentrations of volatile and semivolatile compounds at such sites may reach hundreds of parts per million. As a result, several changes have resulted in air-stripping technology. New air stripping technologies are being employed to achieve very high (>99% removal of volatile compounds and to increase the removal of semivolatiles. New stripper designs are being investigated for compactness and mobility. In addition, emissions controls are being added because air-pollution impacts are larger. The paper discusses these trends and provides examples from ground-water cleanup at remedial-action sites in the United States.

  19. Small mammal-heavy metal concentrations from mined and control sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Rongstad, O.J.

    1982-01-01

    Total body concentrations of zinc, copper, cadmium, lead, nickel, mercury and arsenic were determined for Peromyscus maniculatus and Microtus pennsylvanicus from an active zinc-copper mine near Timmins, Ontario, Canada, and a proposed zinc-copper mine near Crandon, Wisconsin, USA. Metal concentrations were evaluated with respect to area, species, sex and age groups. Metal concentrations in Peromyscus from the proposed mine site were not different from those collected in a third area where no mine or deposit exists. This is probably due to the 30 m of glacial material over the proposed mine site deposit. A statistical interaction between area, species, sex and age was observed for zinc and copper concentrations in small mammals we examined. Peromyscus from the mine site had consistently higher metal concentrations than Peromyscus from the control site. Greater total body cadmium and lead concentrations in adult?compared with juvenile?Peromyscus collected at the mine site suggests age-dependent accumulation of these toxic metals. Microtus did not exhibit this age-related response, and responded to other environmental metals more erratically and to a lesser degree. Differences in the response of these two species to environmental metal exposure may be due to differences in food habits. Nickel, mercury and arsenic concentrations in small mammals from the mine site were not different from controls. Heavy metal concentrations are also presented for Sorex cinereus, Blarina brevicauda and Zapus hudsonicus without respect to age and sex cohorts. Peromyscus may be a potentially important species for the monitoring of heavy metal pollution.

  20. Oviposition Site Selection by the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti and Its Implications for Dengue Control

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jacklyn; Stoddard, Steven T.; Astete, Helvio; Morrison, Amy C.; Scott, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Because no dengue vaccine or antiviral therapy is commercially available, controlling the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, is currently the only means to prevent dengue outbreaks. Traditional models of Ae. aegypti assume that population dynamics are regulated by density-dependent larval competition for food and little affected by oviposition behavior. Due to direct impacts on offspring survival and development, however, mosquito choice in oviposition site can have important consequences for population regulation that should be taken into account when designing vector control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined oviposition patterns by Ae. aegypti among 591 naturally occurring containers and a set of experimental containers in Iquitos, Peru. Using larval starvation bioassays as an indirect measure of container food content, we assessed whether females select containers with the most food for their offspring. Our data indicate that choice of egg-laying site is influenced by conspecific larvae and pupae, container fill method, container size, lid, and sun exposure. Although larval food positively influenced oviposition, our results did not support the hypothesis that females act primarily to maximize food for larvae. Females were most strongly attracted to sites containing immature conspecifics, even when potential competitors for their progeny were present in abundance. Conclusion/Significance Due to strong conspecific attraction, egg-laying behavior may contribute more to regulating Ae. aegypti populations than previously thought. If highly infested containers are targeted for removal or larvicide application, females that would have preferentially oviposited in those sites may instead distribute their eggs among other suitable, previously unoccupied containers. Strategies that kill mosquitoes late in their development (i.e., insect growth regulators that kill pupae rather than larvae) will enhance vector control by creating

  1. Polarized Growth Controls Cell Shape and Bipolar Bud Site Selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Barral, Yves; Snyder, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between polarized growth and division site selection, two fundamental processes important for proper development of eukaryotes. Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exhibit an ellipsoidal shape and a specific division pattern (a bipolar budding pattern). We found that the polarity genes SPA2, PEA2, BUD6, and BNI1 participate in a crucial step of bud morphogenesis, apical growth. Deleting these genes results in round cells and diminishes bud elongation in mutants that exhibit pronounced apical growth. Examination of distribution of the polarized secretion marker Sec4 demonstrates that spa2Δ, pea2Δ, bud6Δ, and bni1Δ mutants fail to concentrate Sec4 at the bud tip during apical growth and at the division site during repolarization just prior to cytokinesis. Moreover, cell surface expansion is not confined to the distal tip of the bud in these mutants. In addition, we found that the p21-activated kinase homologue Ste20 is also important for both apical growth and bipolar bud site selection. We further examined how the duration of polarized growth affects bipolar bud site selection by using mutations in cell cycle regulators that control the timing of growth phases. The grr1Δ mutation enhances apical growth by stabilizing G1 cyclins and increases the distal-pole budding in diploids. Prolonging polarized growth phases by disrupting the G2/M cyclin gene CLB2 enhances the accuracy of bud site selection in wild-type, spa2Δ, and ste20Δ cells, whereas shortening the polarized growth phases by deleting SWE1 decreases the fidelity of bipolar budding. This study reports the identification of components required for apical growth and demonstrates the critical role of polarized growth in bipolar bud site selection. We propose that apical growth and repolarization at the site of cytokinesis are crucial for establishing spatial cues used by diploid yeast cells to position division planes. PMID:10866679

  2. An Evaluation of Techniques to Control Problem Bird Species on Landfill Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Aonghais; Rushton, Steven; Allan, John; Baxter, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    Birds feeding on landfill sites cause problems in terms of nuisance to neighbors, flight safety, a threat to public health, and affecting the day to day site operation. A number of control measures exist to deter problem species; however, research into their effectiveness across sites and for multiple species has been limited. We use a modeling approach in order to assess the effectiveness of nine techniques — pyrotechnics, hand-held distress calls, static distress calls, blank ammunition, a combination of blank and lethal use of ammunition, the use of falcons, the use of hawks, wailers and helium-filled bird-scaring kites — at deterring three commonly recorded species — the Black-headed Gull ( Larus ridibundus), the Herring Gull ( Larus argentatus) and the Lesser Black-backed Gull ( Larus fuscus) — from six landfill sites across the United Kingdom. The use of distress calls, falconry, and combinations of lethal and nonlethal use of ammunition were the most effective techniques for initially deterring birds from these sites. However, when habituation is considered, there is a clear difference between techniques such as falconry, which have a lethal aspect and may act to reinforce the deterrence, and the use of techniques such as distress calls, which do not. However there are problems related to legislation and public perception when lethal techniques are used.

  3. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS--SITE 2 RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Blythe; S. Miller; C. Richardson; K. Searcy

    2000-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI are co-funding this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project is investigating catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests are being conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit is being used to test the activity of four different catalysts for a period of up to six months at each of three utility sites. Catalyst testing at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, was completed in December 1998. Testing at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, was completed in the fall of 1999, and testing at the third site, which fires a high-sulfur bituminous coal, will begin in 2000. This technical note reports results from Site 2; results from Site 1 were reported in a previous technical note. At Site 2, catalysts were tested in several forms, including powders dispersed in sand bed reactors and in commercial forms such as extruded beads and coated honeycomb structures. This technical note presents results from Site 2 for both the sand bed reactors and commercial catalyst forms. Field testing is being supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and to investigate methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results related to the Site 2 field effort are also included and discussed in this technical note. Preliminary economics, based

  4. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  5. Site-controlled quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Rigal, B.; Jarlov, C.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Calic, M.; Kapon, E.

    2015-10-05

    Two site-controlled quantum dots (QDs) were integrated in a photonic crystal molecule (PCM) formed by L3 nanocavities. A statistical analysis of the coupled cavity modes demonstrated the formation of bonding and anti-bonding delocalized PCM states. Excitonic transitions belonging to each QD were identified by scanning micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy. Co-polarization of the QDs photoluminescence with the coupled cavity modes provides evidence for the simultaneous coupling of two spatially separated QDs to the same PCM mode.

  6. Site-controlled Ag nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy-Towards plasmonic integration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Urbanczyk, Adam; Noetzel, Richard

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate site-controlled growth of epitaxial Ag nanocrystals on patterned GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with high degree of long-range uniformity. The alignment is based on lithographically defined holes in which position controlled InAs quantum dots are grown. The Ag nanocrystals self-align preferentially on top of the InAs quantum dots. No such ordering is observed in the absence of InAs quantum dots, proving that the ordering is strain-driven. The presented technique facilitates the placement of active plasmonic nanostructures at arbitrarily defined positions enabling their integration into complex devices and plasmonic circuits.

  7. Stormwater management criteria for on-site pollution control: a comparative assessment of international practices.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jérémie; Berthier, Emmanuel; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2015-07-01

    Over the last decade, a growing interest has been shown toward innovative stormwater management practices, breaking away from conventional "end of pipe" approaches (based on conveying water offsite to centralized detention facilities). Innovative strategies, referred to as sustainable urban drainage systems, low impact development (LID) or green infrastructures, advocating for management of runoff as close to its origin as possible, have therefore gained a lot of popularity among practitioners and public authorities. However, while the need for pollution control is generally well accepted, there is no wide agreement about management criteria to be given to developers. This article hence aims to compare these criteria through literature analysis of different state or local stormwater management manuals or guidelines, investigating both their suitability for pollution control and their influence on best management practices selection and design. Four categories of criteria were identified: flow-rate limitations, "water quality volumes" (to be treated), volume reduction (through infiltration or evapotranspiration), and non-hydrologic criteria (such as loads reduction targets or maximum effluent concentrations). This study suggests that hydrologic criteria based on volume reduction (rather than treatment) might generally be preferable for on-site control of diffuse stormwater pollution. Nonetheless, determination of an appropriate management approach for a specific site is generally not straightforward and presents a variety of challenges for site designers seeking to satisfy local requirements in addressing stormwater quantity and quality issues. The adoption of efficient LID solution may therefore strongly depend on the guidance given to practitioners to account for these management criteria.

  8. Stormwater Management Criteria for On-Site Pollution Control: A Comparative Assessment of International Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Jérémie; Berthier, Emmanuel; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2015-07-01

    Over the last decade, a growing interest has been shown toward innovative stormwater management practices, breaking away from conventional "end of pipe" approaches (based on conveying water offsite to centralized detention facilities). Innovative strategies, referred to as sustainable urban drainage systems, low impact development (LID) or green infrastructures, advocating for management of runoff as close to its origin as possible, have therefore gained a lot of popularity among practitioners and public authorities. However, while the need for pollution control is generally well accepted, there is no wide agreement about management criteria to be given to developers. This article hence aims to compare these criteria through literature analysis of different state or local stormwater management manuals or guidelines, investigating both their suitability for pollution control and their influence on best management practices selection and design. Four categories of criteria were identified: flow-rate limitations, "water quality volumes" (to be treated), volume reduction (through infiltration or evapotranspiration), and non-hydrologic criteria (such as loads reduction targets or maximum effluent concentrations). This study suggests that hydrologic criteria based on volume reduction (rather than treatment) might generally be preferable for on-site control of diffuse stormwater pollution. Nonetheless, determination of an appropriate management approach for a specific site is generally not straightforward and presents a variety of challenges for site designers seeking to satisfy local requirements in addressing stormwater quantity and quality issues. The adoption of efficient LID solution may therefore strongly depend on the guidance given to practitioners to account for these management criteria.

  9. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  10. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  11. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  12. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  13. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  14. Guidelines to site selection for population surveillance and mosquito control trials: a case study from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Iyaloo, Diana P; Elahee, Khouaildi B; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Lees, Rosemary Susan

    2014-04-01

    Many novel approaches to controlling mosquito vectors through the release of sterile and mass reared males are being developed in the face of increasing insecticide resistance and other limitations of current methods. Before full scale release programmes can be undertaken there is a need for surveillance of the target population, and investigation of parameters such as dispersal and longevity of released, as compared to wild males through mark-release-recapture (MRR) and other experiments, before small scale pilot trials can be conducted. The nature of the sites used for this field work is crucial to ensure that a trial can feasibly collect sufficient and relevant information, given the available resources and practical limitations, and having secured the correct regulatory, community and ethical approvals and support. Mauritius is considering the inclusion of the sterile insect technique (SIT), for population reduction of Aedes albopictus, as a component of the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life's 'Operational Plan for Prevention and Control of Chikungunya and Dengue'. As part of an investigation into the feasibility of integrating the SIT into the Integrated Vector Management (IVM) scheme in Mauritius a pilot trial is planned. Two potential sites have been selected for this purpose, Pointe des Lascars and Panchvati, villages in the North East of the country, and population surveillance has commenced. This case study will here be used to explore the considerations which go into determining the most appropriate sites for mosquito field research. Although each situation is unique, and an ideal site may not be available, this discussion aims to help researchers to consider and balance the important factors and select field sites that will meet their needs.

  15. Preoperative hair removal and surgical site infections: network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, A; Saliou, P; Lucet, J C; Mimoz, O; Keita-Perse, O; Grandbastien, B; Bruyère, F; Boisrenoult, P; Lepelletier, D; Aho-Glélé, L S

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative hair removal has been used to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs) or to prevent hair from interfering with the incision site. We aimed to update the meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials about hair removal for the prevention of SSIs, and conduct network meta-analyses to combine direct and indirect evidence and to compare chemical depilation with clipping. The PubMed, ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials analysing different hair removal techniques and no hair removal in similar groups. Paired and network meta-analyses were conducted. Two readers independently assessed the study limitations for each selected article according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. No study compared clipping with chemical depilation. Network meta-analyses with shaving as the reference showed significantly fewer SSIs with clipping, chemical depilation, or no depilation [relative risk 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.79; 0.60, 0.36-0.97; and 0.56, 0.34-0.96, respectively]. No significant difference was observed between the absence of depilation and chemical depilation or clipping (1.05, 0.55-2.00; 0.97, 0.51-1.82, respectively] or between chemical depilation and clipping (1.09, 0.59-2.01). This meta-analysis of 19 randomized controlled trials confirmed the absence of any benefit of depilation to prevent surgical site infection, and the higher risk of surgical site infection when shaving is used for depilation. Chemical depilation and clipping were compared for the first time. The risk of SSI seems to be similar with both methods.

  16. The imidazoline site involved in control of insulin secretion: characteristics that distinguish it from I1- and I2-sites.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. L.; Brown, C. A.; Scarpello, K. E.; Morgan, N. G.

    1994-01-01

    1. The nature of the binding site mediating the insulin secretagogue activity of certain imidazoline compounds remains unclear and the pharmacology of the I1- and I2-imidazoline sites, described in many tissues, does not correlate with the observed responses to imidazolines in islets. In the present paper, we describe further results which support the concept that the islet imidazoline site may represent a novel subtype of imidazoline receptor. 2. Culture of rat isolated islets in the presence of imidazoline secretagogues (either efaroxan or phentolamine) resulted in loss of responsiveness on subsequent re-exposure to these agents. However, culture of islets with either idazoxan or UK14,304 (imidazoline ligands that do not stimulate insulin secretion) did not lead to any loss of response when the islets were subsequently exposed to efaroxan. By contrast, islets cultured with UK14,304 (a potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist), displayed loss of sensitivity to noradrenaline, consistent with down-regulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors. 3. In order to characterize the imidazoline site further, radioligand binding studies were performed in membranes from RINm5F insulinoma cells using [3H]-RX821002, an imidazoline insulin secretagogue that does not interact significantly with imidazoline sites in other tissues. [3H]-RX821002 labelled alpha 2-adrenoceptors with high affinity (2.01 +/- 0.7 nM) but also labelled a second, non-adrenoceptor site with much lower affinity. 4. Under conditions of alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade (in the presence of adrenaline), efaroxan displaced [3H]-RX821002 binding to the low affinity site, in a dose-dependent manner.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952865

  17. Leaching and persistence of herbicides for kudzu (Pueraria montana) control on pine regeneration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Taylor, John, W.

    2006-03-01

    Kudzu is an exotic vine that threatens forests in the southeastern United States. It can climb, overtop, and subsequently kill new seedlings or mature trees. Herbicides are commonly used to control kudzu; however, eradication might require retreatment for 3 to 10 yr in young stands and 7 to 10 yr for mature stands. Clopyralid, picloram, triclopyr, metsulfuron, and tebuthiuron exert various degrees of control, depending on soil type, meteorological conditions, herbicide formulation, seasonal application, characteristics of the kudzu stand, and frequency and number of herbicide. Field residue data for soil or leachate are lacking for all of these herbicides when they are used in actual forest regeneration programs in the Coastal Plain. These data are needed to assess the relative potential for the herbicides to leach into groundwater or to move off-site into sensitive ecological areas of the Coastal Plain in which sandy soils predominate and the groundwater tends to be shallow. As part of an integrated pest management program to control kudzu on forest regeneration areas at the Savannah River Site near New Ellenton, SC, five herbicides were evaluated from the standpoints of herbicide leaching, kudzu control, and plant community development. Three herbicide chemical families were represented. This included pyridinecarboxylic acid herbicides (clopyralid, picloram 1 2,4-D, and triclopyr), a sulfonylurea herbicide (metsulfuron), and a substituted urea herbicide (tebuthiuron).

  18. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-02-08

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn(2+), hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co(2+). Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites.

  19. Controls on water drop volume at speleothem drip sites: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, Christopher; Mattey, David

    2008-09-01

    SummaryThe growth of speleothem under cave drip sites is closely related to local climate events and provides an increasingly important means of deciphering past climate change. Since calcite precipitation rates depend on the water discharge at the drip site, the drip rate and mass of water drops detaching from stalactites are fundamental controls on speleothem growth and we have investigated factors that control the volume of water drops in this environment. The classical investigations on the volume of falling water drops are reviewed but there have been no measurements of the volume of drops detaching from curved surfaces equivalent to tips of stalactites. In this study we have used an acoustic drop counting method to measure the variation of the mass of water drops detaching from tubes (representing 'soda straw' stalactites) and artificial stalactites with spherical terminations (representing massive stalactites) as a function of tube radius or surface curvature and the drip rate. The experimental method corroborates classical measurements of drop mass detaching from tubes and, for massive stalactites, we derive a simple empirical relationship between drop mass and radius of curvature of a spherical surface, based on 100,000 drop counts from artificial stalactites with 19 different radii ranging from 3.6 mm to 500 mm. The results of this study allow discharge to be calculated from drip interval measurements and provide a quantitative basis for theoretical modelling of speleothem growth from drip sites.

  20. Event-based design tool for construction site erosion and sediment controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenouth, William R.; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides additional discussion surrounding the novel event-based soil loss models developed by Trenouth and Gharabaghi (2015) for the design of erosion and sediment controls (ESCs) for various phases of construction - from pre-development to post-development conditions. The datasets for the study were obtained from three Ontario sites - Greensborough, Cookstown, and Alcona - in addition to datasets mined from the literature for three additional sites - Treynor, Iowa, Coshocton, Ohio and Cordoba, Spain. Model performances were evaluated for each of the study sites, and quantified using commonly-reported statistics. This work is nested within a broader conceptual framework, which includes the estimation of ambient receiving water quality, the prediction of event mean runoff quality for a given design storm, and the calculation of the required level of protection using adequate ESCs to meet receiving water quality guidelines. These models allow design engineers and regulatory agencies to assess the potential risk of ecological damage to receiving waters due to inadequate soil erosion and sediment control practices using dynamic scenario forecasting when considering rapidly changing land use conditions during various phases of construction, typically for a 2- or 5-year design storm return period.

  1. Imaging After GliaSite Brachytherapy: Prognostic MRI Indicators of Disease Control and Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Yoon, Geoffrey; Weingart, John D.; Parisi, Michele; Olivi, Alessandro; Detorie, Nicholas A.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2009-12-01

    framework for the analysis of disease control in future prospective studies of GliaSite treatment.

  2. Institutional Control Policies and Implementation for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Vefa Yucel, Greg Shott, Denise Wieland, et al.

    2007-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has implemented varying institutional control policies in performance assessment/composite analysis (PA/CA) calculations for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (Shott et al., 1998; 2000; Bechtel Nevada [BN] and Neptune and Company Inc. [Neptune], 2006). The facilities are within the actively maintained boundaries of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that are enforced by NNSA/NSO. Under current policies, access required for exposure of the member of public (MOP) or the inadvertent human intruder (IHI) is prohibited. Uncertainties affecting institutional control policies are the duration and effectiveness of the controls during the post-closure period. Implementing a uniform set of institutional control policies for the RWMSs that encompasses waste management and environmental restoration programs and is consistent with the end-state vision for the environmental management programs for the NTS (DOE, 2006) is a primary goal of the maintenance program. The NNSA/NSO Performance Management Plan (DOE, 2002) complies with DOE Policy P455.1, 'Use of Risk-Based End States' (DOE, 2003a). Expected future land uses are a driver in selecting acceptable end state conditions and clean-up goals for the NTS. NNSA/NSO Environmental Management's (EM's) land management assumptions and framework for Environmental Management activities are as follows: The NTS will remain under federal control in perpetuity as an NNSA test site, and the large buffer zone surrounding the NTS (the Nevada Test and Training Range) is assumed to remain under the control of the U.S. Air Force. There are no plans for transfer of any NTS lands to other agencies or public entities. Access will continue to be restricted to the NTS and the surrounding areas. For management purposes, NNSA/NV EM activities have been established based on the source of contamination and type of waste

  3. The application of surficial geophysics to well site exploration and wellhead protection in fracture controlled aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, J.; Jurcek, P.

    1997-10-01

    Siting high capacity wells in fractured controlled aquifers is difficult due to the unpredictable distribution of relatively narrow fracture zones. Geophysical methods can be used to locate fracture zones and select favorable test well locations. Due to the expense of rock drilling, it is common to estimate the parameters of fractured aquifers without monitoring wells. Under these conditions, most interpreters assume an isotropic porous media equivalent. This can lead to serious errors in defining the ground water flow system. This paper presents two case histories that illustrate how surficial geophysical methods can be used to locate high capacity wells in fracture controlled areas. The cases also demonstrate how the properties of fractured aquifers can grossly deviate from isotropic porous media and the errors that can result from ignoring this fact. Geophysical methods can be used to predict the trend of the axis of maximum transmissivity in the aquifer, which can be used to efficiently site monitoring wells to accurately measure aquifer properties. Accurate measurements of anisotropy are critical for defining reasonable wellhead protection zones in fracture controlled aquifers.

  4. Drivers of tall shrub proliferation adjacent to the Dempster Highway, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Emily A.; Lantz, Trevor C.

    2016-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are undergoing rapid changes as a result of climate warming and more frequent disturbances. Disturbances can have particularly large effects on high-latitude ecosystems when ecosystem structure and function is controlled by strong feedbacks between soil conditions, vegetation, and ground thermal regime. In this study we investigated the impact of road construction and maintenance on vegetation structure and biomass along the Dempster Highway where it crosses the Peel Plateau in the Northwest Territories. To explore drivers of tall shrub proliferation and to quantify shrub proliferation in this region of continuous permafrost, greyscale air photos (1975) and Quickbird satellite imagery (2008) were used to map landcover change within two 0.6 km2 belts next to the road and two 0.6 km2 belts 500 m away from the road. Maps showing areas where: 1) tall shrubs expanded, and 2) dwarf shrub tundra resisted invasion were then used to select field sites where a suite of biophysical variables were measured. Rapid tall shrub proliferation and greater biomass adjacent to the road indicate that disturbance can facilitate vegetation change in tundra environments. Our field data also suggests that increased shrub proliferation adjacent to the road was caused by greater soil moisture. Tall shrub proliferation adjacent to the road occurred at lower elevation sites characterized by wetter soils with thicker organic layers. Areas that resisted tall shrub encroachment were located at higher elevations and had drier soils with thin organic layers. Our observations also support previous work illustrating that tall shrub expansion next to the highway promotes strong positive feedbacks to ongoing shrub growth and proliferation.

  5. Attitude guidance and control of the navigation satellites at passage of singular orbit sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, Alexey; Vassilyev, Alexander; Somov, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    The solar-terrestrial reference frame is applied during a navigation satellite flight using onboard measured units of directions on the Sun and Earth, which are beginning in the satellite (Object) mass center. The angle between these units traditionally is named as the angle SOE (Sun - Object - Earth). We consider problems of attitude guidance and control at the spacecraft operation on specific parts of the orbit (singular orbit sites) at following values of the SOE angles — close to 0 deg (small SOE angles) and close to 180 deg (large SOE angles) with a view to minimizing the impact of solar pressure forces on the SC mass center motion.

  6. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Kate L; Harris, Matthew; Thomas, H Lucy; Chow, Yimmy; Seng, Claude

    2014-04-01

    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here a case from local level health protection where the friend of an individual with meningococcal septicaemia used a social networking site to notify potential contacts.

  7. Site-controlled application of electric potential on a conducting polymer "canvas".

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Yutaka; Inagi, Shinsuke; Fuchigami, Toshio

    2012-03-07

    A novel patterning method for conducting polymer films was successfully demonstrated using the concept of bipolar electrochemistry. The local application of an anodic potential to poly(3-methylthiophene) (PMT) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on a bipolar electrode (BPE) realized local electrochemical doping and reaction depending on the supporting salt used. The potential applied on the BPE was measured and corresponded well to the patterns. The array-type driving electrode system was able to draw complex patterns in a site-controlled manner.

  8. Quality Assurance/Quality Control in Waste Site Characterization and Remedial Action.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Als 539 QUALITY ASSIJRANCE/-OWAITY CONTROL IN MASTE SITE vi1 71 CIARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIAL ACTIGN(U) OAK RIDGE ED NATIONAL LAB IN N P MASKAAINEC...and Remedial Action D T Final Report .L Co:i., M. P . Maskarinec NOV 2 3 1987 i’ ~S. K. Holladay P Supported by U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials...National Laboratory USATHAMA &6 ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) P . 0. Box X AMXTH-TE-A Oak Ridge, TN 37831

  9. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Kate L.; Harris, Matthew; Thomas, H. Lucy; Chow, Yimmy; Seng, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here a case from local level health protection where the friend of an individual with meningococcal septicaemia used a social networking site to notify potential contacts. PMID:24688599

  10. Controlled Soil Warming Powered by Alternative Energy for Remote Field Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Jill F.; Henkelman, Jonathan; Allen, Kirsten; Helgason, Warren; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using controlled manipulation of climate variables in the field are critical for developing and testing mechanistic models of ecosystem responses to climate change. Despite rapid changes in climate observed in many high latitude and high altitude environments, controlled manipulations in these remote regions have largely been limited to passive experimental methods with variable effects on environmental factors. In this study, we tested a method of controlled soil warming suitable for remote field locations that can be powered using alternative energy sources. The design was tested in high latitude, alpine tundra of southern Yukon Territory, Canada, in 2010 and 2011. Electrical warming probes were inserted vertically in the near-surface soil and powered with photovoltaics attached to a monitoring and control system. The warming manipulation achieved a stable target warming of 1.3 to 2°C in 1 m2 plots while minimizing disturbance to soil and vegetation. Active control of power output in the warming plots allowed the treatment to closely match spatial and temporal variations in soil temperature while optimizing system performance during periods of low power supply. Active soil heating with vertical electric probes powered by alternative energy is a viable option for remote sites and presents a low-disturbance option for soil warming experiments. This active heating design provides a valuable tool for examining the impacts of soil warming on ecosystem processes. PMID:24386125

  11. Controlled soil warming powered by alternative energy for remote field sites.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jill F; Henkelman, Jonathan; Allen, Kirsten; Helgason, Warren; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using controlled manipulation of climate variables in the field are critical for developing and testing mechanistic models of ecosystem responses to climate change. Despite rapid changes in climate observed in many high latitude and high altitude environments, controlled manipulations in these remote regions have largely been limited to passive experimental methods with variable effects on environmental factors. In this study, we tested a method of controlled soil warming suitable for remote field locations that can be powered using alternative energy sources. The design was tested in high latitude, alpine tundra of southern Yukon Territory, Canada, in 2010 and 2011. Electrical warming probes were inserted vertically in the near-surface soil and powered with photovoltaics attached to a monitoring and control system. The warming manipulation achieved a stable target warming of 1.3 to 2 °C in 1 m(2) plots while minimizing disturbance to soil and vegetation. Active control of power output in the warming plots allowed the treatment to closely match spatial and temporal variations in soil temperature while optimizing system performance during periods of low power supply. Active soil heating with vertical electric probes powered by alternative energy is a viable option for remote sites and presents a low-disturbance option for soil warming experiments. This active heating design provides a valuable tool for examining the impacts of soil warming on ecosystem processes.

  12. Site-controlled synthesis and mechanism of three-dimensional Mo2S3 flowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Gaixia; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2012-12-01

    High-density three-dimensional Mo2S3 flowers have been facilely synthesized with controlled sites by introducing gold particles as the nucleation sites in a chemical vapor deposition process. The whole size of each flower is in micro scale while individual petal has extremely small thickness of around 10 nm. The role of gold particles and precursor concentration in the growth has been carefully investigated. Without gold particles, dense nanopetals were not able to be obtained unless in a highly concentrated sulfur atmosphere. With Au particles, dense products were steadily achieved in a wide precursor concentration range with S:MoO3 molar ratio from 1:5 to 5:1. The morphology and structure of the as-synthesized nanostructures were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The growth mechanism was proposed in which gold particles acted as the initial nucleation sites fixing the nucleation position of the flowers following vapor-solid growth mechanism.

  13. Contamination Control During In Situ Jet Grouting for Application in a Buried Transuranic Waste Site

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Guy George; Jessmore, James Joseph

    2003-02-01

    Engineers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have developed means of contamination control associated with jet-grouting buried radioactive mixed waste sites. Finely divided plutonium/americium oxide particulate can escape as the drill stem of the jet-grouting apparatus exits a waste deposit in preparation for insertion in another injection hole. In studying various options for controlling this potential contamination, engineers found that an elaborate glovebox/drill string shroud system prevents contaminants from spreading. Researchers jet-grouted a pit with nonradioactive tracers to simulate the movement of plutonium fines during an actual application. Data from the testing indicate that the grout immobilizes the tracer material by locking it up in particles large enough to resist aerosolization.

  14. CONTAMINATION CONTROL DURING IN SITU JET GROUTING FOR APPLICATION IN A BURIED TRANSURANIC WASTE SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Guy G.; Jessmore, Jim J.

    2003-02-27

    Engineers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have developed means of contamination control associated with jet-grouting buried radioactive mixed waste sites. Finely divided plutonium/americium oxide particulate can escape as the drill stem of the jet-grouting apparatus exits a waste deposit in preparation for insertion in another injection hole. In studying various options for controlling this potential contamination, engineers found that an elaborate glovebox/drill string shroud system prevents contaminants from spreading. Researchers jet-grouted a pit with nonradioactive tracers to simulate the movement of plutonium fines during an actual application. Data from the testing indicate that the grout immobilizes the tracer material by locking it up in particles large enough to resist aerosolization.

  15. Cadmium control/safety rod disposal at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, S.H.

    1995-05-01

    Four heavy-water-moderated reactors at the Savannah River Site will undergo the removal of 862 activated cadmium control/safety rods. Although these reactors are 40 years old, they offer 4 basic advantages for decommissioning: the equipment is still in some sort of operable state; the reactor is blow the floor in a large process room, allowing access; Control/safety rods can be handled remotely by existing equipment; a radiologically shielded removal path exists. Drawbacks include the following: age of reactors; improvements in technology have caused incompatibility problems; more strigent standards; compliance with environmental regulations. This article details how the removal was carried out and the current status of the project, keeping in mind the above considerations.

  16. Memristive operation mode of a site-controlled quantum dot floating gate transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, P. Hartmann, F.; Mauder, T.; Emmerling, M.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Worschech, L.; Höfling, S.

    2015-05-18

    We have realized a floating gate transistor based on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure with site-controlled InAs quantum dots. By short-circuiting the source contact with the lateral gates and performing closed voltage sweep cycles, we observe a memristive operation mode with pinched hysteresis loops and two clearly distinguishable conductive states. The conductance depends on the quantum dot charge which can be altered in a controllable manner by the voltage value and time interval spent in the charging region. The quantum dot memristor has the potential to realize artificial synapses in a state-of-the-art opto-electronic semiconductor platform by charge localization and Coulomb coupling.

  17. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Dolganov, Nadia A.; Rasmussen, Thomas; Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C.; Felt, Stephen A.; Torreilles, Stéphanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could

  18. Posttranscriptional control of bacteriophage lambda gene expression from a site distal to the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarneros, G; Montañez, C; Hernandez, T; Court, D

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriophage lambda int gene product, integrase, recombines the phage DNA with the host DNA at specific sites on each to accomplish lysogeny. The int gene is transcribed from two promoters, PL and PI, each regulated positively by lambda proteins. The expression of integrase is also controlled from a site, sib, in the b region of the phage genome. This is a unique regulatory site because it is located distal to the structural gene in relation to the promoters. The expression of int from the PL promoter is inhibited when sib is present. This effect appears to be specific for PL because sib does not cause inhibition of PI-dependent int synthesis. lambda mutants that contain alterations in the site have been isolated. Sequence analyses of the mutations reveal single base changes, spanning 37 base pairs (bp) in the b region, some 240 bp beyond the int gene. Another mutant, hef13, which has a phenotype similar to that of sib, introduces a nucleotide change within the same 37-bp region. The sib and hef mutations cluster within a region of dyad symmetry. Regulation of int synthesis by sib occurs after transcription of the int gene. There is no difference in the rate of PL-promoted int mRNA synthesis in either sib+ or sib- phage infections, yet int mRNA is less stable in the sib+ infection. Because RNase III host mutants are defective in sib regulation, processing of the PL mRNA at sib by this endoribonuclease may cause int mRNA decay and decrease int synthesis. PMID:6281759

  19. Initiation of Quality Control during Poly(A) Translation Requires Site-Specific Ribosome Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Juszkiewicz, Szymon; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2017-02-16

    Diverse cellular stressors have been observed to trigger site-specific ubiquitination on several ribosomal proteins. However, the ubiquitin ligases, biochemical consequences, and physiologic pathways linked to these modifications are not known. Here, we show in mammalian cells that the ubiquitin ligase ZNF598 is required for ribosomes to terminally stall during translation of poly(A) sequences. ZNF598-mediated stalling initiated the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) pathway for degradation of nascent truncated proteins. Biochemical ubiquitination reactions identified two sites of mono-ubiquitination on the 40S protein eS10 as the primary ribosomal target of ZNF598. Cells lacking ZNF598 activity or containing ubiquitination-resistant eS10 ribosomes failed to stall efficiently on poly(A) sequences. In the absence of stalling, read-through of poly(A) produces a poly-lysine tag, which might alter the localization and solubility of the associated protein. Thus, ribosome ubiquitination can modulate translation elongation and impacts co-translational quality control to minimize production of aberrant proteins.

  20. Site- and alignment-controlled growth of graphene nanoribbons from nickel nanobars.

    PubMed

    Kato, Toshiaki; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2012-10-01

    Graphene nanoribbons combine the unique electronic and spin properties of graphene with a transport gap that arises from quantum confinement and edge effects. This makes them an attractive candidate material for the channels of next-generation transistors. Nanoribbons can be made in a variety of ways, including lithographic, chemical and sonochemical approaches, the unzipping of carbon nanotubes, the thermal decomposition of SiC and organic synthesis. However, the reliable site and alignment control of nanoribbons with high on/off current ratios remains a challenge. Here we control the site and alignment of narrow (∼23 nm) graphene nanoribbons by directly converting a nickel nanobar into a graphene nanoribbon using rapid-heating plasma chemical vapour deposition. The nanoribbons grow directly between the source and drain electrodes of a field-effect transistor without transfer, lithography and other postgrowth treatments, and exhibit a clear transport gap (58.5 meV), a high on/off ratio (>10(4)) and no hysteresis. Complex architectures, including parallel and radial arrays of supported and suspended ribbons, are demonstrated. The process is scalable and completely compatible with existing semiconductor processes, and is expected to allow integration of graphene nanoribbons with silicon technology.

  1. The PLATO Dome A site-testing observatory: power generation and control systems.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J S; Ashley, M C B; Hengst, S; Luong-Van, D M; Storey, J W V; Yang, H; Zhou, X; Zhu, Z

    2009-06-01

    The atmospheric conditions above Dome A, a currently unmanned location at the highest point on the Antarctic plateau, are uniquely suited to astronomy. For certain types of astronomy Dome A is likely to be the best location on the planet, and this has motivated the development of the Plateau Observatory (PLATO). PLATO was deployed to Dome A in early 2008. It houses a suite of purpose-built site-testing instruments designed to quantify the benefits of Dome A site for astronomy, and science instruments designed to take advantage of the observing conditions. The PLATO power generation and control system is designed to provide continuous power and heat, and a high-reliability command and communications platform for these instruments. PLATO has run and collected data throughout the winter 2008 season completely unattended. Here we present a detailed description of the power generation, power control, thermal management, instrument interface, and communications systems for PLATO, and an overview of the system performance for 2008.

  2. The PLATO Dome A site-testing observatory: Power generation and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Hengst, S.; Luong-van, D. M.; Storey, J. W. V.; Yang, H.; Zhou, X.; Zhu, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The atmospheric conditions above Dome A, a currently unmanned location at the highest point on the Antarctic plateau, are uniquely suited to astronomy. For certain types of astronomy Dome A is likely to be the best location on the planet, and this has motivated the development of the Plateau Observatory (PLATO). PLATO was deployed to Dome A in early 2008. It houses a suite of purpose-built site-testing instruments designed to quantify the benefits of Dome A site for astronomy, and science instruments designed to take advantage of the observing conditions. The PLATO power generation and control system is designed to provide continuous power and heat, and a high-reliability command and communications platform for these instruments. PLATO has run and collected data throughout the winter 2008 season completely unattended. Here we present a detailed description of the power generation, power control, thermal management, instrument interface, and communications systems for PLATO, and an overview of the system performance for 2008.

  3. Cultural Resources Investigation of Three Archaeological Sites along the Roseau Flood Control Project: Roseau County, Minnesota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-30

    the wrong land was recalled by Eldor Norquist, son to Gus. When asked where Norgren built his structures, Norquist indicated the mound area (personal...MAP FRom iAs&, 54LOL T.’GsAD Lornie M. Olson, landowner Eldor Norquist, adjacent landowner WRITTEN REFERENCES Reports by Elden Johnson Uni- veristy

  4. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  5. 77 FR 63873 - Johnson Controls, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers of Valley Staffing and AZ Quality Hudson...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... certification to include workers leased from AZ Quality working on-site at the Hudson, Wisconsin location of... Employment and Training Administration Johnson Controls, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers of Valley Staffing and AZ Quality Hudson, Wisconsin; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for...

  6. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  7. Community Involvement as an Effective Institutional Control at the Weldon Spring Site, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Site

    SciTech Connect

    Deyo, Y.E.; Pauling, T.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) was conducted for the purpose of remediating a portion of a former trinitrotoluene and dinitrotoluene production plant that was operational from 1941 to 1945 and a former uranium refinery that was operational from 1957 to 1966. Surface remediation activities concluded in 2001 with the completion of a 45-acre (.18 square kilometer) on-site engineered disposal facility. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities at the site were officially transferred to the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2003. The Weldon Spring Site is located within the St. Louis, Missouri, metropolitan area (population 3 million). DOE's close relationship with surrounding land owners created a need for innovative solutions to long-term surveillance and maintenance issues at the site. Through a Secretarial proclamation, a plan was established for development of a comprehensive public involvement and education program. This program would act as an institutional control to communicate the historical legacy of the site and would make information available about contamination present at the site to guide people in making decisions about appropriate site activities. In August 2002, the Weldon Spring Site Interpretive Center opened to the public with exhibits about the history of the area, the remediation work that was completed, and a site information repository that is available to visitors. In addition, the Hamburg Trail for hiking and biking was constructed as a joint DOE/MDC effort. The 8-mile trail travels through both DOE and MDC property; a series of historical markers posted along its length to communicate the history of the area and the remediation work that was done as part of WSSRAP activities. A ramp and viewing platform with informational plaques were constructed on the disposal cell to provide an additional mechanism for public education. With a basic marketing program, site visitor-ship has

  8. Impact of adjacent land use on coastal wetland sediments.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Svenja; Buczko, Uwe; Jurasinski, Gerald; Peticzka, Robert; Glatzel, Stephan

    2016-04-15

    Coastal wetlands link terrestrial with marine ecosystems and are influenced from both land and sea. Therefore, they are ecotones with strong biogeochemical gradients. We analyzed sediment characteristics including macronutrients (C, N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S) and heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Al, Co, Cr, Ni) of two coastal wetlands dominated by Phragmites australis at the Darss-Zingst Bodden Chain, a lagoon system at the Southern Baltic Sea, to identify the impact of adjacent land use and to distinguish between influences from land or sea. In the wetland directly adjacent to cropland (study site Dabitz) heavy metal concentrations were significantly elevated. Fertilizer application led to heavy metal accumulation in the sediments of the adjacent wetland zones. In contrast, at the other study site (Michaelsdorf), where the hinterland has been used as pasture, heavy metal concentrations were low. While the amount of macronutrients was also influenced by vegetation characteristics (e.g. carbon) or water chemistry (e.g. sulfate), the accumulation of heavy metals is regarded as purely anthropogenic influence. A principal component analysis (PCA) based on the sediment data showed that the wetland fringes of the two study sites are not distinguishable, neither in their macronutrient status nor in their concentrations of heavy metals, whereas the interior zones exhibit large differences in terms of heavy metal concentrations. This suggests that seaside influences are minor compared to influences from land. Altogether, heavy metal concentrations were still below national precautionary and action values. However, if we regard the macronutrient and heavy metal concentrations in the wetland fringes as the natural background values, an accumulation of trace elements from agricultural production in the hinterland is apparent. Thus, coastal wetlands bordering croplands may function as effective pollutant buffers today, but the future development has to be monitored closely to avoid

  9. Control of Substrate Specificity by Active-Site Residues in Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrobenzene 1,2-dioxygenase from Comamonas sp. strain JS765 catalyzes the initial reaction in nitrobenzene degradation, forming catechol and nitrite. The enzyme also oxidizes the aromatic rings of mono- and dinitrotoluenes at the nitro-substituted carbon, but the basis for this specificity is not understood. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to modify the active site of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, and the contribution of specific residues in controlling substrate specificity and enzyme performance was evaluated. The activities of six mutant enzymes indicated that the residues at positions 258, 293, and 350 in the α subunit are important for determining regiospecificity with nitroarene substrates and enantiospecificity with naphthalene. The results provide an explanation for the characteristic specificity with nitroarene substrates. Based on the structure of nitrobenzene dioxygenase, substitution of valine for the asparagine at position 258 should eliminate a hydrogen bond between the substrate nitro group and the amino group of asparagine. Up to 99% of the mononitrotoluene oxidation products formed by the N258V mutant were nitrobenzyl alcohols rather than catechols, supporting the importance of this hydrogen bond in positioning substrates in the active site for ring oxidation. Similar results were obtained with an I350F mutant, where the formation of the hydrogen bond appeared to be prevented by steric interference. The specificity of enzymes with substitutions at position 293 varied depending on the residue present. Compared to the wild type, the F293Q mutant was 2.5 times faster at oxidizing 2,6-dinitrotoluene while retaining a similar Km for the substrate based on product formation rates and whole-cell kinetics. PMID:16517627

  10. Adjacent Segment Disease in the Cervical and Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Daniel G; Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Saadat, Ehsan; Bono, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is disappointing long-term outcome for both the patient and clinician. In contrast to adjacent segment degeneration, which is a common radiographic finding, ASD is less common. The incidence of ASD in both the cervical and lumbar spine is between 2% and 4% per year, and ASD is a significant contributor to reoperation rates after spinal arthrodesis. The etiology of ASD is multifactorial, stemming from existing spondylosis at adjacent levels, predisposed risk to degenerative changes, and altered biomechanical forces near a previous fusion site. Numerous studies have sought to identify both patient and surgical risk factors for ASD, but a consistent, sole predictor has yet to be found. Spinal arthroplasty techniques seek to preserve physiological biomechanics, thereby minimizing the risk of ASD, and long-term clinical outcome studies will help quantify its efficacy. Treatment strategies for ASD are initially nonoperative, provided a progressive neurological deficit is not present. The spine surgeon is afforded many surgical strategies once operative treatment is elected. The goal of this manuscript is to consider the etiologies of ASD, review its manifestations, and offer an approach to treatment.

  11. Perceptual processing of adjacent and nonadjacent tactile nontargets.

    PubMed

    Evans, P M; Craig, J C; Rinker, M A

    1992-11-01

    Previous research has shown that subjects appear unable to restrict processing to a single finger and ignore a stimulus presented to an adjacent finger. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that, at least for moving stimuli, an adjacent nontarget is fully processed to the level of incipient response activation. The present study replicated and expanded upon these original findings. The results of Experiment 1 showed that an equally large response-competition effect occurred when the nontarget was presented to adjacent and nonadjacent fingers (on the same hand). The results of Experiment 2 showed that the effects observed in Experiment 1 (and in previous studies) were also obtained with stationary stimuli. Although small, there was some indication in the results of Experiment 2 that interference may dissipate more rapidly with distance with stationary stimuli. An additional finding was that interference effects were observed in both experiments with temporal separations between the target and nontarget of up to 100 msec. In Experiment 3, target and nontarget stimuli were presented to opposite hands. Although reduced, interference was still evident with target and nontarget stimuli presented to opposite hands. Varying the physical distance between hands did not produce any change in the amount of interference. The results suggest that the focus of attention on the skin extends nearly undiminished across the fingers of one hand and is not dependent upon the physical distance between sites of stimulation.

  12. Multiple interfaces between a serine recombinase and an enhancer control site-specific DNA inversion

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Meghan M; Chang, Yong; Dhar, Gautam; Heiss, John K; Johnson, Reid C

    2013-01-01

    Serine recombinases are often tightly controlled by elaborate, topologically-defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Hin is a member of the DNA invertase subclass of serine recombinases that are regulated by a remote recombinational enhancer element containing two binding sites for the protein Fis. Two Hin dimers bound to specific recombination sites associate with the Fis-bound enhancer by DNA looping where they are remodeled into a synaptic tetramer competent for DNA chemistry and exchange. Here we show that the flexible beta-hairpin arms of the Fis dimers contact the DNA binding domain of one subunit of each Hin dimer. These contacts sandwich the Hin dimers to promote remodeling into the tetramer. A basic region on the Hin catalytic domain then contacts enhancer DNA to complete assembly of the active Hin tetramer. Our results reveal how the enhancer generates the recombination complex that specifies DNA inversion and regulates DNA exchange by the subunit rotation mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01211.001 PMID:24151546

  13. Surface orientation control of site-specifically immobilized nitro-reductase (NfsB).

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Schroeder, McKenna; Ogorzalek, Tadeusz L; Yang, Pei; Wu, Fu-Gen; Marsh, E Neil G; Chen, Zhan

    2014-05-27

    We demonstrate the control of enzyme orientation for enzymes chemically immobilized on surfaces. Nitro-reductase (NfsB) has the ability to reduce a broad range of nitro-containing compounds and has potential applications in a broad range of areas including the detection and decomposition of explosives. The enzyme was tethered through unique surface cysteine residues to a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) terminated with maleimide groups. One cysteine was introduced close to the active site (V424C), and the other, at a remote site (H360C). The surface-tethered NfsB variants were interrogated by a combination of surface-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to determine how the mode of attachment altered the enzyme's orientation. The activities of the two immobilized NfsB variants were measured and can be well correlated to the deduced orientations. The relationships among enzyme engineering, surface immobilization, enzyme orientation, and enzyme activity were revealed.

  14. Nanoseeding via dual surface modification of alkyl monolayer for site-controlled electroless metallization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sung-Te; Chen, Giin-Shan

    2011-10-04

    In this work, an attempt to fabricate nanostructured metallization patterns on SiO(2) dielectric layers is made by using plasma-patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), in conjunction with a novel aqueous seeding and electroless process. Taking octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) as a test material, the authors demonstrate that optimizing the N(2)-H(2) plasma conditions leads to the successive conversion of the topmost aliphatic chains of alkyl SAMs to carboxyl (COOH) and hydroxyl (C-OH) functional groups, which was previously found in alkyl SAMs only by exposure to "oxygen-based" plasma. Further modifying the plasma-exposed (either COOH or C-OH terminated) regions with an aqueous solution (SC-1) creates surface functionalities that are viable for site-controlled metallic seeding (e.g., Co or Ni) with an adsorption selectivity of greater than 1000:1. Neither the combination of costly PdCl(2) and complex additives nor the demerits of the associated aqueous chemistry (e.g., seed agglomeration and seed sparseness) are involved. Therefore, the seed particles are only 3 nm in size. Simultaneously, there are sufficient particle densities previously unattainable for electroless deposition to trigger highly resolved Cu metallization patterns with a film thickness of less than 10 nm. The formation of the seed-adsorbing sites is discussed, based on a plasma-dissociated, water-mediated chemical oxidation route.

  15. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  16. Control of Gene Expression by RNA Binding Protein Action on Alternative Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Re, Angela; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Transcript levels do not faithfully predict protein levels, due to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and non-coding RNAs. We developed a multivariate linear regression model integrating RBP levels and predicted RBP-mRNA regulatory interactions from matched transcript and protein datasets. RBPs significantly improved the accuracy in predicting protein abundance of a portion of the total modeled mRNAs in three panels of tissues and cells and for different methods employed in the detection of mRNA and protein. The presence of upstream translation initiation sites (uTISs) at the mRNA 5’ untranslated regions was strongly associated with improvement in predictive accuracy. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the recently discovered widespread uTISs in the human genome can be a previously unappreciated substrate of translational control mediated by RBPs. PMID:27923063

  17. Magnetically Controllable Polymer Nanotubes from a Cyclized Crosslinker for Site-Specific Delivery of Doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, Ben; Leupelt, Daniel; Zheng, Yu; Thomas, Laurent S. V.; Werner, Carsten; Steinhart, Martin; Wang, Wenxin

    2015-12-01

    Externally controlled site specific drug delivery could potentially provide a means of reducing drug related side effects whilst maintaining, or perhaps increasing therapeutic efficiency. The aim of this work was to develop a nanoscale drug carrier, which could be loaded with an anti-cancer drug and be directed by an external magnetic field. Using a single, commercially available monomer and a simple one-pot reaction process, a polymer was synthesized and crosslinked within the pores of an anodized aluminum oxide template. These polymer nanotubes (PNT) could be functionalized with iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic manipulation, without affecting the large internal pore, or inherent low toxicity. Using an external magnetic field the nanotubes could be regionally concentrated, leaving areas devoid of nanotubes. Lastly, doxorubicin could be loaded to the PNTs, causing increased toxicity towards neuroblastoma cells, rendering a platform technology now ready for adaptation with different nanoparticles, degradable pre-polymers, and various therapeutics.

  18. Magnetically Controllable Polymer Nanotubes from a Cyclized Crosslinker for Site-Specific Delivery of Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Newland, Ben; Leupelt, Daniel; Zheng, Yu; Thomas, Laurent S. V.; Werner, Carsten; Steinhart, Martin; Wang, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Externally controlled site specific drug delivery could potentially provide a means of reducing drug related side effects whilst maintaining, or perhaps increasing therapeutic efficiency. The aim of this work was to develop a nanoscale drug carrier, which could be loaded with an anti-cancer drug and be directed by an external magnetic field. Using a single, commercially available monomer and a simple one-pot reaction process, a polymer was synthesized and crosslinked within the pores of an anodized aluminum oxide template. These polymer nanotubes (PNT) could be functionalized with iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic manipulation, without affecting the large internal pore, or inherent low toxicity. Using an external magnetic field the nanotubes could be regionally concentrated, leaving areas devoid of nanotubes. Lastly, doxorubicin could be loaded to the PNTs, causing increased toxicity towards neuroblastoma cells, rendering a platform technology now ready for adaptation with different nanoparticles, degradable pre-polymers, and various therapeutics. PMID:26619814

  19. Magnetically Controllable Polymer Nanotubes from a Cyclized Crosslinker for Site-Specific Delivery of Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Leupelt, Daniel; Zheng, Yu; Thomas, Laurent S V; Werner, Carsten; Steinhart, Martin; Wang, Wenxin

    2015-12-01

    Externally controlled site specific drug delivery could potentially provide a means of reducing drug related side effects whilst maintaining, or perhaps increasing therapeutic efficiency. The aim of this work was to develop a nanoscale drug carrier, which could be loaded with an anti-cancer drug and be directed by an external magnetic field. Using a single, commercially available monomer and a simple one-pot reaction process, a polymer was synthesized and crosslinked within the pores of an anodized aluminum oxide template. These polymer nanotubes (PNT) could be functionalized with iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic manipulation, without affecting the large internal pore, or inherent low toxicity. Using an external magnetic field the nanotubes could be regionally concentrated, leaving areas devoid of nanotubes. Lastly, doxorubicin could be loaded to the PNTs, causing increased toxicity towards neuroblastoma cells, rendering a platform technology now ready for adaptation with different nanoparticles, degradable pre-polymers, and various therapeutics.

  20. Linearly polarized single photon antibunching from a site-controlled InGaN quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Jemsson, Tomas; Machhadani, Houssaine; Karlsson, K. Fredrik; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Holtz, Per-Olof

    2014-08-25

    We report on the observation of linearly polarized single photon antibunching in the excitonic emission from a site-controlled InGaN quantum dot. The measured second order coherence function exhibits a significant dip at zero time difference, corresponding to g{sub m}{sup 2}(0)=0.90 under continuous laser excitation. This relatively high value of g{sub m}{sup 2}(0) is well understood by a model as the combination of short exciton life time (320 ps), limited experimental timing resolution and the presence of an uncorrelated broadband background emission from the sample. Our result provides the first rigorous evidence of InGaN quantum dot formation on hexagonal GaN pyramids, and it highlights a great potential in these dots as fast polarized single photon emitters if the background emission can be eliminated.

  1. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  2. Site-specific DICER and DROSHA RNA products control the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Michelini, Flavia; Saxena, Alka; Tang, Dave; de Hoon, Michiel; Anelli, Viviana; Mione, Marina; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-08-09

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in an increasingly recognized number of cellular events. Some ncRNAs are processed by DICER and DROSHA RNases to give rise to small double-stranded RNAs involved in RNA interference (RNAi). The DNA-damage response (DDR) is a signalling pathway that originates from a DNA lesion and arrests cell proliferation3. So far, DICER and DROSHA RNA products have not been reported to control DDR activation. Here we show, in human, mouse and zebrafish, that DICER and DROSHA, but not downstream elements of the RNAi pathway, are necessary to activate the DDR upon exogenous DNA damage and oncogene-induced genotoxic stress, as studied by DDR foci formation and by checkpoint assays. DDR foci are sensitive to RNase A treatment, and DICER- and DROSHA-dependent RNA products are required to restore DDR foci in RNase-A-treated cells. Through RNA deep sequencing and the study of DDR activation at a single inducible DNA double-strand break, we demonstrate that DDR foci formation requires site-specific DICER- and DROSHA-dependent small RNAs, named DDRNAs, which act in a MRE11–RAD50–NBS1-complex-dependent manner (MRE11 also known as MRE11A; NBS1 also known as NBN). DDRNAs, either chemically synthesized or in vitro generated by DICER cleavage, are sufficient to restore the DDR in RNase-A-treated cells, also in the absence of other cellular RNAs. Our results describe an unanticipated direct role of a novel class of ncRNAs in the control of DDR activation at sites of DNA damage.

  3. Site-controlled VLS growth of planar nanowires: yield and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Miao, Xin; Mohseni, Parsian K; Choi, Wonsik; Li, Xiuling

    2014-12-10

    The recently emerged selective lateral epitaxy of semiconductor planar nanowires (NWs) via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism has redefined the long-standing symbolic image of VLS NW growth. The in-plane geometry and self-aligned nature make these planar NWs completely compatible with large scale manufacturing of NW-based integrated nanoelectronics. Here, we report on the realization of perfectly site-controlled growth of GaAs planar NW arrays with unity yield using lithographically defined gold (Au) seed dots. The growth rate of the planar NWs is found to decrease with the NW width at fixed spacing, which is consistent with the conventional VLS model based on the Gibbs-Thomson effect. It is found that in general, the planar and out-of-plane NW growth modes are both present. The yield of planar NWs decreases as their lateral dimension shrinks, and 100% yield of planar NWs can be achieved at moderate V/III ratios. Based on a study of the shape of seed particles, it is proposed that the adhesion between the liquid-phase seed particle and the substrate surface is important in determining the choice of growth mode. These studies represent advances in the fundamental understanding of the VLS planar NW growth mechanism and in the precise control of the planar NW site, density, width, and length for practical applications. In addition, high quality planar InAs NWs on GaAs (100) substrates is realized, verifying that the planar VLS growth mode can be extended to heteroepitaxy.

  4. Cell-cycle-regulated control of VSG expression site silencing by histones and histone chaperones ASF1A and CAF-1b in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Alsford, Sam; Horn, David

    2012-11-01

    Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes involves monoallelic expression and reversible silencing of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes found adjacent to telomeres in polycistronic expression sites (ESs). We assessed the impact on ES silencing of five candidate essential chromatin-associated factors that emerged from a genome-wide RNA interference viability screen. Using this approach, we demonstrate roles in VSG ES silencing for two histone chaperones. Defects in S-phase progression in cells depleted for histone H3, or either chaperone, highlight in particular the link between chromatin assembly and DNA replication control. S-phase checkpoint arrest was incomplete, however, allowing G2/M-specific VSG ES derepression following knockdown of histone H3. In striking contrast, knockdown of anti-silencing factor 1A (ASF1A) allowed for derepression at all cell cycle stages, whereas knockdown of chromatin assembly factor 1b (CAF-1b) revealed derepression predominantly in S-phase and G2/M. Our results support a central role for chromatin in maintaining VSG ES silencing. ASF1A and CAF-1b appear to play constitutive and DNA replication-dependent roles, respectively, in the recycling and assembly of chromatin. Defects in these functions typically lead to arrest in S-phase but defective cells can also progress through the cell cycle leading to nucleosome depletion and derepression of telomeric VSG ESs.

  5. Comparison of mosquito control programs in seven urban sites in Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas.

    PubMed

    Impoinvil, Daniel E; Ahmad, Sajjad; Troyo, Adriana; Keating, Joseph; Githeko, Andrew K; Mbogo, Charles M; Kibe, Lydiah; Githure, John I; Gad, Adel M; Hassan, Ali N; Orshan, Laor; Warburg, Alon; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Sánchez-Loría, Victoria M; Velit-Suarez, Rosanna; Chadee, Dave D; Novak, Robert J; Beier, John C

    2007-10-01

    Mosquito control programs at seven urban sites in Kenya, Egypt, Israel, Costa Rica, and Trinidad are described and compared. Site-specific urban and disease characteristics, organizational diagrams, and strengths, weaknesses, obstacles and threats (SWOT) analysis tools are used to provide a descriptive assessment of each mosquito control program, and provide a comparison of the factors affecting mosquito abatement. The information for SWOT analysis is collected from surveys, focus-group discussions, and personal communication. SWOT analysis identified various issues affecting the efficiency and sustainability of mosquito control operations. The main outcome of our work was the description and comparison of mosquito control operations within the context of each study site's biological, social, political, management, and economic conditions. The issues identified in this study ranged from lack of inter-sector collaboration to operational issues of mosquito control efforts. A lack of sustainable funding for mosquito control was a common problem for most sites. Many unique problems were also identified, which included lack of mosquito surveillance, lack of law enforcement, and negative consequences of human behavior. Identifying common virtues and shortcomings of mosquito control operations is useful in identifying "best practices" for mosquito control operations, thus leading to better control of mosquito biting and mosquito-borne disease transmission.

  6. Influence of a Brazilian sewage outfall on the toxicity and contamination of adjacent sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abessa, D.M.S.; Carr, R.S.; Rachid, B.R.F.; Sousa, E.C.P.M.; Hortelani, M.A.; Sarkis, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    The submarine sewage outfall of Santos (SSOS) is situated in the Santos Bay (São Paulo, Brazil) and is potentially a significant source of contaminants to the adjacent marine ecosystem. The present study aimed to assess the influence of SSOS on the sediment toxicity and contamination at Santos Bay. At the disposal site, sediments tended to be finer, organically richer and exhibited higher levels of surfactants and metals, sometimes exceeding the “Threshold Effect Level” values. The SSOS influence was more evident toward the East, where the sediments exhibited higher levels of TOC, total S and metals during the summer 2000 sampling campaign. Sediment toxicity to amphipods was consistently detected in four of the five stations studied. Amphipod survival tended to correlate negatively to Hg, total N and % mud. This work provides evidence that the SSOS discharge affects the quality of sediments from Santos Bay, and that control procedures are warranted.

  7. Varied interactions between proviruses and adjacent host chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, K F; Groudine, M

    1986-01-01

    Retroviruses integrated at unique locations in the host genome can be expressed at different levels. We have analyzed the preintegration sites of three transcriptionally competent avian endogenous proviruses (evs) to determine whether the various levels of provirus expression correlate with their location in active or inactive regions of chromatin. Our results show that in three of four cell types, the chromatin conformation (as defined by relative nuclease sensitivity) of virus preintegration sites correlates with the level of expression of the resident provirus in ev+ cells: two inactive proviruses (ev-1 and ev-2) reside in nuclease-resistant chromatin domains and one active provirus (ev-3) resides in a nuclease-sensitive domain. Nuclear runoff transcription assays reveal that the preintegration sites of the active and inactive viruses are not transcribed. However, in erythrocytes of 15-day-old chicken embryos (15d RBCs), the structure and activity of the ev-3 provirus is independent of the conformation of its preintegration site. In this cell type, the ev-3 preintegration site is organized in a nuclease-resistant conformation, while the ev-3 provirus is in a nuclease-sensitive conformation and is transcribed. In addition, the nuclease sensitivity of host sequences adjacent to ev-3 is altered in ev-3+ 15d RBCs relative to that found in 15d RBCs that lack ev-3. These data suggest that the relationship between preintegration site structure and retrovirus expression is more complex than previously described. Images PMID:3025623

  8. Individual external exposures from Nevada Test Site fallout for Utah leukemia cases and controls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, R D; Gren, D C; Simon, S L; Wrenn, M E; Hawthorne, H A; Lotz, T M; Stevens, W; Till, J E

    1990-11-01

    External gamma-ray exposures from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have been assigned to 6,507 individual subjects (1,177 leukemia cases and 5,330 control subjects) who died as Utah residents between 1952 and 1981. Leukemia cases were identified, confirmed, and classified by cell type from the Utah Cancer Registry, Utah State vital records, and medical records. Residential histories were obtained from the Deceased Membership File (DMF) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), supplemented by information from the LDS Church Census Records that were taken in 1950, 1955, and 1960-62. Control subjects were selected randomly within age strata from the DMF and were frequency-matched to the cases by age at death and for sex. Individual radiation exposures were assigned as a function of residence location and time interval for each residence during the fallout period (1951-1958) using geographic exposure data taken from the literature. Temporal distribution of exposure for subjects who resided in more than one locality or who were born or died during the fallout period was determined from data of other investigators. Calculated gamma-ray exposures for each place of residence were summed for each subject to yield the exposure to fallout from the NTS.

  9. Initialization of a spin qubit in a site-controlled nanowire quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; McMahon, Peter L.; Fischer, Kevin A.; Puri, Shruti; Müller, Kai; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Reimer, Michael E.; Zwiller, Val; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-05-01

    A fault-tolerant quantum repeater or quantum computer using solid-state spin-based quantum bits will likely require a physical implementation with many spins arranged in a grid. Self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) have been established as attractive candidates for building spin-based quantum information processing devices, but such QDs are randomly positioned, which makes them unsuitable for constructing large-scale processors. Recent efforts have shown that QDs embedded in nanowires can be deterministically positioned in regular arrays, can store single charges, and have excellent optical properties, but so far there have been no demonstrations of spin qubit operations using nanowire QDs. Here we demonstrate optical pumping of individual spins trapped in site-controlled nanowire QDs, resulting in high-fidelity spin-qubit initialization. This represents the next step towards establishing spins in nanowire QDs as quantum memories suitable for use in a large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum computer or repeater based on all-optical control of the spin qubits.

  10. Controlling the density and site of attachment of gold nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Kaur, Inderpreet; Dharamvir, Keya; Bharadwaj, Lalit M

    2012-03-01

    A facile method for controlling the density and site of attachment of gold nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes is demonstrated. Nitric acid based oxidation was carried out to create carboxylic groups exclusively at the ends of carbon nanotubes, whereas oxidation using a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acid with varied reaction time was carried out to control the population of carboxylic groups on the side walls of nanotubes. In turn, 4-aminothiophenol modified gold nanoparticles were covalently interfaced to these carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a zero length cross-linker, 1-ethylene-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide. Raman spectroscopic results showed increase in height of disorder band with each of these successive steps, indicating the increase in degree of functionalization of the carbon nanotubes. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic analysis affirmed the functionalization of nanostructures and the formation of nanohybrid. Transmission electron and field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis ascertained the attachment of gold nanoparticles to the ends and side walls of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The new hybrid nanostructures may find applications in electronic, optoelectronic, and sensing devices.

  11. Individual external exposures from Nevada Test Site fallout for Utah leukemia cases and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.D.; Gren, D.C.; Simon, S.L.; Wrenn, M.E.; Hawthorne, H.A.; Lotz, T.M.; Stevens, W.; Till, J.E. )

    1990-11-01

    External gamma-ray exposures from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have been assigned to 6,507 individual subjects (1,177 leukemia cases and 5,330 control subjects) who died as Utah residents between 1952 and 1981. Leukemia cases were identified, confirmed, and classified by cell type from the Utah Cancer Registry, Utah State vital records, and medical records. Residential histories were obtained from the Deceased Membership File (DMF) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), supplemented by information from the LDS Church Census Records that were taken in 1950, 1955, and 1960-62. Control subjects were selected randomly within age strata from the DMF and were frequency-matched to the cases by age at death and for sex. Individual radiation exposures were assigned as a function of residence location and time interval for each residence during the fallout period (1951-1958) using geographic exposure data taken from the literature. Temporal distribution of exposure for subjects who resided in more than one locality or who were born or died during the fallout period was determined from data of other investigators. Calculated gamma-ray exposures for each place of residence were summed for each subject to yield the exposure to fallout from the NTS.

  12. Inositol phosphate pathway controls transcription of telomeric expression sites in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Ken

    2015-05-26

    African trypanosomes evade clearance by host antibodies by periodically changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. They transcribe only one VSG gene at a time from 1 of about 20 telomeric expression sites (ESs). They undergo antigenic variation by switching transcription between telomeric ESs or by recombination of the VSG gene expressed. We show that the inositol phosphate (IP) pathway controls transcription of telomeric ESs and VSG antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei. Conditional knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 5-kinase (TbPIP5K) or phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase (TbPIP5Pase) or overexpression of phospholipase C (TbPLC) derepresses numerous silent ESs in T. brucei bloodstream forms. The derepression is specific to telomeric ESs, and it coincides with an increase in the number of colocalizing telomeric and RNA polymerase I foci in the nucleus. Monoallelic VSG transcription resumes after reexpression of TbPIP5K; however, most of the resultant cells switched the VSG gene expressed. TbPIP5K, TbPLC, their substrates, and products localize to the plasma membrane, whereas TbPIP5Pase localizes to the nucleus proximal to telomeres. TbPIP5Pase associates with repressor/activator protein 1 (TbRAP1), and their telomeric silencing function is altered by TbPIP5K knockdown. These results show that specific steps in the IP pathway control ES transcription and antigenic switching in T. brucei by epigenetic regulation of telomere silencing.

  13. Inositol phosphate pathway controls transcription of telomeric expression sites in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Ken

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes evade clearance by host antibodies by periodically changing their variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. They transcribe only one VSG gene at a time from 1 of about 20 telomeric expression sites (ESs). They undergo antigenic variation by switching transcription between telomeric ESs or by recombination of the VSG gene expressed. We show that the inositol phosphate (IP) pathway controls transcription of telomeric ESs and VSG antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei. Conditional knockdown of phosphatidylinositol 5-kinase (TbPIP5K) or phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphatase (TbPIP5Pase) or overexpression of phospholipase C (TbPLC) derepresses numerous silent ESs in T. brucei bloodstream forms. The derepression is specific to telomeric ESs, and it coincides with an increase in the number of colocalizing telomeric and RNA polymerase I foci in the nucleus. Monoallelic VSG transcription resumes after reexpression of TbPIP5K; however, most of the resultant cells switched the VSG gene expressed. TbPIP5K, TbPLC, their substrates, and products localize to the plasma membrane, whereas TbPIP5Pase localizes to the nucleus proximal to telomeres. TbPIP5Pase associates with repressor/activator protein 1 (TbRAP1), and their telomeric silencing function is altered by TbPIP5K knockdown. These results show that specific steps in the IP pathway control ES transcription and antigenic switching in T. brucei by epigenetic regulation of telomere silencing. PMID:25964327

  14. A study to control chemical reactions using Si:2p core ionization: site-specific fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Prümper, Georg; Takemoto, Mai; Takahashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiro; Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Tabayashi, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Isao H; Harries, James R; Tamenori, Yusuke; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2011-08-18

    In an aim to create a "sharp" molecular knife, we have studied site-specific fragmentation caused by Si:2p core photoionization of bridged trihalosilyltrimethylsilyl molecules in the vapor phase. Highly site-specific bond dissociation has been found to occur around the core-ionized Si site in some of the molecules studied. The site specificity in fragmentation and the 2p binding energy difference between the two Si sites depend in similar ways on the intersite bridge and the electronegativities of the included halogen atoms. The present experimental and computational results show that for efficient "cutting" the following conditions for the two atomic sites to be separated by the knife should be satisfied. First, the sites should be located far from each other and connected by a chain of saturated bonds so that intersite electron migration can be reduced. Second, the chemical environments of the atomic sites should be as different as possible.

  15. Statistical analysis of site factors controlling preferential flow and transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John; Moeys, Julien; Jarvis, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of the solute transport characteristics of soils at field and catchment scales is important for sustainable management of environmental and agricultural resources. It is known that preferential flow and solute transport through macropores often contribute substantially to the transport of diffuse pollutants to groundwater or surface water via drains. As direct measurement of preferential flow parameters is expensive and time consuming, more easily obtainable soil properties must instead be used as surrogates to predict preferential flow, using so-called pedotransfer functions (PTFs). However, there is evidence that the soil properties used in classical PTFs (soil texture, bulk density, fraction of organic matter) are not sufficient to infer the flow and transport characteristics of near-saturated and saturated soils (e.g. Weynants, M. et al., 2009. Revisiting Vereecken Pedotransfer Functions: Introducing a Closed-Form Hydraulic Model. Vadose Zone Journal 8: 86-95). Rather, the incorporation of additional data such as land use, soil-biota, and soil-type information appears to be necessary (e.g. Jarvis, N. J. et al., 2009. A conceptual model of soil susceptibility to macropore flow. Vadose Zone Journal 8: 902-910). In this study, we make use of a database comprising results of breakthrough curve experiments and corresponding site (parent material, climate, land use, etc.) and soil properties (texture, bulk density, etc.) published in the peer-reviewed literature to identify through statistical analyses (e.g. factorial and cluster analysis) the key soil properties and site attributes that control susceptibility to preferential flow.

  16. Meteorological controls on ozone at an elevated eastern United States regional background monitoring site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, O. R.; Moody, J. L.

    2000-03-01

    To determine synoptic- and regional-scale meteorological controls on ozone upwind of the North Atlantic Ocean, we developed an ozone climatology for Big Meadows, Virginia. Three methodologies were employed to analyze the 6-year ozone data set (1989-1994) from this elevated, regional, background monitoring site. (1)A springtime case study showed that repeated dynamic processes associated with three consecutive cold-front passages were related to a cyclic pattern in ozone variation. Back-trajectory analysis suggests a stratospheric as well as anthropogenic influence on the enhanced ozone events. (2) Analyses of the meteorology and back trajectories associated with daytime ozone events above the 90th percentile and below the 10th percentile revealed strong contrasts in transport history. Enhanced events were strongly associated with dry high-pressure conditions and half were associated with descent through surface anticyclones. Conversely, the depleted-ozone trajectories were typically associated with low-pressure systems and were more likely to be associated with ascending or low-level flow than descending flow. (3) Back trajectories were grouped according to similar transport paths to try to explain ozone variance by airmass transport. In a previous study, segregation of ozone values by transport path explained a relatively large amount of the ozone variance at Bermuda. However, in our study, this approach explained only a small portion of the ozone variance. We attribute the differences in explained variance at the two sites to complex interactions between transport and photochemistry over the continent and a simplified transport regime over the western North Atlantic Ocean.

  17. The Hydrogeologic Conditions in the Upper Dockum Group at the Waste Control Specialists Site, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. M.; grisak, G. E.; Hughes, E.; Pickens, J. F.; Powers, D. W.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Cook, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Control Specialists (WCS) site in Andrews County, west Texas has licenses from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the disposal of radioactive and hazardous material. Four landfills are constructed on the WCS site, including a hazardous waste landfill and three landfills for radioactive waste. All landfills are constructed below grade and within the low-permeability Triassic Dockum Group mudrocks (Cooper Canyon Formation). The Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. The Dockum would be generally classified as an aquitard. At the WCS site, the vertical effective hydraulic conductivity of the Dockum is 1.2×10-9 cm/s, and its horizontal effective conductivity is 2.9×10-7 cm/s. Core samples reveal that at least the upper 300+ feet of the Dockum is in the unsaturated zone. The average capillary pressure in Dockum core samples is -2.84 MPa, with an average saturation of 0.87. High saturation values are not surprising, as Dockum air-entry pressures range from 0.016 to 9.8 MPa, with a mean of 1.0 MPa. Heat dissipation sensors, thermocouple psychrometers, and advanced tensiometers installed in Dockum borehole arrays generally show capillary pressures one order of magnitude less than those measured on core samples. These differences with core data are attributed to the presence of a trapped and compressed gas phase within Dockum materials. In the vicinity of an instrumented borehole, the gas phase pressure equilibrates with atmospheric pressure, lowering the capillary pressure. Little fluid has circulated vertically through the Dockum. Measurements of the electrical conductivity of a saturated paste consisting of water and

  18. On the nature of the optimal control problem at leaking underground fuel tank sites

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, B

    1998-12-01

    In California, leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) legislation was conceived because of concern that ''time bomb plumes'' would ultimately impact a significant portion of the state's ground and surface water resources. However, it has been found that fuel hydrocarbons (FHC) plumes are stable at relatively short distances from the source in areas of shallow groundwater. In urban areas, these shallow aquifers are not even recommended for use because they are subject to contamination from sewers, storm drains, septic fields and a variety of other sources. After the FHC source has been removed, risk to human health or the environment is insignificant in most cases. For this reason, cleanup to maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) will not significantly reduce the social damages associated with current or near-term human health or ecological risk. Based on these findings, California would be able to save significant resources that had been allocated for LUFT-site cleanup. Non-convexities in the rate of decay function and non-differentiability in the cleanup and social damage functions appear to limit the usefulness of models, such as Caputo and Wilen's (1995), that attempt to characterize the optimal cleanup path using marginal analyses. Furthermore, the effect of active remediation efforts on the natural rate of decay in stable plumes is not taken into account in their model. The imposition of deed restrictions prior to a demonstration of cleanup to MCLs is an additional conservative measure imposed by the California Regional Water Quality Control Boards (RWQCBs) to reduce the uncertainty associated with health risks to future users. These measures impose costs on society in the form of lost rents that have not been considered by regulators. By estimating the differential rents during the time to cleanup, regulators would be able to compare the costs of imposing deed restrictions with the values that society imparts to protection of future users. Both land and water

  19. Comparison of mosquito control programs in seven urban sites in Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Impoinvil, Daniel E.; Ahmad, Sajjad; Troyo, Adriana; Keating, Joseph; Githeko, Andrew K.; Mbogo, Charles M; Kibe, Lydiah; Githure, John I.; Gad, Adel M.; Hassan, Ali N.; Orshan, Laor; Warburg, Alon; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Sánchez-Loría, Victoria M.; Velit-Suarez, Rosanna; Chadee, Dave D.; Novak, Robert J.; Beier, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Mosquito control programs at seven urban sites in Kenya, Egypt, Israel, Costa Rica, and Trinidad are described and compared. Site-specific urban and disease characteristics, organizational diagrams, and strengths, weaknesses, obstacles and threats (SWOT) analysis tools are used to provide a descriptive assessment of each mosquito control program, and provide a comparison of the factors affecting mosquito abatement. The information for SWOT analysis is collected from surveys, focus group discussions, and personal communication. SWOT analysis identified various issues affecting the efficiency and sustainability of mosquito control operations. The main outcome of our work was the description and comparison of mosquito control operations within the context of each study site’s biological, social, political, management, and economic conditions. The issues identified in this study ranged from lack of inter-sector collaboration to operational issues of mosquito control efforts. A lack of sustainable funding for mosquito control was a common problem for most sites. Many unique problems were also identified, which included lack of mosquito surveillance, lack of law enforcement, and negative consequences of human behavior. Identifying common virtues and shortcomings of mosquito control operations is useful in identifying “best practices” for mosquito control operations, thus leading to better control of mosquito biting and mosquito-borne disease transmission. PMID:17316882

  20. Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

    1986-03-01

    The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

  1. Contrasting impact of forestry-drainage on CO2 balance at two adjacent peatlands in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohila, Annalea; Minkkinen, Kari; Penttilä, Timo; Launiainen, Samuli; Koskinen, Markku; Ojanen, Paavo; Laurila, Tuomas

    2014-05-01

    Fate of carbon in peatlands after drainage has been a subject of many studies, particularly at agriculturally managed sites, but also at sites prepared for forestry. In general, the drainage of peatlands has been considered to trigger the decomposition rate of peat and to cause carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the peat into the atmosphere. However, there is not yet full consensus on what are the main regulating factors of the carbon balances in forested peatlands, and do all the forested peatland even act as a source of carbon into the atmosphere. In this study we compare the CO2 exchange rates at two adjacent peatland sites in southern Finland, drained for forestry about 40 years earlier. The pair of sites with similar climatic conditions offer an excellent case for studying the mechanisms controlling the carbon balances of forestry-drained peatlands. The sites differ from each other only by fertility, which has an impact on, e.g., tree growth rate. At both sites, CO2 and energy fluxes have been measured with the eddy covariance method over the course of 4 years, but not simultaneously. We have also built at both sites an automatic system consisting of six transparent closed chambers which collect data on the CO2 exchange of the forest floor vegetation (including tree roots) and soil around the year. This enables us to quantify the carbon uptake potential of the ground layer and the peat decomposition rates and helps us to understand the differences between the sites. The results show that the pine and dwarf-shrub-dominated site (nutrient-poor) is a large CO2 sink. The site with a mixture of spruce, birch and pine and lesser ground vegetation (nutrient-rich), on the contrary, has a close-to-neutral CO2 balance, despite the much higher tree growth rate there. In this presentation we will compare the general dynamics and climatic responses of CO2 exchange at the sites, compare the magnitude and factors causing interannual variation, and discuss potential reasons

  2. Hydrodynamic parameters estimation from self-potential data in a controlled full scale site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidichimo, Francesco; De Biase, Michele; Rizzo, Enzo; Masi, Salvatore; Straface, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    A multi-physical approach developed for the hydrodynamic characterization of porous media using hydrogeophysical information is presented. Several pumping tests were performed in the Hydrogeosite Laboratory, a controlled full-scale site designed and constructed at the CNR-IMAA (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto di Metodologia per l'Analisi Ambientale), in Marsico Nuovo (Basilicata Region, Southern Italy), in order to obtain an intermediate stage between laboratory experiments and field survey. The facility consists of a pool, used to study water infiltration processes, to simulate the space and time dynamics of subsurface contamination phenomena, to improve and to find new relationship between geophysical and hydrogeological parameters, to test and to calibrate new geophysical techniques and instruments. Therefore, the Hydrogeosite Laboratory has the advantage of carrying out controlled experiments, like in a flow cell or sandbox, but at field comparable scale. The data collected during the experiments have been used to estimate the saturated hydraulic conductivity ks [ms-1] using a coupled inversion model working in transient conditions, made up of the modified Richards equation describing the water flow in a variably saturated porous medium and the Poisson equation providing the self-potential ϕ [V], which naturally occurs at points of the soil surface owing to the presence of an electric field produced by the motion of underground electrolytic fluids through porous systems. The result obtained by this multi-physical numerical approach, which removes all the approximations adopted in previous works, makes a useful instrument for real heterogeneous aquifer characterization and for predictive analysis of its behavior.

  3. Robotic single site versus robotic multiport hysterectomy in early endometrial cancer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare surgical outcomes and cost of robotic single-site hysterectomy (RSSH) versus robotic multiport hysterectomy (RMPH) in early stage endometrial cancer. Methods This is a retrospective case-control study, comparing perioperative outcomes and costs of RSSH and RMPH in early stage endometrial cancer patients. RSSH were matched 1:2 according to age, body mass index, comorbidity, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetric (FIGO) stage, type of radical surgery, histologic type, and grading. Mean hospital cost per discharge was calculated summarizing the cost of daily hospital room charges, operating room, cost of supplies and length of hospital stay. Results A total of 23 women who underwent RSSH were matched with 46 historic controls treated by RMPH in the same institute, with the same surgical team. No significant differences were found in terms of age, histologic type, stage, and grading. Operative time was similar: 102.5 minutes in RMPH and 110 in RSSH (p=0.889). Blood loss was lower in RSSH than in RMPH (respectively, 50 mL vs. 100 mL, p=0.001). Hospital stay was 3 days in RMPH and 2 days in RSSH (p=0.001). No intraoperative complications occurred in both groups. Early postoperative complications were 2.2% in RMPH and 4.3% in RSSH. Overall cost was higher in RMPH than in RSSH (respectively, $7,772.15 vs. $5,181.06). Conclusion Our retrospective study suggests the safety and feasibility of RSSH for staging early endometrial cancer without major differences from the RMPH in terms of surgical outcomes, but with lower hospital costs. Certainly, further studies are eagerly warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27171672

  4. Exciton dynamics in a site-controlled quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlov, C.; Lyasota, A.; Ferrier, L.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E.

    2015-11-01

    Exciton and cavity mode (CM) dynamics in site-controlled pyramidal quantum dots (QDs), integrated with linear photonic crystal membrane cavities, are investigated for a range of temperatures and photo-excitation power levels. The absence of spurious multi-excitonic effects, normally observed in similar structures based on self-assembled QDs, permits the observation of effects intrinsic to two-level systems embedded in a solid state matrix and interacting with optical cavity modes. The coupled exciton and CM dynamics follow the same trend, indicating that the CM is fed only by the exciton transition. The Purcell reduction of the QD and CM decay times is reproduced well by a theoretical model that includes exciton linewidth broadening and temperature dependent non-radiative processes, from which we extract a Purcell factor of 17 ± 5. For excitation powers above QD saturation, we show the influence of quantum wire barrier states at short delay time, and demonstrate the absence of multiexcitonic background emission.

  5. An On-Site Thermoelectric Cooling Device for Cryotherapy and Control of Skin Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Natalia; Dedow, Karl; Nguy, Lindsey; Sullivan, Patrick; Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy involves the surface application of low temperatures to enhance the healing of soft tissue injuries. Typical devices embody a remote source of chilled water that is pumped through a circulation bladder placed on the treatment site. In contrast, the present device uses thermoelectric refrigeration modules to bring the cooling source directly to the tissue to be treated, thereby achieving significant improvements in control of therapeutic temperature while having a reduced size and weight. A prototype system was applied to test an oscillating cooling and heating protocol for efficacy in regulating skin blood perfusion in the treatment area. Data on 12 human subjects indicate that thermoelectric coolers (TECs) delivered significant and sustainable changes in perfusion for both heating (increase by (±SE) 173.0 ± 66.0%, P < 0.005) and cooling (decrease by (±SE) 57.7 ± 4.2%, P < 0.0005), thus supporting the feasibility of a TEC-based device for cryotherapy with local temperature regulation. PMID:26421089

  6. Heme binding site in apomyoglobin may be effectively targeted with small molecules to control aggregation.

    PubMed

    Azami-Movahed, Mehrnaz; Shariatizi, Sajad; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2013-02-01

    A number of ligands with affinities for the heme binding site of apomyoglobin were tested to control amorphous and fibrillar aggregation in the protein. Several techniques, including fluorescence, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dot blot analysis combined with viability studies were employed for structural characterization and cytotoxicity assessment of the intermediate and final protein structures formed during the aggregation process. Of the small molecules investigated, chrysin and Nile red with high structural similarities to heme were chosen for further studies. Only fibril formation was found to be prevented by Nile red, while chrysin, with a greater structural flexibility, was able to prevent both types of aggregate formation. The two ligands were found to influence aggregation at different stages of intermediate structure formation, an ability determined by their degrees of similarities with heme. Based on structural characterization and toxicity studies, it is concluded that ligands similar in structure to heme may be effective in influencing various stages of aggregate formation and toxicity potencies of the protein structures. Since metalloproteins constitute more than thirty percent of all known proteins, it is concluded that the present strategy may be of general significance.

  7. Exciton dynamics in a site-controlled quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jarlov, C. Lyasota, A.; Ferrier, L.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E.

    2015-11-09

    Exciton and cavity mode (CM) dynamics in site-controlled pyramidal quantum dots (QDs), integrated with linear photonic crystal membrane cavities, are investigated for a range of temperatures and photo-excitation power levels. The absence of spurious multi-excitonic effects, normally observed in similar structures based on self-assembled QDs, permits the observation of effects intrinsic to two-level systems embedded in a solid state matrix and interacting with optical cavity modes. The coupled exciton and CM dynamics follow the same trend, indicating that the CM is fed only by the exciton transition. The Purcell reduction of the QD and CM decay times is reproduced well by a theoretical model that includes exciton linewidth broadening and temperature dependent non-radiative processes, from which we extract a Purcell factor of 17 ± 5. For excitation powers above QD saturation, we show the influence of quantum wire barrier states at short delay time, and demonstrate the absence of multiexcitonic background emission.

  8. Site-specific phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics control Pyrin inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenqing; Yang, Jieling; Liu, Wang; Wang, Yupeng; Shao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Pyrin, encoded by the MEFV gene, is best known for its gain-of-function mutations causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin forms a caspase-1–activating inflammasome in response to inactivating modifications of Rho GTPases by various bacterial toxins or effectors. Pyrin-mediated innate immunity is unique in that it senses bacterial virulence rather than microbial molecules, but its mechanism of activation is unknown. Here we show that Pyrin was phosphorylated in bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We identified Ser-205 and Ser-241 in mouse Pyrin whose phosphorylation resulted in inhibitory binding by cellular 14-3-3 proteins. The two serines underwent dephosphorylation upon toxin stimulation or bacterial infection, triggering 14-3-3 dissociation, which correlated with Pyrin inflammasome activation. We developed antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser-205 and Ser-241, which confirmed the stimuli-induced dephosphorylation of endogenous Pyrin. Mutational analyses indicated that both phosphorylation and signal-induced dephosphorylation of Ser-205/241 are important for Pyrin activation. Moreover, microtubule drugs, including colchicine, commonly used to treat FMF, effectively blocked activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. These drugs did not affect Pyrin dephosphorylation and 14-3-3 dissociation but inhibited Pyrin-mediated apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC) aggregation. Our study reveals that site-specific (de)phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics critically control Pyrin inflammasome activation, illustrating a fine and complex mechanism in cytosolic immunity. PMID:27482109

  9. Resonance fluorescence of a site-controlled quantum dot realized by the buried-stressor growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Max; Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Voigt, Robert; Schnauber, Peter; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rodt, Sven; Strittmatter, André; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    Site-controlled growth of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) represents a major advancement to achieve scalable quantum technology platforms. One immediate benefit is the deterministic integration of quantum emitters into optical microcavities. However, site-controlled growth of QDs is usually achieved at the cost of reduced optical quality. Here, we show that the buried-stressor growth technique enables the realization of high-quality site-controlled QDs with attractive optical and quantum optical properties. This is evidenced by performing excitation power dependent resonance fluorescence experiments at cryogenic temperatures showing QD emission linewidths down to 10 μeV. Resonant excitation leads to the observation of the Mollow triplet under CW excitation and enables coherent state preparation under pulsed excitation. Under resonant π-pulse excitation we observe clean single-photon emission associated with g(2)(0) = 0.12 limited by non-ideal laser suppression.

  10. A Multifaceted Sampling Approach to Better Understanding Biogeochemical and Hydrogeological Controls on Uranium Mobility at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Riverton, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.; Campbell, S.; Bone, S. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding uranium mobility in subsurface environments is not trivial. Obtaining sufficient data to accurately represent soil and aquifer characteristics can require unique approaches that evolve with added site knowledge. At Riverton, the primary source of uranium mill tailings remaining from ore processing was removed but contaminant plumes have persisted longer than predicted by groundwater modeling. What are the primary mechanisms controlling plume persistence? DOE is conducting new characterization studies to assist our understanding of underlying biogeochemical and hydrogeological mechanisms affecting secondary sources. A variety of field sampling techniques are being sequentially employed including augering, trenching, pore water sampling, and installing multi-level wells. In August 2012, vadose zone soil samples from 34 locations and groundwater from 103 boreholes were collected with Geoprobe ® direct push rods. Lower than expected uranium concentrations in composited shallow soils indicated the need for more focused and deeper samples. In May 2014, soil samples containing evaporites were collected along the bank of the Little Wind River; elevated uranium concentrations in evaporite minerals correlated with plume configurations and reflect contaminated groundwater discharge at the river. In September 2014, hand anger samples collected by the river and oxbow lake also indicated the presence of organic rich zones containing elevated uranium (>50 mg/kg). Subsequent samples collected from five backhoe trenches in May 2015 revealed a highly heterogeneous vadose zone composed of clay, silt, sand and cobbles containing evaporites and organic rich zones which may interact with groundwater plumes.Plans for August 2015 include sonic drilling to obtain continuous cores from the surface down to the base of the surficial aquifer with multi-level monitoring wells constructed in each borehole to assess vertical variation in groundwater chemistry. Temporary well

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  12. Factors controlling building susceptibility to earthquakes: 14-year recordings of Islamic archaeological sites in Old Cairo, Egypt: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamh, G. M. E.; Kallash, A.; Azzam, R.

    2008-11-01

    Cairo City has a large number and different forms of Islamic archaeological sites, in particular, at El-Gammalia and El-Moez streets, as well as Coptic archaeological sites, e.g. at Mari Gergis. Human interference and activities at these historical areas resulted in flooding such sites’ foundations with domestic water, deteriorating its basal courses by salt weathering. The 1992 earthquake is another natural environmental hazard severely affecting many of these sites. The aim of the current study is to examine some factors (of bedrock and buildings) that are expected to control building susceptibility to damage by earthquakes by taking 38 Islamic archaeological sites in the El-Gammalia area as a representative case study. Detailed field recordings of site damage category before and after the quake and continued recording of damage features generated by the 1992 quake over the last 14 years, measuring depth to sub-surface water, measuring buildings’ height before the quake and bedrock sampling at these sites for geotechnical investigations were all considered for achieving this aim. The data has been processed mathematically and graphically (using the Excel package) to examine the main factors responsible for building susceptibility to damage by earthquakes. The selected archaeological sites give an excellent representation of the factors controlling building susceptibility to damage by quakes; it is found that the sites with heights (before the quake) ranging from 12 to 14 m are the most affected ones; the sites with the highest damage category before the quake were more susceptible to more damage by the quake; the sites that had been built on alluvium soil were more affected than those built on the Eocene limestone. The age of these sites has, to a small extent, indirect control on sites’ susceptibility to damage by the quake, particularly in parts flooded with domestic water (i.e. affected by salt weathering). The depth to sub-surface water is an effective

  13. Transcription of Two Adjacent Carbohydrate Utilization Gene Clusters in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 Is Controlled by LacI- and Repressor Open Reading Frame Kinase (ROK)-Type Regulators

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Liedtke, Andrea; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Zomer, Aldert

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tracts of mammals, including humans, where their growth is presumed to be dependent on various diet- and/or host-derived carbohydrates. To understand transcriptional control of bifidobacterial carbohydrate metabolism, we investigated two genetic carbohydrate utilization clusters dedicated to the metabolism of raffinose-type sugars and melezitose. Transcriptomic and gene inactivation approaches revealed that the raffinose utilization system is positively regulated by an activator protein, designated RafR. The gene cluster associated with melezitose metabolism was shown to be subject to direct negative control by a LacI-type transcriptional regulator, designated MelR1, in addition to apparent indirect negative control by means of a second LacI-type regulator, MelR2. In silico analysis, DNA-protein interaction, and primer extension studies revealed the MelR1 and MelR2 operator sequences, each of which is positioned just upstream of or overlapping the correspondingly regulated promoter sequences. Similar analyses identified the RafR binding operator sequence located upstream of the rafB promoter. This study indicates that transcriptional control of gene clusters involved in carbohydrate metabolism in bifidobacteria is subject to conserved regulatory systems, representing either positive or negative control. PMID:24705323

  14. Communicating potential risks of uncontrolled site development at a Fusrap site

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, A.D.; Kollar, W.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a particular risk communication challenge at the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site (the Site) in Maywood, New Jersey, USA. That challenge is communicating the potential human exposure risks of uncontrolled site development to landowners, tenants, private contractors and public works entities that may engage in construction activities at or adjacent to Site properties. This is of special concern because the Site does not have the authority to establish physical control over most of the properties where contamination is known or suspected to exist. Consequently, a range of communications techniques have been employed to alert property owners and others to the risks of uncontrolled site development. Each technique has its particular limitations, but collectively this multi-channel communication strategy has proved successful in delivering the risk message. (authors)

  15. Efficacy of cyromazine to control immature stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) developing in winter hay feeding sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hay mixed with manure and urine residues at sites where hay has been provided as supplemental winter feed for cattle provide an excellent substrate for the development of immature stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.). Such sites are primary sources of early summer stable flies in the central U...

  16. 76 FR 81986 - Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower, Spherion, Securitas and ABM Janitorial Services... leased from ABM Janitorial Services North Central, Inc. was employed on-site at the Rock Island, Illinois... Department is amending this certification to include workers leased from ABM Janitorial Services...

  17. Interaction of Cracks Between Two Adjacent Indents in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental observations of the interaction behavior of cracks between two adjacent indents were made using an indentation technique in soda-lime glass. It was specifically demonstrated how one indent crack initiates and propagates in the vicinity of another indent crack. Several types of crack interactions were examined by changing the orientation and distance of one indent relative to the other. It was found that the residual stress field produced by elastic/plastic indentation has a significant influence on controlling the mode of crack interaction. The interaction of an indent crack with a free surface was also investigated for glass and ceramic specimens.

  18. The controlled relay of multiple protons required at the active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2012-07-07

    The enzyme nitrogenase, when reducing natural and unnatural substrates, requires large numbers of protons per chemical catalytic cycle. The active face of the catalytic site (the FeMo-cofactor, FeMo-co) is situated in a protein domain which is largely hydrophobic and anhydrous, and incapable of serial provision of multiple protons. Through detailed analysis of the high quality protein crystal structures available the characteristics of a chain of water molecules leading from the protein surface to a key sulfur atom (S3B) of FeMo-co are described. The first half of the water chain from the surface inwards is branched, slightly variable, and able to accommodate exogenous small molecules: this is dubbed the proton bay. The second half, from the proton bay to S3B, is comprised of a single chain of eight hydrogen bonded water molecules. This section is strictly conserved, and is intimately involved in hydrogen bonds with homocitrate, an essential component that chelates Mo. This is the proton wire, and a detailed Grotthuss mechanism for serial translocation of protons through this proton wire to S3B is proposed. This controlled serial proton relay from the protein surface to S3B is an essential component of the intramolecular hydrogenation paradigm for the complete chemical mechanisms of nitrogenase. Each proton reaching S3B, instigated by electron transfer to FeMo-co, becomes a hydrogen atom that migrates to other components of the active face of FeMo-co and to bound substrates and intermediates, allowing subsequent multiple proton transfers along the proton wire. Experiments to test the proposed mechanism of proton supply are suggested. The water chain in nitrogenase is comparable with the purported proton pumping pathway of cytochrome c oxidase.

  19. Brief interventions to reduce Ecstasy use: a multi-site randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Melissa M; Hides, Leanne; Olivier, Jake; Khawar, Laila; McKetin, Rebecca; Copeland, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Studies examining the ability of motivational enhancement therapy (MET) to augment education provision among ecstasy users have produced mixed results and none have examined whether treatment fidelity was related to ecstasy use outcomes. The primary objectives of this multi-site, parallel, two-group randomized controlled trial were to determine if a single-session of MET could instill greater commitment to change and reduce ecstasy use and related problems more so than an education-only intervention and whether MET sessions delivered with higher treatment fidelity are associated with better outcomes. The secondary objective was to assess participants' satisfaction with their assigned interventions. Participants (N=174; Mage=23.62) at two Australian universities were allocated randomly to receive a 15-minute educational session on ecstasy use (n=85) or a 50-minute session of MET that included an educational component (n=89). Primary outcomes were assessed at baseline, and then at 4-, 16-, and 24-weeks postbaseline, while the secondary outcome measure was assessed 4-weeks postbaseline by researchers blind to treatment allocation. Overall, the treatment fidelity was acceptable to good in the MET condition. There were no statistical differences at follow-up between the groups on the primary outcomes of ecstasy use, ecstasy-related problems, and commitment to change. Both intervention groups reported a 50% reduction in their ecstasy use and a 20% reduction in the severity of their ecstasy-related problems at the 24-week follow up. Commitment to change slightly improved for both groups (9%-17%). Despite the lack of between-group statistical differences on primary outcomes, participants who received a single session of MET were slightly more satisfied with their intervention than those who received education only. MI fidelity was not associated with ecstasy use outcomes. Given these findings, future research should focus on examining mechanisms of change. Such work may

  20. Environmental Controls on Cumulative and Yearly Litter Decay Rates Over Four Years in Forested and Harvested Sites Across Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Thompson, E.; Cameron, A.; Pare, D.; Amiro, B. D.; Lavigne, M.; Smyth, C.; Black, T. A.; Barr, A. G.; Margolis, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    weak. Both temperature and moisture accounted for differences in cumulative decay rates and mass loss of surface litter among forest site type and cover, though soil microenvironment accounted for more variation than did site climate. Forest site type and cover effects were still significant even when controlled for microenvironment, suggesting other soil or biotic factors need to be accounted for in predicting litter decay.

  1. 75 FR 66797 - Watts Regulator, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Employment Control, D/B/A Employment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... Employment and Training Administration Watts Regulator, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Employment Control, D/B/A Employment Staffing, Inc., Spindale, NC; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To... amended (``Act''), 19 U.S.C. 2273, the Department of Labor issued a Certification of Eligibility to...

  2. 75 FR 77664 - Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions... of Honeywell International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division, Rock Island, Illinois... International, Inc., Automation and Control Solutions Division. The Department has determined that these...

  3. NF-E2 disrupts chromatin structure at human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive site 2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J A; Emerson, B M

    1996-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is responsible for forming an active chromatin structure extending over the 100-kb locus, allowing expression of the beta-globin gene family. The LCR consists of four erythroid-cell-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS1 to -4). DNase I hypersensitive sites are thought to represent nucleosome-free regions of DNA which are bound by trans-acting factors. Of the four hypersensitive sites only HS2 acts as a transcriptional enhancer. In this study, we examine the binding of an erythroid protein to its site within HS2 in chromatin in vitro. NF-E2 is a transcriptional activator consisting of two subunits, the hematopoietic cell-specific p45 and the ubiquitous DNA-binding subunit, p18. NF-E2 binds two tandem AP1-like sites in HS2 which form the core of its enhancer activity. In this study, we show that when bound to in vitro-reconstituted chromatin, NF-E2 forms a DNase I hypersensitive site at HS2 similar to the site observed in vivo. Moreover, NF-E2 binding in vitro results in a disruption of nucleosome structure which can be detected 200 bp away. Although NF-E2 can disrupt nucleosomes when added to preformed chromatin, the disruption is more pronounced when NF-E2 is added to DNA prior to chromatin assembly. Interestingly, the hematopoietic cell-specific subunit, p45, is necessary for binding to chromatin but not to naked DNA. Interaction of NF-E2 with its site in chromatin-reconstituted HS2 allows a second erythroid factor, GATA-1, to bind its nearby sites. Lastly, nucleosome disruption by NF-E2 is an ATP-dependent process, suggesting the involvement of energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors. PMID:8816476

  4. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  5. THE INTEGRATION OF ENGINEERED AND INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS: A CASE STUDY APPROACH WITH LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUSLY CLOSED SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2005-02-01

    Environmental remediation efforts that are underway at hundreds of contaminated sites in the United States will not be able to remediate large portions of those sites to conditions that would permit unrestricted access. Rather, large volumes of waste materials, contaminated soils and cleanup residuals will have to be isolated either in place or in new, often on-site, disposal cells with long term monitoring, maintenance and institutional control needs. The challenge continues to be to provide engineering systems and controls that can ensure the protection of public health and the environment over very long time horizons (hundreds to perhaps thousands of years) with minimal intervention. Effective long term management of legacy hazardous and nuclear waste requires an integrated approach that addresses both the engineered containment and control system itself and the institutional controls and other responsibilities that are needed. Decisions concerning system design, monitoring and maintenance, and the institutional controls that will be employed are best done through a "risk-nformed, performance-based" approach. Such an approach should incorporate an analysis of potential "failure" modes and consequences for all important system features, together with lessons learned from experience with systems already in place. The authors will present the preliminary results of a case study approach that included several sites where contamination isolation systems including institutional controls have been implemented. The results are being used together with failure trees and logic diagrams that have been developed for both the engineered barriers and the institutional controls. The use of these analytical tools to evaluate the potential for different levels of failure and associated consequences will be discussed. Of special interest is the robustness of different approaches to providing long-term protection through redundancy and defense in depth.

  6. [Source and distribution characteristic of atmospheric organochlorine pesticides in the Pearl River Estuary and adjacent South China Sea].

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-qing; Zhang, Gan; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiang; Peng, Xian-zhi; Zou, Shi-chun; Qi, Shi-hua

    2008-12-01

    Ship-board air samples were collected during the winter and spring cruise to the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and adjacent South China Sea (SCS) in 2003 and were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Meanwhile, air samples were collected at land-based sites in Guangzhou and Zhongshan for comparison. Results indicated that the detected OCPs were mainly of HCHs, DDTs and chlordane, its concentration ranged between 13-99, 73-390, 63-224 pg/m3 and 10-106, 429-1003, 1724-9638 pg/m3 during the winter and spring cruise, respectively. In general, the concentrations of OCPs were higher during spring cruise than in winter cruise. The measured OCPs concentration in the atmosphere over the PRE and adjacent SCS were found higher at sites close to continent and lower in outer sea, it is suggested that land-based source were to play a key role in the delivery of atmospheric OCPs. The alpha-HCH concentrations had significantly declined, higher gamma-HCH level may attribute to the present usage of lindane. Dicofol application and antifouling paints for fishing ships was suggested to be the important current "fresh" DDT source. The observed high level of chlordane during spring cruise could be related to the large amount usage of chlordane for termite control, as well as the long range transport from the west pacific region.

  7. 21 CFR 1304.50 - Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... REGISTRANTS Online Pharmacies § 1304.50 Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners... being exempt from the definition of an online pharmacy by virtue of section 102(52)(B)(ii) of the...

  8. 21 CFR 1304.50 - Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners that dispense controlled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... REGISTRANTS Online Pharmacies § 1304.50 Disclosure requirements for Web sites of nonpharmacy practitioners... being exempt from the definition of an online pharmacy by virtue of section 102(52)(B)(ii) of the...

  9. Site environmental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the site environmental programs. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs monitor for impacts from operations in several areas. The first area consists of the point of possible release into the environment. The second area consists of possible contamination adjacent to DOE facilities, and the third area is the general environment both on and off the site.

  10. Geological and environmental controls on the change of eruptive style (phreatomagmatic to Strombolian-effusive) of Late Pleistocene El Caracol tuff cone and its comparison with adjacent volcanoes around the Zacapu basin (Michoacán, México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshirsagar, Pooja; Siebe, Claus; Guilbaud, Marie Noëlle; Salinas, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    groundwater flow gradient) did not allow for sustained water/magma interactions at ideal conditions (ratio of 0.2). Hence, the system soon dried out due to insufficient groundwater flow toward the eruption site and the eruption turned purely magmatic. This study shows that despite of its proximity to a large water reservoir (Zacapu lake basin) and similarities with Alberca de Guadalupe maar in regard to age, climate, magma composition, and tectonic environment, several other specific parameters play a crucial role in shaping a monogenetic phreatomagmatic volcano. The case of El Caracol (phreatomagmatic style followed by magmatic during the course of a monogenetic eruption) has been reported from other volcanic fields around the globe where it might have similar causes. Furthermore, the general scarcity of this type of volcanoes in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field implies that the conditions required for their formation are rarely met in this region.

  11. Adjacent segment disease and C-ADR: promises fulfilled?

    PubMed Central

    Riew, K Daniel; Schenk-Kisser, Jeannette M.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Clinical question: Do the rates and timing of adjacent segment disease (ASD) differ between cervical total disc arthroplasty (C-ADR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in patients treated for cervical degenerative disc disease? Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE/PubMed and bibliographies of key articles was done to identify studies with long-term follow-up for symptomatic and/or radiographic ASD comparing C-ADR with fusion for degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine. The focus was on studies with longer follow-up (48–60 months) of primary US Food and Drug Administration trials of Prestige ST, Prodisc-C, and Bryan devices as available. Trials of other discs with a minimum of 24 months follow-up were considered for inclusion. Studies evaluating lordosis/angle changes at adjacent segments and case series were excluded. Results: From 14 citations identified, four reports from three randomized controlled trials and four nonrandomized studies are summarized. Risk differences between C-ADR and ACF for symptomatic ASD were 1.5%–2.3% and were not significant across RCT reports. Time to development of ASD did not significantly differ between treatments. Rates of radiographic ASD were variable. No meaningful comparison of ASD rates based on disc design was possible. No statistical differences in adjacent segment range of motion were noted between treatment groups. Conclusion: Our analysis reveals that, to date, there is no evidence that arthroplasty decreases ASD compared with ACDF; the promise of arthroplasty decreasing ASD has not been fulfilled. PMID:23236312

  12. Impact of wound edge protection devices on surgical site infection after laparotomy: multicentre randomised controlled trial (ROSSINI Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Calvert, Melanie; Bartlett, David C; Gheorghe, Adrian; Redman, Val; Dowswell, George; Hawkins, William; Mak, Tony; Youssef, Haney; Richardson, Caroline; Hornby, Steven; Magill, Laura; Haslop, Richard; Wilson, Sue; Morton, Dion

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of wound edge protection devices in reducing surgical site infection after abdominal surgery. Design Multicentre observer blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients undergoing laparotomy at 21 UK hospitals. Interventions Standard care or the use of a wound edge protection device during surgery. Main outcome measures Surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, assessed by blinded clinicians at seven and 30 days and by patient’s self report for the intervening period. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, duration of stay in hospital, and the effect of characteristics of the patient and operation on the efficacy of the device. Results 760 patients were enrolled with 382 patients assigned to the device group and 378 to the control group. Six patients in the device group and five in the control group did not undergo laparotomy. Fourteen patients, seven in each group, were lost to follow-up. A total of 184 patients experienced surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery, 91/369 (24.7%) in the device group and 93/366 (25.4%) in the control group (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.69 to 1.36; P=0.85). This lack of benefit was consistent across wound assessments performed by clinicians and those reported by patients and across all secondary outcomes. In the secondary analyses no subgroup could be identified in which there was evidence of clinical benefit associated with use of the device. Conclusions Wound edge protection devices do not reduce the rate of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparotomy, and therefore their routine use for this role cannot be recommended. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 40402832 PMID:23903454

  13. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  14. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  15. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  16. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  1. Roof Deformation, Failure Characteristics, and Preventive Techniques of Gob-Side Entry Driving Heading Adjacent to the Advancing Working Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jian-biao; Shen, Wen-long; Guo, Guan-long; Wang, Xiang-yu; Yu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In mining excavation, the roof bending subsidence of gob-side entry driving heading adjacent to the advancing working face (HAWF) can be considerable. Influenced by the original rock pressure, the front and lateral abutment pressure of the adjacent working face, and the front abutment pressure of the current working face, the support body can easily fail, leading to serious instability of the rock mass surrounding the tunnel. To study the stress state and the deformation failure mechanism of the HAWF roof structure, we use on-site survey data, numerical simulation, and theoretical calculations to fit the spatial distribution law of mining abutment pressure piecewise, and establish a dynamic mechanical model of the roof structure. We then propose a roof failure criterion and examine the roof flexure deformation behavioral pattern. We found that the central part of the roof is the main point that controls the surrounding rock. To prevent the deformation and collapse of the roof and rock surrounding the tunnel, we propose techniques that can be applied to HAWF gob-side entry driving, including setting the coal pillar width, the driving stop and restart timing, and other control concepts.

  2. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  3. Guidelines for Vegetative Erosion Control on Wave-Impacted Coastal Dredged Material Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    severity is shore geometry (the shape of the shoreline). Common sense would dictate that sites located in narrow coves may be effectively sheltered from...3 Background.................................................... ....... 3 Role of Marshes in Shore ...Stability................................... 4 Impact of Mars-res on Shore Erosion................................... 6 PARI II: SHORELINE REVEGETATION

  4. CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOIL AND WASTE DEPOSITS AT SUPERFUND LEAD BATTERY RECYCLING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper primarily addresses remediation of contaminated soils and waste deposits at defunct lead-acid battery recycling sites (LBRS) via immobilization and separation processes. A defunct LBRS is a facility at which battery breaking, secondary lead smelting, or both operations...

  5. The interactive on-site inspection system: An information management system to support arms control inspections

    SciTech Connect

    DeLand, S.M.; Widney, T.W.; Horak, K.E.; Caudell, R.B.; Grose, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    The increasing use of on-site inspection (OSI) to meet the nation`s obligations with recently signed treaties requires the nation to manage a variety of inspection requirements. This document describes a prototype automated system to assist in the preparation and management of these inspections.

  6. Triple-site rTMS for the treatment of chronic tinnitus: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Astrid; Schecklmann, Martin; Greenlee, Mark W.; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that tinnitus is related to alterations of neural networks including temporal, parietal, and prefrontal brain regions. The current study examines a rTMS protocol which targets three central nodes of these networks in a two-arm randomized parallel group trial. Overall, 49 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomized to receive either triple-site stimulation (left dorsolateral prefrontal stimulation, 1000 pulses, 20 Hz plus left and right temporoparietal stimulation, 1000 pulses each, 1 Hz) or single-site stimulation (left temporoparietal stimulation, 3000 pulses, 1 Hz). Both groups were treated in ten sessions. Tinnitus severity as measured by the tinnitus questionnaire was assessed before rTMS (day1), after rTMS (day12) and at two follow-up visits (day 90 and day 180). The triple-site protocol was well tolerated. There was a significant reduction in tinnitus severity for both treatment groups. The triple-site group tended to show a more pronounced treatment effect at day 90. However, the measurement time point x group interaction effect was not significant. The current results confirm former studies that indicated a significant reduction of tinnitus severity after rTMS treatment. No significant superiority of the multisite protocol was observed. Future approaches for the enhancement of treatment effects are discussed. PMID:26927363

  7. Control of ion selectivity in LeuT: two Na+ binding sites with two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Noskov, Sergei Y; Roux, Benoît

    2008-03-28

    The x-ray structure of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters, provides a great opportunity to better understand the molecular basis of monovalent cation selectivity in ion-coupled transporters. LeuT possesses two ion binding sites, NA1 and NA2, which are highly selective for Na(+). Extensive all-atom free-energy molecular dynamics simulations of LeuT embedded in an explicit membrane are performed at different temperatures and various occupancy states of the binding sites to dissect the molecular mechanism of ion selectivity. The results show that the two binding sites display robust selectivity for Na(+) over K(+) or Li(+), the competing ions of most similar radii. Of particular interest, the mechanism primarily responsible for selectivity for each of the two binding sites appears to be different. In NA1, selectivity for Na(+) over K(+) arises predominantly from the strong electrostatic field arising from the negatively charged carboxylate group of the leucine substrate coordinating the ion directly. In NA2, which comprises only neutral ligands, selectivity for Na(+) is enforced by the local structural restraints arising from the hydrogen-bonding network and the covalent connectivity of the polypeptide chain surrounding the ion according to a "snug-fit" mechanism.

  8. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... work groups and adjacent tracks. 214.336 Section 214.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.336 On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and... section, on-track safety is required for each adjacent controlled track when a roadway work group with...

  9. 49 CFR 214.336 - On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... work groups and adjacent tracks. 214.336 Section 214.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214.336 On-track safety procedures for certain roadway work groups and... section, on-track safety is required for each adjacent controlled track when a roadway work group with...

  10. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites ("virtual electrodes") in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  11. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  12. Investigation of Processes Controlling Mercury Cycling at Midlatitudinal Marine and Inland Sites: Improvements and Applications of A Mercury Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ye, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous pollutant due to the bioaccumulation in food chain. It is emitted to the atmosphere primarily as elemental form, and the long lifetime of which allows global transport. Oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) generates reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) which plays an important role in the atmospheric mercury cycle by enhancing the rate of mercury deposition to ecosystem. The present study aimed to investigate the midlatitudinal atmospheric Hg cycling. To achieve that, a mercury chemistry box model was improved by employing the most up-to-date kinetic data for gaseous and aqueous reactions, and was applied to summertime clear sky conditions at three specific sites: Appledore Island (marine site), Thompson Farm (coastal site), and Pack Monadnock (inland site). The model was evaluated using observational data of RGM and pHg (particulate mercury) concentrations from these sites. The simulation results for all three sites showed that HgO, which is produced from oxidation of GEM by O3 and OH, contributed the most (>82%) to the total RGM production. Even in the marine boundary layer, halogen species (mainly Br) only contributed less than 12% to total RGM. The importance of reactions in most updated halogen chemistry has been evaluated. Gas and particle partitioning played an important role in coastal and inland environments. Some abnormally high RGM peaks were found at Appledore Island which may be explained by transport and air-sea exchange. Specific reactions and other processes controlling the diurnal cycles of RGM and pHg at the three sites are still being investigated.

  13. Environmental assessment for the offsite commercial cleaning of controlled and routine laundry from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the offsite commercial cleaning of controlled and routine laundry from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Controlled laundry consists of protective clothing and respirator equipment potentially containing radioactive contamination resulting from activities at SRS facilities. Routine laundry includes uncontaminated protective clothing. The aging onsite SRS laundry facility does not comply with current low hazard nuclear facility standards in DOE Order 6430.1. Constructing a new facility on site or upgrading the existing facility have prohibitive costs. The option to seek a commercial offsite vendor was selected as a viable alternative.

  14. Effect of two nonfumigant nematicides on corn grown in two adjacent fields infested with different nematodes.

    PubMed

    Dickson, D W; Hewlett, T E

    1987-10-01

    The organo-phosphate experimental nematicide, O-ethyl S,S-di-sec-butyl phosphorodithioate (FMC 67825), provided yield increases of corn comparable to carbofuran. Both the emulsifiable concentrate and granular formulations of FMC 67825 were equally effective. The evaluations, duplicated in two adjacent fields, clearly demonstrated the importance of the type of plant pathogenic nematodes infesting the sites. Where Belonolaimus longicaudatus occurred, yield increases ranged from 73% to 80%, whereas in the adjacent field (without B. longicaudatus) yields increases ranged from - 14% to 28%.

  15. Which dressing do donor site wounds need?: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Donor site wounds after split-skin grafting are rather 'standard' wounds. At present, lots of dressings and topical agents for donor site wounds are commercially available. This causes large variation in the local care of these wounds, while the optimum 'standard' dressing for local wound care is unclear. This protocol describes a trial in which we investigate the effectiveness of various treatment options for these donor site wounds. Methods A 14-center, six-armed randomized clinical trial is being carried out in the Netherlands. An a-priori power analysis and an anticipated dropout rate of 15% indicates that 50 patients per group are necessary, totaling 300 patients, to be able to detect a 25% quicker mean time to complete wound healing. Randomization has been computerized to ensure allocation concealment. Adult patients who need a split-skin grafting operation for any reason, leaving a donor site wound of at least 10 cm2 are included and receive one of the following dressings: hydrocolloid, alginate, film, hydrofiber, silicone dressing, or paraffin gauze. No combinations of products from other intervention groups in this trial are allowed. Optimum application and changes of these dressings are pursued according to the protocol as supplied by the dressing manufacturers. Primary outcomes are days to complete wound healing and pain (using a Visual Analogue Scale). Secondary outcomes are adverse effects, scarring, patient satisfaction, and costs. Outcome assessors unaware of the treatment allocation will assess whether or not an outcome has occurred. Results will be analyzed according to the intention to treat principle. The first patient was randomized October 1, 2009. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the effectiveness of different treatment options for donor site wounds. The dressing(s) that will prevail in effectiveness, satisfaction and costs will be promoted among clinicians dealing with such patients. Thus, we aim to

  16. Coexistence Analysis of Adjacent Long Term Evolution (LTE) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aulama, Mohannad M.; Olama, Mohammed M

    2013-01-01

    As the licensing and deployment of Long term evolution (LTE) systems are ramping up, the study of coexistence of LTE systems is an essential topic in civil and military applications. In this paper, we present a coexistence study of adjacent LTE systems aiming at evaluating the effect of inter-system interference on system capacity and performance as a function of some of the most common mitigation techniques: frequency guard band, base station (BS) antenna coupling loss, and user equipment (UE) antenna spacing. A system model is constructed for two collocated macro LTE networks. The developed model takes into consideration the RF propagation environment, power control scheme, and adjacent channel interference. Coexistence studies are performed for a different combination of time/frequency division duplex (TDD/FDD) systems under three different guard-bands of 0MHz, 5MHz, and 10MHz. Numerical results are presented to advice the minimum frequency guard band, BS coupling loss, and UE antenna isolation required for a healthy system operation.

  17. Explaining spatial patterns of sap flow: day-to-day shifts in relevance of site- and tree-specific controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle K.; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2015-04-01

    Transpiration is a key process in the hydrological cycle and a sound understanding and quantification of transpiration is essential for management decisions and for hydrological and climatological modelling. To assess transpiration at the tree scale sap flow velocity is commonly measured. Besides atmospheric conditions and soil moisture state, tree-specific characteristics such as species, size or social status control sap flow of individual trees. Within forest stands, properties such as species composition, basal area or stem number also affect sap flow via competition or facilitation mechanisms. Finally, sap flow patterns might also be influenced by landscape-scale characteristics such as geology, slope position or aspect because they affect water and energy availability; however, so far little is known about these larger-scale controls. We studied the relative importance of various tree- and site-specific characteristics with linear statistical models for daily sap velocity observations on 38 trees at 12 locations in mixed beech and oak forests in a catchment in Luxemburg. The temporal variation of the predictors' importance for sap velocity patterns was then related to hydro-meteorological conditions. Results indicate that a combination of tree- and site-specific controls influence sap velocity patterns, namely tree species, tree diameter, stand basal area, geology and aspect. The temporal dynamics of these controls are related to hydro-meteorological conditions, with tree-specific controls dominating when the atmospheric gradient is strong, i.e. the vapour pressure deficit is large, leading to higher sap velocities, whereas landscape-scale site characteristics are more important during weak atmospheric gradients. The importance of individual predictors also varies between spring and summer, probably due to different soil moisture and atmospheric conditions of the two periods. We conclude that both tree- and site-specific characteristics control sap velocity

  18. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  19. Using fuzzy logic analysis for siting decisions of infiltration trenches for highway runoff control.

    PubMed

    Ki, Seo Jin; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2014-09-15

    Determining optimal locations for best management practices (BMPs), including their field considerations and limitations, plays an important role for effective stormwater management. However, these issues have been often overlooked in modeling studies that focused on downstream water quality benefits. This study illustrates the methodology of locating infiltration trenches at suitable locations from spatial overlay analyses which combine multiple layers that address different aspects of field application into a composite map. Using seven thematic layers for each analysis, fuzzy logic was employed to develop a site suitability map for infiltration trenches, whereas the DRASTIC method was used to produce a groundwater vulnerability map on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. In addition, the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), one of the most popular overlay analyses, was used for comparison to fuzzy logic. The results showed that the AHP and fuzzy logic methods developed significantly different index maps in terms of best locations and suitability scores. Specifically, the AHP method provided a maximum level of site suitability due to its inherent aggregation approach of all input layers in a linear equation. The most eligible areas in locating infiltration trenches were determined from the superposition of the site suitability and groundwater vulnerability maps using the fuzzy AND operator. The resulting map successfully balanced qualification criteria for a low risk of groundwater contamination and the best BMP site selection. The results of the sensitivity analysis showed that the suitability scores were strongly affected by the algorithms embedded in fuzzy logic; therefore, caution is recommended with their use in overlay analysis. Accordingly, this study demonstrates that the fuzzy logic analysis can not only be used to improve spatial decision quality along with other overlay approaches, but also is combined with general water quality models for initial and refined

  20. Infection prevention and control in the operating theatre: reducing the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs).

    PubMed

    Weaving, Paul; Cox, Felicia; Milton, Sherran

    2008-05-01

    Continuing advances in surgical techniques, asepsis, operating theatre protocols and ventilation systems that ensure an uninterrupted supply of clean air, should allow all patients to undergo both invasive and minimally-invasive procedures with reduced risk. Patients having surgery in the United Kingdom are probably less vulnerable to surgical site infections (SSIs) than ever before--despite persisting concerns about meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and increasing antibiotic resistance in other organisms such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE).

  1. The proteasome controls presynaptic differentiation through modulation of an on-site pool of polyubiquitinated conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria J.; Alves, Pedro L.; Martins, Luís; Pedro, Joana R.; Ryu, Hyun R.; Jeon, Noo Li; Taylor, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of the presynaptic terminal is a complex and rapid event that normally occurs in spatially specific axonal regions distant from the soma; thus, it is believed to be dependent on intra-axonal mechanisms. However, the full nature of the local events governing presynaptic assembly remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the involvement of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), the major degradative pathway, in the local modulation of presynaptic differentiation. We found that proteasome inhibition has a synaptogenic effect on isolated axons. In addition, formation of a stable cluster of synaptic vesicles onto a postsynaptic partner occurs in parallel to an on-site decrease in proteasome degradation. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins at nascent sites is a local trigger for presynaptic clustering. Finally, proteasome-related ubiquitin chains (K11 and K48) function as signals for the assembly of presynaptic terminals. Collectively, we propose a new axon-intrinsic mechanism for presynaptic assembly through local UPS inhibition. Subsequent on-site accumulation of proteins in their polyubiquitinated state triggers formation of presynapses. PMID:27022091

  2. Effectiveness of urban stormwater control measures in a 100-acre test site

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kansas City, Missouri chose a test area (100 acres) and a control area (80 acres) to test the effectiveness of urban stormwater control (SCM) deployment in conjunction with the USEPA, University of Alabama, University of Missouri-Kansas City and TetraTech. Both the test and cont...

  3. Fugitive dust emission source profiles and assessment of selected control strategies for particulate matter at gravel processing sites in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang-Tang; Chang, Yu-Min; Lin, Wen-Yinn; Wu, Ming-Ching

    2010-10-01

    Particles emitted from gravel processing sites are one contributor to worsening air quality in Taiwan. Major pollution sources at gravel processing sites include gravel and sand piles, unpaved roads, material crushers, and bare ground. This study analyzed fugitive dust emission characteristics at each pollution source using several types of particle samplers, including total suspended particulates (TSP), suspended particulate (PM10), fine suspended particulate (PM2.5), particulate sizer, and dust-fall collectors. Furthermore, silt content and moisture in the gravel were measured to develop particulate emission factors. The results showed that TSP (< 100 microm) concentrations at the boundary of gravel sites ranged from 280 to 1290 microg/m3, which clearly exceeds the Taiwan hourly air quality standard of 500 microg/m3. Moreover, PM10 concentrations, ranging from 135 to 550 microg/m3, were also above the daily air quality standard of 125 microg/m3 and approximately 1.2 and 1.5 times the PM2.5 concentrations, ranging from 105 to 470 microg/m3. The size distribution analysis reveals that mass mean diameter and geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.2 to 5.7 microm and from 2.82 to 5.51, respectively. In this study, spraying surfactant was the most effective control strategy to abate windblown dust from unpaved roads, having a control efficiency of approximately 93%, which is significantly higher than using paved road strategies with a control efficiency of approximately 45%. For paved roads, wet suppression provided the best dust control efficiencies ranging from 50 to 83%. Re-vegetation of disturbed ground had dust control efficiencies ranging from 48 to 64%.

  4. Tissue microenvironments within functional cortical subdivisions adjacent to focal stroke.

    PubMed

    Katsman, Diana; Zheng, Jian; Spinelli, Kateri; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2003-09-01

    Stroke produces a region of complete cell death and areas of partial damage, injury, and gliosis. The spatial relationship of these regions of damage to the infarct core and within spared neuronal circuits has not been identified. A model of cortical stroke was developed within functional subsets of the somatosensory cortex. Infarct size, regions of apoptosis, oxidative DNA damage, heat shock protein induction, and subtypes of reactive gliosis were precisely mapped with the somatosensory body map, quantified, and interrelated. Three tissue microenvironments were recognized: zones of partial ischemic damage, heat shock protein induction, and distributed gliosis. These three zones involved progressively more distant cortical regions, each larger than the infarct core. The zone of partial ischemic damage represents an overlap region of apoptotic cell death, oxidative DNA damage, loss of synaptic connections, and local reactive gliosis. The zone of distributed gliosis occupies distinct functional areas of the somatosensory cortex. The tissue reorganization induced by stroke is much larger than the stroke site itself. Adjacent tissue microenvironments are sites of distinct reactive cellular signaling and may serve as a link between the processes of acute cell death and delayed neuronal plasticity after focal stroke.

  5. Investigation of processes controlling summertime gaseous elemental mercury oxidation at midlatitudinal marine, coastal, and inland sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhuyun; Mao, Huiting; Lin, Che-Jen; Kim, Su Youn

    2016-07-01

    A box model incorporating a state-of-the-art chemical mechanism for atmospheric mercury (Hg) cycling was developed to investigate the oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) at three locations in the northeastern United States: Appledore Island (AI; marine), Thompson Farm (TF; coastal, rural), and Pack Monadnock (PM; inland, rural, elevated). The chemical mechanism in this box model included the most up-to-date Hg and halogen chemistry. As a result, the box model was able to simulate reasonably the observed diurnal cycles of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and chemical speciation bearing distinct differences between the three sites. In agreement with observations, simulated GOM diurnal cycles at AI and TF showed significant daytime peaks in the afternoon and nighttime minimums compared to flat GOM diurnal cycles at PM. Moreover, significant differences in the magnitude of GOM diurnal amplitude (AI > TF > PM) were captured in modeled results. At the coastal and inland sites, GEM oxidation was predominated by O3 and OH, contributing 80-99 % of total GOM production during daytime. H2O2-initiated GEM oxidation was significant (˜ 33 % of the total GOM) at the inland site during nighttime. In the marine boundary layer (MBL) atmosphere, Br and BrO became dominant GEM oxidants, with mixing ratios reaching 0.1 and 1 pptv, respectively, and contributing ˜ 70 % of the total GOM production during midday, while O3 dominated GEM oxidation (50-90 % of GOM production) over the remaining day when Br and BrO mixing ratios were diminished. The majority of HgBr produced from GEM+Br was oxidized by NO2 and HO2 to form brominated GOM species. Relative humidity and products of the CH3O2+BrO reaction possibly significantly affected the mixing ratios of Br or BrO radicals and subsequently GOM formation. Gas-particle partitioning could potentially be important in the production of GOM as well as Br and BrO at the marine site.

  6. Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site: Control Volume/Test Cell and Community Research Asset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrash, W.; Bradford, J.; Malama, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) is a research wellfield or field-scale test facility developed in a shallow, coarse, fluvial aquifer with the objectives of supporting: (a) development of cost- effective, non- or minimally-invasive quantitative characterization and imaging methods in heterogeneous aquifers using hydrologic and geophysical techniques; (b) examination of fundamental relationships and processes at multiple scales; (c) testing theories and models for groundwater flow and solute transport; and (d) educating and training of students in multidisciplinary subsurface science and engineering. The design of the wells and the wellfield support modular use and reoccupation of wells for a wide range of single-well, cross-hole, multiwell and multilevel hydrologic, geophysical, and combined hydrologic-geophysical experiments. Efforts to date by Boise State researchers and collaborators have been largely focused on: (a) establishing the 3D distributions of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical parameters which can then be used as the basis for jointly inverting hard and soft data to return the 3D K distribution and (b) developing subsurface measurement and imaging methods including tomographic characterization and imaging methods. At this point the hydrostratigraphic framework of the BHRS is known to be a hierarchical multi-scale system which includes layers and lenses that are recognized with geologic, hydrologic, radar, seismic, and EM methods; details are now emerging which may allow 3D deterministic characterization of zones and/or material variations at the meter scale in the central wellfield. Also the site design and subsurface framework have supported a variety of testing configurations for joint hydrologic and geophysical experiments. Going forward we recognize the opportunity to increase the R&D returns from use of the BHRS with additional infrastructure (especially for monitoring the vadose zone and surface water-groundwater interactions

  7. On-chip generation and guiding of quantum light from a site-controlled quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, Ayesha; Farrer, Ian; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Jones, Geb A. C.; Ritchie, David A.; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Kalliakos, Sokratis; Ward, Martin B.; Ellis, David J. P.; Shields, Andrew J.; Schwagmann, Andre; Brody, Yarden

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate the emission and routing of single photons along a semiconductor chip originating from carrier recombination in an actively positioned InAs quantum dot. Device–scale arrays of quantum dots are formed by a two–step regrowth process. We precisely locate the propagating region of a unidirectional photonic crystal waveguide with respect to the quantum dot nucleation site. Under pulsed optical excitation, the multiphoton emission probability from the waveguide's exit is 12% ± 5% before any background correction. Our results are a major step towards the deterministic integration of a quantum emitter with the waveguiding components of photonic quantum circuits.

  8. Mammalian RAP1 controls telomere function and gene expression through binding to telomeric and extra-telomeric sites

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Paula; Thanasoula, Maria; Carlos, Ana R.; Gómez, Gonzalo; Tejera, Agueda M.; Schoeftner, Stefan; Dominguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G.; Tarsounas, Madalena; Blasco, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Shelterin binds and protects mammalian telomeres. Here, we generated cells and mice conditionally deleted for the shelterin component RAP1. We find that Rap1 deficiency is dispensable for telomere capping but leads to increased telomere recombination and fragility. Mice with Rap1 deletion in stratified epithelia are viable but have shorter telomeres and develop skin hyperpigmentation at aduldhood. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with ultra-highthroughput sequencing, we find that RAP1 binds to telomeres and to extra-telomeric sites through the (TTAGGG)2 consensus motif. Extra-telomeric RAP1 binding sites are enriched at subtelomeric regions, in agreement with preferential deregulation of subtelomeric genes in Rap1-deficient cells. More than 70% of extra-telomeric RAP1 binding sites are at the vicinity of genes and 31% of the genes deregulated in Rap1-null cells contain RAP1 binding sites, suggesting a role of RAP1 in transcriptional control. These findings place a shelterin component at the interface between telomere function and transcriptional regulation. PMID:20622869

  9. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site

    SciTech Connect

    Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

    1980-05-01

    As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

  10. Soil-atmosphere exchange of methane in adjacent cultivated and floodplain forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Roger A.; Meyer, Judith L.; Cruse, Jennifer M.; Birkhead, Karen M.; Paul, Michael J.

    1999-04-01

    The soil-atmosphere exchange of methane was measured in adjacent cultivated (corn) and forest (upper floodplain, mixed hardwood) habitats of the southeastern U.S. piedmont for a period of 3 years using closed chambers. We have evaluated the effect of the following factors on soil-atmosphere methane exchange: (1) interannual variability of climatic conditions, (2) landscape position (i.e., river levee versus terrace), and (3) disturbance ranging from intense (cultivation) through moderate (approximately annual flooding events that last from weeks to months) to subtle (approximately annual flooding of a few days duration). We found that mean methane consumption in the cultivated and forested terrace sites was <0.3 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, whereas the mean consumption rate in forested levee sites was about 1.4 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 over the course of the 3 years. Moisture levels in the upper soil (0-5 cm) appear to exert little control of methane exchange in any of the habitats. We observed little seasonal variation in methane flux in the levee sites, in contrast to results observed by others in higher-latitude and tropical forests. Our results suggest that very subtle differences in landscape position and disturbance impact the strength of the soil methane sink. We cannot conclude that agricultural development destroyed the methane sink capacity of these floodplain terrace soils because it was probably already quite low due to periodic disturbance by flooding. Limited measurements of nitrogen cycling suggest that methane flux differences observed among the different habitats are not obviously related to differences in N mineralization or nitrification as in other ecosystems.

  11. Site-1 protease-activated formation of lysosomal targeting motifs is independent of the lipogenic transcription control[S

    PubMed Central

    Klünder, Sarah; Heeren, Jörg; Markmann, Sandra; Santer, René; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Site-1 protease (S1P) cleaves membrane-bound lipogenic sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase forming mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) targeting markers on lysosomal enzymes. The translocation of SREBPs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi-resident S1P depends on the intracellular sterol content, but it is unknown whether the ER exit of the α/β-subunit precursor is regulated. Here, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion (atorvastatin treatment) and elevation (LDL overload) on ER-Golgi transport, S1P-mediated cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor, and the subsequent targeting of lysosomal enzymes along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to lysosomes. The data showed that the proteolytic cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor into mature and enzymatically active subunits does not depend on the cholesterol content. In either treatment, lysosomal enzymes are normally decorated with M6P residues, allowing the proper sorting to lysosomes. In addition, we found that, in fibroblasts of mucolipidosis type II mice and Niemann-Pick type C patients characterized by aberrant cholesterol accumulation, the proteolytic cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor was not impaired. We conclude that S1P substrate-dependent regulatory mechanisms for lipid synthesis and biogenesis of lysosomes are different. PMID:26108224

  12. The STIM1-binding site nexus remotely controls Orai1 channel gating

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yandong; Cai, Xiangyu; Loktionova, Natalia A.; Wang, Xianming; Nwokonko, Robert M.; Wang, Xizhuo; Wang, Youjun; Rothberg, Brad S.; Trebak, Mohamed; Gill, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed Orai Ca2+ channels are gated through a unique process of intermembrane coupling with the Ca2+-sensing STIM proteins. Despite the significance of Orai1-mediated Ca2+ signals, how gating of Orai1 is triggered by STIM1 remains unknown. A widely held gating model invokes STIM1 binding directly to Orai1 pore-forming helix. Here we report that an Orai1 C-terminal STIM1-binding site, situated far from the N-terminal pore helix, alone provides the trigger that is necessary and sufficient for channel gating. We identify a critical ‘nexus' within Orai1 connecting the peripheral C-terminal STIM1-binding site to the Orai1 core helices. Mutation of the nexus transforms Orai1 into a persistently open state exactly mimicking the action of STIM1. We suggest that the Orai1 nexus transduces the STIM1-binding signal through a conformational change in the inner core helices, and that STIM1 remotely gates the Orai1 channel without the necessity for direct STIM1 contact with the pore-forming helix. PMID:27929067

  13. Structures of lipoyl synthase reveal a compact active site for controlling sequential sulfur insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jenny E; Hiscox, Martyn J; Dinis, Pedro C; Fox, Stephen J; Iliopoulos, Andreas; Hussey, James E; Sandy, James; Van Beek, Florian T; Essex, Jonathan W; Roach, Peter L

    2014-11-15

    Lipoyl cofactors are essential for living organisms and are produced by the insertion of two sulfur atoms into the relatively unreactive C-H bonds of an octanoyl substrate. This reaction requires lipoyl synthase, a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme superfamily. In the present study, we solved crystal structures of lipoyl synthase with two [4Fe-4S] clusters bound at opposite ends of the TIM barrel, the usual fold of the radical SAM superfamily. The cluster required for reductive SAM cleavage conserves the features of the radical SAM superfamily, but the auxiliary cluster is bound by a CX4CX5C motif unique to lipoyl synthase. The fourth ligand to the auxiliary cluster is an extremely unusual serine residue. Site-directed mutants show this conserved serine ligand is essential for the sulfur insertion steps. One crystallized lipoyl synthase (LipA) complex contains 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), a breakdown product of SAM, bound in the likely SAM-binding site. Modelling has identified an 18 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) deep channel, well-proportioned to accommodate an octanoyl substrate. These results suggest that the auxiliary cluster is the likely sulfur donor, but access to a sulfide ion for the second sulfur insertion reaction requires the loss of an iron atom from the auxiliary cluster, which the serine ligand may enable.

  14. Satellite assisted aerosol correlation in a sequestered CO2 leakage controlled site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.; Nakaema, Walter M.; de Medeiros, José A. G.; Moreira, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. For such task a mimetic sequestration site has been deployed in Florianopolis, Brazil, in order to verify the performance of monitoring plataforms to detect and quantify leakages of ground injected CO2, namely a Cavity Ring Down System (CRDS) - Los Gatos Research - an Eddy Covariance System (Campbell Scientific and Irgason) and meteorological tower for wind, humidity, precipitation and temperature monitoring onsite. The measurement strategy for detecting CO2 leakages can be very challenging since environmental and phytogenic influence can be very severe and play a role on determining if the values measured are unambiguous or not. One external factor to be considered is the amount of incoming solar radiation which will be the driving force for the whole experimental setup and following this reasoning the amount of aerosols in the atmospheric column can be a determinant factor influencing the experimental results. Thus the investigation of measured fluxes CO2 and its concentration with the aforementioned experimental instruments and their correlation with the aerosol data should be taken into account by means of satellite borne systems dedicated to measure aerosol vertical distribution and its optical properties, in this study we have selected CALIPSO and MODIS instrumentation to help on deriving the aerosol properties and CO2 measurements.

  15. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    PubMed

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  16. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  17. Hydrologic characteristics of low-impact stormwater control measures at two sites in northeastern Ohio, 2008-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darner, Robert A.; Shuster, William D.; Dumouchelle, Denise H.

    2015-01-01

    This report updates and examines hydrologic data gathered to characterize the performance of two stormwater-control measure (SCM) sites in the Chagrin River watershed, Ohio. At the Sterncrest Drive site, roadside bioswales and rain gardens were used to alleviate drainage problems in this residential neighborhood area. At the Washington Street site, a treatment train (including a pervious-paver system, rain garden, and bioswales) was used to reduce and delay stormwater runoff at a small business development. Selected metrics were used to demonstrate SCM system performance with regard to stormwater-management objectives at each site. Rain-garden overflow-frequency data collected at the Sterncrest Drive site during 2008–13 were used to characterize system sensitivity to rainfall characteristics. Approximately 70 percent of storms exceeding 0.75 inches during 3 hours or more resulted in overflows. Drainage-design features that may restrict flow through the system were identified. Overall, the data and local observations confirmed the continued success of the SCM at the Sterncrest Drive site in preventing roadway closure due to flooding. The additional years of data collected at the Washington Street site indicated that a previous analysis of increased runoff removal, based on only the first 2 years (2009–10) of data, provided premature conclusions. With 5 years of data (2009–13) and adjusting for changes in rainfall characteristics, it appears that the percentage of runoff removed by the system is decreasing; however, the lag time (time from onset of rainfall to runoff) has remained nearly constant. The annual mean percent removal for 2010–13 ranged from 55 to 37 percent with an overall mean of 45 percent, and this does meet the project objective of reducing runoff from the business complex. One possible explanation for the combination of increased volume of runoff and no change in the timing of runoff is the preferential flow paths developed in the SCM

  18. Uplink scheduling and adjacent-channel coupling loss analysis for TD-LTE deployment.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Woon-Young; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    TD-LTE, one of the two duplexing modes in LTE, operates in unpaired spectrum and has the advantages of TDD-based technologies. It is expected that TD-LTE will be more rapidly deployed in near future and most of WiMax operators will upgrade their networks to TD-LTE gradually. Before completely upgrading to TD-LTE, WiMax may coexist with TD-LTE in an adjacent frequency band. In addition, multiple TD-LTE operators may deploy their networks in adjacent bands. When more than one TDD network operates in adjacent frequency bands, severe interference may happen due to adjacent channel interference (ACI) and unsynchronized operations. In this paper, coexistence issues between TD-LTE and other systems are analyzed and coexistence requirements are provided. This paper has three research objectives. First, frame synchronization between TD-LTE and WiMax is discussed by investigating possible combinations of TD-LTE and WiMax configurations. Second, an uplink scheduling algorithm is proposed to utilize a leakage pattern of ACI in synchronized operations. Third, minimum requirements for coexistence in unsynchronized operations are analyzed by introducing a concept of adjacent-channel coupling loss. From the analysis and simulation results, we can see that coexistence of TD-LTE with other TDD systems is feasible if the two networks are synchronized. For the unsynchronized case, some special cell-site engineering techniques may be required to reduce the ACI.

  19. Uplink Scheduling and Adjacent-Channel Coupling Loss Analysis for TD-LTE Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Woon-Young; Moon, Sung Ho

    2014-01-01

    TD-LTE, one of the two duplexing modes in LTE, operates in unpaired spectrum and has the advantages of TDD-based technologies. It is expected that TD-LTE will be more rapidly deployed in near future and most of WiMax operators will upgrade their networks to TD-LTE gradually. Before completely upgrading to TD-LTE, WiMax may coexist with TD-LTE in an adjacent frequency band. In addition, multiple TD-LTE operators may deploy their networks in adjacent bands. When more than one TDD network operates in adjacent frequency bands, severe interference may happen due to adjacent channel interference (ACI) and unsynchronized operations. In this paper, coexistence issues between TD-LTE and other systems are analyzed and coexistence requirements are provided. This paper has three research objectives. First, frame synchronization between TD-LTE and WiMax is discussed by investigating possible combinations of TD-LTE and WiMax configurations. Second, an uplink scheduling algorithm is proposed to utilize a leakage pattern of ACI in synchronized operations. Third, minimum requirements for coexistence in unsynchronized operations are analyzed by introducing a concept of adjacent-channel coupling loss. From the analysis and simulation results, we can see that coexistence of TD-LTE with other TDD systems is feasible if the two networks are synchronized. For the unsynchronized case, some special cell-site engineering techniques may be required to reduce the ACI. PMID:24707214

  20. Kinetic resolution of racemic α-olefins with ansa-zirconocene polymerization catalysts: Enantiomorphic site vs. chain end control

    PubMed Central

    Byers, Jeffery A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Copolymerization of racemic α-olefins with ethylene and propylene was carried out in the presence of enantiopure C1-symmetric ansa metallocene, {1,2-(SiMe2)2(η5-C5H-3,5-(CHMe2)2)(η5-C5H3)}ZrCl2 to probe the effect of the polymer chain end on enantioselection for the R- or S-α-olefin during the kinetic resolution by polymerization catalysis. Copolymerizations with ethylene revealed that the polymer chain end is an important factor in the enantioselection of the reaction and that for homopolymerization, chain end control generally works cooperatively with enantiomorphic site control. Results from propylene copolymerizations suggested that chain end control arising from a methyl group at the β carbon along the main chain can drastically affect selectivity, but its importance as a stereo-directing element depends on the identity of the olefin. PMID:17032768

  1. Nucleosome positioning and kinetics near transcription-start-site barriers are controlled by interplay between active remodeling and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyotsana J; Marko, John F; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how DNA sequence, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and nucleosome-depleted 'barriers' co-operate to determine the kinetics of nucleosome organization, in a stochastic model of nucleosome positioning and dynamics. We find that 'statistical' positioning of nucleosomes against 'barriers', hypothesized to control chromatin structure near transcription start sites, requires active remodeling and therefore cannot be described using equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show that, unlike steady-state occupancy, DNA site exposure kinetics near a barrier is dominated by DNA sequence rather than by proximity to the barrier itself. The timescale for formation of positioning patterns near barriers is proportional to the timescale for active nucleosome eviction. We also show that there are strong gene-to-gene variations in nucleosome positioning near barriers, which are eliminated by averaging over many genes. Our results suggest that measurement of nucleosome kinetics can reveal information about sequence-dependent regulation that is not apparent in steady-state nucleosome occupancy.

  2. Promotoras de Salud: Roles, Responsibilities, and Contributions in a Multi-Site Community-Based Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K.; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Treviño, Laura; Koskan, Alexis M.; Morales-Campos, Daisy

    2013-01-01

    There is widespread recognition of the cultural and linguistic appropriateness of promotoras de salud (a Spanish term for community health workers) in health education and outreach among Hispanic communities. Yet there are significant gaps in the literature regarding the preparation, implementation and evaluation of promotoras’ engagement in research. To address this gap, we examine promotoras’ research-related training, roles, responsibilities, and contributions in a community-based participatory research project involving a multi-site randomized controlled trial of a physical activity intervention for Mexican-origin women in Texas and South Carolina. We identify both benefits and challenges associated with promotoras’ engagement as community researchers; examine variations and differences in promotora roles and responsibilities related to the research contexts, sites, settings, and individual characteristics; and discuss implications for research and practice. PMID:24695944

  3. Determination of controlling earthquakes from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for nuclear reactor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Boissonnade, A.; Bernreuter, D.; Chokshi, N.; Murphy, A.

    1995-04-04

    Recently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission published, for public comments, a revision to 10 CFR Part 100. The proposed regulation acknowledges that uncertainties are inherent in estimates of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake Ground Motion (SSE) and requires that these uncertainties be addressed through an appropriate analysis. One element of this evaluation is the assessment of the controlling earthquake through the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) and its use in determining the SSE. This paper reviews the basis for the various key choices in characterizing the controlling earthquake.

  4. Remarkable difference in catalytic performance of an organoamino-functionalized MCM-41-HPA composite with controlled site-isolation and site-aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiaofeng; Le, Ying-Yi; Zhu, Quanjing; Fan, Kangnian; Dai, Wei-Lin

    2011-08-01

    The organoamino-functionalized mesoporous silicas with different distribution patterns—site-isolation or site-aggregation are prepared using post-grafting method. We have investigated the effects of the solvents and the catalytic reactivity of these catalysts. It is found that, using the polar ethanol as solvent, the catalytic center is site-isolated. Contrarily, the catalytic center is site-aggregated with the non-polar toluene. Characterization techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption experiments, thermogravimetric analysis, and ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectroscopy, demonstrate the most important dependencies of the distribution pattern on the polarity of solvent.

  5. Effects of nitrogen oxide emission controls on Eastern US surface ozone: A comparison between urban cores and rural background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission controls have led to improved air quality over the past two decades, particularly over the Eastern US. In recent work we quantified the effects of the efforts to abate surface ozone (O3) pollution under the NOx State Implementation Plan (NOx SIP Call) for Eastern US background sites (available from the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET)) using methods from statistical extreme value theory (Rieder et al., 2013). Our analysis showed that the number of summer (JJA) days above the US national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) declined on average by a factor of two between 1988-1998 and 1999-2009 and that probabilistic 1-yr O3 return values declined by about 10 ppb between these two time periods. Here we extend the analysis to observations available from the US EPA Air Quality System (AQS), comprising sites ranging from polluted urban cores to rural sites. We focus on changes in (i) the seasonal and annual average number of days with maximum daily 8-hour average surface O3 above the NAAQS and (ii) probabilistic O3 return values following the NOx SIP Call. Particular focus is given on similarities and differences in surface O3 responses on regional to local level and on contrasting urban cores and rural background sites. References: Rieder H.E., Fiore A.M., Polvani L.M., Lamarque J.-F., Fang Y. (2013): Changes in the frequency and return level of high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States following emission controls, Environ. Res. Lett., 8, 014012, 2013.

  6. Controlling factors of biosphere-atmosphere ammonia exchange at a semi-natural peatland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummer, C.; Richter, U.; Smith, J. J.; Delorme, J. P.; Kutsch, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate net biosphere-atmosphere exchange of ammonia. During a three month field campaign from February to May 2014, we tested the performance of a quantum cascade laser within an eddy-covariance setup. The laser was operated at a semi-natural peatland site that is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and intensive livestock production (~1 km distance). Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 15 ppb. Different concentration patterns could be identified. The variability was closely linked to the timing of management practices and the prevailing local climate, particularly wind direction, temperature and surface wetness with the latter indicating higher non-stomatal uptake under wet conditions leading to decreased concentrations. Average ammonia fluxes were around -15 ng N m-2 s-1 at the beginning of the campaign in February and shifted towards a neutral average exchange regime of -1 to 0 ng N m-2 s-1 in April and May. Intriguingly, during the time of decreasing ammonia uptake, concentrations were considerably rising, which clearly indicated N saturation in the predominant vegetation such as bog heather, purple moor-grass, and cotton grass. The cumulative net uptake for the period of investigation was ~300 g N ha-1. This stresses the importance of a thorough method inter-comparison, e.g. with denuder systems in combination with dry deposition modeling. As previous results from the latter methods showed an annual uptake of ~9 kg N ha-1 for the same site, the implementation of adequate ammonia compensation point parameterizations become crucial in surface-atmosphere exchange schemes for bog vegetation. Through their high temporal resolution, robustness and continuous measurement mode, quantum cascade lasers will help assessing the effects of atmospheric N loads to vulnerable N-limited ecosystems such as peatlands.

  7. Opioids and TRPV1 in the peripheral control of neuropathic pain--Defining a target site in the injured nerve.

    PubMed

    Labuz, Dominika; Spahn, Viola; Celik, Melih Özgür; Machelska, Halina

    2016-02-01

    Targeting peripheral neuropathic pain at its origin may prevent the development of hypersensitivity. Recently we showed this can be mediated by opioid receptors at the injured nerve trunk. Here, we searched for the most relevant peripheral site to block transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), and investigated analgesic interactions between TRPV1 and opioids in neuropathy. In a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in mice, we assessed the effects of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists and TRPV1 antagonist (SB366791) injected at the CCI site or into the injured nerve-innervated paw on spontaneous paw lifting, heat and mechanical sensitivity. We also examined TRPV1 expression in total membrane and plasma membrane fractions from nerves and paws. We found that opioids and SB366791 co-injected in per se nonanalgesic doses at the CCI site or into the paw diminished heat and mechanical sensitivity. SB366791 alone dose-dependently alleviated heat and mechanical sensitivity. TRPV1 blockade in the paw was more effective than at the CCI site. None of the treatments diminished spontaneous paw lifting. TRPV1 expression analysis suggests that the levels of functional TRPV1 do not critically determine the TRPV1 antagonist-mediated analgesia. Together, the identification of the primary action site in damaged nerves is crucial for effective pain control. Contrary to opioids, the TRPV1 blockade in the injured nerve peripheral terminals, rather than at the nerve trunk, appears promising against heat pain. Opioid/TRPV1 antagonist combinations at both locations partially reduced neuropathy-triggered heat and mechanical pain.

  8. Robust Classification and Segmentation of Planar and Linear Features for Construction Site Progress Monitoring and Structural Dimension Compliance Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalek, R.; Lichti, D. D.; Ruwanpura, J.

    2015-08-01

    The application of terrestrial laser scanners (TLSs) on construction sites for automating construction progress monitoring and controlling structural dimension compliance is growing markedly. However, current research in construction management relies on the planned building information model (BIM) to assign the accumulated point clouds to their corresponding structural elements, which may not be reliable in cases where the dimensions of the as-built structure differ from those of the planned model and/or the planned model is not available with sufficient detail. In addition outliers exist in construction site datasets due to data artefacts caused by moving objects, occlusions and dust. In order to overcome the aforementioned limitations, a novel method for robust classification and segmentation of planar and linear features is proposed to reduce the effects of outliers present in the LiDAR data collected from construction sites. First, coplanar and collinear points are classified through a robust principal components analysis procedure. The classified points are then grouped using a robust clustering method. A method is also proposed to robustly extract the points belonging to the flat-slab floors and/or ceilings without performing the aforementioned stages in order to preserve computational efficiency. The applicability of the proposed method is investigated in two scenarios, namely, a laboratory with 30 million points and an actual construction site with over 150 million points. The results obtained by the two experiments validate the suitability of the proposed method for robust segmentation of planar and linear features in contaminated datasets, such as those collected from construction sites.

  9. VERIFICATION OF SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURES FOR SITE- SPECIFIC SO2 AND NOX CONTROL COST ESTIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents results of an evaluation to verify the accuracy of simplified procedures for estimating sulfur dioxide (S02) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) retrofit control costs and performance for 200 502-emitting coal-fired power plants in the 31-state eastern region. nitially...

  10. Rectal site and suboptimal nodal yield predict systemic recurrence in resected colorectal carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brian D; O'Riordan, James M; Stuart, Charlotte; Muldoon, Cian

    2014-09-01

    We assessed the contribution of histopathological features to systemic recurrence (SR) in patients with colorectal cancer, using a case-control design: 71 cases and 184 controls were included, with a mean time until SR of 1.4 ± 0.1 years and a mean follow-up of controls of 1.6 ± 0.06 years. Cases had significantly greater odds of rectal site (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82), stage ≥ pT3 (OR = 2.11), suboptimal (<12) lymph node yield (OR = 4.6), stage ≥ pN1 (OR = 2.46), KRAS mutation (OR = 2.76), and extramural venous invasion (OR = 1.97). By multiple regression analysis, rectal site, stage ≥ pT3, suboptimal lymph node yield, and lymph node positivity independently predicted SR. Rectal cancers were more likely to have a suboptimal node yield than nonrectal cancers (relative risk = 1.6) among the entire cohort. We conclude that rectal cancers have greater risk of SR than colon cancers. A lower yield of lymph nodes in rectal cancer specimens may contribute to this.

  11. Remote robot manipulator coupled with remote-controlled guide vehicle for soil sampling in hazardous waste sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiho

    The important initial step for remediation of hazardous waste is contaminant analysis since the cleanup operation can not begin until the contaminants in hazardous waste sites have been clearly identified. Ames Laboratory, one of the U.S. Department of Energy sites, has developed a robotic sampling system for automation of real-time contaminant analysis in situ which will provide the advantage of lowering the cost per sample, eliminating personnel exposure to hazardous environments, and allowing quicker results. Successful accomplishment of real-time contaminant analysis will require a remote manipulator to perform the sampling tasks in remote and unstructured surroundings, and a remote-controlled guide vehicle to move a remote manipulator into the desired sampling location. This thesis focuses on the design and construction of a remote-controlled guide vehicle to move the robotic sampling system into the contaminated field to obtain soil samples at the desired locations, the development of an integrated dynamic model of a remote manipulator, the identification of dynamic parameters in the integrated dynamic model, and the design of a mobile robotic sampling system. A four-wheeled vehicle prototype has been constructed and its performance tested manually in the field to verify the design requirements. To remotely control the vehicle, mechanical requirements to activate the brake, throttle, transmission, and steering linkages were determined based on experimental results. A teleoperated control utilizing hundred feet long umbilical cords was first employed to remotely control the vehicle. Next, the vehicle was modified to remotely operate in the field by radio control without the aid of long umbilical cords, satisfying all the design specifications. To reduce modeling error in the robotic system, the integrated dynamic system comprised of a remote manipulator (located on a trailer pulled by the remote-controlled guide vehicle) and its drive system has been modeled

  12. Low-impact chemical weed control techniques in UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Cuba.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Enriquez, O; Alvarez, R; Morelli, F; Bastida, F; Camacho, D; Menendez, J

    2012-01-01

    Dichrostachys cinerea is a thorny, acacia-like, fast-growing woody bush which invades fields, wasteland, road sides and other disturbed areas. This gregarious species has become a very aggressive invasive weed in Cuba, where no native predators or pathogens are found. It often encroaches in fallows, overgrazed areas and mismanaged veld. D. cinerea is a very difficult weed to eliminate because of its active suckering, and is liable to produce dense thickets which are quite impenetrable on account of the density and abundance of its long, stiff, sharp thorns. In the Valle de los Ingenios area (Cuba Central), the tree is unchecked and forms veritable forests in areas on which cane growing has been discontinued. Physical management by cutting and burning the plants is not a very efficient control method, since the seeds survive in the soil, and they grow very fast. Therefore, chemical methods via the use of herbicides are often necessary to eradicate this weed. A preliminary study using glyphosate and auxin-like herbicides (2,4-D + picloram, MCPA, and MCPA + 2,4-D) plus adjuvants has been carried out in order to elucidate the best mixtures rendering maximum weed control with minimum herbicide rate and environmental stress. None of the herbicides used except glyphosate and 2,4-D + picloram showed acceptable mortality rates (75-80%) at the recommended doses tested. In the failed herbicide treatments, only the use of double herbicide rates succeeded in controlling marabou. The herbicide mixture of 2,4-D + picloram formulated with either a non-ionic surfactant or a mixture of fatty acid esters was the best option to control D. cinerea in terms of maximum effectiveness and minimum environmental stress, as the reduction in active ingredients applied to the environment was x3 in these two adjuvant-amended formulations compared to 2,4-D + picloram alone.

  13. Drinking water quality in Nepal's Kathmandu Valley: a survey and assessment of selected controlling site characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Nathaniel R.; Levy, Jonathan; Harpp, Karen; Farruggia, Frank

    2008-03-01

    Water was sampled from over 100 sources in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley, including municipal taps, dug wells, shallow-aquifer tube wells, deep-aquifer tube wells, and dhunge dharas (or stone spouts, public water sources that capture groundwater or surface water). Information was gathered on user preference and site and well characteristics, and water was examined for indicators of contamination from sewage, agriculture, or industry. Most problematic were total coliform and Escherichia coli bacteria, which were present in 94 and 72% of all the water samples, respectively. Contamination by nitrate, ammonia and heavy metals was more limited; nitrate and ammonia exceeded Nepali guidelines in 11 and 45% of the samples, respectively. Arsenic and mercury exceeded WHO guidelines in 7 and 10% of the samples, respectively, but arsenic never exceeded the less strict Nepali guideline. Significant differences existed in contamination levels between types of sources; dug wells and dhunge dharas, being the shallowest, were the most contaminated by bacteria and nitrate; deep-aquifer tube wells were the most contaminated by arsenic. Whereas E. coli concentrations decreased with depth, iron and ammonia concentrations increased with depth. These relationships account for people choosing to drink water with higher levels of bacterial contamination based on its superior (non-metallic) taste and appearance.

  14. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  15. FACT plays a major role in histone dynamics affecting VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Denninger, Viola; Rudenko, Gloria

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodelling is involved in the transcriptional regulation of the RNA polymerase I transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs) of Trypanosoma brucei. We show that the T. brucei FACT complex contains the Pob3 and Spt16 subunits, and plays a key role in ES silencing. We see an inverse correlation between transcription and condensed chromatin, whereby FACT knockdown results in ES derepression and more open chromatin around silent ES promoters. Derepressed ESs show increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion, and a decrease in histones at silent ES promoters but not telomeres. In contrast, FACT knockdown results in more histones at the active ES, correlated with transcription shut-down. ES promoters are derepressed in cells stalled at the G2/M cell cycle stage after knockdown of FACT, but not in G2/M cells stalled after knockdown of cyclin 6. This argues that the observed ES derepression is a direct consequence of histone chaperone activity by FACT at the G2/M cell cycle stage which could affect transcription elongation, rather than an indirect consequence of a cell cycle checkpoint. These experiments highlight the role of the FACT complex in cell cycle-specific chromatin remodelling within VSG ESs.

  16. Population structure of harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena in the seas around the UK and adjacent waters.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, M J

    1997-01-01

    The population structure of harbour porpoises from British and adjacent waters was studied by examining variability in a 200 bp (base pair) section of the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from 327 animals. This region contained 20 variable sites giving rise to 24 different haplotypes. Mean nucleotide diversity between all pairs of haplotypes was 0.81% (range 0-4%). The most common haplotype occurred in 63% of the samples and was recorded in all geographical areas; several other haplotypes were present in two or more of the sampling locations. This suggests considerable historical interconnections among populations, probably through gene flow. However, there were significant differences (p < 0.05) as determined by AMOVA (Analysis of Molecular Variance, Excoffier et al. 1992), between porpoises from the northern and southern North Sea, and between the northern North Sea and the Celtic/Irish Sea. The differences were predominantly due to variation among females. This sex-related difference in population genetic structure suggests that males disperse more than females. This has important consequences for evaluating the consequences of incidental catches of porpoises by fisheries in these seas since there may be a greater impact on local populations than is implied by simple calculations of mortality. PMID:9061964

  17. Late glacial and early Holocene Landscapes in northern New England and adjacent areas of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. B.; Jacobson, G. L.

    1985-05-01

    The landscapes of northern New England and adjacent areas of Canada changed greatly between 14,000 and 9000 yr B.P.: deglaciation occurred, sea levels and shorelines shifted, and a vegetational transition from tundra to closed forest took place. Data from 51 14C-dated sites from a range of elevations were used to map ice and sea positions, physiognomic vegetational zones, and the spread of individual tree taxa in the region. A continuum of tundra-woodland-forest passed northeastward and northward without major hesitation or reversal. An increased rate of progression from 11,000 to 10,000 yr B.P. suggests a more rapid warming than in the prior 2000-3000 yr. Elevational gradients controlled the patterns of deglaciation and vegetational change. The earliest spread of tree taxa was via the lowlands of southern Vermont and New Hampshire, and along a coastal corridor in Maine. Only after 12,000 yr B.P. did the taxa spread northward through the rest of the area. Different tree species entered the southern part of the area at different times and continued their spread at different rates. The approximate order of arrival follows: poplars (13,000-12,000 yr B.P. in the south), spruces, paper birch, and jack pine, followed by balsam fir and larch, and possibly ironwood, ash, and elm, and somewhat later by oak, maple, white pine, and finally hemlock (10,000-9000 yr B.P. in the south).

  18. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, the US-ARb plot was burned on 2005/03/08. The second plot, US-ARc, was left unburned as the control for experimental purposes. Aside from 2005, the region evaded burning activities for at least 15 years. Current disturbances consist of only light grazing activities.

  19. Quantum phase transition of a Bose gas in a lattice with a controlled number of atoms per site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the superfluid-Mott insulator quantum phase transition [1] of a gas of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice. We are able to prepare the gas with a controllable number of one, two, or three atoms per lattice site, as verified with photoassociation spectroscopy. We measure momentum distributions using standard time-of-flight imaging techniques. These are similar to those of ref. [1], and exhibit narrow peaks at moderate lattice strengths. We find that the width of these peaks increases for lattice heights greater than about 13 times the recoil energy [2], and we observe interesting differences in this behavior, depending on the number of atoms per site. The data suggest that the quantum phase transition occurs at higher lattice strength with larger site occupation. We acknowledge the support of this work by the R. A. Welch Foundation, The N. S. F., and the D.O.E. Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] Thilo St"oferle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004).

  20. Subsoil heterogeneities controlling porewater contaminant mass and microbial diversity at a site with a complex pollution history.

    PubMed

    Puigserver, Diana; Carmona, José M; Cortés, Amparo; Viladevall, Manuel; Nieto, José M; Grifoll, Magdalena; Vila, Joaquim; Parker, Beth L

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of the conceptual model of pollutant transport and fate in cases of DNAPL contamination at sites with a complex contamination history. The study was carried out in an unconfined aquifer of alluvial fans in the Tarragona Petrochemical Complex (Spain). Two boreholes were drilled and continuous cores were recovered in order to carry out a detailed core description at centimeter scale and a comprehensive sampling of borehole cores. The biogeochemical heterogeneity at these sites is controlled by the conjunction of lithological, hydrochemical and microbiological heterogeneities. Biodegradation processes of contaminant compounds take place not only at the level of the dissolved fraction in the aquifer but also at the level of the fraction retained in the fine, less conductive materials as shown by the biodegradation haloes of parent and metabolite compounds. Sampling the low-conductivity levels also allowed us to identify compounds, e.g. BTEX, that are the remaining traces of the passage of old contaminant plumes whose sources no longer exist. This enabled us to describe past biogeochemical processes and to partially account for the processes occurring today. Transition zones, characterized by numerous textural changes, constitute ecotones whose biostimulation could be effective in promoting the acceleration of the remediation of the multiple pollution at these sites.

  1. Subsoil heterogeneities controlling porewater contaminant mass and microbial diversity at a site with a complex pollution history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigserver, Diana; Carmona, José M.; Cortés, Amparo; Viladevall, Manuel; Nieto, José M.; Grifoll, Magdalena; Vila, Joaquim; Parker, Beth L.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of the conceptual model of pollutant transport and fate in cases of DNAPL contamination at sites with a complex contamination history. The study was carried out in an unconfined aquifer of alluvial fans in the Tarragona Petrochemical Complex (Spain). Two boreholes were drilled and continuous cores were recovered in order to carry out a detailed core description at centimeter scale and a comprehensive sampling of borehole cores. The biogeochemical heterogeneity at these sites is controlled by the conjunction of lithological, hydrochemical and microbiological heterogeneities. Biodegradation processes of contaminant compounds take place not only at the level of the dissolved fraction in the aquifer but also at the level of the fraction retained in the fine, less conductive materials as shown by the biodegradation haloes of parent and metabolite compounds. Sampling the low-conductivity levels also allowed us to identify compounds, e.g. BTEX, that are the remaining traces of the passage of old contaminant plumes whose sources no longer exist. This enabled us to describe past biogeochemical processes and to partially account for the processes occurring today. Transition zones, characterized by numerous textural changes, constitute ecotones whose biostimulation could be effective in promoting the acceleration of the remediation of the multiple pollution at these sites.

  2. Memo-RhoA-mDia1 signaling controls microtubules, the actin network, and adhesion site formation in migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Zaoui, Kossay; Honoré, Stéphane; Isnardon, Daniel; Braguer, Diane; Badache, Ali

    2008-11-03

    Actin assembly at the cell front drives membrane protrusion and initiates the cell migration cycle. Microtubules (MTs) extend within forward protrusions to sustain cell polarity and promote adhesion site turnover. Memo is an effector of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase involved in breast carcinoma cell migration. However, its mechanism of action remained unknown. We report in this study that Memo controls ErbB2-regulated MT dynamics by altering the transition frequency between MT growth and shortening phases. Moreover, although Memo-depleted cells can assemble the Rac1-dependent actin meshwork and form lamellipodia, they show defective localization of lamellipodial markers such as alpha-actinin-1 and a reduced number of short-lived adhesion sites underlying the advancing edge of migrating cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Memo is required for the localization of the RhoA guanosine triphosphatase and its effector mDia1 to the plasma membrane and that Memo-RhoA-mDia1 signaling coordinates the organization of the lamellipodial actin network, adhesion site formation, and MT outgrowth within the cell leading edge to sustain cell motility.

  3. Optimal control theory determination of feasible return-to-launch-site aborts for the HL-20 Personnel Launch System vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Kevin E.

    1994-07-01

    The personnel launch system (PLS) being studied by NASA is a system to complement the space shuttle and provide alternative access to space. The PLS consists of a manned spacecraft launched by an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). A candidate for the manned spacecraft is the HL-20 lifting body. In the event of an ELV malfunction during the initial portion of the ascent trajectory, the HL-20 will separate from the rocket and perform an unpowered return to launch site (RTLS) abort. This work details an investigation, using optimal control theory, of the RTLS abort scenario. The objective of the optimization was to maximize final altitude. With final altitude as the cost function, the feasibility of an RTLS abort at different times during the ascent was determined. The method of differential inclusions was used to determine the optimal state trajectories, and the optimal controls were then calculated from the optimal states and state rates.

  4. Optimal control theory determination of feasible return-to-launch-site aborts for the HL-20 Personnel Launch System vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutton, Kevin E.

    1994-01-01

    The personnel launch system (PLS) being studied by NASA is a system to complement the space shuttle and provide alternative access to space. The PLS consists of a manned spacecraft launched by an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). A candidate for the manned spacecraft is the HL-20 lifting body. In the event of an ELV malfunction during the initial portion of the ascent trajectory, the HL-20 will separate from the rocket and perform an unpowered return to launch site (RTLS) abort. This work details an investigation, using optimal control theory, of the RTLS abort scenario. The objective of the optimization was to maximize final altitude. With final altitude as the cost function, the feasibility of an RTLS abort at different times during the ascent was determined. The method of differential inclusions was used to determine the optimal state trajectories, and the optimal controls were then calculated from the optimal states and state rates.

  5. Pump-and-treat remediation of chlorinated solvent contamination at a controlled field-experiment site.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Chapman, Steven W; Allen-King, Richelle M; Feenstra, Stanley; Cherry, John A

    2006-11-01

    Pump-and-treat (P&T) remediation and associated concentration tailing are investigated at the field scale in a mildly heterogeneous sandy aquifer through the extraction of dissolved chlorinated solvent plumes that had developed over 475 d from a multicomponent dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) source intentionally emplaced in the aquifer at the Borden (ON) research site. Extraction was accomplished via a source-containment well located 25 m from the source and two further downgradient plume-centerline wells to remove the advancing high-concentration dissolved plumes. The 550 days of detailed P&T field data demonstrated the following: remediation, albeit slowly, of the leading 25-60 m plume section to around typical drinking water standard concentrations; concentration tailing (reduction) over 4 orders of magnitude in the plume; a steady-state concentration "plateau" in the source-containment well capturing the steadily dissolving DNAPL source; influences of extraction rate changes (concentration rebounds); and, lengthy tailing from inter-well stagnation-zone areas. Much of the contaminant behavior during the P&T appeared to be "ideal" in the sense that with appropriate specification of the source term and pumping regime, it was reasonably predicted by 3-dimensional numerical model (HydroGeoSphere) simulations that assumed ideal (macrodispersion, linear sorption, etc.) transport. Supporting lab studies confirmed nonideal sorption was, however, important at the point sample scale with enhanced PCE (tetrachloroethene) sorption to low- and high-permeability strata and moderate nonlinear and competitive sorption influences. Although there was limited evidence of nonideal tailing contributions to the field data (underprediction of some tailing curve gradients), such contributions to P&T tailing were not easily discerned and appeared to play a relatively minor role within the mildly heterogeneous aquifer studied.

  6. Stratigraphic Control on CCl4 and CHCl3 Concentrations in the 200 West Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Winsor, Kelsey; Last, George V.

    2008-01-01

    An extensive subsurface contaminant plume of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is the focus of a remedial effort in the 200 West Area of Washington State’s Hanford Site. Remediation requires a high-resolution model of the region’s spatially variable lithofacies and of the effect these units have on CCl4 migration through the unconfined aquifer. To increase detail of previous models, a transect was chosen along the primary groundwater flow path in the most heavily contaminated area. Borehole logs of wells along this 3.7 km-long transect were systematized and used to create a cross section displaying lithofacies depth and continuity. Natural and spectral gamma geophysical logs were examined to pinpoint the depths of geologic units. Depth discrete concentrations of CCl4 and its reductive dechlorination product, chloroform (CHCl3), were overlain on this cross section. Comparison of stratigraphy to contaminant levels shows that peaks in CCl4 concentration occur in thin, fine-grained layers and other that fine-grained layers frequently form lower boundaries to regions of high concentration. Peaks in CCl4 concentrations are frequently located at different depths from those of CHCl3, suggesting that these concentrations are affected by dechlorination of CCl4. Transformation of CCl4 to CHCl3 appears to be more prevalent within reduced, iron-containing sediments. Influence of thin, fine-grained layers within the larger aquifer unit indicates that characterization of contamination in this locality should consider subsurface geology with at least as much resolution as provided in this study.

  7. Comprehensive assessment of heavy metal contamination in sediment of the Pearl River Estuary and adjacent shelf.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqiang; Chen, Fanrong; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Jinsong; Wu, Shijun; Kang, Mingliang

    2012-09-01

    Total metal concentrations (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb), acid volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted metals (AVS-SEM), and heavy metal fractionation were used to assess the heavy metals contamination status and ecological risk in the sediments of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and adjacent shelf. Elevated concentrations at estuarine sites and lower concentrations at adjacent shelf sites are observed, especially for Cu and Zn. Within the PRE, the concentration of heavy metals in the western shore was mostly higher than that in the middle shore. The metals from anthropogenic sources mainly occur in the labile fraction and may be taken up by organisms as the environmental parameters change. A combination of total metal concentrations, metal contamination index and sequential extraction analysis is necessary to get the comprehensive information on the baseline, anthropogenic discharge and bioavailability of heavy metals.

  8. Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning of Hazardous Sites - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schalkoff, R.J.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes work after 4 years of a 3-year project (no-cost extension of the above-referenced project for a period of 12 months granted). The fourth generation of a vision sensing head for geometric and photometric scene sensing has been built and tested. Estimation algorithms for automatic sensor calibration updating under robot motion have been developed and tested. We have modified the geometry extraction component of the rendering pipeline. Laser scanning now produces highly accurate points on segmented curves. These point-curves are input to a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-spline) skinning procedure to produce interpolating surface segments. The NURBS formulation includes quadrics as a sub-class, thus this formulation allows much greater flexibility without the attendant instability of generating an entire quadric surface. We have also implemented correction for diffuse lighting and specular effects. The QRobot joint level control was extended to a complete semi-autonomous robot control system for D and D operations. The imaging and VR subsystems have been integrated and tested.

  9. No site unseen: predicting the failure to control problematic Internet use among young adults.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuhiro; Moshier, Samantha J; Otto, Michael W

    2016-11-01

    Problematic Internet use has been associated with the neglect of valued activities such as work, exercise, social activities, and relationships. In the present study, we expanded the understanding of problematic Internet use by identifying an important predictor of the inability to curb Internet use despite the desire to do so. Specifically, in a college student sample reporting a mean of 27.8 h of recreational Internet use in the past week, we investigated the role of distress intolerance (DI)-an individual difference variable that refers to the inability of an individual to tolerate emotional discomfort and to engage in goal-directed behavior when distressed-to predict the failure to meet personal restrictions on Internet use. Consistent with hypotheses, DI emerged as a significant predictor of the failure to meet self-control goals in both bivariate and multivariate models, indicating that DI offers unique prediction of self-control failure with problematic Internet use. Given that DI is a modifiable trait, these results encourage consideration of DI-focused early intervention strategies.

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Fate Is Controlled by Hrs Tyrosine Phosphorylation Sites That Regulate Hrs Degradation▿

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Kathryn A.; Visser Smit, Gina D.; Place, Trenton L.; Winistorfer, Stanley; Piper, Robert C.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is an endosomal protein essential for the efficient sorting of activated growth factor receptors into the lysosomal degradation pathway. Hrs undergoes ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation on residues Y329 and Y334 downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. It has been difficult to investigate the functional roles of phosphoHrs, as only a small proportion of the cellular Hrs pool is detectably phosphorylated. Using an HEK 293 model system, we found that ectopic expression of the protein Cbl enhances Hrs ubiquitination and increases Hrs phosphorylation following cell stimulation with EGF. We exploited Cbl's expansion of the phosphoHrs pool to determine whether Hrs tyrosine phosphorylation controls EGFR fate. In structure-function studies of Cbl and EGFR mutants, the level of Hrs phosphorylation and rapidity of apparent Hrs dephosphorylation correlated directly with EGFR degradation. Differential expression of wild-type versus Y329,334F mutant Hrs in Hrs-depleted cells revealed that one or both tyrosines regulate ligand-dependent Hrs degradation, as well as EGFR degradation. By modulating Hrs ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and protein levels, Cbl may control the composition of the endosomal sorting machinery and its ability to target EGFR for lysosomal degradation. PMID:17101784

  11. Immature house fly (Musca domestica) control in breeding sites with a new Brevibacillus laterosporus formulation.

    PubMed

    Ruiu, Luca; Satta, Alberto; Floris, Ignazio

    2008-04-01

    A bacterial formulation containing spores of a Brevibacillus laterosporus strain from Sardinia, known to be toxic by ingestion to the house fly (Musca domestica), was assayed in laboratory, outdoor, and field conditions for the control of immature stages of this pest. In all laboratory assays, the bacterial formulation exhibited toxicity against house fly larvae. A concentration of 1 x 10(8) spores of B. laterosporus/g of diet caused 100% mortality of house fly immature stages. The same formulation, applied at a concentration of 1 x 10(8) spores/ml, equivalent to a dose of 2 liters/m(2), caused a reduction in adult emergence from laboratory and natural breeding substrates (outdoor cage experiments) up to 80.3 and 57.8%, respectively. Similarly, this formulation applied in the cow pen of a diary farm at a dose of 2 liters/m(2) produced a significant reduction (30%) in immature fly development. Therefore, the use of this bacterial preparation in microbiological control strategies for the integrated pest management of this species is promising.

  12. An investigation of wash-off controlling parameters at urban and commercial monitoring sites.

    PubMed

    Berretta, C; Gnecco, I; Lanza, L G; La Barbera, P

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between the parameters of the wash-off function and the controlling hydrologic variables are investigated in this paper, assuming that the pollutant generation process basically depends on the watershed rainfall-runoff response characteristics. Data collected during an intense monitoring program carried out by the Department of Environmental Engineering of the University of Genova (Italy) within a residential area, an auto dismantler facility, a tourism terminal and a urban waste truck depot are used to this aim. The observed runoff events are classified into different TSS mass delivery processes and the occurrence of the first flush phenomenon is also investigated. The correlation between the mathematical parameters describing the exponential process and the hydrological parameters of the corresponding rainfall-runoff event is analysed: runoff parameters and in particular the maximum flow discharge over the time of concentration of the drainage network are proposed as the controlling factor for the total mass of pollutant that is made available for wash-off during each runoff event.

  13. Nonconserved Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites in Munc13s Differentially Control Synaptic Short-Term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lipstein, Noa; Schaks, Sabine; Dimova, Kalina; Kalkhof, Stefan; Ihling, Christian; Kölbel, Knut; Ashery, Uri; Rhee, JeongSeop; Brose, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Munc13s are presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle priming and thereby control the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles. During high synaptic activity, Munc13-1 and its closely related homolog, ubMunc13-2, bind Ca2+/calmodulin, resulting in enhanced priming activity and in changes of short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. Here, we studied whether bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, two remote isoforms of Munc13-1 with a neuronal subtype-specific expression pattern, mediate synaptic vesicle priming and regulate short-term synaptic plasticity in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. We identified a single functional Ca2+/calmodulin binding site in these isoforms and provide structural evidence that all Munc13s employ a common mode of interaction with calmodulin despite the lack of sequence homology between their Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites. Electrophysiological analysis showed that, during high-frequency activity, Ca2+/calmodulin binding positively regulates the priming activity of bMunc13-2 and Munc13-3, resulting in an increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of vesicles and subsequently in strong short-term synaptic enhancement of neurotransmission. We conclude that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent regulation of priming activity is structurally and functionally conserved in all Munc13 proteins, and that the composition of Munc13 isoforms in a neuron differentially controls its short-term synaptic plasticity characteristics. PMID:22966208

  14. [Evidence of control and prevention of surgical site infection by shoe covers and private shoes: a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Santos, Alice Medeiros Lutz; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa

    2005-01-01

    The study is about shoe cover and private shoe usage and aimed to find scientific evidence on their direct relation in the control of surgical site contamination and/or infection transmitted by floor microorganisms. A systematic review of basic research on shoe covers and private shoes usage was carried out, covering the period from 1950 to 2003, by means of a search in electronic sources, bibliographies of relevant studies and proceedings of scientific events. The analysis was supported by two researchers, both of whom were experienced in this theme and one of them in research methodology. The research methods revealed a diverse range and various problems. Only 4 studies obtained a dispersion of floor microorganisms to the air environment, although not significant, and none of them was directly related to surgical site contamination and/or infection. Results do not suggest direct evidence on their efficacy but there is evidence, nonetheless, that barrier and microorganisms transfer from one specific area to another depend on the type of shoe cover, with lower transfer rates when private shoes and shoe covers are employed. Occupational contamination risk during shoe cover attire and removal is also evident and the decision about continuity of their usage needs to be technically and administratively controlled.

  15. A 150-base pair 5' region of the MHC class I HLA-B7 gene is sufficient to direct tissue-specific expression and locus control region activity: the alpha site determines efficient expression and in vivo occupancy at multiple cis-active sites throughout this region.

    PubMed

    Kushida, M M; Dey, A; Zhang, X L; Campbell, J; Heeney, M; Carlyle, J; Ganguly, S; Ozato, K; Vasavada, H; Chamberlain, J W

    1997-11-15

    To characterize cis- and trans-acting mechanisms that regulate MHC class I transcription during development and in adult tissues, we have used transgenic mice to study a series of human MHC (HLA)-B7 class I gene constructs. Previous studies identified the 5' -0.66-kb to -0.075-kb region as sufficient to direct appropriate and efficient tissue-specific levels of HLA-B7 RNA relative to H-2 class I. Results here show that DNA 5' of -0.26 kb is not required for any aspect of expression. As the expression level correlated with the transgene copy number, was comparable to H-2 or a per-gene copy basis and was independent of integration site, the -0.075 to -0.26-kb segment also functions as a locus control region. With this region, sequences 3' of -0.075 kb, possibly at the promoter, appear to direct the appropriate tissue distribution. Of conserved sequences in the -0.075 to -0.26-kb region, enhancer B box is nonessential. In contrast, in vivo "footprinting" implicated region I/ enhancer A/NF-kappaB, IFN consensus/response sequence, and alpha in class I regulation as they are "occupied" in a tissue-specific pattern that correlates with expression. Mutation of alpha leads to decreased expression and loss of occupancy not only at alpha but also at region I/enhancer A/NF-kappaB and IFN consensus/response sequence. Thus, site alpha is an essential class I regulatory element, the dominant function of which is to mediate tissue-specific occupancy at multiple adjacent cis-active sites, possibly by facilitating stable synergistic interactions between factors at these distinct elements.

  16. Spine cryoablation: A multimodality image-guided approach for tumors adjacent to major neural elements

    PubMed Central

    Guenette, Jeffrey P.; Tuncali, Kemal; Himes, Nathan; Tatli, Servet; Lee, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    We report percutaneous cryoablation of spine tumors in 7 consecutive patients (5 males, 2 females; mean age 47 years, range 17-68) using intraprocedural image monitoring of ice ball margins to protect adjacent neural elements. Complete tumor ablation was achieved in all patients without neurological complication. Pain relief was achieved in 4 of 5 (80%) patients; the patient with persistent pain was later found to have enlarging metastases at other sites. PMID:27609619

  17. Controlled, Site-Specific Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes with Diazonium Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.

    2013-01-01

    capacities and uses. Site-specific functionalization may enable the use of nanotubes in molecular electronic applications because device functionality is critical at the cross points.

  18. Controls of surface topography on submarine and subaerial hydrothermal fluid flow and vent-site location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani Hassan, N.; Rupke, L.; Iyer, K. H.; Borgia, A.

    2010-12-01

    flanks or even topographic lows (submarine case). Amplitude also has a first-order effect of focusing the vent sites on topographic highs and lows. Another observation is that the wavelength of the topography affects the number of plumes generated in the model. These findings are confirmed in two case studies for the submarine Lucky Strike hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the subaerial geothermal field of Amiata, Italy. In both case studies the predicted vent locations fit well with the observed ones.

  19. Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Carolynn P; Bushlya, Anatoly V; Efimenko, Vladimir F; Ilyanstev, Anatoly; Regoushevsky, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

  20. Help, I Am Losing Control! Examining the Reporting of Sexual Harassment by Adolescents to Social Networking Sites.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Kathleen; Poels, Karolien; Vandebosch, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Sexual harassment is often encountered by adolescents on social networking sites (SNS). One option to cope with a situation of harassment on SNS is to alarm the provider by reporting the transgressive content. It is yet unclear what the determinants of reporting a sexual harassment situation on SNS are, as well as the subsequent actions to these reports from the part of the SNS provider. In this article, we seek to address these gaps, and in particular examine whether control-by-the-self over the situation and negative emotions play a role in the reporting of sexual harassment on SNS. Findings indicate that a low situational control-by-the-self, indirectly (namely through a higher experience of negative emotions such as anger and shame) increases the reporting of sexual harassment by the victim. Public visibility of the incident and the impossibility to remove the content reduce the situational control-by-the-self. Results further suggest that SNS providers often ignore reported situations of sexual harassment. The study concludes with suggestions for responses to reported harassment on SNS, which should be directed toward increasing behavioral control and thereby alleviating negative emotions.

  1. Host-Guest Binding-Site-Tunable Self-Assembly of Stimuli-Responsive Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hao; Qi, Miao; Liu, Yuyang; Tian, Wei

    2016-06-13

    Despite the remarkable progress made in controllable self-assembly of stimuli-responsive supramolecular polymers (SSPs), a basic issue that has not been consideration to date is the essential binding site. The noncovalent binding sites, which connect the building blocks and endow supramolecular polymers with their ability to respond to stimuli, are expected to strongly affect the self-assembly of SSPs. Herein, the design and synthesis of a dual-stimuli thermo- and photoresponsive Y-shaped supramolecular polymer (SSP2) with two adjacent β-cyclodextrin/azobenzene (β-CD/Azo) binding sites, and another SSP (SSP1) with similar building blocks, but only one β-CD/Azo binding site as a control, are described. Upon gradually increasing the polymer solution temperature or irradiating with UV light, SSP2 self-assemblies with a higher binding-site distribution density; exhibits a flower-like morphology, smaller size, and more stable dynamic aggregation process; and greater controllability for drug-release behavior than those observed with SSP1 self-assemblies. The host-guest binding-site-tunable self-assembly was attributed to the positive cooperativity generated among adjacent binding sites on the surfaces of SSP2 self-assemblies. This work is beneficial for precisely controlling the structural parameters and controlled release function of SSP self-assemblies.

  2. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  3. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. A Study of the Pronunciation of Words Containing Adjacent Vowels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greif, Ivo P.

    To determine the usefulness of the commonly taught phonics rule, "only pronounce the first vowel in words that contain adjacent vowels" (the VV rule, with the first "v" pronounced with the long vowel sound), two new studies applied it to words with adjacent vowels in several lists and dictionaries. The first study analyzed words containing…

  5. 47 CFR 90.221 - Adjacent channel power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent channel power limits. 90.221 Section 90.221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.221 Adjacent channel...

  6. 47 CFR 90.221 - Adjacent channel power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent channel power limits. 90.221 Section 90.221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.221 Adjacent channel...

  7. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  8. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  10. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  11. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  12. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  13. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  14. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  15. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  16. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  17. Atrophy of hippocampal subfields and adjacent extrahippocampal structures in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Franciotti, Raffaella; Bubbico, Giovanna; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus and adjacent extrahippocampal structures are organized in distinct and specialized regions which process heterogeneous functions, including memory, and visuospatial functions. Specific alterations of the different hippocampal subfields and adjacent extrahippocampal structures could differently contribute to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Based on visual symptoms which characterize DLB patients, the hippocampal subfields and the adjacent extrahippocampal structures which are mainly involved in the visual functions could be impaired in DLB and preserved in AD. To test this hypothesis, we performed structural magnetic resonance imaging on 19 DLB, 15 AD, and 19 age-matched healthy controls. FreeSurfer's pipelines were used to perform parcellation of hippocampus and adjacent extrahippocampal structures and to assess the structural changes within each region. The cornu ammonis and subiculum were bilaterally damaged in AD and preserved in DLB. The perirhinal cortex and parahippocampus were damaged in DLB but not in AD. Our findings demonstrate that the hippocampal subfields and adjacent extrahippocampal structures were differently altered in AD and DLB. Particularly, DLB patients showed a more focused alteration of the extrahippocampal structures linked to visual functions.

  18. Hydrologic Characteristics of Low-Impact Stormwater Control Measures at Two Sites in Northeastern Ohio, 2008-13 (USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2015-5030)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report updates and examines hydrologic data gathered to characterize the performance of two stormwater control measures (SCM) sites in the Chagrin River watershed, Ohio. At the Sterncrest Drive site, roadside bioswales and rain gardens were used to alleviate drainage problem...

  19. Assessment of Soil Moisture and Fixatives Performance in Controlling Wind Erosion of Contaminated Soil at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.E.; Gudavalli, R.K.

    2008-07-01

    During the remediation of burial grounds at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Washington State, the dispersion of contaminated soil particles and dust is an issue that is faced by site workers on a daily basis. This contamination issue is even more of a concern when one takes into account the semi-arid characteristics of the region where the site is located. To mitigate this problem, workers at the site use a variety of engineered methods to minimize the dispersion of contaminated soil and dust particles. Once such methods is the use of water and/or suppression agents (fixatives) that stabilizes the soil prior to soil excavation, segregation, and removal activities. A primary contributor to the dispersion of contaminated soil and dust is wind soil erosion. The erosion process occurs when the wind speed exceeds a certain threshold value (threshold shear velocity), which depends on a number of factors including wind force loading, particle size, surface soil moisture, and the geometry of the soil. Thus under these circumstances the mobility of contaminated soil and generation and dispersion of particulate matter are significantly influenced by these parameters. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at the Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) to evaluate the effectiveness of three commercially available fixatives in controlling the mobility of soil particles on soil mounds when exposed to varying wind forces. The fixatives tested included: (1) a calcium chloride solution; (2) a petroleum hydrocarbon emulsion; and 3) a synthetic organic. As an initial step, approximately 500 lbs of uncontaminated soil was obtained from the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Soil samples were placed in an open-loop, low speed wind tunnel and exposed to wind forces ranging from 10 to 30 miles per hour (mph). Wind erosion controlling capabilities of commercially available fixatives and soil moisture were tested at a laboratory

  20. GABA(A) receptors implicated in REM sleep control express a benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Quang; Liang, Chang-Lin; Marks, Gerald A

    2013-08-21

    It has been reported that non-subtype-selective GABAA receptor antagonists injected into the nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) of rats induced long-lasting increases in REM sleep. Characteristics of these REM sleep increases were identical to those resulting from injection of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. Both actions were blocked by the muscarinic antagonist, atropine. Microdialysis of GABAA receptor antagonists into the PnO resulted in increased acetylcholine levels. These findings were consistent with GABAA receptor antagonists disinhibiting acetylcholine release in the PnO to result in an acetylcholine-mediated REM sleep induction. Direct evidence has been lacking for localization in the PnO of the specific GABAA receptor-subtypes mediating the REM sleep effects. Here, we demonstrated a dose-related, long-lasting increase in REM sleep following injection (60 nl) in the PnO of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline (DMCM, 10(-2)M). REM sleep increases were greater and more consistently produced than with the non-selective antagonist gabazine, and both were blocked by atropine. Fluorescence immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, colocalized in PnO vesicular acetylcholine transporter, a presynaptic marker of cholinergic boutons, with the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor. These data provide support for the direct action of GABA on mechanisms of acetylcholine release in the PnO. The presence of the γ2 subunit at this locus and the REM sleep induction by DMCM are consistent with binding of benzodiazepines by a GABAA receptor-subtype in control of REM sleep.

  1. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wiechens, Nicola; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase’s most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements. PMID:27019336

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for craniopharyngioma adjacent to optic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Nagai, Aiko; Hayashi, Naoki

    2010-06-01

    Craniopharyngioma has benign histological character. However, because of proximity to optic pathways, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus, it may cause severe and permanent damage to such critical structures and can even be life threatening. Total surgical resection is often difficult. This study aims to evaluate treatment results of Novalis stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for craniopharyngioma adjacent to optic pathways. Ten patients (six men, four women) with craniopharyngioma and median age of 56.5 years (range 10-74 years) were treated by SRT using Novalis from July 2006 through March 2009. Median volume of tumor was 7.9 ml (range 1.1-21 ml). Three-dimensional noncoplanar five- or seven-beam SRT or coplanar five-beam SRT with intensity modulation was performed. Total dose of 30-39 Gy in 10-15 fractions (median 33 Gy) was delivered to the target. Ten patients were followed up for 9-36 months (median 25.5 months). Response rate was 80% (8/10), and control rate was 100%. Improvement of neurological symptoms was observed in five patients. No serious complications due to SRT were found. SRT for craniopharyngioma may be a safe and effective treatment. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine long-term tumor control or late complications.

  3. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  4. Nitrous oxide emission from cropland and adjacent riparian buffers in contrasting hydrogeomorphic settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K; Jacinthe, P A; Vidon, P; Liu, X; Baker, M E

    2014-01-01

    Riparian buffers are important nitrate (NO) sinks in agricultural watersheds, but limited information is available regarding the intensity and control of nitrous oxide (NO) emission from these buffers. This study monitored (December 2009-May 2011) NO fluxes at two agricultural riparian buffers in the White River watershed in Indiana to assess the impact of land use and hydrogeomorphologic (HGM) attributes on emission. The study sites included a riparian forest in a glacial outwash/alluvium setting (White River [WR]) and a grassed riparian buffer in tile-drained till plains (Leary Weber Ditch [LWD]). Adjacent corn ( L.) fields were monitored for land use assessment. Analysis of variance identified season, land use (riparian buffer vs. crop field), and site geomorphology as major drivers of NO fluxes. Strong relationships between N mineralization and NO fluxes were found at both sites, but relationships with other nutrient cycling indicators (C/N ratio, dissolved organic C, microbial biomass C) were detected only at LWD. Nitrous oxide emission showed strong seasonal variability; the largest NO peaks occurred in late spring/early summer as a result of flooding at the WR riparian buffer (up to 27.8 mg NO-N m d) and N fertilizer application to crop fields. Annual NO emission (kg NO-N ha) was higher in the crop fields (WR: 7.82; LWD: 6.37) than in the riparian areas. A significant difference ( < 0.02) in annual NO emission between the riparian buffers was detected (4.32 vs. 1.03 kg NO-N ha at WR and LWD, respectively), and this difference was attributed to site geomorphology and flooding (WR is flood prone; no flooding occurred at tile-drained LWD). The study results demonstrate the significance of landscape geomorphology and land-stream connection (i.e., flood potential) as drivers of NO emission in riparian buffers and therefore argue that an HGM-based approach should be especially suitable for determination of regional NO budget in riparian ecosystems.

  5. Novel control of cardiac myofilament response to calcium by S-glutathionylation at specific sites of myosin binding protein C

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bindiya G.; Wilder, Tanganyika; Solaro, R. John

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated a relation between glutathionylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) and diastolic dysfunction in a hypertensive mouse model stressed by treatment with salt, deoxycorticosterone acetate, and unilateral nephrectomy. Although these results strongly indicated an important role for S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C as a modifier of myofilament function, indirect effects of other post-translational modifications may have occurred. Moreover, we did not determine the sites of thiol modification by glutathionylation. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro method to mimic the in situ S-glutathionylation of myofilament proteins and determined direct functional effects and sites of oxidative modification employing Western blotting and mass spectrometry. We induced glutathionylation in vitro by treatment of isolated myofibrils and detergent extracted fiber bundles (skinned fibers) with oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Immuno-blotting results revealed increased glutathionylation with GSSG treatment of a protein band around 140 kDa. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the 140 kDa band as cMyBP-C and determined the sites of glutathionylation to be at cysteines 655, 479, and 627. Determination of the relation between Ca2+-activation of myofibrillar acto-myosin ATPase rate demonstrated an increased Ca2+-sensitivity induced by the S-glutathionylation. Force generating skinned fiber bundles also showed an increase in Ca-sensitivity when treated with oxidized glutathione, which was reversed with the reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT). Our data demonstrate that a specific and direct effect of S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C is a significant increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. Our data also provide new insights into the functional significance of oxidative modification of myosin binding protein C and the potential role of domains not previously considered to be functionally significant

  6. Using the binding site to control the magnetic and spintronic properties of a single magnetic molecule in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Ben; El Hallak, Fadi; Prueser, Henning; Gill, Tobias G.; Sharp, John; Fisher, Andrew J.; Persson, Mats; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.

    2015-03-01

    Many proposals outline the use of single magnetic molecules in new applications in information technology and spintronics, with the intention of creating new devices based on phenomena that only manifest at the atomic scale. To create these devices it will be necessary to engineer the required properties, whether through controlling the molecule's chemical makeup or its interaction with the external surroundings. The latter may involve using interactions with the supporting substrate surface, which have been shown to not only modify the molecule properties but also create effects such as chirality. Here we utilize the surface interaction to modify the properties of FePc on copper nitride, a thin insulator, above bulk Cu(001). Using scanning tunneling microscopy we show that the interaction with the surface is defined by the binding site of the central Fe atom in the molecule. By performing elastic and inelastic tunneling spectroscopy and comparing the results to DFT modeling, we explore how coupling to the surface can be used to control the molecular orbitals and the accessibility of the spin excitations. This demonstrates the importance of controlling molecule-substrate coupling down to the atomic scale for the development of single molecule devices.

  7. ADAM17 is regulated by a rapid and reversible mechanism that controls access to its catalytic site

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Sylvain M.; Maretzky, Thorsten; Issuree, Priya D. A.; Niu, Xiao-Da; Reiss, Karina; Saftig, Paul; Khokha, Rama; Lundell, Daniel; Blobel, Carl P.

    2010-01-01

    Protein ectodomain shedding is crucial for cell–cell interactions because it controls the bioavailability of soluble tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and ligands of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, and the release of many other membrane proteins. Various stimuli can rapidly trigger ectodomain shedding, yet much remains to be learned about the identity of the enzymes that respond to these stimuli and the mechanisms underlying their activation. Here, we demonstrate that the membrane-anchored metalloproteinase ADAM17, but not ADAM10, is the sheddase that rapidly responds to the physiological signaling pathways stimulated by thrombin, EGF, lysophosphatidic acid and TNFα. Stimulation of ADAM17 is swift and quickly reversible, and does not depend on removal of its inhibitory pro-domain by pro-protein convertases, or on dissociation of an endogenous inhibitor, TIMP3. Moreover, activation of ADAM17 by physiological stimuli requires its transmembrane domain, but not its cytoplasmic domain, arguing against inside–out signaling via cytoplasmic phosphorylation as the underlying mechanism. Finally, experiments with the tight binding hydroxamate inhibitor DPC333, used here to probe the accessibility of the active site of ADAM17, demonstrate that this inhibitor can quickly bind to ADAM17 in stimulated, but not quiescent cells. These findings support the concept that activation of ADAM17 involves a rapid and reversible exposure of its catalytic site. PMID:20980382

  8. Impact of Co-Site Interference on L/C-Band Spectrum for UAS Control and Non-Payload Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Bishop, William D.; Hoder, Douglas J.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide for the safe integration of unmanned aircraft systems into the National Airspace System, the control and non-payload communications (CNPC) link connecting the ground-based pilot with the unmanned aircraft must be highly reliable. A specific requirement is that it must operate using aviation safety radiofrequency spectrum. The 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) provided a potentially suitable allocation for LOS CNPC spectrum in C-Band at 5030-5091 MHz band which, when combined with a previous allocation in L-Band (960-1164 MHz) may satisfy the LOS spectrum requirement and provide for high reliability through dual-band redundancy. However, the LBand spectrum hosts a number of aeronautical navigation systems which require high-power transmitters on-board the aircraft. These high-power transmitters co-located with sensitive CNPC receivers operating in the same frequency band have the potential to create co-site interference, reducing the performance of the CNPC receivers and ultimately reducing the usability of the L-Band for CNPC. This paper examines the potential for co-site interference, as highlighted in recent flight tests, and discusses the impact on the UAS CNPC spectrum availability and requirements for further testing and analysis.

  9. Multi-aquifer pumping test to determine cutoff wall length for groundwater flow control during site excavation in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Noriharu; Kohsaka, Nobuaki; Ishikawa, Akira

    2008-08-01

    Multi-aquifer pumping tests, using a multi-screen pumping well and multi-level piezometers, were carried out for groundwater flow control in a large-scale excavation site in Tokyo, Japan. The site was underlain by multi-layered confined aquifers. In the tests, pumping was carried out using a multi-aquifer pumping well in which a screen depth was chosen arbitrarily. Changes in groundwater pressure heads in each aquifer were measured at each screen position of the multi-aquifer pumping well. Hydraulic conductivity ( K) and specific storage ( S s) of not only aquifers, but also for low permeability layers between the aquifers, were estimated using the Cooper-Jacob method, and calibrated by a finite element method (FEM) groundwater model. Four different cutoff wall lengths were assumed for final excavation depth, and correlations among wall length, pumping discharge and drawdown at the back of the cutoff wall were obtained from simulations using the K and S s parameters in the FEM model. Then, the most suitable wall length was selected based on the simulated correlations considering environmental condition, construction period and cost of the cutoff wall.

  10. Case histories of electrical resistivity and controlled-source magnetotelluric surveys for the site investigation of tunnel construction

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H.S.; Song, Y.; Yi, M.J.; Chung, H.J.; Kim, K.S.

    2006-12-15

    In tunnel construction, the information regarding rock mass quality and the distribution of weak zones is crucial for economical tunnel design and to ensure safety. Usually, the rock mass grade is estimated by observing recovered cores obtained by drilling or by physical parameters calculated in a laboratory using core samples. However, the high drilling cost limits the number of boreholes; furthermore, rough terrains can reduce the access of drilling machines to the survey sites. In such situations, surface geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity or controlled-source magnetotelluric (CSMT) can provide a rough estimate of the rock mass condition over the planned tunnel route. These methods can also map weak zones (faults, fractures, coal bearing zones, and cavities), which are characterized by a lower resistivity than the surrounding fresh rock mass. We present two successful applications of the electrical resistivity and CSMT methods to the site investigation of tunnel construction over a rough terrain. The first example demonstrates that the boundary of the bedrock and weak zones related to the distribution of coaly shale and coal seams were estimated to extend beyond a few hundred meters below the rough surface. The second example shows that the developing direction and depth of cavities, which are mainly related to the weak zones in limestone, were successfully interpreted by a three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity survey with the aid of borehole test results.

  11. Probabilistic peak calling and controlling false discovery rate estimations in transcription factor binding site mapping from ChIP-seq.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shuo; Bailey, Cheryl P; Zhang, Shunpu; Ladunga, Istvan

    2010-01-01

    Localizing the binding sites of regulatory proteins is becoming increasingly feasible and accurate. This is due to dramatic progress not only in chromatin immunoprecipitation combined by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) but also in advanced statistical analyses. A fundamental issue, however, is the alarming number of false positive predictions. This problem can be remedied by improved peak calling methods of twin peaks, one at each strand of the DNA, kernel density estimators, and false discovery rate estimations based on control libraries. Predictions are filtered by de novo motif discovery in the peak environments. These methods have been implemented in, among others, Valouev et al.'s Quantitative Enrichment of Sequence Tags (QuEST) software tool. We demonstrate the prediction of the human growth-associated binding protein (GABPalpha) based on ChIP-seq observations.

  12. Quality Control of the Large-area GEM detectors at Production Sites for the CMS Muon Endcap Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    GEM (Gas Electron Multipliers) detectors will be installed in the high-eta region of the CMS muon system by the year 2019. With precise tracking and fast trigger information, these detectors will significantly improve the CMS muon triggering after the second long shutdown of the LHC. There are six sites, external to CERN, where at total of 160 1-meter long GEM detectors will be produced. We present the detector construction and discuss the critical quality control (QC) procedures implemented for chamber commissioning. Some of the most important QCs discussed are: current leakage tests, gas leak tests, gain measurements, high voltage test and response uniformity test. We discuss the criteria that are used to accept or reject a GEM detector based on the QC results. The production and QC status will be presented as well.

  13. Overview of the instrument control and data reduction software in the Sandia data acquisition system at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, W.B.

    1994-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a sophisticated custom digital data acquisition system to record data from a wide variety of experiments conducted on nuclear weapons effects tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Software is a critical part of this data acquisition system. In particular software has been developed to support an instrumentation/experiment setup database, interactive and automated instrument control, remote data readout and processing, plotting, interactive data analysis, and automated calibration. Some software is also used as firmware in custom subsystems incorporating embedded microprocessors. The software operations are distributed across the nearly 40 computer nodes that comprise the NTS Wide Area Computer Network. This report is an overview of the software developed to support this data acquisition system. The report also provides a brief description of the computer network and the various recording systems used.

  14. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations.

  15. Descriptive analysis and spatial epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) for swine sites participating in area regional control and elimination programs from 3 regions of Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Andreia G.; Poljak, Zvonimir; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Hand, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe demographics, basic biosecurity practices, ownership structure, and prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in swine sites located in 3 regions in Ontario, and investigate the presence of spatial clustering and clusters of PRRS positive sites in the 3 regions. A total of 370 swine sites were enrolled in Area Regional Control and Elimination projects in Niagara, Watford, and Perth from 2010 to 2013. Demographics, biosecurity, and site ownership data were collected using a standardized questionnaire and site locations were obtained from an industry organization. Status was assigned on the basis of available diagnostic tests and/or assessment by site veterinarians. Spatial dependence was investigated using the D-function, the spatial scan statistic test and the spatial relative risk method. Results showed that the use of strict all-in all-out (AIAO) pig flow and shower before entry are uncommon biosecurity practices in swine sites, but a larger proportion of sites reported having a Danish entry. The prevalence of PRRS in the 3 regions ranged from 17% to 48% and localized high and low risk clusters were detected. Sites enrolled in the PRRS control projects were characterized by membership in multiple and overlapping ownership structures and networks, which complicates the way the results of monitoring and disease management measures are communicated to the target population. PMID:26424906

  16. Descriptive analysis and spatial epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) for swine sites participating in area regional control and elimination programs from 3 regions of Ontario.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Andreia G; Poljak, Zvonimir; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Hand, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe demographics, basic biosecurity practices, ownership structure, and prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) in swine sites located in 3 regions in Ontario, and investigate the presence of spatial clustering and clusters of PRRS positive sites in the 3 regions. A total of 370 swine sites were enrolled in Area Regional Control and Elimination projects in Niagara, Watford, and Perth from 2010 to 2013. Demographics, biosecurity, and site ownership data were collected using a standardized questionnaire and site locations were obtained from an industry organization. Status was assigned on the basis of available diagnostic tests and/or assessment by site veterinarians. Spatial dependence was investigated using the D-function, the spatial scan statistic test and the spatial relative risk method. Results showed that the use of strict all-in all-out (AIAO) pig flow and shower before entry are uncommon biosecurity practices in swine sites, but a larger proportion of sites reported having a Danish entry. The prevalence of PRRS in the 3 regions ranged from 17% to 48% and localized high and low risk clusters were detected. Sites enrolled in the PRRS control projects were characterized by membership in multiple and overlapping ownership structures and networks, which complicates the way the results of monitoring and disease management measures are communicated to the target population.

  17. Site-specific mesenchymal control of inflammatory pain to yeast challenge in vulvodynia-afflicted and pain-free women.

    PubMed

    Foster, David C; Falsetta, Megan L; Woeller, Collynn F; Pollock, Stephen J; Song, Kunchang; Bonham, Adrienne; Haidaris, Constantine G; Stodgell, Chris J; Messing, Susan P; Iadarola, Michael; Phipps, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Fibroblast strains were derived from 2 regions of the lower genital tract of localized provoked vulvodynia (LPV) cases and pain-free controls. Sixteen strains were derived from 4 cases and 4 controls, age and race matched, after presampling mechanical pain threshold assessments. Strains were challenged with 6 separate stimuli: live yeast species (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae), yeast extract (zymosan), or inactive vehicle. Production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were proinflammatory response measures. Highest IL-6 and PGE2 occurred with vestibular strains after C albicans, C glabrata, and zymosan challenges, resulting in the ability to significantly predict IL-6 and PGE2 production by genital tract location. After C albicans and C glabrata challenge of all 16 fibroblast strains, adjusting for dual sampling of subjects, PGE2 and IL-6 production significantly predicted the presampling pain threshold from the genital tract site of sampling. At the same location of pain assessment and fibroblast sampling, in situ immunohistochemical (IHC)(+) fibroblasts for IL-6 and Cox-2 were quantified microscopically. The correlation between IL-6 production and IL-6 IHC(+) was statistically significant; however, biological significance is unknown because of the small number of IHC(+) IL-6 fibroblasts identified. A low fibroblast IL-6 IHC(+) count may result from most IL-6 produced by fibroblasts existing in a secreted extracellular state. Enhanced, site-specific, innate immune responsiveness to yeast pathogens by fibroblasts may be an early step in LPV pathogenesis. Fibroblast strain testing may offer an attractive and objective marker of LPV pathology in women with vulvodynia of inflammatory origin.

  18. What controls the oxidative ratio of UK peats? A multi-site study of elemental CHNO concentrations in peat cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, Gareth; Worrall, Fred; Masiello, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) is the amount of CO2 sequestered in the terrestrial biosphere for each mol of O2 produced. The OR governs the effectiveness of a terrestrial biome to mitigate the impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and it has been used to calculate the balance of terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks across the globe. However, few studies have investigated the controls of the variability in OR. What factors affect OR - climate? Soil type? Vegetation type? N deposition? Land use? Land use change? Small shifts in OR could have important implications in the global partitioning of CO2 between the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans. This study looks at peat soils from a series of sites representing a climatic transect across the UK. Duplicate peat cores were taken, along with samples of above-ground vegetation and litter, from sites in northern Scotland (Forsinard), southern Scotland (Auchencorth), northern England (Moor House; Thorne Moor) through the Welsh borders (Whixhall Moss) and Somerset levels (Westhay Moor) to Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor in the south west of England. Sub-samples of the cores were analysed for their CHNO concentrations using a Costech ECS 4010 Elemental combustion system. Using the method of Masiello et al. (2008), OR values could be calculated from these elemental concentrations. Results show that OR values of UK peats varied between 0.82 and 1.27 with a median value of 1.08 which is within the range of world soils. There were significant differences in OR of the peat between sites with the data falling into two broad groupings - Group 1: Forsinard, Auchencorth, Dartmoor and Bodmin Moor; Group 2: Moor House, Thorne Moor, Westhay Moor, Whixhall Moss. Whilst there were significant changes (p < 0.05) in elemental ratios with increasing peat depth (increasing C:N ratio and decreasing O:C ratio) there was no significant difference overall in OR with depth. This paper will explore some of the possible controlling factors on these ratios. Local

  19. PIXE analysis of elements in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qixin; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Lingnuo; Xu, Yongling; Ye, Simao

    1990-04-01

    The elemental regional distributions in 20 resected human stomach tissues were obtained using PIXE analysis. The samples were pathologically divided into four types: normal, adjacent mucosa A, adjacent mucosa B and cancer. The targets for PIXE analysis were prepared by wet digestion with a pressure bomb system. P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se were measured and statistically analysed. We found significantly higher concentrations of P, K, Cu, Zn and a higher ratio of Cu compared to Zn in cancer tissue as compared with normal tissue, but statistically no significant difference between adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue was found.

  20. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  1. Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Superfund Site, Tacoma, Washington Remedial Investigations. Evaluation of Alternative Dredging Methods and Equipment, Disposal Methods and Sites, and Site Control and Treatment Practices for Contaminated Sediments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    sediment resuspension at the dredge site, special-purpose hydraulic dredges produce less resuspension than conventional hydraulic dredges, and with...the exception of hopper dredge overflow, conventional hydraulic dredges produce less resuspension than mechanical dredges. In terms of slurry water that...dredges produce less water than conventional hydraulic dredges. Hydraulic dredges produce less solids resuspension at the dredging site and have a

  2. Growth and decline of shoreline industry in Sydney estuary (Australia) and influence on adjacent estuarine sediments.

    PubMed

    Birch, G F; Lean, J; Gunns, T

    2015-06-01

    Sydney estuary (Australia), like many urbanised waterways, is degraded due to an extended history of anthropogenic activity. Two major sources of contamination to this estuary are discharge by former shoreline industries and historic and contemporary catchment stormwater. The objectives of the present study were to document changes in shoreline land use from European settlement to the present day and determine the influence of this trend on the metal content of adjacent estuarine sediments. Temporal analysis of land use for seven time horizons between 1788 and 2010 showed rapid expansion of industry along much of the Sydney estuary foreshore soon after European settlement due to the benefits of easy and inexpensive access and readily available water for cooling and power. Shoreline industry attained maximum development in 1978 (32-km length) and declined rapidly to the present-day (9-km length) through redevelopment of industrial sites into medium- to high-density, high-value residential housing. Cores taken adjacent to 11 long-term industrial sites showed that past industrial practices contributed significantly to contamination of estuarine sediment. Subsurface metal concentrations were up to 35 times that of present-day surface sediment and over 100 times greater than natural background concentrations. Sedimentation rates for areas adjacent to shoreline industry were between 0.6 and 2.5 cm/year, and relaxation times were estimated at 50 to 100 years. Natural relaxation and non-disturbance of sediments may be the best management practice in most locations.

  3. Hydrocarbon provinces and productive trends in Libya and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Missallati, A.A. Ltd., Tripoli )

    1988-08-01

    According to the age of major reservoirs, hydrocarbon occurrences in Libya and adjacent areas can be grouped into six major systems which, according to their geographic locations, can be classified into two major hydrocarbon provinces: (1) Sirte-Pelagian basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from middle-late Mesozoic to early Tertiary, and (2) Murzog-Ghadames basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from early Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. In the Sirte-Pelagian basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped in structural highs or in stratigraphic wedge-out against structural highs and in carbonate buildups. Here, hydrocarbon generation is characterized by the combined effect of abundant structural relief and reservoir development in the same hydrocarbon systems of the same age, providing an excellent example of hydrocarbon traps in sedimentary basins that have undergone extensive tensional fracturing in a shallow marine environment. In the Murzog-Ghadames basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped mainly in structural highs controlled by paleostructural trends as basement arches which acted as focal points for oil migration and accumulation.

  4. Child sexual abuse prevention training for childcare professionals: an independent multi-site randomized controlled trial of Stewards of Children.

    PubMed

    Rheingold, Alyssa A; Zajac, Kristyn; Chapman, Jason E; Patton, Meghan; de Arellano, Michael; Saunders, Benjamin; Kilpatrick, Dean

    2015-04-01

    Given the significant rates and deleterious consequences of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), identifying effective primary prevention approaches is a clear priority. There isa growing awareness that childcare professionals (e.g.,teachers, childcare personnel, clergy) are in a unique position to engage in prevention efforts due to high accessibility to children and expertise in child development. However, CSA prevention programs targeting childcare professionals have received insufficient attention. The goal of this study was toc on duct an independent multi-site controlled evaluation of an existing CSA prevention program, Stewards of Children, offered through both in-person and web-based formats. This study included 352 childcare professionals recruited from children’s advocacy centers across three states. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) inperson training, (2) web-based training, or (3) waitlist control. Dependent variables included CSA knowledge, CSA attitudes,and self-reported CSA preventive behaviors. Results indicated that Stewards impacted knowledge, attitudes, and preventive behaviors. No differences were found between training modalities (i.e., in-person versus web-based) on knowledge and preventive behaviors. Results indicate that brief trainings for childcare professionals may impact CSA prevention efforts.

  5. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in the surface soil of source-control stormwater infiltration devices - Inter-site comparison.

    PubMed

    Tedoldi, Damien; Chebbo, Ghassan; Pierlot, Daniel; Branchu, Philippe; Kovacs, Yves; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2017-02-01

    Stormwater runoff infiltration brings about some concerns regarding its potential impact on both soil and groundwater quality; besides, the fate of contaminants in source-control devices somewhat suffers from a lack of documentation. The present study was dedicated to assessing the spatial distribution of three heavy metals (copper, lead, zinc) in the surface soil of ten small-scale infiltration facilities, along with several physical parameters (soil moisture, volatile matter, variable thickness of the upper horizon). High-resolution samplings and in-situ measurements were undertaken, followed by X-ray fluorescence analyses and spatial interpolation. Highest metal accumulation was found in a relatively narrow area near the water inflow zone, from which concentrations markedly decreased with increasing distance. Maximum enrichment ratios amounted to >20 in the most contaminated sites. Heavy metal patterns give a time-integrated vision of the non-uniform infiltration fluxes, sedimentation processes and surface flow pathways within the devices. This element indicates that the lateral extent of contamination is mainly controlled by hydraulics. The evidenced spatial structure of soil concentrations restricts the area where remediation measures would be necessary in these systems, and suggests possible optimization of their hydraulic functioning towards an easier maintenance. Heterogeneous upper boundary conditions should be taken into account when studying the fate of micropollutants in infiltration facilities with either mathematical modeling or soil coring field surveys.

  6. Addition of a single E2 binding site to the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 long control region enhances killing of HPV positive cells via HPV E2 protein-regulated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rachna; Palefsky, Joel M

    2010-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is associated with the development of anogenital cancers and their precursor lesions, intraepithelial neoplasia. Treatment strategies against HPV-induced intraepithelial neoplasia are not HPV specific and mostly consist of physical removal or ablation of lesions. We had previously designed an HPV-specific approach to kill HPV-infected cells by the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene driven by HPV E2 binding to E2-binding sites (E2BS) in the native HPV16 long control region. E2-induced TK expression renders the cells sensitive to the prodrug ganciclovir. To optimize this therapeutic approach, we modified the native long control region by adding variable numbers of E2BS adjacent to E2BS4, resulting in greatly increased cell death in HPV-positive cell lines with variable levels of E2 protein expression and no reduction in HPV specificity. Our results showed maximum increase in TK expression and cell killing when one additional E2BS was added adjacent to E2BS. As HPV-infected patients also exhibit variable E2 expression across lesions and within a lesion, this approach may potentiate the clinical utility of the herpes simplex virus type 1 TK/ganciclovir therapeutic approach.

  7. Catchment controls on soil moisture dynamics: from site-specific hysteresis in event responses to temporal stability of patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle K.; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil moisture dynamics is a prerequisite for predicting hydrological response at the hillslope and catchment scale. Soil moisture is not only determined by its input characteristics such as rainfall, its redistribution by vegetation and evapotranspiration. Catchment characteristics resulting from the interplay of geology, topography, land cover and associated soil hydraulic properties also affect the distribution, storage and transport of water in the vadose zone. Successful process predictions and appropriate hydrological model structures thus rely on a good representation of soil moisture patterns and dynamics and benefit from insights into their dependence on catchment characteristics. In a unique measurement setup at the CAOS hydrological observatory in Luxemburg (http://www.caos-project.de) we record hydro-meteorological variables at 45 sensor cluster sites. These sites are distributed across the mesoscale Attert catchment and cover three different geological units (schist, marls and sandstone), two types of land use (forest and grassland), different topographical positions (up- and downslope with north- and south-facing aspects as well as plateau and floodplain locations). At each sensor cluster, each covering approximately an area of 30 m², soil moisture is measured in three profiles at three different depths, in piezometers groundwater levels are recorded, and rain gauges collect throughfall or gross precipitation. At near-stream locations we also measure stream water levels. This extensive sensor network enables us to study the influence of geology, land use and topography on soil moisture dynamics. In this study we focus on short-term hysteretic responses related to individual rainfall events and on longer-term temporal stability of soil moisture patterns. Similarities in the hysteresis loops of rainfall/soil moisture, soil moisture/groundwater levels and soil moisture/stream water levels can give some indication of the dominant catchment

  8. Overall view of tower and adjacent aircraft shelters on flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of tower and adjacent aircraft shelters on flight line. View to east. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Security Guard Tower, Florida Street at Aircraft Shelters Area, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  9. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  10. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  12. 1. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING SOUTH. GARAGE TO EXTREME LEFT, BUILDING 1 TO EXTREME RIGHT. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING SOUTH. GARAGE TO EXTREME LEFT, BUILDING 1 TO EXTREME RIGHT. - Techwood Homes, Building No. 16, 488-514 Techwood Drive, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature.

  16. 15. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of Pier No. 5 and portion of the deck and super-structure. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  17. 7. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of Pier No. 1 and portions of the deck and super-structure. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  18. 8. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of Pier No. 2 and portions of the deck and super-structure. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  19. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  1. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  2. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  3. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel 28, view to southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  5. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  8. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  9. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  12. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOME, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOME, LOOKING WEST. GEORGIA TECH DORMITORY BUILDING, 581-587 TECHWOOD DRIVE, IN FOREGROUND. - Techwood Homes, Building No. 16, 488-514 Techwood Drive, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  13. 72. View of reservoir adjacent to south wall of blowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. View of reservoir adjacent to south wall of blowing engine house where water from furnaces was allowed to cool. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Malaria transmission, infection, and disease at three sites with varied transmission intensity in Uganda: implications for malaria control.

    PubMed

    Kamya, Moses R; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Wanzira, Humphrey; Katureebe, Agaba; Barusya, Chris; Kigozi, Simon P; Kilama, Maxwell; Tatem, Andrew J; Rosenthal, Philip J; Drakeley, Chris; Lindsay, Steve W; Staedke, Sarah G; Smith, David L; Greenhouse, Bryan; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-05-01

    The intensification of control interventions has led to marked reductions in malaria burden in some settings, but not others. To provide a comprehensive description of malaria epidemiology in Uganda, we conducted surveillance studies over 24 months in 100 houses randomly selected from each of three subcounties: Walukuba (peri-urban), Kihihi (rural), and Nagongera (rural). Annual entomological inoculation rate (aEIR) was estimated from monthly Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light trap mosquito collections. Children aged 0.5-10 years were provided long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and followed for measures of parasite prevalence, anemia and malaria incidence. Estimates of aEIR were 2.8, 32.0, and 310 infectious bites per year, and estimates of parasite prevalence 7.4%, 9.3%, and 28.7% for Walukuba, Kihihi, and Nagongera, respectively. Over the 2-year study, malaria incidence per person-years decreased in Walukuba (0.51 versus 0.31, P = 0.001) and increased in Kihihi (0.97 versus 1.93, P < 0.001) and Nagongera (2.33 versus 3.30, P < 0.001). Of 2,582 episodes of malaria, only 8 (0.3%) met criteria for severe disease. The prevalence of anemia was low and not associated with transmission intensity. In our cohorts, where LLINs and prompt effective treatment were provided, the risk of complicated malaria and anemia was extremely low. However, malaria incidence was high and increased over time at the two rural sites, suggesting improved community-wide coverage of LLIN and additional malaria control interventions are needed in Uganda.

  15. Hydraulic and nutritional feedback controls surface patchiness of biological soil crusts at a post-mining site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Gypser, Stella; Subbotina, Maria; Veste, Maik

    2015-04-01

    , and decreased to BSC2, BSC1 and BSC3. Non-metric multidimensional scaling revealed that the lichens and BSC3 were associated with water soluble nutrients (NO3, NH4, K, Mg, Ca) and with pyrite weathering products (pH, SO4), thus representing a high nutrient low hydraulic feedback mode. The mosses and BSC2 represented a low nutrient high hydraulic feedback mode. These feedback mechanisms were considered as synergic, consisting of run-off generating (low hydraulic) and run-on receiving (high hydraulic) BSC patches. Three scenarios for BSC succession were proposed. (1) Initial BSCs sealed the surface until they reached a successional stage (represented by BSC1) from which the development into either of the feedback modes was triggered, (2) initial heterogeneities of the mineral substrate controlled the development of the feedback mode, and (3) complex interactions between lichens and mosses occurred at later stages of system development. It was concluded that, irrespective of successional pathways, two synergic feedback mechanisms contributed to the generation of self-organized surface patchiness. Such small-scale microsite differentiation with different BSCs has important implications for the vegetation in post-mining sites. Reference Fischer, T., Gypser, S., Subbotina, M., Veste, M. (2014) Synergic hydraulic and nutritional feedback mechanisms control surface patchiness of biological soil crusts on tertiary sands at a post-mining site. Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics 62(4):293-302

  16. Risk mitigation by waste-based permeable reactive barriers for groundwater pollution control at e-waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Zhang, Weihua; Ok, Yong Sik; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have proved to be a promising passive treatment to control groundwater contamination and associated human health risks. This study explored the potential use of low-cost adsorbents as PRBs media and assessed their longevity and risk mitigation against leaching of acidic rainfall through an e-waste recycling site, of which Cu, Zn, and Pb were the major contaminants. Batch adsorption experiments suggested a higher adsorption capacity of inorganic industrial by-products [acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) and coal fly ash (CFA)] and carbonaceous recycled products [food waste compost (FWC) and wood-derived biochar] compared to natural inorganic minerals (limestone and apatite). Continuous leaching tests of sand columns with 10 wt% low-cost adsorbents were then conducted to mimic the field situation of acidic rainfall infiltration through e-waste-contaminated soils (collected from Qingyuan, China) by using synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) solution. In general, Zn leached out first, followed by Cu, and finally delayed breakthrough of Pb. In the worst-case scenario (e.g., at initial concentrations equal to 50-fold of average SPLP result), the columns with limestone, apatite, AMDS, or biochar were effective for a relatively short period of about 20-40 pore volumes of leaching, after which Cu breakthrough caused non-cancer risk concern and later-stage Pb leaching considerably increased both non-cancer and lifetime cancer risk associated with portable use of contaminated water. In contrast, the columns with CFA or FWC successfully mitigated overall risks to an acceptable level for a prolonged period of 100-200 pore volumes. Therefore, with proper selection of low-cost adsorbents (or their mixture), waste-based PRBs is a technically feasible and economically viable solution to mitigate human health risk due to contaminated groundwater at e-waste recycling sites.

  17. Downscaling site rainfall from daily to 11.25-minute resolution: event, diurnal, seasonal and decadal controls on downscaling parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Neil; Shi, Shirley; Onof, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Downscaling site rainfall from daily to sub-daily resolution is often approached using the multiplicative discrete random cascade (MDRC) class of models, with mixed success. Questions in any application - for MDRCs or indeed other classes of downscaling model - is to what extent and in what way are model parameters functions of rainfall event type and/or large scale climate controls for example those linked to the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). These questions underlie the applicability of downscaling models for analysing rainfall and hydrological extremes, in particular for synthesising long-term historical or future sub-daily extremes conditional on historic or projected daily data. Coastal Queensland, Australia, is subject to combinations of multiple weather systems, including tropical cyclones, blocking systems, convective storms, frontal systems and ENSO influences. Using 100 years of fine resolution data from two gauges in central Brisbane, microcanonical MDRC models are fitted to data from 1 day to 11.25 minutes in seven cascade levels, each level dividing the time interval and its rainfall volume into two sub-intervals. Each cascade level involves estimating: the probabilities that all the rainfall observed in a time interval is concentrated in only the first of the two sub-intervals and that all the rainfall observed in a time interval is concentrated in only the second of the two sub-intervals; and also two beta distribution parameters that define the probability of a given division of the rainfall into both sub-intervals. These parameters are found to vary systematically with time of day, rainfall volume, event temporal structure, month of year, and ENSO anomaly. Reasonable downscaling performance is achieved (in terms of replicating extreme values of 11.25 minute rainfall given the observed daily data) by including the parameter dependence on the rainfall volume and event structure, although particular applications may justify development of more

  18. DNaseI hypersensitive sites 1, 2 and 3 of the human beta-globin dominant control region direct position-independent expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, P; Hurst, J; Collis, P; Grosveld, F

    1990-01-01

    The human beta-globin dominant control region (DCR) which flanks the multigene beta-globin locus directs high level, site of integration independent, copy number dependent expression on a linked human beta-globin gene in transgenic mice and stably transfected mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. We have assayed each of the individual DNaseI hypersensitive regions present in the full 15kb DCR for position independence and copy number dependence of a linked beta-globin gene in transgenic mice. The results show that at least three of the individual DNaseI hypersensitive site regions (sites 1, 2 and 3), though expressing at lower levels than the full DCR, are capable of position independent, copy number dependent expression. Site 2 alone directs the highest level of expression of the single site constructs, producing nearly 70% of the level of the full DCR. Sites 1 and 3 each provide 30% of the full activity. Deletion of either site 2 or 3 from the complete set significantly reduces the level of expression, but does not effect position independence or copy number dependence. This demonstrates that sites 2 and 3 are required for full expression and suggests that all the sites are required for the full expression of even a single gene from this multigene locus. Images PMID:2362805

  19. Remediation System Evaluation, Selma Pressure Treating Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Selma Pressure Treating site is located 15 miles south of Fresno, adjacent to the city limits of Selma,California and has subsurface contamination from a former wood treating facility. The site occupiesapproximately 40 acres, including...

  20. Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    itself. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. An apparent deficiency in the current understanding is a lack of knowledge about flow directions and rates away from major areas of testing. Efforts are necessary to delineate areas of downgradient flow and to identify factors that constrain and control flow within these areas. These efforts also should identify the areas most critical to gaining detailed understanding and to establishing long-term monitoring sites necessary for effective remediation.

  1. Analysis of Postoperative Thoracolumbar Spine Infections in a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Using the Centers for Disease Control Surgical Site Infection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Richelle C.; Lonner, Baron S.; Andres, Tate M.; Park, Justin J.; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro A.; Bendo, John A.; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.; Errico, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound infections following spinal surgery place a high toll on both the patient and the healthcare system. Although several large series studies have examined the incidence and distribution of spinal wound infection, the applicability of these studies varies greatly since nearly every study is either retrospective and/or lacks standard inclusion criteria for defining surgical site infection. To address this void, we present results from prospectively gathered thoracolumbar spine surgery data for which the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria were stringently applied to define a surgical site infection (SSI). Methods A prospective randomized trial of 314 patients who underwent multilevel thoracolumbar spinal surgery with instrumentation followed by postoperative drain placement was completed (Takemoto et al., 2015). The trial consisted of two antibiotic arms: one for 24-hours, and the other for the duration of the drain; no differences were found between the arms. All infections meeting CDC criteria for SSI were included. Results A total of 40 infections met CDC criteria for SSI, for an overall incidence of 12.7%. Of these, 20 (50%) were culture-positive. The most common organism was Staphylococcus aureus (4 total: methicillin-sensitive=2; methicillin-resistant=2), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (3 cases), Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli (2 cases each). Six infections grew multiple organisms, most commonly involving coagulase-negative staphylococcus and enterococcus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that thoracolumbar SSI occurs at the higher end of the range cited in the literature (2-13%), which is largely based on retrospective data not subjected to the inclusivity of SSI as defined by the CDC. The three most common organisms in our analysis (S. aureus, P. acnes, E. coli) are consistent with previous reports. Staphylococcus aureus continues to be the most common causative organism and continued vigilance and

  2. Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    depression, trauma, sleep , suicide ideation), repeat number of psychiatric hospitalization(s), hope for one’s future, and acceptability of treatment (as...0106 TITLE: Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi- Site...Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial Service Members and Veterans 5a

  3. Mitotic cells form actin-based bridges with adjacent cells to provide intercellular communication during rounding.

    PubMed

    Fykerud, Tone A; Knudsen, Lars M; Totland, Max Z; Sørensen, Vigdis; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Brech, Andreas; Leithe, Edward

    2016-11-01

    In order to achieve accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells undergo a dramatic change in morphology to obtain a spherical shape during mitosis. Interphase cells communicate directly with each other by exchanging ions and small molecules via gap junctions, which have important roles in controlling cell growth and differentiation. As cells round up during mitosis, the gap junctional communication between mitotic cells and adjacent interphase cells ceases. Whether mitotic cells use alternative mechanisms for mediating direct cell-cell communication during rounding is currently unknown. Here, we have studied the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis. We further demonstrate that mitotic cells are able to form actin-based plasma membrane bridges with adjacent cells during rounding. These structures, termed "mitotic nanotubes," were found to be involved in mediating the transport of cytoplasm, including Rab11-positive vesicles, between mitotic cells and adjacent cells. Moreover, a subpool of the gap-junction channel protein connexin43 localized in these intercellular bridges during mitosis. Collectively, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis and identify actin-based plasma membrane bridges as a novel means of communication between mitotic cells and adjacent cells during rounding.

  4. Mitotic cells form actin-based bridges with adjacent cells to provide intercellular communication during rounding

    PubMed Central

    Fykerud, Tone A.; Knudsen, Lars M.; Totland, Max Z.; Dahal-Koirala, Shiva; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Brech, Andreas; Leithe, Edward

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve accurate chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells undergo a dramatic change in morphology to obtain a spherical shape during mitosis. Interphase cells communicate directly with each other by exchanging ions and small molecules via gap junctions, which have important roles in controlling cell growth and differentiation. As cells round up during mitosis, the gap junctional communication between mitotic cells and adjacent interphase cells ceases. Whether mitotic cells use alternative mechanisms for mediating direct cell-cell communication during rounding is currently unknown. Here, we have studied the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis. We further demonstrate that mitotic cells are able to form actin-based plasma membrane bridges with adjacent cells during rounding. These structures, termed “mitotic nanotubes,” were found to be involved in mediating the transport of cytoplasm, including Rab11-positive vesicles, between mitotic cells and adjacent cells. Moreover, a subpool of the gap-junction channel protein connexin43 localized in these intercellular bridges during mitosis. Collectively, the data provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the remodeling of gap junctions during mitosis and identify actin-based plasma membrane bridges as a novel means of communication between mitotic cells and adjacent cells during rounding. PMID:27625181

  5. Mass counts: ERP correlates of non-adjacent dependency learning under different exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Citron, Francesca M M; Oberecker, Regine; Friederici, Angela D; Mueller, Jutta L

    2011-01-10

    Miniature language learning can serve to model real language learning as high proficiency can be reached after very little exposure. In a previous study by Mueller et al. [18] German participants acquired non-adjacent syntactic dependencies by mere exposure to correct Italian sentences, but their ERP pattern differed from the one shown by native speakers. The present study follows up on that experiment using a similar design and material and is focused on two important issues: the influence of acoustic cues in the material and the impact of the learning procedure. With respect to the latter we compared alternating learning and test phases to a continuous learning and test phase. In addition, a splicing procedure eliminated prosodic cues in order to ensure that non-adjacent dependencies were learned instead of adjacent ones. Results for the continuous phase design showed a native-like biphasic ERP pattern, an N400 followed by a left-focused positivity. In the alternating design behavioural accuracy was lower and only an N400 was found. The results suggest an advantage of continuous learning phases for adult learners, possibly due to the absence of ungrammatical items present in the test phases in the alternating learning procedure. Furthermore, the replication of the earlier study with prosodically controlled material adds evidence to the general finding that syntactic non-adjacent dependencies can be learned from mere exposure to correct examples.

  6. Rapid extraction of three instantaneous attributes in the application of high-density on-site seismic acquisition data quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Tong, S.; Wang, L.; Li, L.

    2015-12-01

    It is very important to evaluate the quality of the acquired high-density seismic data on-site acquisition. Fast、quantitative data analysis method can help on-site quality control personnel to monitor the quality of data conveniently. It can also estimate the distribution characteristics of abnormal data. We can adjust the construction parameters in time and guide the on-site acquisition work based on the results of the analysis.Mass data have been acquired by high-density seismic acquisition. Work-load of on-site data analysis and process is increasing because of mass data. We need to analyze the quality of the data quickly and improve the accuracy of the result. In normal seismic data on-site acquisition, on-site quality control personnel usually use qualitative method to analyze seismic data so the analyzing result is affected by the experience of quality control personnel. On-site seismic data analysis method gradually develops from qualitative to quantitative. Now we estimate the quality of seismic data by statistical characters instead of experience. The result of estimate is more reliable.On-site processing software has some analysis method like amplitude analysis, frequency analysis, autocorrelation analysis, F-K analysis and so on. We can estimate the quality of seismic data based on the quantitative process. We can also use a simple method to get the three instantaneous attributes if we transform seismic data to complex domain. On-site seismic data can be analyzed and estimated by applicable attributes (e.g. instantaneous amplitude can be used to find out abnormal trace; quality control personnel can analyze the propagation of the wave field by instantaneous phase because both strong and weak signal can be displayed on the instantaneous phase diagram; Instantaneous frequency could reflect the frequency values of every moment, it can estimate the distribution of on-site seismic data's frequency characteristics quantitative). Transforming seismic data to

  7. Quantifying atmospheric stability conditions at a swine facility and an adjacent corn field in Iowa, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo; Sauer, Thomas J.; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Prueger, John H.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric stability conditions in the atmospheric surface layer control the distance and direction of transport of air contaminants. Near confined animal facilities, transport processes significantly impact air quality as these sites typically act as point sources of dust and odor constituents; however, little information is available on atmospheric stability effects. This study was conducted to assess year-round temporal patterns of atmospheric stability at a swine production facility and an adjacent commercial corn field (CF) in the US Midwest. Two towers of 10 and 20 m heights for continuous micrometeorological measurements were deployed within a CF and between swine buildings (BSB), respectively. Each tower was equipped with an eddy-covariance system at 6.8 m height, infrared thermometers, and six cup anemometers with thermocouples installed at log-distributed heights. Overall results from gradient Richardson number and Monin-Obukhov (z/L) calculations revealed a greater prevalence of unstable conditions for BSB compared with CF. During the 13-month measurement period, unstable cases (z/L ranging from -1 to -0.01) occurred 1.4 times more frequently for BSB than CF (52 vs. 39%, respectively), while stable cases (0.011-0.2) were 1.8 times more frequent for CF than BSB (24 vs. 14%, respectively). These patterns were partly associated with higher surface radiometric temperatures for BSB. Relatively greater diurnal heat capture at BSB (ground and roof surfaces) and a cooling effect in CF through active canopy transpiration during the daytime explain these z/L and radiometric temperature results. Prevalent diurnal atmospheric instability at BSB suggests enhanced ascendant vertical transport of air pollutants perhaps causing greater mixing/dilution with the atmospheric layer and/or their facilitated transport over greater distances when sorbed onto particles. This enhanced understanding of the spatio-temporal patterns of atmospheric stability can be subsequently

  8. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The <2-mm fraction of each sample was analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Ti, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, La, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Te, Th, Tl, U, V, W, Y, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following a near-total digestion in a mixture of HCl, HNO3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods were used for Hg, Se, total C, and carbonate-C on this same size fraction. Only Ag, In, and Te had a large percentage of concentrations below the detection limit. Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset

  9. A novel fixed fibre biofilm membrane process for on-site greywater reclamation requiring no fouling control.

    PubMed

    Jabornig, Simon; Podmirseg, Sabine Marie

    2015-03-01

    On-site greywater treatment and reuse in urban areas bears the potential to reduce huge quantities of wastewater and lower freshwater shortages. Until now dissemination of small, single household applications has been rather limited as simple and high quality water producing, but also cost-effective treatment units have not been developed so far. This paper proposes a new process, based on a concurrently working hollow-fibre membrane as fixed biofilm support and filtration device. Bioreactor characteristics, influence of different aeration rates, membrane flux development, as well as structure and composition of biofilm were monitored to evaluate the performance of the tested pilot unit. The introduced process achieved international water reuse guidelines, worked soundly and could, compared to conventional micro MBR, significantly reduce energy demand (<1.4 kWh m(-3)). Fouling control by air scouring and chemical cleaning was not required once flux had stabilized. The biofilm analysis showed a porous, spongy-like structure. Microbiological investigation revealed a community of sheathed bacteria and nematodes that could play an important role in the flux stabilisation effect. In general, the study confirmed the suitability of the presented process for greywater treatment and provides valuable design data for future optimization and systematic analysis.

  10. Short term impact of artisanal dredges in a Patagonian mussel fishery: Comparisons with commercial diving and control sites.

    PubMed

    Narvarte, Maite; González, Raúl; Medina, Alonso; Avaca, María Soledad; Ginsberg, Susana; Aliotta, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    Mussels in the San Matías Gulf fishery are targeted using artisanal dredges and diving. The main objective of this study was to assess the direct impact of artisanal dredging on the biota and sediments, and to compare the composition of the catches and the individual damage induced by fishing between dredging and commercial diving. The experimental design included samplings from dredge catches, dredge tracks, control sites and commercial diving. According to their damage level, individuals were scored as undamaged, lightly damaged and severely damaged. Sediment characteristics were analyzed using coring samples and traps. Damage of mussels, mostly corresponding to the severely damaged category, was less than 5% both in samples from dredging and diving. Conversely, mean damage of the main bycatch species (sea urchins and ophiuroids) was 75 and 65% in samples from dredging and diving respectively, being most of the individuals lightly damaged. Considering also the catch sample composition of both fishing methods, dredging affected relatively more individuals than diving. Although sediment removal in dredged areas was three times higher than that in non-dredged ones, mean grain size and gravel percentage of sea floor sediments showed subtle differences between them.

  11. Daytime wind valleys adjacent to the Great Salt Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.L. ); Hoard, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    In 1986 Los Alamos National Laboratory was engaged by the US Army to study the meteorological aspects of emergency preparedness at several sites where toxic materials are stored and handled. The project included a series of tracer and meteorological field experiments in the vicinity of the Tooele Army Depot. These experiments generated a large data set for validating numerical simulations and for empirical analyses of the local meteorology. This paper discusses the main characteristics of the daytime, up-valley flow at the Utah site, including frequency of occurrence, horizontal and vertical structure, and temporal evolution. Some parameters controlling the variability in onset time for up-valley flow are identified, and an empirical forecasting scheme is discussed. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  12. 40 CFR 228.4 - Procedures for designation of sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... designation or evaluation studies on a typical site or sites in that area. In such cases, sufficient studies... environmental studies of each site, regions adjacent to the site, and on historical knowledge of the impact of... studies for the evaluation and potential selection of dumping sites will be conducted in accordance...

  13. SPERTI Reactor Pit Building (PER605). Earth shielding protect adjacent Instrument ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I Reactor Pit Building (PER-605). Earth shielding protect adjacent Instrument Cell (PER-606). Security fencing surrounds complex, to which gate entry is provided next to Guard House (PER-607). Note gravel road leading to control area. Earth-covered conduit leads from instrument cell to terminal building out of view. Photographer: R.G. Larsen. Date: June 22, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1701 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. H19-DMR allele-specific methylation analysis reveals epigenetic heterogeneity of CTCF binding site 6 but not of site 5 in head-and-neck carcinomas: a pilot case-control analysis.

    PubMed

    De Castro Valente Esteves, Leda Isabel; De Karla Cervigne, Nilva; Do Carmo Javaroni, Afonso; Magrin, José; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rainho, Cláudia Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2006-02-01

    Aberrant methylation of seven potential binding sites of the CTCF factor in the differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene (H19-DMR) has been suggested as critical for the regulation of IGF2 and H19 imprinted genes. In this study, we analyzed the allele-specific methylation pattern of CTCF binding sites 5 and 6 using methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR followed by RFLP analysis in matched tumoral and lymphocyte DNA from head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, as well as in lymphocyte DNA from control individuals who were cancer-free. The monoallelic methylation pattern was maintained in CTCF binding site 5 in 22 heterozygous out of 91 samples analyzed. Nevertheless, a biallelic methylation pattern was detected in CTCF binding site 6 in a subgroup of HNSCC patients as a somatic acquired feature of tumor cells. An atypical biallelic methylation was also observed in both tumor and lymphocyte DNA from two patients, and at a high frequency in the control group (29 out of 64 informative controls). Additionally, we found that the C/T transition detected by HhaI RFLP suppressed one dinucleotide CpG in critical CTCF binding site 6, of a mutation showing polymorphic frequencies. Although a heterogeneous methylation pattern was observed after DNA sequencing modified by sodium bisulfite, the biallelic methylation pattern was confirmed in 9 out of 10 HNSCCs. These findings are likely to be relevant in the epigenetic regulation of the DMR, especially in pathological conditions in which the imprinting of IGF2 and H19 genes is disrupted.

  15. Control of the active site structure of giant bilayer hemoglobin from the Annelid Eisenia foetida using hierarchic assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Girasole, Marco; Arcovito, Alessandro; Marconi, Augusta; Davoli, Camilla; Congiu-Castellano, Agostina; Bellelli, Andrea; Amiconi, Gino

    2005-12-05

    The active site structure of the oxygenated derivative of the main subassemblies (whole protein, dodecamers, and trimers) of the giant haemoglobin from Eisenia foetida has been characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The data revealed a remarkable effect of the hierarchic assemblies on the active site of the subunit. Specifically, the whole protein has the same site structure of the dodecamer, while a sharp conformational transition occurs when the dodecamer is disassembled into trimers (and monomers) revealing that constraints due to the protein matrix determine the active site geometry and, consequently, the protein function in these large complexes.

  16. Diversity of fungi from the mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest soils.

    PubMed

    Duff, Lyndon B; Urichuk, Theresa M; Hodgins, Lisa N; Young, Jocelyn R; Untereiner, Wendy A

    2016-07-01

    Culture-based methods were employed to recover 3929 isolates of fungi from soils collected in May and July 2014 from mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest sites. The abundance, diversity, and richness of species from nest mounds exceeded those of non-mound soils, particularly in July. Communities of fungi from mounds were more similar to those from mounds than non-mounds; this was also the case for non-mound soils with the exception of one non-mound site in July. Species of Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were dominant in nest soils and represented up to 81.8% of the taxa recovered. Members of the genus Aspergillus accounted for the majority of Trichocomaceae from nests and were represented almost exclusively by Aspergillus navahoensis and Aspergillus pseudodeflectus. Dominant fungi from non-mound sites included Cladosporium cladosporioides, Geomyces pannorum, and species of Acremonium, Fusarium, Penicillium, and Phoma. Although mound nests were warmer than adjacent soils, the dominance of xerotolerant Aspergillus in soils from mounds and the isolation of the majority of Trichocomaceae at 25 and 35 °C suggests that both temperature and water availability may be determinants of fungal community structure in nests of F. ulkei.

  17. Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study.

    PubMed

    Engell, Andrew D; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex.

  18. Face, eye, and body selective responses in fusiform gyrus and adjacent cortex: an intracranial EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Engell, Andrew D.; McCarthy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have investigated the degree to which processing of whole faces, face-parts, and bodies are differentially localized within the fusiform gyrus and adjacent ventral occipitotemporal cortex. While some studies have emphasized the spatial differentiation of processing into discrete areas, others have emphasized the overlap of processing and the importance of distributed patterns of activity. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) recorded from subdural electrodes provides excellent temporal and spatial resolution of local neural activity, and thus provides an alternative method to fMRI for studying differences and commonalities in face and body processing. In this study we recorded iEEG from 12 patients while they viewed images of novel faces, isolated eyes, headless bodies, and flowers. Event-related potential analysis identified 69 occipitotemporal sites at which there was a face-, eye-, or body-selective response when contrasted to flowers. However, when comparing faces, eyes, and bodies to each other at these sites, we identified only 3 face-specific, 13 eye-specific, and 1 body-specific electrodes. Thus, at the majority of sites, faces, eyes, and bodies evoked similar responses. However, we identified ten locations at which the amplitude of the responses spatially varied across adjacent electrodes, indicating that the configuration of current sources and sinks were different for faces, eyes, and bodies. Our results also demonstrate that eye-sensitive regions are more abundant and more purely selective than face- or body-sensitive regions, particularly in lateral occipitotemporal cortex. PMID:25191255

  19. Evidence for Different Reactive Hg Sources and Chemical Compounds at Adjacent Valley and High Elevation Locations.

    PubMed

    Sexauer Gustin, Mae; Pierce, Ashley M; Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B; Holmes, Heather A; Loria-Salazar, S Marcela

    2016-11-15

    The spatial distribution of chemical compounds and concentration of reactive mercury (RM), defined as the sum of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and <3 μm particulate bound mercury (PBM), are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to understand the chemistry, concentration, and spatial and temporal distribution of GOM at adjacent locations (12 km apart) with a difference in elevation of ∼1000 m. Atmospheric GOM measurements were made with passive and active samplers using membranes, and at one location, a Tekran mercury measurement system was used. The chemistry of GOM varied across time and location. On the basis of data collected, chemistry at the low elevation site adjacent to a highway was primarily influenced by pollutants generated by mobile sources (GOM = nitrogen and sulfur-based compounds), and the high elevation site (GOM = halogen-based compounds) was affected by long-range transport in the free troposphere over the marine boundary layer into Nevada. Data collected at these two locations demonstrate that different GOM compounds exist depending on the oxidants present in the air. Measurements of GOM made by the KCl denuder in the Tekran instrument located at the low elevation site were lower than that measured using membranes by 1.7-13 times. Accurate measurements of atmospheric concentrations and chemistry of RM are necessary for proper assessment of environmental impacts, and field measurements are essential for atmospheric models, which in turn influence policy decisions.

  20. The Effects of Single-Level Instrumented Lumbar Laminectomy on Adjacent Spinal Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bisschop, Arno; Holewijn, Roderick M.; Kingma, Idsart; Stadhouder, Agnita; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A.; van der Veen, Albert J.; van Dieën, Jaap H.; van Royen, Barend J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study. Objective Posterior instrumentation is used to stabilize the spine after a lumbar laminectomy. However, the effects on the adjacent segmental stability are unknown. Therefore, we studied the range of motion (ROM) and stiffness of treated lumbar spinal segments and cranial segments after a laminectomy and after posterior instrumentation in flexion and extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). These outcomes might help to better understand adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is reported cranial to the level on which posterior instrumentation is applied. Methods We obtained 12 cadaveric human lumbar spines. Spines were axially loaded with 250 N for 1 hour. Thereafter, 10 consecutive load cycles (4 Nm) were applied in FE, LB, and AR. Subsequently, a laminectomy was performed either at L2 or at L4. Thereafter, load-deformation tests were repeated, after similar preloading. Finally, posterior instrumentation was added to the level treated with a laminectomy before testing was repeated. The ROM and stiffness of the treated, the cranial adjacent, and the control segments were calculated from the load-displacement data. Repeated-measures analyses of variance used the spinal level as the between-subject factor and a laminectomy or instrumentation as the within-subject factors. Results After the laminectomy, the ROM increased (+19.4%) and the stiffness decreased (−18.0%) in AR. The ROM in AR of the adjacent segments also increased (+11.0%). The ROM of treated segments after instrumentation decreased in FE (−74.3%), LB (−71.6%), and AR (−59.8%). In the adjacent segments after instrumentation, only the ROM in LB was changed (−12.9%). Conclusions The present findings do not substantiate a biomechanical pathway toward or explanation for ASD. PMID:25649753