Science.gov

Sample records for adjacent critical structures

  1. Precision, high dose radiotherapy. II. Helium ion treatment of tumors adjacent to critical central nervous system structures

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Castro, J.R.; Collier, J.M.; Gauger, G.; Gutin, P.; Phillips, T.L.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the authors present a technique for treating relatively small, low grade tumors located very close to critical, radiation sensitive central nervous system structures such as the spinal cord and the brain stem. A beam of helium ions is used to irradiate the tumor. The nearby normal tissues are protected by exploiting the superb dose localization properties of this beam, particularly its well defined and controllable range in tissue, the increased dose deposited near the end of this range (i.e., the Bragg peak), the sharp decrease in dose beyond the Bragg peak, and the sharp penumbra of the beam. To illustrate the technique, the authors present a group of 19 patients treated for chordomas, meningiomas and low grade chondrosarcomas in the base of the skull or spinal column. They have been able to deliver high, uniform doses to the target volumes, while keeping the doses to the nearby critical tissues below the threshold for radiation damage. Follow-up on this group of patients is short, averaging 22 months (2 to 75 months). Currently, 15 patients have local control of their tumor. Two major complications, a spinal cord transsection and optic tract damage, are discussed in detail. Their treatment policies have been modified to minimize the risk of these complications in the future, and they are continuing to use this method to treat such patients.

  2. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Structured Water Layers Adjacent to Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Polcik, Martin; Fukuma, Takeshi; Sader, John E.; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Jarvis, Suzanne P.

    2006-01-01

    Water amid the restricted space of crowded biological macromolecules and at membrane interfaces is essential for cell function, though the structure and function of this “biological water” itself remains poorly defined. The force required to remove strongly bound water is referred to as the hydration force and due to its widespread importance, it has been studied in numerous systems. Here, by using a highly sensitive dynamic atomic force microscope technique in conjunction with a carbon nanotube probe, we reveal a hydration force with an oscillatory profile that reflects the removal of up to five structured water layers from between the probe and biological membrane surface. Further, we find that the hydration force can be modified by changing the membrane fluidity. For 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel (Lβ) phase bilayers, each oscillation in the force profile indicates the force required to displace a single layer of water molecules from between the probe and bilayer. In contrast, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine fluid (Lα) phase bilayers at 60°C and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine fluid (Lα) phase bilayers at 24°C seriously disrupt the molecular ordering of the water and result predominantly in a monotonic force profile. PMID:16798815

  4. Bacterial community structure in the Sulu Sea and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Nishimura, Masahiko; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The deep waters of the Sulu Sea are characterized by relatively high and constant water temperatures and low oxygen concentrations. To examine the effect of these characteristics on the bacterial community structure, the culture-independent molecular method was applied to samples from the Sulu Sea and the adjacent areas. DNA was extracted from environmental samples, and the analysis was carried out on PCR-amplified 16S rDNA; fragments were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis. Stations in the Sulu Sea and the adjacent areas showed much more prominent vertical stratification of bacterial community structures than horizontal variation. As predominant sequences, cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria at 10 m depth, δ-proteobacteria at 100 m depth, and green nonsulfur bacteria below 1000 m depth were detected in all sampling areas. High temperatures and low oxygen concentrations are thought to be minor factors in controlling community structure; the quantity and quality of organic materials supplied by the sinking particles, and hydrostatic pressure are believed to be important.

  5. How semantic biases in simple adjacencies affect learning a complex structure with non-adjacencies in AGL: a statistical account

    PubMed Central

    Poletiek, Fenna H.; Lai, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A major theoretical debate in language acquisition research regards the learnability of hierarchical structures. The artificial grammar learning methodology is increasingly influential in approaching this question. Studies using an artificial centre-embedded AnBn grammar without semantics draw conflicting conclusions. This study investigates the facilitating effect of distributional biases in simple AB adjacencies in the input sample—caused in natural languages, among others, by semantic biases—on learning a centre-embedded structure. A mathematical simulation of the linguistic input and the learning, comparing various distributional biases in AB pairs, suggests that strong distributional biases might help us to grasp the complex AnBn hierarchical structure in a later stage. This theoretical investigation might contribute to our understanding of how distributional features of the input—including those caused by semantic variation—help learning complex structures in natural languages. PMID:22688639

  6. Structural Orientations Adjacent to Some Colorado Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richard,

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Structural Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Structural orientations (fractures, joints, faults, lineaments, bedding orientations, etc.) were collected with a standard Brunton compass during routine field examinations of geothermal phenomena in Colorado. Often multiple orientations were taken from one outcrop. Care was taken to ensure outcrops were "in place". Point data was collected with a hand-held GPS unit. The structural data is presented both as standard quadrant measurements and in format suitable for ESRI symbology Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4491528.924999 m Left: 207137.983196 m Right: 432462.310324 m Bottom: 4117211.772001 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. THE STRUCTURE OF CRITICAL CARE TRANSFER NETWORKS

    PubMed Central

    Iwashyna, Theodore J.; Christie, Jason D.; Moody, James; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Asch, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Moving patients from low performing hospitals to high performing hospitals may improve patient outcomes. These transfers may be particularly important in critical care, where small relative improvements can yield substantial absolute changes in survival. Objective To characterize the existing critical care network in terms of the pattern of transfers. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, the nationwide 2005 Medicare fee-for-service claims were used to identify the interhospital transfer of critically ill patients, defined as instances where patients used critical care services in 2 temporally adjacent hospitalizations. Measurements We measured the characteristics of the interhospital transfer network and the extent to which ICU patients are referred towards each hospital in that network, a continuous quantitative measure at the hospital-level known as centrality. We evaluated associations between hospital centrality and organizational, medical, surgical and radiologic capabilities. Results There were 47,820 transfers of critically ill patients among 3,308 hospitals. 4.5% of all critical care stays of any length involved an inter-hospital critical care transfer. Hospitals transferred out to a mean of 4.4 other hospitals. More central hospital position was associated with multiple indicators of increased capability. Hospital characteristics explained 40.7% of the variance in hospitals’ centrality. Conclusions Critical care transfers are common, and traverse an informal but structured network. The centrality of a hospital is associated with increased capability in delivery of services, suggesting that existing transfers generally direct patients toward better resourced hospitals. Studies of this network promise further improvements in patient outcomes and efficiency of care. PMID:19536030

  8. Atrophy of hippocampal subfields and adjacent extrahippocampal structures in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Franciotti, Raffaella; Bubbico, Giovanna; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus and adjacent extrahippocampal structures are organized in distinct and specialized regions which process heterogeneous functions, including memory, and visuospatial functions. Specific alterations of the different hippocampal subfields and adjacent extrahippocampal structures could differently contribute to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Based on visual symptoms which characterize DLB patients, the hippocampal subfields and the adjacent extrahippocampal structures which are mainly involved in the visual functions could be impaired in DLB and preserved in AD. To test this hypothesis, we performed structural magnetic resonance imaging on 19 DLB, 15 AD, and 19 age-matched healthy controls. FreeSurfer's pipelines were used to perform parcellation of hippocampus and adjacent extrahippocampal structures and to assess the structural changes within each region. The cornu ammonis and subiculum were bilaterally damaged in AD and preserved in DLB. The perirhinal cortex and parahippocampus were damaged in DLB but not in AD. Our findings demonstrate that the hippocampal subfields and adjacent extrahippocampal structures were differently altered in AD and DLB. Particularly, DLB patients showed a more focused alteration of the extrahippocampal structures linked to visual functions.

  9. Geomorphology and structural geology of Saturnalia Fossae and adjacent structures in the northern hemisphere of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Yin, A.; Russell, C. T.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Blewett, D. T.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.; Le Corre, L.; Mercer, C.; Yingst, R. A.; Garry, W. B.; Jaumann, R.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Gaskell, R. W.; Schröder, S. E.; Ammannito, E.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Vesta is a unique, intermediate class of rocky body in the Solar System, between terrestrial planets and small asteroids, because of its size (average radius of ∼263 km) and differentiation, with a crust, mantle and core. Vesta's low surface gravity (0.25 m/s2) has led to the continual absence of a protective atmosphere and consequently impact cratering and impact-related processes are prevalent. Previous work has shown that the formation of the Rheasilvia impact basin induced the equatorial Divalia Fossae, whereas the formation of the Veneneia impact basin induced the northern Saturnalia Fossae. Expanding upon this earlier work, we conducted photogeologic mapping of the Saturnalia Fossae, adjacent structures and geomorphic units in two of Vesta's northern quadrangles: Caparronia and Domitia. Our work indicates that impact processes created and/or modified all mapped structures and geomorphic units. The mapped units, ordered from oldest to youngest age based mainly on cross-cutting relationships, are: (1) Vestalia Terra unit, (2) cratered highlands unit, (3) Saturnalia Fossae trough unit, (4) Saturnalia Fossae cratered unit, (5) undifferentiated ejecta unit, (6) dark lobate unit, (7) dark crater ray unit and (8) lobate crater unit. The Saturnalia Fossae consist of five separate structures: Saturnalia Fossa A is the largest (maximum width of ∼43 km) and is interpreted as a graben, whereas Saturnalia Fossa B-E are smaller (maximum width of ∼15 km) and are interpreted as half grabens formed by synthetic faults. Smaller, second-order structures (maximum width of <1 km) are distinguished from the Saturnalia Fossae, a first-order structure, by the use of the general descriptive term 'adjacent structures', which encompasses minor ridges, grooves and crater chains. For classification purposes, the general descriptive term 'minor ridges' characterizes ridges that are not part of the Saturnalia Fossae and are an order of magnitude smaller (maximum width of <1 km vs

  10. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liolios, Angelos; Liolios, Asterios; Hatzigeorgiou, George; Radev, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction) on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC) frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  11. [Phytoplankton pigment patterns and community structure in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent areas].

    PubMed

    Lai, Jun-xiang; Yu, Zhi-ming; Song, Xiu-xian; Han, Xiao-tian; Cao, Xi-hua; Yuan, Yong-quan

    2013-09-01

    Three cruises were carried out in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent areas in May, November, June during 2009-2010. The spatial variations of phytoplankton community structure were investigated based on RP-HPLC analysis of pigments and CHEMTAX processing of the pigment data. 21 kinds of pigments were detected, among which chlorophyll a, peridinin, fucoxanthin, 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin, 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin, chlorophyll b, diadinoxanthin, alloxanthin and zeaxanthin were the major pigments in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent areas. Chlorophyll a was the most abundant in all pigments, followed by fuxoxanthin. Other pigments generally contributed a minor proportion to the total pigments. High concentrations of fucoxanthin and peridinin were observed in May 2009 and June 2010, indicating blooms of diatoms and dinoflagellates. The results showed that the composition and distribution of phytoplankton pigments were influenced by environmental factors. The phytoplankton community, as determined by biomarker pigment concentration using HPLC and CHEMTAX, was composed mainly of diatoms, dinoflagellates, cryptophytes, chlorophytes, cyanobacteria, prymnesiophytes, chrysophytes and prasinophytes. The dominant algal groups were diatoms, dinoflagellates and chlorophytes in May 2009. The phytoplankton community was characterized by high contribution of diatoms in November 2009. Diatoms, dinoflagellates and cryptophytes accounted for 62.5% of chlorophyll a in June 2010, and the relative abundance of cyanobacteria was higher in this cruise. The spatial variations of phytoplankton community structure featured distinct regionality. Diatoms, chlorophytes and cryptophytes were the main groups in the inshore waters, and the abundances of prymnesiophytes, chrysophytes and cyanobacteria were increasing from inshore to the open sea. PMID:24288983

  12. SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.

    SciTech Connect

    XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

    2004-03-04

    As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

  13. Structural Priming: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Martin J.; Ferreira, Victor S.

    2009-01-01

    Repetition is a central phenomenon of behavior, and researchers make extensive use of it to illuminate psychological functioning. In the language sciences, a ubiquitous form of such repetition is structural priming, a tendency to repeat or better process a current sentence because of its structural similarity to a previously experienced (“prime”) sentence (Bock, 1986). The recent explosion of research in structural priming has made it the dominant means of investigating the processes involved in the production (and increasingly, comprehension) of complex expressions such as sentences. This review considers its implications for the representation of syntax and the mechanisms of production, comprehension, and their relationship. It then addresses the potential functions of structural priming, before turning to its implications for first language acquisition, bilingualism, and aphasia We close with theoretical and empirical recommendations for future investigations. PMID:18444704

  14. Laramide structure of the central Sangre de Cristo Mountains and adjacent Raton Basin, southern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Laramide structure of the central Sangre de Cristo Mountains (Culebra Range) is interpreted as a system of west-dipping, basement-involved thrusts and reverse faults. The Culebra thrust is the dominant structure in the central part of the range; it dips 30 -55?? west and brings Precambrian metamorphic base-ment rocks over unmetamorphosed Paleozoic rocks. East of the Culebra thrust, thrusts and reverse faults break the basement and overlying cover rocks into north-trending fault blocks; these boundary faults probably dip 40-60?? westward. The orientation of fault slickensides indicates oblique (northeast) slip on the Culebra thrust and dip-slip (ranging from eastward to northward) movement on adjacent faults. In sedimentary cover rocks, east-vergent anticlines overlie and merge with thrusts and reverse faults; these anticlines are interpreted as fault-propagation folds. Minor east-dipping thrusts and reverse faults (backthrusts) occur in both the hanging walls and footwalls of thrusts. The easternmost faults and folds of the Culebra Range form a continuous structural boundary between the Laramide Sangre de Cristo highland and the Raton Basin. Boundary structures consist of west-dipping frontal thrusts flanked on the basinward side by poorly exposed, east-dipping backthrusts. The backthrusts are interpreted to overlie structural wedges that have been emplaced above blind thrusts in the basin margin. West-dipping frontal thrusts and blind thrusts are interpreted to involve basement, but backthrusts are rooted in basin-margin cover rocks. At shallow structural levels where erosion has not exposed a frontal thrust, the structural boundary of the basin is represented by an anticline or monocline. Based on both regional and local stratigraphic evidence, Laramide deformation in the Culebra Range and accompanying synorogenic sedimentation in the western Raton Basin probably took place from latest Cretaceous through early Eocene time. The earliest evidence of uplift and

  15. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality. PMID:26005422

  16. [Community structure of phytoplankton in Haizhou bay and adjacent waters and its relationships with environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Gai; Xue, Ying; Zan, Xiao-Xiao; Ren, Yi-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Based on the data collected from four seasonal surveys in 2011 in Haizhou Bay and adjacent waters, community structure of phytoplankton was studied and their relationships with environmental factors were evaluated by canonical correlation analysis (CCA). A total of 113 phytoplankton species belonging to 3 phyla and 44 genera were collected, among which Bacillariophyta species were the most abundant species, which included 39 genera and 99 species, accounting for 87.6% of total taxa, followed by Pyrrophyta, which included 4 genera and 13 species, accounting for 11.5 percent of total taxa. And the least abundant species were Chrysophyta species, which had only 1 species belonging to 1 genus. Among these dominant species, Coscinodiscus and Chaetoceros were the dominant groups in Bacillariophyta, while Ceratium was the dominant group in Dinophyta, and the dominant species were Meuniera membranacea, Coscinodiscus subtilis var. subtilis, Eucampia zodiacus and Bacillaria paxillifera. There were obvious seasonal variations in the species composition and predominant species. The abundances of phytoplankton in all the stations ranged from 0.08 x 10(5) cells m(-3) to 108.48 x 10(5) cells x m(-3) in Haizhou Bay. The average annual density of phytoplankton was 10.71 x 10(5) cells x m(-3), being the highest in autumn (29.08 x 10(5) cells x m(-3)) and the lowest in summer (1.69 x 10(5) cells x m(-3)). The Shannon index, Pielou index and Margalef index of the phytoplankton community were higher in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. CCA suggested that the main factors affecting the phytoplankton community were sea surface temperature (SST), followed by nutrients (NO(3-)-N, PO4(3-)-P, SiO3(2-)-Si) and dissolved oxygen (DO). The abundances and distribution of some dominant species were closely related with these main factors.

  17. Structure of phytoplankton communities in the Yenisei estuary and over the adjacent Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, I. N.; Flint, M. V.; Sergeeva, V. M.; Druzhkova, E. I.; Nedospasov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Material was collected in the Yenisei estuary and over the adjacent Kara Sea shelf at a quasimeridional transect from 71°49'70″ to 75°59'93″ N in September 2011. The structural characteristics of the phytoplankton community were determined by latitudinal zonality of environmental conditions. Two well-distinguished phytocenoses—freshwater and marine—were found in this region. Phytoplankton in the freshwater part of the estuary was composed solely of the freshwater algae species and was distinguished by the highest numbers (up to 2 × 106 cell/L) and biomass (up to 1.4 mg/L). The marine phytocenoses over the Yenisei shoal was composed of marine neritic species; the abundance and biomass of phytoplankton in this area were significantly lower (0.2 × 106 cell/L and 0.4 mg/L, respectively). The area of intensive interaction of riverine and marine waters—the estuarine frontal zone, with ~130 km latitudinal extension (from 72° to 74° N)—was characterized by a sharp halocline, which separated the desalinated upper layer from the underlying marine water. Freshwater algal species predominated above the halocline, whereas marine species predominated below. The lower border of the euphotic layer was located 8 to 15 m below the halocline. The niche between the halocline and the lower border of the euphotic layer was characterized by high nutrient concentrations, which together with sufficient illumination determined the intensive development of phytoplankton and high values of primary production.

  18. Critical roles of isoleucine-364 and adjacent residues in a hydrophobic gate control of phospholipid transport by the mammalian P4-ATPase ATP8A2

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Anna L.; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Lemmin, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Stine A.; Molday, Laurie L.; Vilsen, Bente; Molday, Robert S.; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Andersen, Jens Peter

    2014-01-01

    P4-ATPases (flippases) translocate specific phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine from the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell membrane to the cytosolic leaflet, upholding an essential membrane asymmetry. The mechanism of flipping this giant substrate has remained an enigma. We have investigated the importance of amino acid residues in transmembrane segment M4 of mammalian P4-ATPase ATP8A2 by mutagenesis. In the related ion pumps Na+,K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase, M4 moves during the enzyme cycle, carrying along the ion bound to a glutamate. In ATP8A2, the corresponding residue is an isoleucine, which recently was found mutated in patients with cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and dysequilibrium syndrome. Our analyses of the lipid substrate concentration dependence of the overall and partial reactions of the enzyme cycle in mutants indicate that, during the transport across the membrane, the phosphatidylserine head group passes near isoleucine-364 (I364) and that I364 is critical to the release of the transported lipid into the cytosolic leaflet. Another M4 residue, N359, is involved in recognition of the lipid substrate on the exoplasmic side. Our functional studies are supported by structural homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, suggesting that I364 and adjacent hydrophobic residues function as a hydrophobic gate that separates the entry and exit sites of the lipid and directs sequential formation and annihilation of water-filled cavities, thereby enabling transport of the hydrophilic phospholipid head group in a groove outlined by the transmembrane segments M1, M2, M4, and M6, with the hydrocarbon chains following passively, still in the membrane lipid phase. PMID:24706822

  19. A Giant Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Encasing the Entire Left Kidney and Adherent to Adjacent Structures: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung Don; Oh, Sung Jin; Suh, Byoung Jo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Park, Jong Kwon; Kim, Yeon Mee; Kim, Bo Mi

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal liposarcoma is a rare tumor. The dimension and weight of liposarcoma are variable; those over 20 kg are called ‘giant liposarcoma’. Herein, we report giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma measuring 45 cm in diameter and 25 kg in weight encasing the entire left kidney and adherent to adjacent structures. A 71-year-old woman presented for a regular checkup. Image study revealed a huge mass probably indicative of retroperitoneal liposarcoma encasing the entire left kidney and adherent to adjacent structures. We performed an organ-preserving surgical removal. The pathologic report was liposarcoma. At postoperative month 16, a follow-up CT revealed a locally recurrent tumor. The patient underwent surgical removal of the newly discovered mass. After the second surgery, the patient underwent regular follow-up CT for approximately 12 months, and to date, there has been no evidence of tumor recurrence. High-grade liposarcoma shows sensitivity to radiation therapy. However, the toxic effect of radiation therapy limits this option by treatment modality. The use of chemotherapy is also controversial. As a result, complete resection is the gold standard treatment. Here, we report a giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma encasing the entire left kidney and adherent to adjacent structures, describe successful organ-preserving surgical removal and discuss prognosis. PMID:27462239

  20. Fish assemblage structure in the hypoxic zone in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xiujuan; Jin, Xianshi; Yuan, Wei

    2010-05-01

    Fish assemblage structure in the hypoxic zone in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and its adjacent waters were analyzed based on data from bottom trawl surveys conducted on the R/V Beidou in June, August and October 2006. Four fish assemblages were identified in each survey using two-way indicator species analysis (TWIA). High fish biomass was found in the northern part, central part and coastal waters of the survey area; in contrast, high fish diversity was found in the southern part of the survey area and the Changjiang estuary outer waters. Therefore, it is difficult to maintain high fishery production when high fish diversity is evenly distributed in the fish community. Fish became smaller and fish size spectra tended to be narrower because of fish species variations and differences in growth characteristics. Fish diversity increased, the age to maturity was reduced and some migrant species were not collected in the surveys. Fish with low economic value, small size, simple age structure and low tropic level were predominant in fish assemblages in the Changjiang estuary and its adjacent waters. The lowest hypoxic value decreased in the Changjiang estuary and its adjacent waters.

  1. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  2. Impact structures of northeastern Eurasia: The territories of Russia and adjacent countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaitis, V. L.

    1999-09-01

    More than thirty impact structures have been discovered in the last three decades in northeastern Eurasia, which includes Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Kazakhstan and Mongolia. The largest impact events of the 20th century also occurred here: the Tunguska and Sikhote Alin events, in Siberia and Primorye, respectively. Many of these impact structures have been studied in detail. This is particularly the case for the largest examples: Popigai (100 km), Puchezh-Katunki (80 km) and Kara (65 km). Detailed data and descriptions of the geological characteristics, morphology, and the nature of the impact breccias and impactites (impact melt rocks) are to be found in numerous publications published mostly in Russia. As these data and descriptions are not generally available to non-Russian scientists, this review summarizes the current state of knowledge on these impact structures. It also provides references to the principal publications detailing them.

  3. Polymorphism of DNA sequence adjacent to human beta-globin structural gene: relationship to sickle mutation.

    PubMed

    Kan, Y W; Dozy, A M

    1978-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease mapping of the human globin genes revealed a genetic variation in a Hpa I recognition site about 5000 nucleotides from the 3' end of the beta-globin structural gene. Instead of a normal 7.6-kilobase (kb) fragment which contains the beta-globin structural gene, 7.0-kb and 13.0-kb variants were detected. Both variants were found in people of African origin and were not detected in Asians or Caucasians. The 13.0-kb variant is frequently associated with the sickle hemoglobin mutation and may be useful for the prediction of the sickle cell gene in prenatal diagnosis. Polymorphism in a restriction enzyme site could be considered as a new class of genetic marker and may offer a new approach to linkage analysis and anthropological studies.

  4. Computer-generated holography enhances voltage dye fluorescence discrimination in adjacent neuronal structures

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Amanda J.; Zampini, Valeria; Tanese, Dimitrii; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Voltage-sensitive fluorescence indicators enable tracking neuronal electrical signals simultaneously in multiple neurons or neuronal subcompartments difficult to access with patch electrodes. However, efficient widefield epifluorescence detection of rapid voltage fluorescence transients necessitates that imaged cells and structures lie sufficiently far from other labeled structures to avoid contamination from out of focal plane and scattered light. We overcame this limitation by exciting dye fluorescence with one-photon computer-generated holography shapes contoured to axons or dendrites of interest, enabling widefield detection of voltage fluorescence with high spatial specificity. By shaping light onto neighboring axons and dendrites, we observed that dendritic back-propagating action potentials were broader and slowly rising compared with axonal action potentials, differences not measured in the same structures illuminated with a large “pseudowidefield” (pWF) spot of the same excitation density. Shaped illumination trials showed reduced baseline fluorescence, higher baseline noise, and fractional fluorescence transient amplitudes two times greater than trials acquired with pWF illumination of the same regions. PMID:26157998

  5. Computer-generated holography enhances voltage dye fluorescence discrimination in adjacent neuronal structures.

    PubMed

    Foust, Amanda J; Zampini, Valeria; Tanese, Dimitrii; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Emiliani, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive fluorescence indicators enable tracking neuronal electrical signals simultaneously in multiple neurons or neuronal subcompartments difficult to access with patch electrodes. However, efficient widefield epifluorescence detection of rapid voltage fluorescence transients necessitates that imaged cells and structures lie sufficiently far from other labeled structures to avoid contamination from out of focal plane and scattered light. We overcame this limitation by exciting dye fluorescence with one-photon computer-generated holography shapes contoured to axons or dendrites of interest, enabling widefield detection of voltage fluorescence with high spatial specificity. By shaping light onto neighboring axons and dendrites, we observed that dendritic back-propagating action potentials were broader and slowly rising compared with axonal action potentials, differences not measured in the same structures illuminated with a large "pseudowidefield" (pWF) spot of the same excitation density. Shaped illumination trials showed reduced baseline fluorescence, higher baseline noise, and fractional fluorescence transient amplitudes two times greater than trials acquired with pWF illumination of the same regions. PMID:26157998

  6. Gravity anomaly and crustal density structure in Jilantai rift zone and its adjacent region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiju; Shen, Chongyang; Tan, Hongbo; Yang, Guangliang

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the interpretation of Bouguer gravity anomalies measured along a 250 km long Suhaitu-Etuokeqi gravity profile located at the transitional zone of the Alxa and Ordos blocks where geophysical characteristics are very complex. The analysis is carried out in terms of the ratio of elevation and Bouguer gravity anomaly, the normalized full gradient of a section of the Bouguer gravity anomaly ( G h ) and the crustal density structure reveal that (1) the ratio of highs and lows of elevation and Bouguer gravity anomaly is large between Zhengyiguan fault (F4) and Helandonglu fault (F6), which can be explained due to crustal inhomogeneities related to the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet block in the northeast; (2) the main active faults correspond to the G h contour strip or cut the local region, and generally show strong deformation characteristics, for example the Bayanwulashan mountain front fault ( F1) or the southeast boundary of Alxa block is in accord with the western change belt of G h , a belt about 10 km wide that extends to about 30 km; (3) Yinchuan-Pingluo fault ( F8) is the seismogenic structure of the Pingluo M earthquake, and its focal depth is about 15 km; (4) the Moho depth trend and Bouguer gravity anomaly variation indicates that the regional gravity field is strongly correlated with the Moho discontinuity.

  7. Gravity anomaly and crustal density structure in Jilantai rift zone and its adjacent region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiju; Shen, Chongyang; Tan, Hongbo; Yang, Guangliang

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the interpretation of Bouguer gravity anomalies measured along a 250 km long Suhaitu-Etuokeqi gravity profile located at the transitional zone of the Alxa and Ordos blocks where geophysical characteristics are very complex. The analysis is carried out in terms of the ratio of elevation and Bouguer gravity anomaly, the normalized full gradient of a section of the Bouguer gravity anomaly (G h ) and the crustal density structure reveal that (1) the ratio of highs and lows of elevation and Bouguer gravity anomaly is large between Zhengyiguan fault (F4) and Helandonglu fault (F6), which can be explained due to crustal inhomogeneities related to the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet block in the northeast; (2) the main active faults correspond to the G h contour strip or cut the local region, and generally show strong deformation characteristics, for example the Bayanwulashan mountain front fault (F1) or the southeast boundary of Alxa block is in accord with the western change belt of G h , a belt about 10 km wide that extends to about 30 km; (3) Yinchuan-Pingluo fault (F8) is the seismogenic structure of the Pingluo M earthquake, and its focal depth is about 15 km; (4) the Moho depth trend and Bouguer gravity anomaly variation indicates that the regional gravity field is strongly correlated with the Moho discontinuity.

  8. Structures and Energetics of Four Adjacent G·U Pairs That Stabilize an RNA Helix.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaobo; Mooers, Blaine H M; Thomas, Leonard M; Malone, Joshua; Harris, Steven; Schroeder, Susan J

    2015-10-22

    Consecutive G·U base pairs inside RNA helices can be destabilizing, while those at the ends of helices are thermodynamically stabilizing. To determine if this paradox could be explained by differences in base stacking, we determined the high-resolution (1.32 Å) crystal structure of (5'-GGUGGCUGUU-3')2 and studied three sequences with four consecutive terminal G·U pairs by NMR spectroscopy. In the crystal structure of (5'-GGUGGCUGUU-3')2, the helix is overwound but retains the overall features of A-form RNA. The penultimate base steps at each end of the helix have high base overlap and contribute to the unexpectedly favorable energetic contribution for the 5'-GU-3'/3'-UG-5' motif in this helix position. The balance of base stacking and helical twist contributes to the positional dependence of G·U pair stabilities. The energetic stabilities and similarity to A-form RNA helices suggest that consecutive G·U pairs would be recognized by RNA helix binding proteins, such as Dicer and Ago. Thus, these results will aid future searches for target sites of small RNAs in gene regulation. PMID:26425937

  9. Structure, burial history, and petroleum potential of frontal thrust belt and adjacent foreland, southwest Montana.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, W.J.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Bostick, N.H.; Maughan, E.K.

    1983-01-01

    The frontal thrust belt in the Lima area of SW Montana consists of blind (nonsurfacing) thrusts of the Lima thrust system beneath the Lima anticline and the Tendoy thrust sheet to the W. The Tendoy sheet involves Mississippian through Cretaceous rocks of the SW-plunging nose of the Mesozoic Blacktail-Snowcrest uplift that are thrust higher (NE) onto the uplift. The front of the Tendoy sheet W of Lima locally has been warped by later compressive deformation which also involved synorogenic conglomerates of the structurally underlying Beaverhead Formation. To the N, recent extension faulting locally has dropped the front of the Tendoy sheet beneath Quaternary gravels. Rocks of the exposed Tendoy sheet have never been deeply buried, based on vitrinite relectance of = or <0.6%, conodont CAI (color alteration index) values that are uniformly 1, and on supporting organic geochemical data from Paleozoic rocks from the Tendoy thrust sheet. Directly above and W of the Tendoy sheet lie formerly more deeply buried rocks of the Medicine Lodge thrust system. Their greater burial depth is indicated by higher conodont CAI values. W-dipping post-Paleocene extension faults truncate much of the rear part of the Tendoy sheet and also separate the Medicine Lodge sheet from thrust sheets of the Beaverhead Range still farther W. -from Authors

  10. Structure and deformation history of the northern range of Trinidad and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, S. T.; Pindell, J. L.

    1993-08-01

    Conflicting models have been proposed for both the evolution of northern South America and the neotectonics of the south Caribbean plate boundary zone. The Trinidadian portion of the margin is particularly controversial, but surprisingly it has been little studied. We present a structural analysis of Trinidad's Northern Range, pertinent updates of the island's stratigraphy and sedimentology, and new zircon fission track age determinations, and use them to constrain Trinidad's geologic history, and to better understand the controlling tectonic processes. In our interpretation Trinidad's three E-ENE striking ranges, which are separated by late Neogene-Recent depocenters, expose (1) the Northern Range Group, generally greenschist-metamorphosed Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous north facing continental slope sediments of the Northern Range, deposited on the northern South American passive margin 200-400 km to the WNW, and (2) the Trinidad Group, Cretaceous-Paleogene shelf slope sediments of the central and southern Trinidad deposited less than 100 km WNW of their present location. A small allochthon composing the Sans Souci Group Cretaceous tholeiitic volcaniclastic, basaltic, and gabbroic rocks (Sans Souci Formation) and sediments (Toco Formation) now in the northeastern Northern Range, has been transported hundreds of kilometers from the west with the Caribbean Plate. Despite earlier references to Cretaceous orogenesis, all deformation in Trinidad is of Cenozoic age. The first deformation in the Northern Range (D1) formed north vergent nappes and induced greenschist metamorphism, probably in the Late Eocene or Oligocene. The nappes developed either by the underthrusting of the Proto-Caribbean crust beneath South America due to convergence between North and South America, or as gravity slides caused by oversteepening induced by this convergence and/or the passage of the Caribbean Plate's peripheral bulge and arrival of its foredeep. Northern Range D2 deformation is south

  11. Comparison of phylogeographic structure and population history of two Phrynocephalus species in the Tarim Basin and adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xia, Lin; He, Jingbo; Wu, Yonghua; Fu, Jinzhong; Yang, Qisen

    2010-12-01

    An aridification of the Tarim Basin and adjacent areas since middle Pleistocene has produced significant genetic structuring of the local fauna. We examined the phylogeographic patterns, population structure and history of Phrynocephalus axillaris and Phrynocephalus forsythii using a mitochondrial fragment ND4-tRNA(LEU). Phylogenetic hypotheses were constructed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference, and the divergence times of major lineages were estimated by BEAST. Population structure and history were inferred by nested clade analysis, neutrality tests, mismatch distribution, and isolation by distance analysis. The two species might have experienced different evolutionary history throughout their current distribution. For P. forsythii, a vicariant event, as a consequence of geological isolation and desert expansion, might have produced the significant divergence between the Tarim and the Yanqi populations. For P. axillaris, populations of the Yanqi, Turpan and Hami Basins might have been established through dispersal during demographic expansion. Climatic fluctuations caused alternate expansion and shrinkage of rivers and oases several times, which likely led to habitat fragmentation for both species. Interaction between vicariance, dispersal and habitat fragmentation produced the current distribution and genetic diversity. The observed difference between the two species may be due partially to their different reproductive modes (ovoviviparous vs. oviparous). PMID:20955804

  12. Comparison of phylogeographic structure and population history of two Phrynocephalus species in the Tarim Basin and adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xia, Lin; He, Jingbo; Wu, Yonghua; Fu, Jinzhong; Yang, Qisen

    2010-12-01

    An aridification of the Tarim Basin and adjacent areas since middle Pleistocene has produced significant genetic structuring of the local fauna. We examined the phylogeographic patterns, population structure and history of Phrynocephalus axillaris and Phrynocephalus forsythii using a mitochondrial fragment ND4-tRNA(LEU). Phylogenetic hypotheses were constructed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference, and the divergence times of major lineages were estimated by BEAST. Population structure and history were inferred by nested clade analysis, neutrality tests, mismatch distribution, and isolation by distance analysis. The two species might have experienced different evolutionary history throughout their current distribution. For P. forsythii, a vicariant event, as a consequence of geological isolation and desert expansion, might have produced the significant divergence between the Tarim and the Yanqi populations. For P. axillaris, populations of the Yanqi, Turpan and Hami Basins might have been established through dispersal during demographic expansion. Climatic fluctuations caused alternate expansion and shrinkage of rivers and oases several times, which likely led to habitat fragmentation for both species. Interaction between vicariance, dispersal and habitat fragmentation produced the current distribution and genetic diversity. The observed difference between the two species may be due partially to their different reproductive modes (ovoviviparous vs. oviparous).

  13. Optimal design of viscous damper connectors for adjacent structures using genetic algorithm and Nelder-Mead algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Kasra; Hare, Warren; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2012-04-01

    Passive dampers can be used to connect two adjacent structures in order to mitigate earthquakes induced pounding damages. Theoretical and experimental studies have confirmed efficiency and applicability of various connecting devices, such as viscous damper, MR damper, etc. However, few papers employed optimization methods to find the optimal mechanical properties of the dampers, and in most papers, dampers are assumed to be uniform. In this study, we optimized the optimal damping coefficients of viscous dampers considering a general case of non-uniform damping coefficients. Since the derivatives of objective function to damping coefficients are not known, to optimize damping coefficients, a heuristic search method, i.e. the genetic algorithm, is employed. Each structure is modeled as a multi degree of freedom dynamic system consisting of lumped-masses, linear springs and dampers. In order to examine dynamic behavior of the structures, simulations in frequency domain are carried out. A pseudo-excitation based on Kanai-Tajimi spectrum is used as ground acceleration. The optimization results show that relaxing the uniform dampers coefficient assumption generates significant improvement in coupling effectiveness. To investigate efficiency of genetic algorithm, solution quality and solution time of genetic algorithm are compared with those of Nelder-Mead algorithm.

  14. Quantitative Evaluation of the Substantially Variable Morphology and Function of the Left Atrial Appendage and Its Relation with Adjacent Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Fan, Qiong-Ying; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Liu, Guo-Chao; Yang, Hai-Qing; Feng, Ping-Yong; Wang, Yong; Song, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate quantitatively the morphology, anatomy and function of the left atrial appendage (LAA) and its relation with adjacent structures. Materials and Methods A total of 860 patients (533 men, 62.0%, age 55.9±10.4 year) who had cardiac multidetector computed tomography angiography from May to October 2012 were enrolled for analysis. Results Seven types and 6 subtypes of LAA morphology were found with Type 2 being the most prevalent. Type 5 was more significantly (P<0.05) present in women (8.0%) than in men (4.2%). LAA orifice was oval in 81.5%, triangular in 7.3%, semicircular in 4%, water drop-like in 3.2%, round in 2.4% and foot-like in 1.6%. The LAA orifice had a significantly greater (P<0.01) major axis in men (24.79±3.81) than in women (22.68±4.07). The LAA orifice long axis was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with the height, weight and surface area of the patient. The LAA morphology parameters displayed strong positive correlation with the left atrium volume, aortic cross area long axis or LSPV long axis but poor correlation with the height, weight, surface area and vertebral body height of the patients. Four types of LAA ridge were identified: AI, AII, B and C with the distribution of 17.6%, 69.9%, 5.9% and 6.6%, respectively. The LAA had a significantly (P<0.05) greater distance from its orifice to the mitral ring in women than in men. The LAA had two filling and two emptying processes with the greatest volume at 45% phase but the least volume at 5% phase. The LAA maximal, minimal and emptying volumes were all significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with the body height, weight and surface area, whereas the LAA ejection fraction had an inverse correlation with the LAA minimal volume but no correlation with the maximal volume. Conclusion The LAA has substantially variable morphologies and relation with the adjacent structures, which may be helpful in guiding the LAA trans-catheter occlusion or catheter ablation

  15. Structure-dependent response of a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector for organic compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Zhao, Jiang; Leopold, Kyle; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-01-15

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries is indispensable for drug discovery research. However, the HTS data quality for lead discovery, lead optimization, and quantitative structure activity relationship studies has been severely compromised due to the uncertain compound concentrations in screening plates. In order to address this issue, we compared various high-throughput technologies for quantification of compounds in microtiter plate format without the need for authentic compounds as standards and identified the chemiluminescence nitrogen detector (CLND) as the method of choice at the present time. However, the structure dependence of this detector has not been well studied. A proposed rule suggested that the only exception to equimolar response is for compounds that contain adjacent nitrogen atoms. The response should be zero when the adjacent nitrogen atoms are connected by a double bond and 0.5 when they are connected by a single bond. In this investigation, we studied a broad range of compounds with isolated and adjacent nitrogen atoms. We confirmed that compounds with isolated nitrogen atoms produce an equimolar response with a 15-20% variation depending on structures and compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a double bond giving nearly zero response. We discovered that the CLND response for compounds containing adjacent nitrogen atoms that are connected with a single bond is highly structure dependent. Substitutions on the nitrogen atoms or nearby in the molecule can increase the CLND response to approach a value higher than the predicted value 0.5 (maximal value 0.82/nitrogen atom). Without substitution, much lower values than predicted (minimal value 0.0-0.08/nitrogen atom) are obtained. Therefore, the prediction of response of 0.5/nitrogen atom for compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond should be abandoned. Compounds with similar structures should be used to generate calibration curves for

  16. Integrated geophysical data processing and interpretation of crustal structure in Ethiopia with emphasis on the Ogaden Basin and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadesse, Ketsela

    The combined effects of magmatism and stretching due to asthenosphere upwelling modifies the crustal structure of the Earth as seen in the Ethiopian rift and adjacent areas. The Ethiopian rift provides unique opportunities to understand the nature of rifted crust and the intensity of its modification by magmatic processes. I used geological and geophysical data to conduct an integrated study in and around the Ethiopian rift including the northern Kenyan rift and the northern part of the Kenyan dome. New gravity, controlled source seismic, and teleseismic data from the EAGLE (Ethiopia-Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment) were used as additional constraints in my analysis of the crustal structure of Ethiopian rift and adjacent plateaus. Application of a residual gravity anomaly filtering technique using upward continuation revealed various crustal features within the Ethiopian rift and the flanking plateau regions. Short wavelength high amplitude positive anomalies coincide with the local volcanic complexes and calderas. In addition low gravity anomalies are associated with areas of thicker sediments within the rift valley. Axial and cross rift gravity profiles were modeled in 2.5 dimensions constrained with seismic refraction and geologic data. The axial model connects the Kenyan dome through Turkana rift and Main Ethiopian rift (MER) up to the Afar triple junction and provides a new integrated picture of lithospheric structure along the rift for over 1000 km. This model indicates a thin crust (26 km) underlying the Afar region. The crust gradually thickens towards the MER where it is about 35-40 km thick. Towards the south the crust thins and is only 22 km thick when it reaches the Turkana area. The southern section of the axial model indicates that the crust is about 35 km thick beneath the central Kenyan rift. All these thickness values are in agreement with the EAGLE and Kenya Rift International Seismic Project (KRISP) and earlier refraction results and

  17. Food structure is critical for optimal health.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    Much nutrition policy is nutrient-based, supported by extensive nutrient science and food nutrient composition tables and recommendations for dietary evaluation. There are no comparable instruments for food structure. This constitutes a policy and practice gap since food is valued for its textural properties and not simply its chemistry. The structurally-important 'dietary fibre' at first proved of greater interest for its chemistry than its physico-chemistry even to health scientists and workers. As food chemistry became evidently complex, especially for phytonutrients, food-based dietary guidelines became an imperative and were launched by FAO and WHO in Cyprus in 1995. Food-health relationships, after weaning, are best articulated in terms of the achievement of dietary diversity, predicated partly on how intact foods are or in what way they are prepared. Cooking itself has health-promoting characteristics. Even with identical chemistry, food structure makes a major difference to biological and health outcomes. With evidence that food structure contributes to the matrix that food provides for nutrient delivery, and also to gut microbiomic profile and integrity, concern has grown about overly-processed food and health outcomes. The definition and categorisation of 'ultra-processed foods' is now a work-in-progress. Future public health nutritional and clinical nutrition developments will take account of food structure. To these ends, food composition tables will need to provide information like particle size and viscosity. Dietary recommendations will need to take account of food structure, as is the case for Brazil whose first step is "Make natural or minimally processed foods the basis of your diet". PMID:26667120

  18. Food structure is critical for optimal health.

    PubMed

    Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    Much nutrition policy is nutrient-based, supported by extensive nutrient science and food nutrient composition tables and recommendations for dietary evaluation. There are no comparable instruments for food structure. This constitutes a policy and practice gap since food is valued for its textural properties and not simply its chemistry. The structurally-important 'dietary fibre' at first proved of greater interest for its chemistry than its physico-chemistry even to health scientists and workers. As food chemistry became evidently complex, especially for phytonutrients, food-based dietary guidelines became an imperative and were launched by FAO and WHO in Cyprus in 1995. Food-health relationships, after weaning, are best articulated in terms of the achievement of dietary diversity, predicated partly on how intact foods are or in what way they are prepared. Cooking itself has health-promoting characteristics. Even with identical chemistry, food structure makes a major difference to biological and health outcomes. With evidence that food structure contributes to the matrix that food provides for nutrient delivery, and also to gut microbiomic profile and integrity, concern has grown about overly-processed food and health outcomes. The definition and categorisation of 'ultra-processed foods' is now a work-in-progress. Future public health nutritional and clinical nutrition developments will take account of food structure. To these ends, food composition tables will need to provide information like particle size and viscosity. Dietary recommendations will need to take account of food structure, as is the case for Brazil whose first step is "Make natural or minimally processed foods the basis of your diet".

  19. [Effects of macro-jellyfish abundance dynamics on fishery resource structure in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent waters].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiu-Juan; Zhuang, Zhi-Meng; Jin, Xian-Shi; Dai, Fang-Qun

    2011-12-01

    Based on the bottom trawl survey data in May 2007 and May and June 2008, this paper analyzed the effects of the abundance dynamics of macro-jellyfish on the species composition, distribution, and abundance of fishery resource in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent waters. From May 2007 to June 2008, the average catch per haul and the top catch per haul of macro-jellyfish increased, up to 222.2 kg x h(-1) and 1800 kg x h(-1) in June 2008, respectively. The macro-jellyfish were mainly distributed in the areas around 50 m isobath, and not beyond 100 m isobath where was the joint front of the coastal waters of East China Sea, Yangtze River runoff, and Taiwan Warm Current. The main distribution area of macro-jellyfish in June migrated northward, as compared with that in May, and the highest catches of macro-jellyfish in May 2007 and May 2008 were found in the same sampling station (122.5 degrees E, 28.5 degrees N). In the sampling stations with higher abundance of macro-jellyfish, the fishery abundance was low, and the fishery species also changed greatly, mainly composed by small-sized species (Trachurus japonicus, Harpadon nehereus, and Acropoma japonicum) and pelagic species (Psenopsis anomala, Octopus variabilis) and Trichiurus japonicus, and P. anomala accounted for 23.7% of the total catch in June 2008. Larimichthys polyactis also occupied higher proportion of the total catch in sampling stations with higher macro-jellyfish abundance, but the demersal species Lophius litulon was not found, and a few crustaceans were collected. This study showed that macro-jellyfish had definite negative effects on the fishery community structure and abundance in the Yangtze River estuary fishery ecosystem, and further, changed the energy flow patterns of the ecosystem through cascading trophic interactions. Therefore, macro-jellyfish was strongly suggested to be an independent ecological group when the corresponding fishery management measures were considered.

  20. Objective structured clinical exams: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Turner, John L; Dankoski, Mary E

    2008-09-01

    Since their inception in the 1970s, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) have become popular and now are part of the US Medical Licensing Examination for all US medical graduates. Despite general acceptance of this method, there is debate over the value of OSCE testing compared to more traditional methods. A review of reliability and validity research does not clearly show superiority of OSCE testing. To use OSCEs in a valid and reliable way, attention must be paid to test content, test design, and implementation factors, especially when the results will be used for high-stakes decision making. While questions remain around the application of OSCE testing, there are also both known and hidden benefits to students, faculty, and organizations that use OSCEs. This paper reviews the pros and cons of the OSCE method and outlines important issues for medical educators to consider when planning to use OSCEs in their programs. PMID:18988044

  1. Mechanical and structural properties of bone in non-critical and critical healing in rat.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Rebecca M; Seidt, Britta M; Shah, Miheer; Schwarz, Carolin; Willie, Bettina M; Duda, Georg N; Fratzl, Peter; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    A fracture in bone results in a dramatic change of mechanical loading conditions at the site of injury. Usually, bone injuries heal normally but with increasing fracture gaps, healing is retarded, eventually leading to non-unions. The clinical situation of these two processes with different outcomes is well described. However, the exact relation between the mechanical environment and characteristics of the tissues at all levels of structural hierarchy remains unclear. Here we studied the differences in material formation of non-critical (1mm) and critical (5mm gap) healing. We employed a rat osteotomy model to explore bone material structure depending upon the different mechanical conditions. In both cases, primary bone formation was followed by secondary bone deposition with mineral particle sizes changing from on average short and thick to long and thin particles. Bony bridging occurred at first in the endosteal callus and the nanostructure and microstructure developed towards cortical ordered material organization. In contrast, in critical healing, instead of bridging, a marrow cavity closure was formed endosteal, exhibiting tissue structure oriented along the curvature and a periosteal callus with less mature material structure. The two healing processes separated between 4 and 6 weeks post-osteotomy. The outcome of healing was determined by the varied geometrical conditions in critical and non-critical healing, inducing completely different mechanical situations.

  2. Benthic polychaete diversity patterns and community structure in the Whittard Canyon system and adjacent slope (NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, Laetitia M.; Neal, Lenka; Gooday, Andrew J.; Bett, Brian J.; Glover, Adrian G.

    2015-12-01

    We examined deep-sea macrofaunal polychaete species assemblage composition, diversity and turnover in the Whittard Canyon system (NE Atlantic) using replicate megacore samples from three of the canyon branches and one site on the continental slope to the west of the canyon, all at ~3500 m water depth. A total of 110 polychaete species were recorded. Paramphinome jeffreysii was the most abundant species (2326 ind. m-2) followed by Aurospio sp. B (646 ind. m-2), Opheliidae sp. A (393 ind. m-2), Prionospio sp. I (380 ind. m-2), and Ophelina abranchiata (227 ind. m-2). Species composition varied significantly across all sites. From west to east, the dominance of Paramphinome jeffreysii increased from 12.9% on the slope to 39.6% in the Eastern branch. Ordination of species composition revealed that the Central and Eastern branches were most similar, whereas the Western branch and slope sites were more distinct. High abundances of P. jeffreysii and Opheliidae sp. A characterised the Eastern branch of the canyon and may indicate an opportunistic response to a possible recent input of organic matter inside the canyon. Species richness and diversity indices were higher on the slope compared with inside the canyon, and the slope site had higher species evenness. Within the canyon, species diversity between branches was broadly similar. Despite depressed diversity within the canyon compared with the adjacent slope, the fact that 46 of the 99 polychaete species found in the Whittard Canyon were not present on the adjacent slope suggests that this feature may enhance the regional species pool. However, our sampling effort on the adjacent slope was insufficient to confirm this conclusion.

  3. Transmigration of impacted canines: prevalence, management and implications on tooth structure and pulp vitality of adjacent teeth.

    PubMed

    Mazinis, Emmanuel; Zafeiriadis, Anastasios; Karathanasis, Athinodoros; Lambrianidis, Theodor

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of transmigrant canines in a sample of panoramic radiographs of a random Greek population, to classify them and evaluate clinically and radiographically all the implications for adjacent teeth. Panoramic radiographs of 3,586 patients retrieved from eight private practices between 1998 and 2009, were examined. Panoramic radiographs with extracted canines were not included in this study. An impacted canine was considered to be transmigrant when at least part of its length had crossed the midline. Six radiographs exhibited transmigrant canines (0.17% of the total sample of panoramic radiographs), of which four were mandibular and two maxillary. Canine transmigration is a rare phenomenon in Greek population. The impact of transmigrant canines on adjacent teeth varied from inclination, calcific metamorphosis and root resorption to no effect. Orthodontic therapy was the treatment of choice for two of the cases, while in the remaining cases the patients were scheduled for periodic recalls. Clinical and radiographic evaluation and early diagnosis are crucial aids in proper treatment planning.

  4. Benthic meiofaunal composition and community structure in the Sethukuda mangrove area and adjacent open sea, East coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thilagavathi, Balasubramanaian; Das, Bandana; Saravanakumar, Ayyappan; Raja, Kuzhanthaivel

    2011-06-01

    The ecological aspects of meiofaunal communities in the Muthupettai mangrove forest, East coast of India, has not been investigated in the last two decades. Surface water temperature ranged from 23.5 °C to 31.8 °C. Salinity varied from 24 to 34 ppt, while water pH fluctuated from 7.4 to 8.3. Dissolved oxygen concentration ranged from 3.86 to 5.33 mg/l. Meiofauna analysis in this study identified a total of 106 species from the mangrove and adjacent open sea area of Sethukuda. Among these, 56 species of foraminiferans, 20 species of nematodes, 7 species of harpacticoid copepods, 4 species of ostrocodes, and 2 species of rotifers were identified. Furthermore, a single species was identified from the following groups: ciliophora, cnidaria, gnathostomulida, insecta, propulida, bryozoa and polychaete larvae. Meiofaunal density varied between 12029 to 23493 individuals 10 cm/m2. The diversity index ranged from 3.515 to 3.680, species richness index varied from 6.384 to 8.497, and evenness index varied from 0.839 to 0876 in the mangrove area and adjacent open sea.

  5. [Fish community structure and its relationships with environmental factors in Haizhou Bay and adjacent waters of East China in winter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Lin; Xu, Bin-Duo; Ji, Yu-Peng; Ren, Yi-Ping

    2013-06-01

    Based on the bottom trawl survey and environmental investigation data in December 2011, and by using species diversity indices and multi-element analysis, this paper studied the species composition, species diversity, and spatial pattern of fish community as well as their relationships with environmental factors in Haizhou Bay and adjacent waters. A total of 60 fish species were captured, belonging to 51 genera, 34 families, and 10 orders, and mainly composed of warm temperature and warm water demersal fishes. The Margalef species richness index, Shannon diversity index, and Pielou evenness index ranged from 1.14 to 2.84, 1.08 to 2.64, and 0.41 to 0.83, respectively. Cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis showed that the fish community could be spatially clustered into three groups. Group I was in the north of 35 N, group II was in the inshore waters near bay-head, and group III was in the south of 35 degrees N. ANOSIM analysis showed that there existed highly significant differences (R = 0.45-0.91) in the fish species composition among the groups. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that the bottom water temperature, water depth, and sea surface salinity were the most important environmental variables affecting the spatial pattern of fish community in Haizhou Bay and adjacent waters in winter.

  6. Electromagnetic Structure of Few-Nucleon Systems: a Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla

    2000-10-01

    Our current understanding of the structure of nuclei with up to A=8, including energy spectra, electromagnetic form factors, and capture reactions, is critically reviewed within the context of a realistic approach to nuclear dynamics based on two- and three-nucleon interactions and associated electromagnetic currents.

  7. Food web structure of the coastal area adjacent to the Tagus estuary revealed by stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinagre, C.; Máguas, C.; Cabral, H. N.; Costa, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of energy sources, pathways and trophic linkages among organisms is crucial for the understanding of food web dynamics. Stable isotopes were used to identify the trophic level of food web components and track the incorporation of organic matter of different origins in the coastal ecosystem adjacent to the Tagus estuary. It was shown that the river Tagus is a major source of organic carbon to this system. Also, the wide difference in δ 13C among the primary consumers allowed the identification of the pelagic and the benthic energy pathways. The maximum trophic level observed was 2.4 for Sepia officinalis. This value is indicative of a short food web. It was concluded that the diet of the upper trophic level species relies directly on the lower food web levels to a considerable extent, instead of relying mostly on intermediate trophic level species. Moreover, the δ 15N values of primary consumers were very close to that of particulate organic matter, probably due to poorly known processes occurring at the basis of the food web. This lowers the trophic length of the whole food web. Reliance on benthic affinity prey was high for all upper trophic level secondary consumers.

  8. Adjacent positioning of cellular structures enabled by a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein-mediated zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Howell, Audrey S; Bose, Indrani; Lew, Daniel J; Bi, Erfei

    2007-12-31

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are born carrying localized transmembrane landmark proteins that guide the subsequent establishment of a polarity axis and hence polarized growth to form a bud in the next cell cycle. In haploid cells, the relevant landmark proteins are concentrated at the site of the preceding cell division, to which they recruit Cdc24, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the conserved polarity regulator Cdc42. However, instead of polarizing at the division site, the new polarity axis is directed next to but not overlapping that site. Here, we show that the Cdc42 guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) Rga1 establishes an exclusion zone at the division site that blocks subsequent polarization within that site. In the absence of localized Rga1 GAP activity, new buds do in fact form within the old division site. Thus, Cdc42 activators and GAPs establish concentric zones of action such that polarization is directed to occur adjacent to but not within the previous cell division site.

  9. Bioinformatic evidence for a stem-loop structure 5'-adjacent to the IGR-IRES and for an overlapping gene in the bee paralysis dicistroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Wang, Qing S; Jan, Eric; Atkins, John F

    2009-01-01

    The family Dicistroviridae (order Picornavirales) includes species that infect insects and other arthropods. These viruses have a linear positive-sense ssRNA genome of ~8-10 kb, which contains two long ORFs. The 5' ORF encodes the nonstructural polyprotein while the 3' ORF encodes the structural polyprotein. The dicistroviruses are noteworthy for the intergenic Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IGR-IRES) that mediates efficient translation initation on the 3' ORF without the requirement for initiator Met-tRNA. Acute bee paralysis virus, Israel acute paralysis virus of bees and Kashmir bee virus form a distinct subgroup within the Dicistroviridae family. In this brief report, we describe the bioinformatic discovery of a new, apparently coding, ORF in these viruses. The ORF overlaps the 5' end of the structural polyprotein coding sequence in the +1 reading frame. We also identify a potential 14-18 bp RNA stem-loop structure 5'-adjacent to the IGR-IRES. We discuss potential translation initiation mechanisms for the novel ORF in the context of the IGR-IRES and 5'-adjacent stem-loop. PMID:19895695

  10. The growth and structure of double-diffusive cells adjacent to a cooled sidewall in a salt-stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki-Epshtein, Liora; Phillips, Owen M.; Huppert, Herbert E.

    2004-11-01

    Observations and measurements are reported on the patterns and rates of growth in time of the double-diffusive cells that form adjacent to a cooled sidewall in a saltstratified environment. Fluid near the wall is cooled and sinks a distance h where its density, increased by cooling, matches that of the salt-stratified ambient. The fluid separates from the wall, moving outwards as a cool, fresher layer beneath a warmer, more saline region. This leads to growing double-diffusive cells that advance outward at a rate, found by dimensional reasoning, to initially be proportional to N_{0}h, where N_{0} is the initial buoyancy frequency in the ambient and h is the intrusion's vertical thickness. Near the wall at the top of each cell, the sinking colder fluid is continually replaced by selective withdrawal from the ambient ‘far field’. The fluid being withdrawn from the ambient is always the least dense in the cell, and as the experiment proceeds, the straining of the fluid in the ambient region reduces the stratification. The vertical density gradient inside the cell relaxes by continuous hydrostatic adjustment (CHA) to match the ambient and the speed of advance reduces. Measurements of the rate of advance of the cell nose were made in tanks of different lengths L with a range of initial salinity gradients and temperature differences. A simple two-dimensional model is developed to describe the rate of extension of the cells and the internal density gradient as functions of time in which the tank length appears as an important variable. This effect does not seem to have been recognized previously. The rates of evolution in each run involve the time scale tau {=} L /( {C_H hN_0 }), where C_H {≈} 10({) - 2} is a heat transfer coefficient. The mean length of the cells skew2bar {l}(t)and the internal buoyancy frequency as functions of time are given by [ skew2bar {l}(t) / L = t/tau - ( t/2tau)^2,quad N = N_0 (1 - t / 2tau ). ] Inversion of the first of these expressions

  11. The Torsin-family AAA+ Protein OOC-5 Contains a Critical Disulfide Adjacent to Sensor-II That Couples Redox State to Nucleotide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wrabl, James O.; Hayashi, Adam P.; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2008-01-01

    A subgroup of the AAA+ proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope including human torsinA, a protein mutated in hereditary dystonia, is called the torsin family of AAA+ proteins. A multiple-sequence alignment of this family with Hsp100 proteins of known structure reveals a conserved cysteine in the C-terminus of torsin proteins within the Sensor-II motif. A structural model predicts this cysteine to be a part of an intramolecular disulfide bond, suggesting that it may function as a redox sensor to regulate ATPase activity. In vitro experiments with OOC-5, a torsinA homolog from Caenorhabditis elegans, demonstrate that redox changes that reduce this disulfide bond affect the binding of ATP and ADP and cause an attendant local conformational change detected by limited proteolysis. Transgenic worms expressing an ooc-5 gene with cysteine-to-serine mutations that disrupt the disulfide bond have a very low embryo hatch rate compared with wild-type controls, indicating these two cysteines are essential for OOC-5 function. We propose that the Sensor-II in torsin family proteins is a redox-regulated sensor. This regulatory mechanism may be central to the function of OOC-5 and human torsinA. PMID:18550799

  12. The Impact of Adjacent-Dependencies and Staged-Input on the Learnability of Center-Embedded Hierarchical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Jun; Poletiek, Fenna H.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical debate in artificial grammar learning (AGL) regards the learnability of hierarchical structures. Recent studies using an A[superscript n]B[superscript n] grammar draw conflicting conclusions ([Bahlmann and Friederici, 2006] and [De Vries et al., 2008]). We argue that 2 conditions crucially affect learning A[superscript…

  13. The regional structural setting of the 2008 Wells earthquake and Town Creek Flat Basin: implications for the Wells earthquake fault and adjacent structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Christopher S.; Colgan, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    The 2008 Wells earthquake occurred on a northeast-striking, southeast-dipping fault that is clearly delineated by the aftershock swarm to a depth of 10-12 km below sea level. However, Cenozoic rocks and structures around Wells primarily record east-west extension along north- to north-northeast-striking, west-dipping normal faults that formed during the middle Miocene. These faults are responsible for the strong eastward tilt of most basins and ranges in the area, including the Town Creek Flat basin (the location of the earthquake) and the adjacent Snake Mountains and western Windermere Hills. These older west-dipping faults are locally overprinted by a younger generation of east-dipping, high-angle normal faults that formed as early as the late Miocene and have remained active into the Quaternary. The most prominent of these east-dipping faults is the set of en-échelon, north-striking faults that bounds the east sides of the Ruby Mountains, East Humboldt Range, and Clover Hill (about 5 km southwest of Wells). The northeastern-most of these faults, the Clover Hill fault, projects northward along strike toward the Snake Mountains and the approximately located surface projection of the Wells earthquake fault as defined by aftershock locations. The Clover Hill fault also projects toward a previously unrecognized, east-facing Quaternary fault scarp and line of springs that appear to mark a significant east-dipping normal fault along the western edge of Town Creek Flat. Both western and eastern projections may be northern continuations of the Clover Hill fault. The Wells earthquake occurred along this east-dipping fault system. Two possible alternatives to rupture of a northern continuation of the Clover Hill fault are that the earthquake fault (1) is antithetic to an active west-dipping fault or (2) reactivated a Mesozoic thrust fault that dips east as a result of tilting by the west-dipping faults along the west side of the Snake Mountains. Both alternatives are

  14. The effects of timber harvesting on the structure and composition of adjacent old-growth coast redwood forest, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, W.H.; Jones, C.

    2001-01-01

    Data collected across timber harvest boundaries on nine sites within the Redwood National and State Park management area in California, USA, were used to estimate the effective size of old-growth coast redwood preserves. Fourteen variables related to stand structure and composition, wildlife habitat, and physical environment were significantly correlated to distance from the timber harvest boundary using multiple regression analysis. A maximum depth of edge influence of 200 m was determined for variables exhibiting a significant correlation to the distance from the harvest edge. A spatial analysis using ArcView indicated that 53% of the old growth preserved within the study area was influenced by edge conditions, leaving 47% as effective old-growth.

  15. Generic criticality of community structure in random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, Adam; Lipowska, Dorota

    2014-09-01

    We examine a community structure in random graphs of size n and link probability p /n determined with the Newman greedy optimization of modularity. Calculations show that for p <1 communities are nearly identical with clusters. For p =1 the average sizes of a community sav and of the giant community sg show a power-law increase sav˜nα' and sg˜nα. From numerical results we estimate α'≈0.26(1) and α ≈0.50(1) and using the probability distribution of sizes of communities we suggest that α'=α/2 should hold. For p >1 the community structure remains critical: (i) sav and sg have a power-law increase with α'≈α<1 and (ii) the probability distribution of sizes of communities is very broad and nearly flat for all sizes up to sg. For large p the modularity Q decays as Q˜p-0.55, which is intermediate between some previous estimations. To check the validity of the results, we also determine the community structure using another method, namely, a nongreedy optimization of modularity. Tests with some benchmark networks show that the method outperforms the greedy version. For random graphs, however, the characteristics of the community structure determined using both greedy and nongreedy optimizations are, within small statistical fluctuations, the same.

  16. Crustal structure of Wrangellia and adjacent terranes inferred from geophysical studies along a transect through the northern Talkeetna Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glen, J.M.G.; Schmidt, J.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D.K.; O'Neill, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent investigations of the Talkeetna Mountains in south-central Alaska were undertaken to study the region's framework geophysics and to reinterpret structures and crustal composition. Potential field (gravity and magnetic) and magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected along northwest-trending profiles as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Talkeetna Mountains transect project. The Talkeetna Mountains transect area comprises eight 1:63,360 quadrangles (???9500 km2) in the Healy and Talkeetna Mountains 1?? ?? 3?? sheets that span four major lithostratigraphic terranes (Glen et al., this volume) including the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes and two Mesozoic overlap assemblages inboard (northwest) of Wrangellia. These data were used here to develop 21/2-dimensional models for the three profiles. Modeling results reveal prominent gravity, magnetic, and MT gradients (???3.25 mGal/ km, ???100nT/km, ???300 ohm-m/km) corresponding to the Talkeetna Suture Zone-a first-order crustal discontinuity in the deep crust that juxtaposes rocks with strongly contrasting rock properties. This discontinuity corresponds with the suture between relatively dense magnetic crust of Wrangellia (likely of oceanic composition) and relatively less dense transitional crust underlying Jurassic to Cretaceous flysch basins developed between Wrangellia and North America. Some area of the oceanic crust beneath Wrangellia may also have been underplated by mafic material during early to mid-Tertiary volcanism. The prominent crustal break underlies the Fog Lakes basin approximately where theTalkeetna thrust faultwaspreviouslymappedas a surface feature. Potential fieldand MT models, however, indicate that the Talkeetna Suture Zone crustal break along the transect is a deep (2-8 km), steeply west-dipping structure-not a shallow east-dipping Alpine nappe-like thrust. Indeed, most of the crustal breaks in the area appear to be steep in the geophysical data, which is consistent with regional geologic

  17. Seismic structure beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and adjacent areas based on the tomographic inversion of regional earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khrepy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Petrunin, Alexey G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first 3-D model of seismic P and S velocities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and surrounding areas based on the results of passive travel time tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed based on travel time data from ˜ 9000 regional earthquakes provided by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN), and this was complemented with data from the International Seismological Centre (ISC). The resulting P and S velocity patterns were generally consistent with each other at all depths. Beneath the northern part of the Red Sea, we observed a strong high-velocity anomaly with abrupt limits that coincide with the coastal lines. This finding may indicate the oceanic nature of the crust in the Red Sea, and it does not support the concept of gradual stretching of the continental crust. According to our results, in the middle and lower crust, the seismic anomalies beneath the Gulf of Aqaba seem to delineate a sinistral shift (˜ 100 km) in the opposite flanks of the fault zone, which is consistent with other estimates of the left-lateral displacement in the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform fault. However, no displacement structures were visible in the uppermost lithospheric mantle.

  18. Seismic structure of the crust and uppermost mantle of north America and adjacent oceanic basins: A synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chulick, G.S.; Mooney, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new set of contour maps of the seismic structure of North America and the surrounding ocean basins. These maps include the crustal thickness, whole-crustal average P-wave and S-wave velocity, and seismic velocity of the uppermost mantle, that is, Pn and Sn. We found the following: (1) The average thickness of the crust under North America is 36.7 km (standard deviation [s.d.] ??8.4 km), which is 2.5 km thinner than the world average of 39.2 km (s.d. ?? 8.5) for continental crust; (2) Histograms of whole-crustal P- and S-wave velocities for the North American crust are bimodal, with the lower peak occurring for crust without a high-velocity (6.9-7.3 km/sec) lower crustal layer; (3) Regions with anomalously high average crustal P-wave velocities correlate with Precambrian and Paleozoic orogens; low average crustal velocities are correlated with modern extensional regimes; (4) The average Pn velocity beneath North America is 8.03 km/sec (s.d. ?? 0.19 km/sec); (5) the well-known thin crust beneath the western United States extends into northwest Canada; (6) the average P-wave velocity of layer 3 of oceanic crust is 6.61 km/ sec (s.d. ?? 0.47 km/sec). However, the average crustal P-wave velocity under the eastern Pacific seafloor is higher than the western Atlantic seafloor due to the thicker sediment layer on the older Atlantic seafloor.

  19. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  20. Mapping of lithologic and structural units using multispectral imagery. [Afar-Triangle/Ethiopia and adjacent areas (Ethiopian Plateau, Somali Plateau, and parts of Yemen and Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronberg, P. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 MSS imagery covering the Afar-Triangle/Ethiopia and adjacent regions (Ethiopian Plateau, Somali Plateau, and parts of Yemen and Saudi Arabi) was applied to the mapping of lithologic and structural units of the test area at a scale 1:1,000,000. Results of the geological evaluation of the ERTS-1 imagery of the Afar have proven the usefullness of this type of satellite data for regional geological mapping. Evaluation of the ERTS images also resulted in new aspects of the structural setting and tectonic development of the Afar-Triangle, where three large rift systems, the oceanic rifts of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden and the continental East African rift system, seem to meet each other. Surface structures mapped by ERTS do not indicate that the oceanic rift of the Gulf of Aden (Sheba Ridge) continues into the area of continental crust west of the Gulf of Tadjura. ERTS data show that the Wonji fault belt of the African rift system does not enter or cut through the central Afar. The Aysha-Horst is not a Horst but an autochthonous spur of the Somali Plateau.

  1. Fish diversity in the Río de la Plata and adjacent waters: an overview of environmental influences on its spatial and temporal structure.

    PubMed

    Jaureguizar, A J; Solari, A; Cortés, F; Milessi, A C; Militelli, M I; Camiolo, M D; Luz Clara, M; García, M

    2016-07-01

    The fish diversity and the main environmental factors affecting the spatial distribution of species, life history stages and community structure in the Río de la Plata (RdP) and adjacent waters are reviewed and analysed, with emphasis on the functional guild classification. The functional guild classification indicated that most species in the RdP were marine stragglers, zoobenthivores and oviparous species, although the biomass was dominated by estuarine species. Salinity had a stronger influence than temperature on the spatial pattern for all life stages, shallower and fresher waters are the preferred habitats of neonates and juveniles. During the breeding season (spring-summer), adults showed an intrusion into the inner part of RdP or to its adjacent nearshore waters from the offshore waters for spawning or mating, respectively. Variations in river discharge and wind patterns greatly affected the spatial extent of estuarine water, which ultimately influenced the domain of the main life-history stages (juveniles or adults) for both marine and estuarine fishes, as well as species and fish assemblage composition. The strong environmental gradient restricts some species and life-history stages to a particular section and defines three main fish assemblage areas. The composition of the fish assemblage is indicative of the recruitment of freshwater and marine species to the estuary in opposite ways, determined by the vertical stratification. Seasonal changes in the species composition were related to migration as a result of salinity and temperature variations and reproductive migrations to spawning and mating areas. This overview reveals that the RdP is under environmental variations that are likely to produce modifications to fish distribution and abundance that affect its fisheries. This context plus fish stock declines and changes in exploitation patterns could amplify the magnitude of the variations in the fisheries resources availability and affect the

  2. Fish diversity in the Río de la Plata and adjacent waters: an overview of environmental influences on its spatial and temporal structure.

    PubMed

    Jaureguizar, A J; Solari, A; Cortés, F; Milessi, A C; Militelli, M I; Camiolo, M D; Luz Clara, M; García, M

    2016-07-01

    The fish diversity and the main environmental factors affecting the spatial distribution of species, life history stages and community structure in the Río de la Plata (RdP) and adjacent waters are reviewed and analysed, with emphasis on the functional guild classification. The functional guild classification indicated that most species in the RdP were marine stragglers, zoobenthivores and oviparous species, although the biomass was dominated by estuarine species. Salinity had a stronger influence than temperature on the spatial pattern for all life stages, shallower and fresher waters are the preferred habitats of neonates and juveniles. During the breeding season (spring-summer), adults showed an intrusion into the inner part of RdP or to its adjacent nearshore waters from the offshore waters for spawning or mating, respectively. Variations in river discharge and wind patterns greatly affected the spatial extent of estuarine water, which ultimately influenced the domain of the main life-history stages (juveniles or adults) for both marine and estuarine fishes, as well as species and fish assemblage composition. The strong environmental gradient restricts some species and life-history stages to a particular section and defines three main fish assemblage areas. The composition of the fish assemblage is indicative of the recruitment of freshwater and marine species to the estuary in opposite ways, determined by the vertical stratification. Seasonal changes in the species composition were related to migration as a result of salinity and temperature variations and reproductive migrations to spawning and mating areas. This overview reveals that the RdP is under environmental variations that are likely to produce modifications to fish distribution and abundance that affect its fisheries. This context plus fish stock declines and changes in exploitation patterns could amplify the magnitude of the variations in the fisheries resources availability and affect the

  3. Retrograde amnesia and the volume of critical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, M D; Lasserson, D; Kingsley, D R; Bello, F; Rush, C; Stanhope, N; Stevens, T G; Goodman, G; Buckman, J R; Heilpern, G; Kendall, B E; Colchester, A C F

    2003-01-01

    There are many controversies concerning the structural basis of retrograde amnesia (RA). One view is that memories are held briefly within a medial temporal store ("hippocampal complex") before being "consolidated" or reorganised within temporal neocortex and/or networks more widely distributed within the cerebral cortex. An alternative view is that the medial temporal lobes are always involved in the storage and retrieval (reactivation) of autobiographical memories (multiple trace theory). The present study used quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 40 patients with focal pathology/volume loss in different sites, to examine the correlates of impairment on three different measures of RA. The findings supported the view that widespread neural networks are involved in the storage and retrieval of autobiographical and other remote memories. Brain volume measures in critical structures could account for 60% of variance on autobiographical memory measures (for incidents and facts) in diencephalic patients and for 60-68% of variance in patients with frontal lesions. Significant correlations with medial temporal lobe volume were found only in the diencephalic group, in whom they were thought to reflect thalamic changes, but not in patients with herpes encephalitis or hypoxia in whom the temporal lobes were particularly implicated. The latter finding fails to support one of the main predictions of multiple trace theory, as presently expounded. PMID:14750651

  4. Structures of the gauche conformers of somE substituted dimethyl ethers. Effect of adjacent atom lone pairs on methyl group asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, James E.; Altman, Michael; Cordell, Floyd R.; Dai, Yuanfang

    The complete equilibrium structures of CH 3OCH 3 and of the gauche conformers of CH 30CH 2F, HOCH,F, CH,OCH,Cl and CH,OCH,CN have been determined by ab initio gradient computation at the Hartree-Fock, double zeta-plus-polarization level. The very large asymmetries in CH bond distances previously reported from microwave substitution structures are shown to be non-existent in the equilibrium structures and are presumably artifacts. Small differences, different in direction from those reported from the experiments and nearly an order of magnitude smaller in size, do exist. They reflect three factors: (1) a lengthening of a CH bond which is trans to a lone pair on an adjacent atom, (2) a general shortening of CH bonds originating at a carbon atom bearing a highly electronegative substituent, and (3) a specific interaction in which a CX substituent shortens the nearly parallel CH bond on the other methyl group. The last interaction, not previously reported, is mediated by withdrawal of electron density from the oxygen lone pair which is trans to both groups. Other structural features derived from the microwave studies are supported by the new results. Inclusion of polarization functions in the basis set for oxygen is essential for correct determination of the COC angle and the dihedral angles. The dihedral angles of CH 3OCH 2F and HOCH 2F are not correctly determined by the computation even at this level, although the computed values are improved when d functions are used for oxygen and still more by use of two sets of oxygen d functions. Polarization functions on carbon or on fluorine have no effect on the computed torsional angles. There is no problem in computing the correct dihedral angles with the CI or CN derivatives.

  5. Magnetic structures of the low temperature phase of Mn3(VO4)2 - towards understanding magnetic ordering between adjacent Kagomé layers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Oliver; Rohrer, Jochen; Nénert, Gwilherm

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report on a detailed analysis of the magnetic structures of the magnetic phases of the low temperature (lt-) phase of Mn3(VO4)2 (=Mn3V2O8) with a Kagomé staircase structure determined by means of powder neutron diffraction. Two magnetic transitions were found at ∼25 K (HT1 phase, Cmc'a') and ∼17 K (LT1 phase, Pmc'a'), in excellent agreement with previous reports. The LT1 phase is characterized by commensurate magnetic ordering of the magnetic moments on two magnetic sites of the Mn1a/b (2a + 2d) and Mn2 (8i) ions of the nuclear structure (where for the latter site two different overall orientations of magnetic moments within the ab-plane (Mn2a and Mn2b) can be distinguished. This results in mainly antiferromagnetic interactions between edge-sharing Mn-octahedra within the Kagomé planes. The HT1 phase is characterised by strong spin frustration resulting from the loss of ordering of the magnetic moments of Mn2a/b ions along the b-axis. Both magnetic structures are in agreement with the previously reported ferrimagnetic properties of lt-Mn3(VO4)2 and shed light on the magnetic phase diagram of the compound reported previously. The magnetic structures are discussed with respect to superexchange interaction pathways within the Kagomé layers, which appear to be predominantly antiferromagnetic. The magnetic structures of Mn3(VO4)2 are different compared to those reported for Ni3(VO4)2 and Co3(VO4)2 and represent an unique commensurate way out of spin frustration for compounds with strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions within the Kagomé layers. Additionally, we derive a superexchange model, which will be called redox-mediated M-M(')(d(0))-M superexchange and which can help to understand the exclusively ferromagnetic ordering of adjacent Kagomé layers found only for lt-Mn3(VO4)2.

  6. Magnetic structures of the low temperature phase of Mn3(VO4)2 - towards understanding magnetic ordering between adjacent Kagomé layers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Oliver; Rohrer, Jochen; Nénert, Gwilherm

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report on a detailed analysis of the magnetic structures of the magnetic phases of the low temperature (lt-) phase of Mn3(VO4)2 (=Mn3V2O8) with a Kagomé staircase structure determined by means of powder neutron diffraction. Two magnetic transitions were found at ∼25 K (HT1 phase, Cmc'a') and ∼17 K (LT1 phase, Pmc'a'), in excellent agreement with previous reports. The LT1 phase is characterized by commensurate magnetic ordering of the magnetic moments on two magnetic sites of the Mn1a/b (2a + 2d) and Mn2 (8i) ions of the nuclear structure (where for the latter site two different overall orientations of magnetic moments within the ab-plane (Mn2a and Mn2b) can be distinguished. This results in mainly antiferromagnetic interactions between edge-sharing Mn-octahedra within the Kagomé planes. The HT1 phase is characterised by strong spin frustration resulting from the loss of ordering of the magnetic moments of Mn2a/b ions along the b-axis. Both magnetic structures are in agreement with the previously reported ferrimagnetic properties of lt-Mn3(VO4)2 and shed light on the magnetic phase diagram of the compound reported previously. The magnetic structures are discussed with respect to superexchange interaction pathways within the Kagomé layers, which appear to be predominantly antiferromagnetic. The magnetic structures of Mn3(VO4)2 are different compared to those reported for Ni3(VO4)2 and Co3(VO4)2 and represent an unique commensurate way out of spin frustration for compounds with strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions within the Kagomé layers. Additionally, we derive a superexchange model, which will be called redox-mediated M-M(')(d(0))-M superexchange and which can help to understand the exclusively ferromagnetic ordering of adjacent Kagomé layers found only for lt-Mn3(VO4)2. PMID:26585499

  7. Ectomycorrhizal Community Structure and Soil Characteristics of Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus Contorta) and Adjacent Stands of Old Growth Mixed Conifer in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Robert B.; Parker, V. Thomas; Cullings, Kenneth W.; Sun, Sidney (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Forest development patterns following disturbance are known to influence the physical and chemical attributes of soils at different points in time. Changes in soil resources are thought to have a corresponding effect on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community structure. We used molecular methods to compare below-ground ECM species richness, composition, and abundance between adjacent stands of homogenous lodgepole pine and old growth mixed conifer in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). In each stand-type we collected soil cores to both identify mycorrhizae and assess soil chemistry. Although no statistical difference was observed in the mean number of ECM root tips per core between stand types, the total number of species identified (85 versus 35) and the mean number of species per core (8.8 +/- 0.6 versus 2.5 +/- 0.3) were significantly higher in lodgepole pine. Differences between the actual and estimated species richness levels indicated that these forest types support a high number of ECM species and that undersampling was severe. Species compositions were widely disparate between stands where only four species were shared out of a total of 116. Soil analysis also revealed that mixed conifer was significantly lower in pH, but higher in organic matter, potassium, phosphorus, and ammonium when compared to lodgepole pine stands. Species richness per core was correlated with these chemical data, however, analysis of covariance indicated that stand type was the only statistically significant factor in the observed difference in species richness. Our data suggest that ECM fungal richness increases as homogenous lodgepole pine stands grow and mature, but declines after Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir colonize. Despite difficulties linking species composition with soil chemistry, there are a variety of physical and chemical factors that could be influencing ECM community structure. Future field experiments are necessary to test some of the mechanisms potentially operating

  8. Critical Structure for Telescopic Movement of Honey bee (Insecta: Apidae) Abdomen: Folded Intersegmental Membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jieliang; Yan, Shaoze; Wu, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    The folded intersegmental membrane is a structure that interconnects two adjacent abdominal segments; this structure is distributed in the segments of the honey bee abdomen. The morphology of the folded intersegmental membrane has already been documented. However, the ultrastructure of the intersegmental membrane and its assistive role in the telescopic movements of the honey bee abdomen are poorly understood. To explore the morphology and ultrastructure of the folded intersegmental membrane in the honey bee abdomen, frozen sections were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The intersegmental membrane between two adjacent terga has a Z-S configuration that greatly influences the daily physical activities of the honey bee abdomen. The dorsal intersegmental membrane is 2 times thicker than the ventral one, leading to asymmetric abdominal motion. Honey bee abdominal movements were recorded using a high-speed camera and through phase-contrast computed tomography. These movements conformed to the structural features of the folded intersegmental membrane. PMID:27456912

  9. Critical Structure for Telescopic Movement of Honey bee (Insecta: Apidae) Abdomen: Folded Intersegmental Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieliang; Yan, Shaoze; Wu, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    The folded intersegmental membrane is a structure that interconnects two adjacent abdominal segments; this structure is distributed in the segments of the honey bee abdomen. The morphology of the folded intersegmental membrane has already been documented. However, the ultrastructure of the intersegmental membrane and its assistive role in the telescopic movements of the honey bee abdomen are poorly understood. To explore the morphology and ultrastructure of the folded intersegmental membrane in the honey bee abdomen, frozen sections were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The intersegmental membrane between two adjacent terga has a Z–S configuration that greatly influences the daily physical activities of the honey bee abdomen. The dorsal intersegmental membrane is 2 times thicker than the ventral one, leading to asymmetric abdominal motion. Honey bee abdominal movements were recorded using a high-speed camera and through phase-contrast computed tomography. These movements conformed to the structural features of the folded intersegmental membrane. PMID:27456912

  10. Unraveling Structural Infrasound: understanding the science for persistent remote monitoring of critical infrastructure (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, S. M.; Diaz-Alvarez, H.; McComas, S.; Costley, D.; Whitlow, R. D.; Jordan, A. M.; Taylor, O.

    2013-12-01

    structural impact assessment. The Interstate-20 Mississippi River Bridge in Vicksburg, MS is a 7 span, cantilever bridge. On March 23, 2011, a barge moving downstream struck a pier of the bridge. Infrasound stations located approximately 4.5 km away detected the impact. Coincidentally, ERDC had instrumented the bridge with strain gages and accelerometers as part of a structural health monitoring project. Finite Element (FE) models were developed to investigate the structural behavior of the bridge due to the impact, with experimental data and FE models validating source mechanism of the infrasound from the bridge. Health assessment of large dams, whether for flood control or power generation, is critical for both civilian and military applications. Ambient excitations can induce measurable responses in the dam, adjacent foundation and in the reservoir, some of which are in the infrasound passband. The Portugues Dam outside of Ponce, Puerto Rico, is being investigated. Currently in the final stages of construction, infrasound array data collections over all four seasons before and after the opening of the dam will provide a seasonally variable database, begun in July 2013. Impulsive excitation using an instrumented Cold Gas thruster (CGT) instrumented with a dynamic force sensor induces transient frequency responses in the dam, reservoir, and along the dam-foundation interface below 20 Hz, to allow for controlled source validation.

  11. Critical ratios for structural analysis of triacylglycerols using mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments have finally allowed fragment behaviors using APCI-MS to be elucidated after twenty years of literature reports. Critical Ratios have been defined that correspond to various aspects of triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis, from overall degree of unsaturation to localization of fatty ac...

  12. Crust structure of the Northern Margin of North China Craton and adjacent region from Sinoprobe-02 North China seismic WAR/R experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gao, R.; Keller, G. R.; Li, Q.; Cox, C. M.; Hou, H.; Guan, Y.

    2011-12-01

    . The records were cut to 60s and reduced by 8 km/s. The initial velocity model began with a subhorizontal multilayer frame, in which the velocity was constructed and modified from adjacent deep seismic sounding sections for the profile, and the structure was constrained by the high-resolution deep seismic reflection stack section alone the same profile. The 2D ray-tracing program RAYINVR was used for forward modeling and inversion of travel times (Zelt, 1992), and VMED was used for creating and modifying velocity models. The travel time modeling was done using the top to bottom approach layer by layer. The velocity model was altered by trial and error, and travel times were calculated many times until the agreement between observed and calculated travel times were acceptable. Subsequently, the forward model was updated by damped least-squares inversion for the velocity and interface nodes. In our modeling, calculated travel times fit observed travel times for all trace with RMS of 0.1-0.2.The final velocity models derived for the profile reveals large variations both in structure and velocity. Supported by Sinoprobe-02 and US NSF PIRE grant (0730154)

  13. Major structural features of the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent according to lithosphere-scale 3D density and thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Y. P.; Olesen, O.; Ebbing, J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to analyse the regional configuration of the crystalline crust within the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent, a lithosphere-scale 3D structural model has been constructed in the frame of the Crustal Onshore-Offshore Project (COOP project). Construction of the 3D model has been done by use of recently published/released structural data. For upper part of the model, all available data were merged into the following layers: sea water, the Cenozoic, the Upper Cretaceous, the Lower Cretaceous, the Jurassic, the Triassic, the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt, Upper Permian clastics/carbonates and, finally, the Lower Permian-pre-Permian sedimentary rocks. Configuration of the crystalline crust and the Moho topography have been constrained by the published interpretations of deep seismic lines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary has been compiled from previously published data. To evaluate the deep structure of the crystalline crust, a 3D density modelling has been carried out by use of the software IGMAS+ (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). According to the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the study area consists of several layers. Within the upper crystalline crust, gabbro to anorthositic rocks have been included into the 3D model along the western coast of Norway. In addition, a low-density (2627 kg/m3) upper crustal layer is modelled beneath the Horda Platform. The next upper crustal layer is characterized by regional distribution and has a density of 2670 kg/m3. The modelled middle crust of the study area contains four layers with similar densities around 2700 kg/m3. The lower crust consists of three layers. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crustal layer (3060 kg/m3) which corresponds to the high-velocity layer. This layer thickens strongly beneath the Norwegian-Danish Basin and the eastern part of the East-Shetland platform. In addition to this high-density lower crustal layer, the

  14. Deep structure of the northern North Sea and adjacent areas according to regional-scale 3D density and thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Yuriy P.; Olesen, Odleiv; Ebbing, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    To analyse the regional configuration of the crystalline crust within the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent, a lithosphere-scale 3D structural model has been constructed in the frame of the Crustal Onshore-Offshore Project (COOP project). Construction of the 3D model has been carried out using recently published/released data. For upper part of the model, all available data were merged into the following layers: sea water, the Cenozoic, the Upper Cretaceous, the Lower Cretaceous, the Jurassic, the Triassic, the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt, Upper Permian clastics/carbonates and, finally, the Lower Permian-pre-Permian sedimentary rocks. Configuration of the crystalline crust and the Moho topography have been constrained by the published interpretations of deep seismic lines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary has been compiled from previously published data. To evaluate the internal structure of the crystalline crust, a 3D density modelling has been carried out by use of the software IGMAS+ (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). According to the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the study area consists of several layers. Within the upper crystalline crust, gabbro to anorthositic rocks have been included into the 3D model along the western coast of Norway. In addition, a low-density (2627 kg/m3) upper crustal layer is modelled beneath the Horda Platform. The next upper crustal layer is characterized by regional distribution and has a density of 2670 kg/m3. The modelled middle crust of the study area contains four layers with similar densities around 2700 kg/m3. The lower crust consists of three layers. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crustal layer (3060 kg/m3) which corresponds to the high-velocity layer. This layer thickens strongly beneath the Norwegian-Danish Basin and the eastern part of the East-Shetland platform. The obtained Moho is strongly uplifted beneath the Central and Viking

  15. Structural biological materials: critical mechanics-materials connections.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marc André; McKittrick, Joanna; Chen, Po-Yu

    2013-02-15

    Spider silk is extraordinarily strong, mollusk shells and bone are tough, and porcupine quills and feathers resist buckling. How are these notable properties achieved? The building blocks of the materials listed above are primarily minerals and biopolymers, mostly in combination; the first weak in tension and the second weak in compression. The intricate and ingenious hierarchical structures are responsible for the outstanding performance of each material. Toughness is conferred by the presence of controlled interfacial features (friction, hydrogen bonds, chain straightening and stretching); buckling resistance can be achieved by filling a slender column with a lightweight foam. Here, we present and interpret selected examples of these and other biological materials. Structural bio-inspired materials design makes use of the biological structures by inserting synthetic materials and processes that augment the structures' capability while retaining their essential features. In this Review, we explain this idea through some unusual concepts. PMID:23413348

  16. Critical requirements for the design of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements for the design of a large space structure which will be deployed, erected, assembled or fabricated in space are delineated in terms of operational loads, stiffness requirements, structure-control interaction, deformations, precision requirements and member slenderness. Design examples for a truss antenna reflector, interorbit propulsion loads and free-flying solar reflectors are given. It is concluded that the demand for dimensional accuracy and stability form the primary requirements.

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  18. Structural health monitoring of materials by high critical temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, M.; Ruosi, A.; Peluso, G.; Pepe, G. P.

    2002-08-01

    Nowadays, tailoring the material properties is essential for advanced product design in engineering systems. The need to provide key information about micro- and macro-structural behaviour of materials, without destructively sectioning the sample, has spurred the development of nondestructive evaluation methodologies. These techniques are required during material production, quality testing of components during manufacturing, and in-service inspection of structural integrity. To ensure the highest possible operational safety along with an economic efficiency, it is necessary to carry out inspections with a high sensitivity and a proven reliability. Due to its unparalleled magnetic field sensitivity over a wide frequency range and large dynamic range, SQUID-based nondestructive evaluation has unique advantages for materials and structures characterization. We will present an overview of eddy-current nondestructive analysis utilizing high Tc SQUIDs with an emphasis on examples relevant to the aeronautical industry. These include the detection of deep-lying defects in multi-layer structures of Al-Ti alloys and damage of extremely lightweight graphite/epoxy composites. Both of these can be successfully treated by this approach where conventional electromagnetic probes often fail. In addition some results based on the volume integral formulation, successfully developed to simulate the response of the system to different type of flaws in Al-alloy planar structures and to solve the inverse electromagnetic problem, will be shown.

  19. Timing the structural events in the Palaeoproterozoic Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane and adjacent Maluwe basin, West African craton, in central-west Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Théveniaut, H.; Botha, P. M. W.; Gyapong, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Maluwe basin, north-adjacent to the Sunyani basin, is the northernmost of the northeast-trending Eburnean volcaniclastic depositories in Ghana. These basins are separated from one another by remnants of Eoeburnean crust, all formed during the evolution of an arc-backarc basins complex in a Palaeoproterozoic intraoceanic environment. The Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane to the northwest, of mostly Eoeburnean crust is fault bounded with the Maluwe basin along the northeast-trending Bolé-Navrongo fault zone. The stratigraphic sequence, which was the key to unravelling the structural evolution of the study area, was established by means of field observations aided by precision SHRIMP geochronology. The quartzitic, pelitic, quartzofeldspathic and granitic gneisses of the Eoeburnean crust (>2150 Ma) experienced complex metamorphic mineral growth and migmatitization, mostly under static crustal conditions and were subjected to several deformation episodes. The foliated mafic and metasedimentary enclaves within the Ifanteyire granite establish deformation to have taken place prior to ˜2195 Ma, while the tectonically emplaced Kuri amphibolites within the 2187-Ma gneissic Gondo granite indicate a stage of rifting followed by collision. Deformation of granite dykes in the Gondo granites at ˜2150 Ma concluded the development of the Eoeburnean orogenic cycle (DEE). The Sawla Suite, contemporaneous with the deposition of the Maluwe Group, intruded the tectonic exhumed Bolé-Nangodi terrane during extension between ˜2137 and 2125 Ma. The rifting separated the Abulembire fragment from the Bolé-Nangodi terrane. During subsequent northwestward subduction of young back-arc basin oceanic crust the volcaniclastic strata of the Maluwe Group and Sawla granitoids were deformed (DE1) under chlorite/sericite greenschist-grade conditions. The NE-trending folds had subhorizontal axes and subvertical axial planes. Simultaneous to the DE1 orogenesis the molasses of the Banda Group was

  20. Critical Experience Amidst Bureaucratic Structures: Interdisciplinary Dialogue on Educational Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Robin; Crawford, Jeffrey

    The public schools of today are pictured as rigid bureaucratic structures, unresponsive to dynamic change, and stultifying to individual initiative and growth. A discussion is presented on the future needs of education that will meet expanding demands for greater freedom for the individual in a democracy to make intelligent decisions. Proposals…

  1. A critical review of social and structural conditions that influence HIV risk among Mexican deportees

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexican migrants who are deported from the US may be at elevated risk for HIV infection. Deportations of Mexican migrants by the US have reached record numbers. We critically reviewed existing literature to assess how social and structural conditions in post-deportation settings can influence Mexican deported migrants' HIV risk. We also identify critical research gaps and make research recommendations. PMID:24583278

  2. Structured Case Analysis: Developing Critical Thinking Skills in a Marketing Case Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebba, Joanne M.; Hamilton, Janet G.

    2007-01-01

    Structured case analysis is a hybrid pedagogy that flexibly combines diverse instructional methods with comprehensive case analysis as a mechanism to develop critical thinking skills. An incremental learning framework is proposed that allows instructors to develop and monitor content-specific theory and the corresponding critical thinking skills.…

  3. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  4. The Emergent Structure of Feeling: What Does It Mean for Critical Educational Studies and Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Gale, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Critical research in education is not what it used to be. It must now engage with a differently structured and globalized world with different social and material conditions for its peoples. This paper sets out to name the contemporary structure of feeling in which education researchers now work, particularly in terms of what now is to be the…

  5. Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas; Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New

  6. Amorphization of biperiodic domain structures in quasi-uniaxial magnetic films with a critical thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzamastseva, G. V.; Evtikhov, M. G.; Lisovskiĭ, F. V.; Mansvetova, E. G.; Temiryazeva, M. P.

    2008-08-01

    The behavior of biperiodic stripe domain structures in quasi-uniaxial magnetic films with a near-critical thickness is studied by scanning magnetic force microscopy and magnetooptical diffraction. In these films, antiphase and hybrid biperiodic domain structures are found to be absent, and the phase transitions between monoperiodic and in-phase biperiodic domain structures are shown to proceed through two-dimensional domain arrays that are amorphized in the arrangement of near-surface distortions in the domain-wall profile.

  7. Critical contacts between HIV-1 integrase and viral DNA identified by structure-based analysis and photo-crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, T M; Esposito, D; Engelman, A; Craigie, R

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of HIV-1 integrase reveals a cluster of lysine residues near the active site. Using site-directed mutagenesis and photo-crosslinking we find that Lys156 and Lys159 are critical for the functional interaction of integrase with viral DNA. Mutation of Lys156 or Lys159 to glutamate led to a loss of both 3' processing and strand transfer activities in vitro while maintaining the ability to interact with nonspecific DNA and support disintegration. However, mutation of both residues to glutamate produced a synergistic effect eliminating nearly all nonspecific DNA interaction and disintegration activity. In addition, virus containing either of these changes was replication-defective at the step of integration. Photo-crosslinking, using 5-iododeoxyuracil-substituted oligonucleotides, suggests that Lys159 interacts at the N7 position of the conserved deoxyadenosine adjacent to the scissile phosphodiester bond of viral DNA. Sequence conservation throughout retroviral integrases and certain bacterial transposases (e.g. Tn10/IS10) supports the premise that within those families of polynucleotidyl transferases, these residues are strategic for DNA interaction. PMID:9362498

  8. THE STRUCTURE OF GAS-ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS AND THE CONDITION OF THE CRITICAL CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2013-03-01

    In the core accretion model for the formation of gas giant planets, runaway gas accretion onto a core is the primary requisite, triggered when the core mass reaches a critical value. The recently revealed wide diversity of the extrasolar giant planets suggests the necessity to further the understanding of the conditions resulting in the critical core mass that initiates runaway accretion. We study the internal structure of protoplanets under hydrostatic and thermal equilibria represented in terms of a polytropic equation of state to investigate what factors determine and affect the critical core mass. We find that the protoplanets, embedded in protoplanetary disks, have the same configuration as red giants, characterized by the envelope of the centrally condensed type solution. Applying the theory of stellar structure with homology invariants, we demonstrate that there are three types of criteria for the critical core mass depending on the stiffness of polytrope and the nature of outer boundary condition. For the stiff polytropes of index N {<=} 3 with the Bondi radius as the outer boundary, the criterion governing the critical core mass occurs at the surface. For stiff polytropes with the Hill outer boundary and for soft polytropes of N > 3, this criterion acts at the bottom of gaseous envelope. Further, we elucidate the roles and effects of coexistent radiative and convective zones in the envelope of critical core mass. Based on the results, we discuss the relevance of Bondi and Hill surface conditions and explore the parameter dependences of critical core mass.

  9. A Structured Security Assessment Methodology for Manufacturers of Critical Infrastructure Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstetter, Thomas; Knorr, Konstantin; Rosenbaum, Ute

    Protecting our critical infrastructures like energy generation and distribution, telecommunication, production and traffic against cyber attacks is one of the major challenges of the new millennium. However, as security is such a complex and multilayer topic often the necessary structured foundation is missing for a manufacturer to assess the current security level of a system. This paper introduces a methodology for structured security assessments which has been successfully applied during the development of several products for critical infrastructures. The methodology is described in detail and the lessons learnt are given from applying it to several systems during their development.

  10. Critical classroom structures for empowering students to participate in science discourse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleau, Shelly N.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2013-01-01

    We compared contextual characteristics that impacted the nature and substance of "summarizing discussions" in a physics and a chemistry classroom in an Hispanic-serving urban high school. Specifically, we evaluated structural components of curricula and classrooms necessary to develop a culture of critical inquiry. Using the Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum in the physics course, we found that students demonstrated critical thinking, critical evaluation, and used laboratory evidence to support ideas in whole-class summarizing discussions. We then implemented a model similar to PET in the chemistry course. However, chemistry students' statements lacked evidence, opposition and critical evaluation, and required greater teacher facilitation. We hypothesize that the designed laboratories and the research basis of PET influenced the extent to which physics students verbalized substantive scientific thought, authentic appeals to evidence, and a sense of empowerment to participate in the classroom scientific community.

  11. Organization of the Rosy Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Further Evidence in Support of a CIS-Acting Control Element Adjacent to the Xanthine Dehydrogenase Structural Element

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Chovnick, A.; Bhullar, B. S.; Hewitt, J.; Candido, E. P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present report summarizes our recent progress in the genetic dissection of an elementary genetic unit in a higher organism, the rosy locus (ry:3–52.0) in Drosophila melanogaster. Pursuing the hypothesis that the rosy locus includes a noncoding control region, as well as a structural element coding for the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) peptide, experiments are described that characterize and map a rosy locus variant associated with much lower than normal levels of XDH activity. Experiments are described that fail to relate this phenotype to alteration in the structure of the XDH peptide, but clearly associate this character with variation in number of molecules of XDH per fly. Large-scale fine-structure recombination experiments locate the genetic basis for this variation in the number of molecules of XDH per fly to a site immediately to the left of the XDH structural element within a region previously designated as the XDH control element. Moreover, experiments clearly separate this "underproducer" variant site from a previously described "overproducer" site within the control region. Examination of enzyme activity in electrophoretic gels of appropriate heterozygous genotypes demonstrates the cis-acting nature of this variation in the number of molecules of XDH. A revision of the map of the rosy locus, structural and control elements is presented in light of the additional mapping data now available. PMID:109351

  12. Re-examining the factor structure of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory.

    PubMed

    Kakai, Hisako

    2003-04-01

    This study re-examined the factor structure of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory developed by Facione and colleagues. Analysis showed that the four factors had some cross-validity with four factors in Walsh and Hardy's 1997 study. The results suggest the possibility of developing a more efficient short version of the inventory and calls for further improvement.

  13. Judgments of Information Structure in L2 French: Nativelike Performance and the Critical Period Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichle, Robert V.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies using judgments of morphosyntactic errors have shown mixed evidence for a critical period for L2 acquisition (e.g., Birdsong & Molis, Journal of Memory and Language 44: 235-249, 2001, Johnson & Newport, Cognitive Psychology 21: 60-99, 1989). This study uses anomalies in the domain of information structure, the interface between…

  14. Critical Multimodal Literacy: How Nigerian Female Students Critique Texts and Reconstruct Unequal Social Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates how three female Nigerian high school students were taught to deploy critical multimodal literacy to interrogate texts and reconstruct unequal social structures. A class of ninth-grade students in an all-women school was given instruction through the analysis of how multiple modes were used to represent meanings in…

  15. Atomic and Molecular Structure in Chemical Education: A Critical Analysis from Various Perspectives of Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    1997-01-01

    Provides a critical analysis of the role that atomic theory plays in the science curriculum from elementary through secondary school. Examines structural concepts from the perspective of the theory of meaningful learning, information processing theory, and the alternative conceptions movement. Contains 54 references. (DDR)

  16. Radiation Doses to Structures Within and Adjacent to the Larynx are Correlated With Long-Term Diet- and Speech-Related Quality of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Dornfeld, Ken . E-mail: kenneth-dornfeld@uiowa.edu; Simmons, Joel R.; Karnell, Lucy; Karnell, Michael; Funk, Gerry; Yao Min; Wacha, Judith; Zimmerman, Bridget; Buatti, John M.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that radiation dose to key sites in the upper aerodigestive tract is associated with long-term functional outcome after (chemo)radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: This study examined the outcome for 27 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for definitive management of their head-and-neck cancer who were disease free for at least 1 year after treatment. Head-and-neck cancer-specific quality of life (QoL) was assessed before treatment and at 1 year after treatment. Type of diet tolerated, presence of a feeding tube, and degree of weight loss 1 year after treatment were also used as outcome measures. Radiation doses delivered to various points along the upper aerodigestive tract, including base of tongue, lateral pharyngeal walls, and laryngeal structures, were determined from each treatment plan. Radiation doses for each of these points were tested for correlation with outcome measures. Results: Higher doses delivered to the aryepiglottic folds, false vocal cords, and lateral pharyngeal walls near the false cords correlated with a more restrictive diet, and higher doses to the aryepiglottic folds correlated with greater weight loss (p < 0.05) 1 year after therapy. Better posttreatment speech QoL scores were associated with lower doses delivered to structures within and surrounding the larynx. Conclusion: Our data show an inverse relationship between radiation dose delivered to laryngeal structures and speech and diet and QoL outcomes after definitive (chemo)radiation treatment. These findings suggest that efforts to deliver lower doses to laryngeal structures may improve outcomes after definitive (chemo)radiation therapy.

  17. Structural analysis of terrane accretions in the eastern Brooks Range and adjacent areas in central Alaska and Canada. Technical progress report No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Coney, P.J.; Harms, T.A.

    1985-03-14

    Work on radiolarian separation and identification of samples from the Sylvester Allochthon is nearing completion. A preliminary chronostratigraphic chart showing the age range and lithologic type of all dated units has been drawn. The comparative petrography of lithologies from the Sylvester Allochthon and the Angayucham and Mosquito Terranes, and from deformed clastic rocks of the Venetie Terrane is being studied. Several preliminary structure sections have been drawn across the Sylvester Terrane. (ACR)

  18. Wireless structural health monitoring for critical members of civil infrastructures using piezoelectric active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Yun, Chung-Bang; Inman, Daniel J.; Park, Gyuhae

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents several challenging issues on wireless structural health monitoring techniques for critical members of civil infrastructures using piezoelectric active sensors. The basic concept of the techniques is to monitor remotely the structural integrity by observing the impedance variations at the piezoelectric active sensors distributed to critical members of a host structure. An active sensing node incorporating on-board microprocessor and radio frequency telemetry is introduced in a sense of tailoring wireless sensing technology to the impedance method. A data compression algorithm using principal component analysis is embedded into the on-board chip of the active sensing node. The data compression algorithm would promote efficiency in terms of both power management and noise elimination of the active sensor node. Finally, a piezoelectric sensor self-diagnosis issue is touched introducing a new impedance model equation that incorporates the effects of sensor and bonding defects.

  19. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M.; Ishii, K.; Kuo, W. L.; Piper, M.; Connolly, A.; Shi, Y. P.; Wu, R.; Lin, C. C.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. RESULTS: Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating

  20. Brazed Joints Design and Allowables: Discuss Margins of Safety in Critical Brazed Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    FLom, Yury

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation tutorial discusses margins of safety in critical brazed structures. It reviews: (1) the present situation (2) definition of strength (3) margins of safety (4) design allowables (5) mechanical testing (6) failure criteria (7) design flowchart (8) braze gap (9) residual stresses and (10) delayed failures. This presentation addresses the strength of the brazed joints, the methods of mechanical testing, and our ability to evaluate the margins of safety of the brazed joints as it applies to the design of critical and expensive brazed assemblies.

  1. Crustal structure of the eastern Algerian continental margin and adjacent deep basin: implications for late Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyahiaoui, B.; Sage, F.; Abtout, A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Yelles-Chaouche, K.; Schnürle, P.; Marok, A.; Déverchère, J.; Arab, M.; Galve, A.; Collot, J. Y.

    2015-06-01

    We determine the deep structure of the eastern Algerian basin and its southern margin in the Annaba region (easternmost Algeria), to better constrain the plate kinematic reconstruction in this region. This study is based on new geophysical data collected during the SPIRAL cruise in 2009, which included a wide-angle, 240-km-long, onshore-offshore seismic profile, multichannel seismic reflection lines and gravity and magnetic data, complemented by the available geophysical data for the study area. The analysis and modelling of the wide-angle seismic data including refracted and reflected arrival travel times, and integrated with the multichannel seismic reflection lines, reveal the detailed structure of an ocean-to-continent transition. In the deep basin, there is an ˜5.5-km-thick oceanic crust that is composed of two layers. The upper layer of the crust is defined by a high velocity gradient and P-wave velocities between 4.8 and 6.0 km s-1, from the top to the bottom. The lower crust is defined by a lower velocity gradient and P-wave velocity between 6.0 and 7.1 km s-1. The Poisson ratio in the lower crust deduced from S-wave modelling is 0.28, which indicates that the lower crust is composed mainly of gabbros. Below the continental edge, a typical continental crust with P-wave velocities between 5.2 and 7.0 km s-1, from the top to the bottom, shows a gradual seaward thinning of ˜15 km over an ˜35-km distance. This thinning is regularly distributed between the upper and lower crusts, and it characterizes a rifted margin, which has resulted from backarc extension at the rear of the Kabylian block, here represented by the Edough Massif at the shoreline. Above the continental basement, an ˜2-km-thick, pre-Messinian sediment layer with a complex internal structure is interpreted as allochthonous nappes of flysch backthrusted on the margin during the collision of Kabylia with the African margin. The crustal structure, moreover, provides evidence for Miocene

  2. Evaluating upper versus lower crustal extension through structural reconstructions and subsidence analysis of basins adjacent to the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz, Guy; Mann, Paul

    2013-06-01

    The D'Entrecasteaux Island (DEI) gneiss domes are fault-bounded domes with ~2.5 km of relief exposing ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) and high-pressure (HP) metamorphic gneisses and migmatites exhumed in an Oligocene-Miocene arc-continent collision and subduction zone subject to late Miocene to recent continental extension. Multichannel seismic reflection data and well data show the Trobriand basin formed as a fore-arc basin caused by southward Miocene subduction at the Trobriand trench. Subduction slowed at ~8 Ma as the margin transitioned to an extensional tectonic environment. Since then, the Trobriand basin has subsided 1-2.5 km as a broad sag basin with few normal faults deforming the basin fill. South of the DEI, the Goodenough rift basin developed after extension began (~8 Ma) as the hanging wall of the north-dipping Owen-Stanley normal fault that bounds the basin's southern margin. The lack of upper crustal extension accompanying subsidence in the Trobriand and Goodenough basins suggests depth-dependent lithospheric extension since 8 Ma has accompanied uplift of the DEI gneiss domes. Structural reconstructions of seismic profiles show 2.3-13.4 km of basin extension in the upper crust, while syn-rift basin subsidence values indicate at least 20.7-23.6 km of extension occurred in the entire crust since ~8 Ma. Results indicating thinning is preferentially accommodated in the lower crust surrounding the DEI are used to constrain a schematic model of uplift of the DEI domes involving vertical exhumation of buoyant, postorogenic lower crust, far-field extension from slab rollback, and an inverted two-layer crustal density structure.

  3. Stress Analysis of B-52B and B-52H Air-Launching Systems Failure-Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2005-01-01

    The operational life analysis of any airborne failure-critical structural component requires the stress-load equation, which relates the applied load to the maximum tangential tensile stress at the critical stress point. The failure-critical structural components identified are the B-52B Pegasus pylon adapter shackles, B-52B Pegasus pylon hooks, B-52H airplane pylon hooks, B-52H airplane front fittings, B-52H airplane rear pylon fitting, and the B-52H airplane pylon lower sway brace. Finite-element stress analysis was performed on the said structural components, and the critical stress point was located and the stress-load equation was established for each failure-critical structural component. The ultimate load, yield load, and proof load needed for operational life analysis were established for each failure-critical structural component.

  4. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system.

  5. Phylogeographic Structure of a Tethyan Relict Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae) Traces Pleistocene Geologic and Climatic Changes in the Western Himalayas, Tianshan Mountains, and Adjacent Desert Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ming-Li; Yin, Lin-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Complex geological movements more or less affected or changed floristic structures, while the alternation of glacials and interglacials is presumed to have further shaped the present discontinuous genetic pattern of temperate plants. Here we consider Capparis spinosa, a xeromorphic Tethyan relict, to discuss its divergence pattern and explore how it responded in a stepwise fashion to Pleistocene geologic and climatic changes. 267 individuals from 31 populations were sampled and 24 haplotypes were identified, based on three cpDNA fragments (trnL-trnF, rps12-rpl20, and ndhF). SAMOVA clustered the 31 populations into 5 major clades. AMOVA suggests that gene flow between them might be restricted by vicariance. Molecular clock dating indicates that intraspecific divergence began in early Pleistocene, consistent with a time of intense uplift of the Himalaya and Tianshan Mountains, and intensified in mid-Pleistocene. Species distribution modeling suggests range reduction in the high mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of cold climates when glacier advanced, while gorges at midelevations in Tianshan appear to have served as refugia. Populations of low-altitude desert regions, on the other hand, probably experienced only marginal impacts from glaciation, according to the high levels of genetic diversity.

  6. Genetic structure of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) in northern Japan and adjacent regions revealed by nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mineaki; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kawahara, Takayuki; Sugita, Hisashi; Saito, Hideyuki; Sabirov, Renat N

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) was studied across the natural range of the species, including two small isolated populations in south Sakhalin and Hayachine, by using six microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial gene sequences. We also analyzed P. jezoensis, a sympatric spruce in the range. Genetic diversity of P. glehnii was higher in central Hokkaido and the lowest in the Hayachine. Bayesian clustering and principal coordinate analysis by using the microsatellites indicated that the Hayachine was clearly distinct from other populations, implying that it had undergone strong genetic drift since the last glacial period. P. glehnii harbored four mitochondrial haplotypes, two of which were shared with P. jezoensis. One of the two was observed without geographical concentration, suggesting its derivation from ancestral polymorphism. Another was observed in south Sakhalin and in P. jezoensis across Sakhalin. The Bayesian clustering--by using four microsatellite loci, including P. jezoensis populations--indicated unambiguous species delimitation, but with possible admixture of P. jezoensis genes into P. glehnii in south Sakhalin, where P. glehnii is abundantly overwhelmed by P. jezoensis; this might explain the occurrence of introgression of the haplotype of P. jezoensis into P. glehnii.

  7. Phylogeographic Structure of a Tethyan Relict Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae) Traces Pleistocene Geologic and Climatic Changes in the Western Himalayas, Tianshan Mountains, and Adjacent Desert Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ming-Li; Yin, Lin-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Complex geological movements more or less affected or changed floristic structures, while the alternation of glacials and interglacials is presumed to have further shaped the present discontinuous genetic pattern of temperate plants. Here we consider Capparis spinosa, a xeromorphic Tethyan relict, to discuss its divergence pattern and explore how it responded in a stepwise fashion to Pleistocene geologic and climatic changes. 267 individuals from 31 populations were sampled and 24 haplotypes were identified, based on three cpDNA fragments (trnL-trnF, rps12-rpl20, and ndhF). SAMOVA clustered the 31 populations into 5 major clades. AMOVA suggests that gene flow between them might be restricted by vicariance. Molecular clock dating indicates that intraspecific divergence began in early Pleistocene, consistent with a time of intense uplift of the Himalaya and Tianshan Mountains, and intensified in mid-Pleistocene. Species distribution modeling suggests range reduction in the high mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of cold climates when glacier advanced, while gorges at midelevations in Tianshan appear to have served as refugia. Populations of low-altitude desert regions, on the other hand, probably experienced only marginal impacts from glaciation, according to the high levels of genetic diversity. PMID:27314028

  8. Phylogeographic Structure of a Tethyan Relict Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae) Traces Pleistocene Geologic and Climatic Changes in the Western Himalayas, Tianshan Mountains, and Adjacent Desert Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ming-Li; Yin, Lin-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Complex geological movements more or less affected or changed floristic structures, while the alternation of glacials and interglacials is presumed to have further shaped the present discontinuous genetic pattern of temperate plants. Here we consider Capparis spinosa, a xeromorphic Tethyan relict, to discuss its divergence pattern and explore how it responded in a stepwise fashion to Pleistocene geologic and climatic changes. 267 individuals from 31 populations were sampled and 24 haplotypes were identified, based on three cpDNA fragments (trnL-trnF, rps12-rpl20, and ndhF). SAMOVA clustered the 31 populations into 5 major clades. AMOVA suggests that gene flow between them might be restricted by vicariance. Molecular clock dating indicates that intraspecific divergence began in early Pleistocene, consistent with a time of intense uplift of the Himalaya and Tianshan Mountains, and intensified in mid-Pleistocene. Species distribution modeling suggests range reduction in the high mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of cold climates when glacier advanced, while gorges at midelevations in Tianshan appear to have served as refugia. Populations of low-altitude desert regions, on the other hand, probably experienced only marginal impacts from glaciation, according to the high levels of genetic diversity. PMID:27314028

  9. Geochemical insight into differences in the physical structures and dynamics of two adjacent maar lakes at Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Nicolosi, M.; Nuccio, P. M.; Favara, R.; Paternoster, M.; Rosciglione, A.

    2013-05-01

    report on the first geochemical investigation of the Monticchio maar lakes (Mt. Vulture volcano, southern Italy) covering an annual cycle that aimed at understanding the characteristic features of the physical structures and dynamics of the two lakes. We provide the first detailed description of the lakes based on high-resolution conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, chemical and isotopic (H and O) compositions of the water, and the amounts of dissolved gases (e.g., He, Ar, CH4, and CO2). The combined data set reveals that the two lakes, which are separated by less than 200 m, exhibit different dynamics: one is a meromictic lake, where the waters are rich in biogenic and mantle-derived gases, while the other is a monomictic lake, which exhibits complete turnover of the water in winter and the release of dissolved gases. Our data strongly suggest that the differences in the dynamics of the two lakes are due to different density profiles affected by dissolved solutes, mainly Fe, which is strongly enriched in the deep water of the meromictic lake. A conceptual model of water balance was constructed based on the correlation between the chemical composition of the water and the hydrogen isotopic signature. Gas-rich groundwaters that feed both of the lakes and evaporation processes subsequently modify the water chemistry of the lakes. Our data highlight that no further potential hazardous accumulation of lethal gases is expected at the Monticchio lakes. Nevertheless, geochemical monitoring is needed to prevent the possibility of vigorous gas releases that have previously occurred in historical time.

  10. Microtraps for neutral atoms using superconducting structures in the critical state

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, A.; Brune, M.; Raimond, J.-M.; Nogues, G.; Lupascu, A.; Haroche, S.

    2009-12-15

    Recently demonstrated superconducting atom chips provide a platform for trapping atoms and coupling them to solid-state quantum systems. Controlling these devices requires a full understanding of the supercurrent distribution in the trapping structures. For type-II superconductors, this distribution is hysteretic in the critical state due to the partial penetration of the magnetic field in the thin superconducting film through pinned vortices. We report here an experimental observation of this memory effect. Our results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Bean model of the critical state without adjustable parameters. The memory effect allows to write and store permanent currents in micron-sized superconducting structures and paves the way toward engineered trapping potentials.

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  12. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  13. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins.

  14. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins. PMID:27321477

  15. Band structure and itinerant magnetism in quantum critical NbFe2

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, A. P.; Singh, David J

    2010-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations of the band structure and magnetic ordering in the C14 Laves phase compound NbFe{sub 2}. The magnetism is itinerant in the sense that the moments are highly dependent on ordering. We find an overestimation of the magnetic tendency within the local spin-density approximation, similar to other metals near magnetic quantum critical points. We also find a competition between different magnetic states due to band-structure effects. These lead to competing magnetic tendencies due to competing interlayer interactions, one favoring a ferrimagnetic solution and the other an antiferromagnetic state. While the structure contains Kagome lattice sheets, which could, in principle, lead to strong magnetic frustration, the calculations do not show dominant nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions within these sheets. These results are discussed in relation to experimental observations.

  16. Methods for forewarning of critical condition changes in monitoring civil structures

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Robert K.; Hively, Lee M.

    2013-04-02

    Sensor modules (12) including accelerometers (20) are placed on a physical structure (10) and tri-axial accelerometer data is converted to mechanical power (P) data (41) which then processed to provide a forewarning (57) of a critical event concerning the physical structure (10). The forewarning is based on a number of occurrences of a composite measure of dissimilarity (C.sub.i) exceeding a forewarning threshold over a defined sampling time; and a forewarning signal (58) is provided to a human observer through a visual, audible or tangible signal. A forewarning of a structural failure can also be provided based on a number of occurrences of (C.sub.i) above a failure value threshold.

  17. Critical evaluation on structural stiffness of porous cellular structure of cobalt chromium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Malek, N. M. S.; Mohamed, S. R.; Che Ghani, S. A.; Harun, W. S. Wan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the stiffness characteristics of orthopedic devices implants that mimic the mechanical behavior of bone need to be considered. With the capability of Additive layer manufacturing processes to produce orthopedic implants with tailored mechanical properties are needed. This paper discusses finite element (FE) analysis and mechanical characterization of porous medical grade cobalt chromium (CoCr) alloy in cubical structures with volume based porosity ranging between 60% to 80% produced using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process. ANSYS 14.0 FE modelling software was used to predict the effective elastic modulus of the samples and comparisons were made with the experimental data. The effective mechanical properties of porous samples that were determined by uniaxial compression testing show exponential decreasing trend with the increase in porosity. Finite element model shows good agreement with experimentally obtained stress-strain curve in the elastic regions. The models prove that numerical analysis of actual prosthesis implant can be computed particularly in load bearing condition

  18. Critical behavior and magnetocaloric effect in layered structure Tb2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    The critical behavior and magnetocaloric effects of the layered structure Tb2C have been investigated using magnetization measurements around the Curie temperature. Analyzing temperature and field dependence of magnetization reveals that the Tb2C system undergoes a second-order magnetic phase transition at T C  =  266 K. Critical exponents obtained from modified Arrott, Kouvel–Fisher (KF) and scaling plots are consistent with each other. The critical exponents suggest that the magnetic phase transition in Tb2C can be described by the mean-field model. The exchange energy declines as J(r) ~ r ‑4.547, indicating that long-range interaction dominates the exchange interaction. Consequently, the field dependence magnetic entropy change (ΔS M) of Tb2C, calculated using the Maxwell relation, clearly demonstrates that the relationship between  ‑ΔS M and (H/T C)2/3 obeys the mean-field theory, supporting our conclusion of the ferromagnetism phase transition in Tb2C following the mean-field theory.

  19. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system. PMID:25730830

  20. Characterization of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures in the offshore Santa Maria Basin, south-central California: Chapter CC of Evolution of sedimentary basins/onshore oil and gas investigations - Santa Maria province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willingham, C. Richard; Rietman, Jan D.; Heck, Ronald G.; Lettis, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The Hosgri Fault Zone trends subparallel to the south-central California coast for 110 km from north of Point Estero to south of Purisima Point and forms the eastern margin of the present offshore Santa Maria Basin. Knowledge of the attributes of the Hosgri Fault Zone is important for petroleum development, seismic engineering, and environmental planning in the region. Because it lies offshore along its entire reach, our characterizations of the Hosgri Fault Zone and adjacent structures are primarily based on the analysis of over 10,000 km of common-depth-point marine seismic reflection data collected from a 5,000-km2 area of the central and eastern parts of the offshore Santa Maria Basin. We describe and illustrate the along-strike and downdip geometry of the Hosgri Fault Zone over its entire length and provide examples of interpreted seismic reflection records and a map of the structural trends of the fault zone and adjacent structures in the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. The seismic data are integrated with offshore well and seafloor geologic data to describe the age and seismic appearance of offshore geologic units and marker horizons. We develop a basin-wide seismic velocity model for depth conversions and map three major unconformities along the eastern offshore Santa Maria Basin. Accompanying plates include maps that are also presented as figures in the report. Appendix A provides microfossil data from selected wells and appendix B includes uninterpreted copies of the annotated seismic record sections illustrated in the chapter. Features of the Hosgri Fault Zone documented in this investigation are suggestive of both lateral and reverse slip. Characteristics indicative of lateral slip include (1) the linear to curvilinear character of the mapped trace of the fault zone, (2) changes in structural trend along and across the fault zone that diminish in magnitude toward the ends of the fault zone, (3) localized compressional and extensional structures

  1. Intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction between adjacent phenanthroline molecules in complexes with rare-earth nitrates: Crystal and molecular structures of bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratoytterbium and bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)trinitratolanthanum

    SciTech Connect

    Sadikov, G. G. Antsyshkina, A. S.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2009-01-15

    Crystals of the compounds Yb(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}(Phen){sub 2} (Phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) are investigated using X-ray diffraction. It is established that there exist two different crystalline modifications: the main modification (phase 1) is characteristic of all members of the isostructural series, and the second modification (phase 2) is observed only for the Eu, Er, and Yb elements. It is assumed that the stability and universality of main phase 1 are associated with the occurrence of the nonbonded {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between the adjacent phenanthroline ligands in the complexes. The indication of the interactions is a distortion of the planar shape of the Phen molecule (the folding of the metallocycle along the N-N line with a folding angle of 11{sup o}-13{sup o} and its 'boomerang' distortion). The assumption regarding the {pi}-{pi} stacking interaction is very consistent with the shape of the ellipsoids of atomic thermal vibrations, as well as with the data obtained from thermography and IR spectroscopy. An analysis of the structures of a number of rare-earth compounds has demonstrated that the intracomplex {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions directly contribute to the formation of supramolecular associates in the crystals, such as molecular dimers, supramolecules, chain and layered ensembles, and framework systems.

  2. Target Highlights in CASP9: Experimental Target Structures for the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Moult, John; Bartual, Sergio G.; Bazan, J. Fernando; Berman, Helen; Casteel, Darren E.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Everett, John K.; Hausmann, Jens; Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Hills, Tanya; Hui, Raymond; Hunt, John F.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kennedy, Michael A.; Kim, Choel; Lingel, Andreas; Michalska, Karolina; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Otero, José M.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Pizarro, Juan C.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rousseau, Francois; Tong, Liang; Wernimont, Amy K.; Young, Jasmine; Schwede, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    One goal of the CASP Community Wide Experiment on the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction is to identify the current state of the art in protein structure prediction and modeling. A fundamental principle of CASP is blind prediction on a set of relevant protein targets, i.e. the participating computational methods are tested on a common set of experimental target proteins, for which the experimental structures are not known at the time of modeling. Therefore, the CASP experiment would not have been possible without broad support of the experimental protein structural biology community. In this manuscript, several experimental groups discuss the structures of the proteins which they provided as prediction targets for CASP9, highlighting structural and functional peculiarities of these structures: the long tail fibre protein gp37 from bacteriophage T4, the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ (PKGIβ) dimerization/docking domain, the ectodomain of the JTB (Jumping Translocation Breakpoint) transmembrane receptor, Autotaxin (ATX) in complex with an inhibitor, the DNA-Binding J-Binding Protein 1 (JBP1) domain essential for biosynthesis and maintenance of DNA base-J (β-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil) in Trypanosoma and Leishmania, an so far uncharacterized 73 residue domain from Ruminococcus gnavus with a fold typical for PDZ-like domains, a domain from the Phycobilisome (PBS) core-membrane linker (LCM) phycobiliprotein ApcE from Synechocystis, the Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) activators PFC0360w and PFC0270w from Plasmodium falciparum, and 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:22020785

  3. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. In fulfilling this objective, analytical procedures for joint design and analysis were developed during Phase 1 of the program. Tests were conducted at the element level to supply the empirical data required for methods development. Large composite multirow joints were tested to verify the selected design concepts and for correlation with analysis predictions. The Phase 2 program included additional tests to provide joint design and analysis data, and culminated with several technology demonstration tests of a major joint area representative of a commercial transport wing. The technology demonstration program of Phase 2 is discussed. The analysis methodology development, structural test program, and correlation between test results and analytical strength predictions are reviewed.

  4. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  5. Population genetic structure of critically endangered salamander (Hynobius amjiensis) in China: recommendations for conservation.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Chen, C S; Chen, S H; Ding, P; Fan, Z Y; Lu, Y W; Yu, L P; Lin, H D

    2016-01-01

    Amji's salamander (Hynobius amjiensis) is a critically endangered species (IUCN Red List), which is endemic to mainland China. In the present study, five haplotypes were genotyped for the mtDNA cyt b gene in 45 specimens from three populations. Relatively low levels of haplotype diversity (h = 0.524) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00532) were detected. Analyses of the phylogenic structure of H. amjiensis showed no evidence of major geographic partitions or substantial barriers to historical gene flow throughout the species' range. Two major phylogenetic haplotype groups were revealed, and were estimated to have diverged about 1.262 million years ago. Mismatch distribution analysis, neutrality tests, and Bayesian skyline plots revealed no evidence of dramatic changes in the effective population size. According to the SAMOVA and STRUCTURE analyses, H. amjiensis should be regarded as two different management units. PMID:27323156

  6. Environmental drivers of soil microbial community structure and function at the Avon River Critical Zone Observatory.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deirdre; Mathes, Falko; Farrell, Mark; Leopold, Matthias

    2016-11-15

    The Critical Zone is defined as the thin, permeable layer from the tops of the trees to the bottom of the bedrock that sustains terrestrial life on Earth. The geometry and shape of the various weathering zones are known as the critical zone architecture. At the centre of the Critical Zone are soils and the microorganisms that inhabit them. In Western Australia, the million-year-old stable weathering history and more recent lateral erosion during the past hundreds of thousands of years have created a geomorphic setting where deep weathering zones are now exposed on the surface along the flanks of many lateritic hills. These old weathering zones provide diverse physical and chemical properties that influence near surface pedologic conditions and thus likely shape current surface microbiology. Here, we present data derived from a small lateritic hill on the UWA Farm Ridgefield. Spatial soil sampling revealed the contrasting distribution patterns of simple soil parameters such as pH (CaCl2) and electric conductivity. These are clearly linked with underlying changes of the critical zone architecture and show a strong contrast with low values of pH3.3 at the top of the hill to pH5.3 at the bottom. These parameters were identified as major drivers of microbial spatial variability in terms of bacterial and archaeal community composition but not abundance. In addition, we used sensitive (14)C labelling to assess turnover of three model organic nitrogen compounds - an important biogeochemical functional trait relating to nutrient availability. Though generally rapid and in the order of rates reported elsewhere (t½<5h), some points in the sampling area showed greatly reduced turnover rates (t½>10h). In conclusion, we have shown that the weathering and erosion history of ancient Western Australia affects the surface pedology and has consequences for microbial community structure and function. PMID:27432724

  7. Environmental drivers of soil microbial community structure and function at the Avon River Critical Zone Observatory.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Deirdre; Mathes, Falko; Farrell, Mark; Leopold, Matthias

    2016-11-15

    The Critical Zone is defined as the thin, permeable layer from the tops of the trees to the bottom of the bedrock that sustains terrestrial life on Earth. The geometry and shape of the various weathering zones are known as the critical zone architecture. At the centre of the Critical Zone are soils and the microorganisms that inhabit them. In Western Australia, the million-year-old stable weathering history and more recent lateral erosion during the past hundreds of thousands of years have created a geomorphic setting where deep weathering zones are now exposed on the surface along the flanks of many lateritic hills. These old weathering zones provide diverse physical and chemical properties that influence near surface pedologic conditions and thus likely shape current surface microbiology. Here, we present data derived from a small lateritic hill on the UWA Farm Ridgefield. Spatial soil sampling revealed the contrasting distribution patterns of simple soil parameters such as pH (CaCl2) and electric conductivity. These are clearly linked with underlying changes of the critical zone architecture and show a strong contrast with low values of pH3.3 at the top of the hill to pH5.3 at the bottom. These parameters were identified as major drivers of microbial spatial variability in terms of bacterial and archaeal community composition but not abundance. In addition, we used sensitive (14)C labelling to assess turnover of three model organic nitrogen compounds - an important biogeochemical functional trait relating to nutrient availability. Though generally rapid and in the order of rates reported elsewhere (t½<5h), some points in the sampling area showed greatly reduced turnover rates (t½>10h). In conclusion, we have shown that the weathering and erosion history of ancient Western Australia affects the surface pedology and has consequences for microbial community structure and function.

  8. The critical protein interactions and structures that elicit growth deregulation in cancer and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; May, Andrew P; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to define the critical targets and network interactions that are subverted to elicit growth deregulation in human cells. Understanding and developing rational treatments for cancer requires a definition of the key molecular targets and how they interact to elicit the complex growth deregulation phenotype. Viral proteins provide discerning and powerful probes to understand both how cells work and how they can be manipulated using a minimal number of components. The small DNA viruses have evolved to target inherent weaknesses in cellular protein interaction networks to hijack the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery. In the battle to escape the inevitability of senescence and programmed cell death, cancers have converged on similar mechanisms, through the acquisition and selection of somatic mutations that drive unchecked cellular replication in tumors. Understanding the dynamic mechanisms through which a minimal number of viral proteins promote host cells to undergo unscheduled and pathological replication is a powerful strategy to identify critical targets that are also disrupted in cancer. Viruses can therefore be used as tools to probe the system-wide protein-protein interactions and structures that drive growth deregulation in human cells. Ultimately this can provide a path for developing system context-dependent therapeutics. This review will describe ongoing experimental approaches using viruses to study pathways deregulated in cancer, with a particular focus on viral cellular protein-protein interactions and structures. PMID:21061422

  9. Function of Several Critical Amino Acids in Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Revealed by Its Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Ciszak, E.; Patel, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer, catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and reductive acetylation of lipoyl moieties of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The roles of beta W135, alpha P188, alpha M181, alpha H15 and alpha R349 of E1 determined by kinetic analysis were reassessed by analyzing the three-dimensional structure of human E1. The residues identified above are found to play a structural role rather than being directly involved in catalysis: beta W135 is the center residue in the hydrophobic interaction between beta and beta' subunits; alpha P188 and alpha M181 are critical for the conformation of the TPP-binding motif and interaction between alpha and beta subunits; alpha H15, is necessary for the organization of the N-terminus of alpha and alpha'; subunits and alpha R349 supports the interaction of the C-terminus of the alpha subunits with the beta subunits. Analysis of several critical E1 residues confirms the importance of residues distant from the active site for subunit interactions and enzyme function.

  10. Can Student Nurse Critical Thinking Be Predicted from Perceptions of Structural Empowerment within the Undergraduate, Pre-Licensure Learning Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell-Moore, Shelley P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model using Rosabeth Kanter's theory (1977; 1993) of structural empowerment to determine if this model can predict student nurses' level of critical thinking. Major goals of nursing education are to cultivate graduates who can think critically with a keen sense of clinical judgment, and who can perform…

  11. Structural and functional neuroimaging in patients with Parkinson's disease and visual hallucinations: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant; Saini, Jitender; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop various non-motor symptoms (NMS) during the course of the illness and psychosis is one of the common NMS of PD. Visual hallucinations (VH) are the most common manifestation of psychosis in PD. The exact pathogenesis of VH in patients with PD is not clearly understood. Presence of VH has been described to be associated with rapid cognitive decline and increased nursing home placements in PD patients. A large number of structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted to understand the cerebral basis of VH in PD. Structural imaging studies (Voxel Based Morphometry) have reported grey matter atrophy in multiple regions of the brain such as primary visual cortex, visual association cortex, limbic regions, cholinergic structures such as pedunculopontine nucleus and substantia innominata, which conclude possible alterations of brain regions associated with functions such as visuospatial-perception, attention control and memory. Most functional neuroimaging studies (functional MRI, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computerized tomography) have reported altered activation, blood flow, or reduced metabolism in both dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which probably indicates an alteration in the normal bottom-top visual processing and the presence of an aberrant top-down visual processing. This review critically analyzes the published studies on the structural and functional neuroimaging in PD patients with VH.

  12. Microhabitat types promote the genetic structure of a micro-endemic and critically endangered mole salamander (Ambystoma leorae) of Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sunny, Armando; Monroy-Vilchis, Octavio; Reyna-Valencia, Carlos; Zarco-González, Martha M

    2014-01-01

    The reduced immigration and emigration rates resulting from the lack of landscape connectivity of patches and the hospitality of the intervening matrix could favor the loss of alleles through genetic drift and an increased chance of inbreeding. In order for isolated populations to maintain sufficient levels of genetic diversity and adapt to environmental changes, one important conservation goal must be to preserve or reestablish connectivity among patches in a fragmented landscape. We studied the last known population of Ambystoma leorae, an endemic and critically threatened species. The aims of this study were: (1) to assess the demographic parameters of A. leorae and to distinguish and characterize the microhabitats in the river, (2) to determine the number of existing genetic groups or demes of A. leorae and to describe possible relationships between microhabitats types and demes, (3) to determine gene flow between demes, and (4) to search for geographic locations of genetic discontinuities that limit gene flow between demes. We found three types of microhabitats and three genetically differentiated subpopulations with a significant level of genetic structure. In addition, we found slight genetic barriers. Our results suggest that mole salamander's species are very sensitive to microhabitat features and relatively narrow obstacles in their path. The estimates of bidirectional gene flow are consistent with the pattern of a stepping stone model between demes, where migration occurs between adjacent demes, but there is low gene flow between distant demes. We can also conclude that there is a positive correlation between microhabitats and genetic structure in this population. PMID:25076052

  13. Damage criticality and inspection concerns of composite-metallic aircraft structures under blunt impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, D.; Haack, C.; Bishop, P.; Bezabeh, A.

    2015-04-01

    Composite aircraft structures such as fuselage and wings are subject to impact from many sources. Ground service equipment (GSE) vehicles are regarded as realistic sources of blunt impact damage, where the protective soft rubber is used. With the use of composite materials, blunt impact damage is of special interest, since potential significant structural damage may be barely visible or invisible on the structure's outer surface. Such impact can result in local or non-local damage, in terms of internal delamination in skin, interfacial delamination between stiffeners and skin, and fracture of internal reinforced component such as stringers and frames. The consequences of these events result in aircraft damage, delays, and financial cost to the industry. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the criticality of damage under this impact and provide reliable recommendations for safety and inspection technologies. This investigation concerns a composite-metallic 4-hat-stiffened and 5-frame panel, designed to represent a fuselage structure panel generic to the new generation of composite aircraft. The test fixtures were developed based on the correlation between finite element analyses of the panel model and the barrel model. Three static tests at certain amount of impact energy were performed, in order to improve the understanding of the influence of the variation in shear ties, and the added rotational stiffness. The results of this research demonstrated low velocity high mass impacts on composite aircraft fuselages beyond 82.1 kN of impact load, which may cause extensive internal structural damage without clear visual detectability on the external skin surface.

  14. Structural Identifiability of Systems Biology Models: A Critical Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chis, Oana-Teodora; Banga, Julio R.; Balsa-Canto, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Analysing the properties of a biological system through in silico experimentation requires a satisfactory mathematical representation of the system including accurate values of the model parameters. Fortunately, modern experimental techniques allow obtaining time-series data of appropriate quality which may then be used to estimate unknown parameters. However, in many cases, a subset of those parameters may not be uniquely estimated, independently of the experimental data available or the numerical techniques used for estimation. This lack of identifiability is related to the structure of the model, i.e. the system dynamics plus the observation function. Despite the interest in knowing a priori whether there is any chance of uniquely estimating all model unknown parameters, the structural identifiability analysis for general non-linear dynamic models is still an open question. There is no method amenable to every model, thus at some point we have to face the selection of one of the possibilities. This work presents a critical comparison of the currently available techniques. To this end, we perform the structural identifiability analysis of a collection of biological models. The results reveal that the generating series approach, in combination with identifiability tableaus, offers the most advantageous compromise among range of applicability, computational complexity and information provided. PMID:22132135

  15. The RGD finger of Del-1 is a unique structural feature critical for integrin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Schürpf, Thomas; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Jin-huan; Wang, Rui; Springer, Timothy A.; Wang, Jia-huai

    2012-11-13

    Developmental endothelial cell locus-1 (Del-1) glycoprotein is secreted by endothelial cells and a subset of macrophages. Del-1 plays a regulatory role in vascular remodeling and functions in innate immunity through interaction with integrin {alpha}{sub V}{beta}{sub 3}. Del-1 contains 3 epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and 2 discoidin-like domains. An Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif in the second EGF domain (EGF2) mediates adhesion by endothelial cells and phagocytes. We report the crystal structure of its 3 EGF domains. The RGD motif of EGF2 forms a type II' {beta} turn at the tip of a long protruding loop, dubbed the RGD finger. Whereas EGF2 and EGF3 constitute a rigid rod via an interdomain calcium ion binding site, the long linker between EGF1 and EGF2 lends considerable flexibility to EGF1. Two unique O-linked glycans and 1 N-linked glycan locate to the opposite side of EGF2 from the RGD motif. These structural features favor integrin binding of the RGD finger. Mutagenesis data confirm the importance of having the RGD motif at the tip of the RGD finger. A database search for EGF domain sequences shows that this RGD finger is likely an evolutionary insertion and unique to the EGF domain of Del-1 and its homologue milk fat globule-EGF 8. The RGD finger of Del-1 is a unique structural feature critical for integrin binding.

  16. Geographic variation and genetic structure in the Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi), a critically endangered synanthropic species

    PubMed Central

    Person, Carl; Hayes, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Bird species may exhibit unexpected population structuring over small distances, with gene flow restricted by geographic features such as water or mountains. The Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi) is a critically endangered, synanthropic island endemic with a declining population of fewer than 300 individuals. It now remains only on Andros Island (The Bahamas), which is riddled with waterways that past studies assumed did not hinder gene flow. We examined 1,858 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA sequenced from four gene regions in 14 birds (roughly 5% of the remaining population) found on the largest land masses of Andros Island (North Andros and Mangrove Cay/South Andros). We sought to discern genetic structuring between the remaining subpopulations and its relationship to current conservation concerns. Four unique haplotypes were identified, with only one shared between the two subpopulations. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were higher for the North Andros subpopulation than for the Mangrove Cay/South Andros subpopulation. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) yielded a Wright’s fixation index (Fst) of 0.60 (PFst = 0.016), with 40.2% of the molecular variation explained by within-population differences and 59.8% by among-population differences. Based on the mitochondrial regions examined in this study, we suggest the extant subpopulations of Bahama Oriole exhibit significant population structuring over short distances, consistent with some other non-migratory tropical songbird species. PMID:26644974

  17. Geographic variation and genetic structure in the Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi), a critically endangered synanthropic species.

    PubMed

    Price, Melissa R; Person, Carl; Hayes, William K

    2015-01-01

    Bird species may exhibit unexpected population structuring over small distances, with gene flow restricted by geographic features such as water or mountains. The Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi) is a critically endangered, synanthropic island endemic with a declining population of fewer than 300 individuals. It now remains only on Andros Island (The Bahamas), which is riddled with waterways that past studies assumed did not hinder gene flow. We examined 1,858 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA sequenced from four gene regions in 14 birds (roughly 5% of the remaining population) found on the largest land masses of Andros Island (North Andros and Mangrove Cay/South Andros). We sought to discern genetic structuring between the remaining subpopulations and its relationship to current conservation concerns. Four unique haplotypes were identified, with only one shared between the two subpopulations. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity were higher for the North Andros subpopulation than for the Mangrove Cay/South Andros subpopulation. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) yielded a Wright's fixation index (F st) of 0.60 (P Fst = 0.016), with 40.2% of the molecular variation explained by within-population differences and 59.8% by among-population differences. Based on the mitochondrial regions examined in this study, we suggest the extant subpopulations of Bahama Oriole exhibit significant population structuring over short distances, consistent with some other non-migratory tropical songbird species. PMID:26644974

  18. Analytical description for the critical fixations of evolutionary coordination games on finite complex structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liye; Zou, Yong; Guan, Shuguang; Liu, Zonghua

    2015-04-01

    Evolutionary game theory is crucial to capturing the characteristic interaction patterns among selfish individuals. In a population of coordination games of two strategies, one of the central problems is to determine the fixation probability that the system reaches a state of networkwide of only one strategy, and the corresponding expectation times. The deterministic replicator equations predict the critical value of initial density of one strategy, which separates the two absorbing states of the system. However, numerical estimations of this separatrix show large deviations from the theory in finite populations. Here we provide a stochastic treatment of this dynamic process on complex networks of finite sizes as Markov processes, showing the evolutionary time explicitly. We describe analytically the effects of network structures on the intermediate fixations as observed in numerical simulations. Our theoretical predictions are validated by various simulations on both random and scale free networks. Therefore, our stochastic framework can be helpful in dealing with other networked game dynamics.

  19. Acetylation at a lysine residue adjacent to the CtBP binding motif within adenovirus 12 E1A causes structural disruption and limited reduction of CtBP binding

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, David; Mapp, Katie L.; Webster, Rachel; Gallimore, Phillip H.; Grand, Roger J.A. . E-mail: R.J.A.Grand@bham.ac.uk

    2006-11-25

    C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) has been shown to bind to a highly conserved five-amino-acid motif (PXDLS) located very close to the C-terminus of adenovirus early region 1A proteins. It has also been demonstrated that amino acids C-terminal and N-terminal to this original proposed binding site contribute to the interaction. However, conflicting evidence has been presented to show that acetylation of an adjacent lysine residue in Ad5E1A may or may not influence binding. It has now been demonstrated here that acetylation of a lysine, equivalent to position 261 in Ad12 E1A and position 285 in Ad5E1A, in a synthetic peptide disrupts the binding to CtBP1 and CtBP2 and alters the K {sub i} of the peptide, indicative of a reduction in the affinity of the peptide for CtBP1 and CtBP2, but only to a rather limited extent (less than 2-fold). The solution structures of synthetic peptides equivalent to wild-type and acetylated forms of the Ad12 E1A peptide have been determined by proton NMR spectroscopy. The wild-type form of the peptide adopts a series of {beta}-turns over the region Val{sup 254}-Arg{sup 262}. Within the acetylated isoform, the {beta}-turn conformation is less extensive, Val{sup 26}-Arg{sup 262} adopting a random confirmation. We conclude that secondary structure ({beta}-turns) and an appropriate series of amino acid side chains over an extended binding site (PXDLSXK) are necessary for recognition by CtBP, acetylation of lysine interfering with both of these features, but not to such an extent as to totally inhibit interaction. Moreover, it is possible that the {beta}-turn conformation at the C-terminus of AdE1A contributes to binding to {alpha} importin and nuclear import. Acetylation of lysine {sup 261} could disrupt interaction through structural destabilization as well as charge neutralization and subsequent nuclear localization.

  20. Crystal Structure and Self-Organized Criticality in a Bead Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Elizabeth; Jacobs, D. T.

    2004-03-01

    This experiment examined a conical bead pile, crystal structures that formed in the pile, and the distribution of avalanche sizes when using uniform 3mm stainless steel beads. A bead pile is built by pouring beads onto a circular base with one layer of beads glued as a hexagonal lattice. Beads are then individually dropped from a fixed height after which the pile is massed. This process is repeated for thousands of bead drops. By measuring the number of avalanches of a given size that occurred during the experiment, the resulting distribution could be compared to a power law description as predicted by self-organized criticality. We had found in an earlier experiment that glass beads dropped from a small height were consistent with a simple power-law, but if dropped from larger heights then a power-law times an exponential was needed. The stainless steel beads always had a distribution that deviated from a simple power-law with larger deviations as the beads were dropped from larger heights. In addition, we observed crystal structures (hexagonal close packing and face-centered cubic packing) to form in the mostly amorphous pile during the experiments. These structures formed cliffs where the beads were arranged in a square pattern along their faces, with the cliffs themselves arranged around the pile in a hexagonal pattern as viewed from above. These structures did not prevent avalanches from occurring over their faces, but may have affected the avalanche distributions. We acknowledge support from NASA and from NSF-REU grant DMR 0243811.

  1. Structure of the dimerization domain of DiGeorge critical region 8

    SciTech Connect

    Senturia, R.; Faller, M.; Yin, S.; Loo, J.A.; Cascio, D.; Sawaya, M.R.; Hwang, D.; Clubb, R.T.; Guo, F.

    2010-09-27

    Maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs, {approx}22nt) from long primary transcripts [primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs)] is regulated during development and is altered in diseases such as cancer. The first processing step is a cleavage mediated by the Microprocessor complex containing the Drosha nuclease and the RNA-binding protein DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8). We previously reported that dimeric DGCR8 binds heme and that the heme-bound DGCR8 is more active than the heme-free form. Here, we identified a conserved dimerization domain in DGCR8. Our crystal structure of this domain (residues 298-352) at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution demonstrates a previously unknown use of a WW motif as a platform for extensive dimerization interactions. The dimerization domain of DGCR8 is embedded in an independently folded heme-binding domain and directly contributes to association with heme. Heme-binding-deficient DGCR8 mutants have reduced pri-miRNA processing activity in vitro. Our study provides structural and biochemical bases for understanding how dimerization and heme binding of DGCR8 may contribute to regulation of miRNA biogenesis.

  2. Causes and consequences of fine-scale population structure in a critically endangered freshwater seal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Small, genetically uniform populations may face an elevated risk of extinction due to reduced environmental adaptability and individual fitness. Fragmentation can intensify these genetic adversities and, therefore, dispersal and gene flow among subpopulations within an isolated population is often essential for maintaining its viability. Using microsatellite and mtDNA data, we examined genetic diversity, spatial differentiation, interregional gene flow, and effective population sizes in the critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal (Phoca hispida saimensis), which is endemic to the large but highly fragmented Lake Saimaa in southeastern Finland. Results Microsatellite diversity within the subspecies (HE = 0.36) ranks among the lowest thus far recorded within the order Pinnipedia, with signs of ongoing loss of individual heterozygosity, reflecting very low effective subpopulation sizes. Bayesian assignment analyses of the microsatellite data revealed clear genetic differentiation among the main breeding areas, but interregional structuring was substantially weaker in biparentally inherited microsatellites (FST = 0.107) than in maternally inherited mtDNA (FST = 0.444), indicating a sevenfold difference in the gene flow mediated by males versus females. Conclusions Genetic structuring in the population appears to arise from the joint effects of multiple factors, including small effective subpopulation sizes, a fragmented lacustrine habitat, and behavioural dispersal limitation. The fine-scale differentiation found in the landlocked Saimaa ringed seal is especially surprising when contrasted with marine ringed seals, which often exhibit near-panmixia among subpopulations separated by hundreds or even thousands of kilometres. Our results demonstrate that population structures of endangered animals cannot be predicted based on data on even closely related species or subspecies. PMID:25005257

  3. If You Structure It, They Will Learn ...: Critical Thinking in Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Ron E.

    2004-01-01

    Though in its infancy, research on the use of critical thinking in physical education has shown promising results. To many, the notion of combining critical thinking and physical education might even be seen as a contradiction in terms. This article explores the dispositional aspect of critical thinking and asks two questions: (1) Are students…

  4. Critical taper wedge strength varies with structural style: results from distinct-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L. M.; Suppe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Critical-taper theory has given diverse insight into kinematics, roles of erosion and sedimentation, and the morphology of compressive mountain belts. We have made progress by recasting the parameter-rich mathematics into a simpler form that describes a linear, co-varying relationship between surface slope and detachment dip (α, β), and internal- and basal-sliding strengths (W, F). Using distinct-element models, we tested this simpler theory over a range of wedge strengths and structural styles. We also obtained W & F from observations of surface slope α and detachment dip β in active natural systems, all of which including the numerical models, show wedges are strong but detachments are weak, with F/W=0.1 or less. Model-derived W & F vary about a mean that matches geometry-derived values. Time- and spatially-averaged dynamical F & W are observed to be equal to wedge-derived results. Critical taper reflects the dynamical strengths during wedge growth and is controlled dynamically as base friction varies between an assigned quasi-static value and lower values during slip events. In the wedge, W varies more than F, which may also be true for natural systems. Detachments have frictional stick/slip behavior on a basal wall, but the wedge has more going on within it. Tandem faulting & folding serve to simultaneously weaken and strengthen the wedge, and may occur anywhere: structural style appears to be important to wedge strength evolution. The dynamics of deformation within the wedge and slip upon the base control the finite wedge geometry: static strengths drop to dynamic levels during seismicity, resulting in materials and faults that are weaker than prescribed in models or determined by testing. Relationships between α and W & F are complex. All sudden, stepwise changes in α, W & F with time coincide with seismicity spikes in the models. Large events trigger or are triggered by large changes in F and W. We examine the complex details of dynamically driven

  5. Structural versus dynamical origins of mean-field behavior in a self-organized critical model of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, S Amin; Montakhab, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Critical dynamics of cortical neurons have been intensively studied over the past decade. Neuronal avalanches provide the main experimental as well as theoretical tools to consider criticality in such systems. Experimental studies show that critical neuronal avalanches show mean-field behavior. There are structural as well as recently proposed [Phys. Rev. E 89, 052139 (2014)] dynamical mechanisms that can lead to mean-field behavior. In this work we consider a simple model of neuronal dynamics based on threshold self-organized critical models with synaptic noise. We investigate the role of high-average connectivity, random long-range connections, as well as synaptic noise in achieving mean-field behavior. We employ finite-size scaling in order to extract critical exponents with good accuracy. We conclude that relevant structural mechanisms responsible for mean-field behavior cannot be justified in realistic models of the cortex. However, strong dynamical noise, which can have realistic justifications, always leads to mean-field behavior regardless of the underlying structure. Our work provides a different (dynamical) origin than the conventionally accepted (structural) mechanisms for mean-field behavior in neuronal avalanches.

  6. Critical heat flux on micro-structured zircaloy surfaces for flow boiling of water at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.; Miassoedov, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Wetzel, T.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of surface structure on critical heat flux for flow boiling of water was investigated for Zircaloy tubes in a vertical annular test section. The objectives were to find suitable surface modification processes for Zircaloy tubes and to test their critical heat flux performance in comparison to the smooth tube. Surface structures with micro-channels, porous layer, oxidized layer, and elevations in micro- and nano-scale were produced on a section of a Zircaloy cladding tube. These modified tubes were tested in an internally heated vertical annulus with a heated length of 326 mm and an inner and outer diameter of 9.5 and 18 mm. The experiments were performed with mass fluxes of 250 and 400 kg/(m{sup 2}s), outlet pressures between 120 and 300 kPa, and constant inlet subcooling enthalpy of 167 kJ/kg. Only a small influence of modified surface structures on critical heat flux was observed for the pressure of 120 kPa in the present test section geometry. However, with increasing pressure the critical heat flux could increase up to 29% using the surface structured tubes with micro-channels, porous and oxidized layers. Capillary effects and increased nucleation site density are assumed to improve the critical heat flux performance. (authors)

  7. Structural versus dynamical origins of mean-field behavior in a self-organized critical model of neuronal avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi, S. Amin; Montakhab, Afshin

    2015-11-01

    Critical dynamics of cortical neurons have been intensively studied over the past decade. Neuronal avalanches provide the main experimental as well as theoretical tools to consider criticality in such systems. Experimental studies show that critical neuronal avalanches show mean-field behavior. There are structural as well as recently proposed [Phys. Rev. E 89, 052139 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.052139] dynamical mechanisms that can lead to mean-field behavior. In this work we consider a simple model of neuronal dynamics based on threshold self-organized critical models with synaptic noise. We investigate the role of high-average connectivity, random long-range connections, as well as synaptic noise in achieving mean-field behavior. We employ finite-size scaling in order to extract critical exponents with good accuracy. We conclude that relevant structural mechanisms responsible for mean-field behavior cannot be justified in realistic models of the cortex. However, strong dynamical noise, which can have realistic justifications, always leads to mean-field behavior regardless of the underlying structure. Our work provides a different (dynamical) origin than the conventionally accepted (structural) mechanisms for mean-field behavior in neuronal avalanches.

  8. Structural versus dynamical origins of mean-field behavior in a self-organized critical model of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, S Amin; Montakhab, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Critical dynamics of cortical neurons have been intensively studied over the past decade. Neuronal avalanches provide the main experimental as well as theoretical tools to consider criticality in such systems. Experimental studies show that critical neuronal avalanches show mean-field behavior. There are structural as well as recently proposed [Phys. Rev. E 89, 052139 (2014)] dynamical mechanisms that can lead to mean-field behavior. In this work we consider a simple model of neuronal dynamics based on threshold self-organized critical models with synaptic noise. We investigate the role of high-average connectivity, random long-range connections, as well as synaptic noise in achieving mean-field behavior. We employ finite-size scaling in order to extract critical exponents with good accuracy. We conclude that relevant structural mechanisms responsible for mean-field behavior cannot be justified in realistic models of the cortex. However, strong dynamical noise, which can have realistic justifications, always leads to mean-field behavior regardless of the underlying structure. Our work provides a different (dynamical) origin than the conventionally accepted (structural) mechanisms for mean-field behavior in neuronal avalanches. PMID:26651741

  9. SU-F-19A-03: Dosimetric Advantages in Critical Structure Dose Sparing by Using a Multichannel Cylinder in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy to Treat Vaginal Cuff Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Zhang, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The multichannel cylindrical vaginal applicator is a variation of traditional single channel cylindrical vaginal applicator. The multichannel applicator has additional peripheral channels that provide more flexibility in the planning process. The dosimetric advantage is to reduce dose to adjacent organ at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum while maintaining target coverage with the dose optimization from additional channels. Methods: Vaginal HDR brachytherapy plans are all CT based. CT images were acquired in 2 mm thickness to keep integrity of cylinder contouring. The CTV of 5mm Rind with prescribed treatment length was reconstructed from 5mm expansion of inserted cylinder. The goal was 95% of CTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose in both single channel planning (SCP)and multichannel planning (MCP) before proceeding any further optimization for dose reduction to critical structures with emphasis on D2cc and V2Gy . Results: This study demonstrated noticeable dose reduction to OAR was apparent in multichannel plans. The D2cc of the rectum and bladder were showing the reduced dose for multichannel versus single channel. The V2Gy of the rectum was 93.72% and 83.79% (p=0.007) for single channel and multichannel respectively (Figure 1 and Table 1). To assure adequate coverage to target while reducing the dose to the OAR without any compromise is the main goal in using multichannel vaginal applicator in HDR brachytherapy. Conclusion: Multichannel plans were optimized using anatomical based inverse optimization algorithm of inverse planning simulation annealing. The optimization solution of the algorithm was to improve the clinical target volume dose coverage while reducing the dose to critical organs such as bladder, rectum and bowels. The comparison between SCP and MCP demonstrated MCP is superior to SCP where the dwell positions were based on geometric array only. It concluded that MCP is preferable and is able to provide certain features superior to SCP.

  10. Usability: a critical success factor for managing change in the clinical info-structure.

    PubMed

    Kay, S

    2005-06-01

    There can be no doubt that the clinical info-structure is being significantly enriched with the deployment of new systems throughout the health sector. From a technological perspective, the initial emphasis has been mainly on functionality and only latterly on the usability of these clinical information systems. However, the large scale and rapid pace of the changes being wrought in the health sector will have a major impact on clinicians and patients, not least in how they interact with the technology. Therefore, it is not only hardware and software but people-ware, too, that needs to be actively managed; not simply a one-off functional specification but an ongoing, complex relationship. Usability is the human factor that encompasses the ethical, educational, and evaluative aspects of design. There is also a strong case for regarding usability of clinical information systems as a key critical success factor for the management of change within the health-care domain. In particular, the relationship between usability, and education and training is examined. PMID:16338806

  11. Aging Theories for Establishing Safe Life Spans of Airborne Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2003-01-01

    New aging theories have been developed to establish the safe life span of airborne critical structural components such as B-52B aircraft pylon hooks for carrying air-launch drop-test vehicles. The new aging theories use the equivalent-constant-amplitude loading spectrum to represent the actual random loading spectrum with the same damaging effect. The crack growth due to random loading cycling of the first flight is calculated using the half-cycle theory, and then extrapolated to all the crack growths of the subsequent flights. The predictions of the new aging theories (finite difference aging theory and closed-form aging theory) are compared with the classical flight-test life theory and the previously developed Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories. The new aging theories predict the number of safe flights as considerably lower than that predicted by the classical aging theory, and slightly lower than those predicted by the Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories due to the inclusion of all the higher order terms.

  12. Phytoplankton abundance and structural parameters of the critically endangered protected area Vaya Lake (Bulgaria)

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Ralits; Nenova, Elena; Uzunov, Blagoy; Shishiniova, Maria; Stoyneva, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Vaya (Ramsar site, protected area and Natura 2000 site) is the biggest natural lake in Bulgaria and the shallowest Black Sea coastal lake, which during the last decades has undergone significant changes and was included as critically endangered in the Red List of Bulgarian Wetlands. Our studies were conducted during the summer and autumn months of three years – 2004–2006. The paper presents results on the phytoplankton abundance (numbers, biomass and carbon content) in combination with the indices of species diversity, evenness and dominance. Phytoplankton abundance was extremely high (average values of 1135 × 106 cells/L for the quantity and of 46 mg/L for the biomass) and increased in the end of the studied period (years 2005–2006), when decrease of species diversity and increase of the dominance index values were detected. The carbon content of the phytoplankton was at an average value of 9.7 mg/L and also increased from 2004 to 2006. Cyanoprokaryota dominated in the formation of the total carbon content of the phytoplankton, in its numbers (88%–97.8%), and in the biomass (62%–87.9%). All data on phytoplankton abundance and structural parameters in Vaya confirm the hypertrophic status of the lake and reflect the general negative trend in its development. PMID:26019571

  13. Criticism in the Self, Brain, Relationships, and Social Structure: Implications for Psychodynamic Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Golan

    2016-01-01

    An integrative-psychodynamic theory of criticism in self and relationships is presented (Shahar, 2015). My theoretical starting point is the tension between Authenticity (A; our inherited potential, tantamount to Winnicott's True Self) and Self-Knowledge (SK; what we [think] we know about ourselves). Self-criticism, a formidable dimension of vulnerability to a wide array of psychopathologies, is construed as a distorted form of self-knowledge, reducing internal confusion at the expense of widening the gap between A and SK. Amalgamated by a genetic and neuroanatomic makeup, criticism of the self quickly translates into criticism-based interpersonal exchanges across the life span, culminating in an Axis of Criticism (ACRIM). A psychodynamic-integrative psychotherapy of malignant criticism in self and relationships is described. The article is concluded with some broad reflections on the implication of this work to the theory development and therapeutic action. PMID:27603804

  14. Criticism in the Self, Brain, Relationships, and Social Structure: Implications for Psychodynamic Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Golan

    2016-01-01

    An integrative-psychodynamic theory of criticism in self and relationships is presented (Shahar, 2015). My theoretical starting point is the tension between Authenticity (A; our inherited potential, tantamount to Winnicott's True Self) and Self-Knowledge (SK; what we [think] we know about ourselves). Self-criticism, a formidable dimension of vulnerability to a wide array of psychopathologies, is construed as a distorted form of self-knowledge, reducing internal confusion at the expense of widening the gap between A and SK. Amalgamated by a genetic and neuroanatomic makeup, criticism of the self quickly translates into criticism-based interpersonal exchanges across the life span, culminating in an Axis of Criticism (ACRIM). A psychodynamic-integrative psychotherapy of malignant criticism in self and relationships is described. The article is concluded with some broad reflections on the implication of this work to the theory development and therapeutic action.

  15. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  16. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Jason D; Lee, Monica D; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  17. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  18. Investigating Predictive Role of Critical Thinking on Metacognition with Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between critical thinking and metacognition. The sample of study consists of 390 university students who were enrolled in different programs at Sakarya University, in Turkey. In this study, the Critical Thinking Disposition Scale and Metacognitive Thinking Scale were used. The relationships…

  19. Critical parameters of hard-core Yukawa fluids within the structural theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahaa Khedr, M.; Osman, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    A purely statistical mechanical approach is proposed to account for the liquid-vapor critical point based on the mean density approximation (MDA) of the direct correlation function. The application to hard-core Yukawa (HCY) fluids facilitates the use of the series mean spherical approximation (SMSA). The location of the critical parameters for HCY fluid with variable intermolecular range is accurately calculated. Good agreement is observed with computer simulation results and with the inverse temperature expansion (ITE) predictions. The influence of the potential range on the critical parameters is demonstrated and the universality of the critical compressibility ratio is discussed. The behavior of the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities along the equilibrium line and the near vicinity of the critical point is discussed in details.

  20. Facilitating Interactions through Structured Web-Based Bulletin Boards: A Quasi-Experimental Study on Promoting Learners' Critical Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ya-Ting C.; Newby, Timothy; Bill, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This experimental study investigated the effectiveness of structured Web-Based Bulletin Board (WBB) discussions in improving the critical thinking (CT) skills of learners involved in veterinary distance learning, as well as their attitudes toward learning via WBBs. The two dependent variables were learners' CT skills and their attitudes toward…

  1. Structure and Agency in Learning: A Critical Realist Theory of the Development of Capacity to Reflect on Academic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter; Qualter, Anne; Young, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Theories of learning typically downplay the interplay between social structure and student agency. In this article, we adapt a causal hypothesis from realist social theory and draw on wider perspectives from critical realism to account for the development of capacity to engage in reflection on professional practice in academic roles. We thereby…

  2. Free surface liquid films of binary mixtures. Two-dimensional steady structures at off-critical compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bribesh, Fathi A. M.; Madruga, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    We present steady non-linear solutions of films of confined polymer blends deposited on a solid substrate at off-critical concentrations with a free deformable surface. The solutions are obtained numerically using a variational form of the Cahn-Hilliard equation in the static limit, which allows for internal diffuse interfaces between the two components of the mixture. Existence of most of the branches of non-linear solutions at off-critical concentrations can be predicted from the knowledge of the branching points obtained with a linear stability analysis plus the non-linear solutions at critical concentrations. However, some families of solutions are found not to have correspondence at critical compositions. We take a value for surface tension that allows strong deformations at the sharp free upper surface. Varying the average composition and the length and thickness of the films we find a rich morphology of static films in the form of laterally structure films, layered films, droplets on the substrate, droplets at the free surface, and checkerboard structures. We show that laterally structured solutions are energetically favorable over homogeneous and other structured solutions within the whole spinodal region and even close to the absolute stability binodal boundary.

  3. Microhabitat Types Promote the Genetic Structure of a Micro-Endemic and Critically Endangered Mole Salamander (Ambystoma leorae) of Central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Sunny, Armando; Monroy-Vilchis, Octavio; Reyna-Valencia, Carlos; Zarco-González, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    The reduced immigration and emigration rates resulting from the lack of landscape connectivity of patches and the hospitality of the intervening matrix could favor the loss of alleles through genetic drift and an increased chance of inbreeding. In order for isolated populations to maintain sufficient levels of genetic diversity and adapt to environmental changes, one important conservation goal must be to preserve or reestablish connectivity among patches in a fragmented landscape. We studied the last known population of Ambystoma leorae, an endemic and critically threatened species. The aims of this study were: (1) to assess the demographic parameters of A. leorae and to distinguish and characterize the microhabitats in the river, (2) to determine the number of existing genetic groups or demes of A. leorae and to describe possible relationships between microhabitats types and demes, (3) to determine gene flow between demes, and (4) to search for geographic locations of genetic discontinuities that limit gene flow between demes. We found three types of microhabitats and three genetically differentiated subpopulations with a significant level of genetic structure. In addition, we found slight genetic barriers. Our results suggest that mole salamander’s species are very sensitive to microhabitat features and relatively narrow obstacles in their path. The estimates of bidirectional gene flow are consistent with the pattern of a stepping stone model between demes, where migration occurs between adjacent demes, but there is low gene flow between distant demes. We can also conclude that there is a positive correlation between microhabitats and genetic structure in this population. PMID:25076052

  4. Structure, process and annual intensive care unit mortality across 69 centers: United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS)

    PubMed Central

    Checkley, William; Martin, Greg S; Brown, Samuel M; Chang, Steven Y; Dabbagh, Ousama; Fremont, Richard D; Girard, Timothy D; Rice, Todd W; Howell, Michael D; Johnson, Steven B; O'Brien, James; Park, Pauline K; Pastores, Stephen M; Patil, Namrata T; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Putman, Maryann; Rotello, Leo; Siner, Jonathan; Sajid, Sahul; Murphy, David J; Sevransky, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hospital-level variations in structure and process may affect clinical outcomes in intensive care units (ICUs). We sought to characterize the organizational structure, processes of care, use of protocols and standardized outcomes in a large sample of U.S. ICUs. Design We surveyed 69 ICUs about organization, size, volume, staffing, processes of care, use of protocols, and annual ICU mortality. Setting ICUs participating in the United States Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Critical Illness Outcomes Study (USCIITG-CIOS). Measurements and Main Results We characterized structure and process variables across ICUs, investigated relationships between these variables and annual ICU mortality, and adjusted for illness severity using APACHE II. Ninety-four ICU directors were invited to participate in the study and 69 ICUs (73%) were enrolled, of which 25 (36%) were medical, 24 were surgical (35%) and 20 (29%) were of mixed type, and 64 (93%) were located in teaching hospitals with a median number of 5 trainees per ICU. Average annual ICU mortality was 10.8%, average APACHE II score was 19.3, 58% were closed units and 41% had a 24-hour in-house intensivist. In multivariable linear regression adjusted for APACHE II and multiple ICU structure and process factors, annual ICU mortality was lower in surgical ICUs than in medical ICUs (5.6% lower, 95% CI 2.4%–8.8%) or mixed ICUs (4.5% lower, 95% CI 0.4%–8.7%). We also found a lower annual ICU mortality among ICUs that had a daily plan of care review (5.8% lower, 95% CI 1.6%–10.0%) and a lower bed-to-nurse ratio (1.8% lower when the ratio decreased from 2:1 to 1.5:1; 95% CI 0.25%–3.4%). In contrast, 24-hour intensivist coverage (p=0.89) and closed ICU status (p=0.16) were not associated with a lower annual ICU mortality. Conclusions In a sample of 69 ICUs, a daily plan of care review and a lower bed-to-nurse ratio were both associated with a lower annual ICU mortality. In contrast to 24-hour intensivist

  5. Electronic structure, spin polarization and high critical fields in Chevrel compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlborg, T.; Freeman, A. J.

    1982-05-01

    Results are presented of an extensive theoretical study of the origin of high field superconductivity and/or magnetism in a number of Chevrel phase ternary compounds, MMo 6X 8 (with M=Sn, Eu, Gd and X=S and/or Se) based on self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) energy band calculations using the local density approach (Hedin et al. exchange correlation) for the paramagnetic structures and local spin density formalism (Gunnarsson and Lundqvist) for the ferromagnetic structures. All electrons and all 15 atoms/cell are included with the core electrons (including the 4f's) recalculated in each iteration in a fully relativistic representation and the conduction electrons treated semirelativistically (all relativistic terms except spin-orbit). Superconductivity is found to be due to the high Mo d-band density of states (DOS) at E F resulting from the unusual large charge transfer of Mo electrons to the chalcogen sites. There is also a large charge transfer from the metal site to the cluster (≈2 electrons in Sn and Eu) giving essentially no occupied conduction bands, for example, at the Eu site and a divalent ion isomer shift in very good agreement with the experiments of Dunlap et al. The conduction-electron DOS at the Eu site is found to be reduced by an order of magnitude from its metallic state value - in close agreement with their spin - lattice relaxation rate measurements. This low conduction-electron DOS yields very weak coupling of the 4f electrons to the conduction electrons and only a very weak Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida magnetic interaction showing why all the Chevrel rare-earth compounds - except Ce and Eu - are superconducting despite their having large local magnetic moments. The unusually high upper critical fields, Hc 2, in these materials is found to be due to the unusully flat energy bands near F F. The ferromagnetic (spin polarized) results for the Eu- and Gd-compounds show a net small but positive magnetic moment on the metal site and a

  6. Impact of patient rotational errors on target and critical structure dose in IMRT: A 3D simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Xing, A.; Vial, P.; Scotti, A.; Stirton, R.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, Lois

    2013-06-01

    The impact of 3D rotational errors in patient positioning on dose delivered target volumes and critical structures in IMRT was studied. Patient rotational errors ranging from -30 to +30 was introduced to IMRT treatment plans of pelvis, head and neck and brain treatment sites and the impact of rotational error on DVH metrics was assessed. The magnitude of impact of rotational error on the error in dose delivered to the target volume and critical structures depends on the location of the structures from plan isocentre. In studied plans, a maximum percentage difference of up to -9.8(1s=13.4) % in D95 to PTV was observed for head and neck treatments. Similarly, in Brain treatments a maximum difference of up to 24.0(1s=33.0) % in maximum dose of Optic chiasm was observed. The results suggest that failure to correct patient's rotational error results in under-dosage to target volumes and over-dosage to the critical structures in some specific treatment scenarios.

  7. Evolving Relationship Structures in Multi-sourcing Arrangements: The Case of Mission Critical Outsourcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitlager, Ilja; Helms, Remko; Brinkkemper, Sjaak

    Information Technology Outsourcing practice and research mainly considers the outsourcing phenomenon as a generic fulfilment of the IT function by external parties. Inspired by the logic of commodity, core competencies and economies of scale; assets, existing departments and IT functions are transferred to external parties. Although the generic approach might work for desktop outsourcing, where standardisation is the dominant factor, it does not work for the management of mission critical applications. Managing mission critical applications requires a different approach where building relationships is critical. The relationships involve inter and intra organisational parties in a multi-sourcing arrangement, called an IT service chain, consisting of multiple (specialist) parties that have to collaborate closely to deliver high quality services.

  8. Structural and Critical Behaviors of Ag Rough Films Deposited on Liquid Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Gao-xiang; Feng, Chun-mu; Zhang, Qi-rui; Ge, Hong-liang; Zhang, Xuan-jia

    1996-10-01

    A new Ag rough film system, deposited on silicone oil surfaces by rf-magnetron sputtering method, has been fabricated. The chrysanthemum-like surface morphology at micron length scale is observed. It is proposed that the anomalous critical behavior mainly results from the relative shift between the Ag atom clusters and the substrate. The discussion of the deposition mechanism is also presented.

  9. Scaling between superconducting critical temperature and structural coherence length in YBa2Cu3O6.9 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauzzi, A.; Jönsson-Åkerman, B. Johan; Clerc-Dubois, A.; Pavuna, D.

    2000-09-01

    Measurements of critical temperature Tc in superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.9 films with reduced long-range structural order show the validity of the empirical scaling relation ΔTc propto rc-2 between disorder-induced reduction of Tc and structural coherence length rc in the ab-plane. This result is quantitatively explained by the disorder-induced confinement of the charge carriers within each ordered domain of size rc. Our analysis of the data based on this picture enables us to precisely determine the Ginzburg-Landau superconducting coherence length in the ab-plane, ξab = 1.41 ± 0.04 nm.

  10. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  11. A critical survey of vestigial structures in the postcranial skeletons of extant mammals

    PubMed Central

    Moch, John G.

    2015-01-01

    In the Mammalia, vestigial skeletal structures abound but have not previously been the focus of study, with a few exceptions (e.g., whale pelves). Here we use a phylogenetic bracketing approach to identify vestigial structures in mammalian postcranial skeletons and present a descriptive survey of such structures in the Mammalia. We also correct previous misidentifications, including the previous misidentification of vestigial caviid metatarsals as sesamoids. We also examine the phylogenetic distribution of vestigiality and loss. This distribution indicates multiple vestigialization and loss events in mammalian skeletal structures, especially in the hand and foot, and reveals no correlation in such events between mammalian fore and hind limbs. PMID:26623192

  12. Effect of structural water on the critical characteristics of highly textured YBa2Cu3O6.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, I. B.; Gerasimov, E. G.; Zyuzeva, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of low-temperature treatment (200°C) in a humid argon atmosphere and subsequent annealing (930°C) on the critical parameters of a highly textured YBa2Cu3O6.9 has been studied. During annealing at T = 200°C, the absorbed water is incorporated into the structure of the compound, which is accompanied by the deterioration of its superconducting properties. However, after the recovery annealing at T = 930°C and subsequent oxidation, the superconducting characteristics ( j c , B 1 c , and F p ) are improved. This is explained by the formation of 124-type planar defects, which are effective pinning centers, especially in high fields applied perpendicular to the c axis (⊥ c). The optimum conditions of double annealing substantially increasing the critical current density ( j c ≥ 104 A/cm2) in an external magnetic field up to 10 T and also the first critical fields have been found. In fields up to ˜3 T, the critical current density j c is isotropic despite the conservation of high texture in the samples.

  13. The Hidden Rule: A Critical Discussion of Harvard University's Governing Structure. [A Harvard Watch Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissman, Robert

    The governing structure of Harvard University is reviewed, and the findings include the following: (1) Harvard's present administrative and governance structure utilize corporate techniques of management that allow the president to diffuse administrative tasks without diffusing power--the difficulty of locating responsibility in the decentralized…

  14. [English and Russian terminology for the thoracic skeletal structures of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae): a critical review].

    PubMed

    Khalin, A V; Aĭbulatov, S V

    2013-01-01

    The authors analyze different names of thoracic skeletal structures in mosquitoes (Dip- tera: Culicidae), used by various authors (Kirkpatrick, 1925; Edwards, 1932; Stackelberg, 1937; Sazonova, 1958; Belkin, 1962a, b: Maslov, 1967: Gutsevich et al., 1970; Knight, Laffoon, 1970; McAlpine, 1981; Becker et al., 2010). In the abovementioned publications, a small number of skeletal structures, morphologically very important for the identification of species and genera of the family Culicidae, are denoted by multiple synonymic names, while certain completely different skeletal structures are represented under a single homonymous name. Duplicated synonymic names for thoracic sclerites, setae, and scales on sclerites considerably hamper the work of specialists determining species of the family Culicidae. In some cases, this fact results in erroneous diagnostics of species. We provide a detailed description of the thoracic morphology of mosquitoes, pointing to existing synonymic Russian and English names for each skeletal structure and also recommend the use of a single Russian term for each structure.

  15. Auditory midbrain laminar structure appears adapted to f0 extraction: further evidence and implications of the double critical bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Braun, M

    1999-03-01

    The psychoacoustic 'critical bandwidth' (CB), e.g. approximately 2.6 semitones (= 0.22 octave) at 1.5-3 kHz, is known from many spectral integration phenomena. Cat data suggest that it is represented in the inferior colliculus (IC) (Ehret and Merzenich, 1985, Science 227, 1245-1247), where it is consistently related to the fibrodendritic laminae (Schreiner and Langner, 1997, Nature 388, 383-386). The recent discovery of the CB and the double CB (2CB) in the statistics of frequency spacing of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (Braun, 1997. Hear. Res. 114, 197-203) has initiated further investigations of the novel phenomenon of 2CB. Meta-analysis of psychoacoustic valuation studies of pure-tone intervals again revealed the effects of CB and 2CB. Valuations showed a significant stepwise change with interval size: 2CB indifferent. Scrutiny of cat and human data indicated that for both species, at least in the midspectrum (1-3 kHz in humans), the tonotopic ranges within single IC laminae and the tonotopic distances between neighboring laminae may equal 1 CB (distances to second next laminae being 2CB). This unique architecture would provide the most economical neural convergence of period information from pairs of adjacent harmonic partials 3-6 of complex sound. The resulting summed postsynaptic potentials would thus contain a beat frequency equaling f0 of sound input and being detectable by the known neural behavior of characteristic periodicity response. PMID:10190753

  16. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin. PMID:25066915

  17. Atomic structure of recombinant thaumatin II reveals flexible conformations in two residues critical for sweetness and three consecutive glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito

    2014-11-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein used as a sweetener, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although two major variants designated thaumatin I and thaumatin II exist in plants, there have been few dedicated thaumatin II structural studies and, to date, data beyond atomic resolution had not been obtained. To identify the detailed structural properties explaining why thaumatin elicits a sweet taste, the structure of recombinant thaumatin II was determined at the resolution of 0.99 Å. Atomic resolution structural analysis with riding hydrogen atoms illustrated the differences in the direction of the side-chains more precisely and the electron density maps of the C-terminal regions were markedly improved. Though it had been suggested that the three consecutive glycine residues (G142-G143-G144) have highly flexible conformations, G143, the central glycine residue was successfully modelled in two conformations for the first time. Furthermore, the side chain r.m.s.d. values for two residues (R67 and R82) critical for sweetness exhibited substantially higher values, suggesting that these residues are highly disordered. These results demonstrated that the flexible conformations in two critical residues favoring their interaction with sweet taste receptors are prominent features of the intensely sweet taste of thaumatin.

  18. Fouling assemblages on offshore wind power plants and adjacent substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Dan; Malm, Torleif

    2008-09-01

    A significant expansion of offshore wind power is expected in the near future, with thousands of turbines in coastal waters, and various aspects of how this may influence the coastal ecology including disturbance effects from noise, shadows, electromagnetic fields, and changed hydrological conditions are accordingly of concern. Further, wind power plants constitute habitats for a number of organisms, and may locally alter assemblage composition and biomass of invertebrates, algae and fish. In this study, fouling assemblages on offshore wind turbines were compared to adjacent hard substrate. Influences of the structures on the seabed were also investigated. The turbines differed significantly from adjacent boulders in terms of assemblage composition of epibiota and motile invertebrates. Species number and Shannon-Wiener diversity were, also, significantly lower on the wind power plants. It was also indicated that the turbines might have affected assemblages of invertebrates and algae on adjacent boulders. Off shore wind power plant offer atypical substrates for fouling assemblages in terms of orientation, depth range, structure, and surface texture. Some potential ecological implications of the addition of these non-natural habitats for coastal ecology are discussed.

  19. New adjacent Bis-tetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chou, Chi-Jung; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2003-03-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation led to the isolation of two new Annonaceous acetogenins, annocatacin A ( 1). and annocatacin B ( 2). from the seeds and the leaves, respectively, of Annona muricata. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first examples where the adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran ring system is located at C-15. The new structures were elucidated and characterized by spectral and chemical methods. Both Annonaceous acetogenins 1 and 2 showed significant in vitro cytotoxicity toward the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and 2,2,15, and were compared with the known adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran acetogenins, neoannonin ( 3). desacetyluvaricin ( 4). bullatacin ( 5). asimicin ( 6). annoglaucin ( 7). squamocin ( 8). and rollimusin ( 9).

  20. Conformational Dynamics and Structural Plasticity Play Critical Roles in Ubiquitin Recognition of a UIM Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Patel, Mayank M.; Garcia, Angel E.; Makhatadze, George I.; McCallum, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin-interacting motifs (UIMs) are an important class of protein domains that interact with ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins. These approximately 20 residue-long domains are found in a variety of ubiquitin receptor proteins and serve as recognition modules towards intracellular targets, which may be individual ubiquitin subunits or polyubiquitin chains attached to a variety of proteins. Previous structural studies of the interactions between UIMs with ubiquitin have shown that UIMs adopt an extended structure of a single α-helix, containing a hydrophobic surface with a conserved sequence pattern that interacts with key hydrophobic residues on ubiquitin. In light of this large body of structural studies, details regarding the presence and roles of structural dynamics and plasticity are surprisingly lacking. In order to better understand the structural basis of ubiquitin-UIM recognition, changes in the structure and dynamics of ubiquitin have been characterized upon binding of a UIM domain from the yeast Vps27 protein. The solution structure of a ubiquitin-UIM fusion protein designed to study these interactions is reported here and found to consist of a well-defined ubiquitin core and a bipartite UIM helix. Moreover, we have studied the plasticity of the docking interface as well as global changes in ubiquitin due to UIM binding at the picosecond to nanosecond and microsecond to millisecond protein motions by NMR relaxation. Changes in generalized order parameters of amide groups show a distinct trend toward increased structural rigidity at the UIM-ubiquitin interface relative to values determined in unbound ubiquitin. Analysis of 15N CPMG relaxation dispersion measurements suggest the presence of two types of motions, one directly related to the UIM-binding interface, the other being induced to distal parts of the protein. This study demonstrates a case where localized interactions among protein domains have global effects in protein motions at timescales

  1. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  2. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  3. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  4. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  5. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  6. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell sheets on structural allograft healing of critical-sized femoral defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Teng; Zhu, Zhenan; Awad, Hani A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Dong, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Structural bone allografts are widely used in the clinic to treat critical sized bone defects, despite lacking the osteoinductive characteristics of live autografts. To address this, we generated revitalized structural allografts wrapped with mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (MSC) sheets, which were produced by expanding primary syngenic bone marrow derived cells on temperature-responsive plates, as a tissue engineered periosteum. In vitro assays demonstrated maintenance of the MSC phenotype in the sheets, suggesting that short-term culturing of MSC sheets is not detrimental. To test their efficacy in vivo, allografts wrapped with MSC sheets were transplanted into 4-mm murine femoral defects and compared to allografts with direct seeding of MSCs and allografts without cells. Evaluations consisted of x-ray plain radiography, 3D microCT, histology, and biomechanical testing at 4- and 6-weeks post-surgery. Our findings demonstrate that MSC sheets induce prolonged cartilage formation at the graft-host junction and enhanced bone callus formation, as well as graft-host osteointegration. Moreover, a large periosteal callus was observed spanning the allografts with MSC sheets, which partially mimics live autograft healing. Finally, biomechanical testing showed a significant increase in the structural and functional properties of MSC sheet grafted femurs. Taken together, MSC sheets exhibit enhanced osteogenicity during critical sized bone defect repair, demonstrating the feasibility of this tissue engineering solution for massive allograft healing. PMID:24393269

  7. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell sheets on structural allograft healing of critical sized femoral defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Teng; Zhu, Zhenan; Awad, Hani A; Schwarz, Edward M; Hilton, Matthew J; Dong, Yufeng

    2014-03-01

    Structural bone allografts are widely used in the clinic to treat critical sized bone defects, despite lacking the osteoinductive characteristics of live autografts. To address this, we generated revitalized structural allografts wrapped with mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (MSC) sheets, which were produced by expanding primary syngenic bone marrow derived cells on temperature-responsive plates, as a tissue-engineered periosteum. In vitro assays demonstrated maintenance of the MSC phenotype in the sheets, suggesting that short-term culturing of MSC sheets is not detrimental. To test their efficacy in vivo, allografts wrapped with MSC sheets were transplanted into 4-mm murine femoral defects and compared to allografts with direct seeding of MSCs and allografts without cells. Evaluations consisted of X-ray plain radiography, 3D microCT, histology, and biomechanical testing at 4- and 6-weeks post-surgery. Our findings demonstrate that MSC sheets induce prolonged cartilage formation at the graft-host junction and enhanced bone callus formation, as well as graft-host osteointegration. Moreover, a large periosteal callus was observed spanning the allografts with MSC sheets, which partially mimics live autograft healing. Finally, biomechanical testing showed a significant increase in the structural and functional properties of MSC sheet grafted femurs. Taken together, MSC sheets exhibit enhanced osteogenicity during critical sized bone defect repair, demonstrating the feasibility of this tissue engineering solution for massive allograft healing.

  8. Off-Policy Actor-Critic Structure for Optimal Control of Unknown Systems With Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank L; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Huaguang

    2016-05-01

    An optimal control method is developed for unknown continuous-time systems with unknown disturbances in this paper. The integral reinforcement learning (IRL) algorithm is presented to obtain the iterative control. Off-policy learning is used to allow the dynamics to be completely unknown. Neural networks are used to construct critic and action networks. It is shown that if there are unknown disturbances, off-policy IRL may not converge or may be biased. For reducing the influence of unknown disturbances, a disturbances compensation controller is added. It is proven that the weight errors are uniformly ultimately bounded based on Lyapunov techniques. Convergence of the Hamiltonian function is also proven. The simulation study demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed optimal control method for unknown systems with disturbances. PMID:25935054

  9. Off-Policy Actor-Critic Structure for Optimal Control of Unknown Systems With Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank L; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Huaguang

    2016-05-01

    An optimal control method is developed for unknown continuous-time systems with unknown disturbances in this paper. The integral reinforcement learning (IRL) algorithm is presented to obtain the iterative control. Off-policy learning is used to allow the dynamics to be completely unknown. Neural networks are used to construct critic and action networks. It is shown that if there are unknown disturbances, off-policy IRL may not converge or may be biased. For reducing the influence of unknown disturbances, a disturbances compensation controller is added. It is proven that the weight errors are uniformly ultimately bounded based on Lyapunov techniques. Convergence of the Hamiltonian function is also proven. The simulation study demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed optimal control method for unknown systems with disturbances.

  10. Evaluation of Pactruss design characteristics critical to space station primary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Several aspects of the possible application of the Pactruss concept to the primary truss structure of the space station are investigated. Estimates are made of the loads and hinge moments in deploying diagonal members as full deployment is approached. Included are the effects of beam columning and compliance of the surrounding structure. Requirements for joint design are suggested and a two-stage mid-diagonal latching hinge concept is described or analyzed. The problems with providing the experimental and theoretical tools needed for assuring reliable synchronous deployment are discussed and a first attempt at high-fidelity analytical simulation with NASTRAN is described. An alternative construction scenario in which the entire dual-keel truss structure is deployed as a single Shuttle payload is suggested.

  11. Critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction-Round VII.

    PubMed

    Moult, John; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Rost, Burkhard; Hubbard, Tim; Tramontano, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the supplemental issue of the journal PROTEINS, dedicated to the seventh CASP experiment to assess the state of the art in protein structure prediction. The paper describes the conduct of the experiment, the categories of prediction included, and outlines the evaluation and assessment procedures. Highlights are improvements in model accuracy relative to that obtainable from knowledge of a single best template structure; convergence of the accuracy of models produced by automatic servers toward that produced by human modeling teams; the emergence of methods for predicting the quality of models; and rapidly increasing practical applications of the methods. PMID:17918729

  12. The design process for a pumpkin balloon: structural synthesis, structural analysis, and analytical assessment of some critical design issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, W. W.

    Effects of varying parameters in the design of super-pressure balloons of the "pumpkin" shape such as gore design, tendon stiffness, and structural lack-of-fit between tendons and gore seams are exhibited in analytical studies. The importance of an accurate representation of Poisson's effect for the film is demonstrated. Important design aspects that affect load paths and robustness of the design are discussed together with their resolution and quantification where applicable.

  13. Lying to ourselves: rationality, critical reflexivity, and the moral order as 'structured agency'.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Benny

    2016-07-01

    A report suggests that United States' army officers may engage in dishonest reporting regarding their compliance procedures. Similarly, nurses with espoused high ethical standards sometimes fail to live up to them and may do so while deceiving themselves about such practices. Reasons for lapses are complex. However, multitudinous managerial demands arising within 'technical and instrumental rationality' may impact on honest decision-making. This paper suggests that compliance processes, which operates within the social structural context of the technical and instrumental rationality manifest as 'managerialism', contributes to professional 'dishonesty' about lapses in care, sometimes through 'thoughtlessness'. The need to manage risk, measure, account, and control in order to deliver efficiency, effectiveness, and economy (technical rationality) thus has both unintended and dysfunctional consequences. Meeting compliance requirements may be mediated by factors such as the 'affect heuristic' and 'reflexive deliberations' as part of the 'structured agency' of nurses. It is the complexity of 'structured agency' which may explain why some nurses fail to respond to such things as sentinel events, a failure to recognize 'personal troubles' as 'public issues', a failure which to outsiders who expect rational and professional responses may seem inconceivable. There is a need to understand these processes so that nurses can critique the context in which they work and to move beyond either/or explanations of structure or agency for care failures, and professional dishonesty.

  14. Lying to ourselves: rationality, critical reflexivity, and the moral order as 'structured agency'.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Benny

    2016-07-01

    A report suggests that United States' army officers may engage in dishonest reporting regarding their compliance procedures. Similarly, nurses with espoused high ethical standards sometimes fail to live up to them and may do so while deceiving themselves about such practices. Reasons for lapses are complex. However, multitudinous managerial demands arising within 'technical and instrumental rationality' may impact on honest decision-making. This paper suggests that compliance processes, which operates within the social structural context of the technical and instrumental rationality manifest as 'managerialism', contributes to professional 'dishonesty' about lapses in care, sometimes through 'thoughtlessness'. The need to manage risk, measure, account, and control in order to deliver efficiency, effectiveness, and economy (technical rationality) thus has both unintended and dysfunctional consequences. Meeting compliance requirements may be mediated by factors such as the 'affect heuristic' and 'reflexive deliberations' as part of the 'structured agency' of nurses. It is the complexity of 'structured agency' which may explain why some nurses fail to respond to such things as sentinel events, a failure to recognize 'personal troubles' as 'public issues', a failure which to outsiders who expect rational and professional responses may seem inconceivable. There is a need to understand these processes so that nurses can critique the context in which they work and to move beyond either/or explanations of structure or agency for care failures, and professional dishonesty. PMID:27197710

  15. Synthetic and structural studies on syringolin A and B reveal critical determinants of selectivity and potency of proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Jérôme; Groll, Michael; Illich, Damir J.; Bachmann, André S.; Huber, Robert; Schellenberg, Barbara; Dudler, Robert; Kaiser, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Syrbactins, a family of natural products belonging either to the syringolin or glidobactin class, are highly potent proteasome inhibitors. Although sharing similar structural features, they differ in their macrocyclic lactam core structure and exocyclic side chain. These structural variations critically influence inhibitory potency and proteasome subsite selectivity. Here, we describe the total synthesis of syringolin A and B, which together with enzyme kinetic and structural studies, allowed us to elucidate the structural determinants underlying the proteasomal subsite selectivity and binding affinity of syrbactins. These findings were used successfully in the rational design and synthesis of a syringolin A-based lipophilic derivative, which proved to be the most potent syrbactin-based proteasome inhibitor described so far. With a Ki′ of 8.65 ± 1.13 nM for the chymotryptic activity, this syringolin A derivative displays a 100-fold higher potency than the parent compound syringolin A. In light of the medicinal relevance of proteasome inhibitors as anticancer compounds, the present findings may assist in the rational design and development of syrbactin-based chemotherapeutics. PMID:19359491

  16. Mitochondrial structure and dynamics as critical factors in honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) caste development.

    PubMed

    Santos, Douglas Elias; Alberici, Luciane Carla; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between nutrition and phenotype is an especially challenging question in cases of facultative polyphenism, like the castes of social insects. In the honey bee, Apis mellifera, unexpected modifications in conserved signaling pathways revealed the hypoxia response as a possible mechanism underlying the regulation of body size and organ growth. Hence, the current study was designed to investigate possible causes of why the three hypoxia core genes are overexpressed in worker larvae. Parting from the hypothesis that this has an endogenous cause and is not due to differences in external oxygen levels we investigated mitochondrial numbers and distribution, as well as mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in fat body cells of queen and worker larvae during the caste fate-critical larval stages. By immunofluorescence and electron microscopy we found higher densities of mitochondria in queen larval fat body, a finding further confirmed by a citrate synthase assay quantifying mitochondrial functional units. Oxygen consumption measurements by high-resolution respirometry revealed that queen larvae have higher maximum capacities of ATP production at lower physiological demand. Finally, the expression analysis of mitogenesis-related factors showed that the honey bee TFB1 and TFB2 homologs, and a nutritional regulator, ERR, are overexpressed in queen larvae. These results are strong evidence that the differential nutrition of queen and worker larvae by nurse bees affects mitochondrial dynamics and functionality in the fat body of these larvae, hence explaining their differential hypoxia response. PMID:27058771

  17. Adjuvant formulation structure and composition are critical for the development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Mark T.; Fox, Christopher B.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Sivananthan, Sandra J.; Lucas, Elyse; Lin, Susan; Phan, Tony; Moon, James J.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) each year. Development of a new vaccine to augment or replace the only approved TB vaccine, BCG, is needed to control this disease. Mtb infection is primarily controlled by TH1 cells through the production of IFN-γ and TNF which activate infected macrophages to kill the bacterium. Here we examine an array of adjuvant formulations containing the TLR4 agonist GLA to identify candidate adjuvants to pair with ID93, a lead TB vaccine antigen, to elicit protective TH1 responses. We evaluate a variety of adjuvant formulations including alum, liposomes, and oil-in-water emulsions to determine how changes in formulation composition alter adjuvant activity. We find that alum and an aqueous nanosuspension of GLA synergize to enhance generation of ID93-specific TH1 responses, whereas neither on their own are effective adjuvants for generation of ID93-specific TH1 responses. For GLA containing oil-in-water emulsions, the selection of the oil component is critical for adjuvant activity, whereas a variety of lipid components may be used in liposomal formulations of GLA. The composition of the liposome formulation of ID93/GLA does alter the magnitude of the TH1 response. These results demonstrate that there are multiple solutions for an effective formulation of a novel TB vaccine candidate that enhances both TH1 generation and protective efficacy. PMID:23933525

  18. Critical tipping point distinguishing two types of transitions in modular network structures.

    PubMed

    Shai, Saray; Kenett, Dror Y; Kenett, Yoed N; Faust, Miriam; Dobson, Simon; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Modularity is a key organizing principle in real-world large-scale complex networks. The relatively sparse interactions between modules are critical to the functionality of the system and are often the first to fail. We model such failures as site percolation targeting interconnected nodes, those connecting between modules. We find, using percolation theory and simulations, that they lead to a "tipping point" between two distinct regimes. In one regime, removal of interconnected nodes fragments the modules internally and causes the system to collapse. In contrast, in the other regime, while only attacking a small fraction of nodes, the modules remain but become disconnected, breaking the entire system. We show that networks with broader degree distribution might be highly vulnerable to such attacks since only few nodes are needed to interconnect the modules, consequently putting the entire system at high risk. Our model has the potential to shed light on many real-world phenomena, and we briefly consider its implications on recent advances in the understanding of several neurocognitive processes and diseases. PMID:26764742

  19. Critical tipping point distinguishing two types of transitions in modular network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, Saray; Kenett, Dror Y.; Kenett, Yoed N.; Faust, Miriam; Dobson, Simon; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Modularity is a key organizing principle in real-world large-scale complex networks. The relatively sparse interactions between modules are critical to the functionality of the system and are often the first to fail. We model such failures as site percolation targeting interconnected nodes, those connecting between modules. We find, using percolation theory and simulations, that they lead to a "tipping point" between two distinct regimes. In one regime, removal of interconnected nodes fragments the modules internally and causes the system to collapse. In contrast, in the other regime, while only attacking a small fraction of nodes, the modules remain but become disconnected, breaking the entire system. We show that networks with broader degree distribution might be highly vulnerable to such attacks since only few nodes are needed to interconnect the modules, consequently putting the entire system at high risk. Our model has the potential to shed light on many real-world phenomena, and we briefly consider its implications on recent advances in the understanding of several neurocognitive processes and diseases.

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms activating the cell death processes by chalcones: Critical structural effects.

    PubMed

    Champelovier, Pierre; Chauchet, Xavier; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Garrel, Catherine; Laporte, François; Boutonnat, Jean; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2013-12-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds with diverse pharmacological activities. Chalcones derive from the common structure: 1,3-diphenylpropenone. The present study aims to better understand the mechanistic pathways triggering chalcones anticancer effects and providing evidences that minor structural difference could lead to important difference in mechanistic effect. We selected two recently investigated chalcones (A and B) and investigated them on glioblastoma cell lines. It was found that chalcone A induced an apoptotic process (type I PCD), via the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Chalcone A also increased CDK1/cyclin B ratios and decreased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). Chalcone B induced an autophagic cell death process (type II PCD), ROS-related but independent of both caspases and protein synthesis. Both chalcones increased Bax/Bcl2 ratios and decreased Ki67 and CD71 antigen expressions. The present investigation reveals that despite the close structure of chalcones A and B, significant differences in mechanism of effect were found.

  1. Subscale and Full-Scale Testing of Buckling-Critical Launch Vehicle Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Haynie, Waddy T.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Roberts, Michael G.; Norris, Jeffery P.; Waters, W. Allen; Herring, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    New analysis-based shell buckling design factors (aka knockdown factors), along with associated design and analysis technologies, are being developed by NASA for the design of launch vehicle structures. Preliminary design studies indicate that implementation of these new knockdown factors can enable significant reductions in mass and mass-growth in these vehicles and can help mitigate some of NASA s launch vehicle development and performance risks by reducing the reliance on testing, providing high-fidelity estimates of structural performance, reliability, robustness, and enable increased payload capability. However, in order to validate any new analysis-based design data or methods, a series of carefully designed and executed structural tests are required at both the subscale and full-scale level. This paper describes recent buckling test efforts at NASA on two different orthogrid-stiffened metallic cylindrical shell test articles. One of the test articles was an 8-ft-diameter orthogrid-stiffened cylinder and was subjected to an axial compression load. The second test article was a 27.5-ft-diameter Space Shuttle External Tank-derived cylinder and was subjected to combined internal pressure and axial compression.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms activating the cell death processes by chalcones: Critical structural effects.

    PubMed

    Champelovier, Pierre; Chauchet, Xavier; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Garrel, Catherine; Laporte, François; Boutonnat, Jean; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2013-12-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds with diverse pharmacological activities. Chalcones derive from the common structure: 1,3-diphenylpropenone. The present study aims to better understand the mechanistic pathways triggering chalcones anticancer effects and providing evidences that minor structural difference could lead to important difference in mechanistic effect. We selected two recently investigated chalcones (A and B) and investigated them on glioblastoma cell lines. It was found that chalcone A induced an apoptotic process (type I PCD), via the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Chalcone A also increased CDK1/cyclin B ratios and decreased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). Chalcone B induced an autophagic cell death process (type II PCD), ROS-related but independent of both caspases and protein synthesis. Both chalcones increased Bax/Bcl2 ratios and decreased Ki67 and CD71 antigen expressions. The present investigation reveals that despite the close structure of chalcones A and B, significant differences in mechanism of effect were found. PMID:24134853

  3. Integrative modeling of small artery structure and function uncovers critical parameters for diameter regulation.

    PubMed

    VanBavel, Ed; Tuna, Bilge Guvenc

    2014-01-01

    Organ perfusion is regulated by vasoactivity and structural adaptation of small arteries and arterioles. These resistance vessels are sensitive to pressure, flow and a range of vasoactive stimuli. Several strongly interacting control loops exist. As an example, the myogenic response to a change of pressure influences the endothelial shear stress, thereby altering the contribution of shear-dependent dilation to the vascular tone. In addition, acute responses change the stimulus for structural adaptation and vice versa. Such control loops are able to maintain resistance vessels in a functional and stable state, characterized by regulated wall stress, shear stress, matched active and passive biomechanics and presence of vascular reserve. In this modeling study, four adaptation processes are identified that together with biomechanical properties effectuate such integrated regulation: control of tone, smooth muscle cell length adaptation, eutrophic matrix rearrangement and trophic responses. Their combined action maintains arteries in their optimal state, ready to cope with new challenges, allowing continuous long-term vasoregulation. The exclusion of any of these processes results in a poorly regulated state and in some cases instability of vascular structure.

  4. Neristatin 1 provides critical insight into bryostatin 1 structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Kedei, Noemi; Kraft, Matthew B; Keck, Gary E; Herald, Cherry L; Melody, Noeleen; Pettit, George R; Blumberg, Peter M

    2015-04-24

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone isolated from Bugula neritina, has been the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer. Although it functions as an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro, bryostatin 1 paradoxically antagonizes most responses to the prototypical PKC activator, the phorbol esters. The bottom half of the bryostatin 1 structure has been shown to be sufficient to confer binding to PKC. In contrast, we have previously shown that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is necessary for its unique biological behavior to antagonize phorbol ester responses. Neristatin 1 comprises a top half similar to that of bryostatin 1 together with a distinct bottom half that confers PKC binding. We report here that neristatin 1 is bryostatin 1-like, not phorbol ester-like, in its biological activity on U937 promyelocytic leukemia cells. We conclude that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is largely sufficient for bryostatin 1-like activity, provided the molecule also possesses an appropriate PKC binding domain.

  5. Neristatin 1 provides critical insight into bryostatin 1 structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Kedei, Noemi; Kraft, Matthew B; Keck, Gary E; Herald, Cherry L; Melody, Noeleen; Pettit, George R; Blumberg, Peter M

    2015-04-24

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone isolated from Bugula neritina, has been the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer. Although it functions as an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro, bryostatin 1 paradoxically antagonizes most responses to the prototypical PKC activator, the phorbol esters. The bottom half of the bryostatin 1 structure has been shown to be sufficient to confer binding to PKC. In contrast, we have previously shown that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is necessary for its unique biological behavior to antagonize phorbol ester responses. Neristatin 1 comprises a top half similar to that of bryostatin 1 together with a distinct bottom half that confers PKC binding. We report here that neristatin 1 is bryostatin 1-like, not phorbol ester-like, in its biological activity on U937 promyelocytic leukemia cells. We conclude that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is largely sufficient for bryostatin 1-like activity, provided the molecule also possesses an appropriate PKC binding domain. PMID:25808573

  6. Critical density solitary waves structures in a hot magnetized dusty plasma with vortexlike ion distribution in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S.K.; El-Shamy, E.F.

    2005-04-15

    The nonlinear properties of solitary waves structures in a hot magnetized dusty plasma consisting of isothermal hot electrons, nonisothermal ions, and high negatively charged massive dust grains are reported. A modified Korteweg-de Vries (modified KdV) equation, which admits a solitary waves solution, for small but finite amplitude, is derived using a reductive perturbation theory. A nonisothermal ion distribution provides the possibility of existence of rarefactive solitary waves. On the other hand, the dynamics of solitary waves at a critical ion density is governed by KdV equation. The modification in the amplitude and width of the solitary waves structures due to the inclusion of obliqueness and external magnetic field are also investigated.

  7. Probabilistic Estimation of Critical Flaw Sizes in the Primary Structure Welds of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Hoge, Peter A.; Patel, B. M.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary structure of the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) launch vehicle is constructed of welded mild steel plates. There is some concern over the possibility of structural failure due to welding flaws. It was considered critical to quantify the impact of uncertainties in residual stress, material porosity, applied loads, and material and crack growth properties on the reliability of the welds during its pre-flight and flight. A criterion--an existing maximum size crack at the weld toe must be smaller than the maximum allowable flaw size--was established to estimate the reliability of the welds. A spectrum of maximum allowable flaw sizes was developed for different possible combinations of all of the above listed variables by performing probabilistic crack growth analyses using the ANSYS finite element analysis code in conjunction with the NASGRO crack growth code. Two alternative methods were used to account for residual stresses: (1) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 41 ksi and a limit was set on the net section flow stress during crack propagation. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if this limit was exceeded during four complete flight cycles, and (2) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 49.6 ksi (the parent material s yield strength) and the net section flow stress limit was ignored. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if catastrophic crack growth occurred during four complete flight cycles. Both surface-crack models and through-crack models were utilized to characterize cracks in the weld toe.

  8. A Hydropedological View of Critical Zone Structure and Function at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. W.; McGuire, K. J.; Bullen, T. D.; Ross, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    The gauged catchments of Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest are typical of upland headwaters of the glaciated portion of the Appalachian Mountain region, with coarse, well drained soils, flashy hydrologic response, and low baseflow of streams. Long-term nutrient cycling studies as well as model formulations of soil genesis, critical loads, and rainfall/runoff response are based on a view of the critical zone as dominated by vertical percolation in unsaturated soils, development of soil horizons parallel to the land surface, mineral weathering inputs to the forest limited to the rooting zone and drainage from lumped catchment reservoirs (e.g., the subsoil) as the dominant source of stream flow. However, an interdisciplinary view encompassing hillslope hydrology, pedology and geology shows striking spatial structure of soils that develop transient water tables within the solum in nearly all landscape positions, including many positions that would be considered well drained. In portions of the catchment, shallow bedrock and relatively low hydraulic conductivity in the subsoil promote slope parallel flow and development of soil horizons laterally along hillslope flowpaths rather than in vertical profiles. We distinguished several hydropedologic units based on presence of diagnostic horizons indicative of differing patterns of lateral translocation, podzolization and carbon accumulation. The distribution of soils defined by a hydropedologic perspective appears to be highly dependent on local drainability and extent and duration of transient subsurface saturation. Spatial and temporal variation in surface water chemistry throughout the stream network reflects the diversity of groundwater chemistry in a two component system - shallow transient saturation in hydropedologic units and deeper permanent saturation of thicker glacial till deposits. This new perspective of critical zone structure offers an opportunity to reinterpret the long term record of this well monitored

  9. A critical switch in the enzymatic properties of the Cid1 protein deciphered from its product-bound crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Tello, Paola; Gabus, Caroline; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The addition of uridine nucleotide by the poly(U) polymerase (PUP) enzymes has a demonstrated impact on various classes of RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs), histone-encoding RNAs and messenger RNAs. Cid1 protein is a member of the PUP family. We solved the crystal structure of Cid1 in complex with non-hydrolyzable UMPNPP and a short dinucleotide compound ApU. These structures revealed new residues involved in substrate/product stabilization. In particular, one of the three catalytic aspartate residues explains the RNA dependence of its PUP activity. Moreover, other residues such as residue N165 or the β-trapdoor are shown to be critical for Cid1 activity. We finally suggest that the length and sequence of Cid1 substrate RNA influence the balance between Cid1's processive and distributive activities. We propose that particular processes regulated by PUPs require the enzymes to switch between the two types of activity as shown for the miRNA biogenesis where PUPs can either promote DICER cleavage via short U-tail or trigger miRNA degradation by adding longer poly(U) tail. The enzymatic properties of these enzymes may be critical for determining their particular function in vivo. PMID:24322298

  10. A critical switch in the enzymatic properties of the Cid1 protein deciphered from its product-bound crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Tello, Paola; Gabus, Caroline; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The addition of uridine nucleotide by the poly(U) polymerase (PUP) enzymes has a demonstrated impact on various classes of RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs), histone-encoding RNAs and messenger RNAs. Cid1 protein is a member of the PUP family. We solved the crystal structure of Cid1 in complex with non-hydrolyzable UMPNPP and a short dinucleotide compound ApU. These structures revealed new residues involved in substrate/product stabilization. In particular, one of the three catalytic aspartate residues explains the RNA dependence of its PUP activity. Moreover, other residues such as residue N165 or the β-trapdoor are shown to be critical for Cid1 activity. We finally suggest that the length and sequence of Cid1 substrate RNA influence the balance between Cid1's processive and distributive activities. We propose that particular processes regulated by PUPs require the enzymes to switch between the two types of activity as shown for the miRNA biogenesis where PUPs can either promote DICER cleavage via short U-tail or trigger miRNA degradation by adding longer poly(U) tail. The enzymatic properties of these enzymes may be critical for determining their particular function in vivo.

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  12. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  13. Structured synaptic inhibition has a critical role in multiple-choice motion-discrimination tasks.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Neural network models have been constructed to explore the underlying neural mechanisms for decision-making in multiple-choice motion-discrimination tasks. Despite great progress made, several key experimental observations have not been interpreted. In contrast to homogeneous connectivity between pyramidal cells and interneurons in previous models, here their connectivity is totally structured in a continuous recurrent network model. Specifically, we assume two types of inhibitory connectivity: opposite-feature and similar-feature inhibition, representing that the connectivity strength has a maximum between neural pairs with opposite and identical preferred directions, respectively. With a common parameter set, the model accounted for a wide variety of physiological and behavioral data from monkey experiments, including those that previous models failed to reproduce. We found that the opposite-feature inhibition endows the decision-making circuit with an elimination strategy, which effectively reduces the number of choice alternatives for inspection to speed up the decision process at the cost of decision accuracy. Conversely, the similar-feature inhibition markedly enhances the ability of the network to make a choice among multiple options and improves the accuracy of decisions, while slowing down the decision process. A simplified mean-field model was also presented to analytically characterize the effect of structured inhibition on fine discrimination. We made a testable prediction: only the combination of cross-feature and similar-feature inhibition enables the circuit to make a categorical choice among 12 alternatives. Together, the current work highlights the importance of structured synaptic inhibition in multiple-choice decision-making processes and sheds light on the neural mechanisms for visual motion perception. PMID:25274822

  14. Practical theories for service life prediction of critical aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Monaghan, Richard C.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    A new second-order theory was developed for predicting the service lives of aerospace structural components. The predictions based on this new theory were compared with those based on the Ko first-order theory and the classical theory of service life predictions. The new theory gives very accurate service life predictions. An equivalent constant-amplitude stress cycle method was proposed for representing the random load spectrum for crack growth calculations. This method predicts the most conservative service life. The proposed use of minimum detectable crack size, instead of proof load established crack size as an initial crack size for crack growth calculations, could give a more realistic service life.

  15. Strong spatial genetic structure reduces reproductive success in the critically endangered plant genus Pseudomisopates.

    PubMed

    Amat, María E; Silvertown, Jonathan; Vargas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Clonal growth can be a double-edged sword for endangered species, because the short-term insurance against extinction may incur a longer-term hazard of creating small inbred populations with low fecundity. In the present study, we quantify the advantages and disadvantages of clonal growth regarding the fitness of the central Iberian monotypic endangered genus Pseudomisopates. Preliminary studies showed that the species is self-incompatible and exhibits extensive clonal growth with plants flowering profusely. However, seeds at many sites seemed to be unviable, and no seedlings have been observed in the field. A fully replicated nested sampling design (n = 100) was conducted to explore genetic (using seven SSR loci) and environmental factors potentially affecting seed viability, such as: 1) clonal and genetic diversity, 2) spatial genetic structure, and 3) environmental factors (shrub cover and grazing). Generalized Linear Mixed Models were fitted relating genetic and environmental variables to reproductive variables (seed viability and flower display). Our results indicate that the relatively low genotypic diversity of the population (PD = 0.23), as quantified by SSRs, and the strong spatial genetic structure observed are congruent with intense clonal growth. This clonal growth is enhanced by unfavorable environmental conditions, such as canopy closure and grazing. Under these circumstances, both flower display and mate availability decrease, thus hindering sexual reproduction. Indeed, a mixed reproductive system (clonal and sexual) to escape environmental stochasticity is crucial for the survival of Pseudomisopates, a species inhabiting a disturbance-prone ecosystem.

  16. Crystal Structure of CCM3, a Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Protein Critical for Vascular Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, R; Zhang, H; He, Y; Ji, W; Min, W; Boggon, T

    2010-01-01

    CCM3 mutations are associated with cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM), a disease affecting 0.1-0.5% of the human population. CCM3 (PDCD10, TFAR15) is thought to form a CCM complex with CCM1 and CCM2; however, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known. We have determined the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of CCM3. This structure shows an all {alpha}-helical protein containing two domains, an N-terminal dimerization domain with a fold not previously observed, and a C-terminal focal adhesion targeting (FAT)-homology domain. We show that CCM3 binds CCM2 via this FAT-homology domain and that mutation of a highly conserved FAK-like hydrophobic pocket (HP1) abrogates CCM3-CCM2 interaction. This CCM3 FAT-homology domain also interacts with paxillin LD motifs using the same surface, and partial CCM3 co-localization with paxillin in cells is lost on HP1 mutation. Disease-related CCM3 truncations affect the FAT-homology domain suggesting a role for the FAT-homology domain in the etiology of CCM.

  17. The stochastic structure of critical transitions in water-stressed ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the stochastic structure of natural forcing mechanisms, such as precipitation or temperature, are likely to transform the form and function of ecological systems. Climate models and global datasets show that an increase in global temperature may result in an amplification of the hydrological cycle, not necessarily accompanied by significant changes in mean annual precipitation. In arid and semiarid environments, feedbacks between climate, soil moisture and vegetation are linked to the existence of alternative stable ecosystem states. It has been hypothesized that bistability is associated with tipping points, whereby slow changes in rainfall forcing, and random or anthropogenic disturbances, may trigger catastrophic shifts towards degraded states of the ecosystem. Identifying tipping points and characterizing ecosystem resilience are essential in the assessment of ecological services in a changing environment. We develop a stochastic framework to understand the joint probability density function (pdf) of soil moisture and vegetation biomass under stochastic rainfall. We emphasize the impact of amplified hydrological cycles on ecosystems where alternative states are possible. The joint pdf characterizes the states in which the ecosystem is most likely to be found. We show that the structure of precipitation, not just the mean annual precipitation, controls the most likely state of the ecosystem. We synthesize our analysis by proposing a definition of ecosystem resilience that is based on the modality and time dynamics of the soil moisture-biomass joint pdf.

  18. Strong Coupling Superconductivity in the Vicinity of the Structural Quantum Critical Point in (CaxSr1 -x)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Cheung, Yiu Wing; Saines, Paul J.; Imai, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Michioka, Chishiro; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Goh, Swee K.

    2015-11-01

    The family of the superconducting quasiskutterudites (CaxSr1 -x)3Rh4Sn13 features a structural quantum critical point at xc=0.9 , around which a dome-shaped variation of the superconducting transition temperature Tc is found. Using specific heat, we probe the normal and the superconducting states of the entire series straddling the quantum critical point. Our analysis indicates a significant lowering of the effective Debye temperature on approaching xc, which we interpret as a result of phonon softening accompanying the structural instability. Furthermore, a remarkably large enhancement of 2 Δ /kBTc and Δ C /γ Tc beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer values is found in the vicinity of the structural quantum critical point. The phase diagram of (CaxSr1 -x)3Rh4Sn13 thus provides a model system to study the interplay between structural quantum criticality and strong electron-phonon coupling superconductivity.

  19. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-04-06

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb25+, in SiO2/Si is also discussed.

  20. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-08-01

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO 2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb 25+, in SiO 2/Si is also discussed.

  1. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies. PMID:27287345

  2. Wood production response to climate change will depend critically on forest composition and structure.

    PubMed

    Coomes, David A; Flores, Olivier; Holdaway, Robert; Jucker, Tommaso; Lines, Emily R; Vanderwel, Mark C

    2014-12-01

    Established forests currently function as a major carbon sink, sequestering as woody biomass about 26% of global fossil fuel emissions. Whether forests continue to act as a global sink will depend on many factors, including the response of aboveground wood production (AWP; MgC ha(-1 ) yr(-1) ) to climate change. Here, we explore how AWP in New Zealand's natural forests is likely to change. We start by statistically modelling the present-day growth of 97 199 individual trees within 1070 permanently marked inventory plots as a function of tree size, competitive neighbourhood and climate. We then use these growth models to identify the factors that most influence present-day AWP and to predict responses to medium-term climate change under different assumptions. We find that if the composition and structure of New Zealand's forests were to remain unchanged over the next 30 years, then AWP would increase by 6-23%, primarily as a result of physiological responses to warmer temperatures (with no appreciable effect of changing rainfall). However, if warmth-requiring trees were able to migrate into currently cooler areas and if denser canopies were able to form, then a different AWP response is likely: forests growing in the cool mountain environments would show a 30% increase in AWP, while those in the lowland would hardly respond (on average, -3% when mean annual temperature exceeds 8.0 °C). We conclude that response of wood production to anthropogenic climate change is not only dependent on the physiological responses of individual trees, but is highly contingent on whether forests adjust in composition and structure.

  3. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-06-10

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies.

  4. Adjacent channel interference degradation with minimum shift keyed modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulation results for degradation in signal-to-noise ratio for various values of bit error probability are given for minimum shift-keyed-type signaling in the presence of adjacent channel interference. A serial modulator structure which utilizes spectral shaping is characterized in terms of envelope deviation and bandwidth efficiency. This serial generation technique is convenient for implementation at high data rates and results in signal spectra with lower sidelobe levels than conventional minimum shift-keyed modulation at the expense of moderate envelope deviation. Because of the lower sidelobe levels, the resulting spectra allow denser channel packing than does ideal MSK.

  5. Dramatic changes in DNA conductance with stretching: structural polymorphism at a critical extension.

    PubMed

    Bag, Saientan; Mogurampelly, Santosh; Goddard Iii, William A; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-09-21

    In order to interpret recent experimental studies of the dependence of conductance of ds-DNA as the DNA is pulled from the 3'end1-3'end2 ends, which find a sharp conductance jump for a very short (4.5%) stretching length, we carried out multiscale modeling to predict the conductance of dsDNA as it is mechanically stretched to promote various structural polymorphisms. We calculate the current along the stretched DNA using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, non-equilibrium pulling simulations, quantum mechanics calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. For 5'end1-5'end2 attachments we find an abrupt jump in the current within a very short stretching length (6 Å or 17%) leading to a melted DNA state. In contrast, for 3'end1-3'end2 pulling it takes almost 32 Å (84%) of stretching to cause a similar jump in the current. Thus, we demonstrate that charge transport in DNA can occur over stretching lengths of several nanometers. We find that this unexpected behaviour in the B to S conformational DNA transition arises from highly inclined base pair geometries that result from this pulling protocol. We found that the dramatically different conductance behaviors for two different pulling protocols arise from how the hydrogen bonds of DNA base pairs break. PMID:27545499

  6. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  7. Configuration optimization of dampers for adjacent buildings under seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Kasra; Hare, Warren; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2012-12-01

    Passive coupling of adjacent structures is known to be an effective method to reduce undesirable vibrations and structural pounding effects. Past results have shown that reducing the number of dampers can considerably decrease the cost of implementation and does not significantly decrease the efficiency of the system. The main objective of this study was to find the optimal arrangement of a limited number of dampers to minimize interstorey drift. Five approaches to solving the resulting bi-level optimization problem are introduced and examined (exhaustive search, inserting dampers, inserting floors, locations of maximum relative velocity and a genetic algorithm) and the numerical efficiency of each method is examined. The results reveal that the inserting damper method is the most efficient and reliable method, particularly for tall structures. It was also found that increasing the number of dampers does not necessarily increase the efficiency of the system. In fact, increasing the number of dampers can exacerbate the dynamic response of the system.

  8. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Vranken, Wim; Fogh, Rasmus H; Ragan, Timothy J; Tejero, Roberto; Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kennedy, Michael; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T; Vuister, Geerten W

    2015-08-01

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100% of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90% of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged. PMID:26071966

  9. The Long-Range Model of High-L Rydberg Fine Structure: A Critical Comparison with Experimental Data..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Erica L.; Wright, Laura E.; Lundeen, Stephen R.

    2006-05-01

    A simple view of the fine structure of non-penetrating Rydberg levels, suggested over 70 years ago [1], was refined to treat the fine structure of helium, lithium [2], and other atoms with S-state ion cores [3]. In this view the ion polarizabilities determine the fine structure pattern. Current experimental techniques provide access to highly excited high-L states in He [4], Li [5], Mg, SiIII [6], and Ba[7], and a test of the long-range model is possible with the availability of independent theoretical calculations. A critical comparison of the data treated with the long-range model will be made to the a-priori calculations of the ionic polarizabilities. [1] Joseph E. Mayer and Maria Goeppert Mayer, Phys. Rev. 43 605 (1933). [2] Richard J. Drachman and A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 51 2926 (1995). [3] C. Laughlin, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2787 (1995). [4] G. D. Stevens and S. R. Lundeen, Comments on At. and Mol. Phys., Comments on Mod. Phys. 1,D 207 (2000). [5] C. H. Storry, N. E. Rothery, and E. A. Hessels, Phys. Rev. A 55 128 (1997). [6] R. A. Komara et. al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 S87 (2005). [7] E.L. Snow, et. al. Phys. Rev. A 71, 022510 (2005)

  10. Formation of a thermodynamically metastable structure containing hairpin II is critical for infectivity of potato spindle tuber viroid RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Loss, P; Schmitz, M; Steger, G; Riesner, D

    1991-01-01

    The functional relevance of a hairpin II-containing structure of viroid RNA was studied by site-directed mutagenesis, thermodynamic calculations, experimental denaturation curves and infectivity tests. Hairpin II is formed during thermal denaturation of circular viroids or as part of a metastable structure during synthesis of viroid replication intermediates. In potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), eight single-site mutations were generated in the segments which form hairpin II. From the mutated viroid cDNA clones, linear RNA transcripts of PSTVd unit length were synthesized. The relevance of hairpin II for the mechanism of denaturation was confirmed quantitatively by optical denaturation curves and temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis. Infectivity tests showed that the mutations in the core region of hairpin II reverted to the wild type sequence whereas the mutations in the peripheral regions of hairpin II remained genetically stable. These data are in accordance with the natural variance of hairpin II in other viroids of the PSTVd class. Thus, the integrity of the core of hairpin II is critical for infectivity. Hairpin II exhibits a strong similarity in sequence as well as in three-dimensional structure to certain DNA GC-clusters found in the 5'-upstream regions of some genes in man, animals, viruses and plants. A hypothesis about a function of hairpin II as a binding site for host cell transcription factors is proposed. Images PMID:2001685

  11. Integrating hydrogeophysics and hydrological tracers to characterise the spatial structure of groundwater storage in the critical zone of montane environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J.; Tetzlaff, D.; Bradford, J.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    It is increasingly recognised that groundwater (GW) in montane watersheds has a major influence on the distribution of vegetation communities and ecosystem function, as well as sustaining downstream river flows. In glaciated landscapes, complex and heterogenous drift deposits can have a dominant influence on GW stores and fluxes, and form a poorly understood component of the critical zone. Given the logistical problems and limitations of drilling observation wells in such terrain, hydrogeophysics has outstanding potential to help characterise aquifer structure and understand shallow GW in the critical zone of montane environments. We present the results of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys in an intensively monitored 3.2km2 watershed in the Scottish Highlands with a strong glacial past. We sought to characterise the structure and spatial organisation of GW stores in diverse quaternary drift deposits. This utilized distributed ERT transects that provided a basis for spatial interpolation using geostatistical methods and high resolution LiDAR surveys. Some transects coincided with shallow observation wells that were used to "ground-truth" the inversion of resistivity data. The surveys showed that the drifts covered around 70% of the catchment and varied from 5m deep on the hillslopes to 40m in the valleys. The water table was within 0.2m of the soil surface in the valley bottom areas and about 1.5m deep on steeper hillslopes. The water content of drifts inferred by the ERT surveys and characterisation of the aquifer properties showed highest water content in the peat (~80%) and basal till (20-30%), and low storage in moraine deposits (10%). Upscaling these estimates of inferred storage to the catchment scale indicated around ~2-3 m of GW storage, equivalent to around 4-6 years of effective precipitation. This generally compared well with independent storage estimates inferred from long-term stable isotope time series collected from the aquifers

  12. A critical review of model-based economic studies of depression: modelling techniques, model structure and data sources.

    PubMed

    Haji Ali Afzali, Hossein; Karnon, Jonathan; Gray, Jodi

    2012-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder and is recognized as a chronic disease characterized by multiple acute episodes/relapses. Although modelling techniques play an increasingly important role in the economic evaluation of depression interventions, comparatively little attention has been paid to issues around modelling studies with a focus on potential biases. This, however, is important as different modelling approaches, variations in model structure and input parameters may produce different results, and hence different policy decisions. This paper presents a critical review of literature on recently published model-based cost-utility studies of depression. Taking depression as an illustrative example, through this review, we discuss a number of specific issues in relation to the use of decision-analytic models including the type of modelling techniques, structure of models and data sources. The potential benefits and limitations of each modelling technique are discussed and factors influencing the choice of modelling techniques are addressed. This review found that model-based studies of depression used various simulation techniques. We note that a discrete-event simulation may be the preferred technique for the economic evaluation of depression due to the greater flexibility with respect to handling time compared with other individual-based modelling techniques. Considering prognosis and management of depression, the structure of the reviewed models are discussed. We argue that a few reviewed models did not include some important structural aspects such as the possibility of relapse or the increased risk of suicide in patients with depression. Finally, the appropriateness of data sources used to estimate input parameters with a focus on transition probabilities is addressed. We argue that the above issues can potentially bias results and reduce the comparability of economic evaluations.

  13. Crystal structure of Clostridium thermocellum ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B reveals properties critical for fast enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jung, Junho; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Oh, Deok-Kun; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2011-04-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi) catalyzes the conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) to D-ribulose 5-phosphate, which is an important step in the non-oxidative pathway of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. Recently, Rpis have been used to produce valuable rare sugars for industrial purposes. Of the Rpis, D-ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B from Clostridium thermocellum (CtRpi) has the fastest reactions kinetics. While Thermotoga maritime Rpi (TmRpi) has the same substrate specificity as CtRpi, the overall activity of CtRpi is approximately 200-fold higher than that of TmRpi. To understand the structural basis of these kinetic differences, we determined the crystal structures, at 2.1-Å resolution or higher, of CtRpi alone and bound to its substrates, R5P, D-ribose, and D-allose. Structural comparisons of CtRpi and TmRpi showed overall conservation of their structures with two notable differences. First, the volume of the CtRpi substrate binding pocket (SBP) was 20% less than that of the TmRpi SBP. Second, the residues next to the sugar-ring opening catalytic residue (His98) were different. We switched the key residues, involved in SBP shaping or catalysis, between CtRpi and TmRpi by site-directed mutagenesis, and studied the enzyme kinetics of the mutants. We found that tight interactions between the two monomers, narrow SBP width, and the residues near the catalytic residue are all critical for the fast enzyme kinetics of CtRpi.

  14. Determining the influence of Itaipu Lake on thermal conditions for soybean development in adjacent lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Riddle, C.; Werner, S. S.; Caramori, P.; Ricce, W. S.; Nitsche, P.; von Bertoldi, P.; de Souza, E. F.

    2015-10-01

    Previous numerical simulations have suggested that the area adjacent to Itaipu Lake in Southern Brazil is significantly affecting the local thermal regime through development of a lake breeze. This has led to concerns that soybean growth and development, and consequently yield, has been affected by the creation of the artificial lake in this important agricultural region, but a systematic climatological study of the thermal effects of Itaipu Lake has not been conducted. The objectives of this study were to assess the spatial pattern of minimum and maximum air temperatures in a 10-km-wide area adjacent to Itaipu Lake as affected by distance from the water. Measurements were conducted over 3 years in seven transects along the shore of Itaipu Lake, with five weather stations placed in each transect. Phenological observations in soybean fields surrounding the weather stations were also conducted. Generalized additive models for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) analysis indicated no difference in the temperature time series as distance from water increased. Semivariograms showed that the random components in the air temperature were predominant and that there was no spatial structure to the signal. Wind direction measured over the three growing seasons demonstrated that, on average, the development of a lake breeze is limited to a few locations and a few hours of the day, supporting the temporal and spatial analysis. Phenological observations did not show differences in the timing of critical soybean stages. We suggest that the concerns that soybean development is potentially affected by the presence of Itaipu Lake are not supported by the thermal environment observed.

  15. Determining the influence of Itaipu Lake on thermal conditions for soybean development in adjacent lands.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Riddle, C; Werner, S S; Caramori, P; Ricce, W S; Nitsche, P; von Bertoldi, P; de Souza, E F

    2015-10-01

    Previous numerical simulations have suggested that the area adjacent to Itaipu Lake in Southern Brazil is significantly affecting the local thermal regime through development of a lake breeze. This has led to concerns that soybean growth and development, and consequently yield, has been affected by the creation of the artificial lake in this important agricultural region, but a systematic climatological study of the thermal effects of Itaipu Lake has not been conducted. The objectives of this study were to assess the spatial pattern of minimum and maximum air temperatures in a 10-km-wide area adjacent to Itaipu Lake as affected by distance from the water. Measurements were conducted over 3 years in seven transects along the shore of Itaipu Lake, with five weather stations placed in each transect. Phenological observations in soybean fields surrounding the weather stations were also conducted. Generalized additive models for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) analysis indicated no difference in the temperature time series as distance from water increased. Semivariograms showed that the random components in the air temperature were predominant and that there was no spatial structure to the signal. Wind direction measured over the three growing seasons demonstrated that, on average, the development of a lake breeze is limited to a few locations and a few hours of the day, supporting the temporal and spatial analysis. Phenological observations did not show differences in the timing of critical soybean stages. We suggest that the concerns that soybean development is potentially affected by the presence of Itaipu Lake are not supported by the thermal environment observed.

  16. Ambient pressure structural quantum critical point in the phase diagram of (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))(3)Rh(4)Sn(13).

    PubMed

    Goh, S K; Tompsett, D A; Saines, P J; Chang, H C; Matsumoto, T; Imai, M; Yoshimura, K; Grosche, F M

    2015-03-01

    The quasiskutterudite superconductor Sr_{3}Rh_{4}Sn_{13} features a pronounced anomaly in electrical resistivity at T^{*}∼138  K. We show that the anomaly is caused by a second-order structural transition, which can be tuned to 0 K by applying physical pressure and chemical pressure via the substitution of Ca for Sr. A broad superconducting dome is centered around the structural quantum critical point. Detailed analysis of the tuning parameter dependence of T^{*} as well as insights from lattice dynamics calculations strongly support the existence of a structural quantum critical point at ambient pressure when the fraction of Ca is 0.9 (i.e., x_{c}=0.9). This establishes the (Ca_{x}Sr_{1-x})_{3}Rh_{4}Sn_{13} series as an important system for exploring the physics of structural quantum criticality without the need of applying high pressures. PMID:25793843

  17. Structural and functional changes in the olfactory pathway of adult Drosophila take place at a critical age.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Jean-Marc; Acebes, Angel; Ramaswami, Mani; Ferrús, Alberto

    2003-07-01

    The olfactory system of several holometabolous insect species undergoes anatomical changes after eclosion of the imago, following those occurring during metamorphosis. In parallel, odor experience and learning performance also evolve with age. Here, we analyze the case of adult Drosophila females. Synaptogenesis in the antennal lobe (AL) starts in late pupa and continues during the first days of adult life, at the same time as the behavioral response to odors matures. Individual olfactory glomeruli (DM6, DM2, and V) display specific growth patterns between days 1 and 12 of adult life. Experience can modify the olfactory pathway both structurally and functionally as shown by adaptation experiments. The modifications associated with this form of nonassociative learning seem to take place at a critical age. Exposure to benzaldehyde at days 2-5 of adult life, but not at 8-11, causes behavioral adaptation as well as structural changes in DM2 and V glomeruli. Altered levels in intracellular cAMP, caused by dunce and rutabaga mutants, do not affect the normal changes in glomerular size, at least at day 6 of development, but they prevent those elicited by experience, establishing a molecular difference between glomerular changes of intrinsic versus environmental origin. Taken together, these data demonstrate an imprinting-like phenomenon in the olfactory pathway of young Drosophila adults, and illustrate its glomerulus-specific dynamics.

  18. High-speed scanning of critical structures in aviation using coordinate measurement machine and the laser ultrasonic.

    PubMed

    Swornowski, Pawel J

    2012-01-01

    Aviation is one of the know-how spheres containing a great deal of responsible sub-assemblies, in this case landing gear. The necessity for reducing production cycle times while achieving better quality compels metrologists to look for new and improved ways to perform inspection of critical structures. This article describes the ability to determine the shape deviation and location of defects in landing gear using coordinate measuring machines and laser ultrasonic with high-speed scanning. A nondestructive test is the basis for monitoring microcrack and corrosion propagation in the context of a damage-tolerant design approach. This article presents an overview of the basics and of the various metrological aspects of coordinate measurement and a nondestructive testing method in terms of high-speed scanning. The new test method (laser ultrasonic) promises to produce the necessary increase in inspection quality, but this is limited by the wide range of materials, geometries, and structure aeronautic parts used. A technique combining laser ultrasonic and F-SAFT (Fourier-Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) processing has been proposed for the detection of small defects buried in landing gear. The experimental results of landing gear inspection are also presented. PMID:22700384

  19. Critical Heat Flux for Downward-Facing Boiling on a Coated Hemispherical Vessel Surrounded by an Insulation Structure

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-05-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate the effects of surface coating and an enhanced insulation structure on the downward facing boiling process and the critical heat flux on the outer surface of a hemispherical vessel. Steady-state boiling tests were conducted in the Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling (SBLB) facility using an enhanced vessel/insulation design for the cases with and without vessel coatings. Based on the boiling data, CHF correlations were obtained for both plain and coated vessels. It was found that the nucleate boiling rates and the local CHF limits for the case with micro-porous layer coating were consistently higher than those values for a plain vessel at the same angular location. The enhancement in the local CHF limits and nucleate boiling rates was mainly due to the micro-porous layer coating that increased the local liquid supply rate toward the vaporization sites on the vessel surface. For the case with thermal insulation, the local CHF limit tended to increase from the bottom center at first, then decrease toward the minimum gap location, and finally increase toward the equator. This nonmonotonic behavior, which differed significantly from the case without thermal insulation, was evidently due to the local variation of the two-phase motions in the annular channel between the test vessel and the insulation structure.

  20. High-speed scanning of critical structures in aviation using coordinate measurement machine and the laser ultrasonic.

    PubMed

    Swornowski, Pawel J

    2012-01-01

    Aviation is one of the know-how spheres containing a great deal of responsible sub-assemblies, in this case landing gear. The necessity for reducing production cycle times while achieving better quality compels metrologists to look for new and improved ways to perform inspection of critical structures. This article describes the ability to determine the shape deviation and location of defects in landing gear using coordinate measuring machines and laser ultrasonic with high-speed scanning. A nondestructive test is the basis for monitoring microcrack and corrosion propagation in the context of a damage-tolerant design approach. This article presents an overview of the basics and of the various metrological aspects of coordinate measurement and a nondestructive testing method in terms of high-speed scanning. The new test method (laser ultrasonic) promises to produce the necessary increase in inspection quality, but this is limited by the wide range of materials, geometries, and structure aeronautic parts used. A technique combining laser ultrasonic and F-SAFT (Fourier-Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) processing has been proposed for the detection of small defects buried in landing gear. The experimental results of landing gear inspection are also presented.

  1. Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator Structural Analyses Supporting the NESC Critical Initial Flaw Size Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    The structural analyses described in the present report were performed in support of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Critical Initial Flaw Size (CIFS) assessment for the ARES I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) common shell segment. The structural analysis effort for the NESC assessment had three thrusts: shell buckling analyses, detailed stress analyses of the single-bolt joint test; and stress analyses of two-segment 10 degree-wedge models for the peak axial tensile running load. Elasto-plastic, large-deformation simulations were performed. Stress analysis results indicated that the stress levels were well below the material yield stress for the bounding axial tensile design load. This report also summarizes the analyses and results from parametric studies on modeling the shell-to-gusset weld, flange-surface mismatch, bolt preload, and washer-bearing-surface modeling. These analyses models were used to generate the stress levels specified for the fatigue crack growth assessment using the design load with a factor of safety.

  2. Critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering measurements of FinFET and 3D memory structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles; Bunday, Benjamin; Thiel, Brad; Kline, R. Joseph; Sunday, Daniel; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Wen-li; Matyi, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated that transmission critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) provides high accuracy and precision CD measurements on advanced 3D microelectronic architectures. The competitive advantage of CD-SAXS over current 3D metrology methods such as optical scatterometry is that CD-SAXS is able to decouple and fit cross-section parameters without any significant parameter cross-correlations. As the industry aggressively scales beyond the 22 nm node, CD-SAXS can be used to quantitatively measure nanoscale deviations in the average crosssections of FinFETs and high-aspect ratio (HAR) memory devices. Fitting the average cross-section of 18:1 isolated HAR contact holes with an effective trapezoid model yielded an average pitch of 796.9 +/- 0.4 nm, top diameter of 70.3 +/- 0.9 nm, height of 1088 +/- 4 nm, and sidewall angle below 0.1°. Simulations of dense 40:1 HAR contact holes and FinFET fin-gate crossbar structures have been analyzed using CD-SAXS to inquire the theoretical precision of the technique to measure important process parameters such as fin CD, height, and sidewall angle; BOX etch recess, thickness of hafnium oxide and titanium nitride layers; gate CD, height, and sidewall angle; and hafnium oxide and titanium nitride etch recess. The simulations of HAR and FinFET structures mimic the characteristics of experimental data collected at a synchrotron x-ray source. Using the CD-SAXS simulator, we estimate the measurement capabilities for smaller similar structures expected at future nodes to predict the applicability of this technique to fulfill important CD metrology needs.

  3. Structural and Geomorphic Controls on Dryland Salinity and Regolith Distribution in the Critical Zone, North-east Tasmania, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, M. E.; Moore, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Salinity occurs in the drier and flatter Australian landscapes because there is insufficient rain to flush salts from critical zone. Changes in land use due to agriculture and urbanisation can accelerate salinity effects, leading to soil and water degradation and threatening infrastructure and ecosystems. The dominant lithology in the salt affected regions of North-east Tasmania is dolerite. The geochemistry of dolerite regolith has been examined in order to understand the association between salinity and weathered dolerite. The electrical conductivity of 1:5 soil-waters is higher in the more weathered material (maximum 4.9 dS/m). This confirms field observations that highly weathered dolerite can serve as a significant store for salt in the landscape. However, the clay content and salinity varies, depending on the local geomorphic context. Dolerite weathering on well-drained slopes has favoured the formation of 1:1 kaolinite clays, and sometimes bauxite formation. Kaolinite-bearing regolith can store salt via matrix diffusion processes. However, there are fault-bounded pockets of colluvium and highly-weathered in situmaterial, where the supply of cations has not been diminished and 2:1 montmorillonite clays dominate. These regions have the capacity to store large volumes of salts. The geomorphology also affects the volume of rain and flux of salt from windblown dust and oceanic aerosols. The chemistry of rainwater from an array of bulk deposition collectors was studied from Spring 2013 to Winter 2014. The average salt flux was 79± 10 kg/ha/yr in the study region, ranging from 170± 12 kg/ha/yr in the north to 42 ± 6 kg/ha/yr inland. To assist in understanding why salt is found in certain parts of the landscape but not in others, it is essential to model how water moves through the critical zone and geological structures. By exploring the complex interactions of geomorphology and other biophysical parameters the study area has been divided into Hydrogeological

  4. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  5. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  6. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods for select space propulsion system components (PSAM). Volume 2: Literature surveys of critical Space Shuttle main engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopal, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    The technical effort and computer code development is summarized. Several formulations for Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis (PFEA) are described with emphasis on the selected formulation. The strategies being implemented in the first-version computer code to perform linear, elastic PFEA is described. The results of a series of select Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) component surveys are presented. These results identify the critical components and provide the information necessary for probabilistic structural analysis. Volume 2 is a summary of critical SSME components.

  7. Magnetic transition from the paramagnetic to long-period structure in RMn2O5 multiferroics: Renormalization group analysis of critical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men'shenin, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    A transition from the paramagnetic state to a long-period magnetic structure with an incommensurate wave vector along one crystallographic axis in RMn2O5 multiferroics is considered. An effective Hamiltonian for these oxides is constructed with allowance for spin fluctuations. Critical points are found, and their stability is analyzed using the renormalization group approach. It is shown that critical fluctuations in these compounds admit a second-order phase transition with respect to a multicomponent order parameter.

  8. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  13. Treatment of Symptomatic Osteoma on Eyebrow Using Adjacent Supraorbital Neuroperiosteal Flap.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Park, Jun Ho; Choi, Chang Yong

    2016-07-01

    Osteomas grow slowly, blocking or compressing adjacent structures, and frequently causing aesthetic deformity. Although most patients remain asymptomatic, development of facial pain and headaches due to compression of adjacent sensory nerves is not uncommon. Depending on the location of osteoma, many techniques were introduced to remove it. If the osteoma was located close to important structures such as nerves and vessels, surgeons can be concerned about damaging them resulting in unfavorable symptoms to patients. Osteoma is a benign slow-growing osteogenic lesion, composed of well-differentiated mature bone tissue, characterized by the proliferation of compact or cancellous bone, and found in the head and neck region. It is often slow growing and asymptomatic, diagnosed incidentally on radiographs. It can cause deformation of the bone and compression of the adjacent structures such as nerve compression. This case shows how symptomatic osteoma can be successfully extracted. PMID:27315313

  14. Analysis of core-periphery organization in protein contact networks reveals groups of structurally and functionally critical residues.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Arnold Emerson; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2015-10-01

    The representation of proteins as networks of interacting amino acids, referred to as protein contact networks (PCN), and their subsequent analyses using graph theoretic tools, can provide novel insights into the key functional roles of specific groups of residues. We have characterized the networks corresponding to the native states of 66 proteins (belonging to different families) in terms of their core-periphery organization. The resulting hierarchical classification of the amino acid constituents of a protein arranges the residues into successive layers - having higher core order - with increasing connection density, ranging from a sparsely linked periphery to a densely intra-connected core (distinct from the earlier concept of protein core defined in terms of the three-dimensional geometry of the native state, which has least solvent accessibility). Our results show that residues in the inner cores are more conserved than those at the periphery. Underlining the functional importance of the network core, we see that the receptor sites for known ligand molecules of most proteins occur in the innermost core. Furthermore, the association of residues with structural pockets and cavities in binding or active sites increases with the core order. From mutation sensitivity analysis, we show that the probability of deleterious or intolerant mutations also increases with the core order. We also show that stabilization centre residues are in the innermost cores, suggesting that the network core is critically important in maintaining the structural stability of the protein. A publicly available Web resource for performing core-periphery analysis of any protein whose native state is known has been made available by us at http://www.imsc.res.in/ ~sitabhra/proteinKcore/index.html.

  15. Random mutagenesis of yeast 25S rRNA identify bases critical for 60S subunit structural integrity and function

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Chowdhury, Wasimul; Kitabatake, Makoto; Shin, Byung-shik; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Wang, Suzhi; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Brown, Susan J.; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Asano, Katsura

    2013-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 25S rRNA makes up the major mass and shape of the 60S ribosomal subunit. During translation initiation, the 60S subunit joins the 40S initiation complex, producing the 80S initiation complex. During elongation, the 60S subunit binds the CCA-ends of aminoacyl- and peptidyl-tRNAs at the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, transferring the peptide onto the α-amino group of the aminoacyl-tRNA. To study the role of 25S rRNA in translation in vivo, we randomly mutated 25S rRNA and isolated and characterized seven point mutations that affected yeast cell growth and polysome profiles. Four of these mutations, G651A, A1435U, A1446G and A1587G, change a base involved in base triples crucial for structural integrity. Three other mutations change bases near the ribosomal surface: C2879U and U2408C alter the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, and G1735A maps near a Eukarya-specific bridge to the 40S subunit. By polysome profiling in mmslΔ mutants defective in nonfunctional 25S rRNA decay, we show that some of these mutations are defective in both the initiation and elongation phases of translation. Of the mutants characterized, C2879U displays the strongest defect in translation initiation. The ribosome transit-time assay directly shows that this mutation is also defective in peptide elongation/termination. Thus, our genetic analysis not only identifies bases critical for structural integrity of the 60S subunit, but also suggests a role for bases near the peptidyl transferase center in translation initiation. PMID:26824023

  16. Upper critical field of KFe2As2 under pressure: A test for the change in the superconducting gap structure

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Foroozani, Neda; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Lim, Jinhyuk; Kaluarachchi, Udhara; Kim, Stella K.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Kogan, Vladimir G.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Schilling, James S.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-06-01

    We report measurements of electrical resistivity under pressure to 5.8 GPa, magnetization to 6.7 GPa, and ac susceptibility to 7.1 GPa in KFe2As2. The previously reported change of slope in the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature Tc(p) at a pressure p*~1.8 GPa is confirmed, and Tc(p) is found to be nearly constant above p* up to 7.1 GPa. The T-p phase diagram is very sensitive to the pressure conditions as a consequence of the anisotropic uniaxial pressure dependence of Tc. Across p*, a change in the behavior of the upper critical field is revealed through a scaling analysis of the slope of Hc2 with the effective mass as determined from the A coefficient of the T2 term of the temperature-dependent resistivity. We show that this scaling provides a quantitative test for the changes of the superconducting gap structure and suggests the development of a kz modulation of the superconducting gap above p* as a most likely explanation.

  17. The Importance of Southern Hemisphere CZOs for Evaluating Spatial Patterns of Chemical Structure in the Critical Zone and Assisting Human Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, O.

    2014-12-01

    The US Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN) is a network of sites designed to provide a better understanding of the integrated Earth surface system. The capacity of the critical zone to withstand perturbations, whether driven by climate, land use change, or spread of invasive species, depends on its chemical composition and physical state, which in turn depends on the time evolution of the critical zone. Many temperate and/or tectonically active critical zones contain a relatively short history due to rapid erosion but tectonically quiescent, tropical regions of the planet contain much longer records that need to be understood to cover the full suite of critical zone processes. Southern Hemisphere Critical Zone Observatories such as those proposed for Kruger National Park (KNP) in South Africa and for portions of the Yilgarn Craton in Western Australa will allow us to extend our temporal understanding of development of spatial heterogeneity in the chemical and physical structure of the critical zone. In addition to considering Earth and climate boundary conditions, these sites incorporate the roles that humans play in driving critical zone processes. For instance along the edges of KNP there is strong evidence of soil erosions due to periurbanization and small-scale agriculture. The existence of KNP provides an important contrast between a "natural" and "human-dominated" landscape that can be exploited to evaluate human impacts on critical zone resources and to develop targeted mitigation strategies. Western Australia has an exploitive economy that relies on large-scale agriculture and mineral extraction, both are intensive users of water which is scarce. The proposed CZO there will be partly focused on managing water under intense economic pressures. It is evident that if funding can be found for these sites they will enhance both critical zone science and practical applied science.

  18. Geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Dilamarter, R.C.

    1982-07-01

    The geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas in Indiana, Illinois and Tennessee is presented as a background for interpreters evaluating the present land surface using remotely sensed imagery. Eight physiographic units were analyzed and are briefly discussed with reference to topography and surface deposits. Great diversity was found to be characteristic of the region, the result of different structural influences and geomorphic processes. The landscape bears the marks of fluvial, glacial, eolian, lacustrine and karstic environments, so a regional geomorphic history was compiled from the literature as an aid to understanding the land surface. Three smaller zones in Kentucky were analyzed in greater detail regarding topography and geomorphic development because of their potential importance in subsurface exploration.

  19. An engineered dimeric protein pore that spans adjacent lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Shiksha; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Cheley, Stephen; Sharp, Thomas H.; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-01-01

    The bottom-up construction of artificial tissues is an underexplored area of synthetic biology. An important challenge is communication between constituent compartments of the engineered tissue and between the engineered tissue and additional compartments, including extracellular fluids, further engineered tissue and living cells. Here we present a dimeric transmembrane pore that can span two adjacent lipid bilayers and thereby allow aqueous compartments to communicate. Two heptameric staphylococcal α-hemolysin (αHL) pores were covalently linked in an aligned cap-to-cap orientation. The structure of the dimer, (α7)2, was confirmed by biochemical analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-channel electrical recording. We show that one of two β barrels of (α7)2 can insert into the lipid bilayer of a small unilamellar vesicle, while the other spans a planar lipid bilayer. (α7)2 pores spanning two bilayers were also observed by TEM. PMID:23591892

  20. Correlations between critical current density, j{sub c}, critical temperature, T{sub c}, and structural quality of Y{sub 1}B{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} thin superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, J.; Xing, W.B.; Atlan, D.

    1994-12-31

    Correlations between critical current density (j{sub c}) critical temperature (T{sub c}) and the density of edge dislocations and nonuniform strain have been observed in YBCO thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} single crystals. Distinct maxima in j{sub c} as a function of the linewidths of the (00{ell}) Bragg reflections and as a function of the mosaic spread have been found in the epitaxial films. These maxima in j{sub c} indicate that the magnetic flux lines, in films of structural quality approaching that of single crystals, are insufficiently pinned which results in a decreased critical current density. T{sub c} increased monotonically with improving crystalline quality and approached a value characteristic of a pure single crystal. A strong correlation between j{sub c} and the density of edge dislocations N{sub D} was found. At the maximum of the critical current density the density of edge dislocations was estimated to be N{sub D}{approximately}1-2 x 10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}.

  1. Correlations between critical current density, j(sub c), critical temperature, T(sub c),and structural quality of Y1B2Cu3O(7-x) thin superconducting films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrzanowski, J.; Xing, W. B.; Atlan, D.; Irwin, J. C.; Heinrich, B.; Cragg, R. A.; Zhou, H.; Angus, V.; Habib, F.; Fife, A. A.

    1995-01-01

    Correlations between critical current density (j(sub c)) critical temperature (T(sub c)) and the density of edge dislocations and nonuniform strain have been observed in YBCO thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation on (001) LaAlO3 single crystals. Distinct maxima in j(sub c) as a function of the linewidths of the (00 l) Bragg reflections and as a function of the mosaic spread have been found in the epitaxial films. These maxima in j(sub c) indicate that the magnetic flux lines, in films of structural quality approachingthat of single crystals, are insufficiently pinned which results in a decreased critical current density. T(sub c) increased monotonically with improving crystalline quality and approached a value characteristic of a pure single crystal. A strong correlation between j(sub c) and the density of edge dislocations ND was found. At the maximum of the critical current density the density of edge dislocations was estimated to be N(sub D) approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm.

  2. Correlations between critical current density, j{sub c}, critical temperature, T{sub c}, and structural quality of Y1B2Cu3O(7-x) thin superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, J.; Xing, W.B.; Atlan, D.; Irwin, J.C.; Heinrich, B.; Cragg, R.A.; Zhou, H.; Angus, V.; Habib, F.; Fife, A.A.

    1995-04-01

    Correlations between critical current density (j{sub c}) critical temperature (T{sub c}) and the density of edge dislocations and nonuniform strain have been observed in YBCO thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation on (001) LaAlO3 single crystals. Distinct maxima in j{sub c} as a function of the linewidths of the (00 l) Bragg reflections and as a function of the mosaic spread have been found in the epitaxial films. These maxima in j{sub c} indicate that the magnetic flux lines, in films of structural quality approaching that of single crystals, are insufficiently pinned which results in a decreased critical current density. T{sub c} increased monotonically with improving crystalline quality and approached a value characteristic of a pure single crystal. A strong correlation between j{sub c} and the density of edge dislocations ND was found. At the maximum of the critical current density the density of edge dislocations was estimated to be N{sub D} approximately 1-2 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm.

  3. Species-level view of population structure and gene flow for a critically endangered primate (Varecia variegata)

    PubMed Central

    Baden, Andrea L; Holmes, Sheila M; Johnson, Steig E; Engberg, Shannon E; Louis, Edward E; Bradley, Brenda J

    2014-01-01

    Lemurs are among the world's most threatened mammals. The critically endangered black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata), in particular, has recently experienced rapid population declines due to habitat loss, ecological sensitivities to habitat degradation, and extensive human hunting pressure. Despite this, a recent study indicates that ruffed lemurs retain among the highest levels of genetic diversity for primates. Identifying how this diversity is apportioned and whether gene flow is maintained among remnant populations will help to diagnose and target conservation priorities. We sampled 209 individuals from 19 sites throughout the remaining V. variegata range. We used 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci and ∼550 bp of mtDNA sequence data to evaluate genetic structure and population dynamics, including dispersal patterns and recent population declines. Bayesian cluster analyses identified two distinct genetic clusters, which optimally partitioned data into populations occurring on either side of the Mangoro River. Localities north of the Mangoro were characterized by greater genetic diversity, greater gene flow (lower genetic differentiation) and higher mtDNA haplotype and nucleotide diversity than those in the south. Despite this, genetic differentiation across all sites was high, as indicated by high average FST (0.247) and ΦST (0.544), and followed a pattern of isolation-by-distance. We use these results to suggest future conservation strategies that include an effort to maintain genetic diversity in the north and restore connectivity in the south. We also note the discordance between patterns of genetic differentiation and current subspecies taxonomy, and encourage a re-evaluation of conservation management units moving forward. PMID:25077019

  4. Long-Term Retention of an Intraorbital Metallic Foreign Body Adjacent to the Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Andrew N.; Deng, Jie; Miller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic 47 year-old male patient who suffered a penetrating wound from a metallic foreign body that became embedded adjacent to the optic nerve for over thirty years, as well as the associated examination, imaging, and fundus photography. Intraorbital metallic foreign bodies can be well tolerated and may not require surgical intervention despite proximity to important structures.

  5. Remodeling in myocardium adjacent to an infarction in the pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Scott D; Criscione, John; Covell, James W

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the structure of the "normal" ventricular wall adjacent to an infarcted area involve all components of the myocardium (myocytes, fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and the coronary vasculature) and their three-dimensional structural relationship. Assessing changes in these components requires tracking material markers in the remodeling tissue over long periods of time with a three-dimensional approach as well as a detailed histological evaluation of the remodeled structure. The purpose of the present study was to examine the hypotheses that changes in the tissue adjacent to an infarct are related to myocyte elongation, myofiber rearrangement, and changes in the laminar architecture of the adjacent tissue. Three weeks after myocardial infarction, noninfarcted tissue adjacent to the infarct remodeled by expansion along the direction of the fibers and in the cross fiber direction. These changes are consistent with myocyte elongation and myofiber rearrangement (slippage), as well as a change in cell shape to a more elliptical cross section with the major axis in the epicardial tangent plane, and indicate that reorientation of fibers either via "cell slippage" or changes in orientation of the laminar structure of the ventricular wall are quantitatively important aspects of the remodeling of the normally perfused myocardium.

  6. Implicit acquisition of grammars with crossed and nested non-adjacent dependencies: investigating the push-down stack model.

    PubMed

    Uddén, Julia; Ingvar, Martin; Hagoort, Peter; Petersson, Karl M

    2012-08-01

    A recent hypothesis in empirical brain research on language is that the fundamental difference between animal and human communication systems is captured by the distinction between finite-state and more complex phrase-structure grammars, such as context-free and context-sensitive grammars. However, the relevance of this distinction for the study of language as a neurobiological system has been questioned and it has been suggested that a more relevant and partly analogous distinction is that between non-adjacent and adjacent dependencies. Online memory resources are central to the processing of non-adjacent dependencies as information has to be maintained across intervening material. One proposal is that an external memory device in the form of a limited push-down stack is used to process non-adjacent dependencies. We tested this hypothesis in an artificial grammar learning paradigm where subjects acquired non-adjacent dependencies implicitly. Generally, we found no qualitative differences between the acquisition of non-adjacent dependencies and adjacent dependencies. This suggests that although the acquisition of non-adjacent dependencies requires more exposure to the acquisition material, it utilizes the same mechanisms used for acquiring adjacent dependencies. We challenge the push-down stack model further by testing its processing predictions for nested and crossed multiple non-adjacent dependencies. The push-down stack model is partly supported by the results, and we suggest that stack-like properties are some among many natural properties characterizing the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms that implement the online memory resources used in language and structured sequence processing.

  7. Sound insulation property of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials carrying different masses at adjacent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuguang; Wen, Jihong; Zhao, Honggang; Yu, Dianlong; Cai, Li; Wen, Xisen

    2013-08-01

    We present the experimental realization and theoretical understanding of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials embedded with different masses at adjacent cells, capable of increasing the transmission loss at low frequency. Owing to the reverse vibration of adjacent cells, Transmission loss (TL) peaks appear, and the magnitudes of the TL peaks exceed the predicted results of the composite wall. Compared with commonly used configuration, i.e., all cells carrying with identical mass, the nonuniformity of attaching masses causes another much low TL peak. Finite element analysis was employed to validate and provide insights into the TL behavior of the structure.

  8. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  9. Ambient Pressure Structural Quantum Critical Point in the Phase Diagram of (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Swee K.; Tompsett, D. A.; Saines, P. J.; Chang, H. C.; Matsumoto, T.; Imai, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Grosche, F. M.

    The quasiskutterudite superconductor Sr3Rh4Sn13 features a pronounced anomaly in electrical resistivity at T* ~ 138 K. The anomaly is caused by a second-order structural transition, which can be tuned to 0 K by applying physical pressure and chemical pressure via the substitution of Ca for Sr. A broad superconducting dome is centered around the structural quantum critical point. Detailed analysis of the tuning parameter dependence of T* as well as insights from lattice dynamics calculations strongly support the existence of a structural quantum critical point at ambient pressure when the fraction of Ca is 0.9 (xc=0.9). This establishes the (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13 series as an important system for exploring the physics of structural quantum criticality and its interplay with the superconductivity, without the need of applying high pressures. This work was supported by CUHK (Startup Grant, Direct Grant No. 4053071), UGC Hong Kong (ECS/24300214), Trinity College (Cam- bridge), Grants-in-Aid from MEXT (No. 22350029 and 23550152) and Glasstone Bequest (Oxford).

  10. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  11. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  12. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  14. Structure determination of human Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule and identification of the critical residues linking the interdomain interaction to the anti-apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoming; Qu, Linglong; Ma, Shuaipeng; Wu, Yujie; Jin, Changwen; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2014-07-01

    Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) is a highly conserved anti-apoptotic protein which plays important roles in cells. There are two isoforms of FAIM, of which the short isoform FAIM-S is broadly expressed in all tissues, whereas the long isoform FAIM-L is exclusively expressed in the nervous system. No structure of human FAIM has been reported to date and the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-apoptotic function of FAIM remain unknown. Here, the crystal structure of the human FAIM-S N-terminal domain (NTD) and the NMR solution structure of the human FAIM-S C-terminal domain (CTD) were determined. The structures revealed that the NTD and CTD adopt a similar protein fold containing eight antiparallel β-strands which form two sheets. Both structural and biochemical analyses implied that the NTD exists as a dimer and the CTD as a monomer and that they can interact with each other. Several critical residues were identified to be involved in this interaction. Moreover, mutations of these critical residues also interfered in the anti-apoptotic activity of FAIM-S. Thus, the structural and functional data presented here will provide insight into the anti-apoptotic mechanism of FAIM-S.

  15. Students' Perception of the Logical Structure of Curricular as Compared with Everyday Contexts--Study of Critical Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyfus, A.; Jungwirth, E.

    1980-01-01

    Compares critical thinking ability of pupils in scientific situations and in real-life situations by administering multiple choice tests to Israeli ninth graders (N=344). Results confirm that students do not react similarly when confronted with equivalent situations presented in different contexts. (CS)

  16. Strong Coupling Superconductivity in the Vicinity of the Structural Quantum Critical Point in (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Cheung, Yiu Wing; Saines, Paul J.; Imai, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Michioka, Chishiro; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Goh, Swee K.

    The family of the superconducting quasiskutterudites (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13 features a structural quantum critical point at xc = 0 . 9 , around which a dome-shaped variation of the superconducting transition temperature Tc is found. In this talk, we present the specific heat data for the normal and the superconducting states of the entire series straddling the quantum critical point. Our analysis indicates a significant lowering of the effective Debye temperature on approaching xc, which we interpret as a result of phonon softening accompanying the structural instability. Furthermore, a remarkably large enhancement of 2 Δ /kBTc and ΔC / γTc beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer values is found in the vicinity of the structural quantum critical point. Reference: Wing Chi Yu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press, 2015) This work was supported by the CUHK (Startup Grant, Direct Grant No. 4053071), UGC Hong Kong (ECS/24300214), Grants-in-Aid from MEXT (22350029 and 23550152), and Glasstone Bequest, Oxford.

  17. T.H. Huxley's criticism of German cell theory: an epigenetic and physiological interpretation of cell structure.

    PubMed

    Richmond, M L

    2000-01-01

    In 1853, the young Thomas Henry Huxley published a long review of German cell theory in which he roundly criticized the basic tenets of the Schleiden-Schwann model of the cell. Although historians of cytology have dismissed Huxley's criticism as based on an erroneous interpretation of cell physiology, the review is better understood as a contribution to embryology. "The Cell-theory" presents Huxley's "epigenetic" interpretation of histological organization emerging from changes in the protoplasm to replace the "preformationist" cell theory of Schleiden and Schwann (as modified by Albert von Kolliker), which posited the nucleus as the seat of organic vitality. Huxley's views influenced a number of British biologists, who continued to oppose German cell theory well into the twentieth century. Yet Huxley was pivotal in introducing the new German program of "scientific zoology" to Britain in the early 1850s, championing its empiricist methodology as a means to enact broad disciplinary and institutional reforms in British natural history. PMID:11640226

  18. A critical analysis of air shower structure functions and size spectrum measurements with the NBU air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Basak, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 11,000 showers in the size range 10 to the 4 to 10 to the 6 particles so far detected by the NBU air shower array has been analyzed using five different structure functions. A comparison of structure functions in terms: (1) of shower size; and (2) electron density at various core distances has been discussed to indicate the present status of structure functions in air shower analysis.

  19. Preparation and properties of adjacency crosslinked polyurethane-urea elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan; Cao, Yu-Yang; Wu, Shou-Peng; Li, Zai-Feng

    2012-12-01

    Adjacency crosslinked polyurethane-urea (PUU) elastomers with different crosslinking density were prepared by using hydroxyl-terminated liquid butadiene-nitrile (HTBN), toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and chain extender 3,5-dimethyl thio-toluene diamine (DMTDA) as raw materials, dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as initiator, and N,N'-m-phenylene dimaleimide (HVA-2) as the crosslinking agent. The influences of the crosslinking density and temperature on the structure and properties of such elastomers were investigated. The crosslinking density of PUU elastomer was tested by the NMR method. It is found that when the content of HVA-2 is 1.5%, the mechanical properties of polyurethane elastomer achieve optimal performance. By testing thermal performance of PUU, compared with linear PUU, the thermal stability of the elastomers has a marked improvement. With the addition of HVA-2, the loss factor tan δ decreases. FT-IR spectral studies of PUU elastomer at various temperatures were performed. From this study, heat-resistance polyurethane could be prepared, and the properties of PUU at high temperature could be improved obviously.

  20. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  1. Critical assumptions: thinking critically about critical thinking.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Thelma

    2007-03-01

    The concept of critical thinking has been featured in nursing literature for the past 20 years. It has been described but not defined by both the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the National League for Nursing, although their corresponding accreditation bodies require that critical thinking be included in nursing curricula. In addition, there is no reliable or valid measurement tool for critical thinking ability in nursing. As a result, there is a lack of research support for the assumptions that critical thinking can be learned and that critical thinking ability improves clinical competence. Brookfield suggested that commitments should be made only after a period of critically reflective analysis, during which the congruence between perceptions and reality are examined. In an evidence-based practice profession, we, as nurse educators, need to ask ourselves how we can defend our assumptions that critical thinking can be learned and that critical thinking improves the quality of nursing practice, especially when there is virtually no consensus on a definition.

  2. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  3. The Effects of High-Structure Cooperative versus Low-Structure Collaborative Design of Decision Change, Critical Thinking, and Interaction Pattern during Online Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joung, Sunyoung; Keller, John M.

    2004-01-01

    The terms "cooperative" and "collaborative" are sometimes used interchangeably in reference to group learning activities in classrooms and in online settings. However, they can be viewed as differing in terms of characteristics such as pre-structure, task structure, and content structure (Strijbos & Martens, 2001; Panitz, 1996). This study…

  4. Critical Initial Flaw Size Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Cheston, Derrick J.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The USS consists of several "tuna can" segments that are approximately 216 inches in diameter, 115 inches tall, and 0.5 inches thick. A 6 inch wide by 1 inch thick flange is welded to the skin and is used to fasten adjacent tuna cans. A schematic of a "tuna can" and the location of the flange-to-skin weld are shown in Figure 1. Gussets (shown in yellow in Figure 1) are welded to the skin and flange every 10 degrees around the circumference of the "tuna can". The flange-to-skin weld is a flux core butt weld with a fillet weld on the inside surface, as illustrated in Figure 2. The welding process may create loss of fusion defects in the weld that could develop into fatigue cracks and jeopardize the structural integrity of the Ares I-X vehicle. The CIFS analysis was conducted to determine the largest crack in the weld region that will not grow to failure within 4 lifetimes, as specified by NASA standard 5001 & 5019 [1].

  5. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  7. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  8. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  11. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  12. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  13. 2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. 7; THIS CONTROL GATE IS A 1980s RECONSTRUCTION. - Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lift Lock No. 7 & Control Gate, East side of DuPage River, Channahon, Will County, IL

  14. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  15. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. 28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  19. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  20. GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM DREY STREET PLANT, INSIDE WELCOME WALL - Chambers Window Glass Company, Warehouse & Shipping, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  1. 10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF REAR PORCH. SHED IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Butt Valley Dam, Gate Tender's House, Butt Valley Reservoir Road, Caribou, Plumas County, CA

  2. Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance of the northwest wing - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  4. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  6. 31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  8. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  9. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  10. Lifetime measurements in 102Pd: Searching for empirical proof of the E(5) critical-point symmetry in nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinopoulos, T.; Ashley, S. F.; Axiotis, M.; Spyrou, A.; Harissopulos, S.; Dewald, A.; Litzinger, J.; Möller, O.; Müller-Gatterman, C.; Petkov, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; de Angelis, G.; Ur, C. A.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Lenzi, S. M.; Vlastou, R.; Balabanski, D.

    2016-01-01

    Lifetimes of yrast and nonyrast states of 102Pd populated via the 92Zr(13C, 3 n ) reaction are measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique with a Cologne plunger coupled to a GASP spectrometer. The event-by-event data accumulated at 24 plunger distances in the range of 0.1 μ m to 9 mm are analyzed using the differential decay curve method. The resulting B (E 2 ) values of the γ transitions depopulating yrast-band members up to the Iπ=8+ state are found to deviate significantly from the corresponding predictions of the E(5) critical-point symmetry.

  11. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  12. Decoupling Contributions from Canopy Structure and Leaf Optics is Critical for Remote Sensing Leaf Biochemistry (Reply to Townsend, et al.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knyazikhin, Yuri; Lewis, Philip; Disney, Mathias I.; Stenberg, Pauline; Mottus, Matti; Rautianinen, Miina; Kaufmann, Robert K.; Marshak, Alexander; Schull, Mitchell A.; Carmona, Pedro Latorre; Vanderbilt, Vern; Davis, Anthony B.; Baret, Frederic; Jacquemoud, Stephane; Lyapustin, Alexei; Yang, Yan; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2013-01-01

    Townsend et al. (1) agree that we explained that the apparent relationship (2) between foliar nitrogen (%N) and near-infrared (NIR) canopy reflectance was largely attributable to structure (which is in turn caused by variation in fraction of broadleaf canopy). Our conclusion that the observed correlation with %N was spurious (i.e., lacking a causal basis) is, thus, clearly justified: we demonstrated that structure explained the great majority of observed correlation, where the structural influence was derived precisely via reconciling the observed correlation with radiative-transfer theory. What this also suggests is that such correlations, although observed, do not uniquely provide information on canopy biochemical constituents.

  13. Critical Care

    MedlinePlus

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  14. Investigations on critical parameters, growth, structural and spectral studies of beta-alaninium picrate (BAP) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, D.; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Beta-alaninium picrate (BAP) salt has been synthesized and the solubility of the synthesized sample in double distilled water was determined at different temperatures. Solution stability was studied by observing the metastable zone width by employing the polythermal method. Induction period values for different supersaturation ratios at room temperature were determined based on the isothermal method. The nucleation parameters such as critical radius, critical free energy change, interfacial tension, and nucleation rate have been estimated for BAP salt on the basis of the classical nucleation theory. The lattice parameters of the grown BAP crystal were determined using the x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder XRD study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Fourier transform-Raman studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the BAP crystal. The nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal was studied using the Kurtz-Perry powder technique. UV-visible spectral studies were carried out to understand optical transparency and the type of band gap of the grown BAP crystal.

  15. Crystal Structures and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermophilic Malate Dehydrogenase Reveal Critical Loop Motion for Co-Substrate Binding

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huei-Ru; Wu, Szu-Pei; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate and malate by using the NAD/NADH coenzyme system. The system is used as a conjugate for enzyme immunoassays of a wide variety of compounds, such as illegal drugs, drugs used in therapeutic applications and hormones. We elucidated the biochemical and structural features of MDH from Thermus thermophilus (TtMDH) for use in various biotechnological applications. The biochemical characterization of recombinant TtMDH revealed greatly increased activity above 60°C and specific activity of about 2,600 U/mg with optimal temperature of 90°C. Analysis of crystal structures of apo and NAD-bound forms of TtMDH revealed a slight movement of the binding loop and few structural elements around the co-substrate binding packet in the presence of NAD. The overall structures did not change much and retained all related positions, which agrees with the CD analyses. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at higher temperatures were used to reconstruct structures from the crystal structure of TtMDH. Interestingly, at the simulated structure of 353 K, a large change occurred around the active site such that with increasing temperature, a mobile loop was closed to co-substrate binding region. From biochemical characterization, structural comparison and MD simulations, the thermal-induced conformational change of the co-substrate binding loop of TtMDH may contribute to the essential movement of the enzyme for admitting NAD and may benefit the enzyme's activity. PMID:24386145

  16. Archetypal Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesebro, James W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Argues that archetypal criticism is a useful way of examining universal, historical, and cross-cultural symbols in classrooms. Identifies essential features of an archetype; outlines operational and critical procedures; illustrates archetypal criticism as applied to the cross as a symbol; and provides a synoptic placement for archetypal criticism…

  17. Critical Social Numeracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Presents a five-step method to develop the critical numeracy knowledge of numerically intimidated students. Examines the method in detail, discussing Piagetian diagnostic tools and how to adapt the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) taxonomy to teach critical numeracy. (CMK)

  18. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  19. Critical thickness of high structural quality SrTiO3 films grown on orthorhombic (101) DyScO3

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Marilyn E; Biegalski, Michael D; Schlom, Darrell G

    2008-01-01

    Strained epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} films were grown on orthorhombic (101) DyScO{sub 3} substrates by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. The epitaxy of this substrate/film combination is cube on cube with a pseudocubic out-of-plane (001) orientation. The strain state and structural perfection of films with thicknesses ranging from 50 to 1000 {angstrom} were examined using x-ray scattering. The critical thickness at which misfit dislocations was introduced was between 350 and 500 {angstrom}. These films have the narrowest rocking curves (full width at half maximum) ever reported for any heteroepitaxial oxide film (0.0018{sup o}). Only a modest amount of relaxation is seen in films exceeding the critical thicknesses even after postdeposition annealing at 700{sup o}C in 1 atm of oxygen. The dependence of strain relaxation on crystallographic direction is attributed to the anisotropy of the substrate. These SrTiO{sub 3} films show structural quality more typical of semiconductors such as GaAs and silicon than perovskite materials; their structural relaxation behavior also shows similarity to that of compound semiconductor films.

  20. Protein Structural Studies by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Critical Look at Electrospray Sources and Calibration Issues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Vahidi, Siavash; Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The question whether electrosprayed protein ions retain solution-like conformations continues to be a matter of debate. One way to address this issue involves comparisons of collision cross sections (Ω) measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with Ω values calculated for candidate structures. Many investigations in this area employ traveling wave IMS (TWIMS). It is often implied that nanoESI is more conducive for the retention of solution structure than regular ESI. Focusing on ubiquitin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, we demonstrate that Ω values and collisional unfolding profiles are virtually indistinguishable under both conditions. These findings suggest that gas-phase structures and ion internal energies are independent of the type of electrospray source. We also note that TWIMS calibration can be challenging because differences in the extent of collisional activation relative to drift tube reference data may lead to ambiguous peak assignments. It is demonstrated that this problem can be circumvented by employing collisionally heated calibrant ions. Overall, our data are consistent with the view that exposure of native proteins to electrospray conditions can generate kinetically trapped ions that retain solution-like structures on the millisecond time scale of TWIMS experiments. ᅟ PMID:26369778

  1. Protein Structural Studies by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Critical Look at Electrospray Sources and Calibration Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Vahidi, Siavash; Sowole, Modupeola A.; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The question whether electrosprayed protein ions retain solution-like conformations continues to be a matter of debate. One way to address this issue involves comparisons of collision cross sections (Ω) measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with Ω values calculated for candidate structures. Many investigations in this area employ traveling wave IMS (TWIMS). It is often implied that nanoESI is more conducive for the retention of solution structure than regular ESI. Focusing on ubiquitin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, we demonstrate that Ω values and collisional unfolding profiles are virtually indistinguishable under both conditions. These findings suggest that gas-phase structures and ion internal energies are independent of the type of electrospray source. We also note that TWIMS calibration can be challenging because differences in the extent of collisional activation relative to drift tube reference data may lead to ambiguous peak assignments. It is demonstrated that this problem can be circumvented by employing collisionally heated calibrant ions. Overall, our data are consistent with the view that exposure of native proteins to electrospray conditions can generate kinetically trapped ions that retain solution-like structures on the millisecond time scale of TWIMS experiments.

  2. Critical Thinking vs. Critical Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores four kinds of critical thinking. The first is found in Socratic dialogues, which employ critical thinking mainly to reveal logical fallacies in common opinions, thus cleansing superior minds of error and leaving philosophers free to contemplate universal verities. The second is critical interpretation (hermeneutics) which…

  3. Critically Thinking about Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author states that "critical thinking" has mesmerized academics across the political spectrum and that even high school students are now being called upon to "think critically." He furthers adds that it is no exaggeration to say that "critical thinking" has quickly evolved into a scholarly…

  4. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  5. Structural Motifs Critical for In Vivo Function and Stability of the RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein Rmi1

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jessica A.; Syed, Salahuddin; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2015-01-01

    Rmi1 is a member of the Sgs1/Top3/Rmi1 (STR) complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been implicated in binding and catalytic enhancement of Top3 in the dissolution of double Holliday junctions. Deletion of RMI1 results in a severe growth defect resembling that of top3Δ. Despite the importance of Rmi1 for cell viability, little is known about its functional domains, particularly in Rmi1 of S. cerevisiae, which does not have a resolved crystal structure and the primary sequence is poorly conserved. Here, we rationally designed point mutations based on bioinformatics analysis of order/disorder and helical propensity to define three functionally important motifs in yeast Rmi1 outside of the proposed OB-fold core. Replacing residues F63, Y218 and E220 with proline, designed to break predicted N-terminal and C-terminal α-helices, or with lysine, designed to eliminate hydrophobic residues at positions 63 and 218, while maintaining α-helical structure, caused hypersensitivity to hydroxyurea. Further, Y218P and E220P mutations, but not F63P and F63K mutations, led to reduced Rmi1 levels compared to wild type Rmi1, suggesting a role of the C-terminal α-helix in Rmi1 stabilization, most likely by protecting the integrity of the OB-fold core. Our bioinformatics analysis also suggests the presence of a disordered linker between the N-terminal α-helix and the OB fold core; a P88A mutation, designed to increase helicity in this linker, also impaired Rmi1 function in vivo. In conclusion, we propose a model that maps all functionally important structural features for yeast Rmi1 based on biological findings in yeast and structure-prediction-based alignment with the recently established crystal structure of the N-terminus of human Rmi1. PMID:26717309

  6. Seismotectonics of Northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Aggarwal, Y.P.

    1981-06-10

    Data for local earthquakes recorded by a network of stations in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada were analyzed to study the seismicity, the relationship between earthquakes and known faults, the state of stress, and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. In addition, portable seismographs were deployed in the field to study aftershocks. As a result, accurate locations for about 364 local earthquakes (2< or =m/sub b/< or =5) and 22 focal mechanism solutions were determined. A comparison of the spatial distribution of these events (1970--1979) with historical earthquakes (1534--1959) reveals that seismic activity in the northeast is relatively stationary in space: those areas that have had little or no seismicity historically are relatively aseismic today, whereas the historically active areas are also active today. The instrumental locations, historical seismicity, and focal mechanism solutions show an internal consistency that help us distinguish two distinct seismogenic provinces. (1) The Adirondack-western Quebec province is a northwesterly trending zone of seismic activity, about 200 km wide and at least 500 km long, extending from the SE Adirondacks into western Quebec, Canada. Thrust faulting on planes striking NNW to NW appears to predominate, and the inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression is largely uniform and trends WSW, nearly parallel to the calculated absolute plate motion of North America. Little or no seismicity is found where anorthosite outcrops at the surface. Correlations between gravity anomalies and earthquake locations suggest that seismic activity in this zone is localized to regions of steep NE or SW gradient in Bouguer anomalies. This zone does not appear to extend southeastward to Boston, as proposed by some workers. (2) The Appalachian province is a northeasterly trending zone of seismic activity extending from northern Virginia to New Brunswick, Canada.

  7. Bird communities of highway verges: Influence of adjacent habitat and roadside management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Francis D.; Verheyden, Christophe; Jouventin, Pierre

    1999-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of landscape traversed and roadside structure on the use of highway verges by birds. Three contrasted landscapes were chosen in terms of human land use and vegetation structure: an intensive farmland, a pine plantation, and a matoral. The roadside sections varied in vegetation structure, width and profile. We recorded birds present in roadsides and adjacent habitats by transect counts over all seasons. Roadside bird species appeared for a great part similar to those of adjacent habitats. However, diversity and abundance in verges did not depend on that of adjacent habitats. Woody roadsides were comparable to hedges, as trees (and shrubs) in verges enhanced species richness and abundance of birds in the farmland and woodland sites. Width and profile of verges had less influence. In all sites, typical species of the habitat traversed partly avoided roadsides. On the contrary, numerous species associated with 'rare' habitats in one site preferred roadsides, provided that verge vegetation contrasted with the dominant habitat. It is concluded that birds responses to highways can vary greatly with landscape traversed and verge vegetation. Highway verges could be favorable to birds, if they constitute a complementary habitat to the dominant habitat within a landscape.

  8. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Daeyoup; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61–211, DUSP26-C), the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39–211, DUSP26-N) with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S) monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop) observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS) measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S) exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S) revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S) serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27583453

  9. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Daeyoup; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61-211, DUSP26-C), the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39-211, DUSP26-N) with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S) monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop) observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS) measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S) exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S) revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S) serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27583453

  10. In situ measurements of the critical thickness for strain relaxation in β-GaN/MgO structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Caro, M.; Mejía, Alfredo Campos; Rodríguez, A. G.; Navarro-Contreras, H.; Vidal, M. A.

    2009-02-01

    It is demonstrated by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) studies that the growth of cubic GaN on MgO occurs in a layer-by-layer mode under Ga-rich conditions, growth rates 0.25-0.30 ML/s and 700 °C substrate temperature. From streak-spacing analysis of the observed RHEED patterns, it is possible to infer that the GaN layer grows pseudomorphically on MgO up to 3 monolayers (ML). After that, a relaxation process begins and the layer-by-layer or 2-dimensional growth changes to a columnar or 3-dimensional growth, as evidenced by the transformation of the RHEED patterns, which change from streaky to spotty. The experimental critical thickness ( h c) value of 3 ML is close to the prediction of the Frank-van der Merwe classical model of 2.5 ML. Other models predict h c values 3-6 times the experimental value experimentally observed.

  11. Protein structure plays a critical role in peanut allergen stability and may determine immunodominant IgE-binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Moon; Kopper, Randall; Pons, Laurent; Abraham, Edathara C; Burks, A Wesley; Bannon, Gary A

    2002-07-15

    Hypersensitivity to peanuts is a reaction mediated by IgE Abs in response to several peanut protein allergens. Among these allergenic proteins, Ara h 2 is one of the most commonly recognized allergens. Ara h 2 is a 17-kDa protein that has eight cysteine residues that could form up to four disulfide bonds. Circular dichroism studies showed substantial changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of the reduced Ara h 2 as compared with the native protein. Upon treatment with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or pepsin, a number of relatively large fragments are produced that are resistant to further enzymatic digestion. These resistant Ara h 2 peptide fragments contain intact IgE-binding epitopes and several potential enzyme cut sites that are protected from the enzymes by the compact structure of the protein. The enzyme-treated allergen remains essentially intact despite the action of proteases until the fragments are dissociated when the disulfide linkages are reduced. Amino acid sequence analysis of the resistant protein fragments indicates that they contain most of the immunodominant IgE-binding epitopes. These results provide a link between allergen structure and the immunodominant IgE-binding epitopes within a population of food-allergic individuals.

  12. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant

    PubMed Central

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Fessenden, James D.; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca2+-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2–1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding. PMID:26245150

  13. Critical effect of the N2 amino group on structure, dynamics, and elasticity of DNA polypurine tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Lankas, Filip; Cheatham, Thomas E; Spacková, Nad'a; Hobza, Pavel; Langowski, Jörg; Sponer, Jirí

    2002-01-01

    Unrestrained 5-20-ns explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations using the Cornell et al. force field have been carried out for d[GCG(N)11GCG]2 (N, purine base) considering guanine*cytosine (G*C), adenine*thymine (A*T), inosine*5-methyl-cytosine (I*mC), and 2-amino-adenine*thymine (D*T) basepairs. The simulations unambiguously show that the structure and elasticity of N-tracts is primarily determined by the presence of the amino group in the minor groove. Simulated A-, I-, and AI-tracts show almost identical structures, with high propeller twist and minor groove narrowing. G- and D-tracts have small propeller twisting and are partly shifted toward the A-form. The elastic properties also differ between the two groups. The sequence-dependent electrostatic component of base stacking seems to play a minor role. Our conclusions are entirely consistent with available experimental data. Nevertheless, the propeller twist and helical twist in the simulated A-tract appear to be underestimated compared to crystallographic studies. To obtain further insight into the possible force field deficiencies, additional multiple simulations have been made for d(A)10, systematically comparing four major force fields currently used in DNA simulations and utilizing B and A-DNA forms as the starting structure. This comparison shows that the conclusions of the present work are not influenced by the force field choice. PMID:11964246

  14. Terahertz radiation from InAlAs and GaAs surface intrinsic-N+ structures and the critical electric fields of semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Lin, H. C.; Lin, K. I.; Zhang, X. C.

    2005-09-01

    This study examines terahertz radiation from a series of In0.52Al0.48As and GaAs surface-intrinsic-N+ structures (SIN+) with surface-intrinsic layers of various thicknesses. The built-in electric fields in the SIN+ structures are used as the bias. Experimental results indicate that the amplitudes of the THz emission are independent of the built-in electric fields in the emitters when the built-in electric fields exceed the corresponding critical electric fields of the semiconductors. In contrast, the amplitudes of the THz emission are proportional to the thickness of the intrinsic layer and, therefore, the number of photo-excited charged carriers.

  15. Structural Studies of Lipopolysaccharide-defective Mutants from Brucella melitensis Identify a Core Oligosaccharide Critical in Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Carolina; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Ståhle, Jonas; Holst, Otto; Iriarte, Maite; Zhao, Yun; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Seán; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the lipooligosaccharides from Brucella melitensis mutants affected in the WbkD and ManBcore proteins have been fully characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The results revealed that disruption of wbkD gives rise to a rough lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) with a complete core structure (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-α-d-Manp-(1→5)]-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P), in addition to components lacking one of the terminal β-d-GlcpN and/or the β-d-Glcp residues (48 and 17%, respectively). These structures were identical to those of the R-LPS from B. melitensis EP, a strain simultaneously expressing both smooth and R-LPS, also studied herein. In contrast, disruption of manBcore gives rise to a deep-rough pentasaccharide core (β-d-Glcp-(1→4)-α-Kdop-(2→4)-α-Kdop-(2→6)-β-d-GlcpN3N4P-(1→6)-α-d-GlcpN3N1P) as the major component (63%), as well as a minor tetrasaccharide component lacking the terminal β-d-Glcp residue (37%). These results are in agreement with the predicted functions of the WbkD (glycosyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of the O-antigen) and ManBcore proteins (phosphomannomutase involved in the biosynthesis of a mannosyl precursor needed for the biosynthesis of the core and O-antigen). We also report that deletion of B. melitensis wadC removes the core oligosaccharide branch not linked to the O-antigen causing an increase in overall negative charge of the remaining LPS inner section. This is in agreement with the mannosyltransferase role predicted for WadC and the lack of GlcpN residues in the defective core oligosaccharide. Despite carrying the O-antigen essential in B. melitensis virulence, the core deficiency in the wadC mutant structure resulted in a more efficient detection by innate immunity and attenuation, proving the role of the β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)-β-d-GlcpN-(1→4)[β-d-GlcpN-(1→6)]-β-d-GlcpN-(1→3)-

  16. Using discharge data to reduce structural deficits in a hydrological model with a Bayesian inference approach and the implications for the prediction of critical source areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. P.; Stamm, C.; Schneider, M. K.; Reichert, P.

    2011-12-01

    A distributed hydrological model was used to simulate the distribution of fast runoff formation as a proxy for critical source areas for herbicide pollution in a small agricultural catchment in Switzerland. We tested to what degree predictions based on prior knowledge without local measurements could be improved upon relying on observed discharge. This learning process consisted of five steps: For the prior prediction (step 1), knowledge of the model parameters was coarse and predictions were fairly uncertain. In the second step, discharge data were used to update the prior parameter distribution. Effects of uncertainty in input data and model structure were accounted for by an autoregressive error model. This step decreased the width of the marginal distributions of parameters describing the lower boundary (percolation rates) but hardly affected soil hydraulic parameters. Residual analysis (step 3) revealed model structure deficits. We modified the model, and in the subsequent Bayesian updating (step 4) the widths of the posterior marginal distributions were reduced for most parameters compared to those of the prior. This incremental procedure led to a strong reduction in the uncertainty of the spatial prediction. Thus, despite only using spatially integrated data (discharge), the spatially distributed effect of the improved model structure can be expected to improve the spatially distributed predictions also. The fifth step consisted of a test with independent spatial data on herbicide losses and revealed ambiguous results. The comparison depended critically on the ratio of event to preevent water that was discharged. This ratio cannot be estimated from hydrological data only. The results demonstrate that the value of local data is strongly dependent on a correct model structure. An iterative procedure of Bayesian updating, model testing, and model modification is suggested.

  17. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-10-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  18. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  19. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  20. Critical rearing parameters of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as affected by host plant substrate and host-parasitoid group structure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jian J; Oppel, Craig

    2012-06-01

    In laboratory assays, we evaluated the potential impact of host plant substrate types, host-parasitoid group sizes (densities), and parasitoid-to-host ratios on select fitness parameters of the larval endoparasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), newly introduced for biological control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in the United States. Results from our study showed that offspring production and critical fitness parameters (body size and sex ratio) of T. planipennisi from parasitized emerald ash borer larvae are significantly influenced by host plant substrate type, host-parasitoid group size, parasitoid-to-host ratio, or a combination in the primary exposure assay. The number of both female and male T. planipennisi progeny was significantly greater when emerald ash borer larvae were inserted into tropical ash [Fraxinus uhdei (Wenz.) Lingelsh.] logs rather than green ash (Fraxinus pensylvanica Marshall). When maintained at a constant 1:1 parasitoid-to-host ratio, assays with larger host-parasitoid group sizes (3:3-12:12) produced significantly greater numbers of both male and female offspring per parental wasp compared with those with the single host-parasitoid (1:1) group treatment. As the parasitoid-to-host ratio increased from 1:1 to 8:1 in the assay, the average brood size (number of offspring per parasitized emerald ash borer larva) increased significantly, whereas the average brood sex ratio (female to male) changed from being female-biased (6:1) to male-biased (1:2); body size of female offspring as measured by the length of ovipositor and left hind tibia also was reduced significantly. Based on these findings, we suggest that the current method of rearing T. planipennisi with artificially infested-emerald ash borer larvae use the tropical ash logs for emerald ash borer insertion, a larger (> or = 3:3) host-parasitoid group size and 1:1 parasitoid-to-host ratio in the primary

  1. Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Human APOBEC3B and the Critical Structural Role for a Conserved Methionine.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Sachini U; Guruge, Thisari A; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2015-09-25

    Human APOBEC3B deaminates cytosines in DNA and belongs to the AID/APOBEC family of enzymes. These proteins are involved in innate and adaptive immunity and may cause mutations in a variety of cancers. To characterize its ability to convert cytosines into uracils, we tested several derivatives of APOBEC3B gene for their ability to cause mutations in Escherichia coli. Through this analysis, a methionine residue at the junction of the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential for high mutagenicity. Properties of mutants with substitutions at this position, examination of existing molecular structures of APOBEC3 family members and molecular modeling suggest that this residue is essential for the structural stability of this family of proteins. The APOBEC3B CTD with the highest mutational activity was purified to homogeneity and its kinetic parameters were determined. Size-exclusion chromatography of the CTD monomer showed that it is in equilibrium with its dimeric form and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the protein suggested that the dimer may be quite stable. The partially purified NTD did not show intrinsic deamination activity and did not enhance the activity of the CTD in biochemical assays. Finally, APOBEC3B was at least 10-fold less efficient at mutating 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to thymine than APOBEC3A in a genetic assay and was at least 10-fold less efficient at deaminating 5mC compared to C in biochemical assays. These results shed light on the structural organization of APOBEC3B catalytic domain, its substrate specificity and its possible role in causing genome-wide mutations.

  2. On the Adjacent Eccentric Distance Sum Index of Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui; Cao, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    For a given graph G, ε(v) and deg(v) denote the eccentricity and the degree of the vertex v in G, respectively. The adjacent eccentric distance sum index of a graph G is defined as ξsv(G)=∑v∈V(G)ε(v)D(v)deg(v), where D(v)=∑u∈V(G)d(u,v) is the sum of all distances from the vertex v. In this paper we derive some bounds for the adjacent eccentric distance sum index in terms of some graph parameters, such as independence number, covering number, vertex connectivity, chromatic number, diameter and some other graph topological indices. PMID:26091095

  3. Structural Identification of the Vps18 β-Propeller Reveals a Critical Role in the HOPS Complex Stability and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Heide; Lürick, Anna; Kuhlee, Anne; Balderhaar, Henning Kleine; Bröcker, Cornelia; Kümmel, Daniel; Engelbrecht-Vandré, Siegfried; Gohlke, Ulrich; Raunser, Stefan; Heinemann, Udo; Ungermann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion at the vacuole, the lysosome equivalent in yeast, requires the HOPS tethering complex, which is recruited by the Rab7 GTPase Ypt7. HOPS provides a template for the assembly of SNAREs and thus likely confers fusion at a distinct position on vacuoles. Five of the six subunits in HOPS have a similar domain prediction with strong similarity to COPII subunits and nuclear porins. Here, we show that Vps18 indeed has a seven-bladed β-propeller as its N-terminal domain by revealing its structure at 2.14 Å. The Vps18 N-terminal domain can interact with the N-terminal part of Vps11 and also binds to lipids. Although deletion of the Vps18 N-terminal domain does not preclude HOPS assembly, as revealed by negative stain electron microscopy, the complex is instable and cannot support membrane fusion in vitro. We thus conclude that the β-propeller of Vps18 is required for HOPS stability and function and that it can serve as a starting point for further structural analyses of the HOPS tethering complex. PMID:25324549

  4. Structural Analysis of the Interaction between Dishevelled2 and Clathrin AP-2 Adaptor, A Critical Step in Noncanonical Wnt Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Anan; Xing, Yi; Harrison, Stephen C.; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2010-10-14

    Wnt association with its receptor, Frizzled (Fz), and recruitment by the latter of an adaptor, Dishevelled (Dvl), initiates signaling through at least two distinct pathways (canonical and noncanonical). Endocytosis and compartmentalization help determine the signaling outcome. Our previous work has shown that Dvl2 links at least one Frizzled family member (Fz4) to clathrin-mediated endocytosis by interacting with the {mu}2 subunit of the AP-2 clathrin adaptor, through both a classical endocytic tyrosine motif and a so-called DEP domain. We report here the crystal structure of a chimeric protein that mimics the Dvl2-{mu}2 complex. The DEP domain binds at one end of the elongated, C-terminal domain of {mu}2. This domain:domain interface shows that parts of the {mu}2 surface distinct from the tyrosine-motif site can help recruit specific receptors or adaptors into a clathrin coated pit. Mutation of residues at the DEP-{mu}2 contact or in the tyrosine motif reduce affinity of Dvl2 for {mu}2 and block efficient internalization of Fz4 in response to ligation by Wnt5a. The crystal structure has thus allowed us to identify the specific interaction that leads to Frizzled uptake and to downstream, noncanonical signaling events.

  5. A Critical Comparison of Biomembrane Force Fields: Structure and Dynamics of Model DMPC, POPC, and POPE Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Kirsch, Sonja A; Han, Jing; Sun, Liping; Jiang, Zhenyan; Unruh, Tobias; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-04-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have become an important source of information for the structure and dynamics of biomembranes at molecular detail difficult to access in experiments. A number of force fields for lipid membrane simulations have been derived in the past; the choice of the most suitable force field is, however, frequently hampered by the availability of parameters for specific lipids. Additionally, the comparison of different quantities among force fields is often aggravated by varying simulation parameters. Here, we compare four atomistic lipid force fields, namely, the united-atom GROMOS54a7 and the all-atom force fields CHARMM36, Slipids, and Lipid14, for a broad range of structural and dynamical properties of saturated and monounsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers (DMPC and POPC) as well as for monounsaturated phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers (POPE). Additionally, the ability of the different force fields to describe the gel-liquid crystalline phase transition is compared and their computational efficiency estimated. Moreover, membrane properties like the water flux across the lipid bilayer and lipid acyl chain protrusion probabilities are compared.

  6. Technical decision making with higher order structure data: utilization of differential scanning calorimetry to elucidate critical protein structural changes resulting from oxidation.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Kelly K; Dinh, Nikita; Gabrielson, John P

    2015-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a useful tool for monitoring thermal stability of the molecular conformation of proteins. Here, we present an example of the sensitivity of DSC to changes in stability arising from a common chemical degradation pathway, oxidation. This Note is part of a series of industry case studies demonstrating the application of higher order structure data for technical decision making. For this study, six protein products from three structural classes were evaluated at multiple levels of oxidation. For each protein, the melting temperature (Tm ) decreased linearly as a function of oxidation; however, differences in the rate of change in Tm , as well as differences in domain Tm stability were observed across and within structural classes. For one protein, analysis of the impact of oxidation on protein function was also performed. For this protein, DSC was shown to be a leading indicator of decreased antigen binding suggesting a subtle conformation change may be underway that can be detected using DSC prior to any observable impact on product potency. Detectable changes in oxidized methionine by mass spectrometry (MS) occurred at oxidation levels below those with a detectable conformational or functional impact. Therefore, by using MS, DSC, and relative potency methods in concert, the intricate relationship between a primary structural modification, changes in conformational stability, and functional impact can be elucidated.

  7. Three new structures of left-handed RADA helical filaments: structural flexibility of N-terminal domain is critical for recombinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lee, Chien-Der; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lin, Kuei-Ann; Chang, Chia-Seng; Wang, Andrew H-J; Wang, Ting-Fang

    2009-01-01

    RecA family proteins, including bacterial RecA, archaeal RadA, and eukaryotic Dmc1 and Rad51, mediate homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genome integrity. In the presence of ATP, these proteins bind a single-strand DNA to form a right-handed nucleoprotein filament, which catalyzes pairing and strand exchange with a homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), by as-yet unknown mechanisms. We recently reported a structure of RadA left-handed helical filament, and here present three new structures of RadA left-handed helical filaments. Comparative structural analysis between different RadA/Rad51 helical filaments reveals that the N-terminal domain (NTD) of RadA/Rad51, implicated in dsDNA binding, is highly flexible. We identify a hinge region between NTD and polymerization motif as responsible for rigid body movement of NTD. Mutant analysis further confirms that structural flexibility of NTD is essential for RadA's recombinase activity. These results support our previous hypothesis that ATP-dependent axial rotation of RadA nucleoprotein helical filament promotes homologous recombination.

  8. Critical Muralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  9. Prose and Poetry Classification and Boundary Detection Using Word Adjacency Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxas, Ranzivelle Marianne; Tapang, Giovanni

    Word adjacency networks constructed from written works reflect differences in the structure of prose and poetry. We present a method to disambiguate prose and poetry by analyzing network parameters of word adjacency networks, such as the clustering coefficient, average path length and average degree. We determine the relevant parameters for disambiguation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and the effect size criterion. The accuracy of the method is 74.9 ± 2.9% for the training set and 73.7 ± 6.4% for the test set which are greater than the acceptable classifier requirement of 67.3%. This approach is also useful in locating text boundaries within a single article which falls within a window size where the significant change in clustering coefficient is observed. Results indicate that an optimal window size of 75 words can detect the text boundaries.

  10. 4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side of bridge, taken from river level. Note entire east side and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  11. 12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO THE STEEL PLANT OFFICES. BAR AND BILLET MILLS AND, IN THE DISTANCE, THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES MAY BE SEEN. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. 8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking south. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead setting. Note laced vertical compression members, latticed portal strut, decorative strut bracing, and lightness of diagonal and lateral tension members. View to southeast through southeast portal from truss mid-span. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  14. 11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent Blacksmith Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to southwest (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  15. 1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN BUILDING (BASSIN'S RESTAURANT) (HABS No. DC-357), 501-511 14TH STREET (THE LOCKER ROOM) HABS No. DC-356) ON CORNER, AND MUNSEY BUILDING (HABS No. DC-358) - William J. Stone Building, 1345 E Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ENTRY TO NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON RIGHT, AND HOUSING AREA ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  2. 7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL CONVEYOR; IN THE DISTANCE IS THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SWITCH HOUSE NO. 1; LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  3. 4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN BUILDING PERIODS 1 AND 3. NOTE REUSED WOOD STRIP NAILED TO BUILDING PERIOD 1 POST INSCRIBED 'ST. LEONARD'. THERE ARE NO NAIL HOLES IN THE PERIOD 3 POST, THE FARRING STRIPS ADJUST FOR CLADDING - Charles' Gift, State Routes 2 & 4, Lusby, Calvert County, MD

  4. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  5. 12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE CANAL, LOOKING EAST. BARREN AREA IN FOREGROUND IS DECOMPOSING SAWDUST. DIRT PILE IN BACKGROUND IS THE EDGE OF THE SUMMIT COUNTY LANDFILL. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  6. LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ROOM; THE PIPES AT THE BOTTOM ARE PART OF THE RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM USED FOR HEATING THE FACTORY DURING COLD WEATHER. - Westmoreland Glass Company, Seventh & Kier Streets, Grapeville, Westmoreland County, PA

  7. How subaerial salt extrusions influence water quality in adjacent aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Razieh; Zarei, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ezzat

    2015-12-01

    Brines supplied from salt extrusions cause significant groundwater salinization in arid and semi-arid regions where salt rock is exposed to dissolution by episodic rainfalls. Here we focus on 62 of the 122 diapirs of Hormuz salt emergent in the southern Iran. To consider managing the degradation effect that salt extrusions have on the quality of adjoining aquifers, it is first necessary to understand how they influence adjacent water resources. We evaluate here the impacts that these diapirs have on adjacent aquifers based on investigating their geomorphologies, geologies, hydrologies and hydrogeologies. The results indicate that 28/62 (45%) of our sample of salt diapirs have no significant impact on the quality of groundwater in adjoining aquifers (namely Type N), while the remaining 34/62 (55%) degrade nearby groundwater quality. We offer simple conceptual models that account for how brines flowing from each of these types of salt extrusions contaminate adjacent aquifers. We identify three main mechanisms that lead to contamination: surface impact (Type A), subsurface intrusion (Type B) and indirect infiltration (Type C). A combination of all these mechanisms degrades the water quality in nearby aquifers in 19/62 (31%) of the salt diapirs studied. Having characterized the mechanism(s) by which each diapir affects the adjacent aquifer, we suggest a few possible remediation strategies to be considered. For instance, engineering the surface runoff of diapirs Types A and C into nearby evaporation basins would improve groundwater quality.

  8. Can electromagnetic fields influence the structure and enzymatic digest of proteins? A critical evaluation of microwave-assisted proteomics protocols

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Markus; Nusshold, Christoph; Cantillo, David; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Gruber, Karl; Sattler, Wolfgang; Kappe, C. Oliver

    2012-01-01

    This study reevaluates the putative advantages of microwave-assisted tryptic digests compared to conventionally heated protocols performed at the same temperature. An initial investigation of enzyme stability in a temperature range of 37–80 °C demonstrated that trypsin activity declines sharply at temperatures above 60 °C, regardless if microwave dielectric heating or conventional heating is employed. Tryptic digests of three proteins of different size (bovine serum albumin, cytochrome c and β-casein) were thus performed at 37 °C and 50 °C using both microwave and conventional heating applying accurate internal fiber-optic probe reaction temperature measurements. The impact of the heating method on protein degradation and peptide fragment generation was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS. Time-dependent tryptic digestion of the three proteins and subsequent analysis of the corresponding cleavage products by MALDI-TOF provided virtually identical results for both microwave and conventional heating. In addition, the impact of electromagnetic field strength on the tertiary structure of trypsin and BSA was evaluated by molecular mechanics calculations. These simulations revealed that the applied field in a typical laboratory microwave reactor is 3–4 orders of magnitude too low to induce conformational changes in proteins or enzymes. PMID:22889711

  9. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C; Beilman, Greg J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Schacker, Timothy W; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T

    2012-08-30

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1-infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution.

  10. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA’s MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12504.001 PMID:26765568

  11. A critical appraisal of the zero-multipole method: Structural, thermodynamic, dielectric, and dynamical properties of a water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Nakamura, Haruki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2016-03-01

    We performed extensive and strict tests for the reliability of the zero-multipole (summation) method (ZMM), which is a method for estimating the electrostatic interactions among charged particles in a classical physical system, by investigating a set of various physical quantities. This set covers a broad range of water properties, including the thermodynamic properties (pressure, excess chemical potential, constant volume/pressure heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and thermal expansion coefficient), dielectric properties (dielectric constant and Kirkwood-G factor), dynamical properties (diffusion constant and viscosity), and the structural property (radial distribution function). We selected a bulk water system, the most important solvent, and applied the widely used TIP3P model to this test. In result, the ZMM works well for almost all cases, compared with the smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) method that was carefully optimized. In particular, at cut-off radius of 1.2 nm, the recommended choices of ZMM parameters for the TIP3P system are α ≤ 1 nm-1 for the splitting parameter and l = 2 or l = 3 for the order of the multipole moment. We discussed the origin of the deviations of the ZMM and found that they are intimately related to the deviations of the equilibrated densities between the ZMM and SPME, while the magnitude of the density deviations is very small.

  12. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA's MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. PMID:26765568

  13. A critical appraisal of the zero-multipole method: Structural, thermodynamic, dielectric, and dynamical properties of a water system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Nakamura, Haruki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2016-03-21

    We performed extensive and strict tests for the reliability of the zero-multipole (summation) method (ZMM), which is a method for estimating the electrostatic interactions among charged particles in a classical physical system, by investigating a set of various physical quantities. This set covers a broad range of water properties, including the thermodynamic properties (pressure, excess chemical potential, constant volume/pressure heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and thermal expansion coefficient), dielectric properties (dielectric constant and Kirkwood-G factor), dynamical properties (diffusion constant and viscosity), and the structural property (radial distribution function). We selected a bulk water system, the most important solvent, and applied the widely used TIP3P model to this test. In result, the ZMM works well for almost all cases, compared with the smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) method that was carefully optimized. In particular, at cut-off radius of 1.2 nm, the recommended choices of ZMM parameters for the TIP3P system are α ≤ 1 nm(-1) for the splitting parameter and l = 2 or l = 3 for the order of the multipole moment. We discussed the origin of the deviations of the ZMM and found that they are intimately related to the deviations of the equilibrated densities between the ZMM and SPME, while the magnitude of the density deviations is very small.

  14. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C.; Beilman, Greg J.; Chipman, Jeffrey G.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Silvestri, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1–infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution. PMID:22613799

  15. Sequence-structure correlations in silk: Poly-Ala repeat of N. clavipes MaSp1 is naturally optimized at a critical length scale.

    PubMed

    Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-03-01

    Spider silk is a self-assembling biopolymer that outperforms many known materials in terms of its mechanical performance despite being constructed from simple and inferior building blocks. While experimental studies have shown that the molecular structure of silk has a direct influence on the stiffness, toughness, and failure strength of silk, few molecular-level analyses of the nanostructure of silk assemblies in particular under variations of genetic sequences have been reported. Here we report atomistic-level structures of the MaSp1 protein from the Nephila Clavipes spider dragline silk sequence, obtained using an in silico approach based on replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and explicit water molecular dynamics. We apply this method to study the effects of a systematic variation of the poly-alanine repeat lengths, a parameter controlled by the genetic makeup of silk, on the resulting molecular structure of silk at the nanoscale. Confirming earlier experimental and computational work, a structural analysis reveals that poly-alanine regions in silk predominantly form distinct and orderly β-sheet crystal domains while disorderly regions are formed by glycine-rich repeats that consist of 3(10)-helix type structures and β-turns. Our predictions are directly validated against experimental data based on dihedral angle pair calculations presented in Ramachandran plots combined with an analysis of the secondary structure content. The key result of our study is our finding of a strong dependence of the resulting silk nanostructure depending on the poly-alanine length. We observe that the wildtype poly-alanine repeat length of six residues defines a critical minimum length that consistently results in clearly defined β-sheet nanocrystals. For poly-alanine lengths below six, the β-sheet nanocrystals are not well-defined or not visible at all, while for poly-alanine lengths at and above six, the characteristic nanocomposite structure of silk emerges with no

  16. Sequence-structure correlations in silk: Poly-Ala repeat of N. clavipes MaSp1 is naturally optimized at a critical length scale.

    PubMed

    Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-03-01

    Spider silk is a self-assembling biopolymer that outperforms many known materials in terms of its mechanical performance despite being constructed from simple and inferior building blocks. While experimental studies have shown that the molecular structure of silk has a direct influence on the stiffness, toughness, and failure strength of silk, few molecular-level analyses of the nanostructure of silk assemblies in particular under variations of genetic sequences have been reported. Here we report atomistic-level structures of the MaSp1 protein from the Nephila Clavipes spider dragline silk sequence, obtained using an in silico approach based on replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and explicit water molecular dynamics. We apply this method to study the effects of a systematic variation of the poly-alanine repeat lengths, a parameter controlled by the genetic makeup of silk, on the resulting molecular structure of silk at the nanoscale. Confirming earlier experimental and computational work, a structural analysis reveals that poly-alanine regions in silk predominantly form distinct and orderly β-sheet crystal domains while disorderly regions are formed by glycine-rich repeats that consist of 3(10)-helix type structures and β-turns. Our predictions are directly validated against experimental data based on dihedral angle pair calculations presented in Ramachandran plots combined with an analysis of the secondary structure content. The key result of our study is our finding of a strong dependence of the resulting silk nanostructure depending on the poly-alanine length. We observe that the wildtype poly-alanine repeat length of six residues defines a critical minimum length that consistently results in clearly defined β-sheet nanocrystals. For poly-alanine lengths below six, the β-sheet nanocrystals are not well-defined or not visible at all, while for poly-alanine lengths at and above six, the characteristic nanocomposite structure of silk emerges with no

  17. Structure-Function Analyses of a Staphylococcus epidermidis Autoinducing Peptide Reveals Motifs Critical for AgrC-type Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tian; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-07-15

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is frequently implicated in human infections associated with indwelling medical devices due to its ubiquity in the skin flora and formation of robust biofilms. The accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system plays a prominent role in the establishment of biofilms and infection by this bacterium. Agr activation is mediated by the binding of a peptide signal (or autoinducing peptide, AIP) to its cognate AgrC receptor. Many questions remain about the role of QS in S. epidermidis infections, as well as in mixed-microbial populations on a host, and chemical modulators of its agr system could provide novel insights into this signaling network. The AIP ligand provides an initial scaffold for the development of such probes; however, the structure-activity relationships (SARs) for activation of S. epidermidis AgrC receptors by AIPs are largely unknown. Herein, we report the first SAR analyses of an S. epidermidis AIP by performing systematic alanine and d-amino acid scans of the S. epidermidis AIP-I. On the basis of these results, we designed and identified potent, pan-group inhibitors of the AgrC receptors in the three S. epidermidis agr groups, as well as a set of AIP-I analogs capable of selective AgrC inhibition in either specific S. epidermidis agr groups or in another common staphylococcal species, S. aureus. In addition, we uncovered a non-native peptide agonist of AgrC-I that can strongly inhibit S. epidermidis biofilm growth. Together, these synthetic analogs represent new and readily accessible probes for investigating the roles of QS in S. epidermidis colonization and infections.

  18. Critics and Criticism of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1977-01-01

    Radical educational critics, such as Edgar Friedenberg, Paul Goodman, A. S. Neill, John Holt, Jonathan Kozol, Herbert Kohl, James Herndon, and Ivan Illich, have few constructive goals, no strategy for broad change, and a disdain for modernization and compromise. Additionally, these critics, says the author, fail to consider social factors related…

  19. Seismotectonics of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jih-Ping; Aggarwal, Yash Pal

    1981-06-01

    Data for local earthquakes recorded by a network of stations in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada were analyzed to study the seismicity, the relationship between earthquakes and known faults, the state of stress, and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. In addition, portable seismographs were deployed in the field to study aftershocks. As a result, accurate locations for about 364 local earthquakes (2 ≤ mb ≤ 5) and 22 focal mechanism solutions were determined. A comparison of the spatial distribution of these events (1970-1979) with historical earthquakes (1534-1959) reveals that seismic activity in the northeast is relatively stationary in space: those areas that have had little or no seismicity historically are relatively aseismic today, whereas the historically active areas are also active today. The instrumental locations, historical seismicity, and focal mechanism solutions show an internal consistency that help us distinguish two distinct seismogenic provinces. (1) The Adirondack-western Quebec province is a northwesterly trending zone of seismic activity, about 200 km wide and at least 500 km long, extending from the SE Adirondacks into western Quebec, Canada. Thrust faulting on planes striking NNW to NW appears to predominate, and the inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression is largely uniform and trends WSW, nearly parallel to the calculated absolute plate motion of North America. Little or no seismicity is found where anorthosite outcrops at the surface. Correlations between gravity anomalies and earthquake locations suggest that seismic activity in this zone is localized to regions of steep NE or SW gradient in Bouguer anomalies. This zone does not appear to extend southeastward to Boston, as proposed by some workers. (2) The Appalachian province is a northeasterly trending zone of seismic activity extending from northern Virginia to New Brunswick, Canada. Highangle reverse or thrust faulting on N to NE trending planes

  20. Critical behavior of RMn2O5 oxides near the magnetic phase transition to a structure incommensurate in two spatial directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men'shenin, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    A phase transition from the paramagnetic state to the long-period magnetic structure in RMn2O5 oxides with the star of the wave vector determining the incommensurability of long-range magnetic order in two spatial directions has been investigated. An effective Hamiltonian of the system that allows one to describe this transition in the framework of the renormalization group approach has been constructed. It has been shown that there is a stable critical point of transformations of this group at which there occurs a second-order phase transition. The critical indices have been found. The obtained results have been compared with the results for phase transitions occurring in these oxides in accordance with the star of the wave vector, which provides incommensurability in one of the spatial directions. It has been found that fluctuations of the four-component order parameter due to the low spatial symmetry of these compounds do not change the order of the phase transition, which was found in terms of the Landau theory.

  1. Experimental investigation on seismic response control of adjacent buildings using semi-active MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yi-Qing; Liu, H. J.; Ko, Jan Ming

    2002-06-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on semi-active seismic response control of adjacent building structures using magneto-rheological (MR) dampers. A 1:15 scaled adjacent structural system consisting of a 12-story building model and an 8-story building model was tested on shaking table with MR damper passive and semi-active control. An MR damper with large stroke is specifically designed for this study. After experimentally identifying dynamic characteristics of the individual MR damper and the uncontrolled structural models, the two building models are interconnected with the MR damper at different floors and semi-active control is implemented using the dSPACE DS1005 real-time control system. The structures are excited on their base by a shaking table imposing sweep sine excitation and El Centro earthquake excitation. A stochastic optimal control strategy proposed by the authors is applied through the dSPACE system and its MATLAB environment to accomplish real-time semi-active control from the measurement of displacement and velocity responses at each floor. This control strategy results in a dissipative energy control with its feedback control force being a nonlinear generalized damping force. The structural response under semi-active control is compared with that by using the MR damper as a passive device without voltage input. Different MR damper installation locations are addressed in the experimental study to search for maximum response mitigation capability.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion and structure of some n-alkanes in near critical and supercritical carbon dioxide at infinite dilution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huajie; Gao, Wei; Sun, Zhenfan; Lei, Bingxin; Li, Gaonan; Chen, Liuping

    2013-10-17

    The diffusion coefficients of n-alkanes (from CH4 to C14H30) in near critical and supercritical carbon dioxide at infinite dilution have been studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results agree well with experiment, which suggests that the simulation method is a powerful tool to obtain diffusion coefficients of solutes in fluids at high pressures. The local structures of such fluids are further investigated by calculating radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. Meanwhile, the dihedral, end-to-end distance and radius of gyration, which are calculated to characterize the flexibility of n-alkanes, are used to reasonably explain the abnormal trends on radial distribution functions and coordination numbers. Moreover, it is found that the flexibility effects on diffusion in pure n-alkanes and infinitely dilute n-alkane/CO2 system are different. The differences in MD simulation results of molecular diffusion in such systems could be qualitatively explained by the flexibility.

  3. The NMR structure of the II–III–VI three-way junction from the Neurospora VS ribozyme reveals a critical tertiary interaction and provides new insights into the global ribozyme structure

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Lemieux, Sébastien; Legault, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    As part of an effort to structurally characterize the complete Neurospora VS ribozyme, NMR solution structures of several subdomains have been previously determined, including the internal loops of domains I and VI, the I/V kissing-loop interaction and the III–IV–V junction. Here, we expand this work by determining the NMR structure of a 62-nucleotide RNA (J236) that encompasses the VS ribozyme II–III–VI three-way junction and its adjoining stems. In addition, we localize Mg2+-binding sites within this structure using Mn2+-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA displays a family C topology with a compact core stabilized by continuous stacking of stems II and III, a cis WC/WC G•A base pair, two base triples and two Mg2+ ions. Moreover, it reveals a remote tertiary interaction between the adenine bulges of stems II and VI. Additional NMR studies demonstrate that both this bulge–bulge interaction and Mg2+ ions are critical for the stable folding of the II–III–VI junction. The NMR structure of the J236 RNA is consistent with biochemical studies on the complete VS ribozyme, but not with biophysical studies performed with a minimal II–III–VI junction that does not contain the II–VI bulge–bulge interaction. Together with previous NMR studies, our findings provide important new insights into the three-dimensional architecture of this unique ribozyme. PMID:26124200

  4. Stress during a Critical Postnatal Period Induces Region-Specific Structural Abnormalities and Dysfunction of the Prefrontal Cortex via CRF1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dun; Liao, Xue-Mei; Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Liu, Rui; Xie, Xiao-Meng; Jia, Jiao; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Ji-Tao; Schmidt, Mathias V; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    During the early postnatal period, environmental influences play a pivotal role in shaping the development of the neocortex, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that is crucial for working memory and goal-directed actions. Exposure to stressful experiences during this critical period may disrupt the development of PFC pyramidal neurons and impair the wiring and function of related neural circuits. However, the molecular mechanisms of the impact of early-life stress on PFC development and function are not well understood. In this study, we found that repeated stress exposure during the first postnatal week hampered dendritic development in layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons in the dorsal agranular cingulate cortex (ACd) and prelimbic cortex (PL) of neonatal mice. The deleterious effects of early postnatal stress on structural plasticity persisted to adulthood only in ACd layer V pyramidal neurons. Most importantly, concurrent blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) by systemic antalarmin administration (20 μg/g of body weight) during early-life stress exposure prevented stress-induced apical dendritic retraction and spine loss in ACd layer V neurons and impairments in PFC-dependent cognitive tasks. Moreover, the magnitude of dendritic regression, especially the shrinkage of apical branches, of ACd layer V neurons predicted the degree of cognitive deficits in stressed mice. Our data highlight the region-specific effects of early postnatal stress on the structural plasticity of prefrontal pyramidal neurons, and suggest a critical role of CRF1 in modulating early-life stress-induced prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:25403725

  5. The genesis of Typhoon Nuri as observed during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS-08) field experiment - Part 1: The role of the easterly wave critical layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Lussier, L. L., III; Moore, R. W.; Wang, Z.

    2010-10-01

    An observational and real-time model forecast study of the genesis of Typhoon Nuri during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS-08) field campaign in the western North Pacific sector is presented. Analysis and observational data show that the surrounding base state is an easterly trade wind flow and the precursor disturbance to Typhoon Nuri is an easterly wave that originates in the ITCZ in the Central Pacific. This disturbance can be tracked more than 10 days prior to tropical storm formation. An overview of the field data is presented here using a newly proposed dynamical framework for tropical cyclone formation within the critical layer of an easterly wave. Despite propagating through a hostile environment ripe with strong vertical wind shear and relatively dry air, the easterly wave critical layer protects the proto-vortex and allows it to gestate until it reaches a more favorable environment. Within this protective "Kelvin cat's eye flow" located within the wave's critical layer existed a sweet spot, defined as the intersection between the wave trough and critical latitude, which is the preferred location for tropical cyclogenesis. Global Forecast System Final Analyses and IR satellite imagery, which shows convective bands wrapping around the sweet spot as genesis nears, confirm that this sweet spot is the location where Typhoon Nuri's dominant low-level circulation emerges. United States Air Force C130 and Naval Research Laboratory P3 research flights on 16 and 17 August collected flight-level, dropwindsonde, and Doppler radar data that allowed an evaluation of the dynamic and thermodynamic processes within the cat's eye circulation. The dropwindsonde analyses identifies the precursor easterly wave disturbance on 16 August and identifies an area of weak low-level cyclonic circulation on 17 August. Real-time forecasts were produced using operational global prediction model data to support scientific missions during TCS-08. These forecasts were found to be

  6. The genesis of Typhoon Nuri as observed during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS-08) field experiment - Part 1: The role of the easterly wave critical layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. T.; Lussier, L. L., III; Moore, R. W.; Wang, Z.

    2009-09-01

    An observational and real-time model forecast study of the genesis of Typhoon Nuri during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS-08) field campaign in the western North Pacific sector is presented. Analysis and observational data show that the surrounding base state flow was an easterly trade wind flow and the precursor disturbance to Typhoon Nuri was an easterly wave that originated in the ITCZ in the Central Pacific and can be tracked more than 10 days prior to tropical storm formation. An overview of the field data is presented here using a newly proposed dynamical framework for tropical cyclone formation within the critical layer of an easterly wave. Despite propagating through a hostile environment ripe with strong vertical wind shear and relatively dry air, the easterly wave critical layer protected the proto-vortex and allowed it to gestate until it reached a more favorable environment. Within this protective "Kelvin's cat's eye flow" located within the wave's critical layer existed a "sweet spot", defined as the intersection between the wave trough and critical latitude, which was the preferred location for tropical cyclogenesis. Global Forecast System Final Analyses and IR satellite imagery, which shows convective bands wrapping around the sweet spot as genesis nears, confirm that this sweet spot is the location where Typhoon Nuri's dominant low-level circulation emerges. United States Air Force C130 and Naval Research Laboratory P3 research flights on 16 and 17 August collected flight-level, dropwindsonde, and Doppler radar data that allowed an evaluation of the dynamic and thermodynamic processes within the cat's eye. The dropwindsonde analyses identified the precursor easterly wave disturbance on 16 August and identified an area of weak low-level cyclonic circulation on 17 August. During the TCS-08 experiment "real-time forecasts" were produced in real-time using operational global prediction model data to support scientific missions. These forecasts

  7. ON THE WIND-INDUCED EXCHANGE BETWEEN INDIAN RIVER BAY, DELAWARE AND THE ADJACENT CONTINENTAL SHELF. (R826945)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The structure of the wind-induced exchange between Indian River Bay, Delaware and the adjacent continental shelf is examined based on current measurements made at the Indian River Inlet which represents the only conduit of exchange between the bay and the coastal ocean. Local ...

  8. Interaction between two adjacent grounded sources in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haigen; Lin, Jun; Liu, Changsheng; Kang, Lili; Li, Gang; Zeng, Xinsen

    2016-03-01

    Multi-source and multi-frequency emission method can make full use of the valuable and short flight time in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic (FSAEM) exploration, which has potential to investigate the deep earth structure in complex terrain region. Because several sources are adjacent in multi-source emission method, the interaction of different sources should be considered carefully. An equivalent circuit model of dual-source is established in this paper to assess the interaction between two individual sources, where the parameters are given with the typical values based on the practical instrument system and its application. By simulating the output current of two sources in different cases, the influence from the adjacent source is observed clearly. The current waveforms show that the mutual resistance causes the fluctuation and drift in another source and that the mutual inductance causes transient peaks. A field test with dual-source was conducted to certify the existence of interaction between adjacent sources. The simulation of output current also shows that current errors at low frequency are mainly caused by the mutual resistance while those at high frequency are mainly due to the mutual inductance. Increasing the distance between neighboring sources is a proposed measure to reduce the emission signal errors with designed ones. The feasible distance is discussed in the end. This study gives a useful guidance to lay multi sources to meet the requirement of measurement accuracy in FSAEM survey.

  9. Interaction between two adjacent grounded sources in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haigen; Lin, Jun; Liu, Changsheng; Kang, Lili; Li, Gang; Zeng, Xinsen

    2016-03-01

    Multi-source and multi-frequency emission method can make full use of the valuable and short flight time in frequency domain semi-airborne electromagnetic (FSAEM) exploration, which has potential to investigate the deep earth structure in complex terrain region. Because several sources are adjacent in multi-source emission method, the interaction of different sources should be considered carefully. An equivalent circuit model of dual-source is established in this paper to assess the interaction between two individual sources, where the parameters are given with the typical values based on the practical instrument system and its application. By simulating the output current of two sources in different cases, the influence from the adjacent source is observed clearly. The current waveforms show that the mutual resistance causes the fluctuation and drift in another source and that the mutual inductance causes transient peaks. A field test with dual-source was conducted to certify the existence of interaction between adjacent sources. The simulation of output current also shows that current errors at low frequency are mainly caused by the mutual resistance while those at high frequency are mainly due to the mutual inductance. Increasing the distance between neighboring sources is a proposed measure to reduce the emission signal errors with designed ones. The feasible distance is discussed in the end. This study gives a useful guidance to lay multi sources to meet the requirement of measurement accuracy in FSAEM survey. PMID:27036795

  10. Structure of an outer surface lipoprotein BBA64 from the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi which is critical to ensure infection after a tick bite.

    PubMed

    Brangulis, Kalvis; Tars, Kaspars; Petrovskis, Ivars; Kazaks, Andris; Ranka, Renate; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-06-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne infection caused by the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi from infected Ixodes ticks to a mammalian host during the blood meal. Previous studies have shown that the expression of B. burgdorferi surface-localized lipoproteins, which include BBA64, is up-regulated during the process of tick feeding. Although the exact function of BBA64 is not known, this lipoprotein is critical for the transmission of the spirochete from the tick salivary glands to the mammalian organism after a tick bite. Since the mechanism of development of the disease and the functions of the surface lipoproteins associated with borreliosis are still poorly understood, the crystal structure of the B. burgdorferi outer surface lipoprotein BBA64 was solved at 2.4 Å resolution in order to obtain a better insight into the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi and to promote the discovery of novel potential preventive drugs against Lyme disease. In this study, the crystal structure of BBA64 was also compared with that of the paralogous protein CspA (also referred to as BbCRASP-1, CRASP-1 or BBA68). CspA is the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein-1 of B. burgdorferi; its structure is known, but its function apparently differs from that of BBA64. It is demonstrated that unlike the homologous CspA, BBA64 does not form a homodimer. Their differences in function could be explained by divergence in their amino-acid sequences, electrostatic surface potentials and overall tertiary structures. The C-terminal part of BBA64 has a different conformation to that of CspA; the conformation of this region is essential for the proper function of CspA.

  11. Design, structure-activity relationships, X-ray crystal structure, and energetic contributions of a critical P1 pharmacophore: 3-chloroindole-7-yl-based factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Sitkoff, Doree; Zhang, Jing; Klei, Herbert E; Kish, Kevin; Liu, Eddie C-K; Hartl, Karen S; Seiler, Steve M; Chang, Ming; Huang, Christine; Youssef, Sonia; Steinbacher, Thomas E; Schumacher, William A; Grazier, Nyeemah; Pudzianowski, Andrew; Apedo, Atsu; Discenza, Lorell; Yanchunas, Joseph; Stein, Philip D; Atwal, Karnail S

    2008-12-11

    An indole-based P1 moiety was incorporated into a previously established factor Xa inhibitor series. The indole group was designed to hydrogen-bond with the carbonyl of Gly218, while its 3-methyl or 3-chloro substituent was intended to interact with Tyr228. These interactions were subsequently observed in the X-ray crystal structure of compound 18. SAR studies led to the identification of compound 20 as the most potent FXa inhibitor in this series (IC(50) = 2.4 nM, EC(2xPT) = 1.2 microM). An in-depth energetic analysis suggests that the increased binding energy of 3-chloroindole-versus 3-methylindole-containing compounds in this series is due primarily to (a) the more hydrophobic nature of chloro- versus methyl-containing compounds and (b) an increased interaction of 3-chloroindole versus 3-methylindole with Gly218 backbone. The stronger hydrophobicity of chloro- versus methyl-substituted aromatics may partly explain the general preference for chloro- versus methyl-substituted P1 groups in FXa, which extends beyond the current series.

  12. 38. VIEW OF COTTRELL MAGNETIC IMPULSE GENERATOR ADJACENT TO SIX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. VIEW OF COTTRELL MAGNETIC IMPULSE GENERATOR ADJACENT TO SIX GAP ROTARY RECTIFIER. THIS UNIT GENERATED A MAGNETIC PULSE WHICH WAS TRANSMITTED TO THE COLLECTION PLATES IN THE ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR CHAMBER. THESE PERIODIC PULSES VIBRATE THE PLATES AND CAUSE PRECIPITATED ARTICLES OF SMOKE AND FLY ASH TO FALL TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PRECIPITATOR CHAMBER. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  13. 20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent to Test Cell 9 in Component Test Laboratory (T-27), looking west. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, tanks, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  15. Jaw position uncertainty and adjacent fields in breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Emma; Bäck, Anna; Chakarova, Roumiana

    2015-11-08

    Locoregional treatment of breast cancer involves adjacent, half blocked fields matched at isocenter. The objective of this work is to study the dosimetric effects of the uncertainties in jaw positioning for such a case, and how a treatment planning protocol including adjacent field overlap of 1 mm affects the dose distribution. A representative treatment plan, involving 6 and 15 photon beams, for a patient treated at our hospital is chosen. Monte Carlo method (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc) is used to simulate the treatment. Uncertainties in jaw positioning of ± 1 mm are addressed, which implies extremes in reality of 2 mm field gap/overlap when planning adjacent fields without overlap and 1 mm gap or 3 mm overlap for a planning protocol with 1 mm overlap. Dosimetric parameters for PTV, lung and body are analyzed. Treatment planning protocol with 1 mm overlap of the adjacent fields does not considerably counteract possible underdosage of the target in the case studied. PTV-V95% is for example reduced from 95% for perfectly aligned fields to 90% and 91% for 2 mm and 1 mm gap, respectively. However, the risk of overdosage in PTV and in healthy soft tissue is increased when following the protocol with 1 mm overlap. A 3 mm overlap compared to 2 mm overlap results in an increase in maximum dose to PTV, PTV-D2%, from 113% to 121%. V120% for 'Body-PTV' is also increased from 5 cm(3) to 14 cm(3). A treatment planning protocol with 1 mm overlap does not considerably improve the coverage of PTV in the case of erroneous jaw positions causing gap between fields, but increases the overdosage in PTV and doses to healthy tissue, in the case of overlapping fields, for the case investigated.

  16. Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door at right. Projection area at center is equipped with automatic security drapes. Projection room uses a 45 degree mirror to reflect the image onto the frosted glass screen. Door on far left leads to display area senior battle staff viewing bridge, and the commander's quarters - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  17. Mutual Diffusional Interference Between Adjacent Stomata of a Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G. D.; Viskanta, R.

    1968-01-01

    The mutual diffusional interference between adjacent stomata in laminar flow over a leaf is shown to play a decisive role in determining overall transpiration. The magnitude of this interference varies with the interaction of the vapor diffusional shells forming above each stoma and the air flow over the leaf. The interference decreases with increasing incident radiation and wind velocity. The effect of interference on the stomatal resistance to diffusion plays a major role in the overall variations in transpiration. PMID:16656876

  18. Structure and Function of the Escherichia coli Protein YmgB: A Protein Critical for Biofilm Formation and Acid-resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,J.; Page, R.; Garcia-Contreras, R.; Palermino, J.; Zhang, X.; Doshi, O.; Wood, T.; Peti, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene cluster ymgABC was identified in transcriptome studies to have a role in biofilm development and stability. In this study, we showed that YmgB represses biofilm formation in rich medium containing glucose, decreases cellular motility, and protects the cell from acid indicating that YmgB has a major role in acid-resistance in E. coli. Our data show that these phenotypes are potentially mediated through interactions with the important cell signal indole. In addition, gel mobility-shift assays suggest that YmgB may be a non-specific DNA-binding protein. Using nickel-enrichment DNA microarrays, we showed that YmgB binds, either directly or indirectly, via a probable ligand, genes important for biofilm formation. To advance our understanding of the function of YmgB, we used X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of the protein to 1.8 A resolution. YmgB is a biological dimer that is structurally homologous to the E. coli gene regulatory protein Hha, despite having only 5% sequence identity. This supports our DNA microarray data showing that YmgB is a gene regulatory protein. Therefore, this protein, which clearly has a critical role in acid-resistance in E. coli, has been renamed as AriR for regulator of acid resistance influenced by indole.

  19. Critical influence of adsorption geometry in the heterogeneous epoxidation of "allylic" alkenes: structure and reactivity of three phenylpropene isomers on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Williams, Federico J; Cropley, Rachael L; Vaughan, Owain P H; Urquhart, Andrew J; Tikhov, Mintcho S; Kolczewski, Christine; Hermann, Klaus; Lambert, Richard M

    2005-12-01

    It has long been conjectured that the difficulty of heterogeneously epoxidizing higher alkenes such as propene is due to the presence in the molecule of "allylic" H atoms that are readily stripped off by the oxygenated surface of the metal catalyst resulting in combustion. Here, taking advantage of the intrinsically higher epoxidation selectivity of Cu over Ag under vacuum conditions, we have used three phenylpropene structural isomers to examine the correlation between adsorption geometry and oxidation chemistry. It is found that under comparable conditions alpha-methylstyrene, trans-methylstyrene, and allylbenzene behave very differently on the oxygenated Cu(111) surface: the first undergoes extensive epoxidation accompanied by relatively little decomposition of the alkene; the second leads to some epoxide formation and extensive alkene decomposition; and the third is almost inert with respect to both reaction pathways. This reactive behavior is understandable in terms of the corresponding molecular conformations determined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The proximity to the surface of the C=C function and of the allylic H atoms is critically important in determining reaction selectivity. This demonstrates the importance of adsorption geometry and confirms that allylic H stripping is indeed a key process that limits epoxidation selectivity in such cases.

  20. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  1. Stabilization of endangered part of structures by building dry brunt brick buttressing, critical case study of plane wall in DKG-North Area, Mohenjo daro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, J. M.; Park, J.

    2013-07-01

    'World Heritage Sites' are places or buildings of outstanding universal value recognized as constituting a world heritage 'for whose protection it is the duty of the international community as a whole to co-operate'. The concept of World Heritage is at the core of the World Heritage Convention, adopted by Heritage List as a means of identifying, protecting, conserving and presenting those parts of the world's natural and cultural heritage that are of sufficient 'outstanding universal value' to be the responsibility of the international community as a whole. By joining the Convention, nation states are pledged to safeguard the WH S by protecting their national heritage. UNESCO in 1972, to which 160 nations have now been adhered. The Convention came into force in 1975 and established a Site in their territory as part of a universally agreed policy for World. Moenjodaro site covering an area of 555 Acres out of which only 10 % of it has been excavated by exposing 50 Kilometer standing walls. The wall of the main street of DK G Area, Mohen jo Daro partially deformed, due to the torque effects this is studied here on a lateral cross wall in the chief house. Furthermore, the resulting behaviour of the bucking wall demonstrates the significant loadbearing capacity of the structure under service conditions and its high sensitivity to imposed changes of the geometry. Although the tensile stresses exceeded the flexural strength at the vertices and the length of the wall, hence both the geometry and condition of this area are critical for the safety of the wall. The results of this study can improve the assessment and thus help in the preservation of many important structures of the metropolitan city. Here the hydrous characteristic of the brick is studied as a general phenomenon, it is observed that the remains of the sites located in Sindh suffered a lot mostly due to age, human neglect variations of atmospheric condition, severe temperature and natural disasters. The main

  2. Cryptic Population Structuring and the Role of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec as a Gene Flow Barrier in the Critically Endangered Central American River Turtle

    PubMed Central

    González-Porter, Gracia P.; Maldonado, Jesús E.; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Vogt, Richard C.; Janke, Axel; Fleischer, Robert C.; Hailer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The critically endangered Central American River Turtle (Dermatemys mawii) is the only remaining member of the Dermatemydidae family, yet little is known about its population structuring. In a previous study of mitochondrial (mt) DNA in the species, three main lineages were described. One lineage (Central) was dominant across most of the range, while two other lineages were restricted to Papaloapan (PAP; isolated by the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and the Sierra de Santa Marta) or the south-eastern part of the range (1D). Here we provide data from seven polymorphic microsatellite loci and the R35 intron to re-evaluate these findings using DNA from the nuclear genome. Based on a slightly expanded data set of a total of 253 samples from the same localities, we find that mtDNA and nuclear DNA markers yield a highly congruent picture of the evolutionary history and population structuring of D. mawii. While resolution provided by the R35 intron (sequenced for a subset of the samples) was very limited, the microsatellite data revealed pronounced population structuring. Within the Grijalva-Usumacinta drainage basin, however, many populations separated by more than 300 kilometers showed signals of high gene flow. Across the entire range, neither mitochondrial nor nuclear DNA show a significant isolation-by-distance pattern, but both genomes highlight that the D. mawii population in the Papaloapan basin is genetically distinctive. Further, both marker systems detect unique genomic signals in four individuals with mtDNA clade 1D sampled on the southeast edge of the Grijalva-Usumacinta basin. These individuals may represent a separate cryptic taxon that is likely impacted by recent admixture. PMID:24086253

  3. Cryptic population structuring and the role of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec as a gene flow barrier in the critically endangered Central American River Turtle.

    PubMed

    González-Porter, Gracia P; Maldonado, Jesús E; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Vogt, Richard C; Janke, Axel; Fleischer, Robert C; Hailer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The critically endangered Central American River Turtle (Dermatemys mawii) is the only remaining member of the Dermatemydidae family, yet little is known about its population structuring. In a previous study of mitochondrial (mt) DNA in the species, three main lineages were described. One lineage (Central) was dominant across most of the range, while two other lineages were restricted to Papaloapan (PAP; isolated by the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and the Sierra de Santa Marta) or the south-eastern part of the range (1D). Here we provide data from seven polymorphic microsatellite loci and the R35 intron to re-evaluate these findings using DNA from the nuclear genome. Based on a slightly expanded data set of a total of 253 samples from the same localities, we find that mtDNA and nuclear DNA markers yield a highly congruent picture of the evolutionary history and population structuring of D. mawii. While resolution provided by the R35 intron (sequenced for a subset of the samples) was very limited, the microsatellite data revealed pronounced population structuring. Within the Grijalva-Usumacinta drainage basin, however, many populations separated by more than 300 kilometers showed signals of high gene flow. Across the entire range, neither mitochondrial nor nuclear DNA show a significant isolation-by-distance pattern, but both genomes highlight that the D. mawii population in the Papaloapan basin is genetically distinctive. Further, both marker systems detect unique genomic signals in four individuals with mtDNA clade 1D sampled on the southeast edge of the Grijalva-Usumacinta basin. These individuals may represent a separate cryptic taxon that is likely impacted by recent admixture. PMID:24086253

  4. Interleukin-10 is produced by a specific subset of taste receptor cells and critical for maintaining structural integrity of mouse taste buds.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Chai, Jinghua; Zhou, Minliang; Simon, Nirvine; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2014-02-12

    Although inflammatory responses are a critical component in defense against pathogens, too much inflammation is harmful. Mechanisms have evolved to regulate inflammation, including modulation by the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Previously we have shown that taste buds express various molecules involved in innate immune responses, including the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Here, using a reporter mouse strain, we show that taste cells also express the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Remarkably, IL-10 is produced by only a specific subset of taste cells, which are different from the TNF-producing cells in mouse circumvallate and foliate taste buds: IL-10 expression was found exclusively in the G-protein gustducin-expressing bitter receptor cells, while TNF was found in sweet and umami receptor cells as reported previously. In contrast, IL-10R1, the ligand-binding subunit of the IL-10 receptor, is predominantly expressed by TNF-producing cells, suggesting a novel cellular hierarchy for regulating TNF production and effects in taste buds. In response to inflammatory challenges, taste cells can increase IL-10 expression both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that taste buds use separate populations of taste receptor cells that coincide with sweet/umami and bitter taste reception to modulate local inflammatory responses, a phenomenon that has not been previously reported. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency in mice leads to significant reductions in the number and size of taste buds, as well as in the number of taste receptor cells per taste bud, suggesting that IL-10 plays critical roles in maintaining structural integrity of the peripheral gustatory system. PMID:24523558

  5. Historic surface faulting in continental United States and adjacent parts of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonilla, M.G.

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes geometric aspects of approximately 35 instances of historic faulting of the ground surface in the continental United States and adjacent parts of Mexico. This information is of immediate importance in the selection and evaluation of sites for vital structures such as nuclear power plants. The data are presented in a table and graphs which show the quantitative relations between various aspects of the faulting. Certain items in the table that are uncertain, poorly known, or not in the published literature are briefly described in the text.

  6. Staying Critical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Wilfred; Kemmis, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the two authors of "Becoming Critical: education, knowledge and action research" look back at the book's history since its publication 20 years ago. We describe how the book was originally written, and the diverse responses and reactions that it has produced. We identify some of the book's inadequacies and limitations, and…

  7. Geology of the Cape Mendocino, Eureka, Garberville, and Southwestern Part of the Hayfork 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangles and Adjacent Offshore Area, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Ellen, S.D.; Blake, M.C.; Jayko, Angela S.; Irwin, W.P.; Aalto, K.R.; Carver, G.A.; Clarke, S.H.; Barnes, J.B.; Cecil, J.D.; Cyr, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction These geologic maps and accompanying structure sections depict the geology and structure of much of northwestern California and the adjacent continental margin. The map area includes the Mendocino triple junction, which is the juncture of the North American continental plate with two plates of the Pacific ocean basin. The map area also encompasses major geographic and geologic provinces of northwestern California. The maps incorporate much previously unpublished geologic mapping done between 1980 and 1995, as well as published mapping done between about 1950 and 1978. To construct structure sections to mid-crustal depths, we integrate the surface geology with interpretations of crustal structure based on seismicity, gravity and aeromagnetic data, offshore structure, and seismic reflection and refraction data. In addition to describing major geologic and structural features of northwestern California, the geologic maps have the potential to address a number of societally relevant issues, including hazards from earthquakes, landslides, and floods and problems related to timber harvest, wildlife habitat, and changing land use. All of these topics will continue to be of interest in the region, as changing land uses and population density interact with natural conditions. In these interactions, it is critical that the policies and practices affecting man and the environment integrate an adequate understanding of the geology. This digital map database, compiled from previously published and unpublished data, and new mapping by the authors, represents the general distribution of bedrock and surficial deposits in the mapped area. Together with the accompanying text file (ceghmf.ps, ceghmf.pdf, ceghmf.txt), it provides current information on the geologic structure and stratigraphy of the area covered. The database delineates map units that are identified by general age and lithology following the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. The

  8. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing.

  9. Digital depth horizon compilations of the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent Arctic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Data have been digitized and combined to create four detailed depth horizon grids spanning the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent offshore areas. These map horizon compilations were created to aid in petroleum system modeling and related studies. Topography/bathymetry is extracted from a recent Arctic compilation of global onshore DEM and satellite altimetry and ship soundings offshore. The Lower Cretaceous Unconformity (LCU), the top of the Triassic Shublik Formation, and the pre-Carboniferous acoustic basement horizon grids are created from numerous seismic studies, drill hole information, and interpolation. These horizons were selected because they mark critical times in the geologic evolution of the region as it relates to petroleum. The various horizons clearly show the major tectonic elements of this region including the Brooks Range, Colville Trough, Barrow Arch, Hanna Trough, Chukchi Platform, Nuwuk Basin, Kaktovik Basin, and Canada Basin. The gridded data are available in a variety of data formats for use in regional studies.

  10. Dynamic networks community detection via low rank component recovery of adjacency matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wei; Michailidis, George

    Dynamic community detection in networks has been of high interest due to its various applications. In this work, we apply low rank extraction technique on adjacency matrices to approximate the community structures. Not only can we accurately identify the phase transition time points where significant changes in the community structures occur, but also we can increase the accuracy of the core community structures recovered in the `peace' time ranges by averaging the low rank components. A systematic methodology has been proposed as how to accomplish the target. Factor model, and stochastic block model (including weighted scenario) have been tested for the robustness of our model. Besides, applications on both Kuramoto model and US Senate Roll Call data are also carried out and interesting results are obtained.

  11. Drivers of tall shrub proliferation adjacent to the Dempster Highway, Northwest Territories, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Emily A.; Lantz, Trevor C.

    2016-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are undergoing rapid changes as a result of climate warming and more frequent disturbances. Disturbances can have particularly large effects on high-latitude ecosystems when ecosystem structure and function is controlled by strong feedbacks between soil conditions, vegetation, and ground thermal regime. In this study we investigated the impact of road construction and maintenance on vegetation structure and biomass along the Dempster Highway where it crosses the Peel Plateau in the Northwest Territories. To explore drivers of tall shrub proliferation and to quantify shrub proliferation in this region of continuous permafrost, greyscale air photos (1975) and Quickbird satellite imagery (2008) were used to map landcover change within two 0.6 km2 belts next to the road and two 0.6 km2 belts 500 m away from the road. Maps showing areas where: 1) tall shrubs expanded, and 2) dwarf shrub tundra resisted invasion were then used to select field sites where a suite of biophysical variables were measured. Rapid tall shrub proliferation and greater biomass adjacent to the road indicate that disturbance can facilitate vegetation change in tundra environments. Our field data also suggests that increased shrub proliferation adjacent to the road was caused by greater soil moisture. Tall shrub proliferation adjacent to the road occurred at lower elevation sites characterized by wetter soils with thicker organic layers. Areas that resisted tall shrub encroachment were located at higher elevations and had drier soils with thin organic layers. Our observations also support previous work illustrating that tall shrub expansion next to the highway promotes strong positive feedbacks to ongoing shrub growth and proliferation.

  12. Critical Information at Critical Moments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fierman, Ben; Thrower, Raymond H., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    On a daily basis, administrators are reminded of the potential, perhaps the likelihood, of violence or natural crises on their campuses. Comprehensive studies have been conducted and point to recommendations and best practices for planning, preparing, responding to, and recovering from critical incidents. The International Association of Campus…

  13. Crystal structure of acivicin-inhibited γ-glutamyltranspeptidase reveals critical roles for its C-terminus in autoprocessing and catalysis.*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristin; Cullati, Sierra; Sand, Aaron; Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (HpGT) is a general γ-glutamyl hydrolase and a demonstrated virulence factor. The enzyme confers a growth advantage to the bacterium, providing essential amino acid precursors by initiating the degradation of extracellular glutathione and glutamine. HpGT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily and undergoes autoprocessing to generate the active form of the enzyme. Acivicin is a widely used γ-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor that covalently modifies the enzyme, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The time-dependent inactivation of HpGT exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on acivicin concentration with kmax = 0.033 ± 0.006 sec−1 and KI = 19.7 ± 7.2 μM. Structure determination of acivicin-modified HpGT (1.7 Å; Rfactor=17.9%; Rfree=20.8%) demonstrates that acivicin is accommodated within the γ-glutamyl binding pocket of the enzyme. The hydroxyl group of Thr 380, the catalytic nucleophile in the autoprocessing and enzymatic reactions, displaces chloride from the acivicin ring to form the covalently linked complex. Within the acivicin-modified HpGT structure, the C-terminus of the protein becomes ordered with Phe 567 positioned over the active site. Substitution or deletion of Phe 567 leads to a >10-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, underscoring its importance in catalysis. The mobile C-terminus is positioned by several electrostatic interactions within the C-terminal region, most notably a salt bridge between Arg 475 and Glu 566. Mutational analysis reveals that Arg 475 is critical for the proper placement of the C-terminal region, the Tyr 433 containing loop, and the proposed oxyanion hole. PMID:19256527

  14. Crystal Structure of Acivicin-Inhibited [gamma]-Glutamyltranspeptidase Reveals Critical Roles for Its C-Terminus in Autoprocessing and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kristin; Cullati, Sierra; Sand, Aaron; Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-03-27

    Helicobacter pylori {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase (HpGT) is a general {gamma}-glutamyl hydrolase and a demonstrated virulence factor. The enzyme confers a growth advantage to the bacterium, providing essential amino acid precursors by initiating the degradation of extracellular glutathione and glutamine. HpGT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily and undergoes autoprocessing to generate the active form of the enzyme. Acivicin is a widely used {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor that covalently modifies the enzyme, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The time-dependent inactivation of HpGT exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on acivicin concentration with k{sub max} = 0.033 {+-} 0.006 s{sup -1} and K{sub I} = 19.7 {+-} 7.2 {micro}M. Structure determination of acivicin-modified HpGT (1.7 {angstrom}; R{sub factor} = 17.9%; R{sub free} = 20.8%) demonstrates that acivicin is accommodated within the {gamma}-glutamyl binding pocket of the enzyme. The hydroxyl group of Thr 380, the catalytic nucleophile in the autoprocessing and enzymatic reactions, displaces chloride from the acivicin ring to form the covalently linked complex. Within the acivicin-modified HpGT structure, the C-terminus of the protein becomes ordered with Phe 567 positioned over the active site. Substitution or deletion of Phe 567 leads to a >10-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, underscoring its importance in catalysis. The mobile C-terminus is positioned by several electrostatic interactions within the C-terminal region, most notably a salt bridge between Arg 475 and Glu 566. Mutational analysis reveals that Arg 475 is critical for the proper placement of the C-terminal region, the Tyr 433 containing loop, and the proposed oxyanion hole.

  15. Synthesis of a Molecule with Four Different Adjacent Pnictogens.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Alexander; Schulz, Axel; Villinger, Alexander

    2016-08-22

    The synthesis of a molecule containing four adjacent different pnictogens was attempted by conversion of a Group 15 allyl analogue anion [Mes*NAsPMes*](-) (Mes*=2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl) with antimony(III) chloride. A suitable precursor is Mes*N(H)AsPMes* (1) for which several syntheses were investigated. The anions afforded by deprotonation of Mes*N(H)AsPMes* were found to be labile and, therefore, salts could not be isolated. However, the in situ generated anions could be quenched with SbCl3 , yielding Mes*N(SbCl2 )AsPMes* (4). PMID:27377437

  16. CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

  17. Interaction of Cracks Between Two Adjacent Indents in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental observations of the interaction behavior of cracks between two adjacent indents were made using an indentation technique in soda-lime glass. It was specifically demonstrated how one indent crack initiates and propagates in the vicinity of another indent crack. Several types of crack interactions were examined by changing the orientation and distance of one indent relative to the other. It was found that the residual stress field produced by elastic/plastic indentation has a significant influence on controlling the mode of crack interaction. The interaction of an indent crack with a free surface was also investigated for glass and ceramic specimens.

  18. Retroperitoneal multilocular bronchogenic cyst adjacent to adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Yang, S W; Linton, J A; Ryu, S J; Shin, D H; Park, C S

    1999-10-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are generally found in the mediastinum, particularly posterior to the carina, but they rarely occur in such unusual sites as the skin, subcutaneous tissue, pericardium, and even the retroperitoneum. A 30-year-old Korean man underwent surgery to remove a cystic adrenal mass incidentally discovered during routine physical checkup. At surgery, it proved to be a multilocular cyst located in the retroperitoneum adjacent to the left adrenal gland. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by respiratory epithelium over connective tissue with submucous glands, cartilage and smooth muscle, thereby histologically confirming bronchogenic cyst. This is the first reported case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst in an adult without other congenital anomalies in Korea.

  19. Structure-function studies of human deoxyhypusine synthase: identification of amino acid residues critical for the binding of spermidine and NAD.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Um, P Y; Park, M H

    2001-05-01

    Deoxyhypusine synthase catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of hypusine [N(epsilon)-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine]. The crystal structure of human deoxyhypusine synthase in complex with NAD revealed four NAD-binding sites per enzyme tetramer, and led to a prediction of the spermidine-binding pocket. We have replaced each of the seven amino acid residues at the predicted spermidine-binding site, and eleven residues that contact NAD, on an individual basis with alanine. Of the amino acid residues at the spermidine site, substitution of Asp-243, Trp-327, His-288, Asp-316 or Glu-323 with alanine caused an almost complete loss of spermidine binding and enzyme activity; only the mutation Tyr-305-->Ala showed partial binding and activity. His-288-->Ala was also deficient in terms of binding NAD. NAD binding was significantly reduced in all of the NAD-site mutant enzymes, except for Glu-137-->Ala, which showed a normal binding of NAD, but was totally lacking in spermidine binding. Of the NAD-site mutant enzymes, Asp-342-->Ala, Asp-313-->Ala and Asp-238-->Ala displayed the lowest binding of NAD. These enzymes and His-288Ala also showed a reduced binding of spermidine, presumably because spermidine binding is dependent on NAD. These findings permit the positive identification of amino acid residues critical for binding of spermidine and NAD, and provide a new insight into the complex molecular interactions involved in the deoxyhypusine synthase reaction. PMID:11311149

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) as revealed by mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minmin; Zheng, Jinsong; Wu, Min; Ruan, Rui; Zhao, Qingzhong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Ecological surveys have indicated that the population of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (YFP, Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) is becoming increasingly small and fragmented, and will be at high risk of extinction in the near future. Genetic conservation of this population will be an important component of the long-term conservation effort. We used a 597 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and 11 microsatellite loci to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of the YFP. The analysis of both mtDNA and microsatellite loci suggested that the genetic diversity of the YFP will possibly decrease in the future if the population keeps declining at a rapid rate, even though these two types of markers revealed different levels of genetic diversity. In addition, mtDNA revealed strong genetic differentiation between one local population, Xingchang-Shishou (XCSS), and the other five downstream local populations; furthermore, microsatellite DNA unveiled fine but significant genetic differentiation between three of the local populations (not only XCSS but also Poyang Lake (PY) and Tongling (TL)) and the other local populations. With an increasing number of distribution gaps appearing in the Yangtze main steam, the genetic differentiation of local populations will likely intensify in the future. The YFP is becoming a genetically fragmented population. Therefore, we recommend attention should be paid to the genetic conservation of the YFP. PMID:24968271

  1. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Critically Endangered Yangtze Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) as Revealed by Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minmin; Zheng, Jinsong; Wu, Min; Ruan, Rui; Zhao, Qingzhong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Ecological surveys have indicated that the population of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (YFP, Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) is becoming increasingly small and fragmented, and will be at high risk of extinction in the near future. Genetic conservation of this population will be an important component of the long-term conservation effort. We used a 597 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and 11 microsatellite loci to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of the YFP. The analysis of both mtDNA and microsatellite loci suggested that the genetic diversity of the YFP will possibly decrease in the future if the population keeps declining at a rapid rate, even though these two types of markers revealed different levels of genetic diversity. In addition, mtDNA revealed strong genetic differentiation between one local population, Xingchang–Shishou (XCSS), and the other five downstream local populations; furthermore, microsatellite DNA unveiled fine but significant genetic differentiation between three of the local populations (not only XCSS but also Poyang Lake (PY) and Tongling (TL)) and the other local populations. With an increasing number of distribution gaps appearing in the Yangtze main steam, the genetic differentiation of local populations will likely intensify in the future. The YFP is becoming a genetically fragmented population. Therefore, we recommend attention should be paid to the genetic conservation of the YFP. PMID:24968271

  2. A new critical dimension metrology for chrome-on-glass substrates based on s-parameter measurements extracted from coplanar waveguide test structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokoye, Chidubem A.; Zaghloul, Mona; Cresswell, Michael W.; Allen, Richard A.; Murabito, Christine E.

    2006-10-01

    The technical objective of the work reported here is to assess whether radio-frequency (RF) measurements made on coplanar waveguide (CPW) test structures, which are replicated in conducting material on insulating substrates, could be employed to extract the critical dimension (CD) of the signal line using its center-to-center separation from the groundlines as a reference. The specific near-term objective is to assess whether this CPW-based CD-metrology has sensitivity and repeatability competitive with the other metrology techniques that are now used for chrome-on-glass (COG) photomasks. An affirmative answer is encouraging because advancing to a non-contact and non-vacuum implementation would then seem possible for this application. Our modeling of specific cases shows that, when the pitch of the replicated lines of the CPW is maintained constant, the sensitivity of its characteristic impedance to the CDs of the signal and ground lines is approximately 60 Ω/μm. This is a potentially useful result. For the same implementation, the quantity ∂C/∂w has a value of approximately 45 (pF/m)/μm, which appears to be large enough to provide acceptable accuracy.

  3. Historical volcanoes of Armenia and adjacent areas: What is revisited?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanian, A.; Jrbashyan, R.; Trifonov, V.; Philip, H.; Arakelian, S.; Avagyan, A.; Baghdassaryan, H.; Davtian, V.

    2006-07-01

    The validity of some data in Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62] that are revisited by R. Haroutiunian is considered. A conclusion is made that the revisions suggested by Haroutiunian concern unessential parts of the content of work by Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62]. This article presents new evidence and re-proves the earlier conclusions that are disputed or revised by R. Haroutiunian.

  4. Stress Wave Interaction Between Two Adjacent Blast Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changping; Johansson, Daniel; Nyberg, Ulf; Beyglou, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Rock fragmentation by blasting is determined by the level and state of stress in the rock mass subjected to blasting. With the application of electronic detonators, some researchers stated that it is possible to achieve improved fragmentation through stress wave superposition with very short delay times. This hypothesis was studied through theoretical analysis in the paper. First, the stress in rock mass induced by a single-hole shot was analyzed with the assumptions of infinite velocity of detonation and infinite charge length. Based on the stress analysis of a single-hole shot, the stress history and tensile stress distribution between two adjacent holes were presented for cases of simultaneous initiation and 1 ms delayed initiation via stress superposition. The results indicated that the stress wave interaction is local around the collision point. Then, the tensile stress distribution at the extended line of two adjacent blast holes was analyzed for a case of 2 ms delay. The analytical results showed that the tensile stress on the extended line increases due to the stress wave superposition under the assumption that the influence of neighboring blast hole on the stress wave propagation can be neglected. However, the numerical results indicated that this assumption is unreasonable and yields contrary results. The feasibility of improving fragmentation via stress wave interaction with precise initiation was also discussed. The analysis in this paper does not support that the interaction of stress waves improves the fragmentation.

  5. Adjacent flaps for lower lip reconstruction after mucocele resection.

    PubMed

    Ying, Binbin

    2012-03-01

    Mucocele forms because of salivary gland mucous extravasation or retention and is usually related to trauma in the area of the lower lip. It is a common benign lesion in the oral region. Although there are many conservative treatments such as the creation of a pouch (marsupialization), freezing (cryosurgery), micromarsupialization, and CO2 laser vaporization, surgical resection is the most commonly used means. Generally speaking, an elliptic incision was made to fully enucleate the lesion along with the overlying mucosa and the affected glands, then direct suturing is adequate. However, in some cases, direct suturing could cause lower lip deformity, and adjacent flaps for lower lip reconstruction after mucocele resection might be quite necessary. Based on our experience, adjacent mucosal flaps could be used when lesions were close to or even break through the vermilion border or their diameters were much more than 1 cm. A-T advancement flaps and transposition flaps were the mostly applied ones. Follow-up showed that all patients realized primary healing after 1 week postoperatively with satisfactory lower lip appearance, and there was no sign of increasing incidence of relapse. PMID:22421867

  6. Ammonia- and methane-oxidizing microorganisms in high-altitude wetland sediments and adjacent agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Shan, Jingwen; Zhang, Jingxu; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation is known to be carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), while methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB)) play an important role in mitigating methane emissions from the environment. However, the difference of AOA, AOB, and MOB distribution in wetland sediment and adjacent upland soil remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundances and community structures of AOA, AOB, and MOB in sediments of a high-altitude freshwater wetland in Yunnan Province (China) and adjacent agricultural soils. Variations of AOA, AOB, and MOB community sizes and structures were found in water lily-vegetated and Acorus calamus-vegetated sediments and agricultural soils (unflooded rice soil, cabbage soil, and garlic soil and flooded rice soil). AOB community size was higher than AOA in agricultural soils and lily-vegetated sediment, but lower in A. calamus-vegetated sediment. MOB showed a much higher abundance than AOA and AOB. Flooded rice soil had the largest AOA, AOB, and MOB community sizes. Principal coordinate analyses and Jackknife Environment Clusters analyses suggested that unflooded and flooded rice soils had relatively similar AOA, AOB, and MOB structures. Cabbage soil and A. calamus-vegetated sediment had relatively similar AOA and AOB structures, but their MOB structures showed a large difference. Nitrososphaera-like microorganisms were the predominant AOA species in garlic soil but were present with a low abundance in unflooded rice soil and cabbage soil. Nitrosospira-like AOB were dominant in wetland sediments and agricultural soils. Type I MOB Methylocaldum and type II MOB Methylocystis were dominant in wetland sediments and agricultural soils. Moreover, Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that AOA Shannon diversity was positively correlated with the ratio of organic carbon to nitrogen (p < 0.05). This work could provide some new insights toward ammonia and methane oxidation in soil and wetland sediment

  7. Post larval, short-term, colonization patterns: The effect of substratum complexity across subtidal, adjacent, habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sanz, Sara; Tuya, Fernando; Navarro, Pablo G.; Angulo-Preckler, Carlos; Haroun, Ricardo J.

    2012-10-01

    Benthic habitats are colonized by organisms from the water column and adjacent habitats. There are, however, variations in the 'acceptability' of any habitat to potential colonists. We assessed whether the structural complexity of artificial substrata affected patterns of short-term colonization of post larval faunal assemblages across subtidal habitats within a coastal landscape. Specifically, we tested whether short-term colonization patterns on 3 types of artificial substrata encompassing a range of complexities, including a leaf-like unit, a cushion-shaped leaf-like unit and a cushion-shaped unit, were consistent across 4 adjacent habitats: macroalgal-dominated bottoms, urchin-grazed barrens, seagrass meadows and sandy patches, at Gran Canaria (eastern Atlantic). A total of 16,174 organisms were collected after 4 weeks and 4 taxonomic groups (Crustacea, Chordata, Echinodermata and Mollusca) dominated the assemblage. Despite considerable among-taxa variability being observed in response to habitat effects, the total abundance of colonizers, as well as the abundance of Arthropoda, Chordata and Echinodermata, was affected by the habitat where collectors were deployed, but did not differ among types of collectors. Similarly, the assemblage structure of colonizers was mainly affected by the habitat, but not by the type of collector; habitat contributed to explain most variation in the assemblage structure of the four dominant taxonomic groups (from ca. 5.44-19.23%), and obscured, in all cases, variation explained by the type of collector. As a result, the variation in short-term colonization patterns of faunal assemblages into artificial collectors was mostly affected by variation associated with habitats rather than by differences in the structural complexity of collectors. The largest abundances of colonizers, particularly Echinodermata, were found on sandy patches relative to other habitats, suggesting that the 'availability', rather than any particular attribute

  8. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  9. Critical Viscosity of Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2001 will measure the viscous behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The thermostat for CVX sits inside the white cylinder on a support structure that is placed inside a pressure canister. A similar canister holds the electronics and control systems. The CVX-2 arrangement is identical. The principal investigator is Dr. Robert F. Berg (not shown) of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD. This is a detail view of MSFC 0100143.

  10. Dependence of AT1 angiotensin receptor function on adjacent asparagine residues in the seventh transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Hunyady, L; Ji, H; Jagadeesh, G; Zhang, M; Gáborik, Z; Mihalik, B; Catt, K J

    1998-08-01

    For several G protein-coupled receptors, amino acids in the seventh transmembrane helix have been implicated in ligand binding and receptor activation. The function of this region in the AT1 angiotensin receptor was further investigated by mutation of two conserved polar residues (Asn294 and Asn295) and the adjacent Phe293 residue. Analysis of the properties of the mutant receptors expressed in COS-7 cells revealed that alanine replacement of Phe293 had no major effect on AT1 receptor function. Substitution of the adjacent Asn294 residue with alanine (N294A) reduced receptor binding affinities for angiotensin II, two nonpeptide agonists (L-162,313 and L-163,491), and the AT1-selective nonpeptide antagonist losartan but not that for the peptide antagonist [Sar1, Ile8]angiotensin II. The N294A receptor also showed impaired G protein coupling and severely attenuated inositol phosphate generation. In contrast, alanine replacement of Asn295 decreased receptor binding affinities for all angiotensin II ligands but did not impair signal transduction. Additional substitutions of Asn295 with a variety of amino acids did not identify specific structural elements for ligand binding. These findings indicate that Asn295 is required for the integrity of the intramembrane binding pocket of the AT1a receptor but is not essential for signal generation. They also demonstrate the importance of transmembrane helices in the formation of the binding site for nonpeptide AT1 receptor agonists. We conclude that the Asn294 residue of the AT1 receptor is an essential determinant of receptor activation and that the adjacent Asn295 residue is required for normal ligand binding.

  11. Polysaccharide structural features that are critical for the binding of sulfated fucans to bindin, the adhesive protein from sea urchin sperm.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1987-10-15

    We have investigated the structural features of sulfated fucose-containing polysaccharides which are responsible for their selective binding to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus bindin. The data presented demonstrate that the sulfate esters and a molecular weight in excess of approximately 15,000 are required for high affinity binding of the fucans to bindin. Desulfation destroys the binding activity of the fucans, which can be fully restored by chemical resulfation. Fucan fragments of an average molecular weight of 15,000 were nearly as active as the starting material (Mr 10(6)). The observed IC50 value for fragments of Mr congruent to 10,000 and Mr congruent to 5,000 were 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher, respectively. The binding of fucoidan to bindin is stable in high salt (50% at 1.2 M NaCl) whereas the binding of fucoidan to DEAE-cellulose or polylysine is inhibited by the concentrations of salt normally found in sea water (50% at 0.2 and 0.5 M NaCl, respectively). This result suggests that the binding mechanism is not a simple ionic interaction and that hydrogen bonding and cooperativity may also be important determinants of the binding mechanism. We also found that polyvinyl sulfate binds to bindin with high affinity and inhibits the bindin-mediated agglutination of sea urchin eggs. The results of these investigations suggest that the spatial orientation of the sulfate esters plays a critical role in determining the selectivity of sulfated polysaccharide binding and that the polysaccharide backbone does not play a direct role in the binding mechanism.

  12. Exploring the Anti-Cancer Activity of Novel Thiosemicarbazones Generated through the Combination of Retro-Fragments: Dissection of Critical Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Rasko, Nathalie; Potůčková, Eliška; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Musiol, Robert; Małecki, Jan G.; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Ratuszna, Alicja; Muchowicz, Angelika; Gołąb, Jakub; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Richardson, Des R.; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) are an interesting class of ligands that show a diverse range of biological activity, including anti-fungal, anti-viral and anti-cancer effects. Our previous studies have demonstrated the potent in vivo anti-tumor activity of novel TSCs and their ability to overcome resistance to clinically used chemotherapeutics. In the current study, 35 novel TSCs of 6 different classes were designed using a combination of retro-fragments that appear in other TSCs. Additionally, di-substitution at the terminal N4 atom, which was previously identified to be critical for potent anti-cancer activity, was preserved through the incorporation of an N4-based piperazine or morpholine ring. The anti-proliferative activity of the novel TSCs were examined in a variety of cancer and normal cell-types. In particular, compounds 1d and 3c demonstrated the greatest promise as anti-cancer agents with potent and selective anti-proliferative activity. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the chelators that utilized “soft” donor atoms, such as nitrogen and sulfur, resulted in potent anti-cancer activity. Indeed, the N,N,S donor atom set was crucial for the formation of redox active iron complexes that were able to mediate the oxidation of ascorbate. This further highlights the important role of reactive oxygen species generation in mediating potent anti-cancer activity. Significantly, this study identified the potent and selective anti-cancer activity of 1d and 3c that warrants further examination. PMID:25329549

  13. Scale-dependent interactions between vegetation, landscape, and climate: How critical zone structure influences ecohydrological reslience in a rapidly changing world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, P. D.; Barnard, H. R.; Chorover, J.; Fan, Y.; Gallo, E. L.; Godsey, S.; Maxwell, R. M.; McNamara, J. P.; Swetnam, T. L.; Tague, N.

    2015-12-01

    Concurrent changes in climate, land cover, and population are pushing coupled human and natural systems outside of the historical range of natural variability, presenting major challenges to the management of natural and built environments worldwide. A comprehensive understanding of how precipitation is partitioned to ecosystem and societal water resources is central to many of these challenges. Although considerable progress has been made advancing process understanding and developing ecohydrological models, a key challenge remains applying this knowledge to landscape and regional scales of resource management. Approaches to address this challenge, ranging from deterministic to probabilistic models, all face the challenge of identifying scale breaks in the coupling between biotic and abiotic processes. We employ an alternative, complementary approach, combining newer observations (e.g. high resolution aerial LiDAR; isotopes) and established techniques to identify scale breaks and transitions in how ecological processes, occurring on relatively short timescales, are coupled to longer-term development of critical zone, that typically develops over longer time scales. At stand scales, vegetation structure strongly controls the fraction of precipitation partitioned to evaporation by influencing both solar radiation and turbulence with a net change in effective precipitation (water available for transpiration, recharge, or streamflow) of as much as 25%. At hillslope scales, topographic shading or exposure has similar magnitude effects on total evapotranspiration, while topographically driven water subsidy can double carbon storage through increases in both tree size and number. At catchment-scales, the coupling between vegetation, climate, and the physical landscape results in a predictable signature in hydrologic partitioning that reflects regional susceptibility to drought. Importantly, these transitions in biophysical interactions, occurring at scales from 0.01 to

  14. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  15. GOAT ROCKS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT ROADLESS AREAS, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Close, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Goat Rocks Wilderness and adjacent roadless areas are a rugged, highly forested, scenic area located on the crest of the Cascade Range in south-central Washington. Several mineral claims have been staked in the area. Mineral surveys were conducted. Geochemical, geophysical, and geologic investigations indicate that three areas have probable mineral-resource potential for base metals in porphyry-type deposits. Available data are not adequate to permit definition of the potential for oil and gas. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of other kinds of energy resources in the area. Evaluation of resource potential in the three areas identified as having probable mineral-resource potential could be improved by more detailed geochemical studies and geologic mapping.

  16. Scolopendromorpha of New Guinea and adjacent islands (Myriapoda, Chilopoda).

    PubMed

    Schileyko, Arkady A; Stoev, Pavel E

    2016-01-01

    The centipede fauna of the second largest island in the world, New Guinea, and its adjacent islands, is poorly known, with most information deriving from the first half of the 20th century. Here we present new data on the order Scolopendromorpha based on material collected in the area in the last 40 years, mainly by Bulgarian and Latvian zoologists. The collections comprise eleven species of six genera and three families. The diagnosis of Cryptops (Trigonocryptops) is emended in the light of the recent findings. The old and doubtful record of Scolopendra multidens Newport, 1844 from New Guinea is referred to S. subspinipes Leach, 1815 and the species is here excluded from the present day list of New Guinean scolopendromorphs. Cryptops nepalensis Lewis, 1999 is here recorded from New Guinea for the first time. An annotated list and an identification key to the scolopendromorphs of the studied region are presented. PMID:27515618

  17. Reconnaissance geologic map of Kodiak Island and adjacent islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.

    2013-01-01

    Kodiak Island and its adjacent islands, located on the west side of the Gulf of Alaska, contain one of the largest areas of exposure of the flysch and melange of the Chugach terrane of southern Alaska. However, in the past 25 years, only detailed mapping covering small areas in the archipelago has been done. This map and its associated digital files (Wilson and others, 2005) present the best available mapping compiled in an integrated fashion. The map and associated digital files represent part of a systematic effort to release geologic map data for the United States in a uniform manner. The geologic data have been compiled from a wide variety of sources, ranging from state and regional geologic maps to large-scale field mapping. The map data are presented for use at a nominal scale of 1:500,000, although individual datasets (see Wilson and others, 2005) may contain data suitable for use at larger scales.

  18. 38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA 1900 MICHIGAN MACHINERY MFG. CO. PUNCH PRESS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE FACTORY BUILDING. AT THE LEFT FOREGROUND IS A MOVABLE TIRE BENDER FOR SHAPING ELI WINDMILL WHEEL RIMS. AT THE CENTER IS A FLOOR-MOUNTED CIRCA 1900 SNAG GRINDER OF THE TYPE USED FOR SMOOTHING ROUGH CASTINGS. ON THE WHEELED WORK STATION IS A SUNNEN BUSHING GRINDER, BEHIND WHICH IS A TRIPOD CHAIN VICE. IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND IS A WOODEN CHEST OF DRAWERS WHICH CONTAINS A 'RAG DRAWER' STILL FILLED WITH CLOTH RAGS PLACED IN THE FACTORY BUILDING AT THE INSISTENCE OF LOUISE (MRS. ARTHUR) KREGEL FOR THE CONVENIENCE AND CLEANLINESS OF WORKERS. IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND IS A CIRCA 1900 CROSS-CUTOFF CIRCULAR SAW. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  19. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  20. Adjacent effect and cross talk of land surfaces on coastal water in the Aster VNIR and SWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Tsutomu; Masuda, Kazuhiko; Sato, Isao; Tsuchida, Satoshi

    2002-12-01

    The adjacency effect is discussed at coastal areas of main land and peninsula using VNIR and SWIR on ASTER sensor, although the cross-talk phenomenon is apparently noted on some SWIR. The purpose of the analysis is to derive optical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol. The aerosol model is in accordance to the dust-like model. This model is adopted to ASTER and MISR on Terra satellite. Data is the Atsumi Peninsula near Nagoya (34° 40'N, 134° 00'E) GMT1.55 on July 10,2000. The ASTER SWIR(1.65μm-2.395μm) cross-talk phenomenon is noted in the data. This is known as a result of a structure of ASTER sensor. It is relatively large (5-6 DN counts and 100 lines or 3km length). On the other hands, when ASTER observe heterogeneous surface of coastal water, the adjacency effect due to the scattering by atmosphere might partly be contaminated to the above effect. In the SWIR region of spectrum, molecular scattering is practically neglected. However, some aerosol model indicates strong scattering effect at SWIR wavelengths. The main results are (1) The Japan Main land indicates 6~20 times more effect than the peninsula on adjacent radiance from ocean water. (2) SWIR & VNIR exhibit similar adjacent effect which might indicate aerosol or large particles.

  1. [Effects of wheat planted adjacent to rape on the major pests and their natural enemies in wheat field].

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Wu, Wen-Qing; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2011-12-01

    Based on the dynamic analysis of insect community structure characteristics, an investigation was conducted on the composition, abundance, and stability of wheat aphids and their major natural enemies in the wheat field adjacent to rape field in Handan City, Hebei Province in 2008-2009. The wheat and rape fields had the similar composition of insect communities. The main pests were aphids, their predatory natural enemies included ladybirds, green lacewings, spiders, and hover flies, and their parasitic natural enemies were wasps. In 2008-2009, the composition of insect communities in the wheat and rape fields had definite changes, but the common features were the lowest abundance of aphids and the highest abundance of predatory and parasitic natural enemies in wheat field adjacent to rape field. The insect community, aphid sub-community, and predatory natural enemy' s sub-community had a high stability in the wheat field adjacent to rape field and a low stability far from the rape field, suggesting that planting wheat adjacent to rape could effectively protect and make use of the natural enemies and promote their control ability on wheat aphids in wheat field.

  2. Effect of Fluoridated Sealants on Adjacent Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cagetti, M.G.; Carta, G.; Cocco, F.; Sale, S.; Congiu, G.; Mura, A.; Strohmenger, L.; Lingström, P.; Campus, G.

    2014-01-01

    A double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed in 6- to 7-yr-old schoolchildren to evaluate, in a 30-mo period, whether the caries increment on the distal surface of the second primary molars adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with fluoride release compounds would be lower with respect to those adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with a nonfluoridated sealant. In sum, 2,776 subjects were enrolled and randomly divided into 3 groups receiving sealants on sound first molars: high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (GIC group); resin-based sealant with fluoride (fluoride-RB group); and a resin-based sealant without fluoride (RB group). Caries (D1 – D3 level) was recorded on the distal surface of the second primary molar, considered the unit of analysis including only sound surfaces at the baseline. At baseline, no differences in caries prevalence were recorded in the 3 groups regarding the considered surfaces. At follow-up, the prevalence of an affected unit of analysis was statistically lower (p = .03) in the GIC and fluoride-RB groups (p = .04). In the GIC group, fewer new caries were observed in the unit of analysis respect to the other 2 groups. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.68; p < .01) for GIC vs. RB and 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.04; p = .005) for fluoride-RB vs. RB. Caries incidence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic status (IRR = 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.42; p = .05). Dental sealant high-viscosity GIC and fluoride-RB demonstrated protection against dental caries, and there was evidence that these materials afforded additional protection for the tooth nearest to the sealed tooth (clinical trial registration NCT01588210). PMID:24846910

  3. Subduction initiation adjacent to a relic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although plate tectonics is well established, how subduction initiates over tectonic history has remained obscure. It has been proposed that passive margins may be a possible place for subduction initiation, but there is no obvious Cenozoic example of such a scenario, including along the passive margins of the Atlantic Ocean. With a computational method that follows the deformation of a visco-elasto-plastic medium, here we show that a favourable locale for subduction initiation is the juxtaposition of an old oceanic plate adjacent to a young, but relic arc. Significant density anomalies leading to subduction initiation arise from two major factors. One is the compositional difference between the relic arc crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle; the other is the thermal difference due to the age offset between the two plates. With such a setup, we observe spontaneous subduction initiation if the oceanic crust is significantly weakened by pore fluid pressure. If the oceanic crust is relatively strong, a small amount of plate convergence is required to induce subduction. The evidence that Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermedec subduction zones both initiate adjacent to a relic island arc support our conclusions. The initiation of both subduction zones at 51-52 Ma with commensurate compression on their respective overriding plates support a causal link between both subduction initiation events through a change in Pacific Plate motion. Our results provide an explanation for the rarity of subduction initiation at the passive margins. The continental lithosphere is typically old and cold. Consequently, the thermal effects cancel the compositional buoyancy contrast between the continental crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle, making subduction initiation difficult at passive margins.

  4. Prevention of enamel demineralization adjacent to glass ionomer filling materials.

    PubMed

    Forss, H; Seppä, L

    1990-04-01

    In order to study the release of fluoride and prevention of enamel demineralization by different filling materials, standardized cavities were prepared in 80 extracted human molars. The cavities were filled as follows: 1. Fuji II F; 2. Ketac-Fil; 3. Ketac-Silver; 4. Silar. Twenty molars were used as controls (no filling). Enamel slabs with the fillings were subjected to 9 days of demineralization (30 min daily) and remineralization (artificial saliva, replaced daily). Fluoride release in the saliva was determined on days 1, 3, 5, and 9. Enamel fluoride content adjacent to the cavities was determined initially and after the de-remineralization using the acid etch technique. On day 1, the largest amount of fluoride in the saliva was released by Fuji, but on day 9 the largest amount was released by Ketac-Fil. Ketac-Silver released significantly less fluoride than Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The average initial fluoride content of enamel was 2200 ppm. After the test period, fluoride contents adjusted for biopsy depth were 1822, 1690, 1693, 1337, and 888 ppm in groups 1-5, respectively. The amounts of phosphorus dissolved by the second acid etch were 28.9 (SE 2.6), 30.2 (2.0), 34.4 (2.8), 44.1 (2.7), and 42.2 (2.4) micrograms, respectively. Softening of surface enamel during the test period was clearly reduced in teeth filled with Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The results show that glass ionomer materials release considerable amounts of fluoride and prevent demineralization of the adjacent enamel in vitro. Fuji and Ketac-Fil seem to be more effective than Ketac-Silver.

  5. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and adjacent waters, Mass. 110.140 Section 110.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 35744, June 20, 2011. (a... adjacent waters, Mass. (a) * * * (2) Anchorage B. All waters bounded by a line beginning at 41°36′42.3″...

  6. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  7. Diversity of fungi from the mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest soils.

    PubMed

    Duff, Lyndon B; Urichuk, Theresa M; Hodgins, Lisa N; Young, Jocelyn R; Untereiner, Wendy A

    2016-07-01

    Culture-based methods were employed to recover 3929 isolates of fungi from soils collected in May and July 2014 from mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest sites. The abundance, diversity, and richness of species from nest mounds exceeded those of non-mound soils, particularly in July. Communities of fungi from mounds were more similar to those from mounds than non-mounds; this was also the case for non-mound soils with the exception of one non-mound site in July. Species of Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were dominant in nest soils and represented up to 81.8% of the taxa recovered. Members of the genus Aspergillus accounted for the majority of Trichocomaceae from nests and were represented almost exclusively by Aspergillus navahoensis and Aspergillus pseudodeflectus. Dominant fungi from non-mound sites included Cladosporium cladosporioides, Geomyces pannorum, and species of Acremonium, Fusarium, Penicillium, and Phoma. Although mound nests were warmer than adjacent soils, the dominance of xerotolerant Aspergillus in soils from mounds and the isolation of the majority of Trichocomaceae at 25 and 35 °C suggests that both temperature and water availability may be determinants of fungal community structure in nests of F. ulkei.

  8. Diversity of fungi from the mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest soils.

    PubMed

    Duff, Lyndon B; Urichuk, Theresa M; Hodgins, Lisa N; Young, Jocelyn R; Untereiner, Wendy A

    2016-07-01

    Culture-based methods were employed to recover 3929 isolates of fungi from soils collected in May and July 2014 from mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest sites. The abundance, diversity, and richness of species from nest mounds exceeded those of non-mound soils, particularly in July. Communities of fungi from mounds were more similar to those from mounds than non-mounds; this was also the case for non-mound soils with the exception of one non-mound site in July. Species of Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were dominant in nest soils and represented up to 81.8% of the taxa recovered. Members of the genus Aspergillus accounted for the majority of Trichocomaceae from nests and were represented almost exclusively by Aspergillus navahoensis and Aspergillus pseudodeflectus. Dominant fungi from non-mound sites included Cladosporium cladosporioides, Geomyces pannorum, and species of Acremonium, Fusarium, Penicillium, and Phoma. Although mound nests were warmer than adjacent soils, the dominance of xerotolerant Aspergillus in soils from mounds and the isolation of the majority of Trichocomaceae at 25 and 35 °C suggests that both temperature and water availability may be determinants of fungal community structure in nests of F. ulkei. PMID:27192606

  9. The ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) of the Strandzha Mountain and adjacent coastal territories (Bulgaria and Turkey)

    PubMed Central

    Guéorguiev, Borislav

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The knowledge of the ground-beetle fauna of Strandzha is currently incomplete, and is largely based on data from the Bulgarian part of the region and on records resulting from casual collecting. This study represents a critical revision of the available literature, museum collections and a three years field study of the carabid beetles of the Bulgarian and Turkish parts of Strandzha Mountain and the adjacent Black Sea Coast territories. New information A total of 328 species and subspecies of Carabidae, belonging to 327 species from the region of Strandzha Mountain and adjacent seacoast area, have been listed. Of these, 77 taxa represent new records for the Bulgarian part of the region, and 110 taxa new records for Turkish part of the studied region. Two taxa, one subgenus (Haptotapinus Reitter, 1886) and one species (Pterostichus crassiusculus), are new to the fauna of Bulgaria. Based on a misidentification, the species Apotomus testaceus is excluded from the list of the Bulgarian fauna. Seven species (Carabus violaceus azurescens, Apotomus rufus, Platynus proximus, Molops alpestris kalofericus, M. dilatatus angulicollis, Pterostichus merklii, and Calathus metallicus) are treated as doubtful for the regional fauna, and one (Apotomus rufus) also for the Bulgarian fauna. Altogether, 43 taxa collected in the Turkish part of the region are new for European Turkey. New taxa for Turkey are the genera Myas and Oxypselaphus, the subgenus Feronidius, and nine species and subspecies (Carabus granulatus granulatus, Dyschirius tristis, Bembidion normannum apfelbecki, B. subcostatum vau, Acupalpus exiguus, Myas chalybaeus, Oxypselaphus obscurus, Pterostichus leonisi, Pt. melas). In addition, there are a further seven species that are here confirmed for Turkey. PMID:27099564

  10. Physical, Structural and Operational Vulnerability of Critical Facilities in Valle de Chalco Solidaridad, Estado de Mexico, Mexico. Case of study: Avándaro, San Isidro and El Triunfo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Ponce-Pacheco, A. B.; Espinosa-Campos, O.; Huerta-Parra, M.; Reyes-Pimentel, T.; Rodriguez, F.; Benitez-Olivares, I.

    2010-12-01

    Valle de Chalco Solidaridad is located in Mexico City Metropolitan Area in Estado de Mexico, Mexico. In this town there is a sewage canal called “La Compañía”. A wall of this canal collapsed on February 5, 2010 due to heavy rains creating the flooding of four surrounding communities. It is important to point out that this area is frequently exposed to floods. In this work, we consider a critical facility as an essential structure for performance, health care and welfare within a community or/and as a place that can be used as shelter in case of emergency or disaster. Global vulnerability (the sum of the three measured vulnerabilities) of the 25 critical facilities identified in the locations of Avándaro, San Isidro and El Triunfo was assessed using the Community Vulnerability Assessment Tool developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). For each critical facility we determined its operational, structural and physical vulnerabilities. For our analysis, we considered the four main natural hazards to which Valle de Chalco is exposed: earthquakes, floods, landslides and sinking. We considered five levels of vulnerability using a scale from 1 to 5, where values range from very low to very high vulnerability, respectively. A critical facilities database was generated by collecting general information for three categories: schools, government and church. Each facility was evaluated considering its location in relation to identified high-risk areas. Our results indicate that in average, the global vulnerability of all facilities is low, however, there are particular cases in which this global vulnerability is high. The average operational vulnerability of the three communities is moderate. The global structural vulnerability (sum of the structural vulnerability for the four analyzed hazards) is moderate. In particular, the structural vulnerability to earthquakes is low, to landslides is very low, to flooding is moderate and to sinking is

  11. Lineaments and their tectonic implications in Rocky Mountains and adjacent plains region

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, E.K.; Perry, W.J. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Two orthogonal sets of lineaments in Phanerozoic rocks of the Rocky Mountains and adjacent plains region probably reflect recurrent structural movement along corresponding fractures in the underlying igneous and metamorphic rocks. The lineaments seem to have been primarily paleotopographic features that affected the depositional and erosional margins, thicknesses, and the distribution of lithofacies of Phanerozoic strata. At small scales, the crosscutting lineaments of either set suggest primarily vertical movements of rectangular blocks along through-going rectilinear fractures in the basement rocks. At larger scales, the differential movement of these blocks apparently was propagated upward through the strata and formed a variety of structures, many of which are en echelon. Blocks in the region moved at different times, and they commonly rotated about horizontal axes, as indicated by lateral differences in rates of associated sedimentation and by structural features along the lineaments. Throughout most of the Phanerozoic, the movements seem to have been mainly along the diagonal set (northeast, northwest) of lineaments, but the cardinal set (north-south, east-west) also influenced the development of Laramide structures and the present landscape in the Rocky Mountain region. The structural stresses, which were released along the two sets of lineaments, may reflect plate movements, and they probably are related to orogenies caused either by plate collisions or by rifting and continental fragmentation.

  12. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  13. Rpn1 provides adjacent receptor sites for substrate binding and deubiquitination by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuan; Chen, Xiang; Elsasser, Suzanne; Stocks, Bradley B.; Tian, Geng; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Shi, Yanhong; Zhang, Naixia; de Poot, Stefanie A. H.; Tuebing, Fabian; Sun, Shuangwu; Vannoy, Jacob; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Engen, John R.; Finley, Daniel; Walters, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract INTRODUCTION The ubiquitin-proteasome system comprises hundreds of distinct pathways of degradation, which converge at the step of ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. Five proteasomal ubiquitin receptors have been identified, two that are intrinsic to the proteasome (Rpn10 and Rpn13) and three reversibly associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors (Rad23, Dsk2, and Ddi1). RATIONALE We found that the five known proteasomal ubiquitin receptors of yeast are collectively nonessential for ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome. We therefore screened for additional ubiquitin receptors in the proteasome and identified subunit Rpn1 as a candidate. We used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the structure of the binding site within Rpn1, which we term the T1 site. Mutational analysis of this site showed its functional importance within the context of intact proteasomes. T1 binds both ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like (UBL) proteins, in particular the substrate-delivering shuttle factor Rad23. A second site within the Rpn1 toroid, T2, recognizes the UBL domain of deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp6, as determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis and validated by amino acid substitution and functional assays. The Rpn1 toroid thus serves a critical scaffolding role within the proteasome, helping to assemble multiple proteasome cofactors as well as substrates. RESULTS Our results indicate that proteasome subunit Rpn1 can recognize both ubiquitin and UBL domains of substrate shuttling factors that themselves bind ubiquitin and function as reversibly-associated proteasomal ubiquitin receptors. Recognition is mediated by the T1 site within the Rpn1 toroid, which supports proteasome function in vivo. We found that the capacity of T1 to recognize both ubiquitin and UBL proteins was shared with Rpn10 and Rpn13. The surprising multiplicity of ubiquitin-recognition domains within the proteasome may promote enhanced

  14. A plot tree structure to represent surface flow connectivity in rural catchments: definition and application for mining critical source areas and temporal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Cordier, Marie-Odile; Grimaldi, Catherine; Salmon-Monviola, Jordy; Masson, Veronique; Squividant, Herve; Trepos, Ronan

    2013-04-01

    ., Tortrat F., Cordier M.O., 2009. A plot drainage network as a conceptual tool for the spatial representation of surface flow pathways in agricultural catchments. Computer and Geosciences, 35, 276-288. Gascuel-Odoux C., Aurousseau P., Cordier M.O., Durand P., Garcia F., Masson, V., Salmon-Monviola J., Tortrat F., Trepos, R. 2009. A decision-oriented model to evaluate the effect of land use and management on herbicide contamination in stream water. Environmental modelling and software, 24, 1433-1446. Gascuel-Odoux C., Aurousseau, P., Doray, T., Squividant, H., Macary, F., Uny, D., Grimaldi, C., 2011. Incorporating landscape features in a plot tree structure to represent surface flow connectivity in rural catchments. Hydrological Processes, 25, 3625-3636. Salmon-Monviola J., Gascuel-Odoux C., Garcia F., Tortrat F., Cordier M.O., Masson V., Trepos R., 2011. Simulating the effect of technical and environmental constraints on the spatio-temporal distribution of herbicide applications and stream losses. Agriculture, Environment and Ecosystems, 140, 382-394. Trepos, R., Masson V., Cordier, M.O., Gascuel-Odoux, C., Salmon-Monviola J., 2012. Mining simulation data by rule induction to determine critical source areas of stream water pollution by herbicides. Computers and Electronics in Agriculture 86: 75-88.

  15. Navigated Pin-Point Approach to Osteoid Osteoma Adjacent to the Facet Joint of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Masashi; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Nishizawa, Kazuya; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign osteoblastic tumor. Its curative treatment is complete removal of the nidus, where intraoperative localization of the nidus governs clinical results. However, treatment can be difficult since the lesion is often invisible over the bony surface. Accordingly, establishment of an ideal less invasive surgical strategy for spinal OO remains yet unsettled. We illustrate the efficacy of a computed tomography (CT)-based navigation system in excising OO located adjacent to the facet joint of spine. In our 2 cases, complete and pin-point removal of the nidus located close to the facet joint was successfully achieved, without excessive removal of the bone potentially leading to spinal instability and possible damage of nearby neurovascular structures. We advocate a less invasive approach to spinal OO, particularly in an environment with an available CT-based navigation system. PMID:26949472

  16. Contrasting microbial assemblages in adjacent water masses associated with the East Australian Current.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Justin R; Doblin, Martina A; Jeffries, Thomas C; Brown, Mark V; Newton, Kelly; Ralph, Peter J; Baird, Mark; Mitchell, James G

    2012-10-01

    Different oceanographic provinces host discrete microbial assemblages that are adapted to local physicochemical conditions. We sequenced and compared the metagenomes of two microbial communities inhabiting adjacent water masses in the Tasman Sea, where the recent strengthening of the East Australian Current (EAC) has altered the ecology of coastal environments. Despite the comparable latitude of the samples, significant phylogenetic differences were apparent, including shifts in the relative frequency of matches to Cyanobacteria, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Fine-scale variability in the structure of SAR11, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus populations, with more matches to 'warm-water' ecotypes observed in the EAC, indicates the EAC may drive an intrusion of tropical microbes into temperate regions of the Tasman Sea. Furthermore, significant shifts in the relative importance of 17 metabolic categories indicate that the EAC prokaryotic community has different physiological properties than surrounding waters. PMID:23760900

  17. Contrasting microbial assemblages in adjacent water masses associated with the East Australian Current.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Justin R; Doblin, Martina A; Jeffries, Thomas C; Brown, Mark V; Newton, Kelly; Ralph, Peter J; Baird, Mark; Mitchell, James G

    2012-10-01

    Different oceanographic provinces host discrete microbial assemblages that are adapted to local physicochemical conditions. We sequenced and compared the metagenomes of two microbial communities inhabiting adjacent water masses in the Tasman Sea, where the recent strengthening of the East Australian Current (EAC) has altered the ecology of coastal environments. Despite the comparable latitude of the samples, significant phylogenetic differences were apparent, including shifts in the relative frequency of matches to Cyanobacteria, Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Fine-scale variability in the structure of SAR11, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus populations, with more matches to 'warm-water' ecotypes observed in the EAC, indicates the EAC may drive an intrusion of tropical microbes into temperate regions of the Tasman Sea. Furthermore, significant shifts in the relative importance of 17 metabolic categories indicate that the EAC prokaryotic community has different physiological properties than surrounding waters.

  18. Seismic responses of two adjacent buildings. I. Data and analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    1993-01-01

    In this two-part paper, responses of two, adjacent, seven-story buildings in Norwalk, California, to the Whittier-Narrows, Calif, earthquake of Oct. 1, 1987 are studied. Building A, instrumented according to code recommendations, and building B, extensively instrumented, are offset by 16.3 m from one another. The data set includes motions from the superstructure of both buildings, from a downhole below the foundation of building B, and from three free-field sites. Part I of the paper includes descriptions of the buildings, site, instrumentation, and analysis of the data of each building. System identification and spectral analysis techniques are employed in part I. Building A has identical first-mode frequencies of 0.65 Hz for both building axes. The strong-motion response characteristics of building A are considerably different than those determined from low-amplitude tests. Building B has fundamental modes at 0.76 Hz and 0.83 Hz in the major and minor axes, respectively. Torsional and diaphragm effects in building B are negligible.

  19. Snow Distribution Patterns in Clearings and Adjacent Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Douglas L.; Swanson, Robert H.

    1986-12-01

    Snow accumulation patterns were determined for clearings and adjacent forest at Marmot Creek experimental watershed and James River, Alberta. At maximum accumulation snow water equivalent (SWE) was greater in clearings than in forest whether clearings were large, as in 8- to 13-ha blocks where SWE averaged 20% more than in the forest, or small as in the ¼ to 6-H (height) diameter circular clearings where SWE was 13-45% greater than in the forest. SWE was 42 to 52% less in north than in south sectors of 2-6 H clearings. These differences increased with clearing size and time since beginning of accumulation period and are caused by snow ablation (melt and evaporation), a function of direct solar radiation reaching the snowpack. In such situations the snow that has accumulated on the ground cannot be considered a measure of the snow that has actually fallen there. For water balances and hydrologic modeling, snow measurements in partially cleared watersheds must be adjusted for temporal and spatial factors specific to the watershed.

  20. Seismic responses of two adjacent buildings. II. Interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    1993-01-01

    Presented in this part of the two-part paper is a study of the relations between earthquake motions recorded from two, adjacent, seven-story buildings, from a downhole below the foundation of one of the buildings and from three free-field sites, all within one city block. This unique data set was obtained during the Whittier-Narrows, Calif. earthquake of Oct. 1, 1987, Part I includes background information on the two buildings, the site, and the data set. Building response characteristics of a code-type instrumented building (A) and an extensively instrumented building (B) are also studied. In this part, spectral analysis techniques are used to study the relationships between the motions of the roofs and basements, the downhole and the free-field sites. It is asserted that there is building-soil-building interaction between the two buildings at a frequency of 2.35 Hz. Furthermore, the free-field motions are shown to be influenced by the presence of the buildings.

  1. Particulate Matter Levels in Ambient Air Adjacent to Industrial Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Nizam, N. M. S.; Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Lajis, A.; Kassim, A. H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Air quality in the residential areas adjacent to the industrial regions is of great concern due to the association with human health risks. In this work, the concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) in the ambient air of UTHM campus was investigated tostudy the air qualityand their compliance to the Malaysian Ambient Air Quality Guidelines (AAQG). The PM10 samples were taken over 24 hours from the most significant area at UTHM including Stadium, KolejKediamanTunDr. Ismail (KKTDI) and MakmalBahan. The meteorological parameters; temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction as well as particulate matterwere estimated by using E-Sampler Particulate Matter (PM10) Collector. The highest concentrations of PM10 (55.56 µg/m3) was recorded at MakmalBahan during the working and weekend days. However, these concentrations are less than 150 pg/m3. It can be concluded that although UTHM is surrounded by the industrial area, the air quality in the campus still within the standards limits.

  2. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  3. Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.; Squillace, P.

    1994-01-01

    Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer and quantification of herbicide bank storage during high streamflow were investigated at a research site on the Cedar River flood plain, 10 km southeast of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During high streamflow in March 1990, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background in water from wells as distant as 20, 50, and 10 m from the river's edge, respectively. During high streamflow in May 1990, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background as distant as 20, 50, 10, and 20 m from the river's edge, respectively. Herbicide bank storage took place during high streamflow when hydraulic gradients were from the river to the alluvial aquifer and the laterally infiltrating river water contained herbicide concentrations larger than background concentrations in the aquifer. The herbicide bank storage can be quantified by multiplying herbicide concentration by the "effective area" that a well represented and an assumed porosity of 0.25. During March 1990, herbicide bank storage values were calculated to be 1.7,79, and 4.0 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor, respectively. During May 1990, values were 7.1, 54, 11, and 19 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, respectively. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  4. The Current Tectonics of the Yukon and Adjacent Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, R. D.; Leonard, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The current tectonics across the Yukon and adjacent areas of western Northwest Territories (NWT) and northern British Columbia appear to be driven primarily by the Yakutat Terrane collision, an "indenter" in the corner of the Gulf of Alaska. GPS data show 1-10 mm/yr northward and eastward, decreasing inland. The rates from earthquake statistics are similar although there are important discrepancies. The eastern Cordillera earthquake mechanisms are mainly thrust in the Mackenzie Mountains of southwestern NWT where the Cordillera upper crust is overthrusting the craton. To the north, the mechanisms are mainly strike-slip in the Richardson Mountains that appear to lie along the edge of the craton. The deformation appears to be limited to the hot and weak Cordillera with the strong craton providing an irregular eastern boundary. For example, there is an eastward bow in the craton edge and the deformation in the Mackenzie Mountains. On the Beaufort Sea margin in the region of the Mackenzie Delta there appears to be a type of "subduction zone" with the continent very slowly overthrusting the oceanic plate, a process that has continued since at least the Cretaceous. A northward moving continental margin block is bounded by left lateral faulting in the west (Canning Displacement Zone of eastern Alaska) and right lateral faulting in the east (Richardson Mountains in eastern Yukon). There is almost no seismicity on this thrust belt but as for some other subduction zones such as Cascadia there is the potential for very infrequent great earthquakes.

  5. Adjacent level spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Sreeramalingam, Rathinavelu

    2012-05-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is rare, but the same occurring at adjacent levels without disturbing the operated level is very rare. We report a case, with 5 year followup, who underwent ACDF from C5 to C7 for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. He showed neurological improvement after surgery but developed discharging sinus after 2 weeks, which healed with antibiotics. He improved on his preoperative symptoms well for the first 2 months. He started developing progressive neck pain and myelopathy after 3 months and investigations revealed spondylodiscitis at C3 and C4 with erosion, collapse, and kyphosis, without any evidence of implant failure or graft rejection at the operated level. He underwent reexploration and implant removal at the operated level (there was good fusion from C5 to C7) followed by debridement/decompression at C3, C4 along with iliac crest bone grafting and stabilization with plate and screws after maximum correction of kyphosis. The biopsy specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa and appropriate sensitive antibiotics (gentamycin and ciprofloxacin) were given for 6 weeks. He was under regular followup for 5 years his myelopathy resolved completely and he is back to work. Complete decompression of the cord and fusion from C2 to C7 was demonstrable on postoperative imaging studies without any evidence of implant loosening or C1/C2 instability at the last followup. PMID:22719127

  6. Macrobenthos of Yenisei Bay and the adjacent Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. V.; Vedenin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Trawl samples were collected in the northern region of Yenisei Bay and adjacent parts of the Kara Sea shelf. A total of eight stations were taken. We found more than 200 species of benthic organisms. A consecutive replacement of benthic communities is observed when going to the north from the Ob and Yenisei estuaries to the open parts of the sea. We could distinguish four different species complexes in the investigated area: a brackish-water complex where Saduria entomon is dominant; an intermediate complex where S. sibirica, S. sabini and Portlandia aestuariorum are dominant; a transitional complex with P. arctica as a dominant species and with a small amount of Ophiocten sericeum; a marine complex where O. sericeum is dominant. When salinity increased, some brackish-water species were replaced by related euryhaline species. One such example was the replacement of brackish-water Saduria entomon isopods by two euryhaline species: S. sibirica and S. sabini. The consecutive replacement of benthic communities showed a break near Sverdrup Island. In this area the marine complex was replaced by a transitional complex with P. arctica.

  7. IL-22R, IL-10R2, and IL-22BP binding sites are topologically juxtaposed on adjacent and overlapping surfaces of IL-22.

    PubMed

    Wu, Paul W; Li, Jing; Kodangattil, Sreekumar R; Luxenberg, Deborah P; Bennett, Frann; Martino, Margot; Collins, Mary; Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyriaki; Gill, Davinder S; Wolfman, Neil M; Fouser, Lynette A

    2008-10-24

    Interleukin (IL) 22 is a type II cytokine that is produced by immune cells and acts on nonimmune cells to regulate local tissue inflammation. As a product of the recently identified T helper 17 lineage of CD4(+) effector lymphocytes, IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal immunity as well as in dysregulated inflammation observed in autoimmune diseases. We used comprehensive mutagenesis combined with mammalian cell expression, ELISA cell-based, and structural methods to evaluate how IL-22 interacts with its cell surface receptor, IL-22R/IL-10R2, and with secreted IL-22 binding protein. This study identifies those amino acid side chains of IL-22 that are individually important for optimal binding to IL-22R, considerably expands the definition of IL-22 surface required for binding to IL-10R2, and demonstrates how IL-22 binding protein prevents IL-22R from binding to IL-22. The IL-22R and IL-10R2 binding sites are juxtaposed on adjacent IL-22 surfaces contributed mostly by helices A, D, and F and loop AB. Our results also provide a model for how IL-19, IL-20, IL-24, and IL-26 which are other IL-10-like cytokines, interact with their respective cell surface receptors.

  8. Alteration-weakening leading to localized deformation in a damage aureole adjacent to a dormant shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backeberg, Nils R.; Rowe, Christie D.; Barshi, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    Deformation adjacent to faults and shear zones is traditionally thought to correlate with slip. Inherited structures may control damage geometry, localizing fluid flow and deformation in a damage aureole around structures, even after displacement has ceased. In this paper we document a post-shearing anastomosing foliation and fracture network that developed to one side of the Mesoarchean Marmion Shear Zone. This fracture network hosts the low-grade, disseminated Hammond Reef gold deposit. The shear zone juxtaposed a greenstone belt against tonalite gneiss and was locked by an intrusion that was emplaced during the final stages of suturing. After cessation of activity, fluids channeled along fault- and intrusion-related fractures led to the pervasive sericitization of feldspars. Foliated zones resulted from flattening in the weaker sericite-rich tonalite during progressive alteration without any change in the regional NW-SE shortening direction. The anastomosing pattern may have been inherited from an earlier ductile fabric, but sericite alteration and flattening fabrics all formed post-shearing. Thus, the apparent foliated fracture network adjacent to the Marmion Shear Zone is a second-order effect of shear-related damage, distinct in time from shear activity, adjacent to an effectively dormant shear zone. This phenomenon has implications for understanding the relative timing of fault zone activity, alteration and (in this case) gold mineralization related to long-term fault zone permeability.

  9. Pathogenesis of the discal cysts communicating with an adjacent herniated disc. Histological and ultrastructual studies of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Takeno, Kenichi; Uchida, Kenzo; Yayama, Takafumi; Nakajima, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Guerrero, Alexander; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-03-01

    Discal cyst of the lumbar spine is a very rare cause of back pain and sciatica. We report two cases of discal cysts communicating with an adjacent herniated disc. From CT and MRI findings, they were diagnosed as having a discal cyst in the epidural space, which compressed the nerve root. After an adequate surgical field was obtained with a microscope and a Casper retractor, the discal cyst could be excised and satisfactory decompression of the adjacent nerve root was obtained. From histological and electron microscopic study, the presence of residual herniated tissues was confirmed in the cyst wall. Macrophages played an important role in the absorption of herniated tissue and the formation of the discal cyst. Hemorrhage in the cyst wall will make the serous hemorrhagic fluid-filled cystic structure in the absorbed spaces of the prolapsed disc. In this study, we confirmed that the discal cyst could have developed from the absorption process of a disc herniation. PMID:20138794

  10. Critical Pedagogy for Critical Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutak, Fatma Aslan; Bondy, Elizabeth; Adams, Thomasenia L.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief introduction to critical pedagogy and further discussion on critical mathematics education. Critical mathematics education enables students to read the world with mathematics. Three emerging domains of mathematics education related to critical mathematics education are discussed in this manuscript: ethnomathematics,…

  11. Tidally influenced alongshore circulation at an inlet-adjacent shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; List, Jeffrey H.; Erikson, Li H.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of tidal forcing to alongshore circulation inside the surfzone is investigated at a 7 km long sandy beach adjacent to a large tidal inlet. Ocean Beach in San Francisco, CA (USA) is onshore of a ∼150 km2 ebb-tidal delta and directly south of the Golden Gate, the sole entrance to San Francisco Bay. Using a coupled flow-wave numerical model, we find that the tides modulate, and in some cases can reverse the direction of, surfzone alongshore flows through two separate mechanisms. First, tidal flow through the inlet results in a barotropic tidal pressure gradient that, when integrated across the surfzone, represents an important contribution to the surfzone alongshore force balance. Even during energetic wave conditions, the tidal pressure gradient can account for more than 30% of the total alongshore pressure gradient (wave and tidal components) and up to 55% during small waves. The wave driven component of the alongshore pressure gradient results from alongshore wave height and corresponding setup gradients induced by refraction over the ebb-tidal delta. Second, wave refraction patterns over the inner shelf are tidally modulated as a result of both tidal water depth changes and strong tidal flows (∼1 m/s), with the effect from currents being larger. These tidally induced changes in wave refraction result in corresponding variability of the alongshore radiation stress and pressure gradients within the surfzone. Our results indicate that tidal contributions to the surfzone force balance can be significant and important in determining the direction and magnitude of alongshore flow.

  12. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  13. Seabed drifter movement in San Diego Bay and adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Robert R.; Wallace, William J.

    1982-06-01

    The seabed drifter has been used successfully to provide valuable information in many estuarine and open sea environments. It was therefore selected for use in the San Diego area. Five hundred drifters were released in San Diego Bay and adjacent ocean waters to delineate bottom flow patterns. Four significant bottom drift regimes are differentiated: off-coastal, main bay channel, open and semi-enclosed docking basins. Mean residual bottom drift ranged between 0·17km day -1 off the coast to essentially zero in the docking basins. Off-coast drifter results (31% recovery) showed a persistent northmoving bottom current with shallow near-coast drift distances between 4 and 25 km. This nearshore north moving bottom current appears to cause a net bottom water inflow into the main San Diego Bay channel (44% recovery). In the open bay a reverse trend was observed from the 16% of the drifters recovered. At the head of the estuary, evaporative densification is believed to occur, with the heavier water sinking and moving outward, towards the estuary mouth, resulting in an area of opposing bottom water currents. In this area San Diego Gas and Electric power plant takes in an average 150 million gallons of cooling water daily which, discharged as warm surface water, is suggested as the surface divergence mode required to reconcile the observed flow. With the three San Diego Bay electric power plants utilizing more than 5% of the maximum tidal prism for cooling purposes, this flow may play a major role in the overall bay circulation and requires quantitative investigation.

  14. Late Quaternary history of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowlands and adjacent Adirondack Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Pair, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The reconstruction of Late Wisconsinan ice retreat, proglacial lakes, and Champlain Sea history from the northwest Adirondack slope and adjacent St. Lawrence Lowlands is critical to the synthesis of a regional picture of deglacial events in the eastern Great Lakes region. Unfortunately, these same areas are well known for their limited exposures, landforms covered by thick forest, large tracts of land inaccessible to detailed field mapping, and the overall paucity of glacial materials preserved on upland surfaces. Despite these limitations, a model which utilizes multiple and field-truthed evidence has been used to designate areas where ice border deposits indicate a substantial recessional position. It employs the following criteria in this analysis: sedimentology and morphostratigraphy of morainal landform segments and related sediments; orientation and continuity of ice border drainage channels; and the relationship of ice borders and drainage systems to well documented local and regional water bodies which accompanied ice retreat. The results of this approach have provided a unique regional picture of deglaciation. Despite the inherent limitations of working in upland areas to reconstruct glacial events, detailed morphostratigraphic correlations based on multiple lines of evidence can yield important information. The positions of five former ice borders have been reconstructed from the available data. These ice margins correspond closely with those documented previously by others adjoining areas. This type of study, utilizing multiple and field-truthed lines of evidence, constitutes a tangible step towards understanding the nature and history of ice retreat along this portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  15. Trace element fingerprinting of cockle (Cerastoderma edule) shells can reveal harvesting location in adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Fernando; Génio, Luciana; Costa Leal, Miguel; Albuquerque, Rui; Queiroga, Henrique; Rosa, Rui; Calado, Ricardo

    2015-07-07

    Determining seafood geographic origin is critical for controlling its quality and safeguarding the interest of consumers. Here, we use trace element fingerprinting (TEF) of bivalve shells to discriminate the geographic origin of specimens. Barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) were quantified in cockle shells (Cerastoderma edule) captured with two fishing methods (by hand and by hand-raking) and from five adjacent fishing locations within an estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Results suggest no differences in TEF of cockle shells captured by hand or by hand-raking, thus confirming that metal rakes do not act as a potential source of metal contamination that could somehow bias TEF results. In contrast, significant differences were recorded among locations for all trace elements analysed. A Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP) revealed that 92% of the samples could be successfully classified according to their fishing location using TEF. We show that TEF can be an accurate, fast and reliable method to determine the geographic origin of bivalves, even among locations separated less than 1 km apart within the same estuarine system. Nonetheless, follow up studies are needed to determine if TEF can reliably discriminate between bivalves originating from different ecosystems.

  16. Trace element fingerprinting of cockle (Cerastoderma edule) shells can reveal harvesting location in adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Fernando; Génio, Luciana; Costa Leal, Miguel; Albuquerque, Rui; Queiroga, Henrique; Rosa, Rui; Calado, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Determining seafood geographic origin is critical for controlling its quality and safeguarding the interest of consumers. Here, we use trace element fingerprinting (TEF) of bivalve shells to discriminate the geographic origin of specimens. Barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr) and lead (Pb) were quantified in cockle shells (Cerastoderma edule) captured with two fishing methods (by hand and by hand-raking) and from five adjacent fishing locations within an estuarine system (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Results suggest no differences in TEF of cockle shells captured by hand or by hand-raking, thus confirming that metal rakes do not act as a potential source of metal contamination that could somehow bias TEF results. In contrast, significant differences were recorded among locations for all trace elements analysed. A Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP) revealed that 92% of the samples could be successfully classified according to their fishing location using TEF. We show that TEF can be an accurate, fast and reliable method to determine the geographic origin of bivalves, even among locations separated less than 1 km apart within the same estuarine system. Nonetheless, follow up studies are needed to determine if TEF can reliably discriminate between bivalves originating from different ecosystems. PMID:26149418

  17. Critical Configurations of Hard Disks on the Torus

    2013-04-16

    CCHDT constructs and classifies various arrangements of hard disks of a single radius places on the unit square with periodic boundary conditions. Specifially, a given configuration is evolved to the nearest critical point on a smoothed hard disk energy fuction, and is classified by the adjacency matrix of the canonically labelled contact graph.

  18. An evolution in listening: An analytical and critical study of structural, acoustic, and phenomenal aspects of selected works by Pauline Oliveros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setar, Katherine Marie

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation analytically and critically examines composer Pauline Oliveros's philosophy of 'listening' as it applies to selected works created between 1961 and 1984. The dissertation is organized through the application of two criteria: three perspectives of listening (empirical, phenomenal, and, to a lesser extent, personal), and categories derived, in part, from her writings and interviews (improvisational, traditional, theatrical, electronic, meditational, and interactive). In general, Oliveros's works may be categorized by one of two listening perspectives. The 'empirical' listening perspective, which generally includes pure acoustic phenomenon, independent from human interpretation, is exemplified in the analyses of Sound Patterns (1961), OH HA AH (1968), and, to a lesser extent, I of IV (1966). The 'phenomenal' listening perspective, which involves the human interaction with the pure acoustic phenomenon, includes a critical examination of her post-1971 'meditation' pieces and an analytical and critical examination of her tonal 'interactive' improvisations in highly resonant space, such as Watertank Software (1984). The most pervasive element of Oliveros's stylistic evolution is her gradual change from the hierarchical aesthetic of the traditional composer, to one in which creative control is more equally shared by all participants. Other significant contributions by Oliveros include the probable invention of the 'meditation' genre, an emphasis on the subjective perceptions of musical participants as a means to greater musical awareness, her musical exploration of highly resonant space, and her pioneering work in American electronic music. Both analytical and critical commentary were applied to selective representative works from Oliveros's six compositional categories. The analytical methods applied to the Oliveros's works include Wayne Slawson's vowel/formant theory as described in his book, Sound Color, an original method of categorizing consonants as

  19. Results of en bloc resection for hepatocellular carcinoma extending to adjacent organs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Ming; Sui, Cheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Xu, Feng; Kan, Tong; Yang, Jia-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Background To curatively resect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with adjacent organ extension, the combined resection of these organs is inevitable. We analyzed the safety and effectiveness of en bloc resection for HCC extending to adjacent organs. Methods From December 2002 to May 2006, we compared the surgical outcomes of patients with HCC extending to adjacent organs with those of closely matched, randomly selected patients with HCC without adjacent organ extension. Results We included 42 patients whose HCC extended to adjacent organs and 126 patients whose HCC did not extend to adjacent organs. There was no significant difference in survival, operative morbidity or mortality between the groups. In patients with HCC extending to adjacent organs, histopathological examination of the specimen revealed true tumour invasion in 13 and adhesion in 29 patients. Those with tumour invasion were more likely to have a high incidence of capsule infiltration, microvascular invasion and early intrahepatic recurrence (≤ 1 yr after hepatectomy). The 5-year overall survival of patients with tumour invasion was 11.5%, whereas that of patients with tumour adhesion was 38.1% (p = 0.033). Conclusion En bloc resection is a safe and effective therapy for HCC extending to adjacent organs. Tumour invasion to adjacent organs exhibits a more aggressive clinical behaviour and is associated with worse survival than tumour adhesion. PMID:22617536

  20. Trophic coupling between two adjacent benthic food webs within a man-made intertidal area: A stable isotopes evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Gauthier; Riera, Pascal; Leroux, Cédric

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed at establishing the effects of human-made physical modifications on the trophic structure and functioning of an intertidal benthic food web in Arcachon Bay (France). The main food sources and the most representative consumers were sampled on an artificial rocky dyke and its adjacent seagrass meadow. The food sources of consumers were inferred through the use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. The contributions of the different food sources to the diets of the consumers were established using the Isosource mixing model. In order to reduce the range of feasible contributions, additional non-isotopic constraints were added when necessary to the outputs of this model. We observed a more complex food web than previously shown for artificial habitats. Moreover, it appears that several consumers inhabiting the artificial environment base most of their diet on allochtonous eelgrass-derived detritus. In turn, several consumers inhabiting the eelgrass meadow consumed significantly macroalgae-derived material originating from the adjacent artificial rocky area. These results point out that the food webs associated to adjacent habitats can influence each other through the utilisation of exported organic matter.

  1. Effects of Typhoon Haikui on Nutrient Concentrations and Biological Production in the Yangtze Estuary and Its Adjacent Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Water temperature, salinity, turbidity, nutrient concentrations, and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured at four sampling stations in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) and its adjacent sea before and after the passage of typhoon HAIKUI. The structure of the estuarine water column and nutrient concentrations changed greatly due to the typhoon, as strong winds and heavy precipitation caused offshore water intrusion into the YRE as well as increased freshwater discharge. Vertical mixing affected the water column within a short period after the typhoon passed over the area. As the wind subsided, the Yangtze Diluted Water (YDW) had a strong effect on the surface water, whereas the offshore water intrusion primarily influenced the bottom water. Nutrient concentrations in the surface layer increased significantly after HAIKUI, whereas complicated trends were detected in the middle and bottom layers. After the typhoon, the concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, and silicate increased by 1.14, 0.08, and 0.31 × 109 mol, respectively, relative to the values before the typhoon. Moreover, we estimate that typhoons have contributed about 118.56, 8.32, and 32.24 × 109 mol of these nutrients to the YRE and its adjacent sea over the past 60 years. The increased nutrient concentrations greatly accelerated the growth of phytoplankton, although the biomass started to decline rapidly in the first few days after the typhoon because of opposing conditions. These results suggest that typhoon HAIKUI had a profound influence on water cycling and biological production in the YRE and its adjacent sea.

  2. Assessment of Bacterial bph Gene in Amazonian Dark Earth and Their Adjacent Soils

    PubMed Central

    Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Mendes, Lucas William; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Lima, Amanda Barbosa; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2014-01-01

    Amazonian Anthrosols are known to harbour distinct and highly diverse microbial communities. As most of the current assessments of these communities are based on taxonomic profiles, the functional gene structure of these communities, such as those responsible for key steps in the carbon cycle, mostly remain elusive. To gain insights into the diversity of catabolic genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons in anthropogenic horizons, we analysed the bacterial bph gene community structure, composition and abundance using T-RFLP, 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR essays, respectively. Soil samples were collected in two Brazilian Amazon Dark Earth (ADE) sites and at their corresponding non-anthropogenic adjacent soils (ADJ), under two different land use systems, secondary forest (SF) and manioc cultivation (M). Redundancy analysis of T-RFLP data revealed differences in bph gene structure according to both soil type and land use. Chemical properties of ADE soils, such as high organic carbon and organic matter, as well as effective cation exchange capacity and pH, were significantly correlated with the structure of bph communities. Also, the taxonomic affiliation of bph gene sequences revealed the segregation of community composition according to the soil type. Sequences at ADE sites were mostly affiliated to aromatic hydrocarbon degraders belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Sphingomonas, Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Conexibacter and Burkholderia. In both land use sites, shannon's diversity indices based on the bph gene data were higher in ADE than ADJ soils. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that specific properties in ADE soils shape the structure and composition of bph communities. These results provide a basis for further investigations focusing on the bio-exploration of novel enzymes with potential use in the biotechnology/biodegradation industry. PMID:24927167

  3. Lineaments and their tectonic implications in Rocky Mountains and adjacent plains region

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, E.K.; Perry, W.J. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Two orthogonal sets of lineaments in Phanerozoic rocks of the Rocky Mountains and adjacent plains region probably reflect recurrent structural movement along corresponding fractures in the underlying igneous and metamorphic rocks. The lineaments seem to have been primarily paleotopographic features that affected the depositional and erosional margins, thicknesses, and the distribution of lithofacies of Phanerozoic strata. One set is oriented approximately N5-15/sup 0/E and N75-85/sup 0/W; the other set is oriented about N50-60/sup 0/E and N30-40/sup 0/W. At small scales, the crosscutting lineaments of either set indicate primarily vertical movements of rectangular blocks along through-going rectilinear fractures in the basement rocks. At larger scales, the differential movement of these blocks apparently was propagated upward through the strata and formed a variety of structures, many of which are en echelon. Blocks in the region moved at different times, and they commonly rotated about horizontal axes, as indicated by lateral differences in rates of associated sedimentation and by structural features along the lineaments. Through most of the Phanerozoic, the movements seem to have been mainly along the diagonal set (northeast, northwest) of lineaments, but the cardinal set (north-south, east-west) also influenced the development of Laramide structures and the present landscape in the Rocky Mountain region. The structural stresses, which were released along the two sets of lineaments, may reflect plate movements, and they probably are related to orogenies caused either by plate collisions or by rifting and continental fragmentation.

  4. Stabilities of ant nests and their adjacent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echezona, B. C.; Igwe, C. A.

    2012-10-01

    Nests habour ants and termites and protect them from harsh environmental conditions. The structural stabilities of nests were studied to ascertain their relative vulnerability to environmental stresses. Arboreal-ant nests were pried from different trees, while epigeous-termite nests were excavated from soil surface within the sample area. Soils without any visible sign of ant or termite activity were also sampled 6 m away from the nests as control. Laboratory analysis result showed that irrespective of the tree hosts, the aggregate stabilities of the ant nests were lower than those of the ground termite, with nests formed on Cola nitida significantly showing lower aggregate stability (19.7%) than other antnest structures. Clay dispersion ratio, moisture content, water stable aggregate class <0.25mm and sand mass were each negatively correlated with aggregate stability, while water stable aggregate class1.00-0.50 mm gave a positive correlation. Nest structures were dominated more by water stable aggregate class >2.00 mm but path analysis demonstrated that water stable aggregate class <0.25 mm contributed most to the higher aggregate stability of the termite nest than the other nest. Nest aggregates had greater structural stability compared to the control soil. The higher structural stability of termite nests over other nest and soil was considered a better adaptive mechanism against body desiccation.

  5. The lithosphere of Ellesmere Island and adjacent northwestern Greenland (CALE 'A' transect onshore)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, R.; Schiffer, C.; Oakey, G. N.

    2013-12-01

    Ellesmere Island, in Canada's Arctic, comprises a series of ~SW-NE trending tectonic provinces, the crustal structure and geological expression of which represent a combination of interplate, accretionary orogenesis in the Palaeozoic (Caledonian equivalent and Ellesmerian orogenies) and intraplate orogenesis in the Cenozoic (Eurekan Orogeny). The present-day topography of Ellesmere Island is closely related to the crustal architecture of these tectonic provinces, which includes the adjacent polar continental margin. A two-dimensional lithosphere-scale model is presented that crosses Ellesmere Island from northern Baffin Bay to the Arctic Ocean, part of Transect 'A' of the Circum-Arctic Lithosphere Evolution (CALE) project. The model is based on gravity and magnetic data constrained by mapped geological structure as well as a not yet unpublished Receiver Function study, based on teleseismic data acquired between 2010 and 2012 by a passive seismological array on Ellesmere Island called 'ELLITE'. In northern Baffin Bay and on parts of the polar margin of Ellesmere Island (and adjacent northwestern Greenland), published crustal scale seismic refraction velocity models also provide some constraint to the lithosphere model. The most recent tectonic event governing the geological and physiographic character of Ellesmere Island is the Eurekan Orogeny, an intraplate orogeny that developed as a consequence of North Atlantic-Arctic plate reorganisations and the resulting convergence of Greenland against Ellesmere Island in the Palaeogene. The basement of the Eurekan orogen comprises Precambrian-aged lithosphere in its northernmost (Pearya terrane) and southeasternmost (Greenland-Canada craton) parts as well as possibly younger lithosphere accreted during Palaeozoic orogenesis in central Ellesmere Island. Its southern margin, marking the southern terminus of the constructed lithosphere model, comprises the late Precambrian-Early Palaeozoic passive continental margin of

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Influence of Selective Edge Removal and Refractory Period in a Self-Organized Critical Neuron Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Tian-Lun

    2009-08-01

    A simple model for a set of integrate-and-fire neurons based on the weighted network is introduced. By considering the neurobiological phenomenon in brain development and the difference of the synaptic strength, we construct weighted networks develop with link additions and followed by selective edge removal. The network exhibits the small-world and scale-free properties with high network efficiency. The model displays an avalanche activity on a power-law distribution. We investigate the effect of selective edge removal and the neuron refractory period on the self-organized criticality of the system.

  7. Morphogenesis at criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotov, Dmitry; Dubuis, Julien; Wieschaus, Eric; Gregor, Thomas; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Embryonic development of many multicellular organisms begins with the generation of spatially varying patterns of morphogens that encode the body plan of the future organism. We study the spatial pattern formed by the gap gene proteins in the early fruit fly embryo, which is anchored by ``crossing points'' between expression levels of different genes; these are thought to result from mutual repression. We explore a broad class of models for such interacting genes and show that the parameters implied implied by recent quantitative measurements are non-generic, but rather tuned to certain values, so that the entire gap gene network operates close to the critical surface in its phase diagram. We develop a mean field description of this system as well as derive signatures of critical behavior in the structure of expression noise. One such signature is that fluctuations are dominated by a single ``massless'' mode, so that fluctuations of expression levels of different genes are highly correlated/anticorrelated. We find a surprisingly high degree of anticorrelation in the real experimental data. These results suggest an interesting possibility that the network of genes responsible for development is operating near criticality.

  8. Relative Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Debra

    2013-05-01

    Relative equilibria of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems with symmetry are critical points of appropriate scalar functions parametrized by the Lie algebra (or its dual) of the symmetry group. Setting aside the structures - symplectic, Poisson, or variational - generating dynamical systems from such functions highlights the common features of their construction and analysis, and supports the construction of analogous functions in non-Hamiltonian settings. If the symmetry group is nonabelian, the functions are invariant only with respect to the isotropy subgroup of the given parameter value. Replacing the parametrized family of functions with a single function on the product manifold and extending the action using the (co)adjoint action on the algebra or its dual yields a fully invariant function. An invariant map can be used to reverse the usual perspective: rather than selecting a parametrized family of functions and finding their critical points, conditions under which functions will be critical on specific orbits, typically distinguished by isotropy class, can be derived. This strategy is illustrated using several well-known mechanical systems - the Lagrange top, the double spherical pendulum, the free rigid body, and the Riemann ellipsoids - and generalizations of these systems.

  9. Critical Viewing: Stimulant to Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Kevin; Splaine, John

    This document is intended to improve the critical viewing skills and increase the understanding and appreciation of what is viewed. Included are the chapters: (1) "Critical Thinking: The Parts of an Argument," intended to develop a process to help a person judge arguments in what is read, seen, and heard; (2) "Critical Viewing: Concepts, Skills,…

  10. Pelagic ciliate communities within the Amundsen Sea polynya and adjacent sea ice zone, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yong; Liu, Qian; Yang, Eun Jin; Wang, Min; Kim, Tae Wan; Cho, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    Polynyas, areas of open water surrounded by sea ice, are sites of intense primary production and ecological hotspots in the Antarctic Ocean. This study determined the spatial variation in communities of pelagic ciliates in an Amundsen Sea polynya (ASP) and adjacent sea ice zones (SIZ) during austral summer from February to March 2012, and the results were compared with biotic and abiotic environmental factors. The species number, abundance and biomass were higher in the ASP than SIZ. Canonical analysis indicated that the communities in the ASP were distinct from those under the sea ice. The pelagic ciliate community structure was closely correlated with environmental variability. Several primary environmental variables, both alone and in combination, were found to affect community spatial patterns. The ciliate biomasses in the ASP and SIZ areas were both significantly correlated with total and nano-Chl a. This analysis of the ciliated microzooplankton communities associated with high primary production provides new insights into the roles of ciliates in biogeochemical cycles in high-latitude polynyas. Additionally, our findings provide detailed data on the composition, distribution, and structure of polynya ciliate communities in the Amundsen Sea.

  11. Geochemistry and hydrology of thermal springs in the Idaho Batholith and adjacent areas, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The occurrence of nature of thermal springs in the Idaho batholith and adjacent areas suggest a relation between structural controls and deeply circulating hot-water systems. Springs issuing from granitic rocks are associated mostly with major regional fault structures. Springs issuing from other rocks probably are related to local faulting. Individual spring flows and water temperatures are variable and range from less than 1 gallon per minute to 2,710 gallons per minute and from 20.5 degrees to 94.0 degrees Celsius. Annual spring discharge is at least 27,000 acre-feet; heat discharges convectively is estimated to be 5.0 x 107 calories per second. Thermal springs discharge relatively dilute water; dissolved solids range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. The chemical quality of the water suggests deep circulation of meteoric water. Estimated reservoir temperatures are generally less than 100 degrees Celsius, but temperatures for several springs exceed 150 degrees Celsius. Stable-isotope data suggest that most of the thermal water is not derived from current precipitation. Carbon-14 values indicate that thermal waters are old; apparent residence times range from 9,000 to more than 40,000 years.

  12. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Lee, C; Day, D; Wall, M; Saw, C; MoberlyChan, W; Farmer, J; Boussoufl, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H; Branagan, D; D'Amato, A

    2006-11-13

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). Neutron multiplication and the potential for criticality are enhanced by the presence of a moderator during cask loading in water, water incursion in accidents conditions during spent fuel storage or transport. To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{trademark}, Metamic{trademark}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant material (HPCRM) can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous--an essential property for corrosion resistance--and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison.

  13. Variable length adjacent partitioning for PTS based PAPR reduction of OFDM signal

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Zeyid T.; Rahman, Md. Mijanur; Yaakob, S. N.; Razalli, Mohammad Shahrazel; Kadhim, Rasim A.

    2015-05-15

    Peak-to-Average power ratio (PAPR) is a major drawback in OFDM communication. It leads the power amplifier into nonlinear region operation resulting into loss of data integrity. As such, there is a strong motivation to find techniques to reduce PAPR. Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS) is an attractive scheme for this purpose. Judicious partitioning the OFDM data frame into disjoint subsets is a pivotal component of any PTS scheme. Out of the existing partitioning techniques, adjacent partitioning is characterized by an attractive trade-off between cost and performance. With an aim of determining effects of length variability of adjacent partitions, we performed an investigation into the performances of a variable length adjacent partitioning (VL-AP) and fixed length adjacent partitioning in comparison with other partitioning schemes such as pseudorandom partitioning. Simulation results with different modulation and partitioning scenarios showed that fixed length adjacent partition had better performance compared to variable length adjacent partitioning. As expected, simulation results showed a slightly better performance of pseudorandom partitioning technique compared to fixed and variable adjacent partitioning schemes. However, as the pseudorandom technique incurs high computational complexities, adjacent partitioning schemes were still seen as favorable candidates for PAPR reduction.

  14. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  15. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  16. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  17. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  18. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  19. 30 CFR 282.6 - Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State. 282.6 Section 282.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR General § 282.6 Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State....

  20. Large subarticular cysts (geodes) adjacent to the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carter, A R; Liyanage, S P

    1975-10-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis are described, who developed very large bone cysts or geodes adjacent to the knee-joint. The existence of cysts adjacent to joints involved by rheumatoid arthritis is well recognised, but the occurrence of very large cysts is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulties. Possible aetiological factors are discussed.