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Sample records for adjacent gene pairs

  1. A 53-base-pair inverted repeat negatively regulates expression of the adjacent and divergently oriented cytochrome P450(BM-1) gene and its regulatory gene, bm1P1, in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, G C; Sung, C C; Liu, C H; Kao, H S

    1997-01-01

    To study the role of the cis-acting element(s) in controlling the expression of the cytochrome P450(BM-1) gene and its upstream regulatory gene, bm1P1, in Bacillus megaterium, various deletion derivatives were constructed. A 53-bp inverted repeat located midway between the P450(BM-1) gene and bm1P1 gene was found in vivo to negatively regulate the expression of both genes, the regulation of which may occur at the transcriptional level. The promoter of the P450(BM-1), gene was also identified and found to be similar to those recognized by the sigmaA RNA polymerase of Bacillus subtilis. Possible mechanisms by which the 53-bp inverted repeat regulates the gene expression are discussed. PMID:8982010

  2. Structures and Energetics of Four Adjacent G·U Pairs That Stabilize an RNA Helix.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaobo; Mooers, Blaine H M; Thomas, Leonard M; Malone, Joshua; Harris, Steven; Schroeder, Susan J

    2015-10-22

    Consecutive G·U base pairs inside RNA helices can be destabilizing, while those at the ends of helices are thermodynamically stabilizing. To determine if this paradox could be explained by differences in base stacking, we determined the high-resolution (1.32 Å) crystal structure of (5'-GGUGGCUGUU-3')2 and studied three sequences with four consecutive terminal G·U pairs by NMR spectroscopy. In the crystal structure of (5'-GGUGGCUGUU-3')2, the helix is overwound but retains the overall features of A-form RNA. The penultimate base steps at each end of the helix have high base overlap and contribute to the unexpectedly favorable energetic contribution for the 5'-GU-3'/3'-UG-5' motif in this helix position. The balance of base stacking and helical twist contributes to the positional dependence of G·U pair stabilities. The energetic stabilities and similarity to A-form RNA helices suggest that consecutive G·U pairs would be recognized by RNA helix binding proteins, such as Dicer and Ago. Thus, these results will aid future searches for target sites of small RNAs in gene regulation. PMID:26425937

  3. Aberrant gene expression in mucosa adjacent to tumor reveals a molecular crosstalk in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A colorectal tumor is not an isolated entity growing in a restricted location of the body. The patient’s gut environment constitutes the framework where the tumor evolves and this relationship promotes and includes a complex and tight correlation of the tumor with inflammation, blood vessels formation, nutrition, and gut microbiome composition. The tumor influence in the environment could both promote an anti-tumor or a pro-tumor response. Methods A set of 98 paired adjacent mucosa and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 50 colon mucosa from healthy donors (246 samples in total) were included in this work. RNA extracted from each sample was hybridized in Affymetrix chips Human Genome U219. Functional relationships between genes were inferred by means of systems biology using both transcriptional regulation networks (ARACNe algorithm) and protein-protein interaction networks (BIANA software). Results Here we report a transcriptomic analysis revealing a number of genes activated in adjacent mucosa from CRC patients, not activated in mucosa from healthy donors. A functional analysis of these genes suggested that this active reaction of the adjacent mucosa was related to the presence of the tumor. Transcriptional and protein-interaction networks were used to further elucidate this response of normal gut in front of the tumor, revealing a crosstalk between proteins secreted by the tumor and receptors activated in the adjacent colon tissue; and vice versa. Remarkably, Slit family of proteins activated ROBO receptors in tumor whereas tumor-secreted proteins transduced a cellular signal finally activating AP-1 in adjacent tissue. Conclusions The systems-level approach provides new insights into the micro-ecology of colorectal tumorogenesis. Disrupting this intricate molecular network of cell-cell communication and pro-inflammatory microenvironment could be a therapeutic target in CRC patients. PMID:24597571

  4. Expression of pair rule gene orthologs in the blastoderm of a myriapod: evidence for pair rule-like mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A hallmark of Drosophila segmentation is the stepwise subdivision of the body into smaller and smaller units, and finally into the segments. This is achieved by the function of the well-understood segmentation gene cascade. The first molecular sign of a segmented body appears with the action of the pair rule genes, which are expressed as transversal stripes in alternating segments. Drosophila development, however, is derived, and in most other arthropods only the anterior body is patterned (almost) simultaneously from a pre-existing field of cells; posterior segments are added sequentially from a posterior segment addition zone. A long-standing question is to what extent segmentation mechanisms known from Drosophila may be conserved in short-germ arthropods. Despite the derived developmental modes, it appears more likely that conserved mechanisms can be found in anterior patterning. Results Expression analysis of pair rule gene orthologs in the blastoderm of the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda) suggests that these genes are generally involved in segmenting the anterior embryo. We find that the Glomeris pairberry-1 ( pby-1) gene is expressed in a pair rule pattern that is also found in insects and a chelicerate, the mite Tetraynchus urticae. Other Glomeris pair rule gene orthologs are expressed in double segment wide domains in the blastoderm, which at subsequent stages split into two stripes in adjacent segments. Conclusions The expression patterns of the millipede pair rule gene orthologs resemble pair rule patterning in Drosophila and other insects, and thus represent evidence for the presence of an ancestral pair rule-like mechanism in myriapods. We discuss the possibilities that blastoderm patterning may be conserved in long-germ and short-germ arthropods, and that a posterior double segmental mechanism may be present in short-germ arthropods. PMID:22595029

  5. Evolutionary conservation of neighbouring gene pairs in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiling; Han, Bin

    2009-05-15

    Evolutionary conservation of neighbouring gene pairs has been widely explored in many species, but remains poorly understood in plants. The availability of several plant genome sequences allows for an in-depth investigation of this problem in plants. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic conservation of physically linked gene pairs in nine plant genomes and compared the conservation in different orientations. We also examined several potential determinants to detect whether they affect the conservation of neighbouring gene pairs. Our results suggested that among the three types of neighbouring gene pairs, closely linked parallel pairs might be the least conserved. Intergenic distance was shown to be a major determinant of linkage conservation, suggesting that the conservation of gene order in plants was determined primarily by chance. The enrichment of housekeeping genes was identified to contribute to the conservation of all three types and the enrichment of genes involved in protein metabolism might contribute to the conservation of parallel pairs. Moreover, a co-expressed signal was detected in conserved divergent pairs, which might be determined by intergenic distance.

  6. Prediction of regulatory gene pairs using dynamic time warping and gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Andy C; Hsu, Hui-Huang; Lu, Ming-Da; Tseng, Vincent S; Shih, Timothy K

    2014-01-01

    Selecting informative genes is the most important task for data analysis on microarray gene expression data. In this work, we aim at identifying regulatory gene pairs from microarray gene expression data. However, microarray data often contain multiple missing expression values. Missing value imputation is thus needed before further processing for regulatory gene pairs becomes possible. We develop a novel approach to first impute missing values in microarray time series data by combining k-Nearest Neighbour (KNN), Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and Gene Ontology (GO). After missing values are imputed, we then perform gene regulation prediction based on our proposed DTW-GO distance measurement of gene pairs. Experimental results show that our approach is more accurate when compared with existing missing value imputation methods on real microarray data sets. Furthermore, our approach can also discover more regulatory gene pairs that are known in the literature than other methods.

  7. GLK gene pairs regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David W; Martin, David J; Copley, Martin J; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2002-09-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that requires close co-ordination between two genomes. Many of the proteins that accumulate in the chloroplast are encoded by the nuclear genome, and the developmental transition from proplastid to chloroplast is regulated by nuclear genes. Here we show that a pair of Golden 2-like (GLK) genes regulates chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. The GLK proteins are members of the GARP superfamily of transcription factors, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the maize, rice and Arabidopsis GLK gene pairs comprise a distinct group within the GARP superfamily. Further phylogenetic analysis suggests that the gene pairs arose through separate duplication events in the monocot and dicot lineages. As in rice, AtGLK1 and AtGLK2 are expressed in partially overlapping domains in photosynthetic tissue. Insertion mutants demonstrate that this expression pattern reflects a degree of functional redundancy as single mutants display normal phenotypes in most photosynthetic tissues. However, double mutants are pale green in all photosynthetic tissues and chloroplasts exhibit a reduction in granal thylakoids. Products of several genes involved in light harvesting also accumulate at reduced levels in double mutant chloroplasts. GLK genes therefore regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

  8. Prevalence and Abundance of Florfenicol and Linezolid Resistance Genes in Soils Adjacent to Swine Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Wang, Yang; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Zheng; Du, Xiang-Dang; Jiang, Haiyang; Xia, Xi; Shen, Zhangqi; Ding, Shuangyang; Wu, Congming; Zhou, Bingrui; Wu, Yongning; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Florfenicol is extensively used in livestock to prevent or cure bacterial infections. However, it is not known whether the administration of florfenicol has resulted in the emergence and dissemination of florfenicol resistance genes (FRGs, including fexA, fexB, cfr, optrA, floR, and pexA) in microbial populations in surrounding farm environments. Here we collected soil samples for the detection of FRGs and the residue of florfenicol from six swine farms with the record of florfenicol usage. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and metagenomic sequencing revealed a significantly higher relative abundance of FRGs in the soils adjacent to the three swine farms where florfenicol was heavily used compared with the other sites. Meanwhile, the detectable levels of florfenicol were also identified in soils from two of these three farms using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. It appears that amount of florfenicol used on swine farms and the spreading of soils with swine waste could promote the prevalence and abundance of FRGs, including the linezolid resistance genes cfr and optrA, in adjacent soils, and agricultural application of swine manure with florfenicol may have caused a residual level of florfenicol in the soils. PMID:27573068

  9. Prevalence and Abundance of Florfenicol and Linezolid Resistance Genes in Soils Adjacent to Swine Feedlots

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qin; Wang, Yang; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Zheng; Du, Xiang-dang; Jiang, Haiyang; Xia, Xi; Shen, Zhangqi; Ding, Shuangyang; Wu, Congming; Zhou, Bingrui; Wu, Yongning; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Florfenicol is extensively used in livestock to prevent or cure bacterial infections. However, it is not known whether the administration of florfenicol has resulted in the emergence and dissemination of florfenicol resistance genes (FRGs, including fexA, fexB, cfr, optrA, floR, and pexA) in microbial populations in surrounding farm environments. Here we collected soil samples for the detection of FRGs and the residue of florfenicol from six swine farms with the record of florfenicol usage. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and metagenomic sequencing revealed a significantly higher relative abundance of FRGs in the soils adjacent to the three swine farms where florfenicol was heavily used compared with the other sites. Meanwhile, the detectable levels of florfenicol were also identified in soils from two of these three farms using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. It appears that amount of florfenicol used on swine farms and the spreading of soils with swine waste could promote the prevalence and abundance of FRGs, including the linezolid resistance genes cfr and optrA, in adjacent soils, and agricultural application of swine manure with florfenicol may have caused a residual level of florfenicol in the soils. PMID:27573068

  10. Odd-paired controls frequency doubling in Drosophila segmentation by altering the pair-rule gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erik; Akam, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila embryo transiently exhibits a double-segment periodicity, defined by the expression of seven 'pair-rule' genes, each in a pattern of seven stripes. At gastrulation, interactions between the pair-rule genes lead to frequency doubling and the patterning of 14 parasegment boundaries. In contrast to earlier stages of Drosophila anteroposterior patterning, this transition is not well understood. By carefully analysing the spatiotemporal dynamics of pair-rule gene expression, we demonstrate that frequency-doubling is precipitated by multiple coordinated changes to the network of regulatory interactions between the pair-rule genes. We identify the broadly expressed but temporally patterned transcription factor, Odd-paired (Opa/Zic), as the cause of these changes, and show that the patterning of the even-numbered parasegment boundaries relies on Opa-dependent regulatory interactions. Our findings indicate that the pair-rule gene regulatory network has a temporally modulated topology, permitting the pair-rule genes to play stage-specific patterning roles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18215.001 PMID:27525481

  11. Tenm, a Drosophila gene related to tenascin, is a new pair-rule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, S; Martin, D; Hagios, C; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe the molecular characterization of the Drosophila gene tenm, a large transcription unit spanning > 110 kb of DNA. tenm encodes a large extracellular protein of 2515 amino acids related to the extracellular matrix molecule tenascin. The Tenm protein is found in seven stripes during the blastoderm stage, and each stripe overlaps with the even-skipped stripes. tenm mutants show a phenotype resembling that of odd-paired (opa), a member of the pair-rule class of segmentation genes. Thus, Tenm is the first example of a pair-rule gene product acting from outside the cell. While the Tenm protein is under the control of fushi tarazu and even-skipped, but not of opa, at least two pair-rule genes, paired (prd) and sloppy paired (slp), and all segment-polarity genes analysed to date are under the control of tenm. Our data suggest that Tenm initiates a signal transduction cascade which acts, via or in concert with opa, on downstream targets such as prd, slp, gooseberry, engrailed and wingless, leading to an opa-like phenotype. Images PMID:8070401

  12. Reanalyze unassigned reads in Sanger based metagenomic data using conserved gene adjacency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Investigation of metagenomes provides greater insight into uncultured microbial communities. The improvement in sequencing technology, which yields a large amount of sequence data, has led to major breakthroughs in the field. However, at present, taxonomic binning tools for metagenomes discard 30-40% of Sanger sequencing data due to the stringency of BLAST cut-offs. In an attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of metagenomic data, we re-analyzed the discarded metagenomes by using less stringent cut-offs. Additionally, we introduced a new criterion, namely, the evolutionary conservation of adjacency between neighboring genes. To evaluate the feasibility of our approach, we re-analyzed discarded contigs and singletons from several environments with different levels of complexity. We also compared the consistency between our taxonomic binning and those reported in the original studies. Results Among the discarded data, we found that 23.7 ± 3.9% of singletons and 14.1 ± 1.0% of contigs were assigned to taxa. The recovery rates for singletons were higher than those for contigs. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a high degree of similarity (0.94 ± 0.03 at the phylum rank and 0.80 ± 0.11 at the family rank) between the proposed taxonomic binning approach and those reported in original studies. In addition, an evaluation using simulated data demonstrated the reliability of the proposed approach. Conclusions Our findings suggest that taking account of conserved neighboring gene adjacency improves taxonomic assignment when analyzing metagenomes using Sanger sequencing. In other words, utilizing the conserved gene order as a criterion will reduce the amount of data discarded when analyzing metagenomes. PMID:21083935

  13. Assessment of Bacterial bph Gene in Amazonian Dark Earth and Their Adjacent Soils

    PubMed Central

    Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Mendes, Lucas William; Germano, Mariana Gomes; Lima, Amanda Barbosa; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2014-01-01

    Amazonian Anthrosols are known to harbour distinct and highly diverse microbial communities. As most of the current assessments of these communities are based on taxonomic profiles, the functional gene structure of these communities, such as those responsible for key steps in the carbon cycle, mostly remain elusive. To gain insights into the diversity of catabolic genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons in anthropogenic horizons, we analysed the bacterial bph gene community structure, composition and abundance using T-RFLP, 454-pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR essays, respectively. Soil samples were collected in two Brazilian Amazon Dark Earth (ADE) sites and at their corresponding non-anthropogenic adjacent soils (ADJ), under two different land use systems, secondary forest (SF) and manioc cultivation (M). Redundancy analysis of T-RFLP data revealed differences in bph gene structure according to both soil type and land use. Chemical properties of ADE soils, such as high organic carbon and organic matter, as well as effective cation exchange capacity and pH, were significantly correlated with the structure of bph communities. Also, the taxonomic affiliation of bph gene sequences revealed the segregation of community composition according to the soil type. Sequences at ADE sites were mostly affiliated to aromatic hydrocarbon degraders belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Sphingomonas, Rhodococcus, Mycobacterium, Conexibacter and Burkholderia. In both land use sites, shannon's diversity indices based on the bph gene data were higher in ADE than ADJ soils. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that specific properties in ADE soils shape the structure and composition of bph communities. These results provide a basis for further investigations focusing on the bio-exploration of novel enzymes with potential use in the biotechnology/biodegradation industry. PMID:24927167

  14. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  15. Hybrid male sterility in rice controlled by interaction between divergent alleles of two adjacent genes.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunming; Zhao, Lifeng; Niu, Baixiao; Su, Jing; Wu, Hao; Chen, Yuanling; Zhang, Qunyu; Guo, Jingxin; Zhuang, Chuxiong; Mei, Mantong; Xia, Jixing; Wang, Lan; Wu, Haibin; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2008-12-01

    Sterility is common in hybrids between divergent populations, such as the indica and japonica subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa). Although multiple loci for plant hybrid sterility have been identified, it remains unknown how alleles of the loci interact at the molecular level. Here we show that a locus for indica-japonica hybrid male sterility, Sa, comprises two adjacent genes, SaM and SaF, encoding a small ubiquitin-like modifier E3 ligase-like protein and an F-box protein, respectively. Most indica cultivars contain a haplotype SaM(+)SaF(+), whereas all japonica cultivars have SaM(-)SaF(-) that diverged by nucleotide variations in wild rice. Male semi-sterility in this heterozygous complex locus is caused by abortion of pollen carrying SaM(-). This allele-specific gamete elimination results from a selective interaction of SaF(+) with SaM(-), a truncated protein, but not with SaM(+) because of the presence of an inhibitory domain, although SaM(+) is required for this male sterility. Lack of any one of the three alleles in recombinant plants does not produce male sterility. We propose a two-gene/three-component interaction model for this hybrid male sterility system. The findings have implications for overcoming male sterility in inter-subspecific hybrid rice breeding.

  16. Broadband optical parametric amplifier formed by two pairs of adjacent four-wave mixing sidebands in a tellurite microstructured optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tuan, Tong-Hoang; Kawamura, Harutaka; Nagasaka, Kenshiro; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2016-05-01

    A broadband fibre-optical parametric amplifier (FOPA) operating at a novel wavelength region that is far from the pump wavelength has been demonstrated by exploiting two pairs of adjacent four-wave mixing (FWM) sidebands generated simultaneously in a tellurite microstructured optical fibre (TMOF). Owing to the large nonlinearity of the TMOF and the high pump peak power provided by a picosecond laser, a maximal average gain of 65.1 dB has been obtained. When the FOPA is operated in a saturated state, a flat-gain amplification from 1424 nm to 1459 nm can be achieved. This broadband and high-gain FOPA operating at new wavelength regions far from the pump offers the prospect of all-optical signal processing.

  17. A DNA Fragment Mapped within the Submicroscopic Deletion of Ph1, a Chromosome Pairing Regulator Gene in Polyploid Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gill, K. S.; Gill, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    Bread wheat is an allohexaploid consisting of three genetically related (homoeologous) genomes. The homoeologous chromosomes are capable of pairing but strict homologous pairing is observed at metaphase 1. The diploid-like pairing is regulated predominantly by Ph1, a gene mapped on long arm of chromosome 5B. We report direct evidence that a mutant of the gene (ph1b) arose from a submicroscopic deletion. A probe (XksuS1-5) detects the same missing fragment in two independent mutants ph1b and ph1c and a higher intensity fragment in a duplication of the Ph1 gene. It is likely that XksuS1-5 lies adjacent to Ph1 on the same chromosome fragment that is deleted in ph1b and ph1c. XksuS1-5 can be used to tag Ph1 gene to facilitate incorporation of genetic material from homoeologous genomes of the Triticeae. It may also be a useful marker in cloning Ph1 gene by chromosome walking. PMID:1936962

  18. Identifying concerted evolution and gene conversion in mammalian gene pairs lasting over 100 million years

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Andrew R; Scherer, Stephen W

    2009-01-01

    Background Concerted evolution occurs in multigene families and is characterized by stretches of homogeneity and higher sequence similarity between paralogues than between orthologues. Here we identify human gene pairs that have undergone concerted evolution, caused by ongoing gene conversion, since at least the human-mouse divergence. Our strategy involved the identification of duplicated genes with greater similarity within a species than between species. These genes were required to be present in multiple mammalian genomes, suggesting duplication early in mammalian divergence. To eliminate genes that have been conserved due to strong purifying selection, our analysis also required at least one intron to have retained high sequence similarity between paralogues. Results We identified three human gene pairs undergoing concerted evolution (BMP8A/B, DDX19A/B, and TUBG1/2). Phylogenetic investigations reveal that in each case the duplication appears to have occurred prior to eutherian mammalian radiation, with exactly two paralogues present in all examined species. This indicates that all three gene duplication events were established over 100 million years ago. Conclusion The extended duration of concerted evolution in multiple distant lineages suggests that there has been prolonged homogenization of specific segments within these gene pairs. Although we speculate that selection for homogenization could have been utilized in order to maintain crucial homo- or hetero- binding domains, it remains unclear why gene conversion has persisted for such extended periods of time. Through these analyses, our results demonstrate additional examples of a process that plays a definite, although unspecified, role in molecular evolution. PMID:19583854

  19. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R

    2015-10-15

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequences of two adjacent early vaccinia virus genes located within the inverted terminal repetition.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, S; Gershowitz, A; Moss, B

    1982-11-01

    The proximal part of the 10,000-base pair (bp) inverted terminal repetition of vaccinia virus DNA encodes at least three early mRNAs. A 2,236-bp segment of the repetition was sequenced to characterize two of the genes. This task was facilitated by constructing a series of recombinants containing overlapping deletions; oligonucleotide linkers with synthetic restriction sites provided points for radioactive labeling before sequencing by the chemical degradation method of Maxam and Gilbert (Methods Enzymol. 65:499-560, 1980). The ends of the transcripts were mapped by hybridizing labeled DNA fragments to early viral RNA and resolving nuclease S1-protected fragments in sequencing gels, by sequencing cDNA clones, and from the lengths of the RNAs. The nucleotide sequences for at least 60 bp upstream of both transcriptional initiation sites are more than 80% adenine . thymine rich and contain long runs of adenines and thymines with some homology to procaryotic and eucaryotic consensus sequences. The gene transcribed in the rightward direction encodes an RNA of approximately 530 nucleotides with a single open reading frame of 420 nucleotides. Preceding the first AUG, there is a heptanucleotide that can hybridize to the 3' end of 18S rRNA with only one mismatch. The derived amino acid sequence of the protein indicated a molecular weight of 15,500. The gene transcribed in the leftward direction encodes an RNA 1,000 to 1,100 nucleotides long with an open reading frame of 996 nucleotides and a leader sequence of only 5 to 6 nucleotides. The derived amino acid sequence of this protein indicated a molecular weight of 38,500. The 3' ends of the two transcripts were located within 100 bp of each other. Although there are adenine . thymine-rich clusters near the putative transcriptional termination sites, specific AATAAA polyadenylic acid signal sequences are absent.

  1. Multiple Genome Comparison within a Bacterial Species Reveals a Unit of Evolution Spanning Two Adjacent Genes in a Tandem Paralog Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    It has been assumed that an open reading frame (ORF) represents a unit of gene evolution as well as a unit of gene expression and function. In the present work, we report a case in which a unit comprising the 3′ region of an ORF linked to a downstream intergenic region that is in turn linked to the 5′ region of a downstream ORF has been conserved, and has served as the unit of gene evolution. The genes are tandem paralogous genes from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, for which more than ten entire genomes have been sequenced. We compared these multiple genome sequences at a locus for the lpl (lipoprotein-like) cluster (encoding lipoprotein homologs presumably related to their host interaction) in the genomic island termed νSaα. A highly conserved nucleotide sequence found within every lpl ORF is likely to provide a site for homologous recombination. Comparison of phylogenies of the 5′-variable region and the 3′-variable region within the same ORF revealed significant incongruence. In contrast, pairs of the 3′-variable region of an ORF and the 5′-variable region of the next downstream ORF gave more congruent phylogenies, with distinct groups of conserved pairs. The intergenic region seemed to have coevolved with the flanking variable regions. Multiple recombination events at the central conserved region appear to have caused various types of rearrangements among strains, shuffling the two variable regions in one ORF, but maintaining a conserved unit comprising the 3′-variable region, the intergenic region, and the 5′-variable region spanning adjacent ORFs. This result has strong impact on our understanding of gene evolution because most gene lineages underwent tandem duplication and then diversified. This work also illustrates the use of multiple genome sequences for high-resolution evolutionary analysis within the same species. PMID:18765438

  2. The major and minor chicken vitellogenin genes are each adjacent to partially deleted pseudogene copies of the other.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R; Fischer, A H; Burch, J B

    1989-01-01

    The major chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGII) has previously been cloned and sequenced. We now report the isolation of genomic clones that encompass a minor chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGIII) which is also expressed in the liver in response to estradiol. Our analysis reveals that a pseudogene for VTGII (psi VTGII) lies 1,426 base pairs upstream of this VTGIII gene. A reevaluation of published sequence data reveals that the converse is also true, namely, that a pseudogene for VTGIII (psi VTGIII) lies 1,345 base pairs downstream of the VTGII gene. Our results show that a 335-base-pair deletion has removed the psi VTGIII promoter and cap site but left residual estrogen response element in a region where nuclease-hypersensitive sites have been reported to be induced in response to estradiol. Images PMID:2796998

  3. Plastid-LCGbase: a collection of evolutionarily conserved plastid-associated gene pairs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plastids carry their own genetic material that encodes a variable set of genes that are limited in number but functionally important. Aside from orthology, the lineage-specific order and orientation of these genes are also relevant. Here, we develop a database, Plastid-LCGbase (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/plastid-LCGbase/), which focuses on organizational variability of plastid genes and genomes from diverse taxonomic groups. The current Plastid-LCGbase contains information from 470 plastid genomes and exhibits several unique features. First, through a genome-overview page generated from OrganellarGenomeDRAW, it displays general arrangement of all plastid genes (circular or linear). Second, it shows patterns and modes of all paired plastid genes and their physical distances across user-defined lineages, which are facilitated by a step-wise stratification of taxonomic groups. Third, it divides the paired genes into three categories (co-directionally-paired genes or CDPGs, convergently-paired genes or CPGs and divergently-paired genes or DPGs) and three patterns (separation, overlap and inclusion) and provides basic statistics for each species. Fourth, the gene pairing scheme is expandable, where neighboring genes can also be included in species-/lineage-specific comparisons. We hope that Plastid-LCGbase facilitates gene variation (insertion-deletion, translocation and rearrangement) and transcription-level studies of plastid genomes. PMID:25378306

  4. Plastid-LCGbase: a collection of evolutionarily conserved plastid-associated gene pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plastids carry their own genetic material that encodes a variable set of genes that are limited in number but functionally important. Aside from orthology, the lineage-specific order and orientation of these genes are also relevant. Here, we develop a database, Plastid-LCGbase (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/plastid-LCGbase/), which focuses on organizational variability of plastid genes and genomes from diverse taxonomic groups. The current Plastid-LCGbase contains information from 470 plastid genomes and exhibits several unique features. First, through a genome-overview page generated from OrganellarGenomeDRAW, it displays general arrangement of all plastid genes (circular or linear). Second, it shows patterns and modes of all paired plastid genes and their physical distances across user-defined lineages, which are facilitated by a step-wise stratification of taxonomic groups. Third, it divides the paired genes into three categories (co-directionally-paired genes or CDPGs, convergently-paired genes or CPGs and divergently-paired genes or DPGs) and three patterns (separation, overlap and inclusion) and provides basic statistics for each species. Fourth, the gene pairing scheme is expandable, where neighboring genes can also be included in species-/lineage-specific comparisons. We hope that Plastid-LCGbase facilitates gene variation (insertion-deletion, translocation and rearrangement) and transcription-level studies of plastid genomes. PMID:25378306

  5. Structures of the gauche conformers of somE substituted dimethyl ethers. Effect of adjacent atom lone pairs on methyl group asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, James E.; Altman, Michael; Cordell, Floyd R.; Dai, Yuanfang

    The complete equilibrium structures of CH 3OCH 3 and of the gauche conformers of CH 30CH 2F, HOCH,F, CH,OCH,Cl and CH,OCH,CN have been determined by ab initio gradient computation at the Hartree-Fock, double zeta-plus-polarization level. The very large asymmetries in CH bond distances previously reported from microwave substitution structures are shown to be non-existent in the equilibrium structures and are presumably artifacts. Small differences, different in direction from those reported from the experiments and nearly an order of magnitude smaller in size, do exist. They reflect three factors: (1) a lengthening of a CH bond which is trans to a lone pair on an adjacent atom, (2) a general shortening of CH bonds originating at a carbon atom bearing a highly electronegative substituent, and (3) a specific interaction in which a CX substituent shortens the nearly parallel CH bond on the other methyl group. The last interaction, not previously reported, is mediated by withdrawal of electron density from the oxygen lone pair which is trans to both groups. Other structural features derived from the microwave studies are supported by the new results. Inclusion of polarization functions in the basis set for oxygen is essential for correct determination of the COC angle and the dihedral angles. The dihedral angles of CH 3OCH 2F and HOCH 2F are not correctly determined by the computation even at this level, although the computed values are improved when d functions are used for oxygen and still more by use of two sets of oxygen d functions. Polarization functions on carbon or on fluorine have no effect on the computed torsional angles. There is no problem in computing the correct dihedral angles with the CI or CN derivatives.

  6. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. PMID:25909656

  7. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  8. Evolution of the pair rule gene network: Insights from a centipede.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack; Akam, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Comparative studies have examined the expression and function of homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster pair rule and segment polarity genes in a range of arthropods. The segment polarity gene homologues have a conserved role in the specification of the parasegment boundary, but the degree of conservation of the upstream patterning genes has proved more variable. Using genomic resources we identify a complete set of pair rule gene homologues from the centipede Strigamia maritima, and document a detailed time series of expression during trunk segmentation. We find supportive evidence for a conserved hierarchical organisation of the pair rule genes, with a division into early- and late-activated genes which parallels the functional division into primary and secondary pair rule genes described in insects. We confirm that the relative expression of sloppy-paired and paired with respect to wingless and engrailed at the parasegment boundary is conserved between myriapods and insects; suggesting that functional interactions between these genes might be an ancient feature of arthropod segment patterning. However, we find that the relative expression of a number of the primary pair rule genes is divergent between myriapods and insects. This corroborates suggestions that the evolution of upper tiers in the segmentation gene network is more flexible. Finally, we find that the expression of the Strigamia pair rule genes in periodic patterns is restricted to the ectoderm. This suggests that any direct role of these genes in segmentation is restricted to this germ layer, and that mesoderm segmentation is either dependent on the ectoderm, or occurs through an independent mechanism.

  9. Evolution of the pair rule gene network: Insights from a centipede☆

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jack; Akam, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Comparative studies have examined the expression and function of homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster pair rule and segment polarity genes in a range of arthropods. The segment polarity gene homologues have a conserved role in the specification of the parasegment boundary, but the degree of conservation of the upstream patterning genes has proved more variable. Using genomic resources we identify a complete set of pair rule gene homologues from the centipede Strigamia maritima, and document a detailed time series of expression during trunk segmentation. We find supportive evidence for a conserved hierarchical organisation of the pair rule genes, with a division into early- and late-activated genes which parallels the functional division into primary and secondary pair rule genes described in insects. We confirm that the relative expression of sloppy-paired and paired with respect to wingless and engrailed at the parasegment boundary is conserved between myriapods and insects; suggesting that functional interactions between these genes might be an ancient feature of arthropod segment patterning. However, we find that the relative expression of a number of the primary pair rule genes is divergent between myriapods and insects. This corroborates suggestions that the evolution of upper tiers in the segmentation gene network is more flexible. Finally, we find that the expression of the Strigamia pair rule genes in periodic patterns is restricted to the ectoderm. This suggests that any direct role of these genes in segmentation is restricted to this germ layer, and that mesoderm segmentation is either dependent on the ectoderm, or occurs through an independent mechanism. PMID:23810931

  10. Evolution of the pair rule gene network: Insights from a centipede.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack; Akam, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Comparative studies have examined the expression and function of homologues of the Drosophila melanogaster pair rule and segment polarity genes in a range of arthropods. The segment polarity gene homologues have a conserved role in the specification of the parasegment boundary, but the degree of conservation of the upstream patterning genes has proved more variable. Using genomic resources we identify a complete set of pair rule gene homologues from the centipede Strigamia maritima, and document a detailed time series of expression during trunk segmentation. We find supportive evidence for a conserved hierarchical organisation of the pair rule genes, with a division into early- and late-activated genes which parallels the functional division into primary and secondary pair rule genes described in insects. We confirm that the relative expression of sloppy-paired and paired with respect to wingless and engrailed at the parasegment boundary is conserved between myriapods and insects; suggesting that functional interactions between these genes might be an ancient feature of arthropod segment patterning. However, we find that the relative expression of a number of the primary pair rule genes is divergent between myriapods and insects. This corroborates suggestions that the evolution of upper tiers in the segmentation gene network is more flexible. Finally, we find that the expression of the Strigamia pair rule genes in periodic patterns is restricted to the ectoderm. This suggests that any direct role of these genes in segmentation is restricted to this germ layer, and that mesoderm segmentation is either dependent on the ectoderm, or occurs through an independent mechanism. PMID:23810931

  11. Analyses of interactions among pair-rule genes and the gap gene Krüppel in Bombyx segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    In the short-germ insect Tribolium, a pair-rule gene circuit consisting of the Tribolium homologs of even-skipped, runt, and odd-skipped (Tc-eve, Tc-run and Tc-odd, respectively) has been implicated in segment formation. To examine the application of the model to other taxa, I studied the expression and function of pair-rule genes in Bombyx mori, together with a Bombyx homolog of Krüppel (Bm-Kr), a known gap gene. Knockdown embryos of Bombyx homologs of eve, run and odd (Bm-eve, Bm-run and Bm-odd) exhibited asegmental phenotypes similar to those of Tribolium knockdowns. However, pair-rule gene interactions were similar to those of both Tribolium and Drosophila, which, different from Tribolium, shows a hierarchical segmentation mode. Additionally, the Bm-odd expression pattern shares characteristics with those of Drosophila pair-rule genes that receive upstream regulatory input. On the other hand, Bm-Kr knockdowns exhibited a large posterior segment deletion as observed in short-germ insects. However, a detailed analysis of these embryos indicated that Bm-Kr modulates expression of pair-rule genes like in Drosophila, although the mechanisms appear to be different. This suggested hierarchical interactions between Bm-Kr and pair-rule genes. Based on these results, I concluded that the pair-rule gene circuit model that describes Tribolium development is not applicable to Bombyx. PMID:26102481

  12. Analyses of interactions among pair-rule genes and the gap gene Krüppel in Bombyx segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    In the short-germ insect Tribolium, a pair-rule gene circuit consisting of the Tribolium homologs of even-skipped, runt, and odd-skipped (Tc-eve, Tc-run and Tc-odd, respectively) has been implicated in segment formation. To examine the application of the model to other taxa, I studied the expression and function of pair-rule genes in Bombyx mori, together with a Bombyx homolog of Krüppel (Bm-Kr), a known gap gene. Knockdown embryos of Bombyx homologs of eve, run and odd (Bm-eve, Bm-run and Bm-odd) exhibited asegmental phenotypes similar to those of Tribolium knockdowns. However, pair-rule gene interactions were similar to those of both Tribolium and Drosophila, which, different from Tribolium, shows a hierarchical segmentation mode. Additionally, the Bm-odd expression pattern shares characteristics with those of Drosophila pair-rule genes that receive upstream regulatory input. On the other hand, Bm-Kr knockdowns exhibited a large posterior segment deletion as observed in short-germ insects. However, a detailed analysis of these embryos indicated that Bm-Kr modulates expression of pair-rule genes like in Drosophila, although the mechanisms appear to be different. This suggested hierarchical interactions between Bm-Kr and pair-rule genes. Based on these results, I concluded that the pair-rule gene circuit model that describes Tribolium development is not applicable to Bombyx.

  13. A Discrete Transition Zone Organizes the Topological and Regulatory Autonomy of the Adjacent Tfap2c and Bmp7 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Taro; Klein, Felix A.; Langenfeld, Katja; Glaser, Juliane; Huber, Wolfgang; Spitz, François

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented role of remote enhancers in controlling developmental gene expression, the mechanisms that allocate enhancers to genes are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the cis-regulatory organization of the locus containing the Tfap2c and Bmp7 genes in vivo, using a series of engineered chromosomal rearrangements. While these genes lie adjacent to one another, we demonstrate that they are independently regulated by distinct sets of enhancers, which in turn define non-overlapping regulatory domains. Chromosome conformation capture experiments reveal a corresponding partition of the locus in two distinct structural entities, demarcated by a discrete transition zone. The impact of engineered chromosomal rearrangements on the topology of the locus and the resultant gene expression changes indicate that this transition zone functionally organizes the structural partition of the locus, thereby defining enhancer-target gene allocation. This partition is, however, not absolute: we show that it allows competing interactions across it that may be non-productive for the competing gene, but modulate expression of the competed one. Altogether, these data highlight the prime role of the topological organization of the genome in long-distance regulation of gene expression. PMID:25569170

  14. Polymorphism of DNA sequence adjacent to human beta-globin structural gene: relationship to sickle mutation.

    PubMed

    Kan, Y W; Dozy, A M

    1978-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease mapping of the human globin genes revealed a genetic variation in a Hpa I recognition site about 5000 nucleotides from the 3' end of the beta-globin structural gene. Instead of a normal 7.6-kilobase (kb) fragment which contains the beta-globin structural gene, 7.0-kb and 13.0-kb variants were detected. Both variants were found in people of African origin and were not detected in Asians or Caucasians. The 13.0-kb variant is frequently associated with the sickle hemoglobin mutation and may be useful for the prediction of the sickle cell gene in prenatal diagnosis. Polymorphism in a restriction enzyme site could be considered as a new class of genetic marker and may offer a new approach to linkage analysis and anthropological studies.

  15. Transcription control of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase and adjacent genes in Anabaena species.

    PubMed Central

    Li, L A; Tabita, F R

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activase (rca) was uniformly localized downstream from the genes encoding the large and small subunits of RubisCO (rbcL and rbcS) in three strains of Anabaena species. However, two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), situated between rbcS and rca in Anabaena sp. strain CA, were not found in the intergenic region of Anabaena variabilis and Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. During autotrophic growth of Anabaena cells, rca and rbc transcripts accumulated in the light and diminished in the dark; light-dependent expression of these genes was not affected by the nitrogen source and the concentration of exogenous CO2 supplied to the cells. When grown on fructose, rca- and rbc-specific transcripts accumulated in A. variabilis regardless of whether the cells were illuminated. Transcript levels, however, were much lower in dark-grown heterotrophic cultures than in photoheterotrophic cultures. In photoheterotrophic cultures, the expression of the rca and rbc genes was similar to that in cultures grown with CO2 as the sole source of carbon. Although the rbcL-rbcS and rca genes are linked and are in the same transcriptional orientation in Anabaena strains, hybridization of rbc and rca to distinct transcripts suggested that these genes are not cotranscribed, consistent with the results of primer extension and secondary structure analysis of the nucleotide sequence. Transcription from ORF1 and ORF2 was not detected under the conditions examined, and the function of these putative genes remains unknown. Images PMID:7961423

  16. Bioinformatics Identification of Drug Resistance-Associated Gene Pairs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ze-Jia; Yang, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Due to the extensive use of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the development of mutations, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is recognized as one of the most dangerous threats to global tuberculosis control. Some single mutations have been identified to be significantly linked with drug resistance. However, the prior research did not take gene-gene interactions into account, and the emergence of transmissible drug resistance is connected with multiple genetic mutations. In this study we use the bioinformatics software GBOOST (The Hong Kong University, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China) to calculate the interactions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) pairs and identify gene pairs associated with drug resistance. A large part of the non-synonymous mutations in the drug target genes that were included in the screened gene pairs were confirmed by previous reports, which lent sound solid credits to the effectiveness of our method. Notably, most of the identified gene pairs containing drug targets also comprise Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) family proteins, suggesting that PPE family proteins play important roles in the drug resistance of Mtb. Therefore, this study provides deeper insights into the mechanisms underlying anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, and the present method is useful for exploring the drug resistance mechanisms for other microorganisms. PMID:27618895

  17. Bioinformatics Identification of Drug Resistance-Associated Gene Pairs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ze-Jia; Yang, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Due to the extensive use of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the development of mutations, the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is recognized as one of the most dangerous threats to global tuberculosis control. Some single mutations have been identified to be significantly linked with drug resistance. However, the prior research did not take gene-gene interactions into account, and the emergence of transmissible drug resistance is connected with multiple genetic mutations. In this study we use the bioinformatics software GBOOST (The Hong Kong University, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China) to calculate the interactions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) pairs and identify gene pairs associated with drug resistance. A large part of the non-synonymous mutations in the drug target genes that were included in the screened gene pairs were confirmed by previous reports, which lent sound solid credits to the effectiveness of our method. Notably, most of the identified gene pairs containing drug targets also comprise Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) family proteins, suggesting that PPE family proteins play important roles in the drug resistance of Mtb. Therefore, this study provides deeper insights into the mechanisms underlying anti-tuberculosis drug resistance, and the present method is useful for exploring the drug resistance mechanisms for other microorganisms. PMID:27618895

  18. A new human gene (DXS1357E) with ubiquitous expression, located in Xq28 adjacent to the adrenoleukodystrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mosser, J.; Sarde, C.O.; Vicaire, S.

    1994-07-15

    The authors have isolated a new human gene (DXS1357E; laboratory name: CDM) localized in Xq28. This gene is transcribed from the same CpG island as the adrenoleukodystrophy gene (ALD) and is oriented in the opposite direction. It encodes a 1.5-kb transcript that exhibits ubiquitous expression and contains a single open reading frame. The 246 deduced amino acid sequence suggests the presence of membrane-associated segments and a weak similarity with the rod-like tail portion of heavy chain myosins from different species. The DXS1357E gene may be a candidate for one of the many diseases mapping to this region. A preliminary analysis did not show rearrangements of the gene in 19 independent patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Two adjacent nuclear genes are required for functional complementation of a chloroplast trans-splicing mutant from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Balczun, Carsten; Bunse, Astrid; Hahn, Daniela; Bennoun, Pierre; Nickelsen, Jörg; Kück, Ulrich

    2005-09-01

    The chloroplast tscA gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes a co-factor RNA that is involved in trans-splicing of exons 1 and 2 of the psaA mRNA encoding a core polypeptide of photosystem I. Here we provide molecular and genetic characterization of the trans-splicing mutant TR72, which is defective in the 3'-end processing of the tscA RNA and consequently defective in splicing exons 1 and 2 of the psaA mRNA. Using genomic complementation, two adjacent nuclear genes were identified, Rat1 and Rat2, that are able to restore the photosynthetic growth of mutant TR72. Restoration of the photosynthesis phenotype, however, was successful only with a DNA fragment containing both genes, while separate use of the two genes did not rescue the wild-type phenotype. This was further confirmed by using a set of 10 gene derivatives in complementation tests. The deduced amino acid sequence of Rat1 shows significant sequence homology to the conserved NAD+-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases of eukaryotic organisms. However, mutagenesis of conserved residues in this putative NAD+-binding domain did not reveal any effect on restoration efficiency. Immunodetection analyses with enriched fractions of chloroplast proteins indicated that Rat1 is associated with chloroplast membranes. Using the yeast three-hybrid system, we were able to demonstrate the specific binding of tscA RNA by the Rat1 polypeptide. We propose that the two nuclear factors Rat1 and Rat2 are involved in processing of chloroplast tscA RNA and in subsequent splicing of psaA exons 1 and 2.

  20. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  1. Cooperative gene regulation by microRNA pairs and their identification using a computational workflow

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Ulf; Lai, Xin; Winter, Felix; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an integral part of gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, it has been shown that pairs of miRNAs can repress the translation of a target mRNA in a cooperative manner, which leads to an enhanced effectiveness and specificity in target repression. However, it remains unclear which miRNA pairs can synergize and which genes are target of cooperative miRNA regulation. In this paper, we present a computational workflow for the prediction and analysis of cooperating miRNAs and their mutual target genes, which we refer to as RNA triplexes. The workflow integrates methods of miRNA target prediction; triplex structure analysis; molecular dynamics simulations and mathematical modeling for a reliable prediction of functional RNA triplexes and target repression efficiency. In a case study we analyzed the human genome and identified several thousand targets of cooperative gene regulation. Our results suggest that miRNA cooperativity is a frequent mechanism for an enhanced target repression by pairs of miRNAs facilitating distinctive and fine-tuned target gene expression patterns. Human RNA triplexes predicted and characterized in this study are organized in a web resource at www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/triplexrna/. PMID:24875477

  2. The Drosophila eve insulator Homie promotes eve expression and protects the adjacent gene from repression by polycomb spreading.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Miki; Sun, Guizhi; Jaynes, James B

    2013-10-01

    Insulators can block the action of enhancers on promoters and the spreading of repressive chromatin, as well as facilitating specific enhancer-promoter interactions. However, recent studies have called into question whether the activities ascribed to insulators in model transgene assays actually reflect their functions in the genome. The Drosophila even skipped (eve) gene is a Polycomb (Pc) domain with a Pc-group response element (PRE) at one end, flanked by an insulator, an arrangement also seen in other genes. Here, we show that this insulator has three major functions. It blocks the spreading of the eve Pc domain, preventing repression of the adjacent gene, TER94. It prevents activation of TER94 by eve regulatory DNA. It also facilitates normal eve expression. When Homie is deleted in the context of a large transgene that mimics both eve and TER94 regulation, TER94 is repressed. This repression depends on the eve PRE. Ubiquitous TER94 expression is "replaced" by expression in an eve pattern when Homie is deleted, and this effect is reversed when the PRE is also removed. Repression of TER94 is attributable to spreading of the eve Pc domain into the TER94 locus, accompanied by an increase in histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 27. Other PREs can functionally replace the eve PRE, and other insulators can block PRE-dependent repression in this context. The full activity of the eve promoter is also dependent on Homie, and other insulators can promote normal eve enhancer-promoter communication. Our data suggest that this is not due to preventing promoter competition, but is likely the result of the insulator organizing a chromosomal conformation favorable to normal enhancer-promoter interactions. Thus, insulator activities in a native context include enhancer blocking and enhancer-promoter facilitation, as well as preventing the spread of repressive chromatin.

  3. Variants in Adjacent Oxytocin/Vasopressin Gene Region and Associations with ASD Diagnosis and Other Autism Related Endophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Sunday M.; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Yan, Zhongyu; Guter, Stephen; Cook, Edwin H.; Jacob, Suma

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been increasing interest in oxytocin (peptide: OT, gene: OXT) as a treatment pathway for neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Neurodevelopmental disorders affect functional, social, and intellectual abilities. With advances in molecular biology, research has connected multiple gene regions to the clinical presentation of ASD. Studies have also shown that the neuropeptide hormones OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP) influence mammalian social and territorial behaviors and may have treatment potential for neurodevelopmental disorders. Published data examining molecular and phenotypic variation in ASD, such as cognitive abilities, are limited. Since most studies have focused on the receptors in the OT-AVP system, we investigated genetic variation within peptide genes for association with phenotypic ASD features that help identify subgroups within the spectrum. Methods: In this study, TDT analysis was carried out utilizing FBAT in 207 probands (156 trios) and a European Ancestry (EA) subsample (108 trios).The evolutionarily related and adjacent genes of OXT and AVP were studied for associations between the tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms and ASD diagnosis, social abilities, restrictive and repetitive behaviors, and IQ for cognitive abilities. Additionally, relationships with whole blood serotonin (WB5HT) were explored because of the developmental relationships connecting plasma levels of OT and WB5HT within ASD. Results: Results indicate significant association between OXT rs6084258 (p = 0.001) and ASD. Associations with several endophenotypes were also noted: OXT rs6133010 was associated with IQ (full scale IQ, p = 0.008; nonverbal IQ, p = 0.010, verbal IQ, p = 0.006); and OXT rs4813625 and OXT rs877172 were associated with WB5HT levels (EA, p = 0.027 and p = 0.033, respectively). Additionally, we measured plasma OT (pOT) levels in a subsample (N = 54). Results show the three polymorphisms, OXT rs6084258, OXT

  4. The Role of Transcription Factors at Antisense-Expressing Gene Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Thiemicke, Alexander; Hsu, Tiffany Y.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoded close to one another on the chromosome are often coexpressed, by a mechanism and regulatory logic that remain poorly understood. We surveyed the yeast genome for tandem gene pairs oriented tail-to-head at which expression antisense to the upstream gene was conserved across species. The intergenic region at most such tandem pairs is a bidirectional promoter, shared by the downstream gene mRNA and the upstream antisense transcript. Genomic analyses of these intergenic loci revealed distinctive patterns of transcription factor regulation. Mutation of a given transcription factor verified its role as a regulator in trans of tandem gene pair loci, including the proximally initiating upstream antisense transcript and downstream mRNA and the distally initiating upstream mRNA. To investigate cis-regulatory activity at such a locus, we focused on the stress-induced NAD(P)H dehydratase YKL151C and its downstream neighbor, the metabolic enzyme GPM1. Previous work has implicated the region between these genes in regulation of GPM1 expression; our mutation experiments established its function in rich medium as a repressor in cis of the distally initiating YKL151C sense RNA, and an activator of the proximally initiating YKL151C antisense RNA. Wild-type expression of all three transcripts required the transcription factor Gcr2. Thus, at this locus, the intergenic region serves as a focal point of regulatory input, driving antisense expression and mediating the coordinated regulation of YKL151C and GPM1. Together, our findings implicate transcription factors in the joint control of neighboring genes specialized to opposing conditions and the antisense transcripts expressed between them. PMID:27190003

  5. The human paired domain gene PAX7 (Hup1) maps to chromosome 1p35-1p36. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, B.W. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-07-01

    The human PAX7 gene encodes a protein containing a domain homologous to the Drosophila paired box first described in three segmentation genes. In addition to the paired box, the gene contains the conserved octa-peptide and a paired-type homeobox. Two of the five known human PAX genes have been implicated in human disorders so far. Here the authors have used a somatic cell hybrid panel to localize PAX7 to human chromosome 1. In situ hybridization shows that PAX7 is confined to the short arm of chromosome 1 at 1p35-1p36.2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Fine Physical Mapping of Ph1, a Chromosome Pairing Regulator Gene in Polyploid Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gill, K. S.; Gill, B. S.; Endo, T. R.; Mukai, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The diploid-like chromosome pairing in polyploid wheat is controlled by the Ph1 (pairing homoeologous) gene that is located on chromosome arm 5BL. By using a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques, we report the physical location of the Ph1 gene to a submicroscopic chromosome region (Ph1 gene region) that is flanked by the breakpoints of two deletions (5BL-1 and ph1c) and is marked by a DNA probe (XksuS1). The Ph1 gene region is present distal to the breakpoint of deletion 5BL-1 but proximal to the C-band 5BL2.1. Two other DNA probes (Xpsr128 and Xksu75) flank the region-Xpsr128 being proximal and Xksu75 being distal. The estimated size of the region is less than 3 Mb. The chromosome region around the Ph1 gene is high in recombination as the genetic distance of the region between 5BL-1 breakpoint and C-band 5BL2.1 (not resolved by the microscope) is at least 9.3 cM. PMID:8375657

  7. Sense-antisense gene-pairs in breast cancer and associated pathological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grinchuk, Oleg V.; Motakis, Efthymios; Yenamandra, Surya Pavan; Ow, Ghim Siong; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Tang, Zhiqun; Yarmishyn, Aliaksandr A.; Ivshina, Anna V.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of human protein-coding genes form hereditary complex genome architectures composed of sense-antisense (SA) gene pairs (SAGPs) transcribing their RNAs from both strands of a given locus. Such architectures represent important novel components of genome complexity contributing to gene expression deregulation in cancer cells. Therefore, the architectures might be involved in cancer pathways and, in turn, be used for novel drug targets discovery. However, the global roles of SAGPs in cancer pathways has not been studied. Here we investigated SAGPs associated with breast cancer (BC)-related pathways using systems biology, prognostic survival and experimental methods. Gene expression analysis identified 73 BC-relevant SAGPs that are highly correlated in BC. Survival modelling and metadata analysis of the 1161 BC patients allowed us to develop a novel patient prognostic grouping method selecting the 12 survival-significant SAGPs. The qRT-PCR-validated 12-SAGP prognostic signature reproducibly stratified BC patients into low- and high-risk prognostic subgroups. The 1381 SAGP-defined differentially expressed genes common across three studied cohorts were identified. The functional enrichment analysis of these genes revealed the GABPA gene network, including BC-relevant SAGPs, specific gene sets involved in cell cycle, spliceosomal and proteasomal pathways. The co-regulatory function of GABPA in BC cells was supported using siRNA knockdown studies. Thus, we demonstrated SAGPs as the synergistically functional genome architectures interconnected with cancer-related pathways and associated with BC patient clinical outcomes. Taken together, SAGPs represent an important component of genome complexity which can be used to identify novel aspects of coordinated pathological gene networks in cancers. PMID:26517092

  8. Comparative gene array analysis of progenitor cells from human paired deep neck and subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Tews, D; Schwar, V; Scheithauer, M; Weber, T; Fromme, T; Klingenspor, M; Barth, T F; Möller, P; Holzmann, K; Debatin, K M; Fischer-Posovszky, P; Wabitsch, M

    2014-09-01

    Brown and white adipocytes have been shown to derive from different progenitors. In this study we sought to clarify the molecular differences between human brown and white adipocyte progenitors cells. To this end, we performed comparative gene array analysis on progenitor cells isolated from paired biopsies of deep and subcutaneous neck adipose tissue from individuals (n = 6) undergoing neck surgery. Compared with subcutaneous neck progenitors, cells from the deep neck adipose tissue displayed marked differences in gene expression pattern, including 355 differentially regulated (>1.5 fold) genes. Analysis of highest regulated genes revealed that STMN2, MME, ODZ2, NRN1 and IL13RA2 genes were specifically expressed in white progenitor cells, whereas expression of LRRC17, CNTNAP3, CD34, RGS7BP and ADH1B marked brown progenitor cells. In conclusion, progenitors from deep neck and subcutaneous neck adipose tissue are characterized by a distinct molecular signature, giving rise to either brown or white adipocytes. The newly identified markers may provide potential pharmacological targets facilitating brown adipogenesis. PMID:25102227

  9. Mammalian Axoneme Central Pair Complex Proteins: Broader Roles Revealed by Gene Knockout Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Zhang, Zhibing; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    The axoneme genes, their encoded proteins, their functions and the structures they form are largely conserved across species. Much of our knowledge of the function and structure of axoneme proteins in cilia and flagella is derived from studies on model organisms like the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The core structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, which in most motile cilia and flagella contains a 9 + 2 configuration of microtubules. The two central microtubules are the scaffold of the central pair complex (CPC). Mutations that disrupt CPC genes in Chlamydomonas and other model organisms result in defects in assembly, stability and function of the axoneme, leading to flagellar motility defects. However, targeted mutations generated in mice in the orthologous CPC genes have revealed significant differences in phenotypes of mutants compared to Chlamydomonas. Here we review observations that support the concept of cell-type specific roles for the CPC genes in mice, and an expanded repertoire of functions for the products of these genes in cilia, including non-motile cilia, and other microtubule-associated cellular functions. PMID:26785425

  10. Linkage of the VNTR/insulin-gene and type I diabetes mellitus: Increased gene sharing in affected sibling pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Owerbach, D.; Gabbay, K.H. )

    1994-05-01

    Ninety-six multiplex type I diabetic families were typed at the 5' flanking region of the insulin gene by using a PCR assay that better resolves the VNTR into multiple alleles. Affected sibling pairs shared 2, 1, and 0 VNTR alleles - identical by descent - at a frequency of .47, .45, and .08, respectively, a ratio that deviated from the expected 1:2:1 ratio (P<.001). These results confirm linkage of the chromosome 11p15.5 region with type I diabetes mellitus susceptibility. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods. PMID:23880430

  12. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods.

  13. An extreme-sib-pair genome scan for genes regulating blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Rogus, J J; Terwedow, H A; Yang, J; Wang, Z; Chen, C; Niu, T; Wang, B; Xu, H; Weiss, S; Schork, N J; Fang, Z

    1999-06-01

    Hypertension, a risk factor for many cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases, affects one in four Americans, at an annual cost of>$30 billion. Although genetic mutations have been identified in rare forms of hypertension, including Liddle syndrome and glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism, the abundance of plausible candidate genes and potential environmental risk factors has complicated the genetic dissection of more prevalent essential hypertension. To search systematically for chromosomal regions containing genes that regulate blood pressure, we scanned the entire autosomal genome by using 367 polymorphic markers. Our study population, selected from a blood-pressure screen of >200,000 Chinese adults, comprises rare but highly efficient extreme sib pairs (207 discordant, 258 high concordant, and 99 low concordant) and all but a single parent of these sibs. By virtue of the sampling design, the number of sib pairs, and the availability of genotyped parents, this study represents one of the most powerful of its kind. Although no regions achieved a 5% genomewide significance level, maximum LOD-score values were >2.0 (unadjusted P<.001) for regions containing five markers (D3S2387, D11S2019, D15S657, D16S3396, and D17S1303), in our primary analysis. Other promising regions identified through secondary analyses include loci near D4S3248, D7S2195, D10S1423, D20S470, D20S482, D21S2052, PAH, and AGT.

  14. Silencing of a metaphase I-specific gene results in a phenotype similar to that of the Pairing homeologous 1 (Ph1) gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Ramanjot; Nagarajan, Ragupathi; Bennypaul, Harvinder; Sidhu, Gaganpreet K; Sidhu, Gaganjot; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2014-09-30

    Although studied extensively since 1958, the molecular mode of action of the Pairing homeologous 1 (Ph1) gene is still unknown. In polyploid wheat, the diploid-like chromosome pairing is principally controlled by the Ph1 gene via preventing homeologous chromosome pairing (HECP). Here, we report a candidate Ph1 gene (C-Ph1) present in the Ph1 locus, transient as well as stable silencing of which resulted in a phenotype characteristic of the Ph1 gene mutants, including HECP, multivalent formation, and disrupted chromosome alignment on the metaphase I (MI) plate. Despite a highly conserved DNA sequence, the C-Ph1 gene homeologues showed a dramatically different structure and expression pattern, with only the 5B copy showing MI-specific expression, further supporting our claim for the Ph1 gene. In agreement with the previous reports about the Ph1 gene, the predicted protein of the 5A copy of the C-Ph1 gene is truncated, and thus perhaps less effective. The 5D copy is expressed around the onset of meiosis; thus, it may function during the earlier stages of chromosome pairing. Along with alternate splicing, the predicted protein of the 5B copy is different from the protein of the other two copies because of an insertion. These structural and expression differences among the homeologues concurred with the previous observations about Ph1 gene function. Stable RNAi silencing of the wheat gene in Arabidopsis showed multivalents and centromere clustering during meiosis I. PMID:25232038

  15. Combinatory Microarray and SuperSAGE Analyses Identify Pairing-Dependently Transcribed Genes in Schistosoma mansoni Males, Including Follistatin

    PubMed Central

    Leutner, Silke; Oliveira, Katia C.; Rotter, Björn; Beckmann, Svenja; Buro, Christin; Hahnel, Steffen; Kitajima, Joao P.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Winter, Peter; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a disease of world-wide importance and is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. These parasites exhibit a unique reproduction biology as the female's sexual maturation depends on a constant pairing-contact to the male. Pairing leads to gonad differentiation in the female, and even gene expression of some gonad-associated genes is controlled by pairing. In contrast, no morphological changes have been observed in males, although first data indicated an effect of pairing also on gene transcription in males. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the influence of pairing on males, we performed a combinatory approach applying SuperSAGE and microarray hybridization, generating the most comprehensive data-set on differential transcription available to date. Of 6,326 sense transcripts detected by both analyses, 29 were significantly differentially transcribed. Besides mutual confirmation, the two methods complemented each other as shown by data comparison and real-time PCR, which revealed a number of genes with consistent regulation across all methods. One of the candidate genes, follistatin of S. mansoni (SmFst) was characterized in more detail by in situ hybridization and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction analyses with potential binding partners. Conclusions/Significance Beyond confirming previously hypothesized differences in metabolic processes between pairing-experienced (EM) and pairing-unexperienced males (UM), our data indicate that neuronal processes are involved in male-female interaction but also TGFβ-signaling. One candidate revealing significant down-regulation in EM was the TGFβ-pathway controlling molecule follistatin (SmFst). First functional analyses demonstrated SmFst interaction with the S. mansoni TGFβ-receptor agonists inhibin/activin (SmInAct) and bone morphogenic protein (SmBMP), and all molecules colocalized in the testes. This indicates a yet unknown role of the TGFβ-pathway for

  16. Marker production by PCR amplification with primer pairs from conserved sequences of WRKY genes in chili pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Han, Jung-Heon; Yeom, Seon-In; Harn, Chee-Hark; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-04-30

    Despite increasing awareness of the importance of WRKY genes in plant defense signaling, the locations of these genes in the Capsicum genome have not been established. To develop WRKY-based markers, primer sequences were deduced from the conserved sequences of the DNA binding motif within the WRKY domains of tomato and pepper genes. These primers were derived from upstream and downstream parts of the conserved sequences of the three WRKY groups. Six primer combinations of each WRKY group were tested for polymorphisms between the mapping parents, C. annuum 'CM334' and C. annuum 'Chilsungcho'. DNA fragments amplified by primer pairs deduced from WRKY Group II genes revealed high levels of polymorphism. Using 32 primer pairs to amplify upstream and downstream parts of the WRKY domain of WRKY group II genes, 60 polymorphic bands were detected. Polymorphisms were not detected with primer pairs from downstream parts of WRKY group II genes. Half of these primers were subjected to F2 genotyping to construct a linkage map. Thirty of 41 markers were located evenly spaced on 20 of the 28 linkage groups, without clustering. This linkage map also consisted of 199 AFLP and 26 SSR markers. This WRKY-based marker system is a rapid and simple method for generating sequence-specific markers for plant gene families.

  17. The gene for PAX7, a member of the paired-box-containing genes, is localized on human chromosome arm 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.N.; Morris, S.W. Univ. of Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN ); Sublett, J.E.; Li, Baitao; Valentine, M.B. ); Noll, M. )

    1993-09-01

    The murine Pax-7 gene and the cognate human gene, formerly designated HuP1, are members of the multigene paired-box-containing class of developmental regulatory genes first identified in Drosophila. By analysis of somatic cell hybrids segregating human chromosomes, the gene encoding PAX7 was localized to human chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed this assignment and allowed mapping of the gene to the terminal region of the short arm (1p36) of the extensive homology between human chromosome 1p and the distal segment of mouse chromosome 4, extending from bands C5 through E2. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Evolution of paired domains: isolation and sequencing of jellyfish and hydra Pax genes related to Pax-5 and Pax-6.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Rodin, A; Zhou, Y; Dickinson, D P; Harper, D E; Hewett-Emmett, D; Li, W H

    1997-05-13

    Pax proteins are a family of transcription factors with a highly conserved paired domain; many members also contain a paired-type homeodomain and/or an octapeptide. Nine mammalian Pax genes are known and classified into four subgroups: Pax-1/9, Pax-2/5/8, Pax-3/7, and Pax-4/6. Most of these genes are involved in nervous system development. In particular, Pax-6 is a key regulator that controls eye development in vertebrates and Drosophila. Although the Pax-4/6 subgroup seems to be more closely related to Pax-2/5/8 than to Pax-3/7 or Pax-1/9, its evolutionary origin is unknown. We therefore searched for a Pax-6 homolog and related genes in Cnidaria, which is the lowest phylum of animals that possess a nervous system and eyes. A sea nettle (a jellyfish) genomic library was constructed and two pax genes (Pax-A and -B) were isolated and partially sequenced. Surprisingly, unlike most known Pax genes, the paired box in these two genes contains no intron. In addition, the complete cDNA sequences of hydra Pax-A and -B were obtained. Hydra Pax-B contains both the homeodomain and the octapeptide, whereas hydra Pax-A contains neither. DNA binding assays showed that sea nettle Pax-A and -B and hydra Pax-A paired domains bound to a Pax-5/6 site and a Pax-5 site, although hydra Pax-B paired domain bound neither. An alignment of all available paired domain sequences revealed two highly conserved regions, which cover the DNA binding contact positions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Pax-A and especially Pax-B were more closely related to Pax-2/5/8 and Pax-4/6 than to Pax-1/9 or Pax-3/7 and that the Pax genes can be classified into two supergroups: Pax-A/Pax-B/Pax-2/5/8/4/6 and Pax-1/9/3/7. From this analysis and the gene structure, we propose that modern Pax-4/6 and Pax-2/5/8 genes evolved from an ancestral gene similar to cnidarian Pax-B, having both the homeodomain and the octapeptide.

  19. Employing gene set top scoring pairs to identify deregulated pathway-signatures in dilated cardiomyopathy from integrated microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aik Choon

    2012-01-01

    It is well accepted that a set of genes must act in concert to drive various cellular processes. However, under different biological phenotypes, not all the members of a gene set will participate in a biological process. Hence, it is useful to construct a discriminative classifier by focusing on the core members (subset) of a highly informative gene set. Such analyses can reveal which of those subsets from the same gene set correspond to different biological phenotypes. In this study, we propose Gene Set Top Scoring Pairs (GSTSP) approach that exploits the simple yet powerful relative expression reversal concept at the gene set levels to achieve these goals. To illustrate the usefulness of GSTSP, we applied this method to five different human heart failure gene expression data sets. We take advantage of the direct data integration feature in the GSTSP approach to combine two data sets, identify a discriminative gene set from >190 predefined gene sets, and evaluate the predictive power of the GSTSP classifier derived from this informative gene set on three independent test sets (79.31% in test accuracy). The discriminative gene pairs identified in this study may provide new biological understanding on the disturbed pathways that are involved in the development of heart failure. GSTSP methodology is general in purpose and is applicable to a variety of phenotypic classification problems using gene expression data.

  20. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes and Antibiotic Residues in Wastewater and Soil Adjacent to Swine Feedlots: Potential Transfer to Agricultural Lands

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wang, Thanh; Shao, Bing; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate use of antibiotics in swine feed could cause accelerated emergence of antibiotic resistance genes, and agricultural application of swine waste could spread antibiotic resistance genes to the surrounding environment. Objectives: We investigated the distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes from swine feedlots and their surrounding environment. Methods: We used a culture-independent method to identify PMQR genes and estimate their levels in wastewater from seven swine feedlot operations and corresponding wastewater-irrigated farm fields. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones in wastewater and soil samples were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Results: The predominant PMQR genes in both the wastewater and soil samples were qnrD, qepA, and oqxB, whereas qnrS and oqxA were present only in wastewater samples. Absolute concentrations of all PMQR genes combined ranged from 1.66 × 107 to 4.06 × 108 copies/mL in wastewater and 4.06 × 106 to 9.52 × 107 copies/g in soil. Concentrations of (fluoro)quinolones ranged from 4.57 to 321 ng/mL in wastewater and below detection limit to 23.4 ng/g in soil. Significant correlations were found between the relative abundance of PMQR genes and (fluoro)quinolone concentrations (r = 0.71, p = 0.005) and the relative abundance of PMQR genes in paired wastewater and agricultural soil samples (r = 0.91, p = 0.005). Conclusions: Swine feedlot wastewater may be a source of PMQR genes that could facilitate the spread of antibiotic resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in animal husbandry environments using a culture-independent method. PMID:22569244

  1. Silencing of a gene adjacent to the breakpoint of a widespread Drosophila inversion by a transposon-induced antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Puig, Marta; Cáceres, Mario; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2004-06-15

    Adaptive changes in nature occur by a variety of mechanisms, and Drosophila chromosomal inversions was one of the first studied examples. However, the precise genetic causes of the adaptive value of inversions remain uncertain. Here we investigate the impact of the widespread inversion 2j of Drosophila buzzatii on the expression of the CG13617 gene, whose coding region is located only 12 bp away from the inversion proximal breakpoint. This gene is transcribed into a 2.3-kb mRNA present in all D. buzzatii developmental stages. More importantly, the expression level of CG13617 is reduced 5-fold in embryos of lines homozygous for the 2j inversion compared with lines without the inversion. An antisense RNA that originates in the Foldback-like transposon Kepler inserted at the breakpoint junction in all of the 2j lines and that forms duplexes with the CG13617 mRNA in 2j embryos is most likely responsible for the near silencing of the gene. Few examples of RNA interference caused by transposable elements (TEs) have been previously described, but this mechanism might be prevalent in many organisms and illustrates the potential of TEs as a major source of genetic variation. In addition, because chromosomal rearrangements are usually induced by TEs, position effects might be more common than previously recognized and contribute significantly to the evolutionary success of inversions.

  2. Adjacent chromosomal regions can evolve at very different rates: evolution of the Drosophila 68C glue gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Meyerowitz, E M; Martin, C H

    1984-01-01

    The 68C puff is a highly transcribed region of the Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes. Three different classes of messenger RNA originate in a 5000-bp region in the puff; each class is translated to one of the salivary gland glue proteins sgs-3, sgs-7, or sgs-8. These messenger RNA classes are coordinately controlled, with each RNA appearing in the third larval instar and disappearing at the time of puparium formation. Their disappearance is initiated by the action of the steroid hormone ecdysterone. In the work reported here, we studied evolution of this hormone-regulated gene cluster in the melanogaster species subgroup of Drosophila. Genome blot hybridization experiments showed that five other species of this subgroup have DNA sequences that hybridize to D. melanogaster 68C sequences, and that these sequences are divided into a highly conserved region, which does not contain the glue genes, and an extraordinarily diverged region, which does. Molecular cloning of this DNA from D. simulans, D. erecta, D. yakuba, and D. teissieri confirmed the division of the region into a slowly and a rapidly evolving portion, and also showed that the rapidly evolving region of each species codes for third instar larval salivary gland RNAs homologous to the D. melanogaster glue mRNAs. The highly conserved region is at least 13,000 bp long, and is not known to code for any RNAs.

  3. Identification and characterization of a T-cell-specific enhancer adjacent to the murine CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins is a tightly regulated process tied to the maturation of functionally distinct classes of thymocytes. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of expression of the genes encoding CD4 and CD8 is likely to yield important insight into regulation of the differentiated functions of T cells. Here, we report the identification of a T-cell-specific enhancer in a DNase I-hypersensitive region about 13 kb 5' of the transcription initiation site of the murine CD4 gene. Within the minimal enhancer element, at least three nuclear protein binding sites were identified by DNase I footprint analysis. One site contains the consensus motif for TCF-1 alpha/LEF-1, a recently identified HMG box transcription factor primarily expressed in pre-B and T cells. By Southwestern (DNA-protein) blotting and binding competition analyses, the protein binding to this site was found to be indistinguishable from TCF-1 alpha/LEF-1. Mutagenesis of this site resulted in loss of factor binding but had a relatively minor effect on enhancer activity. In contrast, mutations in another site, containing two consensus binding motifs for basic helix-loop-helix proteins, abolished factor binding and dramatically reduced enhancer activity. None of the protein binding sites had activity on its own, suggesting that the CD4 enhancer requires the interaction of multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1922061

  4. Creation of cis-regulatory elements during sea urchin evolution by co-option and optimization of a repetitive sequence adjacent to the spec2a gene.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Sandeep; Kiyama, Takae; Villinski, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Ning; Liang, Shuguang; Klein, William H

    2004-09-15

    The creation, preservation, and degeneration of cis-regulatory elements controlling developmental gene expression are fundamental genome-level evolutionary processes about which little is known. Here, we identify critical differences in cis-regulatory elements controlling the expression of the sea urchin aboral ectoderm-specific spec genes. We found multiple copies of a repetitive sequence element termed RSR in genomes of species within the Strongylocentrotidae family, but RSRs were not detected in genomes of species outside Strongylocentrotidae. spec genes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus are invariably associated with RSRs, and the spec2a RSR functioned as a transcriptional enhancer and displayed greater activity than did spec1 or spec2c RSRs. Single-base pair differences at two cis-regulatory elements within the spec2a RSR increased the binding affinities of four transcription factors, SpCCAAT-binding factor at one element and SpOtx, SpGoosecoid, and SpGATA-E at another. The cis-regulatory elements to which these four factors bound were recent evolutionary acquisitions that acted to either activate or repress transcription, depending on the cell type. These elements were found in the spec2a RSR ortholog in Strongylocentrotus pallidus but not in RSR orthologs of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis or Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. Our results indicated that a dynamic pattern of cis-regulatory element evolution exists for spec genes despite their conserved aboral ectoderm expression.

  5. Connectivity of vertebrate genomes: Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) genes in spotted gar, basal teleosts, and tetrapods□

    PubMed Central

    Braasch, Ingo; Guiguen, Yann; Loker, Ryan; Letaw, John H.; Ferrara, Allyse; Bobe, Julien; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish are important models for human biology, health, and disease. Because genome duplication in a teleost ancestor (TGD) impacts the evolution of teleost genome structure and gene repertoires, we must discriminate gene functions that are shared and ancestral from those that are lineage-specific in teleosts or tetrapods to accurately apply inferences from teleost disease models to human health. Generalizations must account both for the TGD and for divergent evolution between teleosts and tetrapods after the likely two rounds of genome duplication shared by all vertebrates. Progress in sequencing techniques provides new opportunities to generate genomic and transcriptomic information from a broad range of phylogenetically informative taxa that facilitate detailed understanding of gene family and gene function evolution. We illustrate here the use of new sequence resources from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a rayfin fish that diverged from teleosts before the TGD, as well as RNA-Seq data from gar and multiple teleost lineages to reconstruct the evolution of the Paired-related homeobox (Prrx) transcription factor gene family, which is involved in the development of mesoderm and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. We show that for Prrx genes, the spotted gar genome and gene expression patterns mimic mammals better than teleosts do. Analyses force the seemingly paradoxical conclusion that regulatory mechanisms for the limb expression domains of Prrx genes existed before the evolution of paired appendages. Detailed evolutionary analyses like those reported here are required to identify fish species most similar to the human genome to optimally connect fish models to human gene functions in health and disease. PMID:24486528

  6. Site-specific impacts on gene expression and behavior in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed in situ to streams adjacent to sewage treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Environmental monitoring for pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in the aquatic environment traditionally employs a variety of methods including analytical chemistry, as well as a variety of histological and biochemical endpoints that correlate with the fish fitness. It is now clear that analytical chemistry alone is insufficient to identify aquatic environments that are compromised because these measurements do not identify the biologically available dose. The biological endpoints that are measured are important because they relate to known impairments; however, they are not specific to the contaminants and often focus on only a few known endpoints. These studies can be enhanced by looking more broadly at changes in gene expression, especially if the analysis focuses on biochemical pathways. The present study was designed to obtain additional information for well-characterized sites adjacent to sewage treatment plants in MN that are thought to be impacted by endocrine disruptors. Results Here we examine five sites that have been previously characterized and examine changes in gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) that have been caged for 48 h in each of the aquatic environments. We find that the gene expression changes are characteristic and unique at each of the five sites. Also, fish exposed to two of the sites, 7 and 12, present a more aggressive behavior compared to control fish. Conclusion Our results show that a short-term exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents was able to induce a site-specific gene expression pattern in the fathead minnow gonad and liver. The short-term exposure was also enough to affect fish sexual behavior. Our results also show that microarray analysis can be very useful at determining potential exposure to chemicals, and could be used routinely as a tool for environmental monitoring. PMID:19811676

  7. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M.; Ishii, K.; Kuo, W. L.; Piper, M.; Connolly, A.; Shi, Y. P.; Wu, R.; Lin, C. C.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. RESULTS: Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating

  8. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments. PMID:26713069

  9. Transcriptional co-regulation of evolutionarily conserved microRNA/cone opsin gene pairs: implications for photoreceptor subtype specification.

    PubMed

    Daido, Yutaka; Hamanishi, Sakurako; Kusakabe, Takehiro G

    2014-08-01

    The vertebrate retina contains two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which use distinct types of opsins and phototransduction proteins. Cones can be further divided into several subtypes with differing wavelength sensitivity and morphology. Although photoreceptor development has been extensively studied in a variety of vertebrate species, the mechanism by which photoreceptor subtypes are established is still largely unknown. Here we report two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-726 and miR-729, which are potentially involved in photoreceptor subtype specification. In the medaka Oryzias latipes, the genes encoding miR-726 and miR-729 are located upstream of the red-sensitive opsin gene LWS-A and the UV-sensitive opsin gene SWS1, respectively, and are transcribed in the opposite direction from the respective opsin genes. The miR-726/LWS pair is conserved between teleosts and tetrapods, and the miR-729/SWS1 pair is conserved among teleosts. in situ hybridization analyses and fluorescence reporter assays suggest that these miRNAs are co-expressed with the respective opsins in specific cone subtypes. Potential targets of miR-726 and miR-729 predicted in silico include several transcription factors that regulate photoreceptor development. Functional analyses of cis-regulatory sequences in vivo suggest that transcription of the paired microRNA and opsin genes is co-regulated by common cis-regulatory modules. We propose an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that controls photoreceptor subtype identity through coupling between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations.

  10. A Novel Pathogenicity Island Integrated Adjacent to the thrW tRNA Gene of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Encodes a Vacuolating Autotransporter Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, V. R.; Gyles, C. L.

    2003-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence and genetic organization of the Vat-encoding pathogenicity island (PAI) of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strain Ec222. The 22,139-bp PAI is situated adjacent to the 3′ terminus of the thrW tRNA gene, has a G+C content of 41.2%, and includes a bacteriophage SfII integrase gene, mobile genetic elements, two open reading frames with products exhibiting sequence similarity to known proteins, and several other open reading frames of unknown function. The PAI encodes an autotransporter protein, Vat (vacuolating autotransporter toxin), which induces the formation of intracellular vacuoles resulting in cytotoxic effects similar to those caused by the VacA toxin from Helicobacter pylori. The predicted 148.3-kDa protein product possesses the three domains that are typical of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae: an N-terminal signal sequence of 55 amino acids, a 111.8-kDa passenger domain containing a modified serine protease site (ATSGSG), and a C-terminal outer membrane translocator of 30.5 kDa. Vat has 75% protein homology with the hemagglutinin Tsh, an autotransporter of avian pathogenic E. coli. A vat deletion mutant of Ec222 showed no virulence in respiratory and cellulitis infection models of disease in broiler chickens. We conclude that the newly described PAI and Vat may be involved in the pathogenicity of avian septicemic E. coli strain Ec222 and other avian pathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:12933851

  11. Non-coding RNA derived from the region adjacent to the human HO-1 E2 enhancer selectively regulates HO-1 gene induction by modulating Pol II binding

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Mimura, Junsei; Itoh, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have disclosed the function of enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), which are long non-coding RNAs transcribed from gene enhancer regions, in transcriptional regulation. However, it remains unclear whether eRNAs are involved in the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) induction. Here, we report that multiple nuclear-enriched eRNAs are transcribed from the regions adjacent to two human HO-1 enhancers (i.e. the distal E2 and proximal E1 enhancers), and some of these eRNAs are induced by the oxidative stress-causing reagent diethyl maleate (DEM). We demonstrated that the expression of one forward direction (5′ to 3′) eRNA transcribed from the human HO-1 E2 enhancer region (named human HO-1enhancer RNA E2-3; hereafter called eRNA E2-3) was induced by DEM in an NRF2-dependent manner in HeLa cells. Conversely, knockdown of BACH1, a repressor of HO-1 transcription, further increased DEM-inducible eRNA E2-3 transcription as well as HO-1 expression. In addition, we showed that knockdown of eRNA E2-3 selectively down-regulated DEM-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, eRNA E2-3 knockdown attenuated DEM-induced Pol II binding to the promoter and E2 enhancer regions of HO-1 without affecting NRF2 recruitment to the E2 enhancer. These findings indicate that eRNAE2-3 is functional and is required for HO-1 induction. PMID:25404134

  12. Interaction of the CCAAT displacement protein with shared regulatory elements required for transcription of paired histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hodiri, H M; Perry, M

    1995-01-01

    The H2A and H2B genes of the Xenopus xlh3 histone gene cluster are transcribed in opposite directions from initiation points located approximately 235 bp apart. The close proximity of these genes to one another suggests that their expression may be controlled by either a single bidirectional promoter or by separate promoters. Our analysis of the transcription of histone gene pairs containing deletions and site-specific mutations of intergenic DNA revealed that both promoters are distinct but that they overlap physically and share multiple regulatory elements, providing a possible basis for the coordinate regulation of their in vivo activities. Using the intergenic DNA fragment as a probe and extracts from mammalian and amphibian cells, we observed the formation of a specific complex containing the CCAAT displacement protein (CDP). The formation of the CDP-containing complex was not strictly dependent on any single element in the intergenic region but instead required the presence of at least two of the three CCAAT motifs. Interestingly, similar CDP-containing complexes were formed on the promoters from the three other histone genes. The binding of CDP to histone gene promoters may contribute to the coordination of their activities during the cell cycle and early development. PMID:7791766

  13. dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins and regulates expression at divergently paired genes

    PubMed Central

    Korenjak, Michael; Kwon, Eunjeong; Morris, Robert T.; Anderssen, Endre; Amzallag, Arnaud; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    dREAM complexes represent the predominant form of E2F/RBF repressor complexes in Drosophila. dREAM associates with thousands of sites in the fly genome but its mechanism of action is unknown. To understand the genomic context in which dREAM acts we examined the distribution and localization of Drosophila E2F and dREAM proteins. Here we report a striking and unexpected overlap between dE2F2/dREAM sites and binding sites for the insulator-binding proteins CP190 and Beaf-32. Genetic assays show that these components functionally co-operate and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on mutant animals demonstrate that dE2F2 is important for association of CP190 with chromatin. dE2F2/dREAM binding sites are enriched at divergently transcribed genes, and the majority of genes upregulated by dE2F2 depletion represent the repressed half of a differentially expressed, divergently transcribed pair of genes. Analysis of mutant animals confirms that dREAM and CP190 are similarly required for transcriptional integrity at these gene pairs and suggest that dREAM functions in concert with CP190 to establish boundaries between repressed/activated genes. Consistent with the idea that dREAM co-operates with insulator-binding proteins, genomic regions bound by dREAM possess enhancer-blocking activity that depends on multiple dREAM components. These findings suggest that dREAM functions in the organization of transcriptional domains. PMID:25053843

  14. Systems biology-guided identification of synthetic lethal gene pairs and its potential use to discover antibiotic combinations

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Monk, Jonathan M.; Lewis, Robert M.; In Loh, Suh; Mishra, Arti; Abhay Nagle, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Chitkala; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar; Luche, Michele; Kitchen, Douglas B.; Andrews, Kathleen A.; Fong, Nicole L.; Li, Howard J.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Charusanti, Pep

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models of metabolism from bacterial systems biology have proven their utility across multiple fields, for example metabolic engineering, growth phenotype simulation, and biological discovery. The usefulness of the models stems from their ability to compute a link between genotype and phenotype, but their ability to accurately simulate gene-gene interactions has not been investigated extensively. Here we assess how accurately a metabolic model for Escherichia coli computes one particular type of gene-gene interaction, synthetic lethality, and find that the accuracy rate is between 25% and 43%. The most common failure modes were incorrect computation of single gene essentiality and biological information that was missing from the model. Moreover, we performed virtual and biological screening against several synthetic lethal pairs to explore whether two-compound formulations could be found that inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. One set of molecules was identified that, depending on the concentrations, inhibits E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in an additive or antagonistic manner. These findings pinpoint specific ways in which to improve the predictive ability of metabolic models, and highlight one potential application of systems biology to drug discovery and translational medicine. PMID:26531810

  15. OB gene not linked to human obesity in Mexican American affected sib pairs from Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Bray, M S; Boerwinkle, E; Hanis, C L

    1996-11-01

    Obesity is a highly prevalent disease, which is associated with a number of chronic conditions and, as such, represents a major public health burden. Numerous studies indicate that there is a genetic component contributing to interindividual variability in obesity. The discovery of the ob gene in mice, mutations in which produce extreme obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), provides a prime candidate gene for human obesity. We investigated linkage between the human OB gene and obesity in a sample of Mexican Americans from Starr County, Texas. Markers D7S635 and D7S1875, estimated to lie within a region approximately 290 to 400 kb proximal to the OB gene, were used to genotype 177 obese individuals distributed in 64 sibships. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) above 30 kg/m2. Linkage analyses for affected sibling pairs provided no evidence for linkage in this sample. In addition, differences between siblings for weight, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, percent body fat, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood lipid measures were not significantly related to number of alleles shared identical by state (IBS) for either of the two markers. While the OB gene may be involved in the metabolic sequences leading to obesity, the present linkage results do not support the existence of common genetic variation at or near the OB locus that increases risk for human obesity. PMID:8882881

  16. LDGIdb: a database of gene interactions inferred from long-range strong linkage disequilibrium between pairs of SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complex human diseases may be associated with many gene interactions. Gene interactions take several different forms and it is difficult to identify all of the interactions that are potentially associated with human diseases. One approach that may fill this knowledge gap is to infer previously unknown gene interactions via identification of non-physical linkages between different mutations (or single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) to avoid hitchhiking effect or lack of recombination. Strong non-physical SNP linkages are considered to be an indication of biological (gene) interactions. These interactions can be physical protein interactions, regulatory interactions, functional compensation/antagonization or many other forms of interactions. Previous studies have shown that mutations in different genes can be linked to the same disorders. Therefore, non-physical SNP linkages, coupled with knowledge of SNP-disease associations may shed more light on the role of gene interactions in human disorders. A user-friendly web resource that integrates information about non-physical SNP linkages, gene annotations, SNP information, and SNP-disease associations may thus be a good reference for biomedical research. Findings Here we extracted the SNPs located within the promoter or exonic regions of protein-coding genes from the HapMap database to construct a database named the Linkage-Disequilibrium-based Gene Interaction database (LDGIdb). The database stores 646,203 potential human gene interactions, which are potential interactions inferred from SNP pairs that are subject to long-range strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), or non-physical linkages. To minimize the possibility of hitchhiking, SNP pairs inferred to be non-physically linked were required to be located in different chromosomes or in different LD blocks of the same chromosomes. According to the genomic locations of the involved SNPs (i.e., promoter, untranslated region (UTR) and coding region (CDS)), the

  17. Perception of the usefulness of drug/gene pairs and barriers for pharmacogenomics in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Quinones, Luis Abel; Lavanderos, Maria Alejandra; Cayun, Juan Pablo; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Agundez, Jose Augusto; Caceres, Dante Daniel; Roco, Angela Margarita; Morales, Jorge E; Herrera, Luisa; Encina, Gonzalo; Isaza, Carlos Alberto; Redal, Maria Ana; Larovere, Laura; Soria, Nestor Walter; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Castaneda-Hernandez, Gilberto; Lopez-Cortes, Andres; Magno, Luiz Alexandre; Lopez, Marisol; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Rodeiro, Idania; Castro de Guerra, Dinorah; Teran, Enrique; Estevez-Carrizo, Francisco; Lares-Assef, Ismael

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics areas are currently emerging fields focused to manage pharmacotherapy that may prevent undertreatment while avoiding associated drug toxicity in patients. Large international differences in the awareness and in the use of pharmacogenomic testing are presumed, but not well assessed to date. In the present study we review the awareness of Latin American scientific community about pharmacogenomic testing and the perceived barriers for their clinical application. In order to that, we have compiled information from 9 countries of the region using a structured survey which is compared with surveys previously performed in USA and Spain. The most relevant group of barriers was related to the need for clear guidelines for the use of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice, followed by insufficient awareness about pharmacogenomics among clinicians and the absence of regulatory institutions that facilitate the use of pharmacogenetic tests. The higher ranked pairs were TPMT/thioguanine, TPMT/azathioprine, CYP2C9/warfarin, UGT1A1/irinotecan, CYP2D6/amitriptiline, CYP2C19/citalopram and CYP2D6/clozapine. The lower ranked pairs were SLCO1B1/simvastatin, CYP2D6/metoprolol and GP6D/chloroquine. Compared with USA and Spanish surveys, 25 pairs were of lower importance for Latin American respondents. Only CYP2C19/esomeprazole, CYP2C19/omeprazole, CYP2C19/celecoxib and G6PD/dapsone were ranked higher or similarly to the USA and Spanish surveys. Integration of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice needs training of healthcare professionals and citizens, but in addition legal and regulatory guidelines and safeguards will be needed. We propose that the approach offered by pharmacogenomics should be incorporated into the decision-making plans in Latin America. PMID:24524664

  18. Perception of the usefulness of drug/gene pairs and barriers for pharmacogenomics in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Quinones, Luis Abel; Lavanderos, Maria Alejandra; Cayun, Juan Pablo; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Agundez, Jose Augusto; Caceres, Dante Daniel; Roco, Angela Margarita; Morales, Jorge E; Herrera, Luisa; Encina, Gonzalo; Isaza, Carlos Alberto; Redal, Maria Ana; Larovere, Laura; Soria, Nestor Walter; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Castaneda-Hernandez, Gilberto; Lopez-Cortes, Andres; Magno, Luiz Alexandre; Lopez, Marisol; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Rodeiro, Idania; Castro de Guerra, Dinorah; Teran, Enrique; Estevez-Carrizo, Francisco; Lares-Assef, Ismael

    2014-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics areas are currently emerging fields focused to manage pharmacotherapy that may prevent undertreatment while avoiding associated drug toxicity in patients. Large international differences in the awareness and in the use of pharmacogenomic testing are presumed, but not well assessed to date. In the present study we review the awareness of Latin American scientific community about pharmacogenomic testing and the perceived barriers for their clinical application. In order to that, we have compiled information from 9 countries of the region using a structured survey which is compared with surveys previously performed in USA and Spain. The most relevant group of barriers was related to the need for clear guidelines for the use of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice, followed by insufficient awareness about pharmacogenomics among clinicians and the absence of regulatory institutions that facilitate the use of pharmacogenetic tests. The higher ranked pairs were TPMT/thioguanine, TPMT/azathioprine, CYP2C9/warfarin, UGT1A1/irinotecan, CYP2D6/amitriptiline, CYP2C19/citalopram and CYP2D6/clozapine. The lower ranked pairs were SLCO1B1/simvastatin, CYP2D6/metoprolol and GP6D/chloroquine. Compared with USA and Spanish surveys, 25 pairs were of lower importance for Latin American respondents. Only CYP2C19/esomeprazole, CYP2C19/omeprazole, CYP2C19/celecoxib and G6PD/dapsone were ranked higher or similarly to the USA and Spanish surveys. Integration of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice needs training of healthcare professionals and citizens, but in addition legal and regulatory guidelines and safeguards will be needed. We propose that the approach offered by pharmacogenomics should be incorporated into the decision-making plans in Latin America.

  19. De Novo Assembly, Gene Annotation and Marker Development Using Illumina Paired-End Transcriptome Sequences in Celery (Apium graveolens L.)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Nan; Wang, Qian; Shen, Huo-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Celery is an increasing popular vegetable species, but limited transcriptome and genomic data hinder the research to it. In addition, a lack of celery molecular markers limits the process of molecular genetic breeding. High-throughput transcriptome sequencing is an efficient method to generate a large transcriptome sequence dataset for gene discovery, molecular marker development and marker-assisted selection breeding. Principal Findings Celery transcriptomes from four tissues were sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 42,280 unigenes (average length of 502.6 bp) that represent the first transcriptome of the species. 78.43% and 48.93% of the unigenes had significant similarity with proteins in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) non-redundant protein database (Nr) and Swiss-Prot database respectively, and 10,473 (24.77%) unigenes were assigned to Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG). 21,126 (49.97%) unigenes harboring Interpro domains were annotated, in which 15,409 (36.45%) were assigned to Gene Ontology(GO) categories. Additionally, 7,478 unigenes were mapped onto 228 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG). Large numbers of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were indentified, and then the rate of successful amplication and polymorphism were investigated among 31 celery accessions. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of generating a large scale of sequence information by Illumina paired-end sequencing and efficient assembling. Our results provide a valuable resource for celery research. The developed molecular markers are the foundation of further genetic linkage analysis and gene localization, and they will be essential to accelerate the process of breeding. PMID:23469050

  20. [Variability of Cytochrome b Gene and Adjacent Section of Gene tRNA-Thr of Mitochondrial DNA in the Northern Mole Vole Ellobius talpinus (Mammalia, Rodentia)].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, A S; Lebedev, V S; Zykov, A E; Bakloushinskaya, I Yu

    2015-12-01

    The Northern mole vole E. talpinus, despite its wide distribution, is characterized by a stable karyotype (2n = NF = 54) and slight morphological polymorphism. We made a preliminary analysis of a mitochondrial DNA fragment to clarify the level of genetic variation and differentiation of E. talpinus. the complete cytochrome b gene (cyt b, 1143 bp) and a short part of its flanking gene tRNA-Thr (27 bp) were sequenced. We studied 16 specimens from eight localities, including Crimea, the Volga region, the Trans-Volga region, the Southern Urals, Western Siberia, and Eastern Turkmenistan. Mitotypes of E. talpinus were distributed on a ML dendrogram as four distinct clusters: the first (I) contains specimens from the Crimea, the second (II) combines individuals from the Volgograd region and the left bank of the Don River, the third (III) includes those from the Trans-Volga region, Southern Urals, the left bank of the Irtysh River, and Eastern Turkmenistan; the fourth (IV) are those from the right bank of the Irtysh River. These clusters were relatively distant from each other: the mean genetic distances (D) between them are 0.021-0.051. The Eastern mole vole E. tancrei differed from E. talpinus population groups 1.5-2 times more (D = 0.077-0.084) than the latter did among themselves. Such variations indirectly proved the unity of E. talpinus, despite its high intraspecific differentiation for the studied fragment of mitochondrial DNA. This differentiation apparently occurred because of the long isolation of E. talpinus population groups, which was due to geographic barriers, in particular, the large rivers that completely separate the species range meridionally (the Volga River, the Irtysh River). Sociality and underground lifestyle could accelerate the fixation of mutations in disjunct populations. The composition and distribution of intraspecific groups of E. talpinus, which were identified in analysis of the mitochondrial DNA fragment, do not coincide with the

  1. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin A.; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  2. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin A; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C; Streit, Wolfgang R; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  3. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin A.; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  4. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin A; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C; Streit, Wolfgang R; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  5. Cognitive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pairs with ADHD: Familial Clustering and Dopamine Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Rich, Erika Carpenter; Ishii, Janeen; McGough, James; McCracken, James; Nelson, Stanley; Smalley, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper examines familiality and candidate gene associations of cognitive measures as potential endophenotypes in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: The sample consists of 540 participants, aged 6 to 18, who were diagnosed with ADHD from 251 families recruited for a larger genetic study of ADHD. All members of…

  6. The srhSR gene pair from Staphylococcus aureus: genomic and proteomic approaches to the identification and characterization of gene function.

    PubMed

    Throup, J P; Zappacosta, F; Lunsford, R D; Annan, R S; Carr, S A; Lonsdale, J T; Bryant, A P; McDevitt, D; Rosenberg, M; Burnham, M K

    2001-08-28

    Systematic analysis of the entire two-component signal transduction system (TCSTS) gene complement of Staphylococcus aureus revealed the presence of a putative TCSTS (designated SrhSR) which shares considerable homology with the ResDE His-Asp phospho-relay pair of Bacillus subtilis. Disruption of the srhSR gene pair resulted in a dramatic reduction in growth of the srhSR mutant, when cultured under anaerobic conditions, and a 3-log attenuation in growth when analyzed in the murine pyelonephritis model. To further understand the role of SrhSR, differential display two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the cell-free extracts derived from the srhSR mutant and the corresponding wild type. Proteins shown to be differentially regulated were identified by mass spectrometry in combination with protein database searching. An srhSR deletion led to changes in the expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism and other metabolic processes including arginine catabolism, xanthine catabolism, and cell morphology. The impaired growth of the mutant under anaerobic conditions and the dramatic changes in proteins involved in energy metabolism shed light on the mechanisms used by S. aureus to grow anaerobically and indicate that the staphylococcal SrhSR system plays an important role in the regulation of energy transduction in response to changes in oxygen availability. The combination of proteomics, bio-informatics, and microbial genetics employed here represents a powerful set of techniques which can be applied to the study of bacterial gene function.

  7. The duplicated paired box protein 7 (pax7) genes differentially transcribed during Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shuang; Tan, Xungang; Li, Meijie; Sui, Yulei; Du, Shao Jun; You, Feng

    2015-11-01

    PAX are important regulators of developmental processes. PAX7 plays crucial roles in patterning of the dorsal central nervous system (CNS), neural crest (NC), and skeletal muscle. Here, we identified six spliced isoforms of pax7a and one pax7b and characterized their expression patterns. All of flounder Pax7a-1, Pax7a-2, Pax7a-3, and Pax7b contain a conserved paired domain (PD), an octapeptide motif (OP), and a paired type homeodomain (HD). However, the PD of Pax7a-4 and the HD of Pax7a-5 are not intact, and there is no HD in Pax7a-4 and Pax7a-6. pax7a and pax7b show distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns during embryogenesis. Whole-mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that the expression patterns of pax7a and pax7b are overlapping but distinguishable in the dorsal central nervous system. pax7a is expressed in most part of the brain and the neural tube, while pax7b is expressed exclusively in the diencephalon and the midbrain. In addition, pax7a is also expressed in the cranial NC and the trunk NC. RT-PCR results show that there were different expression patterns between the different isoforms. These results indicate subfunction partitioning of the duplicated pax7 genes. The duplicated pax7 may provide additional flexibility in fine-tuning neurogenesis and somitogenesis.

  8. Lethal osteogenesis imperfecta congenita and a 300 base pair gene deletion for an alpha 1(I)-like collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, F M; Cheah, K S; Nicholls, A C; Price, A B; Grosveld, F G

    1984-01-01

    Broad boned lethal osteogenesis imperfecta is a severely crippling disease of unknown cause. By means of recombinant DNA technology a 300 base pair deletion in an alpha 1(I)-like collagen gene was detected in six patients and four complete parent-child groups including patients with this disease. One from each set of the patients' clinically unaffected parents also carried the deletion, implying that affected patients were genetic compounds. The study suggests that prenatal diagnosis should be possible with 100% accuracy in subjects without the deletion and with 50% accuracy in those who possess it (who would be either heterozygous--normal, or affected with the disease). Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6419953

  9. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  10. Monitoring and Source Tracking of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Adjacent to Swine Production Facilities over a 3-Year Period▿

    PubMed Central

    Koike, S.; Krapac, I. G.; Oliver, H. D.; Yannarell, A. C.; Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R. I.; Mackie, R. I.

    2007-01-01

    To monitor the dissemination of resistance genes into the environment, we determined the occurrence of tetracycline resistance (Tcr) genes in groundwater underlying two swine confinement operations. Monitoring well networks (16 wells at site A and 6 wells at site C) were established around the lagoons at each facility. Groundwater (n = 124) and lagoon (n = 12) samples were collected from the two sites at six sampling times from 2000 through 2003. Total DNA was extracted, and PCR was used to detect seven Tcr genes [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(C), tet(H), and tet(Z)]. The concentration of Tcr genes was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. To confirm the Tcr gene source in groundwater, comparative analysis of tet(W) gene sequences was performed on groundwater and lagoon samples. All seven Tcr genes were continually detected in groundwater during the 3-year monitoring period at both sites. At site A, elevated detection frequency and concentration of Tcr genes were observed in the wells located down-gradient of the lagoon. Comparative analysis of tet(W) sequences revealed that the impacted groundwater contained gene sequences almost identical (99.8% identity) to those in the lagoon, but these genes were not found in background libraries. Novel sequence clusters and unique indigenous resistance gene pools were also found in the groundwater. Thus, antibiotic resistance genes in groundwater are affected by swine manure, but they are also part of the indigenous gene pool. PMID:17545324

  11. Transposon Mutagenesis Paired with Deep Sequencing of Caulobacter crescentus under Uranium Stress Reveals Genes Essential for Detoxification and Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. To gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFa and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. Our results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus. IMPORTANCE Caulobacter crescentus is an aerobic bacterium that is highly resistant to uranium (U) and has great potential to be used in U bioremediation, but its mechanisms of U resistance are poorly understood. We conducted a Tn-seq screen to identify genes specifically required for U resistance in C. crescentus. The genes that we identified have previously remained elusive using other omics approaches and thus

  12. The Enhancer of Split Complex and Adjacent Genes in the 96f Region of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Required for Segregation of Neural and Epidermal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schrons, H.; Knust, E.; Campos-Ortega, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] of Drosophila melanogaster is located in the 96F region of the third chromosome and comprises at least seven structurally related genes, HLH-mδ, HLH-mγ, HLH-mβ, HLH-m3, HLH-m5, HLH-m7 and E(spl). The functions of these genes are required during early neurogenesis to give neuroectodermal cells access to the epidermal pathway of development. Another gene in the 96F region, namely groucho, is also required for this process. However, groucho is not structurally related to, and appears to act independently of, the genes of the E(spl)-C; the possibility is discussed that groucho acts upstream to the E(spl)-C genes. Indirect evidence suggests that a neighboring transcription unit (m4) may also take part in the process. Of all these genes, only gro is essential; m4 is a dispensable gene, the deletion of which does not produce detectable morphogenetic abnormalities, and the genes of the E(spl)-C are to some extent redundant and can partially substitute for each other. This redundancy is probably due to the fact that the seven genes of the E(spl)-C encode highly conserved putative DNA-binding proteins of the bHLH family. The genes of the complex are interspersed among other genes which appear to be unrelated to the neuroepidermal lineage dichotomy. PMID:1427039

  13. Monitoring and source tracking of tetracycline resistance genes in lagoons and groundwater adjacent to swine production facilities over a 3-year period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koike, S.; Krapac, I.G.; Oliver, H.D.; Yannarell, A.C.; Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Mackie, R.I.

    2007-01-01

    To monitor the dissemination of resistance genes into the environment, we determined the occurrence of tetracycline resistance (Tcr) genes in groundwater underlying two swine confinement operations. Monitoring well networks (16 wells at site A and 6 wells at site C) were established around the lagoons at each facility. Groundwater (n = 124) and lagoon (n = 12) samples were collected from the two sites at six sampling times from 2000 through 2003. Total DNA was extracted, and PCR was used to detect seven Tcr genes [tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(C), tet(H), and tet(Z)]. The concentration of Tcr genes was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. To confirm the Tcr gene source in groundwater, comparative analysis of tet(W) gene sequences was performed on groundwater and lagoon samples. All seven Tcr genes were continually detected in groundwater during the 3-year monitoring period at both sites. At site A, elevated detection frequency and concentration of Tcr genes were observed in the wells located down-gradient of the lagoon. Comparative analysis of tet(W) sequences revealed that the impacted groundwater contained gene sequences almost identical (99.8% identity) to those in the lagoon, but these genes were not found in background libraries. Novel sequence clusters and unique indigenous resistance gene pools were also found in the groundwater. Thus, antibiotic resistance genes in groundwater are affected by swine manure, but they are also part of the indigenous gene pool. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Assortative human pair-bonding for partner ancestry and allelic variation of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Coren L.; Campbell, Benjamin C.; Dreber, Anna; Garcia, Justin R.; Lum, J. Koji

    2010-01-01

    The 7 repeat (7R) allele of the dopamine receptor D4 gene has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and risk taking. On the cross-population scale, 7R allele frequencies have been shown to be higher in populations with more of a history of long-term migrations. It has also been shown that the 7R allele is associated with individuals having multiple ancestries. Here, we conduct a replication of this latter finding with two independent samples. Measures of subjects’ ancestry are used to examine past reproductive bonds. The individuals’ history of interracial/ancestral dating and their feelings about this are also assessed. Tentative support for an association between multiple ancestries and the 7R allele was found. These results are dependent upon the method of questioning subjects about their ancestries, with only finer-scale measures of ancestry being associated with 7R. Interracial dating and feelings about interracial pairing were not related to the presence of the 7R allele. This study provides continued support for a role for the 7R allele in migration and/or mate choice patterns. However, replications and extensions of this study are needed and the way ancestry/race is assessed must be carefully considered. PMID:19713452

  15. Bioinformatic evidence for a stem-loop structure 5'-adjacent to the IGR-IRES and for an overlapping gene in the bee paralysis dicistroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Wang, Qing S; Jan, Eric; Atkins, John F

    2009-01-01

    The family Dicistroviridae (order Picornavirales) includes species that infect insects and other arthropods. These viruses have a linear positive-sense ssRNA genome of ~8-10 kb, which contains two long ORFs. The 5' ORF encodes the nonstructural polyprotein while the 3' ORF encodes the structural polyprotein. The dicistroviruses are noteworthy for the intergenic Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IGR-IRES) that mediates efficient translation initation on the 3' ORF without the requirement for initiator Met-tRNA. Acute bee paralysis virus, Israel acute paralysis virus of bees and Kashmir bee virus form a distinct subgroup within the Dicistroviridae family. In this brief report, we describe the bioinformatic discovery of a new, apparently coding, ORF in these viruses. The ORF overlaps the 5' end of the structural polyprotein coding sequence in the +1 reading frame. We also identify a potential 14-18 bp RNA stem-loop structure 5'-adjacent to the IGR-IRES. We discuss potential translation initiation mechanisms for the novel ORF in the context of the IGR-IRES and 5'-adjacent stem-loop. PMID:19895695

  16. The amdR product and a CCAAT-binding factor bind to adjacent, possibly overlapping DNA sequences in the promoter region of the Aspergillus nidulans amdS gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Heeswijck, R; Hynes, M J

    1991-01-01

    The amdS gene of Aspergillus nidulans is regulated by a number of positively acting regulatory genes which act additively and independently. Using gel mobility shift assays with crude nuclear extracts we show here that the product of one of these regulatory genes, the amdR gene, binds to DNA fragments containing part of the promoter region of the amdS gene. This confirms the earlier prediction from DNA sequence data that amdR encodes a DNA-binding protein containing a cysteine-rich 'zinc finger' motif. In addition we detected the binding of another previously unidentified protein to an adjacent, possibly overlapping region of the amdS 5' sequence at the site of a consensus 'CCAAT-box' sequence. Replacement of the CCAAT sequence with CCTTT abolished the binding of this protein which we have designated as an A. nidulans 'CCAAT-box' binding factor (AnCF). The 'CCAAT-box' sequence appears to be involved in determining the basal level of transcription of amdS (T.G.Littlejohn and M.J.H., unpublished data). This suggests that AnCF is a transcription factor, and that the 'CCAAT-box' sequences found in the promoters of some filamentous fungal genes function as binding sites for these factors, as in other eucaryotes. Images PMID:2041742

  17. The amdR product and a CCAAT-binding factor bind to adjacent, possibly overlapping DNA sequences in the promoter region of the Aspergillus nidulans amdS gene.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijck, R; Hynes, M J

    1991-05-25

    The amdS gene of Aspergillus nidulans is regulated by a number of positively acting regulatory genes which act additively and independently. Using gel mobility shift assays with crude nuclear extracts we show here that the product of one of these regulatory genes, the amdR gene, binds to DNA fragments containing part of the promoter region of the amdS gene. This confirms the earlier prediction from DNA sequence data that amdR encodes a DNA-binding protein containing a cysteine-rich 'zinc finger' motif. In addition we detected the binding of another previously unidentified protein to an adjacent, possibly overlapping region of the amdS 5' sequence at the site of a consensus 'CCAAT-box' sequence. Replacement of the CCAAT sequence with CCTTT abolished the binding of this protein which we have designated as an A. nidulans 'CCAAT-box' binding factor (AnCF). The 'CCAAT-box' sequence appears to be involved in determining the basal level of transcription of amdS (T.G. Littlejohn and M.J.H., unpublished data). This suggests that AnCF is a transcription factor, and that the 'CCAAT-box' sequences found in the promoters of some filamentous fungal genes function as binding sites for these factors, as in other eucaryotes.

  18. Toward a clinical practice guide in pharmacogenomics testing for functional polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Gene/drug pairs and barriers perceived in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Aldea, Ana; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Bernal, María L.; Borobia, Alberto M.; Borrás, Emma; Carballo, Miguel; Carvajal, Alfonso; García-Muñiz, José D.; Gervasini, Guillermo; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.; Lucena, María I.; Martínez, Carmen; Sacristán, José A.; Salado, Inés; Sinués, Blanca; Vicente, Jorge; García-Martín, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of biomarkers is an issue of great importance with regard to adverse drug reactions. The potential of pharmacogenomic biomarkers has been extensively investigated in recent years. However, several barriers to implementing the use of pharmacogenomics testing exist. We conducted a survey among members of the Spanish Societies of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology to obtain information about the perception of such barriers and to compare the perceptions of participants about the relative importance of major gene/drug pairs. Of 11 potential barriers, the highest importance was attributed to lack of institutional support for pharmacogenomics testing, and to the issues related to the lack of guidelines. Of the proposed gene/drug pairs the highest importance was assigned to HLA-B/abacavir, UGT1A1/irinotecan, and CYP2D6/tamoxifen. In this perspective article, we compare the relative importance of 29 gene/drug pairs in the Spanish study with that of the same pairs in the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics study, and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to develop a guide for clinical practice in pharmacogenomics testing. PMID:23233861

  19. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with allelic deletions at 13q14 commonly have one intact RB1 gene: Evidence for a role of an adjacent locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, Y.; Grander, D.; Linder, S.; Einhorn, S.; Soederhall, S. ); Szekely, L. ); Juliusson, G.; Gahrton, G. )

    1993-09-15

    The authors have previously shown that 30% of patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) have hemizygous deletions of the retinoblastoma (RB1) gene at 13q14. RB1 gene deletions may thus participate in malignant transformation of B-CLL, but is it also possible that a neighboring gene on 13q is the relevant one. To answer this question the remaining RB1 allele of eight clones with hemizygous deletions was studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and immunofluorescense techniques. Cells from 10 patients without RB1 gene deletions were also studied by these methods. Lack of RB1 mRNA and RB protein expression was seen in leukemia cells from one of the patients. All other cases were found to be normal with regard to immunofluorescense, RT-PCR, and SSCP analysis, indicating at least one functional RB1 allele and supporting the importance of another gene in the 13q14 deletions. The authors then performed extended Southern blot analysis of the 13q region, using probes for 10 different loci. In 14 of 31 CLL clones (45%), deletions of a region telomeric to the RB1 gene (D13S25) were observed. In 4 of the cases the deletions were homozygous. Hemizygous deletions of the RB1 gene were observed in 11 of these patients and in one of the patients without D13S25 deletions. These data thus indicate that a gene(s) telomeric to RB1 is involved in the malignant transformation of CLL clones and that deletions of this region are a common event in this disease. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Paired box gene 2 is associated with estrogen receptor α in ovarian serous tumors: Potential theory basis for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Ma, Haifen

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Paired box gene (PAX)2 is activated by estradiol via estrogen receptor (ER)α in breast and endometrial cancer. The expression of PAX2 was restricted to ovarian serous tumors and only one case was positive in borderline mucinous tumor in our previous study. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was performed to assess the expression of ERα in 58 cases of ovarian serous tumors, including 30 serous cystadenomas, 16 borderline serous cystadenomas, 12 serous carcinomas and 67 cases of ovarian mucinous tumors, including 29 mucinous cystadenoma, 23 borderline mucinous cystadenoma and 15 mucinous carcinoma, which were the same specimens with detection of PAX2 expression. The results demonstrated that ERα was expressed in 10% (3/30) of serous cystadenomas, 62.5% (10/16) borderline serous cystadenomas and 66.7% (8/12) serous carcinomas. The expression of ERα in borderline serous cystadenomas and serous carcinomas were significantly higher compared with that in serous cystadenomas (P<0.01). ERα was detected in 3.4% (1/29) mucinous cystadenoma, 26.1% (6/23) borderline mucinous cystadenoma and only 6.7% (1/15) mucinous carcinoma. Furthermore, a scatter plot of the expression of PAX2 and ERα revealed a linear correlation between them in ovarian serous tumors (P<0.0001). With few positive results, no correlation was determined in ovarian mucinous tumors. It was demonstrated that PAX2 is associated with ERα in ovarian serous tumors, and this may become a potential theory basis for targeted therapy for ovarian serous tumors. Further research is required to determine how PAX2 and ERα work together, and the role of targeted therapy in ovarian serous tumors. PMID:27446571

  1. A four base pair deletion 5' to the A gamma T gene is associated not only with decreased expression of the A gamma T-globin gene, but also of the G gamma-globin gene in cis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M B; Adams, J G; Steinberg, M H; Winter, W P

    1994-12-01

    A four base pair deletion 5' to A gamma T-globin gene at positions -222 to -225 has been reported to reduce the expression of this gene. To evaluate the prevalence and effect of this deletion, PCR-based methods were employed. The deletion had a gene frequency of 0.06 in a sample of African-American individuals with sickle cell trait, 0.18 in adult African-Americans with normal Hb AA, and 0.36 in caucasians. Seventy cord blood samples from African-American newborns with Hb AA were evaluated by both HPLC and PCR. The frequency of the A gamma T allele was 0.13. The A gamma T-globin chain was always present in a lower proportion than the A gamma I allele (70% of A gamma I), but the percentage of A gamma-globin was the same whether or not A gamma T was present. The total percentage of Hb F, however, was significantly lower in the group with the A gamma T allele (77.1% vs. 87.4%, P < 0.01). These results indicate that the four base pair deletion is not only associated with reduced expression of the A gamma T allele, but also of the G gamma allele in cis, further suggesting a possible role of this region in the modulation of the expression of the linked gamma-globin genes.

  2. Organization of the horizontally transferred pheBA operon and its adjacent genes in the genomes of eight indigenous Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Peters, Maire; Tomikas, Ave; Nurk, Allan

    2004-11-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes encoding phenol degradation (pheBA) in the environment has been previously described. Complete or partial phe-operon was redetected in plasmids of several indigenous Pseudomonas strains isolated from the river water. The sequences of up- and downstream regions of the acquired phe-DNA in eight different plasmids were analyzed. In all cases, miniature insertional elements or putative transposase genes were found suggesting transposase dependent pheBA integration into plasmids. In three cases, an open reading frame encoding homologue to the transcription regulator protein (CatR) of the pheBA operon was determined. PMID:15518880

  3. Loss of Tc-arrow and canonical Wnt signaling alters posterior morphology and pair-rule gene expression in the short-germ insect, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Renata; Fischer, Tamara D; Brown, Susan J

    2009-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in posterior patterning in short-germ insects, including the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Bolognesi et al. Curr Biol 18:1624-1629, 2008b; Angelini and Kaufman Dev Biol 283:409-423, 2005; Miyawaki et al. Mech Dev 121:119-130, 2004). Specifically, depletion of Wnt ligands Tc-Wnt1 and Tc-WntD/8 produces Tribolium embryos lacking abdominal segments. Similar phenotypes are produced by depletion of Tc-porcupine (Tc-porc) or Tc-pangolin (Tc-pan), indicating that the signal is transmitted through the canonical Wnt pathway (Bolognesi et al. Curr Biol 18:1624-1629, 2008b). Here we show that RNAi for the receptor Tc-arrow produced similar truncated phenotypes, providing additional evidence supporting canonical signal transduction. Furthermore, since in Tribolium segments are defined sequentially by a pair-rule gene circuit that, when interrupted, produces truncated phenotypes (Choe et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:6560-6564, 2006), we investigated the relationship between loss of Wnt signaling and this pair-rule gene circuit. After depletion of the receptor Tc-arrow, expression of Tc-Wnt1 was noticeably absent from the growth zone, while Tc-WntD/8 was restricted to a single spot of expression in what remained of the posterior growth zone. The primary pair-rule genes Tc-runt (Tc-run) and Tc-even-skipped (Tc-eve) were expressed normally in the anterior segments, but were reduced to a single spot in the remnants of the posterior growth zone. Thus, expression of pair-rule genes and Tc-WntD/8 are similarly affected by depletion of Wnt signal and disruption of the posterior growth zone. PMID:19705150

  4. Loss of Tc-arrow and canonical Wnt signaling alters posterior morphology and pair-rule gene expression in the short-germ insect, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Renata; Fischer, Tamara D; Brown, Susan J

    2009-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in posterior patterning in short-germ insects, including the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Bolognesi et al. Curr Biol 18:1624-1629, 2008b; Angelini and Kaufman Dev Biol 283:409-423, 2005; Miyawaki et al. Mech Dev 121:119-130, 2004). Specifically, depletion of Wnt ligands Tc-Wnt1 and Tc-WntD/8 produces Tribolium embryos lacking abdominal segments. Similar phenotypes are produced by depletion of Tc-porcupine (Tc-porc) or Tc-pangolin (Tc-pan), indicating that the signal is transmitted through the canonical Wnt pathway (Bolognesi et al. Curr Biol 18:1624-1629, 2008b). Here we show that RNAi for the receptor Tc-arrow produced similar truncated phenotypes, providing additional evidence supporting canonical signal transduction. Furthermore, since in Tribolium segments are defined sequentially by a pair-rule gene circuit that, when interrupted, produces truncated phenotypes (Choe et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:6560-6564, 2006), we investigated the relationship between loss of Wnt signaling and this pair-rule gene circuit. After depletion of the receptor Tc-arrow, expression of Tc-Wnt1 was noticeably absent from the growth zone, while Tc-WntD/8 was restricted to a single spot of expression in what remained of the posterior growth zone. The primary pair-rule genes Tc-runt (Tc-run) and Tc-even-skipped (Tc-eve) were expressed normally in the anterior segments, but were reduced to a single spot in the remnants of the posterior growth zone. Thus, expression of pair-rule genes and Tc-WntD/8 are similarly affected by depletion of Wnt signal and disruption of the posterior growth zone.

  5. Association of ADH and ALDH Genes With Alcohol Dependence in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence (IASPSAD) Sample

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Kalsi, Gursharan; Prescott, Carol A.; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Goldman, David; van den Oord, Edwin J.; Alexander, Jeffry; Jiang, Cizhong; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Patterson, Diana G.; Walsh, Dermot; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Riley, Brien P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The genes coding for ethanol metabolism enzymes [alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)] have been widely studied for their influence on the risk to develop alcohol dependence (AD). However, the relation between polymorphisms of these metabolism genes and AD in Caucasian subjects has not been clearly established. The present study examined evidence for the association of alcohol metabolism genes with AD in the Irish Affected Sib Pair Study of alcohol dependence. Methods: We conducted a case–control association study with 575 independent subjects who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, AD diagnosis and 530 controls. A total of 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the seven ADH (ADH1-7) and two ALDH genes (ALDH1A1 and ALDH2) were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate protocols. Several statistical procedures were implemented to control for false discoveries. Results: All markers with minor allele frequency greater than 0.01 were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Numerous SNPs in ADH genes showed association with AD, including one marker in the coding region of ADH1C (rs1693482 in exon6, Ile271Gln). Haplotypic association was observed in the ADH5 and ADH1C genes, and in a long haplotype block formed by the ADH1A and ADH1B loci. We detected two significant interactions between pairs of markers in intron 6 of ADH6 and intron 12 of ALDH2 (p = 5 × 10−5), and 5′ of both ADH4 and ADH1A (p = 2 × 10−4). Conclusion: We found evidence for the association of several ADH genes with AD in a sample of Western European origin. The significant interaction effects between markers in ADH and ALDH genes suggest possible epistatic roles between alcohol metabolic enzymes in the risk for AD. PMID:18331377

  6. Genome-specific differential gene expressions in resynthesized Brassica allotetraploids from pair-wise crosses of three cultivated diploids revealed by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Pan, Qi; Cui, Cheng; Tan, Chen; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is popular for the speciation of angiosperms but the initial stage of allopolyploidization resulting from interspecific hybridization and genome duplication is associated with different extents of changes in genome structure and gene expressions. Herein, the transcriptomes detected by RNA-seq in resynthesized Brassica allotetraploids (Brassica juncea, AABB; B. napus, AACC; B. carinata, BBCC) from the pair-wise crosses of the same three diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC) were compared to reveal the patterns of gene expressions from progenitor genomes and the effects of different types of genome combinations and cytoplasm, upon the genome merger and duplication. From transcriptomic analyses for leaves and silique walls, extensive expression alterations were revealed in these resynthesized allotetraploids relative to their diploid progenitors, as well as during the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, for differential and transgressive gene expressions were variable in numbers and functions. Genes involved in glucosinolates and DNA methylation were transgressively up-regulated among most samples, suggesting that gene expression regulation was immediately established after allopolyploidization. The expression of ribosomal protein genes was also tissue-specific and showed a similar expression hierarchy of rRNA genes. The balance between the co-up and co-down regulation was observed between reciprocal B. napus with different types of the cytoplasm. Our results suggested that gene expression changes occurred after initial genome merger and such profound alterations might enhance the growth vigor and adaptability of Brassica allotetraploids.

  7. Genome-specific differential gene expressions in resynthesized Brassica allotetraploids from pair-wise crosses of three cultivated diploids revealed by RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; Pan, Qi; Cui, Cheng; Tan, Chen; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is popular for the speciation of angiosperms but the initial stage of allopolyploidization resulting from interspecific hybridization and genome duplication is associated with different extents of changes in genome structure and gene expressions. Herein, the transcriptomes detected by RNA-seq in resynthesized Brassica allotetraploids (Brassica juncea, AABB; B. napus, AACC; B. carinata, BBCC) from the pair-wise crosses of the same three diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC) were compared to reveal the patterns of gene expressions from progenitor genomes and the effects of different types of genome combinations and cytoplasm, upon the genome merger and duplication. From transcriptomic analyses for leaves and silique walls, extensive expression alterations were revealed in these resynthesized allotetraploids relative to their diploid progenitors, as well as during the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, for differential and transgressive gene expressions were variable in numbers and functions. Genes involved in glucosinolates and DNA methylation were transgressively up-regulated among most samples, suggesting that gene expression regulation was immediately established after allopolyploidization. The expression of ribosomal protein genes was also tissue-specific and showed a similar expression hierarchy of rRNA genes. The balance between the co-up and co-down regulation was observed between reciprocal B. napus with different types of the cytoplasm. Our results suggested that gene expression changes occurred after initial genome merger and such profound alterations might enhance the growth vigor and adaptability of Brassica allotetraploids. PMID:26583027

  8. Genome-specific differential gene expressions in resynthesized Brassica allotetraploids from pair-wise crosses of three cultivated diploids revealed by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Pan, Qi; Cui, Cheng; Tan, Chen; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is popular for the speciation of angiosperms but the initial stage of allopolyploidization resulting from interspecific hybridization and genome duplication is associated with different extents of changes in genome structure and gene expressions. Herein, the transcriptomes detected by RNA-seq in resynthesized Brassica allotetraploids (Brassica juncea, AABB; B. napus, AACC; B. carinata, BBCC) from the pair-wise crosses of the same three diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC) were compared to reveal the patterns of gene expressions from progenitor genomes and the effects of different types of genome combinations and cytoplasm, upon the genome merger and duplication. From transcriptomic analyses for leaves and silique walls, extensive expression alterations were revealed in these resynthesized allotetraploids relative to their diploid progenitors, as well as during the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, for differential and transgressive gene expressions were variable in numbers and functions. Genes involved in glucosinolates and DNA methylation were transgressively up-regulated among most samples, suggesting that gene expression regulation was immediately established after allopolyploidization. The expression of ribosomal protein genes was also tissue-specific and showed a similar expression hierarchy of rRNA genes. The balance between the co-up and co-down regulation was observed between reciprocal B. napus with different types of the cytoplasm. Our results suggested that gene expression changes occurred after initial genome merger and such profound alterations might enhance the growth vigor and adaptability of Brassica allotetraploids. PMID:26583027

  9. Genetic structure of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) in northern Japan and adjacent regions revealed by nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mineaki; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kawahara, Takayuki; Sugita, Hisashi; Saito, Hideyuki; Sabirov, Renat N

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) was studied across the natural range of the species, including two small isolated populations in south Sakhalin and Hayachine, by using six microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial gene sequences. We also analyzed P. jezoensis, a sympatric spruce in the range. Genetic diversity of P. glehnii was higher in central Hokkaido and the lowest in the Hayachine. Bayesian clustering and principal coordinate analysis by using the microsatellites indicated that the Hayachine was clearly distinct from other populations, implying that it had undergone strong genetic drift since the last glacial period. P. glehnii harbored four mitochondrial haplotypes, two of which were shared with P. jezoensis. One of the two was observed without geographical concentration, suggesting its derivation from ancestral polymorphism. Another was observed in south Sakhalin and in P. jezoensis across Sakhalin. The Bayesian clustering--by using four microsatellite loci, including P. jezoensis populations--indicated unambiguous species delimitation, but with possible admixture of P. jezoensis genes into P. glehnii in south Sakhalin, where P. glehnii is abundantly overwhelmed by P. jezoensis; this might explain the occurrence of introgression of the haplotype of P. jezoensis into P. glehnii.

  10. Mutual antagonism of the paired-type homeobox genes, vsx2 and dmbx1, regulates retinal progenitor cell cycle exit upstream of ccnd1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wong, Loksum; Power, Namita; Miles, Amanda; Tropepe, Vincent

    2015-06-15

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the transition between the proliferative and a post-mitotic state of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) is key to advancing our knowledge of retinal growth and maturation. In the present study we determined that during zebrafish embryonic retinal neurogenesis, two paired-type homeobox genes - vsx2 and dmbx1 - function in a mutually antagonistic manner. We demonstrate that vsx2 gene expression requires active Fgf signaling and that this in turn suppresses dmbx1 expression and maintains cells in an undifferentiated, proliferative RPC state. This vsx2-dependent RPC state can be prolonged cell-autonomously by knockdown of dmbx1, or it can be suppressed prematurely by the over-expression of dmbx1, which we show can inhibit vsx2 expression and lead to precocious neuronal differentiation. dmbx1 loss of function also results in altered expression of canonical cell cycle genes, and in particular up-regulation of ccnd1, which correlates with our previous finding of a prolonged RPC cell cycle. By knocking down ccnd1 and dmbx1 simultaneously, we show that RPCs can overcome this phenotype to exit the cell cycle on time and differentiate normally into retinal neurons. Collectively, our data provide novel insight into the mechanism that enables RPCs to exit the cell cycle through a previously unrecognized antagonistic interaction of two paired-type homeobox genes that are central regulators of an Fgf-vsx2-dmbx1-ccnd1 signaling axis.

  11. Mutations in Radial Spoke Head Protein Genes RSPH9 and RSPH4A Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Central-Microtubular-Pair Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, Victoria H.; Romio, Leila; Chodhari, Rahul; Hirst, Robert A.; de Castro, Sandra C.P.; Parker, Keith A.; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia; Emes, Richard D.; Wilson, Stephen W.; Wallis, Colin; Johnson, Colin A.; Herrera, Rene J.; Rutman, Andrew; Dixon, Mellisa; Shoemark, Amelia; Bush, Andrew; Hogg, Claire; Gardiner, R. Mark; Reish, Orit; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Purton, Saul; Chung, Eddie M.K.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited disorder arising from dysmotility of motile cilia and sperm. This is associated with a variety of ultrastructural defects of the cilia and sperm axoneme that affect movement, leading to clinical consequences on respiratory-tract mucociliary clearance and lung function, fertility, and left-right body-axis determination. We performed whole-genome SNP-based linkage analysis in seven consanguineous families with PCD and central-microtubular-pair abnormalities. This identified two loci, in two families with intermittent absence of the central-pair structure (chromosome 6p21.1, Zmax 6.7) and in five families with complete absence of the central pair (chromosome 6q22.1, Zmax 7.0). Mutations were subsequently identified in two positional candidate genes, RSPH9 on chromosome 6p21.1 and RSPH4A on chromosome 6q22.1. Haplotype analysis identified a common ancestral founder effect RSPH4A mutation present in UK-Pakistani pedigrees. Both RSPH9 and RSPH4A encode protein components of the axonemal radial spoke head. In situ hybridization of murine Rsph9 shows gene expression restricted to regions containing motile cilia. Investigation of the effect of knockdown or mutations of RSPH9 orthologs in zebrafish and Chlamydomonas indicate that radial spoke head proteins are important in maintaining normal movement in motile, “9+2”-structure cilia and flagella. This effect is rescued by reintroduction of gene expression for restoration of a normal beat pattern in zebrafish. Disturbance in function of these genes was not associated with defects in left-right axis determination in humans or zebrafish. PMID:19200523

  12. Mutations in radial spoke head protein genes RSPH9 and RSPH4A cause primary ciliary dyskinesia with central-microtubular-pair abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Castleman, Victoria H; Romio, Leila; Chodhari, Rahul; Hirst, Robert A; de Castro, Sandra C P; Parker, Keith A; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia; Emes, Richard D; Wilson, Stephen W; Wallis, Colin; Johnson, Colin A; Herrera, Rene J; Rutman, Andrew; Dixon, Mellisa; Shoemark, Amelia; Bush, Andrew; Hogg, Claire; Gardiner, R Mark; Reish, Orit; Greene, Nicholas D E; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Purton, Saul; Chung, Eddie M K; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2009-02-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited disorder arising from dysmotility of motile cilia and sperm. This is associated with a variety of ultrastructural defects of the cilia and sperm axoneme that affect movement, leading to clinical consequences on respiratory-tract mucociliary clearance and lung function, fertility, and left-right body-axis determination. We performed whole-genome SNP-based linkage analysis in seven consanguineous families with PCD and central-microtubular-pair abnormalities. This identified two loci, in two families with intermittent absence of the central-pair structure (chromosome 6p21.1, Zmax 6.7) and in five families with complete absence of the central pair (chromosome 6q22.1, Zmax 7.0). Mutations were subsequently identified in two positional candidate genes, RSPH9 on chromosome 6p21.1 and RSPH4A on chromosome 6q22.1. Haplotype analysis identified a common ancestral founder effect RSPH4A mutation present in UK-Pakistani pedigrees. Both RSPH9 and RSPH4A encode protein components of the axonemal radial spoke head. In situ hybridization of murine Rsph9 shows gene expression restricted to regions containing motile cilia. Investigation of the effect of knockdown or mutations of RSPH9 orthologs in zebrafish and Chlamydomonas indicate that radial spoke head proteins are important in maintaining normal movement in motile, "9+2"-structure cilia and flagella. This effect is rescued by reintroduction of gene expression for restoration of a normal beat pattern in zebrafish. Disturbance in function of these genes was not associated with defects in left-right axis determination in humans or zebrafish.

  13. Obesity induced by a pair-fed high fat sucrose diet: methylation and expression pattern of genes related to energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The expression of some genes controlling energy homeostasis could be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms that may play a role in body weight regulation. Thus, it is known that various nutritional factors affect DNA methylation. In order to assess whether the macronutrient composition of the diet could be related to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and with obesity development, we investigated the effects on methylation and expression patterns of two pair-fed isocaloric diets in rats: control (rich in starch) and HFS (rich in fat and sucrose). Results The pair-fed HFS diet induced higher weight gain and adiposity as compared to the controls as well as liver triglyceride accumulation and oxidative stress. Feeding the HFS diet impaired glucose tolerance and serum triglycerides and cholesterol. Liver glucokinase expression, a key glycolytic gene, remained unaltered, as well as the mRNA values of fatty acid synthase and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 beta subcomplex, 6 (NDUFB6) in liver and visceral adipocytes, which regulate lipogenesis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, respectively. Liver expression of hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (HADHB), a key gene of β-oxidation pathway, was higher in the HFS-fed animals. However, the methylation status of CpG islands in HADHB and glucokinase genes remained unchanged after feeding the HFS diet. Conclusions These results confirm that the distribution and type of macronutrients (starch vs. sucrose, and percent of fat) influence obesity onset and the associated metabolic complications. HFS diets produce obesity independently of total energy intake, although apparently no epigenetic (DNA methylation) changes accompanied the modifications observed in gene expression. PMID:20534152

  14. A Nest of LTR Retrotransposons Adjacent the Disease Resistance-Priming Gene NPR1 in Beta vulgaris L. U.S. Hybrid H20.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, David; Shao, Jonathan; Trimmer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    A nest of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons (RTRs), discovered by LTR_STRUC analysis, is near core genes encoding the NPR1 disease resistance-activating factor and a heat-shock-factor-(HSF-) like protein in sugarbeet hybrid US H20. SCHULTE, a 10 833 bp LTR retrotransposon, with 1372 bp LTRs that are 0.7% divergent, has two ORFs with unexpected introns but encoding a reverse transcriptase with rve and Rvt2 domains similar to Ty1/copia-type retrotransposons and a hypothetical protein. SCHULTE produced significant nucleotide BLAST alignments with repeat DNA elements from all four families of plants represented in the TIGR plant repeat database (PRD); the best nucleotide sequence alignment was to ToRTL1 in Lycopersicon esculentum. A second sugarbeet LTR retrotransposon, SCHMIDT, 11 565 bp in length, has 2561 bp LTRs that share 100% identity with each other and share 98-99% nucleotide sequence identity over 10% of their length with DRVs, a family of highly repetitive, relatively small DNA sequences that are widely dispersed over the sugarbeet genome. SCHMIDT encodes a complete gypsy-like polyprotein in a single ORF. Analysis using LTR_STRUC of an in silico deletion of both of the above two LTR retrotransposons found that SCHULTE and SCHMIDT had inserted within an older LTR retrotransposon, resulting in a nest that is only about 10 Kb upstream of NPR1 in sugarbeet hybrid US H20. PMID:19390694

  15. Antibiotic resistance gene abundances associated with antibiotics and heavy metals in animal manures and agricultural soils adjacent to feedlots in Shanghai; China.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiuling; Shen, Qunhui; Liu, Fang; Ma, Jing; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yuanlong; Wu, Minghong

    2012-10-15

    Eight antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), 7 heavy metals, and 6 antibiotics were quantified in manures and soils collected from multiple feedlots in Shanghai. The samples were analyzed to determine if ARG abundances were associated with heavy metal concentration and independent of antibiotics. The results revealed the presence of chloramphenicol, sulfonamides and tetracyclines at concentration ranges of 3.27-17.85, 5.85-33.37 and 4.54-24.66 mg kg(-1), respectively. Typical heavy metals, such as Cu, Zn, and As, were detected at concentration ranges of 32.3-730.1, 75.9-4333.8, and 2.6-617.2 mg kg(-1). All ARGs tested were detected in the collected samples except tetB(P), which was absent in animal manures. Overall, sulfonamide ARGs were more abundant than tetracycline ARGs. Except for sulII, only a weak positive correlation was found between ARGs and their corresponding antibiotics. On the contrary, significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were found between some ARGs and typical heavy metals. For example, sulA and sulIII were strongly correlated with levels of Cu, Zn and Hg. The data demonstrated that the presence of ARGs was relatively independent of their respective antibiotic inducer. In addition to antibiotics, toxic heavy metals, such as Hg, Cu, and Zn, exerted a strong selection pressure and acted as complementary factors for ARG abundance.

  16. Transcriptome interrogation of human myometrium identifies differentially expressed sense-antisense pairs of protein-coding and long non-coding RNA genes in spontaneous labor at term

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Tarca, Adi; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Jia, Hui; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kalita, Cynthia A.; Cai, Juan; Yeo, Lami; Lipovich, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms responsible for normal and abnormal parturition are poorly understood. Myometrial activation leading to regular uterine contractions is a key component of labor. Dysfunctional labor (arrest of dilatation and/or descent) is a leading indication for cesarean delivery. Compelling evidence suggests that most of these disorders are functional in nature, and not the result of cephalopelvic disproportion. The methodology and the datasets afforded by the post-genomic era provide novel opportunities to understand and target gene functions in these disorders. In 2012, the ENCODE Consortium elucidated the extraordinary abundance and functional complexity of long non-coding RNA genes in the human genome. The purpose of the study was to identify differentially expressed long non-coding RNA genes in human myometrium in women in spontaneous labor at term. Materials and Methods Myometrium was obtained from women undergoing cesarean deliveries who were not in labor (n=19) and women in spontaneous labor at term (n=20). RNA was extracted and profiled using an Illumina® microarray platform. The analysis of the protein coding genes from this study has been previously reported. Here, we have used computational approaches to bound the extent of long non-coding RNA representation on this platform, and to identify co-differentially expressed and correlated pairs of long non-coding RNA genes and protein-coding genes sharing the same genomic loci. Results Upon considering more than 18,498 distinct lncRNA genes compiled nonredundantly from public experimental data sources, and interrogating 2,634 that matched Illumina microarray probes, we identified co-differential expression and correlation at two genomic loci that contain coding-lncRNA gene pairs: SOCS2-AK054607 and LMCD1-NR_024065 in women in spontaneous labor at term. This co-differential expression and correlation was validated by qRT-PCR, an independent experimental method. Intriguingly, one of the two lnc

  17. A new mutation in the CFTR gene, composed of two adjacent DNA alterations, is a common cause of cystic fibrosis among Georgian Jews

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, T.; Berkun, Y.; Yahav, Y.; Augarten, A.; Bashan, N.; Rivlin, Y.; Gazit, E.; Sereth, H.; Kerem, E.; Kerem, B.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Five Jewish cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from four unrelated families, all of whom emigrated from what was Soviet Georgia were studied. The parents in two of the families are first-degree relatives. The clinical phenotype of the patients seems to be associated with a severe disease, as reflected by early age of diagnosis (before the age of 1 year), high sweat chloride level (105-140 meq/liter), and pancreatic insufficiency. The pulmonary function and nutritional status of these patients are normal. These patients were tested for [Delta]F508 by analysis of heteroduplex DNA (4). None of the CF chromosomes was found to carry the [Delta]F508 mutation. Subsequently, PCR-amplified genomic DNA samples from two of these patients were subjected to direct sequencing (5) of regions containing exons 7, 9-12, an 19-21 of the CF gene using the oligonucleotides previously described (3, 6). In exon 7, two DNA alterations 3 bp apart were identified in both patients. The first alteration in a C [yields] A transversion at nucleotide position 1207, changing the glutamine codon to lysine (Q359K). The second DNA alteration is a C [yields] A transversion at nucleotide position 1211 changing the threonine codon to lysine (T360K). The two DNA alterations cause nonconservative amino acid substitutions, changing each of the two uncharged polar amino acids (glutamine and threonine) to a basic amino acid, lysine. The Q359K substitution destroys an Rsal recognition site and can be detected by PCR amplification of exon 7 using 7i-5 and 7i-3 oligonucleotides (6), followed by Rsal digestion and electrophoresis on 10% polyacrylamide gels. Two Rsal sites are found in a normal amplified DNA fragment, resulting in three restriction fragments of 292, 68, and 50 bp. Digestion of the PCR fragment of an individual homozygous for this substitution resulted in only two fragments of 342 and 68 bp. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  18. A genetic linkage map of mouse chromosome 2 extending from thrombospondin to paired box gene 1, including the H3 minor histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zuberi, A.R.; Nguyen, H.Q.; Auman, H.J.

    1996-04-01

    The classical minor histocompatibility 3(H3) locus was originally defined by the phenotype of skin graft rejection, which is complex genetic trait. H3 is now known to be a gene complex comprised of a minimum of two functionally interdependent alloantigen-encoding loci, H3a and H3b. H3a encodes a peptide recognized by cytotoxic T cells, and H3b encodes a peptide that stimulates helper T cells. The H3 complex also contains the {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin gene (B2m), and polymorphisms in B2m contribute to the tissue rejection phenotype. We describe a high-density genetic linkage map of a 16-cM region of mouse Chromosome 2 from thromospondin (Thbs1) to paired box gene 1 (Pax1). This genetic map includes H3a, H3b, and B2m. Other genes and anonymous loci have also been placed on the map. H3a maps between D2Mit444 and B2m in close vicinity to several known genes. H3b maps 12 cM distal to H3a, and the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 2 gene (Pcsk2; formerly Nec2) cosegregates with H3b in a high-resolution backcross panel. The H3 complex spans a region that shows conserved synteny to human chromosomes 15q, 2q, and 20p. 59 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The genetic architecture of reproductive isolation during speciation-with-gene-flow in lake whitefish species pairs assessed by RAD sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Pavey, Scott A; Normandeau, Eric; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-09-01

    During speciation-with-gene-flow, effective migration varies across the genome as a function of several factors, including proximity of selected loci, recombination rate, strength of selection, and number of selected loci. Genome scans may provide better empirical understanding of the genome-wide patterns of genetic differentiation, especially if the variance due to the previously mentioned factors is partitioned. In North American lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), glacial lineages that diverged in allopatry about 60,000 years ago and came into contact 12,000 years ago have independently evolved in several lakes into two sympatric species pairs (a normal benthic and a dwarf limnetic). Variable degrees of reproductive isolation between species pairs across lakes offer a continuum of genetic and phenotypic divergence associated with adaptation to distinct ecological niches. To disentangle the complex array of genetically based barriers that locally reduce the effective migration rate between whitefish species pairs, we compared genome-wide patterns of divergence across five lakes distributed along this divergence continuum. Using restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, we combined genetic mapping and population genetics approaches to identify genomic regions resistant to introgression and derive empirical measures of the barrier strength as a function of recombination distance. We found that the size of the genomic islands of differentiation was influenced by the joint effects of linkage disequilibrium maintained by selection on many loci, the strength of ecological niche divergence, as well as demographic characteristics unique to each lake. Partial parallelism in divergent genomic regions likely reflected the combined effects of polygenic adaptation from standing variation and independent changes in the genetic architecture of postzygotic isolation. This study illustrates how integrating genetic mapping and population genomics of multiple sympatric

  20. Hormone Replacement Therapy Associated White Blood Cell DNA Methylation and Gene Expression are Associated With Within-Pair Differences of Body Adiposity and Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Aileen; Pöllänen, Eija; Ismail, Khadeeja; Sipilä, Sarianna; Mikkola, Tuija M; Berglund, Eva; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kovanen, Vuokko; Ollikainen, Miina

    2015-12-01

    The loss of estrogen during menopause causes changes in the female body, with wide-ranging effects on health. Estrogen-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) leads to a relief of typical menopausal symptoms, benefits bone and muscle health, and is associated with tissue-specific gene expression profiles. As gene expression is controlled by epigenetic factors (including DNA methylation), many of which are environmentally sensitive, it is plausible that at least part of the HRT-associated gene expression is due to changes in DNA methylation profile. We investigated genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression patterns of white blood cells (WBCs) and their associations with body composition, including muscle and bone measures of monozygotic (MZ) female twin pairs discordant for HRT. We identified 7,855 nominally significant differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with 4,044 genes. Of the genes with DMRs, five (ACBA1, CCL5, FASLG, PPP2R2B, and UHRF1) were also differentially expressed. All have been previously associated with HRT or estrogenic regulation, but not with HRT-associated DNA methylation. All five genes were associated with bone mineral content (BMC), and ABCA1, FASLG, and UHRF1 were also associated with body adiposity. Our study is the first to show that HRT associates with genome-wide DNA methylation alterations in WBCs. Moreover, we show that five differentially expressed genes with DMRs associate with clinical measures, including body fat percentage, lean body mass, bone mass, and blood lipids. Our results indicate that at least part of the known beneficial HRT effects on body composition and bone mass may be regulated by DNA methylation associated alterations in gene expression in circulating WBCs.

  1. Novel single base-pair deletion in exon 1 of XK gene leading to McLeod syndrome with chorea, muscle wasting, peripheral neuropathy, acanthocytosis and haemolysis.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Bettencourt, Conceição; Kioumi, Anna; Tsiptsios, Iakovos; Tychalas, Athanasios; Evaggelia, Markousi; George, Kaltsounis; Makris, Vasileios; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry

    2014-04-15

    We present a 70-year-old male patient of Greek origin with choreatic movements of the tongue and face, lower limb muscle weakness, peripheral neuropathy, elevated creatinephosphokinase (CPK), acanthocytosis and haemolysis in the absence of Kell RBC antigens with an additional Factor IX-deficiency. Genetic testing for mutations in the three exons of the XK gene revealed a previously unreported hemizygous single base-pair frameshift deletion at exon 1 (c.229delC, p.Leu80fs). In conclusion, we hereby describe a rare phenotype of a patient with McLeod syndrome which was discovered coincidentally during routine blood group testing and consecutively genetically confirmed.

  2. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  3. Quantitative disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris involves an Arabidopsis immune receptor pair and a gene of unknown function.

    PubMed

    Debieu, Marilyne; Huard-Chauveau, Carine; Genissel, Anne; Roux, Fabrice; Roby, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Although quantitative disease resistance (QDR) is a durable and broad-spectrum form of resistance in plants, the identification of the genes underlying QDR is still in its infancy. RKS1 (Resistance related KinaSe1) has been reported recently to confer QDR in Arabidopsis thaliana to most but not all races of the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). We therefore explored the genetic bases of QDR in A. thaliana to diverse races of X. campestris (Xc). A nested genome-wide association mapping approach was used to finely map the genomic regions associated with QDR to Xcc12824 (race 2) and XccCFBP6943 (race 6). To identify the gene(s) implicated in QDR, insertional mutants (T-DNA) were selected for the candidate genes and phenotyped in response to Xc. We identified two major QTLs that confer resistance specifically to Xcc12824 and XccCFBP6943. Although QDR to Xcc12824 is conferred by At5g22540 encoding for a protein of unknown function, QDR to XccCFBP6943 involves the well-known immune receptor pair RRS1/RPS4. In addition to RKS1, this study reveals that three genes are involved in resistance to Xc with strikingly different ranges of specificity, suggesting that QDR to Xc involves a complex network integrating multiple response pathways triggered by distinct pathogen molecular determinants.

  4. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind. PMID:20178631

  5. Pick a Pair. Pancake Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2005-01-01

    Cold February weather and pancakes are a traditional pairing. Pancake Day began as a way to eat up the foods that were abstained from in Lent--traditionally meat, fat, eggs and dairy products. The best-known pancake event is The Pancake Day Race in Buckinghamshire, England, which has been run since 1445. This column describes pairs of books that…

  6. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  7. Unusual Properties of Regulatory DNA from the Drosophila Engrailed Gene: Three ``pairing-Sensitive'' Sites within a 1.6-Kb Region

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 2-kb fragment of engrailed DNA can suppress expression of a linked marker gene, white, in the P element vector CaSpeR. This suppression is dependent on the presence of two copies of engrailed DNA-containing P elements (P[en]) in proximity in the Drosophila genome (either in cis or in trans). In this study, the 2-kb fragment was dissected and found to contain three fragments of DNA which could mediate white suppression [called ``pairing-sensitive sites'' (PS)]. A PS site was also identified in regulatory DNA from the Drosophila escargot gene. The eye colors of six different P[en] insertions in the escargot gene suggest an interaction between P[en]-encoded and genome-encoded PS sites. I hypothesize that white gene expression from P[en] is repressed by the formation of a protein complex which is initiated at the engrailed PS sites and also requires interactions with flanking genomic DNA. Genes were sought which influence the function of PS sites. Mutations in some Polycomb and trithorax group genes were found to affect the eye color from some P[en] insertion sites. However, different mutations affected expression from different P[en] insertion sites and no one mutation was found to affect expression from all P[en] insertion sites examined. These results suggest that white expression from P[en] is not directly regulated by members of the Polycomb and trithorax group genes, but in some cases can be influenced by them. I propose that engrailed PS sites normally act to promote interactions between distantly located engrailed regulatory sites and the engrailed promoter. PMID:8005412

  8. De novo assembly, gene annotation, and simple sequence repeat marker development using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences in the pearl oyster Pinctada maxima.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuewen; Lei, Qiannan; Tian, Qunli; Xie, Shaohe; Du, Xiaodong; Li, Junhui; Wang, Liqun; Xiong, Yuanxin

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the mantle transcriptome of pearl oyster Pinctada maxima and developed EST-SSR markers using Illumina HiSeq 2000 paired-end sequencing technology. A total of 49,500,748 raw reads were generated. De novo assembly generated 108,704 unigenes with an average length of 407 bp. Sequence similarity search with known proteins or nucleotides revealed that 30,200 (27.78%) and 25,824 (23.76%) consensus sequences were homologous with the sequences in the non-redundant protein and Swiss-Prot databases, respectively, and that 19,701 (18.12%) of these unigenes were possibly involved in approximately 234 known signaling pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. Ninety one biomineralization-related unigenes were detected. In a cultured stock, 1764 simple sequence repeats were identified and 56 primer pairs were randomly selected and tested. The rate of successful amplification was 68.3%. The developed molecular markers are helpful for further studies on genetic linkage analysis, gene localization, and quantitative trait loci mapping.

  9. Computer-aided codon-pairs deoptimization of the major envelope GP5 gene attenuates porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Zhao; Opriessnig, Tanja; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Zhou, Lei; Cao, Dianjun; Cao, Qian; Yang, Hanchun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic attenuated virus engineering (SAVE) is an emerging technology that enables rapid attenuation of viruses. In this study, by using SAVE we demonstrated rapid attenuation of an arterivirus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The major envelope GP5 gene of PRRSV was codon-pair deoptimized aided by a computer algorithm. The codon-pair deoptimized virus, designated as SAVE5 with a deoptimized GP5 gene, was successfully rescued in vitro. The SAVE5 virus replicated at a lower level in vitro with a significant decrease of GP5 protein expression compared to the wild-type PRRSV VR2385 virus. Pigs experimentally infected with the SAVE5 virus had significantly lower viremia level up to 14 days post-infection as well as significantly reduced gross and histological lung lesions when compared to wild-type PRRSV VR2385 virus-infected pigs, indicating the attenuation of the SAVE5 virus. This study proved the feasibility of rapidly attenuating PRRSV by SAVE.

  10. X-Linked juvenile retinoschisis associated with a 4-base pair insertion at codon 55 of the XLRS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, M; Trese, M T; Shastry, B S

    2000-02-16

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) is a bilateral vitreoretinal disorder with no known cure. The gene responsible for the disease was recently isolated by positional cloning methods and a spectrum of mutations has been described in families with RS pathology. In this report, we screened six sporadic cases of RS for mutations in the RS gene to understand the etiology of isolated cases. Our extensive studies revealed a novel 4 bp insertion in one family and the remaining families did not show mutations in the RS gene. This mutation altered the reading frame including codon 55 resulting in nine aberrant amino acid residues. The unaffected mother did not contain this mutation. Additionally, it was not found in 60 normal control chromosomes, suggesting that the insertion mutation is disease related in the family analyzed. PMID:10679210

  11. X-Linked juvenile retinoschisis associated with a 4-base pair insertion at codon 55 of the XLRS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, M; Trese, M T; Shastry, B S

    2000-02-16

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) is a bilateral vitreoretinal disorder with no known cure. The gene responsible for the disease was recently isolated by positional cloning methods and a spectrum of mutations has been described in families with RS pathology. In this report, we screened six sporadic cases of RS for mutations in the RS gene to understand the etiology of isolated cases. Our extensive studies revealed a novel 4 bp insertion in one family and the remaining families did not show mutations in the RS gene. This mutation altered the reading frame including codon 55 resulting in nine aberrant amino acid residues. The unaffected mother did not contain this mutation. Additionally, it was not found in 60 normal control chromosomes, suggesting that the insertion mutation is disease related in the family analyzed.

  12. The Paralogous Pairs of Genes Involved in Clavulanic Acid and Clavam Metabolite Biosynthesis Are Differently Regulated in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Tahlan, Kapil; Anders, Cecilia; Jensen, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Carboxyethylarginine synthase, encoded by the paralogous ceaS1 and ceaS2 genes, catalyzes the first reaction in the shared biosynthetic pathway leading to clavulanic acid and the other clavam metabolites in Streptomyces clavuligerus. The nutritional regulation of ceaS1 and ceaS2 expression was analyzed by reverse transcriptase PCR and by the use of the enhanced green fluorescent protein-encoding gene (egfp) as a reporter. ceaS1 was transcribed in complex soy medium only, whereas ceaS2 was transcribed in both soy and defined starch-asparagine (SA) media. The transcriptional start points of the two genes were also mapped to a C residue 98 bp upstream of ceaS1 and a G residue 51 bp upstream of the ceaS2 start codon by S1 nuclease protection and primer extension analyses. Furthermore, transcriptional mapping of the genes encoding the beta-lactam synthetase (bls1) and proclavaminate amidinohydrolase (pah1) isoenzymes from the paralogue gene cluster indicated that a single polycistronic transcript of ∼4.9 kb includes ceaS1, bls1, and pah1. The expression of ceaS1 and ceaS2 in a mutant strain defective in the regulatory protein CcaR was also examined. ceaS1 transcription was not affected in the ccaR mutant, whereas that of ceaS2 was greatly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Overall, our results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in regulating the expression of ceaS1 and ceaS2, and presumably also of other paralogous genes that encode proteins involved in the early stages of clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:15342599

  13. The role of specialized transcription factories in chromosome pairing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Cook, Peter R

    2008-11-01

    Homologous chromosomes can pair in somatic and germ line cells, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how they do so. One popular class of models involves base-pairing between DNA strands catalyzed by recombination proteins, but pairing still occurs in mutants lacking the relevant functional proteins. We discuss an alternative based on two observations: transcription occurs in factories that specialize in transcribing specific gene sub-sets, and chromosomes only pair when transcribed. Each chromosome in the haploid set has a unique array of transcription units strung along its length; we suggest each is organized into clouds of loops tethered to specialized factories. Only homologs share similar strings of clouds and factories. Pairing begins when a promoter on one chromosome initiates in the homologous and specialized factory organized mainly by its homologous partner. This transiently ties the two homologs together, to increase the chances that adjacent promoters initiate in their homologous factories and that the two homologs will be zipped together. Then, interactions between promoters and RNA polymerases in the factories mediate pairing.

  14. Germline cell death is inhibited by P-element insertions disrupting the dcp-1/pita nested gene pair in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Laundrie, Bonni; Peterson, Jeanne S; Baum, Jason S; Chang, Jeffrey C; Fileppo, Dana; Thompson, Sharona R; McCall, Kimberly

    2003-12-01

    Germline cell death in Drosophila oogenesis is controlled by distinct signals. The death of nurse cells in late oogenesis is developmentally regulated, whereas the death of egg chambers during mid-oogenesis is induced by environmental stress or developmental abnormalities. P-element insertions in the caspase gene dcp-1 disrupt both dcp-1 and the outlying gene, pita, leading to lethality and defective nurse cell death in late oogenesis. By isolating single mutations in the two genes, we have found that the loss of both genes contributes to this ovary phenotype. Mutants of pita, which encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein, are homozygous lethal and show dumpless egg chambers and premature nurse cell death in germline clones. Early nurse cell death is not observed in the dcp-1/pita double mutants, suggesting that dcp-1+ activity is required for the mid-oogenesis cell death seen in pita mutants. dcp-1 mutants are viable and nurse cell death in late oogenesis occurs normally. However, starvation-induced germline cell death during mid-oogenesis is blocked, leading to a reduction and inappropriate nuclear localization of the active caspase Drice. These findings suggest that the combinatorial loss of pita and dcp-1 leads to the increased survival of abnormal egg chambers in mutants bearing the P-element alleles and that dcp-1 is essential for cell death during mid-oogenesis.

  15. The Transcriptional Regulator Rv0485 Modulates the Expression of a pe and ppe Gene Pair and Is Required for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Rachael M.; Goonesekera, Sunali D.; Bloom, Barry R.; Sampson, Samantha L.

    2009-01-01

    The pe and ppe genes are unique to mycobacteria and are widely speculated to play a role in tuberculosis pathogenesis. However, little is known about how expression of these genes is controlled. Elucidating the regulatory control of genes found exclusively in mycobacteria, such as the pe and ppe gene families, may be key to understanding the success of this pathogen. In this study, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to elucidate pe and ppe regulation. This resulted in the identification of Rv0485, a previously uncharacterized transcriptional regulator. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed that disruption of Rv0485 reduced the expression of the pe13 and ppe18 gene pair (Rv1195 and Rv1196), defined the Rv0485 regulon, and emphasized the lack of global regulation of pe and ppe genes. The in vivo phenotype of the Rv0485 transposon mutant strain (Rv0485::Tn) was investigated in the mouse model, where it was demonstrated that the mutation has minimal effect on bacterial organ burden. Despite this, disruption of Rv0485 allowed mice to survive for significantly longer, with substantially reduced lung pathology in comparison with mice infected with wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Infection of immune-deficient SCID mice with the Rv0485::Tn strain also resulted in extended survival times, suggesting that Rv0485 plays a role in modulation of innate immune responses. This is further supported by the finding that disruption of Rv0485 resulted in reduced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by infected murine macrophages. In summary, we have demonstrated that disruption of a previously uncharacterized transcriptional regulator, Rv0485, results in reduced expression of pe13 and ppe18 and attenuation of M. tuberculosis virulence. PMID:19651861

  16. GAS2 and GAS4, a Pair of Developmentally Regulated Genes Required for Spore Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Ragni, Enrico; Coluccio, Alison; Rolli, Eleonora; Rodriguez-Peña, José Manuel; Colasante, Gaia; Arroyo, Javier; Neiman, Aaron M.; Popolo, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The GAS multigene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is composed of five paralogs (GAS1 to GAS5). GAS1 is the only one of these genes that has been characterized to date. It encodes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein functioning as a β(1,3)-glucan elongase and required for proper cell wall assembly during vegetative growth. In this study, we characterize the roles of the GAS2 and GAS4 genes. These genes are expressed exclusively during sporulation. Their mRNA levels showed a peak at 7 h from induction of sporulation and then decreased. Gas2 and Gas4 proteins were detected and reached maximum levels between 8 and 10 h from induction of sporulation, a time roughly coincident with spore wall assembly. The double null gas2 gas4 diploid mutant showed a severe reduction in the efficiency of sporulation, an increased permeability of the spores to exogenous substances, and production of inviable spores, whereas the single gas2 and gas4 null diploids were similar to the parental strain. An analysis of spore ultrastructure indicated that the loss of Gas2 and Gas4 proteins affected the proper attachment of the glucan to the chitosan layer, probably as a consequence of the lack of coherence of the glucan layer. The ectopic expression of GAS2 and GAS4 genes in a gas1 null mutant revealed that these proteins are redundant versions of Gas1p specialized to function in a compartment at a pH value close to neutral. PMID:17189486

  17. Microphthalmia in Texel sheep is associated with a missense mutation in the paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3) gene.

    PubMed

    Becker, Doreen; Tetens, Jens; Brunner, Adrian; Bürstel, Daniela; Ganter, Martin; Kijas, James; Drögemüller, Cord

    2010-01-13

    Microphthalmia in sheep is an autosomal recessive inherited congenital anomaly found within the Texel breed. It is characterized by extremely small or absent eyes and affected lambs are absolutely blind. For the first time, we use a genome-wide ovine SNP array for positional cloning of a Mendelian trait in sheep. Genotyping 23 cases and 23 controls using Illumina's OvineSNP50 BeadChip allowed us to localize the causative mutation for microphthalmia to a 2.4 Mb interval on sheep chromosome 22 by association and homozygosity mapping. The PITX3 gene is located within this interval and encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor involved in vertebrate lens formation. An abnormal development of the lens vesicle was shown to be the primary event in ovine microphthalmia. Therefore, we considered PITX3 a positional and functional candidate gene. An ovine BAC clone was sequenced, and after full-length cDNA cloning the PITX3 gene was annotated. Here we show that the ovine microphthalmia phenotype is perfectly associated with a missense mutation (c.338G>C, p.R113P) in the evolutionary conserved homeodomain of PITX3. Selection against this candidate causative mutation can now be used to eliminate microphthalmia from Texel sheep in production systems. Furthermore, the identification of a naturally occurring PITX3 mutation offers the opportunity to use the Texel as a genetically characterized large animal model for human microphthalmia.

  18. Evolution of genes neighborhood within reconciled phylogenies: an ensemble approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Context The reconstruction of evolutionary scenarios for whole genomes in terms of genome rearrangements is a fundamental problem in evolutionary and comparative genomics. The DeCo algorithm, recently introduced by Bérard et al., computes parsimonious evolutionary scenarios for gene adjacencies, from pairs of reconciled gene trees. However, as for many combinatorial optimization algorithms, there can exist many co-optimal, or slightly sub-optimal, evolutionary scenarios that deserve to be considered. Contribution We extend the DeCo algorithm to sample evolutionary scenarios from the whole solution space under the Boltzmann distribution, and also to compute Boltzmann probabilities for specific ancestral adjacencies. Results We apply our algorithms to a dataset of mammalian gene trees and adjacencies, and observe a significant reduction of the number of syntenic conflicts observed in the resulting ancestral gene adjacencies. PMID:26696141

  19. A two base pair deletion in the PQBP1 gene is associated with microphthalmia, microcephaly, and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Garay, Isabel; Tomás, Miguel; Oltra, Silvestre; Ramser, Juliane; Moltó, Maria D; Prieto, Félix; Meindl, Alfons; Kutsche, Kerstin; Martínez, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    X-linked mental retardation has been traditionally divided into syndromic (S-XLMR) and non-syndromic forms (NS-XLMR), although the borderlines between these phenotypes begin to vanish and mutations in a single gene, for example PQBP1, can cause S-XLMR as well as NS-XLMR. Here, we report two maternal cousins with an apparently X-linked phenotype of mental retardation (MR), microphthalmia, choroid coloboma, microcephaly, renal hypoplasia, and spastic paraplegia. By multipoint linkage analysis with markers spanning the entire X-chromosome we mapped the disease locus to a 28-Mb interval between Xp11.4 and Xq12, including the BCOR gene. A missense mutation in BCOR was described in a family with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome, a phenotype showing substantial overlapping features with that described in the two cousins. However, no mutation in the BCOR gene was found in both patients. Subsequent mutation analysis of PQBP1, located within the delineated linkage interval in Xp11.23, revealed a 2-bp deletion, c.461_462delAG, that cosegregated with the disease. Notably, the same mutation is associated with the Hamel cerebropalatocardiac syndrome, another form of S-XLMR. Haplotype analysis suggests a germline mosaicism of the 2-bp deletion in the maternal grandmother of both affected individuals. In summary, our findings demonstrate for the first time that mutations in PQBP1 are associated with an S-XLMR phenotype including microphthalmia, thereby further extending the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with PQBP1 mutations. PMID:17033686

  20. Increased New lncRNA-mRNA Gene Pair Levels in Human Cumulus Cells Correlate With Oocyte Maturation and Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Cao, Yunxia; Xu, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Huifen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Beili; Hao, Yan; Wei, Zhaolian; Zhou, Ping; Chen, Dawei

    2015-08-01

    The close relationship between cumulus cells and oocyte indicates that the analysis of cumulus gene expression is a potential noninvasive method to aid embryo selection and in vitro fertilization outcome. Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) could regulate essential pathways that contribute to human oocyte maturation, fertilization, and embryo development, which indicates that lncRNA would be valuable biomarkers. In our previous study, AK124742 is a newly detected lncRNA that was identified as being natural antisense to PSMD6, but its role in oocyte and embryo development is still not elucidated and needs to be investigated. Here, the expression of AK124742 and PSMD6 was measured in 40 pairs of cumulus cells from oocytes that result in high-quality embryos (HCCs) and from oocytes that result in poor-quality embryos (PCCs) by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The predictive value of AK124742 and PSMD6 was evaluated using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Notably, elevated expression levels of AK124742 and PSMD6 were observed in HCCs compared to PCCs (72.5% and 62.5%, respectively; P < .01). Expression of AK124742 was potentially positively associated with the PSMD6 levels. The relative expression levels of AK124742 and PSMD6 in the pregnancy group were significantly higher than those in the nonpregnancy group (P < .01).The area under the ROC curve of AK124742 was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.64-0.93). In conclusion, AK124742 and PSMD6 as a new lncRNA-messenger RNA gene pair in human cumulus cells may be considered as potential biomarkers to aid embryo selection.

  1. Light and auxin responsive cytochrome P450s from Withania somnifera Dunal: cloning, expression and molecular modelling of two pairs of homologue genes with differential regulation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Tripathi, Sandhya; Mishra, Bhawana; Narnoliya, L K; Misra, L N; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2015-11-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) catalyse a wide variety of oxygenation/hydroxylation reactions that facilitate diverse metabolic functions in plants. Specific CYP families are essential for the biosynthesis of species-specialized metabolites. Therefore, we investigated the role of different CYPs related to secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera, a medicinally important plant of the Indian subcontinent. In this study, complete complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of four different CYP genes were isolated and christened as WSCYP93Id, WSCYP93Sm, WSCYP734B and WSCYP734R. These cDNAs encoded polypeptides comprising of 498, 496, 522 and 550 amino acid residues with their deduced molecular mass of 56.7, 56.9, 59.4 and 62.2 kDa, respectively. Phylogenetic study and molecular modelling analysis of the four cloned WSCYPs revealed their categorization into two CYP families (CYP83B1 and CYP734A1) belonging to CYP71 and CYP72 clans, respectively. BLASTp searches showed similarity of 75 and 56 %, respectively, between the two CYP members of CYP83B1 and CYP734A1 with major variances exhibited in their N-terminal regions. The two pairs of homologues exhibited differential expression profiles in the leaf tissues of selected chemotypes of W. somnifera as well as in response to treatments such as methyl jasmonate, wounding, light and auxin. Light and auxin regulated two pairs of WSCYP homologues in a developing seedling in an interesting differential manner. Their lesser resemblance and homology with other CYP sequences suggested these genes to be more specialized and distinct ones. The results on chemotype-specific expression patterns of the four genes strongly suggested their key/specialized involvement of the CYPs in the biosynthesis of chemotype-specific metabolites, though their further biochemical characterization would reveal the specificity in more detail. It is revealed that WSCYP93Id and WSCYP93Sm may be broadly involved in the oxygenation reactions in the plant and, thereby, control

  2. Light and auxin responsive cytochrome P450s from Withania somnifera Dunal: cloning, expression and molecular modelling of two pairs of homologue genes with differential regulation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Tripathi, Sandhya; Mishra, Bhawana; Narnoliya, L K; Misra, L N; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2015-11-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) catalyse a wide variety of oxygenation/hydroxylation reactions that facilitate diverse metabolic functions in plants. Specific CYP families are essential for the biosynthesis of species-specialized metabolites. Therefore, we investigated the role of different CYPs related to secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera, a medicinally important plant of the Indian subcontinent. In this study, complete complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of four different CYP genes were isolated and christened as WSCYP93Id, WSCYP93Sm, WSCYP734B and WSCYP734R. These cDNAs encoded polypeptides comprising of 498, 496, 522 and 550 amino acid residues with their deduced molecular mass of 56.7, 56.9, 59.4 and 62.2 kDa, respectively. Phylogenetic study and molecular modelling analysis of the four cloned WSCYPs revealed their categorization into two CYP families (CYP83B1 and CYP734A1) belonging to CYP71 and CYP72 clans, respectively. BLASTp searches showed similarity of 75 and 56 %, respectively, between the two CYP members of CYP83B1 and CYP734A1 with major variances exhibited in their N-terminal regions. The two pairs of homologues exhibited differential expression profiles in the leaf tissues of selected chemotypes of W. somnifera as well as in response to treatments such as methyl jasmonate, wounding, light and auxin. Light and auxin regulated two pairs of WSCYP homologues in a developing seedling in an interesting differential manner. Their lesser resemblance and homology with other CYP sequences suggested these genes to be more specialized and distinct ones. The results on chemotype-specific expression patterns of the four genes strongly suggested their key/specialized involvement of the CYPs in the biosynthesis of chemotype-specific metabolites, though their further biochemical characterization would reveal the specificity in more detail. It is revealed that WSCYP93Id and WSCYP93Sm may be broadly involved in the oxygenation reactions in the plant and, thereby, control

  3. Genetic variants and effects on milk traits of the caprine paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) gene in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyu; Wu, Xianfeng; Cai, Hanfang; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2013-12-15

    The paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2) gene plays a critical role in cell proliferation, differentiation, hematopoiesis and organogenesis. This gene regulates several genes' expressions in the Wnt/beta-catenin and POU1F1 pathways, thereby probably affecting milk performance. The goal of this study was to characterize the genetic variants of the PITX2 gene and test their associations with milk traits in dairy goats. Herein, four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), AC_000163:g.18117T>C, g.18161C>G, g.18322C>A and g.18353T>C, within the caprine PITX2 gene, were found in two famous Chinese dairy goat breeds. These SNPs mapping at Cys28Arg, Pro42Pro, IVS1+79C>A and IVS1+110T>C, were genotyped by the MvaI, SmaI, MspI and RsaI aCRS-RFLP or PCR-RFLP methods, respectively. Accordingly, two main haplotypes (CGCT and CGCC) were identified among the specimens. Association testing revealed that the SmaI and RsaI polymorphisms were significantly associated with the milk fat content, milk lactose content and milk density (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in the Guanzhong (GZ) dairy goats, respectively. At the same time, the RsaI locus was also found to significantly link to the second lactation milk yield, milk fat content, milk lactose content, milk density and milk total solid content (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in the Xinong Saanen (XNSN) dairy goats, respectively. These results indicated that the caprine PITX2 gene had the significant effects on milk traits. Hence, the RsaI and SmaI loci could be regarded as two DNA markers for selecting superior milk performance in dairy goats. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variation of the goat PITX2 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection (MAS) in breeding and genetics in dairy goats.

  4. PIntron: a fast method for detecting the gene structure due to alternative splicing via maximal pairings of a pattern and a text

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A challenging issue in designing computational methods for predicting the gene structure into exons and introns from a cluster of transcript (EST, mRNA) sequences, is guaranteeing accuracy as well as efficiency in time and space, when large clusters of more than 20,000 ESTs and genes longer than 1 Mb are processed. Traditionally, the problem has been faced by combining different tools, not specifically designed for this task. Results We propose a fast method based on ad hoc procedures for solving the problem. Our method combines two ideas: a novel algorithm of proved small time complexity for computing spliced alignments of a transcript against a genome, and an efficient algorithm that exploits the inherent redundancy of information in a cluster of transcripts to select, among all possible factorizations of EST sequences, those allowing to infer splice site junctions that are largely confirmed by the input data. The EST alignment procedure is based on the construction of maximal embeddings, that are sequences obtained from paths of a graph structure, called embedding graph, whose vertices are the maximal pairings of a genomic sequence T and an EST P. The procedure runs in time linear in the length of P and T and in the size of the output. The method was implemented into the PIntron package. PIntron requires as input a genomic sequence or region and a set of EST and/or mRNA sequences. Besides the prediction of the full-length transcript isoforms potentially expressed by the gene, the PIntron package includes a module for the CDS annotation of the predicted transcripts. Conclusions PIntron, the software tool implementing our methodology, is available at http://www.algolab.eu/PIntron under GNU AGPL. PIntron has been shown to outperform state-of-the-art methods, and to quickly process some critical genes. At the same time, PIntron exhibits high accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) when benchmarked with ENCODE annotations. PMID:22537006

  5. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects. PMID:27287802

  6. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects.

  7. Restricted V gene usage and VH/VL pairing of mouse humoral response against the N-terminal immunodominant epitope of the amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Remy; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Cribbs, David H.; Van Nostrand, William E.; Wark, Kim L.; Dolezal, Olan

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, the potential of antibodies as therapeutic strategies to treat Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been growing, based on successful experimental and clinical trials in transgenic mice. Despite, undesirable side effects in humans using an active immunization approach, immunotherapy still remains one of the most promising treatments for AD. In this study, we analyzed the V genes of twelve independently isolated monoclonal antibodies raised against the N-terminal immunodominant epitope of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ or A beta). Surprisingly, we found a high and unusual level of restriction in the VH/VL pairing of these antibodies. Moreover, these antibodies mostly differ in their heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HCDR3) and the residues in the antibodies which contact Aβ are already present in the germline V-genes. Based on these observations and or co-crystal structures of antibodies with Aβ, the aim of the current study was to better understand the role of antibody V-domains, HCDR3 regions, key contact residue (H58) and germline encoded residues in Aβ recognition. For that purpose, we designed and produced a range of recombinant Fab constructs. All the Fabs were tested and compared by surface plasmon resonance on Aβ1–16, Aβ1–42 high molecular weight and Aβ1–42 low molecular weight soluble oligomers. Although all the Fabs recognized the Aβ1–16 peptide and the Aβ1–42 high molecular weight soluble oligomers, they did not bind the Aβ1–42 low molecular weight soluble oligomers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that: (1) an aromatic residue at position H58 in the antibody is essential in the recognition of Aβ and (2) Fabs based on germline V-genes bind to Aβ monomers with a low affinity. These findings may have important implications in designing more effective therapeutic antibodies against Aβ. PMID:20970857

  8. Genetic Analysis Using an Isogenic Mating Pair of Aspergillus fumigatus Identifies Azole Resistance Genes and Lack of MAT Locus’s Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Eckhaus, Michael A.; Chang, Yun C.; Mounaud, Stephanie; Figat, Abigail; Joardar, Vinita; Pakala, Suman B.; Pakala, Suchitra; Venepally, Pratap; Fedorova, Natalie; Nierman, William C.; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus fumigatus is a major cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients. The discovery of highly fertile strains of A. fumigatus opened the possibility to merge classical and contemporary genetics to address key questions about this pathogen. The merger involves sexual recombination, selection of desired traits, and genomics to identify any associated loci. We constructed a highly fertile isogenic pair of A. fumigatus strains with opposite mating types and used them to investigate whether mating type is associated with virulence and to find the genetic loci involved in azole resistance. The pair was made isogenic by 9 successive backcross cycles of the foundational strain AFB62 (MAT1-1) with a highly fertile (MAT1-2) progeny. Genome sequencing showed that the F9 MAT1-2 progeny was essentially identical to the AFB62. The survival curves of animals infected with either strain in three different animal models showed no significant difference, suggesting that virulence in A. fumigatus was not associated with mating type. We then employed a relatively inexpensive, yet highly powerful strategy to identify genomic loci associated with azole resistance. We used traditional in vitro drug selection accompanied by classical sexual crosses of azole-sensitive with resistant isogenic strains. The offspring were plated under varying drug concentrations and pools of resulting colonies were analyzed by whole genome sequencing. We found that variants in 5 genes contributed to azole resistance, including mutations in erg11A (cyp51A), as well as multi-drug transporters, erg25, and in HMG-CoA reductase. The results demonstrated that with minimal investment into the sequencing of three pools from a cross of interest, the variation(s) that contribute any phenotype can be identified with nucleotide resolution. This approach can be applied to multiple areas of interest in A. fumigatus or other heterothallic pathogens, especially for virulence

  9. Uneven X inactivation in a female monozygotic twin pair with Fabry disease and discordant expression of a novel mutation in the alpha-galactosidase A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Ploos van Amstel, J K; Jansen, R P; Wevers, R A; Salvayre, R; Levade, T

    1996-01-01

    We describe two female monozygotic (MZ) twins heterozygous for Fabry disease, an X linked disorder resulting from the deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A. While one of the twins was clinically affected, the other was asymptomatic. Enzymatic assay of alpha-galactosidase in blood leucocytes, skin fibroblasts, Epstein-Barr virus transformed lymphoid cell lines, and hair follicles of the twins and their parents confirmed the heterozygous status of the twins and indicated that Fabry disease had occurred as a result of a de novo mutation. The son of the unaffected twin sister was shown to be hemizygous. Molecular analysis of the alpha-galactosidase A gene permitted the identification of an as yet undescribed point mutation at position 10182 of exon 5 which causes an Asp to Asn substitution at codon 231. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis again showed the heterozygous status of the twins and a normal pattern in their parents. The basis for the discordant expression of this d novo mutation in the twins was investigated by studying their X inactivation status. Analysis of the inactive X specific methylation at the androgen receptor gene showed unbalanced inactivation in the twins' fibroblasts and in opposite directions. While the maternally derived X chromosome was preferentially active in the asymptomatic twin, the paternal X chromosome was active in the other, affected twin and was found in her hemizygotic nephew. These data suggest that the paternal X chromosome carries the de novo alpha-galactosidase A mutation and that uneven X inactivation is the underlying mechanism for disease expression in this novel female MZ twin pair. This is the first documented case of female twins discordant for Fabry disease. Images PMID:8863162

  10. [A Pair of Siblings with Frontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and a Novel Thr462Lysfs Mutation in the TBK1 Gene].

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Brendel, M; van der Zee, J; van Broeckhoven, C; Rominger, A; Danek, A; Levin, J

    2016-08-01

    We report on a pair of siblings with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and a novel Thr462Lysfs mutation in the TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) gene identified through the European Early-Onset Dementia Consortium. The patients presented at the age of 77 and 75 years and displayed dementia and bulbar symptoms as well as progressive paresis. After a progressive course, both of them died only a few months after diagnosis. Most recently, TBK1 mutations were identified in patients with FTD and ALS. A loss of expression of the mutant allele, leading to 50 % reduced TBK1 protein levels, seems to be causative. The occurrence of TBK1 mutations in FTD and ALS underlines the fact that FTD and ALS are part of the same disease spectrum. For future therapeutic trials, characterization of TBK1 mutation carriers in presymptomatic cohorts, such as the genetic frontotemporal dementia initiative (GENFI), is of great importance. PMID:27570907

  11. Construction of mate pair full-length cDNAs libraries and characterization of transcriptional start sites and termination sites

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kyoko; Suzuki, Ayako; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    To identify and characterize transcript structures ranging from transcriptional start sites (TSSs) to poly(A)-addition sites (PASs), we constructed and analyzed human TSS/PAS mate pair full-length cDNA libraries from 14 tissue types and four cell lines. The collected information enabled us to define TSS cluster (TSC) and PAS cluster (PAC) relationships for a total of 8530/9400 RefSeq genes, as well as 4251/5618 of their putative alternative promoters/terminators and 4619/4605 intervening transcripts, respectively. Analyses of the putative alternative TSCs and alternative PACs revealed that their selection appeared to be mostly independent, with rare exceptions. In those exceptional cases, pairs of transcript units rarely overlapped one another and were occasionally separated by Rad21/CTCF. We also identified a total of 172 similar cases in which TSCs and PACs spanned adjacent but distinct genes. In these cases, different transcripts may utilize different functional units of a particular gene or of adjacent genes. This approach was also useful for identifying fusion gene transcripts in cancerous cells. Furthermore, we could construct cDNA libraries in which 3′-end mate pairs were distributed randomly over the transcripts. These libraries were useful for assembling the internal structure of previously uncharacterized alternative promoter products, as well as intervening transcripts. PMID:25034687

  12. Pairing Learners in Pair Work Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Neomy; Aldosari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although pair work is advocated by major theories of second language (L2) learning and research findings suggest that pair work facilitates L2 learning, what is unclear is how to best pair students in L2 classes of mixed L2 proficiency. This study investigated the nature of pair work in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) class in a college in…

  13. Microevolution of cis-regulatory elements: an example from the pair-rule segmentation gene fushi tarazu in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed

    Bakkali, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    The importance of non-coding DNAs that control transcription is ever noticeable, but the characterization and analysis of the evolution of such DNAs presents challenges not found in the analysis of coding sequences. In this study of the cis-regulatory elements of the pair rule segmentation gene fushi tarazu (ftz) I report the DNA sequences of ftz's zebra element (promoter) and a region containing the proximal enhancer from a total of 45 fly lines belonging to several populations of the species Drosophila melanogaster, D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. teissieri, D. orena and D. erecta. Both elements evolve at slower rate than ftz synonymous sites, thus reflecting their functional importance. The promoter evolves more slowly than the average for ftz's coding sequence while, on average, the enhancer evolves more rapidly, suggesting more functional constraint and effective purifying selection on the former. Comparative analysis of the number and nature of base substitutions failed to detect significant evidence for positive/adaptive selection in transcription-factor-binding sites. These seem to evolve at similar rates to regions not known to bind transcription factors. Although this result reflects the evolutionary flexibility of the transcription factor binding sites, it also suggests a complex and still not completely understood nature of even the characterized cis-regulatory sequences. The latter seem to contain more functional parts than those currently identified, some of which probably transcription factor binding. This study illustrates ways in which functional assignments of sequences within cis-acting sequences can be used in the search for adaptive evolution, but also highlights difficulties in how such functional assignment and analysis can be carried out.

  14. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of mRNA transcripts for highly sensitive gene expression profiling in near real time.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhiyong; Young, Brandon; Baird, Alison E; Soper, Steven A

    2013-08-20

    Expression analysis of mRNAs transcribed from certain genes can be used as important sources of biomarkers for in vitro diagnostics. While the use of reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) can provide excellent analytical sensitivity for monitoring transcript numbers, more sensitive approaches for expression analysis that can report results in near real-time are needed for many critical applications. We report a novel assay that can provide exquisite limits-of-quantitation and consists of reverse transcription (RT) followed by a ligase detection reaction (LDR) with single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) to provide digital readout through molecular counting. For this assay, no PCR was employed, which enabled short assay turnaround times. To facilitate implementation of the assay, a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microchip, which was fabricated using hot embossing, was employed to carry out the LDR in a continuous flow format with online single-molecule detection following the LDR. As demonstrators of the assay's utility, MMP-7 mRNA was expression profiled from several colorectal cancer cell lines. It was found that the RT-LDR/spFRET assay produced highly linear calibration plots even in the low copy number regime. Comparison to RT-qPCR indicated a better linearity over the low copy number range investigated (10-10,000 copies) with an R(2) = 0.9995 for RT-LDR/spFRET and R(2) = 0.98 for RT-qPCR. In addition, differentiating between copy numbers of 10 and 50 could be performed with higher confidence using RT-LDR/spFRET. To demonstrate the short assay turnaround times obtainable using the RT-LDR/spFRET assay, a two thermal cycle LDR was carried out on amphiphysin gene transcripts that can serve as important diagnostic markers for ischemic stroke. The ability to supply diagnostic information on possible stroke events in short turnaround times using RT-LDR/spFRET will enable clinicians to treat patients effectively with appropriate time

  15. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A.; Lipsky, N.; Baldwin, C.T. ); Sheffer, R. ); Clarren, S.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. The authors have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding protein that contains a structural motif known as the paired domain and is believed to regulate the expression of other genes. In this report they describe two new mutations, in the human PAX3 gene, that are associated with WS. One mutation was found in a family with WS-I, while the other mutation was found in a family with WS-III. Both mutations were in the highly conserved paired domain of the human PAX3 gene and are similar to other mutations that cause WS. The results indicate that mutations in the PAX3 gene can cause both WS-I and WS-III. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Expression of the pair-rule gene homologs runt, Pax3/7, even-skipped-1 and even-skipped-2 during larval and juvenile development of the polychaete annelid Capitella teleta does not support a role in segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Annelids and arthropods each possess a segmented body. Whether this similarity represents an evolutionary convergence or inheritance from a common segmented ancestor is the subject of ongoing investigation. Methods To investigate whether annelids and arthropods share molecular components that control segmentation, we isolated orthologs of the Drosophila melanogaster pair-rule genes, runt, paired (Pax3/7) and eve, from the polychaete annelid Capitella teleta and used whole mount in situ hybridization to characterize their expression patterns. Results When segments first appear, expression of the single C. teleta runt ortholog is only detected in the brain. Later, Ct-runt is expressed in the ventral nerve cord, foregut and hindgut. Analysis of Pax genes in the C. teleta genome reveals the presence of a single Pax3/7 ortholog. Ct-Pax3/7 is initially detected in the mid-body prior to segmentation, but is restricted to two longitudinal bands in the ventral ectoderm. Each of the two C. teleta eve orthologs has a unique and complex expression pattern, although there is partial overlap in several tissues. Prior to and during segment formation, Ct-eve1 and Ct-eve2 are both expressed in the bilaterial pair of mesoteloblasts, while Ct-eve1 is expressed in the descendant mesodermal band cells. At later stages, Ct-eve2 is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and in mesoderm along the dorsal midline. In late stage larvae and adults, Ct-eve1 and Ct-eve2 are expressed in the posterior growth zone. Conclusions C. teleta eve, Pax3/7 and runt homologs all have distinct expression patterns and share expression domains with homologs from other bilaterians. None of the pair-rule orthologs examined in C. teleta exhibit segmental or pair-rule stripes of expression in the ectoderm or mesoderm, consistent with an independent origin of segmentation between annelids and arthropods. PMID:22510249

  17. Powered Tate Pairing Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bo Gyeong; Park, Je Hong

    In this letter, we provide a simple proof of bilinearity for the eta pairing. Based on it, we show an efficient method to compute the powered Tate pairing as well. Although efficiency of our method is equivalent to that of the Tate pairing on the eta pairing approach, but ours is more general in principle.

  18. Sequences more than 500 base pairs upstream of the human U3 small nuclear RNA gene stimulate the synthesis of U3 RNA in frog oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, D.; Reddy, R. ); Wright, D. )

    1991-06-04

    Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes contain strong promoters capable of initiating transcription once every 4 s. Studies on the human U1 snRNA gene, carried out in other laboratories, showed that sequences within 400 bp of the 5' flanking region are sufficient for maximal levels of transcription both in vivo and in frog oocytes (reviewed in Dahlberg and Lund (1988)). The authors studied the expression of a human U3 snRNA gene by injecting 5' deletion mutants into frog oocytes. The results show that sequences more than 500 bp upstream of the U3 snRNA gene have a 2-3-fold stimulatory effect on the U3 snRNA synthesis. These results indicate that the human U3 snRNA gene is different from human U1 snRNA gene in containing regulatory elements more than 500 bp upstream. The U3 snRNA gene upstream sequences contain an AluI homologous sequence in the {minus}1,200 region; these AluI sequences were transcribed in vitro and in frog oocytes but were not detectable in Hela cells.

  19. Ancestral Y-linked genes were maintained by translocation to the X and Y chromosomes fused to an autosomal pair in the Okinawa spiny rat Tokudaia muenninki.

    PubMed

    Murata, Chie; Kuroki, Yoko; Imoto, Issei; Kuroiwa, Asato

    2016-09-01

    Two species of the genus Tokudaia lack the Y chromosome and SRY, but several Y-linked genes have been rescued by translocation or transposition to other chromosomes. Tokudaia muenninki is the only species in the genus that maintains the Y owing to sex chromosome-autosome fusions. According to previous studies, many SRY pseudocopies and other Y-linked genes have evolved by excess duplication in this species. Using RNA-seq and RT-PCR, we found that ZFY, EIF2S3Y, TSPY, UTY, DDX3Y, USP9Y, and RBMY, but not UBA1Y, had high deduced amino acid sequence similarity and similar expression patterns with other rodents, suggesting that these genes were functional. Based on FISH and quantitative real-time PCR, all of the genes except for UTY and DDX3Y were amplified on the X and Y chromosomes with approximately 10-66 copies in the male genome. In a comparative analysis of the 372.4-kb BAC sequence and Y-linked gene transcripts from T. muenninki with the mouse Y genomic sequence, we observed that multiple-copy genes in the ancestral Y genome were nonfunctional, indicating that the gene functions were assumed by amplified copies. We also found a LTR sequence at the distal end of a SRY duplication unit, suggesting that unequal sister chromatid exchange mediated by retrotransposable elements could have been involved in SRY amplification. Our results revealed that the Y-linked genes were rescued from degeneration via translocations to other sex chromosomal regions and amplification events in T. muenninki.

  20. Ancestral Y-linked genes were maintained by translocation to the X and Y chromosomes fused to an autosomal pair in the Okinawa spiny rat Tokudaia muenninki.

    PubMed

    Murata, Chie; Kuroki, Yoko; Imoto, Issei; Kuroiwa, Asato

    2016-09-01

    Two species of the genus Tokudaia lack the Y chromosome and SRY, but several Y-linked genes have been rescued by translocation or transposition to other chromosomes. Tokudaia muenninki is the only species in the genus that maintains the Y owing to sex chromosome-autosome fusions. According to previous studies, many SRY pseudocopies and other Y-linked genes have evolved by excess duplication in this species. Using RNA-seq and RT-PCR, we found that ZFY, EIF2S3Y, TSPY, UTY, DDX3Y, USP9Y, and RBMY, but not UBA1Y, had high deduced amino acid sequence similarity and similar expression patterns with other rodents, suggesting that these genes were functional. Based on FISH and quantitative real-time PCR, all of the genes except for UTY and DDX3Y were amplified on the X and Y chromosomes with approximately 10-66 copies in the male genome. In a comparative analysis of the 372.4-kb BAC sequence and Y-linked gene transcripts from T. muenninki with the mouse Y genomic sequence, we observed that multiple-copy genes in the ancestral Y genome were nonfunctional, indicating that the gene functions were assumed by amplified copies. We also found a LTR sequence at the distal end of a SRY duplication unit, suggesting that unequal sister chromatid exchange mediated by retrotransposable elements could have been involved in SRY amplification. Our results revealed that the Y-linked genes were rescued from degeneration via translocations to other sex chromosomal regions and amplification events in T. muenninki. PMID:27333765

  1. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  2. Transfection of shRNA-encoding Minivector DNA of a few hundred base pairs to regulate gene expression in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, N; Fogg, J M; Zechiedrich, L; Zu, Y

    2011-01-01

    This work illustrates the utility of Minivector DNA, a non-viral, supercoiled gene therapy vector incorporating short hairpin RNA from an H1 promoter. Minivector DNA is superior to both plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) in that it has improved biostability while maintaining high cell transfection efficiency and gene silencing capacity. Minivector DNAs were stable for over 48 h in human serum, as compared with only 0.5 and 2 h for siRNA and plasmid, respectively. Although all three nucleic acids exhibited similar transfection efficiencies in easily transfected adhesion fibroblasts cells, only Minivector DNAs and siRNA were capable of transfecting difficult-to-transfect suspension lymphoma cells. Minivector DNA and siRNA were capable of silencing the gene encoding anaplastic lymphoma kinase, a key pathogenic factor of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and this silencing caused inhibition of the lymphoma cells. Based on these results, Minivector DNAs are a promising new gene therapy tool. PMID:20962872

  3. Identification of single base-pair mutation on uidA gene of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) mediated PCR clamping.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Toshiyuki; Futo, Satoshi; Tsuna, Mika; Namimatsu, Takanori; Sakano, Tetsuya; Kawai, Keiichi; Suzuki, Tohru

    2004-02-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) is a new type of DNA analogue with a peptide backbone. We developed a rapid identification system of Escherichia. coli O157:H7 using PNA mediated PCR clamping. Firstly, we confirmed a single nucleotide alteration in the uidA gene (T93G), which is specific to E. coli O157: H7. We designed forward mutant DNA primer, wild type PNA, and a reverse DNA primer corresponding to the uidA sequence. PCR cycle consisted of four steps including dual annealing temperatures, 57 degrees C and 45 degrees C. Among 20 E. coli strains with various serotypes and 4 neighboring strains, the amplified bands (517 bp) were detected only in E. coli O157:H7 strains. PNA has specifically inhibited the PCR amplification from a wild type uidA gene. We successfully developed a multiplex PCR system, which detects both shigatoxin (stx) and uidA genes at once, to get reliable results by easier and rapid operation. We also analyzed kinetic parameters of PNA/DNA association using surface plasmon resonance and melting temperature using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We discussed a selection mechanism of PCR clamping from these results. PMID:14981299

  4. Pairing forces in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution, the author mentions some features of pairing forces that are unique to nuclei and cover some areas of major interest in nuclear structure research, that involve pairing. At the level of most nuclear structure studies, nuclei are treated as consisting of two kinds of fermions (protons and neutrons) in a valence space with rather few levels. These features give rise to unique aspects of pairing forces in nuclei: (1) n-p pairing in T = 0 as well as the usual T = 1 pairing that is characteristic of like fermions; (2) a need to correct pairing calculations for the (1/N) effects that can typically be neglected in superconducting solids. An issue of current concern is the nature of the pairing interaction: several recent studies suggest a need for a density dependent form of the pairing interaction. There is a good deal of feedback between the questions of accurate calculations of pairing interactions and the form and magnitude of the pairing interaction. Finally, the authors discuss some many-body wave functions that are a generalization of the BCS wave function form, and apply them to a calculation of energy level spacings in superdeformed rotational bands.

  5. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  6. Matched-pair classification

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    Following an analogous distinction in statistical hypothesis testing, we investigate variants of machine learning where the training set comes in matched pairs. We demonstrate that even conventional classifiers can exhibit improved performance when the input data has a matched-pair structure. Online algorithms, in particular, converge quicker when the data is presented in pairs. In some scenarios (such as the weak signal detection problem), matched pairs can be generated from independent samples, with the effect not only doubling the nominal size of the training set, but of providing the structure that leads to better learning. A family of 'dipole' algorithms is introduced that explicitly takes advantage of matched-pair structure in the input data and leads to further performance gains. Finally, we illustrate the application of matched-pair learning to chemical plume detection in hyperspectral imagery.

  7. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  8. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today.

  9. Isolation of the human insulin-like growth factor genes: insulin-like growth factor II and insulin genes are contiguous.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Gerhard, D S; Fong, N M; Sanchez-Pescador, R; Rall, L B

    1985-01-01

    Overlapping recombinant clones that encompass the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I and II genes have been isolated from a human genomic DNA library. Each gene is present once per haploid genome; the IGF-I gene spans greater than 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) and the IGF-II gene is at least 15 kbp. The exon-intron organization of these genes is similar, each having four exons, which is one more than the related insulin gene. Comparison of the restriction endonuclease cleavage maps of the IGF-II and insulin genes, including their flanking regions and hybridization with an IGF-II cDNA probe, revealed that they are adjacent to one another. The IGF-II and insulin genes have the same polarity and are separated by 12.6 kbp of intergenic DNA that includes a dispersed middle repetitive Alu sequence. The order of the genes is 5'-insulin-IGF-II-3'. Images PMID:3901002

  10. Paired watershed study design

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, J.C.; Spooner, J.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the fact sheet is to describe the paired watershed approach for conducting nonpoint source (NPS) water quality studies. The basic approach requires a minimum of two watersheds - control and treatment - and two periods of study - calibration and treatment. The basis of the paired watershed approach is that there is a quantifiable relationship between paired water quality data for the two watersheds, and that this relationship is valid until a major change is made in one of the watersheds.

  11. Proteomic profiling of 13 paired ductal infiltrating breast carcinomas and non-tumoral adjacent counterparts.

    PubMed

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Cancemi, Patrizia; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Di Cara, Gianluca; Taormina, Pietra; Marrazzo, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    According to recent statistics, breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of death among women in Western countries. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, presently classified into several subtypes according to their cellular origin. Among breast cancer histotypes, infiltrating ductal carcinoma represents the most common and potentially aggressive form. Despite the current progress achieved in early cancer detection and treatment, including the new generation of molecular therapies, there is still need for identification of multiparametric biomarkers capable of discriminating between cancer subtypes and predicting cancer progression for personalized therapies. One established step in this direction is the proteomic strategy, expected to provide enough information on breast cancer profiling. To this aim, in the present study we analyzed 13 breast cancer tissues and their matched non-tumoral tissues by 2-DE. Collectively, we identified 51 protein spots, corresponding to 34 differentially expressed proteins, which may represent promising candidate biomarkers for molecular-based diagnosis of breast cancer and for pattern discovery. The relevance of these proteins as factors contributing to breast carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:21136615

  12. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  13. Pairing Beyond BCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We concentrate on the specifics of the nuclear pairing problem from the standpoint of the BCS approach. We consider the properties of nuclear pairing which usually are not discussed in standard texts: how good is the BCS theory in nuclear context compared to the exact large-scale diagonalization, whether it can be improved by the particle number conservation, how to mark the phase transition regions in a mesoscopic system like a nucleus, how may effective many-body forces influence the formation and structure of the pairing condensate, what effect the decay instability has on the paired nuclear structure, etc.

  14. Development of a PCR Assay Based on a Single-Base Pair Substitution for the Detection of Aeromonas caviae by Targeting the gyrB Gene.

    PubMed

    Payattikul, Penpan; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2015-09-01

    Aeromonas caviae is a bacterial pathogen that causes various infectious diseases in both humans and animals. To facilitate its detection, we developed species-specific primer sets targeting polymorphisms in the gyrB gene for use in a PCR assay. The technique was able to detect 100% (29/29) of the A. caviae strains tested using either of two sets of primers (designated ACF1-ACR and ACF3-ACR), which produced 293-bp and 206-bp amplicons, respectively. Another set of primers (designated ACF2-ACR) yielded a 237-bp amplicon and exhibited 90% (26/29) positive results with respect to A. caviae. None of the primer sets exhibited cross-reactivity with 12 non-A. caviae isolates and 52 other non-Aeromonas bacteria. The detection limit using the ACF2-ACR and ACF3-ACR primer sets in pure culture was 1.6 × 10(3) CFU/mL, or 6 CFU per reaction, whereas that of the ACF1-ACR primer set was 1.6 × 10(4) CFU/mL, or 60 CFU per reaction. In the case of spiked Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, the sensitivity of all primer sets without enrichment was 1.8 × 10(4) CFU/g, or 30 CFU per reaction. Primer set ACF3-ACR was the best for a PCR assay targeting the gyrB gene, and the PCR technique developed was rapid, specific, and sensitive for the identification of A. caviae.

  15. Development of a PCR Assay Based on a Single-Base Pair Substitution for the Detection of Aeromonas caviae by Targeting the gyrB Gene.

    PubMed

    Payattikul, Penpan; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2015-09-01

    Aeromonas caviae is a bacterial pathogen that causes various infectious diseases in both humans and animals. To facilitate its detection, we developed species-specific primer sets targeting polymorphisms in the gyrB gene for use in a PCR assay. The technique was able to detect 100% (29/29) of the A. caviae strains tested using either of two sets of primers (designated ACF1-ACR and ACF3-ACR), which produced 293-bp and 206-bp amplicons, respectively. Another set of primers (designated ACF2-ACR) yielded a 237-bp amplicon and exhibited 90% (26/29) positive results with respect to A. caviae. None of the primer sets exhibited cross-reactivity with 12 non-A. caviae isolates and 52 other non-Aeromonas bacteria. The detection limit using the ACF2-ACR and ACF3-ACR primer sets in pure culture was 1.6 × 10(3) CFU/mL, or 6 CFU per reaction, whereas that of the ACF1-ACR primer set was 1.6 × 10(4) CFU/mL, or 60 CFU per reaction. In the case of spiked Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, the sensitivity of all primer sets without enrichment was 1.8 × 10(4) CFU/g, or 30 CFU per reaction. Primer set ACF3-ACR was the best for a PCR assay targeting the gyrB gene, and the PCR technique developed was rapid, specific, and sensitive for the identification of A. caviae. PMID:26223267

  16. How semantic biases in simple adjacencies affect learning a complex structure with non-adjacencies in AGL: a statistical account

    PubMed Central

    Poletiek, Fenna H.; Lai, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A major theoretical debate in language acquisition research regards the learnability of hierarchical structures. The artificial grammar learning methodology is increasingly influential in approaching this question. Studies using an artificial centre-embedded AnBn grammar without semantics draw conflicting conclusions. This study investigates the facilitating effect of distributional biases in simple AB adjacencies in the input sample—caused in natural languages, among others, by semantic biases—on learning a centre-embedded structure. A mathematical simulation of the linguistic input and the learning, comparing various distributional biases in AB pairs, suggests that strong distributional biases might help us to grasp the complex AnBn hierarchical structure in a later stage. This theoretical investigation might contribute to our understanding of how distributional features of the input—including those caused by semantic variation—help learning complex structures in natural languages. PMID:22688639

  17. Association between the p73 gene G4C14-to-A4T14 single nucleotide polymorphism and risk of cervical cancer by high resolution melting and PCR with confronting two-pair primers in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    GUO, HAIYAN; YANG, SHAODI; XU, LIJIAN; LI, DING; TANG, JIANXIN; WANG, SHUANGSHAUNG; WEI, BENJIE; LIU, ZHENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    As a member of the p53 gene family, the p73 gene can affect an individual's susceptibility to cancer through a p53-like manner. DNA sequence variation in the p73 gene has been reported to be associated with cancer risk. The present study aimed to identify whether the p73 gene G4C14-to-A4T14 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with risk of cervical cancer in a Chinese population. The p73 G4C14-to-A4T14 polymorphism was genotyped in 175 cervical cancer and 189 healthy control peripheral blood DNA samples using high resolution melting, polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers and direct DNA sequencing. The results demonstrated that carriers of the AT/AT genotype were associated with a significantly increased risk of cervical cancer (P=0.042; χ2=4.122; odds ratio = 2.241; 95% confidence interval = 1.013–4.956) compared with the GC/GC genotype carriers. In addition, there was a significant association between p73 genotypes and tumor size in patients with cervical cancer (P=0.014; χ2=8.607). However, no association was identified between p73 genotypes and tumor stage, histological type or lymph node metastasis in patients with cervical cancer. These results suggest that the p73 G4C14-to-A4T14 SNP may function as a marker of genetic susceptibility to cervical cancer in the Chinese population. PMID:27347206

  18. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  19. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  20. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  1. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  2. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  3. Pair contact process with diffusion of pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, F. L.; Dickman, Ronald; Fulco, U. L.

    2011-03-01

    The pair contact process (PCP) is a nonequilibrium stochastic model which, like the basic contact process (CP), exhibits a phase transition to an absorbing state. The two models belong to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, despite the fact that the PCP possesses infinitely many absorbing configurations whereas the CP has but one. The critical behavior of the PCP with hopping by particles (PCPD) is as yet unclear. Here we study a version of the PCP in which nearest-neighbor particle pairs can hop but individual particles cannot. Using quasistationary simulations for three values of the diffusion probability (D = 0.1, 0.5 and 0.9), we find convincing evidence of DP-like critical behavior.

  4. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    SciTech Connect

    James Valles

    2008-07-23

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  5. Critical Schwinger Pair Production.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-03-01

    We investigate Schwinger pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric backgrounds. A critical point for the onset of pair production can be approached by fields that marginally provide sufficient electrostatic energy for an off-shell long-range electron-positron fluctuation to become a real pair. Close to this critical point, we observe features of universality which are analogous to continuous phase transitions in critical phenomena with the pair-production rate serving as an order parameter: electric backgrounds can be subdivided into universality classes and the onset of pair production exhibits characteristic scaling laws. An appropriate design of the electric background field can interpolate between power-law scaling, essential Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type scaling, and a power-law scaling with log corrections. The corresponding critical exponents only depend on the large-scale features of the electric background, whereas the microscopic details of the background play the role of irrelevant perturbations not affecting criticality. PMID:26991162

  6. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  7. A gene-model-free method for linkage analysis of a disease-related-trait based on analysis of proband/sibling pairs.

    PubMed

    Sung, Heejong; Finch, Stephen J; Ye, Kenny Q; Mendell, Nancy R

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the power of finding linkage to a disease locus through analysis of the disease-related traits. We propose two family-based gene-model-free linkage statistics. Both involve considering the distribution of the number of alleles identical by descent with the proband and comparing siblings with the disease-related trait to those without the disease-related-trait. The objective is to find linkages to disease-related traits that are pleiotropic for both the disease and the disease-related-traits. The power of these statistics is investigated for Kofendrerd Personality Disorder-related traits a (Joining/founding cults) and trait b (Fear/discomfort with strangers) of the simulated data. The answers were known prior to the execution of the reported analyses. We find that both tests have very high power when applied to the samples created by combining the data of the three cities for which we have nuclear family data. PMID:16451658

  8. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  9. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  12. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  13. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  14. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  15. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  16. Resonantly paired fermionic superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarie, V.; Radzihovsky, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present a theory of a degenerate atomic Fermi gas, interacting through a narrow Feshbach resonance, whose position and therefore strength can be tuned experimentally, as demonstrated recently in ultracold trapped atomic gases. The distinguishing feature of the theory is that its accuracy is controlled by a dimensionless parameter proportional to the ratio of the width of the resonance to Fermi energy. The theory is therefore quantitatively accurate for a narrow Feshbach resonance. In the case of a narrow s-wave resonance, our analysis leads to a quantitative description of the crossover between a weakly paired BCS superconductor of overlapping Cooper pairs and a strongly paired molecular Bose-Einstein condensate of diatomic molecules. In the case of pairing via a p-wave resonance, that we show is always narrow for a sufficiently low density, we predict a detuning-temperature phase diagram, that in the course of a BCS-BEC crossover can exhibit a host of thermodynamically distinct phases separated by quantum and classical phase transitions. For an intermediate strength of the dipolar anisotropy, the system exhibits a px + i py paired superfluidity that undergoes a topological phase transition between a weakly coupled gapless ground state at large positive detuning and a strongly paired fully gapped molecular superfluid for a negative detuning. In two dimensions the former state is characterized by a Pfaffian ground state exhibiting topological order and non-Abelian vortex excitations familiar from fractional quantum Hall systems.

  17. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  18. Distinguishing epigenetic features of preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to seminomas and nonseminomas

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Yulia V.; Zinovyeva, Marina V.; Stukacheva, Elena A.; Klimov, Alexey; Tryakin, Alexey A.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.

    2016-01-01

    PIWI pathway proteins are expressed during spermatogenesis where they play a key role in germ cell development. Epigenetic loss of PIWI proteins expression was previously demonstrated in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), implying their involvement in TGCT development. In this work, apart from studying only normal testis and TGCT samples, we also analyzed an intermediate stage, i.e. preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to TGCTs. Importantly, in this study, we minimized the contribution of patient-to-patient heterogeneity by using matched preneoplastic/TGCT samples. Surprisingly, expression of germ cell marker DDX4 suggests that spermatogenesis is retained in premalignant testis tissues adjacent to nonseminoma, but not those adjacent to seminoma. Moreover, this pattern is followed by expression of PIWI pathway genes, which impacts one of their functions: DNA methylation level over LINE-1 promoters is higher in preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to nonseminomas than those adjacent to seminomas. This finding might imply distinct routes for development of the two types of TGCTs and could be used as a novel diagnostic marker, possibly, noninvasively. Finally, we studied the role of CpG island methylation in expression of PIWI genes in patient samples and using in vitro experiments in cell line models: a more complex interrelation between DNA methylation and expression of the corresponding genes was revealed. PMID:26843623

  19. The novel regulatory ncRNA, NfiS, optimizes nitrogen fixation via base pairing with the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yuhua; Yan, Yongliang; Deng, Zhiping; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Shang, Liguo; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun; Ke, Qi; Lu, Jiasi; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen; Xie, Zhihong; Cheng, Qi; Elmerich, Claudine; Lin, Min

    2016-07-26

    Unlike most Pseudomonas, the root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 fixes nitrogen after the horizontal acquisition of a nitrogen-fixing (nif) island. A genome-wide search for small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in P. stutzeri A1501 identified the novel P. stutzeri-specific ncRNA NfiS in the core genome, whose synthesis was significantly induced under nitrogen fixation or sorbitol stress conditions. The expression of NfiS was RNA chaperone Hfq-dependent and activated by the sigma factor RpoN/global nitrogen activator NtrC/nif-specific activator NifA regulatory cascade. The nfiS-deficient mutant displayed reduced nitrogenase activity, as well as increased sensitivity to multiple stresses, such as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Secondary structure prediction and complementation studies confirmed that a stem-loop structure was essential for NfiS to regulate the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA synthesis and thus nitrogenase activity. Microscale thermophoresis and physiological analysis showed that NfiS directly pairs with nifK mRNA and ultimately enhances nitrogenase activity by increasing the translation efficiency and the half-life of nifK mRNA. Our data also suggest structural and functional divergence of NfiS evolution in diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic backgrounds. It is proposed that NfiS was recruited by nifK mRNA as a novel regulator to integrate the horizontally acquired nif island into host global networks.

  20. Gene expression of the dibasic-pair cleaving enzyme NRD convertase (N-arginine dibasic convertase) is differentially regulated in the GH3 pituitary and Mat-Lu prostate cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, A G; Pierotti, A R

    2000-01-01

    NRD convertase (N-arginine dibasic convertase, NRD-C) is a dibasic selective metalloprotease which cleaves on the N-terminal side of an arginine residue in a dibasic pair. Abundant in endocrine tissues, the highest levels are found in testis. The mechanism whereby NRD-C expression is regulated at the transcriptional level has been examined by reporter-gene assay and electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays. Analysis of the rat and human promoters show that they are highly conserved, containing a number of motifs which may correspond to transcription-factor binding sites. The rat promoter has been cloned into a luciferase reporter vector and analysed in a number of cell lines. Full functionality of the promoter is observed with 5' deletions to 411 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site in spermatid, prostate and pituitary cell lines. Further deletion to 101 bp causes a complete loss of activity in spermatid and prostate lines. By contrast, GH3 pituitary cells display no reduction in promoter activity with deletion to 101 bp of upstream sequence. A number of transcription-factor binding sites have been identified by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays in the region 411-101; however, no differences in binding between the cell lines were observed. PMID:11042131

  1. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  2. Binaural unmasking with multiple adjacent masking electrodes in bilateral cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Litovsky, Ruth; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BiCI) users gain an advantage in noisy situations from a second implant, but their bilateral performance falls short of normal hearing listeners. Channel interactions due to overlapping electrical fields between electrodes can impair speech perception, but its role in limiting binaural hearing performance has not been well characterized. To address the issue, binaural masking level differences (BMLD) for a 125 Hz tone in narrowband noise were measured using a pair of pitch-matched electrodes while simultaneously presenting the same masking noise to adjacent electrodes, representing a more realistic stimulation condition compared to prior studies that used only a single electrode pair. For five subjects, BMLDs averaged 8.9 ± 1.0 dB (mean ± s.e.) in single electrode pairs but dropped to 2.1 ± 0.4 dB when presenting noise on adjacent masking electrodes, demonstrating a negative impact of the additional maskers. Removing the masking noise from only the pitch-matched electrode pair not only lowered thresholds but also resulted in smaller BMLDs. The degree of channel interaction estimated from auditory nerve evoked potentials in three subjects was significantly and negatively correlated with BMLD. The data suggest that if the amount of channel interactions can be reduced, BiCI users may experience some performance improvements related to binaural hearing. PMID:21682415

  3. Intergrin gene expression profiles of humanhepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian-Xin; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Hui; Zhu, An-Long; Wang, Xiu-Qin; Wu, Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gene expression profiles of intergrin genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through the usage of Atlas Human Cancer Array membranes, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern blot. METHODS: Hybridization of cDNA array membrane was performed with α 32P-labeled cDNA probes synthesized from RNA isolated from hepatocellular carcinoma and adjacent non-cirrhotic liver. AtlasImage, which is a software specific to array, was used to analyze the result. RT-PCR of 24 pairs specimen and Northern blot of 4 pairs specimen were used to confirm the expression pattern of some intergrin genes identified by Atlas arrays hybridization. RESULTS: Among 588 genes spotted in membrane, 17 genes were related to intergrin. Four genes were up-regulated, such as intergrin alpha8, beta1, beta7 and beta8 in HCC. Whereas there were no genes down-regulated in HCC. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis of intergrin beta1 gene gave results consistent with cDNA array findings. CONCLUSION: Investigation of these intergrin genes should help to disclose the molecular mechanism of the cell adhesion, invasive and metastasis of HCC. A few genes are reported to have changed in HCC for the first time. The quick and high-throughout method of profiling gene expression by cDNA array provides us overview of key factors that may involved in HCC, and may find the clue of the study of HCC metastasis and molecular targets of anti-metastasis therapy. The precise relationship between the altered genes and HCC is a matter of further investigation. PMID:12174369

  4. Multi-pair states in electron-positron pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöllert, Anton; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra strong electromagnetic fields can lead to spontaneous creation of single or multiple electron-positron pairs. A quantum field theoretical treatment of the pair creation process combined with numerical methods provides a description of the fermionic quantum field state, from which all observables of the multiple electron-positron pairs can be inferred. This allows to study the complex multi-particle dynamics of electron-positron pair creation in-depth, including multi-pair statistics as well as momentum distributions and spin. To illustrate the potential benefit of this approach, it is applied to the intermediate regime of pair creation between nonperturbative Schwinger pair creation and perturbative multiphoton pair creation where the creation of multi-pair states becomes nonnegligible but cascades do not yet set in. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how spin and helicity of the created electrons and positrons are affected by the polarization of the counterpropagating laser fields, which induce the creation of electron-positron pairs.

  5. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  6. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  11. LCGbase: A Comprehensive Database for Lineage-Based Co-regulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Yubin; Fan, Zhonghua; Liu, Guiming; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Animal genes of different lineages, such as vertebrates and arthropods, are well-organized and blended into dynamic chromosomal structures that represent a primary regulatory mechanism for body development and cellular differentiation. The majority of genes in a genome are actually clustered, which are evolutionarily stable to different extents and biologically meaningful when evaluated among genomes within and across lineages. Until now, many questions concerning gene organization, such as what is the minimal number of genes in a cluster and what is the driving force leading to gene co-regulation, remain to be addressed. Here, we provide a user-friendly database-LCGbase (a comprehensive database for lineage-based co-regulated genes)-hosting information on evolutionary dynamics of gene clustering and ordering within animal kingdoms in two different lineages: vertebrates and arthropods. The database is constructed on a web-based Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP framework and effective interactive user-inquiry service. Compared to other gene annotation databases with similar purposes, our database has three comprehensible advantages. First, our database is inclusive, including all high-quality genome assemblies of vertebrates and representative arthropod species. Second, it is human-centric since we map all gene clusters from other genomes in an order of lineage-ranks (such as primates, mammals, warm-blooded, and reptiles) onto human genome and start the database from well-defined gene pairs (a minimal cluster where the two adjacent genes are oriented as co-directional, convergent, and divergent pairs) to large gene clusters. Furthermore, users can search for any adjacent genes and their detailed annotations. Third, the database provides flexible parameter definitions, such as the distance of transcription start sites between two adjacent genes, which is extendable to genes that flanking the cluster across species. We also provide useful tools for sequence alignment, gene

  12. The novel regulatory ncRNA, NfiS, optimizes nitrogen fixation via base pairing with the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yuhua; Yan, Yongliang; Deng, Zhiping; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Shang, Liguo; Yang, Zhimin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun; Ke, Qi; Lu, Jiasi; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen; Xie, Zhihong; Cheng, Qi; Elmerich, Claudine; Lin, Min

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most Pseudomonas, the root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 fixes nitrogen after the horizontal acquisition of a nitrogen-fixing (nif) island. A genome-wide search for small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in P. stutzeri A1501 identified the novel P. stutzeri-specific ncRNA NfiS in the core genome, whose synthesis was significantly induced under nitrogen fixation or sorbitol stress conditions. The expression of NfiS was RNA chaperone Hfq-dependent and activated by the sigma factor RpoN/global nitrogen activator NtrC/nif-specific activator NifA regulatory cascade. The nfiS-deficient mutant displayed reduced nitrogenase activity, as well as increased sensitivity to multiple stresses, such as osmotic and oxidative stresses. Secondary structure prediction and complementation studies confirmed that a stem-loop structure was essential for NfiS to regulate the nitrogenase gene nifK mRNA synthesis and thus nitrogenase activity. Microscale thermophoresis and physiological analysis showed that NfiS directly pairs with nifK mRNA and ultimately enhances nitrogenase activity by increasing the translation efficiency and the half-life of nifK mRNA. Our data also suggest structural and functional divergence of NfiS evolution in diazotrophic and nondiazotrophic backgrounds. It is proposed that NfiS was recruited by nifK mRNA as a novel regulator to integrate the horizontally acquired nif island into host global networks. PMID:27407147

  13. Use of transmitochondrial cybrids to assign a complex I defect to the mitochondrial DNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 gene mutation at nucleotide pair 14459 that causes Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jun, A S; Trounce, I A; Brown, M D; Shoffner, J M; Wallace, D C

    1996-01-01

    A heteroplasmic G-to-A transition at nucleotide pair (np) 14459 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) gene has been identified as the cause of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and/or pediatric-onset dystonia in three unrelated families. This ND6 np 14459 mutation changes a moderately conserved alanine to a valine at amino acid position 72 of the ND6 protein. Enzymologic analysis of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (complex I) with submitochondrial particles isolated from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts revealed a 60% reduction (P < 0.005) of complex I-specific activity in patient cell lines compared with controls, with no differences in enzymatic activity for complexes II plus III, III and IV. This biochemical defect was assigned to the ND6 np 14459 mutation by using transmitochondrial cybrids in which patient Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines were enucleated and the cytoplasts were fused to a mtDNA-deficient (p 0) lymphoblastoid recipient cell line. Cybrids harboring the np 14459 mutation exhibited a 39% reduction (p < 0.02) in complex I-specific activity relative to wild-type cybrid lines but normal activity for the other complexes. Kinetic analysis of the np 14459 mutant complex I revealed that the Vmax of the enzyme was reduced while the Km remained the same as that of wild type. Furthermore, specific activity was inhibited by increasing concentrations of the reduced coenzyme Q analog decylubiquinol. These observations suggest that the np 14459 mutation may alter the coenzyme Q-binding site of complex I. PMID:8622678

  14. Tissue-specific epigenetics in gene neighborhoods: myogenic transcription factor genes

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sruti; Terragni, Jolyon; Zhang, Guoqiang; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Haushka, Stephen; Johnston, Douglas; Baribault, Carl; Lacey, Michelle; Ehrlich, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) genes, MYOD1, MYOG, MYF6 and MYF5, are critical for the skeletal muscle lineage. Here, we used various epigenome profiles from human myoblasts (Mb), myotubes (Mt), muscle and diverse non-muscle samples to elucidate the involvement of multigene neighborhoods in the regulation of MRF genes. We found more far-distal enhancer chromatin associated with MRF genes in Mb and Mt than previously reported from studies in mice. For the MYF5/MYF6 gene-pair, regions of Mb-associated enhancer chromatin were located throughout the adjacent 236-kb PTPRQ gene even though Mb expressed negligible amounts of PTPRQ mRNA. Some enhancer chromatin regions inside PTPRQ in Mb were also seen in PTPRQ mRNA-expressing non-myogenic cells. This suggests dual-purpose PTPRQ enhancers that upregulate expression of PTPRQ in non-myogenic cells and MYF5/MYF6 in myogenic cells. In contrast, the myogenic enhancer chromatin regions distal to MYOD1 were intergenic and up to 19 kb long. Two of them contain small, known MYOD1 enhancers, and one displayed an unusually high level of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in a quantitative DNA hydroxymethylation assay. Unexpectedly, three regions of MYOD1-distal enhancer chromatin in Mb and Mt overlapped enhancer chromatin in umbilical vein endothelial cells, which might upregulate a distant gene (PIK3C2A). Lastly, genes surrounding MYOG were preferentially transcribed in Mt, like MYOG itself, and exhibited nearby myogenic enhancer chromatin. These neighboring chromatin regions may be enhancers acting in concert to regulate myogenic expression of multiple adjacent genes. Our findings reveal the very different and complex organization of gene neighborhoods containing closely related transcription factor genes. PMID:26041816

  15. Existence of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Kyu; Lee, Kyoung Hee

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, using the fixed point theorem for Kakutani factorizable multifunctions, we shall prove new existence theorems of best proximity pairs and equilibrium pairs for free abstract economies, which include the previous fixed point theorems and equilibrium existence theorems.

  16. MicroSyn: a user friendly tool for detection of microsynteny in a gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Bin; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Background: The traditional phylogeny analysis within gene family is mainly based on DNA or amino acid sequence homologies. However, these phylogenetic tree analyses are not suitable for those non-traditional gene families like microRNA with very short sequences. For the normal protein-coding gene families, low bootstrap values are frequently encountered in some nodes, suggesting low confidence or likely inappropriateness of placement of those members in those nodes. Results: We introduce MicroSyn software as a means of detecting microsynteny in adjacent genomic regions surrounding genes in gene families. MicroSyn searches for conserved, flanking colinear homologous gene pairs between two genomic fragments to determine the relationship between two members in a gene family. The colinearity of homologous pairs is controlled by a statistical distance function. As a result, gene duplication history can be inferred from the output independent of gene sequences. MicroSyn was designed for both experienced and non-expert users with a user-friendly graphical-user interface. MicroSyn is available from: http://fcsb.njau.edu. cn/microsyn/. Conclusions: Case studies of the microRNA167 genes in plants and Xyloglucan ndotransglycosylase/Hydrolase family in Populus trichocarpa were presented to show the utility of the software. The easy using of MicroSyn in these examples suggests that the software is an additional valuable means to address the problem intrinsic in the computational methods and sequence qualities themselves in gene family analysis.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of the leu C and npr M genes and a putative spo IV gene from Bacillus megaterium DSM319.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, F; Busskamp, M; Wittchen, K D

    1994-05-01

    The leuC gene, encoding 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, the nprM gene (neutral protease) and a sporulation gene coding for a putative spoIV protein (spoIV) from Bacillus megaterium DSM 319 were cloned and the nucleotide sequences were determined. The leuC gene is 1101 bp in length, preceded by a ribosome binding site; no promoter consensus sequence could be found. The nucleotide sequence from nprM when compared to the recently published gene from B. megaterium ATCC 14581 exhibited only a 17-base pair deviation. From a sporulation mutant isolated after transposon-mutagenesis with transposon Tn917 the insertion site of the transposon was cloned and adjacent chromosomal fragments were characterized. An open reading frame that encodes for a putative spo protein of 247 amino-acid residues was identified. PMID:7764969

  18. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  19. Prospective very young asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galád, A.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Zizka, J.

    2014-07-01

    Several tens of asteroid pairs can be discerned from the background main-belt asteroids. The majority of them are thought to have formed within only the last few 10^6 yr. The youngest recognized pairs have formed more than ≈ 10 kyr ago. As some details of pair formation are still not understood well, the study of young pairs is of great importance. It is mainly because the conditions at the time of the pair formation could be deduced much more reliably for young pairs. For example, space weathering on the surfaces of the components, or changes in their rotational properties (in spin rates, tumbling, coordinates of rotational pole) could be negligible since the formation of young pairs. Also, possible strong perturbations by main-belt bodies on pair formation can be reliably studied only for extremely young pairs. Some pairs can quickly blend in with the background asteroids, so even the frequency of asteroid pair formation could be determined more reliably based on young pairs (though only after a statistically significant sample is at disposal). In our regular search for young pairs in the growing asteroid database, only multiopposition asteroids with very similar orbital and proper elements are investigated. Every pair component is represented by a number of clones within orbital uncertainties and drifting in semimajor axis due to the Yarkovsky effect. We found that, if the previously unrecognized pairs (87887) 2000 SS_{286} - 2002 AT_{49} and (355258) 2007 LY_{4} - 2013AF_{40} formed at the recent very close approach of their components, they could become the youngest known pairs. In both cases, the relative encounter velocities of the components were only ˜ 0.1 m s^{-1}. However, the minimum distances between some clones are too large and a few clones of the latter pair did not encounter recently (within ≈ 10 kyr). The age of some prospective young pairs cannot be determined reliably without improved orbital properties (e.g., the second component of a pair

  20. Multiple origins of asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotationally fissioned asteroids produce unbound asteroid pairs that have very similar heliocentric orbits. Backward integration of their current heliocentric orbits provides an age of closest proximity that can be used to date the rotational fission event. Most asteroid pairs follow a predicted theoretical relationship between the primary spin period and the mass ratio of the two pair members that is a direct consequence of the YORP-induced rotational fission hypothesis. If the progenitor asteroid has strength, asteroid pairs may have higher mass ratios or faster rotating primaries. However, the process of secondary fission leaves the originally predicted trend unaltered. We also describe the characteristics of pair members produced by four alternative routes from a rotational fission event to an asteroid pair. Unlike direct formation from the event itself, the age of closest proximity of these pairs cannot generally be used to date the rotational fission event since considerable time may have passed.

  1. Stereo Pair, Honolulu, Oahu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, is a large and growing urban area. This stereoscopic image pair, combining a Landsat image with topography measured by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), shows how topography controls the urban pattern. This color image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    Features of interest in this scene include Diamond Head (an extinct volcano near the bottom of the image), Waikiki Beach (just above Diamond Head), the Punchbowl National Cemetary (another extinct volcano, near the image center), downtown Honolulu and Honolulu harbor (image left-center), and offshore reef patterns. The slopes of the Koolau mountain range are seen in the right half of the image. Clouds commonly hang above ridges and peaks of the Hawaiian Islands, but in this synthesized stereo rendition appear draped directly on the mountains. The clouds are actually about 1000 meters (3300 feet) above sea level.

    This stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image collected at the same time as the SRTM flight. The topography data were used to create two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the

  2. Stereo Pair, Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This stereoscopic image pair is a perspective view that shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north toward the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada Flintridge are also shown. The cluster of large buildings left of center, at the base of the mountains, is the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Data shown in this image can be used to predict both how wildfires spread over the terrain and how mudflows are channeled down the canyons.

    The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation, U. S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provided the image detail, and the Landsat Thematic Mapper provided the color. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data and the aerial photography. The image can be viewed in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair, and viewing them with a stereoscope.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  4. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence. PMID:17730606

  5. Pygmy stars: first pair.

    PubMed

    Zwicky, F

    1966-07-01

    The binary LP 101-15/16 having the proper motion of 1.62 seconds of arc per year has been studied with the prime-focus spectrograph of the 200-inch (508 cm) telescope. Indications are that LP 101-15/16 is the first pair of pygmy stars ever discovered. One of its components, LP 101-16, is probably a blue pygmy star which is at least four magnitudes fainter than the ordinary white dwarfs. Also, two of the Balmer lines in absorption appear to be displaced toward the red by amounts which indicate the existence of an Einstein gravitational red shift corresponding to about 1000 km sec-1. On the other hand LP 101-15 is red and shows an entirely new type of spectrum, which suggests that it may be a first representative of a type of red pygmy star which is 2.5 magnitudes fainter than the M-type dwarf stars of the main sequence.

  6. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  7. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  9. A suppressor of mutations in the region adjacent to iterons of pSC101 ori.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkubo, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1997-01-01

    Some single-base changes in a 14-bp region (the downstream region) adjacent to three repeated sequences (iterons) in pSC101 ori are very deleterious for replication. We isolated a host suppressor mutation for one of these mutations and found that the suppressor suppressed all the mutations tested in the downstream region. The nucleotide sequence of the suppressor revealed that the suppressor gene was identical to dksA, which encodes a multicopy suppressor of the heat shock gene dnaK. PMID:9068662

  10. Gene replacements and insertions in rice by intron targeting using CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Meng, Xiangbing; Zong, Yuan; Chen, Kunling; Zhang, Huawei; Liu, Jinxing; Li, Jiayang; Gao, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific nucleases have been exploited to create targeted gene knockouts in various plants(1), but replacing a fragment and even obtaining gene insertions at specific loci in plant genomes remain a serious challenge. Here, we report efficient intron-mediated site-specific gene replacement and insertion approaches that generate mutations using the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system. Using a pair of single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeting adjacent introns and a donor DNA template including the same pair of sgRNA sites, we achieved gene replacements in the rice endogenous gene 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) at a frequency of 2.0%. We also obtained targeted gene insertions at a frequency of 2.2% using a sgRNA targeting one intron and a donor DNA template including the same sgRNA site. Rice plants harbouring the OsEPSPS gene with the intended substitutions were glyphosate-resistant. Furthermore, the site-specific gene replacements and insertions were faithfully transmitted to the next generation. These newly developed approaches can be generally used to replace targeted gene fragments and to insert exogenous DNA sequences into specific genomic sites in rice and other plants. PMID:27618611

  11. Comprehensive annotation of bidirectional promoters identifies co-regulation among breast and ovarian cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mary Q; Koehly, Laura M; Elnitski, Laura L

    2007-04-20

    A "bidirectional gene pair" comprises two adjacent genes whose transcription start sites are neighboring and directed away from each other. The intervening regulatory region is called a "bidirectional promoter." These promoters are often associated with genes that function in DNA repair, with the potential to participate in the development of cancer. No connection between these gene pairs and cancer has been previously investigated. Using the database of spliced-expressed sequence tags (ESTs), we identified the most complete collection of human transcripts under the control of bidirectional promoters. A rigorous screen of the spliced EST data identified new bidirectional promoters, many of which functioned as alternative promoters or regulated novel transcripts. Additionally, we show a highly significant enrichment of bidirectional promoters in genes implicated in somatic cancer, including a substantial number of genes implicated in breast and ovarian cancers. The repeated use of this promoter structure in the human genome suggests it could regulate co-expression patterns among groups of genes. Using microarray expression data from 79 human tissues, we verify regulatory networks among genes controlled by bidirectional promoters. Subsets of these promoters contain similar combinations of transcription factor binding sites, including evolutionarily conserved ETS factor binding sites in ERBB2, FANCD2, and BRCA2. Interpreting the regulation of genes involved in co-expression networks, especially those involved in cancer, will be an important step toward defining molecular events that may contribute to disease.

  12. Discovering Pair-wise Synergies in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Cao, Dan; Gao, Jun; Yuan, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    Informative gene selection can have important implications for the improvement of cancer diagnosis and the identification of new drug targets. Individual-gene-ranking methods ignore interactions between genes. Furthermore, popular pair-wise gene evaluation methods, e.g. TSP and TSG, are helpless for discovering pair-wise interactions. Several efforts to discover pair-wise synergy have been made based on the information approach, such as EMBP and FeatKNN. However, the methods which are employed to estimate mutual information, e.g. binarization, histogram-based and KNN estimators, depend on known data or domain characteristics. Recently, Reshef et al. proposed a novel maximal information coefficient (MIC) measure to capture a wide range of associations between two variables that has the property of generality. An extension from MIC(X; Y) to MIC(X1; X2; Y) is therefore desired. We developed an approximation algorithm for estimating MIC(X1; X2; Y) where Y is a discrete variable. MIC(X1; X2; Y) is employed to detect pair-wise synergy in simulation and cancer microarray data. The results indicate that MIC(X1; X2; Y) also has the property of generality. It can discover synergic genes that are undetectable by reference feature selection methods such as MIC(X; Y) and TSG. Synergic genes can distinguish different phenotypes. Finally, the biological relevance of these synergic genes is validated with GO annotation and OUgene database. PMID:27470995

  13. Discovering Pair-wise Synergies in Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Cao, Dan; Gao, Jun; Yuan, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    Informative gene selection can have important implications for the improvement of cancer diagnosis and the identification of new drug targets. Individual-gene-ranking methods ignore interactions between genes. Furthermore, popular pair-wise gene evaluation methods, e.g. TSP and TSG, are helpless for discovering pair-wise interactions. Several efforts to discover pair-wise synergy have been made based on the information approach, such as EMBP and FeatKNN. However, the methods which are employed to estimate mutual information, e.g. binarization, histogram-based and KNN estimators, depend on known data or domain characteristics. Recently, Reshef et al. proposed a novel maximal information coefficient (MIC) measure to capture a wide range of associations between two variables that has the property of generality. An extension from MIC(X; Y) to MIC(X1; X2; Y) is therefore desired. We developed an approximation algorithm for estimating MIC(X1; X2; Y) where Y is a discrete variable. MIC(X1; X2; Y) is employed to detect pair-wise synergy in simulation and cancer microarray data. The results indicate that MIC(X1; X2; Y) also has the property of generality. It can discover synergic genes that are undetectable by reference feature selection methods such as MIC(X; Y) and TSG. Synergic genes can distinguish different phenotypes. Finally, the biological relevance of these synergic genes is validated with GO annotation and OUgene database. PMID:27470995

  14. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate. PMID:27573684

  15. Pairs of promoter pairs in a web of transcription.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2016-08-30

    A new analysis has characterized a fundamental building block of complex transcribed loci. Constellations of core promoters can generally be reduced to pairs of divergent transcription units, where the distance between the pairs of transcription units correlates with constraints on genomic context, which in turn contribute to transcript fate.

  16. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III

    1996-10-29

    Methods of operation are disclosed for different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced-apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity. 13 figs.

  17. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing using multiple electrodes and with resistances being defined between the electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1996-01-01

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from inside the cased well. The multiple electrode apparatus have a minimum of three spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage the interior of the cased well. Measurement information is obtained related to current which is caused to flow from the cased well into the adjacent geological formation. First compensation information is obtained related to a first casing resistance between a first pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. Second compensation information is obtained related to a second casing resistance between a second pair of the spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes. The measurement information, and first and second compensation information are used to determine a magnitude related to the adjacent formation resistivity.

  18. Assessment Strategies for Pair Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Jan Hendrik; Mentz, Elsa; Meyer, Lukas

    2009-01-01

    Although pair programming has proved its usefulness in teaching and learning programming skills, it is difficult to assess the individual roles and abilities of students whilst programming in pairs. (Note that within this manuscript, the term assessment refers to evaluating individual student performance.) Assessing only the outcomes of a pair…

  19. Differential transcriptional profiling of damaged and intact adjacent dorsal root ganglia neurons in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, A K; Batti, L; Bilbao, D; Buness, A; Rittner, H L; Heppenstall, P A

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and "bystanders," thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG. PMID:25880204

  20. Differential transcriptional profiling of damaged and intact adjacent dorsal root ganglia neurons in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, A K; Batti, L; Bilbao, D; Buness, A; Rittner, H L; Heppenstall, P A

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and "bystanders," thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG.

  1. Differential Transcriptional Profiling of Damaged and Intact Adjacent Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, A. K.; Batti, L.; Bilbao, D.; Buness, A.; Rittner, H. L.; Heppenstall, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and “bystanders,” thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG. PMID:25880204

  2. Guanidinium Pairing Facilitates Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Allolio, Christoph; Baxova, Katarina; Vazdar, Mario; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2016-01-14

    Ab initio free energy calculations of guanidinium pairing in aqueous solution confirm the counterintuitive conjecture that the like-charge ion pair is thermodynamically stable. Transferring the guanidinium pair to the inside of a POPC lipid bilayer, like-charge ion pairing is found to occur also inside the membrane defect. It is found to contribute to the nonadditivity of ion transfer, thereby facilitating the presence of ions inside the bilayer. The effect is quantified by free energy decomposition and comparison with ammonium ions, which do not form a stable pair. The presence of two charges inside the center of the bilayer leads to the formation of a pore. Potential consequences for cell penetrating peptides and ion conduction are drawn.

  3. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  4. Stereo Pair: Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, near El Cain, Argentina shows complexly eroded volcanic terrain, with basalt mesas, sinkholes, landslide debris, playas, and relatively few integrated drainage channels. Surrounding this site (but also extending far to the east) is a broad plateau capped by basalt, the Meseta de Somuncura. Here, near the western edge of the plateau, erosion has broken through the basalt cap in a variety of ways. On the mesas, water-filled sinkholes (lower left) are most likely the result of the collapse of old lava tubes. Along the edges of the mesas (several locations) the basalt seems to be sliding away from the plateau in a series of slices. Water erosion by overland flow is also evident, particularly in canyons where vegetation blankets the drainage channels (green patterns, bottom of image). However, overland water flow does not extend very far at any location. This entire site drains to local playas, some of which are seen here (blue). While the water can reach the playas and then evaporate, what becomes of the eroded rock debris? Wind might excavate some of the finer eroded debris, but the fate of much of the missing bedrock remains mysterious.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7 satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The

  5. Stereo Pair, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This view of northern Patagonia, at Los Menucos, Argentina shows remnants of relatively young volcanoes built upon an eroded plain of much older and contorted volcanic, granitic, and sedimentary rocks. The large purple, brown, and green 'butterfly' pattern is a single volcano that has been deeply eroded. Large holes on the volcano's flanks indicate that they may have collapsed soon after eruption, as fluid molten rock drained out from under its cooled and solidified outer shell. At the upper left, a more recent eruption occurred and produced a small volcanic cone and a long stream of lava, which flowed down a gully. At the top of the image, volcanic intrusions permeated the older rocks resulting in a chain of small dark volcanic peaks. At the top center of the image, two halves of a tan ellipse pattern are offset from each other. This feature is an old igneous intrusion that has been split by a right-lateral fault. The apparent offset is about 6.6 kilometers (4 miles). Color, tonal, and topographic discontinuities reveal the fault trace as it extends across the image to the lower left. However, young unbroken basalt flows show that the fault has not been active recently.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive

  6. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks.

  7. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  9. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  10. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  13. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  14. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  15. 2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. 7; THIS CONTROL GATE IS A 1980s RECONSTRUCTION. - Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lift Lock No. 7 & Control Gate, East side of DuPage River, Channahon, Will County, IL

  16. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  17. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  1. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  2. GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM DREY STREET PLANT, INSIDE WELCOME WALL - Chambers Window Glass Company, Warehouse & Shipping, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  3. 10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF REAR PORCH. SHED IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Butt Valley Dam, Gate Tender's House, Butt Valley Reservoir Road, Caribou, Plumas County, CA

  4. Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance of the northwest wing - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  5. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  6. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  8. 31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  10. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  11. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  12. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  14. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.

  15. A constitutively expressed pair of rpoE2-chrR2 in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 is required for survival under antibiotic and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Namrata; Kumar, Santosh; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors (σ(E)) are known to bring about changes in gene expression to enable bacteria to adapt to different stresses. The Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 genome harbours nine genes encoding σ(E), of which two are adjacent to the genes encoding ChrR-type zinc-binding anti-sigma (ZAS) factors. We describe here the role and regulation of a new pair of rpoE-chrR, which was found in the genome of A. brasilense Sp7 in addition to the previously described rpoE-chrR pair (designated rpoE1-chrR1). The rpoE2-chrR2 pair is also cotranscribed, and their products show protein-protein interaction. The -10 and -35 promoter elements of rpoE2-chrR2 and rpoE1-chrR1 were similar but not identical. Unlike the promoter of rpoE1-chrR1, the rpoE2-chrR2 promoter was neither autoregulated nor induced by oxidative stress. Inactivation of chrR2 or overexpression of rpoE2 in A. brasilense Sp7 resulted in an overproduction of carotenoids. It also conferred resistance to oxidative stresses and antibiotics. By controlling the synthesis of carotenoids, initiation and elongation of translation, protein folding and purine biosynthesis, RpoE2 seems to play a crucial role in preventing and repairing the cellular damage caused by oxidative stress. Lack of autoregulation and constitutive expression of rpoE2-chrR2 suggest that RpoE2-ChrR2 may provide a rapid mechanism to cope with oxidative stress, wherein singlet oxygen ((1)O(2))-mediated dissociation of the RpoE2-ChrR2 complex might release RpoE2 to drive the expression of its target genes.

  16. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  17. Pairing Properties of Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Pairing properties of even-even superheavy N=184 isotones are studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS approach. In the particle-hole channel we take the Skyrme energy density functional SLy4, while in the particle-particle channel we employ the seniority pairing force and zero-range delta-interactions with different forms of density dependence. We conclude that the calculated static fission trajectories weakly depend on the specific form of the delta-pairing interaction. We also investigate the impact of triaxiality on the inner fission barrier and find a rather strong Z dependence of the effect.

  18. Lack of linkage between the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene and bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, C A; Sarlis, N J; Berrettini, W H; Badner, J A; Chrousos, G P; Gershon, E S; Detera-Wadleigh, S D

    1997-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in the regulation of the stress response. Abnormalities in CRH secretion have been documented in both the depression and manic phases of bipolar disorder (BPD). In the present study, we investigated genetic linkage between the CRH gene and BPD in 22 pedigrees. A highly informative, short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism adjacent to the CRH gene on human chromosomal region 8q13 was used to examine linkage. Affected sibling pair (ASP) and the likelihood-based disequilibrium tests revealed nonsignificant values. We conclude that the CRH gene is not linked to BPD; if genes involved in the regulation of stress response are indeed linked to BPD, the search should be directed towards those that regulate CRH secretion or its effects on target tissues.

  19. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  20. Comparison of Flavivirus Universal Primer Pairs and Development of a Rapid, Highly Sensitive Heminested Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Detection of Flaviviruses Targeted to a Conserved Region of the NS5 Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scaramozzino, Natale; Crance, Jean-Marc; Jouan, Alain; DeBriel, Dominique A.; Stoll, Françoise; Garin, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Arthropod-transmitted flaviviruses are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality, causing severe encephalitic, hemorrhagic, and febrile illnesses in humans. Because there are no specific clinical symptoms for infection by a determined virus and because different arboviruses could be present in the same area, a genus diagnosis by PCR would be a useful first-line diagnostic method. The six published Flavivirus genus primer pairs localized in the NS1, NS3, NS5, and 3′ NC regions were evaluated in terms of specificity and sensitivity with flaviviruses (including the main viruses pathogenic for humans) at a titer of 105 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50s) ml−1 with a common identification step by agarose gel electrophoresis. Only one NS5 primer pair allowed the detection of all tested flaviviruses with the sensitivity limit of 105 TCID50s ml−1. Using a heminested PCR with new primers designed in the same region after an alignment of 30 different flaviviruses, the sensitivity of reverse transcription-PCR was improved and allowed the detection of about 200 infectious doses ml−1 with all of the tick- and mosquito-borne flaviviruses tested. It was confirmed that the sequenced amplified products in the NS5 region allowed predictability of flavivirus species by dendrogram, including the New York 99 West Nile strain. This technique was successfully performed with a cerebrospinal fluid sample from a patient hospitalized with West Nile virus encephalitis. PMID:11326014

  1. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein–gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. PMID:26936792

  2. Dynamical interactions of galaxy pairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    1990-01-01

    Here the author briefly reviews the dynamics of sinking satellites and the effect of companions on elliptical galaxies. The author then discusses recent work on interacting disk systems, and finally focuses on a favorite interacting pair, NGC 5194/5195.

  3. Pair Excitations in Fermi Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Helga M.; Krotscheck, Eckhard; Schörkhuber, Karl; Springer, Josef

    2006-09-01

    We present a theory of multi-pair excitations in strongly interacting Fermi systems. Based on an equations-of-motion approach for time-dependent pair correlations it leads to a qualitatively new structure of the density-density response function. Our theory reduces to both, i) the "correlated" random-phase approximation (RPA) for fermions if the two-pair excitations are ignored, and ii) the correlated Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theory for bosons in the appropriate limit. The theory preserves the two first energy-weighted sum rules. A familiar problem of the standard RPA is that its zero-sound mode is energetically much higher than found in experiments. The popular cure of introducing an average effective mass in the Lindhard function violates sum rules and describes the physics incorrectly. We demonstrate that the inclusion of correlated pair excitations gives the correct dispersion. As in 4He, a modification of the effective mass is unnecessary also in 3He.

  4. Double binding energy differences: Mean-field or pairing effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chong

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter we present a systematic analysis on the average interaction between the last protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei, which can be extracted from the double differences of nuclear binding energies. The empirical average proton-neutron interaction Vpn thus derived from experimental data can be described in a very simple form as the interplay of the nuclear mean field and the pairing interaction. It is found that the smooth behavior as well as the local fluctuations of the Vpn in even-even nuclei with N ≠ Z are dominated by the contribution from the proton-neutron monopole interactions. A strong additional contribution from the isoscalar monopole interaction and isovector proton-neutron pairing interaction is seen in the Vpn for even-even N = Z nuclei and for the adjacent odd-A nuclei with one neutron or proton being subtracted.

  5. Gene expression profiles on predicting protein interaction network and exploring of new treatments for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zehui; Zheng, Rui; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we aimed to explore disease-associated genes and their functions in lung cancer. We downloaded the gene expression profile GSE4115 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Total 97 lung cancer and 90 adjacent non-tumor lung tissue (normal) samples were applied to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by paired t test and variance analysis in spectral angle mapper (SAM) package in R. Gene Ontology (GO) functional enrichment analysis of DEGs were performed with Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery, followed by construction of protein-protein interaction (PPI) network from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD). Finally, network modules were analyzed by the MCODE algorithm to detect protein complexes in the PPI network. Total 3,102 genes were identified as DEGs at FDR < 0.05, including 1,146 down-regulated and 1,956 up-regulated DEGs. GO functional enrichment analysis revealed that up-regulated DEGs mainly participated in cell cycle and intracellular related functions, and down-regulated DEGs might influence cell functions. There were 39,240 pairs of PPIs in human obtained from HPRD databases, 3,102 DEGs were mapped to this PPI network, in which 2,429 pairs of PPIs and 1,342 genes were identified. With MCODE algorithm, 48 modules were selected, including five corresponding modules and three modules with differences in gene expressing profiles. In addition, three DGEs, FXR2, ARFGAP1 and ELAVL1 were discovered as potential lung cancer related genes. The discovery of featured genes which were probably related to lung cancer, has a great significance on studying mechanism, distinguishing normal and cancer tissues, and exploring new treatments for lung cancer. PMID:25205123

  6. A genome walking strategy for the identification of nucleotide sequences adjacent to known regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Yao, Ting; Cai, Mei; Xiao, Xiuqing; Ding, Xuezhi; Xia, Liqiu

    2013-02-01

    To identify the transposon insertion sites in a soil actinomycete, Saccharopolyspora spinosa, a genome walking approach, termed SPTA-PCR, was developed. In SPTA-PCR, a simple procedure consisting of TA cloning and a high stringency PCR, following the single primer-mediated, randomly-primed PCR, can eliminate non-target DNA fragments and obtain target fragments specifically. Using SPTA-PCR, the DNA sequence adjacent to the highly conserved region of lectin coding gene in onion plant, Allium chinense, was also cloned. PMID:23108875

  7. Superconductivity: The persistence of pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, Alex; Littlewood, Peter

    2015-05-20

    Superconductivity stems from a weak attraction between electrons that causes them to form bound pairs and behave much like bosons. These so-called Cooper pairs are phase coherent, which leads to the astonishing properties of zero electrical resistance and magnetic flux expulsion typical of superconducting materials. This coherent state may be qualitatively understood within the Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) model, which predicts that a gas of interacting bosons will become unstable below a critical temperature and condense into a phase of matter with a macroscopic, coherent population in the lowest energy state, as happens in 4He or cold atomic gases. The successful theory proposed by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS) predicts that at the superconducting transition temperature Tc, electrons simultaneously form pairs and condense, with no sign of pairing above Tc. Theorists have long surmised that the BCS and BEC models are opposite limits of a single theory and that strong interactions or low density can, in principle, drive the system to a paired state at a temperature Tpair higher than Tc, making the transition to the superconducting state BEC-like (Fig. 1). Yet most superconductors to date are reasonably well described by BCS theory or its extensions, and there has been scant evidence in electronic materials for the existence of pairing independent of the full superconducting state (though an active debate rages over the cuprate superconductors). Writing in Nature, Jeremy Levy and colleagues have now used ingenious nanostructured devices to provide evidence for electron pairing1. Perhaps surprisingly, the material they have studied is a venerable, yet enigmatic, low-temperature superconductor, SrTiO3.

  8. Bacterial community composition in Brazilian Anthrosols and adjacent soils characterized using culturing and molecular identification.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, B; Grossman, J; Tsai, M T; Gomes, J E; Lehmann, J; Peterson, J; Neves, E; Thies, J E

    2009-07-01

    Microbial community composition was examined in two soil types, Anthrosols and adjacent soils, sampled from three locations in the Brazilian Amazon. The Anthrosols, also known as Amazonian dark earths, are highly fertile soils that are a legacy of pre-Columbian settlement. Both Anthrosols and adjacent soils are derived from the same parent material and subject to the same environmental conditions, including rainfall and temperature; however, the Anthrosols contain high levels of charcoal-like black carbon from which they derive their dark color. The Anthrosols typically have higher cation exchange capacity, higher pH, and higher phosphorus and calcium contents. We used culture media prepared from soil extracts to isolate bacteria unique to the two soil types and then sequenced their 16S rRNA genes to determine their phylogenetic placement. Higher numbers of culturable bacteria, by over two orders of magnitude at the deepest sampling depths, were counted in the Anthrosols. Sequences of bacteria isolated on soil extract media yielded five possible new bacterial families. Also, a higher number of families in the bacteria were represented by isolates from the deeper soil depths in the Anthrosols. Higher bacterial populations and a greater diversity of isolates were found in all of the Anthrosols, to a depth of up to 1 m, compared to adjacent soils located within 50-500 m of their associated Anthrosols. Compared to standard culture media, soil extract media revealed diverse soil microbial populations adapted to the unique biochemistry and physiological ecology of these Anthrosols. PMID:19381712

  9. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Tumor, Adjacent, and Normal Tissues of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhenzhu; Shen, Yanting; Lu, Jiafeng; Xie, Xueying; Ge, Qinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major type of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma (AC), one major subtype of NSCLC. In this study, the miRNAs were detected in normal, adjacent, and tumor tissues by next-generation sequencing. Then the expression levels of differential miRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In the results, 259, 401, and 389 miRNAs were detected in tumor, adjacent, and normal tissues of pooled AC samples, respectively. In addition, for the first time we have found that miR-21-5p and miR-196a-5p were gradually upregulated from normal to adjacent to tumor tissues; miR-218-5p was gradually downregulated with 2-fold or greater change in AC tissues. These 3 miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Lastly, we predicted target genes of these 3 miRNAs and enriched the potential functions and regulatory pathways. The aberrant miR-21-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-218-5p may become biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. This research may be useful for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and the study of pathology in lung cancer. PMID:27247934

  10. Nongenic transcription, gene regulation and action at a distance.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter R

    2003-11-15

    In eukaryotes, motifs such as silencers, enhancers and locus control regions act over thousands of base pairs to regulate adjacent genes; insulators limit such effects, and barriers confine repressive heterochromatin to particular chromosomal segments. Recent results show that many of these motifs are nongenic transcription units, and two of them directly contact their targets lying further down the chromosome to loop the intervening DNA: the barriers (scs and scs') flanking the 87A7 heat-shock locus in the fly contact each other, and a locus control region touches the beta-globin gene in the mouse. I hypothesize that the act of transcription underlies the function of these regulators; active polymerizing complexes tend to cluster into 'factories' and this facilitates molecular contact between the transcribed regulator and its distant (and transcribed) target. PMID:14576342

  11. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-10-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  12. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  13. Ambiguities in the elastic scattering of 8 MeV neutrons from adjacent nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Lawson, R.D.; Guenther, P.T.

    1989-10-01

    Ratios of the cross sections for elastic scattering of 8 MeV neutrons from adjacent nuclei are measured over the angular range {approx}20{degree} {minus} 160{degree} for the target pairs {sup 51}V/Cr, {sup 59}Co/{sup 58}Ni, Cu/Zn, {sup 89}Y/{sup 93}Nb, {sup 89}Y/Zr, {sup 93}Nb/Zr, In/Cd and {sup 209}Bi/Pb. The observed ratios vary from unity by as much as a factor of {approx}2 at some angles for the lighter target pairs. Approximately half the measured ratios are reasonably explained by a simple spherical optical model, including size and isospin contributions. In all cases, the geometry of the real optical--model potential is essentially the same for neighboring nuclei, and the real--potential strengths are consistent with the Lane model. In contrast, it is found that the imaginary potential may be quite different for adjacent nuclei, and the nature of this difference is examined. It is shown that the spin--spin interaction has a negligible effect on the calculation of the elastic--scattering ratios, but that channel coupling, leading to a large reorientation of the target ground state, can be a consideration, particularly in the {sup 59}Co/{sup 58}Ni case. In the A {approx} 50--60 region the calculated ratios are sensitive to spin--orbit effects, but the exact nature of this interaction must await more definitive polarization measurements. The measured and calculated results suggest that the concept of a conventional global'' or even regional'' optical potential provides no more than a qualitative representation of the physical reality for a number of cases. 48 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Enhanced Phase Synchronization of Blood Flow Oscillations between Heated and Adjacent Non-heated Sacral Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2012-01-01

    The study of skin microcirculation may be used to assess risk for pressure ulcers. It is observed that local heating not only causes an increase in blood flow of the heated skin but also in the adjacent non-heated skin. The underlying physiological mechanism of this indirect vasodilation of the non-heated skin remains unclear. We hypothesized that blood flow oscillations (BFO) in the adjacent non-heated skin area synchronize with BFO in the heated skin, thus inducing a vasodilatory response. We investigated BFO in the heated and adjacent non-heated skin (12.1±1.2 cm distance) on the sacrum in 12 healthy participants. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose blood flow signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and the IMFs with power spectra over the frequency range of 0.0095–0.02 Hz, 0.02–0.05 Hz, and 0.05–0.15 Hz were chosen as the characteristic components corresponding to metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic regulations, respectively. Then, the instantaneous phase of the characteristic components was calculated using the Hilbert transform. From the time series of phase difference between a pair of characteristic components, the epochs of phase synchronization were detected. The results showed that myogenic and neurogenic BFO exhibit self-phase synchronization during the slower vasodilation of the heated skin. In the non-heated skin, the degree of synchronization of BFO is associated with the changes in blood flow. PMID:22936012

  15. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  16. CNV Concordance in 1,097 MZ Twin Pairs.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ehli, Erik A; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Weber, Zachary; Mbarek, Hamdi; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Brooks, Andrew; Hudziak, Jim J; Sullivan, Patrick F; de Geus, Eco J; Davies, Gareth E; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-02-01

    Monozygotic (MZ) twins are genetically identical at conception, making them informative subjects for studies on somatic mutations. Copy number variants (CNVs) are responsible for a substantial part of genetic variation, have relatively high mutation rates, and are likely to be involved in phenotypic variation. We conducted a genome-wide survey for post-twinning de novo CNVs in 1,097 MZ twin pairs. Comparisons between MZ twins were made by CNVs measured in DNA from blood or buccal epithelium with the Affymetrix 6.0 microarray and two calling algorithms. In addition, CNV concordance rates were compared between the different sources of DNA, and gene-enrichment association analyses were conducted for thought problems (TP) and attention problems (AP) using CNVs concordant within MZ pairs. We found a total of 153 putative post-twinning de novo CNVs >100 kb, of which the majority resided in 15q11.2. Based on the discordance of raw intensity signals a selection was made of 20 de novo CNVs for a qPCR validation experiments. Two out of 20 post-twinning de novo CNVs were validated with qPCR in the same twin pair. The 13-year-old MZ twin pair that showed two discordances in CN in 15q11.2 in their buccal DNA did not show large phenotypic differences. From the remaining 18 putative de novo CNVs, 17 were deletions or duplications that were concordant within MZ twin pairs. Concordance rates within twin pairs of CNV calls with CN ≠ 2 were ~80%. Buccal epithelium-derived DNA showed a slightly but significantly higher concordance rate, and blood-derived DNA showed significantly more concordant CNVs per twin pair. The gene-enrichment analyses on concordant CNVs showed no significant associations between CNVs overlapping with genes involved in neuronal processes and TP or AP after accounting for the source of DNA. PMID:25578775

  17. On the Adjacent Eccentric Distance Sum Index of Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui; Cao, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    For a given graph G, ε(v) and deg(v) denote the eccentricity and the degree of the vertex v in G, respectively. The adjacent eccentric distance sum index of a graph G is defined as ξsv(G)=∑v∈V(G)ε(v)D(v)deg(v), where D(v)=∑u∈V(G)d(u,v) is the sum of all distances from the vertex v. In this paper we derive some bounds for the adjacent eccentric distance sum index in terms of some graph parameters, such as independence number, covering number, vertex connectivity, chromatic number, diameter and some other graph topological indices. PMID:26091095

  18. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Jason D; Lee, Monica D; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  19. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  20. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  1. Hox gene duplications correlate with posterior heteronomy in scorpions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant P; Schwager, Evelyn E; Extavour, Cassandra G; Wheeler, Ward C

    2014-10-01

    The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been attributed to tagmatization, the coordinated evolution of adjacent metameres to form morphologically and functionally distinct segmental regions called tagmata. Specification of regional identity is regulated by the Hox genes, of which 10 are inferred to be present in the ancestor of arthropods. With six different posterior segmental identities divided into two tagmata, the bauplan of scorpions is the most heteronomous within Chelicerata. Expression domains of the anterior eight Hox genes are conserved in previously surveyed chelicerates, but it is unknown how Hox genes regionalize the three tagmata of scorpions. Here, we show that the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus has two paralogues of all Hox genes except Hox3, suggesting cluster and/or whole genome duplication in this arachnid order. Embryonic anterior expression domain boundaries of each of the last four pairs of Hox genes (two paralogues each of Antp, Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B) are unique and distinguish segmental groups, such as pectines, book lungs and the characteristic tail, while maintaining spatial collinearity. These distinct expression domains suggest neofunctionalization of Hox gene paralogues subsequent to duplication. Our data reconcile previous understanding of Hox gene function across arthropods with the extreme heteronomy of scorpions.

  2. Hox gene duplications correlate with posterior heteronomy in scorpions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Prashant P.; Schwager, Evelyn E.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Wheeler, Ward C.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary success of the largest animal phylum, Arthropoda, has been attributed to tagmatization, the coordinated evolution of adjacent metameres to form morphologically and functionally distinct segmental regions called tagmata. Specification of regional identity is regulated by the Hox genes, of which 10 are inferred to be present in the ancestor of arthropods. With six different posterior segmental identities divided into two tagmata, the bauplan of scorpions is the most heteronomous within Chelicerata. Expression domains of the anterior eight Hox genes are conserved in previously surveyed chelicerates, but it is unknown how Hox genes regionalize the three tagmata of scorpions. Here, we show that the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus has two paralogues of all Hox genes except Hox3, suggesting cluster and/or whole genome duplication in this arachnid order. Embryonic anterior expression domain boundaries of each of the last four pairs of Hox genes (two paralogues each of Antp, Ubx, abd-A and Abd-B) are unique and distinguish segmental groups, such as pectines, book lungs and the characteristic tail, while maintaining spatial collinearity. These distinct expression domains suggest neofunctionalization of Hox gene paralogues subsequent to duplication. Our data reconcile previous understanding of Hox gene function across arthropods with the extreme heteronomy of scorpions. PMID:25122224

  3. Ribosomal protein L7a is encoded by a gene (Surf-3) within the tightly clustered mouse surfeit locus.

    PubMed Central

    Giallongo, A; Yon, J; Fried, M

    1989-01-01

    The mouse Surfeit locus, which contains a cluster of at least four genes (Surf-1 to Surf-4), is unusual in that adjacent genes are separated by no more than 73 base pairs (bp). The heterogeneous 5' ends of Surf-1 and Surf-2 are separated by only 15 to 73 bp, the 3' ends of Surf-1 and Surf-3 are only 70 bp apart, and the 3' ends of Surf-2 and Surf-4 overlap by 133 bp. This very tight clustering suggests a cis interaction between adjacent Surfeit genes. The Surf-3 gene (which could code for a basic polypeptide of 266 amino acids) is a highly expressed member of a pseudogene-containing multigene family. By use of an anti-peptide serum (against the C-terminal nine amino acids of the putative Surf-3 protein) for immunofluorescence and immunoblotting of mouse cell components and by in vitro translation of Surf-3 cDNA hybrid-selected mRNA, the Surf-3 gene product was identified as a 32-kilodalton ribosomal protein located in the 60S ribosomal subunit. From its subunit location, gel migration, and homology with a limited rat ribosomal peptide sequence, the Surf-3 gene was shown to encode the mouse L7a ribosomal protein. The Surf-3 gene is highly conserved through evolution and was detected by nucleic acid hybridization as existing in multiple copies (multigene families) in other mammals and as one or a few copies in birds, Xenopus, Drosophila, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The Surf-3 C-terminal anti-peptide serum detects a 32-kilodalton protein in other mammals, birds, and Xenopus but not in Drosophila and S. pombe. The possible effect of interaction of the Surf-3 ribosomal protein gene with adjacent genes in the Surfeit locus at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level or both levels is discussed. Images PMID:2648130

  4. Pair-Starved Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model for the innermost (within the light cylinder of canonical radius, approx. c/Omega) structure of open-magnetic-field lines of a rotating neutron star (NS) with relativistic outflow of charged particles (electrons/positrons) and arbitrary angle between the NS spin and magnetic axes. We present the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations for the magnetic field and electric current in the pair-starved regime where the density of electron-positron plasma generated above the pulsar polar cap is not sufficient to completely screen the accelerating electric field and thus establish thee E . B = 0 condition above the pair-formation front up to the very high altitudes within the light cylinder. The proposed mode1 may provide a theoretical framework for developing the refined model of the global pair-starved pulsar magnetosphere.

  5. Variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing among F1 hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Lidia; Greizerstein, Eduardo; Ferrari, María

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in the exclusive pairing of homologous chromosomes have been described in several polyploid species but little is known about the activity of these genes in diploids (which have only one dose of each homoeologous genome). Analysis of the meiotic behaviour of species, natural and artificial hybrids and polyploids of Glandularia suggests that, in allopolyploids where homoeologous genomes are in two doses, regulator genes prevent homoeologous pairing. The different meiotic phenotypes in diploid F1 hybrids between Glandularia pulchella and Glandularia incisa strongly suggest that these pairing regulator genes possess an incomplete penetrance when homoeologous genomes are in only one dose. Moreover, the meiotic analysis of natural and artificial F1 hybrids suggests that the genetic constitution of parental species influences the activity of pairing regulator genes and is mainly responsible for variability in the amount of homoeologous pairing observed in diploid hybrids. In Glandularia, the pairing regulator genes originated in South American diploid species. The cytogenetic characteristics of this genus make it a good model to analyse and explore in greater depth the activity of pairing regulator genes at different ploidy levels. PMID:27255515

  6. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  7. Evolutionary Transitions of MicroRNA-Target Pairs.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Masafumi; Fujimi, Mai; Iwamoto, Chie; Onizuka, Kanako; Fukuda, Nana; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-06-04

    How newly generated microRNA (miRNA) genes are integrated into gene regulatory networks during evolution is fundamental in understanding the molecular and evolutionary bases of robustness and plasticity in gene regulation. A recent model proposed that after the birth of a miRNA, the miRNA is generally integrated into the network by decreasing the number of target genes during evolution. However, this decreasing model remains to be carefully examined by considering in vivo conditions. In this study, we therefore compared the number of target genes among miRNAs with different ages, combining experiments with bioinformatics predictions. First, we focused on three Drosophila miRNAs with different ages. As a result, we found that an older miRNA has a greater number of target genes than a younger miRNA, suggesting the increasing number of targets for each miRNA during evolution (increasing model). To further confirm our results, we also predicted all target genes for all miRNAs in D. melanogaster, considering co-expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in vivo The results obtained also do not support the decreasing model but are reasonably consistent with the increasing model of miRNA-target pairs. Furthermore, our large-scale analyses of currently available experimental data of miRNA-target pairs also showed a weak but the same trend in humans. These results indicate that the current decreasing model of miRNA-target pairs should be reconsidered and the increasing model may be more appropriate to explain the evolutionary transitions of miRNA-target pairs in many organisms.

  8. Evolutionary Transitions of MicroRNA-Target Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Masafumi; Fujimi, Mai; Iwamoto, Chie; Onizuka, Kanako; Fukuda, Nana; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    How newly generated microRNA (miRNA) genes are integrated into gene regulatory networks during evolution is fundamental in understanding the molecular and evolutionary bases of robustness and plasticity in gene regulation. A recent model proposed that after the birth of a miRNA, the miRNA is generally integrated into the network by decreasing the number of target genes during evolution. However, this decreasing model remains to be carefully examined by considering in vivo conditions. In this study, we therefore compared the number of target genes among miRNAs with different ages, combining experiments with bioinformatics predictions. First, we focused on three Drosophila miRNAs with different ages. As a result, we found that an older miRNA has a greater number of target genes than a younger miRNA, suggesting the increasing number of targets for each miRNA during evolution (increasing model). To further confirm our results, we also predicted all target genes for all miRNAs in D. melanogaster, considering co-expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in vivo. The results obtained also do not support the decreasing model but are reasonably consistent with the increasing model of miRNA-target pairs. Furthermore, our large-scale analyses of currently available experimental data of miRNA-target pairs also showed a weak but the same trend in humans. These results indicate that the current decreasing model of miRNA-target pairs should be reconsidered and the increasing model may be more appropriate to explain the evolutionary transitions of miRNA-target pairs in many organisms. PMID:27189995

  9. 4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side of bridge, taken from river level. Note entire east side and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  10. 12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO THE STEEL PLANT OFFICES. BAR AND BILLET MILLS AND, IN THE DISTANCE, THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES MAY BE SEEN. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking south. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead setting. Note laced vertical compression members, latticed portal strut, decorative strut bracing, and lightness of diagonal and lateral tension members. View to southeast through southeast portal from truss mid-span. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  13. 11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent Blacksmith Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to southwest (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  14. 1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN BUILDING (BASSIN'S RESTAURANT) (HABS No. DC-357), 501-511 14TH STREET (THE LOCKER ROOM) HABS No. DC-356) ON CORNER, AND MUNSEY BUILDING (HABS No. DC-358) - William J. Stone Building, 1345 E Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ENTRY TO NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON RIGHT, AND HOUSING AREA ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  1. 7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL CONVEYOR; IN THE DISTANCE IS THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SWITCH HOUSE NO. 1; LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  2. 4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN BUILDING PERIODS 1 AND 3. NOTE REUSED WOOD STRIP NAILED TO BUILDING PERIOD 1 POST INSCRIBED 'ST. LEONARD'. THERE ARE NO NAIL HOLES IN THE PERIOD 3 POST, THE FARRING STRIPS ADJUST FOR CLADDING - Charles' Gift, State Routes 2 & 4, Lusby, Calvert County, MD

  3. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  4. 12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE CANAL, LOOKING EAST. BARREN AREA IN FOREGROUND IS DECOMPOSING SAWDUST. DIRT PILE IN BACKGROUND IS THE EDGE OF THE SUMMIT COUNTY LANDFILL. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  5. LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ROOM; THE PIPES AT THE BOTTOM ARE PART OF THE RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM USED FOR HEATING THE FACTORY DURING COLD WEATHER. - Westmoreland Glass Company, Seventh & Kier Streets, Grapeville, Westmoreland County, PA

  6. How subaerial salt extrusions influence water quality in adjacent aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Razieh; Zarei, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ezzat

    2015-12-01

    Brines supplied from salt extrusions cause significant groundwater salinization in arid and semi-arid regions where salt rock is exposed to dissolution by episodic rainfalls. Here we focus on 62 of the 122 diapirs of Hormuz salt emergent in the southern Iran. To consider managing the degradation effect that salt extrusions have on the quality of adjoining aquifers, it is first necessary to understand how they influence adjacent water resources. We evaluate here the impacts that these diapirs have on adjacent aquifers based on investigating their geomorphologies, geologies, hydrologies and hydrogeologies. The results indicate that 28/62 (45%) of our sample of salt diapirs have no significant impact on the quality of groundwater in adjoining aquifers (namely Type N), while the remaining 34/62 (55%) degrade nearby groundwater quality. We offer simple conceptual models that account for how brines flowing from each of these types of salt extrusions contaminate adjacent aquifers. We identify three main mechanisms that lead to contamination: surface impact (Type A), subsurface intrusion (Type B) and indirect infiltration (Type C). A combination of all these mechanisms degrades the water quality in nearby aquifers in 19/62 (31%) of the salt diapirs studied. Having characterized the mechanism(s) by which each diapir affects the adjacent aquifer, we suggest a few possible remediation strategies to be considered. For instance, engineering the surface runoff of diapirs Types A and C into nearby evaporation basins would improve groundwater quality.

  7. Amazonian anthrosols support similar microbial communities that differ distinctly from those extant in adjacent, unmodified soils of the same mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Julie M; O'Neill, Brendan E; Tsai, Siu Mui; Liang, Biqing; Neves, Eduardo; Lehmann, Johannes; Thies, Janice E

    2010-07-01

    We compared the microbial community composition in soils from the Brazilian Amazon with two contrasting histories; anthrosols and their adjacent non-anthrosol soils of the same mineralogy. The anthrosols, also known as the Amazonian Dark Earths or terra preta, were managed by the indigenous pre-Colombian Indians between 500 and 8,700 years before present and are characterized by unusually high cation exchange capacity, phosphorus (P), and calcium (Ca) contents, and soil carbon pools that contain a high proportion of incompletely combusted biomass as biochar or black carbon (BC). We sampled paired anthrosol and unmodified soils from four locations in the Manaus, Brazil, region that differed in their current land use and soil type. Community DNA was extracted from sampled soils and characterized by use of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. DNA bands of interest from Bacteria and Archaea DGGE gels were cloned and sequenced. In cluster analyses of the DNA fingerprints, microbial communities from the anthrosols grouped together regardless of current land use or soil type and were distinct from those in their respective, paired adjacent soils. For the Archaea, the anthrosol communities diverged from the adjacent soils by over 90%. A greater overall richness was observed for Bacteria sequences as compared with those of the Archaea. Most of the sequences obtained were novel and matched those in databases at less than 98% similarity. Several sequences obtained only from the anthrosols grouped at 93% similarity with the Verrucomicrobia, a genus commonly found in rice paddies in the tropics. Sequences closely related to Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria sp. were recovered only from adjacent soil samples. Sequences related to Pseudomonas, Acidobacteria, and Flexibacter sp. were recovered from both anthrosols and adjacent soils. The strong similarities among the microbial communities present in the anthrosols for

  8. Missing energies at pair creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Ela, A. A.; Hassan, S.; Bagge, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Wilson cloud chamber measurements of the separated spectra of positrons and electrons produced by gamma quanta of 6.14 MeV differ considerably from the theoretically predicted spectra by BETHE and HEITLER, but are in good agreement with those of a modified theory of pair creation.

  9. Cooper pair transfer in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, G.; Idini, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2013-10-01

    The second-order distorted wave Born approximation implementation of two-particle transfer direct reactions which includes simultaneous and successive transfer, properly corrected by non-orthogonality effects, is tested with the help of controlled nuclear structure and reaction inputs against data spanning the whole mass table, and showed to constitute a quantitative probe of nuclear pairing correlations.

  10. Pick a Pair. Being Bony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Pat

    2004-01-01

    This column suggests pairings of fiction and nonfiction books to meet curricular needs and help students to compare/contrast the texts as they may be asked on state tests. The author of this paper focuses on activities surrounding Halloween. Since many schools are discouraged from teaching about Halloween, this can be a great time to investigate…

  11. Pairing Linguistic and Music Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiEdwardo, MaryAnn Pasda

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how music in the language classroom setting can be a catalyst for developing reading, writing, and understanding skills. Studies suggest that pairing music and linguistic intelligences in the college classroom improves students' grades and abilities to compose theses statements for research papers in courses that emphasize…

  12. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  13. Regulation of DNA Pairing in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Daley, James M.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major mechanism for eliminating DNA double-strand breaks from chromosomes. In this process, the break termini are resected nucleolytically to form 3′ ssDNA (single-strand DNA) overhangs. A recombinase (i.e., a protein that catalyzes homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange) assembles onto the ssDNA and promotes pairing with a homologous duplex. DNA synthesis then initiates from the 3′ end of the invading strand, and the extended DNA joint is resolved via one of several pathways to restore the integrity of the injured chromosome. It is crucial that HR be carefully orchestrated because spurious events can create cytotoxic intermediates or cause genomic rearrangements and loss of gene heterozygosity, which can lead to cell death or contribute to the development of cancer. In this review, we will discuss how DNA motor proteins regulate HR via a dynamic balance of the recombination-promoting and -attenuating activities that they possess. PMID:25190078

  14. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wiechens, Nicola; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase’s most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements. PMID:27019336

  15. The Chromatin Remodelling Enzymes SNF2H and SNF2L Position Nucleosomes adjacent to CTCF and Other Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; Gkikopoulos, Triantaffyllos; Schofield, Pieta; Rocha, Sonia; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Within the genomes of metazoans, nucleosomes are highly organised adjacent to the binding sites for a subset of transcription factors. Here we have sought to investigate which chromatin remodelling enzymes are responsible for this. We find that the ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling enzyme SNF2H plays a major role organising arrays of nucleosomes adjacent to the binding sites for the architectural transcription factor CTCF sites and acts to promote CTCF binding. At many other factor binding sites SNF2H and the related enzyme SNF2L contribute to nucleosome organisation. The action of SNF2H at CTCF sites is functionally important as depletion of CTCF or SNF2H affects transcription of a common group of genes. This suggests that chromatin remodelling ATPase's most closely related to the Drosophila ISWI protein contribute to the function of many human gene regulatory elements.

  16. Near intron pairs and the metazoan tree.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jörg; Stadler, Peter F; Krauss, Veiko

    2013-03-01

    Gene structure data can substantially advance our understanding of metazoan evolution and deliver an independent approach to resolve conflicts among existing hypotheses. Here, we used changes of spliceosomal intron positions as novel phylogenetic marker to reconstruct the animal tree. This kind of data is inferred from orthologous genes containing mutually exclusive introns at pairs of sequence positions in close proximity, so-called near intron pairs (NIPs). NIP data were collected for 48 species and utilized as binary genome-level characters in maximum parsimony (MP) analyses to reconstruct deep metazoan phylogeny. All groupings that were obtained with more than 80% bootstrap support are consistent with currently supported phylogenetic hypotheses. This includes monophyletic Chordata, Vertebrata, Nematoda, Platyhelminthes and Trochozoa. Several other clades such as Deuterostomia, Protostomia, Arthropoda, Ecdysozoa, Spiralia, and Eumetazoa, however, failed to be recovered due to a few problematic taxa such as the mite Ixodesand the warty comb jelly Mnemiopsis. The corresponding unexpected branchings can be explained by the paucity of synapomorphic changes of intron positions shared between some genomes, by the sensitivity of MP analyses to long-branch attraction (LBA), and by the very unequal evolutionary rates of intron loss and intron gain during evolution of the different subclades of metazoans. In addition, we obtained an assemblage of Cnidaria, Porifera, and Placozoa as sister group of Bilateria+Ctenophora with medium support, a disputable, but remarkable result. We conclude that NIPs can be used as phylogenetic characters also within a broader phylogenetic context, given that they have emerged regularly during evolution irrespective of the large variation of intron density across metazoan genomes.

  17. Near intron pairs and the metazoan tree.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jörg; Stadler, Peter F; Krauss, Veiko

    2013-03-01

    Gene structure data can substantially advance our understanding of metazoan evolution and deliver an independent approach to resolve conflicts among existing hypotheses. Here, we used changes of spliceosomal intron positions as novel phylogenetic marker to reconstruct the animal tree. This kind of data is inferred from orthologous genes containing mutually exclusive introns at pairs of sequence positions in close proximity, so-called near intron pairs (NIPs). NIP data were collected for 48 species and utilized as binary genome-level characters in maximum parsimony (MP) analyses to reconstruct deep metazoan phylogeny. All groupings that were obtained with more than 80% bootstrap support are consistent with currently supported phylogenetic hypotheses. This includes monophyletic Chordata, Vertebrata, Nematoda, Platyhelminthes and Trochozoa. Several other clades such as Deuterostomia, Protostomia, Arthropoda, Ecdysozoa, Spiralia, and Eumetazoa, however, failed to be recovered due to a few problematic taxa such as the mite Ixodesand the warty comb jelly Mnemiopsis. The corresponding unexpected branchings can be explained by the paucity of synapomorphic changes of intron positions shared between some genomes, by the sensitivity of MP analyses to long-branch attraction (LBA), and by the very unequal evolutionary rates of intron loss and intron gain during evolution of the different subclades of metazoans. In addition, we obtained an assemblage of Cnidaria, Porifera, and Placozoa as sister group of Bilateria+Ctenophora with medium support, a disputable, but remarkable result. We conclude that NIPs can be used as phylogenetic characters also within a broader phylogenetic context, given that they have emerged regularly during evolution irrespective of the large variation of intron density across metazoan genomes. PMID:23201572

  18. Analysis of the Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Overlapping Gene Pair lef3 and ac68 Reveals that AC68 Is a Per Os Infectivity Factor and that LEF3 Is Critical, but Not Essential, for Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yingchao; Fang, Minggang; Erlandson, Martin A.

    2012-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac68 is a core gene that overlaps lef3 which encodes the single-stranded DNA binding protein. A knockout (KO) virus lacking both lef3 and ac68 was generated (lef3-ac68 2×KO) to enable the functional study of ac68. To produce an ac68KO virus that did not impact lef3 expression, the lef3-ac68 2×KO virus was repaired with a DNA fragment containing lef3 and ac68, in which ac68 contained point mutations so that only LEF3 was expressed. Repair of lef3-ac68 2×KO with just ac68 generated an lef3KO virus. Analysis of the ac68KO virus showed that viral DNA replication and budded virus (BV) levels were unaffected compared to levels in the double-repair or wild-type (WT) control virus. Bioassay analyses of Trichoplusia ni larvae injected with BV directly into the hemolymph, bypassing the gut, showed no difference in mortality rates between the ac68KO and the WT viruses. However, in oral bioassays the ac68KO occlusion bodies failed to kill larvae. These results show that the core gene ac68 encodes a per os infectivity factor (pif6). The lef3KO virus was also analyzed, and virus replication was drastically reduced compared to WT virus, but very low levels of lef3KO virus DNA replication and BV production could be detected. In addition, in transfected cells P143 was transported to the nucleus in the absence of LEF3. This study therefore shows for the first time that even though the loss of LEF3 severely impairs virus replication, it is not absolutely essential for P143 nuclear import or viral replication. PMID:22278232

  19. The subtelomeric region is important for chromosome recognition and pairing during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Calderón, María del Carmen; Rey, María-Dolores; Cabrera, Adoración; Prieto, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    The process of meiosis results in the formation of haploid daughter cells, each of which inherit a half of the diploid parental cells' genetic material. The ordered association of homologues (identical chromosomes) is a critical prerequisite for a successful outcome of meiosis. Homologue recognition and pairing are initiated at the chromosome ends, which comprise the telomere dominated by generic repetitive sequences, and the adjacent subtelomeric region, which harbours chromosome-specific sequences. In many organisms telomeres are responsible for bringing the ends of the chromosomes close together during early meiosis, but little is known regarding the role of the subtelomeric region sequence during meiosis. Here, the observation of homologue pairing between a pair of Hordeum chilense chromosomes lacking the subtelomeric region on one chromosome arm indicates that the subtelomeric region is important for the process of homologous chromosome recognition and pairing.

  20. The subtelomeric region is important for chromosome recognition and pairing during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, María del Carmen; Rey, María-Dolores; Cabrera, Adoración; Prieto, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The process of meiosis results in the formation of haploid daughter cells, each of which inherit a half of the diploid parental cells' genetic material. The ordered association of homologues (identical chromosomes) is a critical prerequisite for a successful outcome of meiosis. Homologue recognition and pairing are initiated at the chromosome ends, which comprise the telomere dominated by generic repetitive sequences, and the adjacent subtelomeric region, which harbours chromosome-specific sequences. In many organisms telomeres are responsible for bringing the ends of the chromosomes close together during early meiosis, but little is known regarding the role of the subtelomeric region sequence during meiosis. Here, the observation of homologue pairing between a pair of Hordeum chilense chromosomes lacking the subtelomeric region on one chromosome arm indicates that the subtelomeric region is important for the process of homologous chromosome recognition and pairing. PMID:25270583

  1. Planetesimal Scattering and its Implications for the Period-Ratio Distribution of Kepler Planet Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Krantzler, Seth O.; Ford, Eric B.; Tasker, Elizabeth; Rasio, Fred

    2015-12-01

    Period ratios of most adjacent planet pairs in Kepler's multiplanet systems seem random. However, there is a clear excess and dearth of systems just exterior and interior to major mean motion resonances, respectively. We show that dynamical interactions between initially resonant planet pairs and planetesimals in a planetesimal disk can naturally produce the observed asymmetric abundances in period ratios of near-resonant pairs for a wide variety of planet and planetesimal disk properties (Chatterjee & Ford 2015). We further extend this study to include planet pairs initially not in resonance. We will present our key results from this large suite of simulations. We will also discuss implications of planetesimal scattering for the observable properties of these planets including their TTV signal and mass-radius properties as a result of planetesimal accretion.

  2. Identification of a cyclic-AMP-responsive element within the rat somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Montminy, M R; Sevarino, K A; Wagner, J A; Mandel, G; Goodman, R H

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the regulation of somatostatin gene expression by cAMP in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells transfected with the rat somatostatin gene. Forskolin at 10 microM caused a 4-fold increase in somatostatin mRNA levels within 4 hr of treatment in stably transfected cells. Chimeric genes containing the somatostatin gene promoter fused to the bacterial reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase were also induced by cAMP in PC12 cells. To delineate the sequences required for response to cAMP, we constructed a series of promoter deletion mutants. Our studies defined a region between 60 and 29 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site that conferred cAMP responsiveness when placed adjacent to the simian virus 40 promoter. Within the cAMP-responsive element of the somatostatin gene, we observed an 8-base palindrome, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', which is highly conserved in many other genes whose expression is regulated by cAMP. cAMP responsiveness was greatly reduced when the somatostatin fusion genes were transfected into the mutant PC12 line A126-1B2, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase 2. Our studies indicate that transcriptional regulation of the somatostatin gene by cAMP requires protein kinase 2 activity and may depend upon a highly conserved promoter element. Images PMID:2875459

  3. Pair production in inhomogeneous fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, Holger; Klingmueller, Klaus

    2005-09-15

    We employ the recently developed worldline numerics, which combines string-inspired field theory methods with Monte Carlo techniques, to develop an algorithm for the computation of pair-production rates in scalar QED for inhomogeneous background fields. We test the algorithm with the classic Sauter potential, for which we compute the local production rate for the first time. Furthermore, we study the production rate for a superposition of a constant E field and a spatially oscillating field for various oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal that the approximation by a local derivative expansion already fails for frequencies small compared to the electron-mass scale, whereas for strongly oscillating fields a derivative expansion for the averaged field represents an acceptable approximation. The worldline picture makes the nonlocal nature of pair production transparent and facilitates a profound understanding of this important quantum phenomenon.

  4. Flux Quantization Without Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Alan

    2013-03-01

    It is universally accepted that the superconducting flux quantum h/2e requires the existence of a phase-coherent macroscopic wave function of Cooper pairs, each with charge 2e. On the contrary, we assert that flux quantization can be better understood in terms of single-electron quantum states, localized on the scale of the coherence length and organized into a real-space phase-antiphase structure. This packing configuration is consistent with the Pauli exclusion principle for single-electron states, maintains long-range phase coherence, and is compatible with much of the BCS formalism. This also accounts for h/2e in the Josephson effect, without Cooper pairs. Experimental evidence for this alternative picture may be found in deviations from h/2e in loops and devices much smaller than the coherence length. A similar phase-antiphase structure may also account for superfluids, without the need for boson condensation.

  5. One-dimensional Cooper pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, R.; Fortes, M.; de Llano, M.; Solís, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    We study electron pairing in a one-dimensional (1D) fermion gas at zero temperature under zero- and finite-range, attractive, two-body interactions. The binding energy of Cooper pairs (CPs) with zero total or center-of-mass momentum (CMM) increases with attraction strength and decreases with interaction range for fixed strength. The excitation energy of 1D CPs with nonzero CMM display novel, unique properties. It satisfies a dispersion relation with two branches: a phonon-like linear excitation for small CP CMM; this is followed by roton-like quadratic excitation minimum for CMM greater than twice the Fermi wavenumber, but only above a minimum threshold attraction strength. The expected quadratic-in-CMM dispersion in vacuo when the Fermi wavenumber is set to zero is recovered for any coupling. This paper completes a three-part exploration initiated in 2D and continued in 3D.

  6. New adjacent Bis-tetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chou, Chi-Jung; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2003-03-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation led to the isolation of two new Annonaceous acetogenins, annocatacin A ( 1). and annocatacin B ( 2). from the seeds and the leaves, respectively, of Annona muricata. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first examples where the adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran ring system is located at C-15. The new structures were elucidated and characterized by spectral and chemical methods. Both Annonaceous acetogenins 1 and 2 showed significant in vitro cytotoxicity toward the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and 2,2,15, and were compared with the known adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran acetogenins, neoannonin ( 3). desacetyluvaricin ( 4). bullatacin ( 5). asimicin ( 6). annoglaucin ( 7). squamocin ( 8). and rollimusin ( 9).

  7. Segmentation and the pairing hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bragason, Orn

    2004-09-30

    The effect of stimulus contiguity and response contingency on responding in chain schedules was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, four pigeons were trained on two simple three-link chain schedules that alternated within sessions. Initial links were correlated with a variable-interval 30s schedule, and middle and terminal links were correlated with interdependent variable-interval 30s variable-interval 30s schedules. The combined duration of the interdependent schedules summed to 60s. The two chains differed with respect to signaling of the schedule components: a two-stimulus chain had one stimulus paired with the initial link and one stimulus paired with both the middle and the terminal link, while a three-stimulus chain had a different stimulus paired with the each of the three links. The results showed that the two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain. In Experiment 2, four pigeons were exposed to three separate conditions, the two- and three-stimulus chains of Experiment 1 and a three-stimulus chain that had a 3s delay to terminal-link entry from the middle-link response that produced it. The two-stimulus chain maintained lower initial-link responding than the three-stimulus chain, as in Experiment 1, and a similar initial-link responding was maintained by the two-stimulus chain and the three-stimulus chain with the delay contingency. The results demonstrate that a stimulus noncontiguous with food can maintain responding that is sometimes greater than a stimulus contiguous with food, depending on the response contingency for terminal-link entry. The results are contrary to the pairing hypothesis of conditioned reinforcement.

  8. Asymmetric Ion-Pairing Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Brak, Katrien

    2014-01-01

    Charged intermediates and reagents are ubiquitous in organic transformations. The interaction of these ionic species with chiral neutral, anionic, or cationic small molecules has emerged as a powerful strategy for catalytic, enantioselective synthesis. This review describes developments in the burgeoning field of asymmetric ion-pairing catalysis with an emphasis on the insights that have been gleaned into the structural and mechanistic features that contribute to high asymmetric induction. PMID:23192886

  9. 38. VIEW OF COTTRELL MAGNETIC IMPULSE GENERATOR ADJACENT TO SIX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. VIEW OF COTTRELL MAGNETIC IMPULSE GENERATOR ADJACENT TO SIX GAP ROTARY RECTIFIER. THIS UNIT GENERATED A MAGNETIC PULSE WHICH WAS TRANSMITTED TO THE COLLECTION PLATES IN THE ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATOR CHAMBER. THESE PERIODIC PULSES VIBRATE THE PLATES AND CAUSE PRECIPITATED ARTICLES OF SMOKE AND FLY ASH TO FALL TO THE BOTTOM OF THE PRECIPITATOR CHAMBER. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  10. 20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Interior view of fuel storage pit or vault adjacent to Test Cell 9 in Component Test Laboratory (T-27), looking west. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, tanks, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Jaw position uncertainty and adjacent fields in breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Emma; Bäck, Anna; Chakarova, Roumiana

    2015-11-08

    Locoregional treatment of breast cancer involves adjacent, half blocked fields matched at isocenter. The objective of this work is to study the dosimetric effects of the uncertainties in jaw positioning for such a case, and how a treatment planning protocol including adjacent field overlap of 1 mm affects the dose distribution. A representative treatment plan, involving 6 and 15 photon beams, for a patient treated at our hospital is chosen. Monte Carlo method (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc) is used to simulate the treatment. Uncertainties in jaw positioning of ± 1 mm are addressed, which implies extremes in reality of 2 mm field gap/overlap when planning adjacent fields without overlap and 1 mm gap or 3 mm overlap for a planning protocol with 1 mm overlap. Dosimetric parameters for PTV, lung and body are analyzed. Treatment planning protocol with 1 mm overlap of the adjacent fields does not considerably counteract possible underdosage of the target in the case studied. PTV-V95% is for example reduced from 95% for perfectly aligned fields to 90% and 91% for 2 mm and 1 mm gap, respectively. However, the risk of overdosage in PTV and in healthy soft tissue is increased when following the protocol with 1 mm overlap. A 3 mm overlap compared to 2 mm overlap results in an increase in maximum dose to PTV, PTV-D2%, from 113% to 121%. V120% for 'Body-PTV' is also increased from 5 cm(3) to 14 cm(3). A treatment planning protocol with 1 mm overlap does not considerably improve the coverage of PTV in the case of erroneous jaw positions causing gap between fields, but increases the overdosage in PTV and doses to healthy tissue, in the case of overlapping fields, for the case investigated.

  12. Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Conference room 211, adjacent to commander's quarters, with vault door at right. Projection area at center is equipped with automatic security drapes. Projection room uses a 45 degree mirror to reflect the image onto the frosted glass screen. Door on far left leads to display area senior battle staff viewing bridge, and the commander's quarters - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  13. Mutual Diffusional Interference Between Adjacent Stomata of a Leaf 1

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G. D.; Viskanta, R.

    1968-01-01

    The mutual diffusional interference between adjacent stomata in laminar flow over a leaf is shown to play a decisive role in determining overall transpiration. The magnitude of this interference varies with the interaction of the vapor diffusional shells forming above each stoma and the air flow over the leaf. The interference decreases with increasing incident radiation and wind velocity. The effect of interference on the stomatal resistance to diffusion plays a major role in the overall variations in transpiration. PMID:16656876

  14. Creating Knockouts of Conserved Oligomeric Golgi Complex Subunits Using CRISPR-Mediated Gene Editing Paired with a Selection Strategy Based on Glycosylation Defects Associated with Impaired COG Complex Function.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jessica Bailey; Lupashin, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a key evolutionally conserved multisubunit protein machinery that regulates tethering and fusion of intra-Golgi transport vesicles. The Golgi apparatus specifically promotes sorting and complex glycosylation of glycoconjugates. Without proper glycosylation and processing, proteins and lipids will be mislocalized and/or have impaired function. The Golgi glycosylation machinery is kept in homeostasis by a careful balance of anterograde and retrograde trafficking to ensure proper localization of the glycosylation enzymes and their substrates. This balance, like other steps of membrane trafficking, is maintained by vesicle trafficking machinery that includes COPI vesicular coat proteins, SNAREs, Rabs, and both coiled-coil and multi-subunit vesicular tethers. The COG complex interacts with other membrane trafficking components and is essential for proper localization of Golgi glycosylation machinery. Here we describe using CRISPR-mediated gene editing coupled with a phenotype-based selection strategy directly linked to the COG complex's role in glycosylation homeostasis to obtain COG complex subunit knockouts (KOs). This has resulted in clonal KOs for each COG subunit in HEK293T cells and gives the ability to further probe the role of the COG complex in Golgi homeostasis. PMID:27632008

  15. Fouling assemblages on offshore wind power plants and adjacent substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Dan; Malm, Torleif

    2008-09-01

    A significant expansion of offshore wind power is expected in the near future, with thousands of turbines in coastal waters, and various aspects of how this may influence the coastal ecology including disturbance effects from noise, shadows, electromagnetic fields, and changed hydrological conditions are accordingly of concern. Further, wind power plants constitute habitats for a number of organisms, and may locally alter assemblage composition and biomass of invertebrates, algae and fish. In this study, fouling assemblages on offshore wind turbines were compared to adjacent hard substrate. Influences of the structures on the seabed were also investigated. The turbines differed significantly from adjacent boulders in terms of assemblage composition of epibiota and motile invertebrates. Species number and Shannon-Wiener diversity were, also, significantly lower on the wind power plants. It was also indicated that the turbines might have affected assemblages of invertebrates and algae on adjacent boulders. Off shore wind power plant offer atypical substrates for fouling assemblages in terms of orientation, depth range, structure, and surface texture. Some potential ecological implications of the addition of these non-natural habitats for coastal ecology are discussed.

  16. Pair Tunneling through Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikh, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Coupling to molecular vibrations induces a polaronic shift, and can lead to a negative charging energy, U. For negative U, the occupation of the ground state of the molecule is even. In this situation, virtual pair transitions between the molecule and the leads can dominate electron transport. At low temperature, T, these transitions give rise to the charge-Kondo effect [1]. We developed the electron transport theory through the negative-U molecule [2] at relatively high T, when the Kondo correlations are suppressed. Two physical ingredients distinguish our theory from the transport through a superconducting grain coupled to the normal leads [3]: (i) in parallel with sequential pair-tunneling processes, single-particle cotunneling processes take place; (ii) the electron pair on the molecule can be created (or annihilated) by two electrons tunneling in from (or out to) opposite leads. We found that, even within the rate-equation description, the behavior of differential conductance through the negative-U molecule as function of the gate voltage is quite peculiar: the height of the peak near the degeneracy point is independent of temperature, while its width is proportional to T. This is in contrast to the ordinary Coulomb-blockade conductance peak, whose integral strength is T-independent. At finite source-drain bias, V>>T, the width of the conductance peak is ˜V, whereas the conventional Coulomb-blockade peak at finite V splits into two sharp peaks at detunings V/2, and -V/2. Possible applications to the gate-controlled current rectification and switching will be discussed. [1] A. Taraphder and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2814 (1991). [2] J. Koch, M. E. Raikh, and F. von Oppen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 056803 (2006). [3] F. W. J. Hekking, L. I. Glazman, K. A. Matveev, and R. I. Shekhter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4138 (1993).

  17. Identification of Gene-Expression Signatures and Protein Markers for Breast Cancer Grading and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Chi; Du, Wei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The grade of a cancer is a measure of the cancer's malignancy level, and the stage of a cancer refers to the size and the extent that the cancer has spread. Here we present a computational method for prediction of gene signatures and blood/urine protein markers for breast cancer grades and stages based on RNA-seq data, which are retrieved from the TCGA breast cancer dataset and cover 111 pairs of disease and matching adjacent noncancerous tissues with pathologists-assigned stages and grades. By applying a differential expression and an SVM-based classification approach, we found that 324 and 227 genes in cancer have their expression levels consistently up-regulated vs. their matching controls in a grade- and stage-dependent manner, respectively. By using these genes, we predicted a 9-gene panel as a gene signature for distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well differentiated breast cancers, and a 19-gene panel as a gene signature for discriminating between the moderately and well differentiated breast cancers. Similarly, a 30-gene panel and a 21-gene panel are predicted as gene signatures for distinguishing advanced stage (stages III-IV) from early stage (stages I-II) cancer samples and for distinguishing stage II from stage I samples, respectively. We expect these gene panels can be used as gene-expression signatures for cancer grade and stage classification. In addition, of the 324 grade-dependent genes, 188 and 66 encode proteins that are predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively; and of the 227 stage-dependent genes, 123 and 51 encode proteins predicted to be blood-secretory and urine-excretory, respectively. We anticipate that some combinations of these blood and urine proteins could serve as markers for monitoring breast cancer at specific grades and stages through blood and urine tests. PMID:26375396

  18. Origin and loss of nested LRRTM/α-catenin genes during vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Uvarov, Pavel; Kajander, Tommi; Airaksinen, Matti S

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat transmembrane neuronal proteins (LRRTMs) form in mammals a family of four postsynaptic adhesion proteins, which have been shown to bind neurexins and heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) glypican on the presynaptic side. Mutations in the genes encoding LRRTMs and neurexins are implicated in human cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Our analysis shows that in most jawed vertebrates, lrrtm1, lrrtm2, and lrrtm3 genes are nested on opposite strands of large conserved intron of α-catenin genes ctnna2, ctnna1, and ctnna3, respectively. No lrrtm genes could be found in tunicates or lancelets, while two lrrtm genes are found in the lamprey genome, one of which is adjacent to a single ctnna homolog. Based on similar highly positive net charge of lamprey LRRTMs and the HSPG-binding LRRTM3 and LRRTM4 proteins, we speculate that the ancestral LRRTM might have bound HSPG before acquiring neurexins as binding partners. Our model suggests that lrrtm gene translocated into the large ctnna intron in early vertebrates, and that subsequent duplications resulted in three lrrtm/ctnna gene pairs present in most jawed vertebrates. However, we detected three prominent exceptions: (1) the lrrtm3/ctnna3 gene structure is absent in the ray-finned fish genomes, (2) the genomes of clawed frogs contain ctnna1 but lack the corresponding nested (lrrtm2) gene, and (3) contain lrrtm3 gene in the syntenic position but lack the corresponding host (ctnna3) gene. We identified several other protein-coding nested gene structures of which either the host or the nested gene has presumably been lost in the frog or chicken lineages. Interestingly, majority of these nested genes comprise LRR domains. PMID:24587117

  19. Adjacent channel interference degradation with minimum shift keyed modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulation results for degradation in signal-to-noise ratio for various values of bit error probability are given for minimum shift-keyed-type signaling in the presence of adjacent channel interference. A serial modulator structure which utilizes spectral shaping is characterized in terms of envelope deviation and bandwidth efficiency. This serial generation technique is convenient for implementation at high data rates and results in signal spectra with lower sidelobe levels than conventional minimum shift-keyed modulation at the expense of moderate envelope deviation. Because of the lower sidelobe levels, the resulting spectra allow denser channel packing than does ideal MSK.

  20. Synthesis of a Molecule with Four Different Adjacent Pnictogens.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Alexander; Schulz, Axel; Villinger, Alexander

    2016-08-22

    The synthesis of a molecule containing four adjacent different pnictogens was attempted by conversion of a Group 15 allyl analogue anion [Mes*NAsPMes*](-) (Mes*=2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl) with antimony(III) chloride. A suitable precursor is Mes*N(H)AsPMes* (1) for which several syntheses were investigated. The anions afforded by deprotonation of Mes*N(H)AsPMes* were found to be labile and, therefore, salts could not be isolated. However, the in situ generated anions could be quenched with SbCl3 , yielding Mes*N(SbCl2 )AsPMes* (4). PMID:27377437

  1. CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

  2. Interaction of Cracks Between Two Adjacent Indents in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental observations of the interaction behavior of cracks between two adjacent indents were made using an indentation technique in soda-lime glass. It was specifically demonstrated how one indent crack initiates and propagates in the vicinity of another indent crack. Several types of crack interactions were examined by changing the orientation and distance of one indent relative to the other. It was found that the residual stress field produced by elastic/plastic indentation has a significant influence on controlling the mode of crack interaction. The interaction of an indent crack with a free surface was also investigated for glass and ceramic specimens.

  3. Retroperitoneal multilocular bronchogenic cyst adjacent to adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Yang, S W; Linton, J A; Ryu, S J; Shin, D H; Park, C S

    1999-10-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are generally found in the mediastinum, particularly posterior to the carina, but they rarely occur in such unusual sites as the skin, subcutaneous tissue, pericardium, and even the retroperitoneum. A 30-year-old Korean man underwent surgery to remove a cystic adrenal mass incidentally discovered during routine physical checkup. At surgery, it proved to be a multilocular cyst located in the retroperitoneum adjacent to the left adrenal gland. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by respiratory epithelium over connective tissue with submucous glands, cartilage and smooth muscle, thereby histologically confirming bronchogenic cyst. This is the first reported case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst in an adult without other congenital anomalies in Korea.

  4. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhter, R. I.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Jonson, M.; Aharony, A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals.

  5. Rashba Splitting of Cooper Pairs.

    PubMed

    Shekhter, R I; Entin-Wohlman, O; Jonson, M; Aharony, A

    2016-05-27

    We investigate theoretically the properties of a weak link between two superconducting leads, which has the form of a nonsuperconducting nanowire with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling caused by an electric field. In the Coulomb-blockade regime of single-electron tunneling, we find that such a weak link acts as a "spin splitter" of the spin states of Cooper pairs tunneling through the link, to an extent that depends on the direction of the electric field. We show that the Josephson current is sensitive to interference between the resulting two transmission channels, one where the spins of both members of a Cooper pair are preserved and one where they are both flipped. As a result, the current is a periodic function of the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and of the bending angle of the nanowire (when mechanically bent); an identical effect appears due to strain-induced spin-orbit coupling. In contrast, no spin-orbit induced interference effect can influence the current through a single weak link connecting two normal metals. PMID:27284669

  6. Bound Polaron Pair Formation in Poly (phenylenevinylenes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * PHOTOGENERATED YIELD OF SINGLET EXCITONS * AGGREGRATION EFFECTS ON EXCITED STATE PHOTO-GENERATION * ASSIGNMENT TO BOUND POLARON PAIRS AND DISCUSSION * PROBLEMS WITH THE BOUND POLARON PAIR PICTURE AND CONCLUSION * REFERENCES

  7. LOD wars: The affected-sib-pair paradigm strikes back!

    SciTech Connect

    Farrall, M.

    1997-03-01

    In a recent letter, Greenberg et al. aired their concerns that the affected-sib-pair (ASP) approach was becoming excessively popular, owing to misconceptions and ignorance of the properties and limitations of both the ASP and the classic LOD-score approaches. As an enthusiast of using the ASP approach to map susceptibility genes for multifactorial traits, I would like to contribute a few comments and explanatory notes in defense of the ASP paradigm. 18 refs.

  8. Crystal Structures of Non-Natural Nucleobase Pairs in A- and B-DNA†

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Millie M.; Singh, Isha; Kellett, Whitney F.; Hoshika, Shuichi; Benner, Steven A.; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which synthetic biology can be used to expand genetic information systems compatible with natural enzymes and cells will depend on the extent to which multiple and contiguous non-natural nucleobase pairs fit within the standard double helical conformations of DNA. Toward this goal, two non-standard nucleobases (Z, 6-amino-5-nitro-2(1H)-pyridone and P, 2-amino-imidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)one) were designed to form a Z:P pair with a standard “edge on” Watson-Crick geometry, but with rearranged hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups. Here, we present the crystal structures of two self-complementary 16-mer oligonucleotides containing Z:P pairs. The first contained two consecutive Z:P nucleobase pairs and was found to crystallize within a host-guest complex in B-form. The second contained six consecutive Z:P pairs; it was found to crystallize as an A-form DNA duplex, although it can adopt B-form in solution as inferred from circular dichroism spectra. Although Z:P pairs have some structural properties that are similar to those of G:C pairs, unique features include stacking of the nitro group on Z with the adjacent heterocyclic nucleobase ring in A-DNA. In both B-and A-DNA, major groove widths associated with the Z:P pairs are approximately 1 Å wider than those of comparable G:C pairs potentially due to the presence of the nitro group in Z. Thus, our structural studies suggest that multiple and consecutive Z:P pairs are readily accommodated in DNA duplex structures recognized by natural polymerases, and therefore the GACTZP synthetic genetic system has the requisite properties to expand sequence space. PMID:25961938

  9. Reinforcement of reproductive isolation between adjacent populations in the Park Grass Experiment.

    PubMed

    Silvertown, J; Servaes, C; Biss, P; Macleod, D

    2005-09-01

    It has been debated, ever since Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace disagreed about the matter, whether natural selection plays a role in reinforcing reproductive isolation during the earliest stages of speciation. Recent theory suggests that it can do so, but until now the empirical evidence has conspicuously lacked a case in which reinforcement has actually been observed to split a population. We show that this has occurred at least once in populations of the grass Anthoxanthum odoratum growing in the Park Grass Experiment where flowering time has shifted at the boundaries between plots. As a consequence, gene flow via pollen has been severely limited and adjacent populations that had a common origin at the start of the experiment in 1856 have now diverged at neutral marker loci. PMID:15999138

  10. Reinforcement of reproductive isolation between adjacent populations in the Park Grass Experiment.

    PubMed

    Silvertown, J; Servaes, C; Biss, P; Macleod, D

    2005-09-01

    It has been debated, ever since Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace disagreed about the matter, whether natural selection plays a role in reinforcing reproductive isolation during the earliest stages of speciation. Recent theory suggests that it can do so, but until now the empirical evidence has conspicuously lacked a case in which reinforcement has actually been observed to split a population. We show that this has occurred at least once in populations of the grass Anthoxanthum odoratum growing in the Park Grass Experiment where flowering time has shifted at the boundaries between plots. As a consequence, gene flow via pollen has been severely limited and adjacent populations that had a common origin at the start of the experiment in 1856 have now diverged at neutral marker loci.

  11. Pair bonds: arrival synchrony in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, T G; Gill, J A; Sigurbjörnsson, T; Sutherland, W J

    2004-10-01

    Synchronous arrival of pairs of migratory birds at their breeding grounds is important for maintaining pair bonds and is achieved by pairs that remain together all year round. Here we show that arrival is also synchronized in paired individuals of a migratory shorebird, the black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa islandica), even though they winter hundreds of kilometres apart and do not migrate together. The mechanisms required to achieve this synchrony and prevent 'divorce' illustrate the complexity of migratory systems. PMID:15470417

  12. Individuation of Pairs of Objects in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Alan M.; Chen, Marian L.

    2007-01-01

    Looking-time studies examined whether 11-month-old infants can individuate two pairs of objects using only shape information. In order to test individuation, the object pairs were presented sequentially. Infants were familiarized either with the sequential pairs, disk-triangle/disk-triangle (XY/XY), whose shapes differed within but not across…

  13. The Associability of CVC Pairs. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, William E.; Kiess, Harold O.

    To obtain an a priori estimate of natural language mediators (NLM's) 320 pairs of words with the consonant-vowel-consonant-pattern (CVC's) were broken into four series of 90 pairs and presented to 240 male and female undergraduates. Pairs were shown for 15 seconds while the subjects wrote down any associative device or NLM they could generate that…

  14. Stem and leaf hydraulics of congeneric tree species from adjacent tropical savanna and forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guang-You; Hoffmann, William A; Scholz, Fabian G; Bucci, Sandra J; Meinzer, Frederick C; Franco, Augusto C; Cao, Kun-Fang; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2008-03-01

    Leaf and stem functional traits related to plant water relations were studied for six congeneric species pairs, each composed of one tree species typical of savanna habitats and another typical of adjacent forest habitats, to determine whether there were intrinsic differences in plant hydraulics between these two functional types. Only individuals growing in savanna habitats were studied. Most stem traits, including wood density, the xylem water potential at 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity, sapwood area specific conductivity, and leaf area specific conductivity did not differ significantly between savanna and forest species. However, maximum leaf hydraulic conductance (K (leaf)) and leaf capacitance tended to be higher in savanna species. Predawn leaf water potential and leaf mass per area were also higher in savanna species in all congeneric pairs. Hydraulic vulnerability curves of stems and leaves indicated that leaves were more vulnerable to drought-induced cavitation than terminal branches regardless of genus. The midday K (leaf) values estimated from leaf vulnerability curves were very low implying that daily embolism repair may occur in leaves. An electric circuit analog model predicted that, compared to forest species, savanna species took longer for their leaf water potentials to drop from predawn values to values corresponding to 50% loss of K (leaf) or to the turgor loss points, suggesting that savanna species were more buffered from changes in leaf water potential. The results of this study suggest that the relative success of savanna over forest species in savanna is related in part to their ability to cope with drought, which is determined more by leaf than by stem hydraulic traits. Variation among genera accounted for a large proportion of the total variance in most traits, which indicates that, despite different selective pressures in savanna and forest habitats, phylogeny has a stronger effect than habitat in determining most hydraulic traits

  15. Historical volcanoes of Armenia and adjacent areas: What is revisited?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanian, A.; Jrbashyan, R.; Trifonov, V.; Philip, H.; Arakelian, S.; Avagyan, A.; Baghdassaryan, H.; Davtian, V.

    2006-07-01

    The validity of some data in Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62] that are revisited by R. Haroutiunian is considered. A conclusion is made that the revisions suggested by Haroutiunian concern unessential parts of the content of work by Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62]. This article presents new evidence and re-proves the earlier conclusions that are disputed or revised by R. Haroutiunian.

  16. Stress Wave Interaction Between Two Adjacent Blast Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changping; Johansson, Daniel; Nyberg, Ulf; Beyglou, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Rock fragmentation by blasting is determined by the level and state of stress in the rock mass subjected to blasting. With the application of electronic detonators, some researchers stated that it is possible to achieve improved fragmentation through stress wave superposition with very short delay times. This hypothesis was studied through theoretical analysis in the paper. First, the stress in rock mass induced by a single-hole shot was analyzed with the assumptions of infinite velocity of detonation and infinite charge length. Based on the stress analysis of a single-hole shot, the stress history and tensile stress distribution between two adjacent holes were presented for cases of simultaneous initiation and 1 ms delayed initiation via stress superposition. The results indicated that the stress wave interaction is local around the collision point. Then, the tensile stress distribution at the extended line of two adjacent blast holes was analyzed for a case of 2 ms delay. The analytical results showed that the tensile stress on the extended line increases due to the stress wave superposition under the assumption that the influence of neighboring blast hole on the stress wave propagation can be neglected. However, the numerical results indicated that this assumption is unreasonable and yields contrary results. The feasibility of improving fragmentation via stress wave interaction with precise initiation was also discussed. The analysis in this paper does not support that the interaction of stress waves improves the fragmentation.

  17. Adjacent flaps for lower lip reconstruction after mucocele resection.

    PubMed

    Ying, Binbin

    2012-03-01

    Mucocele forms because of salivary gland mucous extravasation or retention and is usually related to trauma in the area of the lower lip. It is a common benign lesion in the oral region. Although there are many conservative treatments such as the creation of a pouch (marsupialization), freezing (cryosurgery), micromarsupialization, and CO2 laser vaporization, surgical resection is the most commonly used means. Generally speaking, an elliptic incision was made to fully enucleate the lesion along with the overlying mucosa and the affected glands, then direct suturing is adequate. However, in some cases, direct suturing could cause lower lip deformity, and adjacent flaps for lower lip reconstruction after mucocele resection might be quite necessary. Based on our experience, adjacent mucosal flaps could be used when lesions were close to or even break through the vermilion border or their diameters were much more than 1 cm. A-T advancement flaps and transposition flaps were the mostly applied ones. Follow-up showed that all patients realized primary healing after 1 week postoperatively with satisfactory lower lip appearance, and there was no sign of increasing incidence of relapse. PMID:22421867

  18. Bacterial community structure in the Sulu Sea and adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Nishimura, Masahiko; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    The deep waters of the Sulu Sea are characterized by relatively high and constant water temperatures and low oxygen concentrations. To examine the effect of these characteristics on the bacterial community structure, the culture-independent molecular method was applied to samples from the Sulu Sea and the adjacent areas. DNA was extracted from environmental samples, and the analysis was carried out on PCR-amplified 16S rDNA; fragments were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis. Stations in the Sulu Sea and the adjacent areas showed much more prominent vertical stratification of bacterial community structures than horizontal variation. As predominant sequences, cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria at 10 m depth, δ-proteobacteria at 100 m depth, and green nonsulfur bacteria below 1000 m depth were detected in all sampling areas. High temperatures and low oxygen concentrations are thought to be minor factors in controlling community structure; the quantity and quality of organic materials supplied by the sinking particles, and hydrostatic pressure are believed to be important.

  19. Slow overmethylation of housekeeping genes in the body mucosa is associated with the risk for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Rhyu, Mun-Gan; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Wook; Kim, Suk-Il; Hong, Seung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection increases age-related diverse overmethylation in gene-control regions, which increases the risk of gastric cancer. The H. pylori-associated overmethylation changes subsequently disappear when gastric atrophy and cancer develop. To identify cancer-risk epigenotypes, we traced dynamic methylation changes in the background mucosa of the stomach depending on the extent of gastric atrophy. Paired biopsy specimens were obtained from the noncancerous antrum and body mucosa of 102 patients with cancer and 114 H. pylori-positive and 112 H. pylori-negative controls. The grade of gastric atrophy was evaluated using the endoscopic atrophic border score. The methylation-variable sites at the CpG-island margins and near the transcriptional start sites lacking CpG islands were semiquantitatively analyzed by radioisotope-labeling methylation-specific PCR. We selected eight housekeeping genes adjacent to Alu (CDH1, ARRDC4, PPARG, and TRAPPC2L) or LTR retroelements (MMP2, CDKN2A, RUNX2, and RUNX3) and eight stomach-specific genes (TFF2, PGC, ATP4B, TFF1, TFF3, GHRL, PGA, and ATP4A). Analysis of age-related methylation in the H. pylori-positive controls revealed slow overmethylation in the body and in the LTR-adjacent genes. A high-frequency overmethylation defined based on the slowly overmethylated genes was frequently observed in the body of patients with gastric cancer with open-type atrophy (OR, 12.7; 95% confidence interval, 3.2-49.8). The rapidly changing methylation of Alu-adjacent genes was barely increased in the antrum of patients with gastric cancer. Among diverse methylation changes associated with H. pylori infection, an increase in slowly changing methylation could serve as a cancer-risk marker.

  20. Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: The insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.S.; McGinnis, R.E. ); Ewens, W.J. )

    1993-03-01

    A population association has consistently been observed between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and the class 1 alleles of the region of tandem-repeat DNA (5[prime] flanking polymorphism [5[prime]FP])adjacent to the insulin gene on chromosome 11p. This finding suggests that the insulin gene region contains a gene or genes contributing to IDDM susceptibility. However, several studies that have sought to show linkage with IDDM by testing for cosegregation in affected sib pairs have failed to find evidence for linkage. As means for identifying genes for complex diseases, both the association and the affected-sib-pairs approaches have limitations. It is well known that population association between a disease and a genetic marker can arise as an artifact of population structure, even in the absence of linkage. On the other hand, linkage studies with modest numbers of affected sib pairs may fail to detect linkage, especially if there is linkage heterogeneity. The authors consider an alternative method to test for linkage with a genetic marker when population association has been found. Using data from families with at least one affected child, they evaluate the transmission of the associated marker allele from a heterozygous parent to an affected offspring. This approach has been used by several investigators, but the statistical properties of the method as a test for linkage have not been investigated. In the present paper they describe the statistical basis for this transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (transmission/disequilibrium test [TDT]). They then show the relationship of this test to tests of cosegregation that are based on the proportion of haplotypes or genes identical by descent in affected sibs. The TDT provides strong evidence for linkage between the 5[prime]FP and susceptibility to IDDM. 27 refs., 6 tabs.

  1. The gooseberry-zipper region of Drosophila: five genes encode different spatially restricted transcripts in the embryo.

    PubMed

    Côté, S; Preiss, A; Haller, J; Schuh, R; Kienlin, A; Seifert, E; Jäckle, H

    1987-09-01

    Genetic analysis of the Drosophila chromosome region 60 E9-F1 identified two functions affecting embryonic development; gooseberry (gsb), a segment polarity gene, and zipper (zip), an unclassified gene which affects cuticle formation severely. By contrast, molecular analysis revealed five genes with different temporal and spatial patterns of expression in the embryo. Candidate genes for gsb and zip functions were identified. Two adjacent genes are eventually expressed in regular stripes within the posterior region of each segment. One of them is expressed initially in a pair-rule mode; the second gene expresses reduced levels of transcripts in a mutant which leaves the transcribed region and the sequences up to the second gene intact. This observation, the patterns of transcripts in the embryo and the genetic data suggest that both genes are involved in gooseberry segmentation function. zip is expressed in neural tissue and not in epidermal anlagen. Embryos lacking zip activity also develop abnormal neural tissue consistent with the argument that the zip cuticle phenotype is a secondary effect. Additional newly identified genes are expressed in specific domains of the embryo, covering mesoderm anlagen and the dorsal region of embryos at blastoderm stage, respectively. PMID:16453795

  2. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  3. Perturbations of vortex ring pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Horn, Bart; Parikh, Sarthak

    2016-02-01

    We study pairs of coaxial vortex rings starting from the action for a classical bosonic string in a three-form background. We complete earlier work on the phase diagram of classical orbits by explicitly considering the case where the circulations of the two vortex rings are equal and opposite. We then go on to study perturbations, focusing on cases where the relevant four-dimensional transfer matrix splits into two-dimensional blocks. When the circulations of the rings have the same sign, instabilities are mostly limited to wavelengths smaller than a dynamically generated length scale at which single-ring instabilities occur. When the circulations have the opposite sign, larger wavelength instabilities can occur.

  4. Activity and abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in secondary forest and manioc plantations of Amazonian Dark Earth and their adjacent soils.

    PubMed

    Lima, Amanda B; Muniz, Aleksander W; Dumont, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of atmospheric CH4 in upland soils is mostly mediated by uncultivated groups of microorganisms that have been identified solely by molecular markers, such as the sequence of the pmoA gene encoding the β-subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme. The objective of this work was to compare the activity and diversity of methanotrophs in Amazonian Dark Earth soil (ADE, Hortic Anthrosol) and their adjacent non-anthropic soil. Secondly, the effect of land use in the form of manioc cultivation was examined by comparing secondary forest and plantation soils. CH4 oxidation potentials were measured and the structure of the methanotroph communities assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and amplicon pyrosequencing of pmoA genes. The oxidation potentials at low CH4 concentrations (10 ppm of volume) were relatively high in all the secondary forest sites of both ADE and adjacent soils. CH4 oxidation by the ADE soil only recently converted to a manioc plantation was also relatively high. In contrast, both the adjacent soils used for manioc cultivation and the ADE soil with a long history of agriculture displayed lower CH4 uptake rates. Amplicon pyrosequencing of pmoA genes indicated that USCα, Methylocystis and the tropical upland soil cluster (TUSC) were the dominant groups depending on the site. By qPCR analysis it was found that USCα pmoA genes, which are believed to belong to atmospheric CH4 oxidizers, were more abundant in ADE than adjacent soil. USCα pmoA genes were abundant in both forested and cultivated ADE soil, but were below the qPCR detection limit in manioc plantations of adjacent soil. The results indicate that ADE soils can harbor high abundances of atmospheric CH4 oxidizers and are potential CH4 sinks, but as in other upland soils this activity can be inhibited by the conversion of forest to agricultural plantations. PMID:25374565

  5. Activity and abundance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in secondary forest and manioc plantations of Amazonian Dark Earth and their adjacent soils

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Amanda B.; Muniz, Aleksander W.; Dumont, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of atmospheric CH4 in upland soils is mostly mediated by uncultivated groups of microorganisms that have been identified solely by molecular markers, such as the sequence of the pmoA gene encoding the β-subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme. The objective of this work was to compare the activity and diversity of methanotrophs in Amazonian Dark Earth soil (ADE, Hortic Anthrosol) and their adjacent non-anthropic soil. Secondly, the effect of land use in the form of manioc cultivation was examined by comparing secondary forest and plantation soils. CH4 oxidation potentials were measured and the structure of the methanotroph communities assessed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and amplicon pyrosequencing of pmoA genes. The oxidation potentials at low CH4 concentrations (10 ppm of volume) were relatively high in all the secondary forest sites of both ADE and adjacent soils. CH4 oxidation by the ADE soil only recently converted to a manioc plantation was also relatively high. In contrast, both the adjacent soils used for manioc cultivation and the ADE soil with a long history of agriculture displayed lower CH4 uptake rates. Amplicon pyrosequencing of pmoA genes indicated that USCα, Methylocystis and the tropical upland soil cluster (TUSC) were the dominant groups depending on the site. By qPCR analysis it was found that USCα pmoA genes, which are believed to belong to atmospheric CH4 oxidizers, were more abundant in ADE than adjacent soil. USCα pmoA genes were abundant in both forested and cultivated ADE soil, but were below the qPCR detection limit in manioc plantations of adjacent soil. The results indicate that ADE soils can harbor high abundances of atmospheric CH4 oxidizers and are potential CH4 sinks, but as in other upland soils this activity can be inhibited by the conversion of forest to agricultural plantations. PMID:25374565

  6. Comparison between soil and biomass carbon in adjacent hardwood and red pine forests

    SciTech Connect

    Perala, D.A.; Rollinger, J.L.; Wilson, D.M.

    1995-06-01

    The distribution of carbon in soil and biomass was studied across Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, USA, in 40 pole-sized red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantations paired with adjacent hardwood stands. Pine and hardwood stands shared a common boundary and soil. Hardwood stands were mixed species, naturally regenerated second growth following logging. Carbon in total, standing crop averaged the same in both hardwood and red pine forest types, although the hardwoods averaged 14 years older than red pine. Coarse woody debris, shrubs, and herbs contained little carbon. Only the forest floor carbon pool was significantly different between forest types. Forest floor had a greater mass beneath red pine than hardwoods. There was no difference in total ecosystem carbon between red pine and hardwood stands. Total mineral soil aggregated across the depth profile contained the same total amount of carbon in both pine and hardwood stands; however, the carbon was found in different vertical patterns. Amounts of carbon in the upper levels of soil (0--4 cm) were higher under hardwoods, and amounts were higher under red pine at the 8--16 cm and 16--32 cm soil depths. Where July air temperatures were relatively cool, red pine stored carbon more efficiently both in the forest floor and deep in the soil. Red pine also sequestered more carbon in mineral soil with increasing April--September precipitation.

  7. DNase I hypersensitive sites within the inducible qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive regions were mapped within the 17.3-kilobase qa (quinic acid) gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. The 5'-flanking regions of the five qa structural genes and the two qa regulatory genes each contain DNase I hypersensitive sites under noninducing conditions and generally exhibit increases in DNase I cleavage upon induction of transcription with quinic acid. The two large intergenic regions of the qa gene cluster appear to be similarly organized with respect to the positions of constitutive and inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites. Inducible hypersensitive sites on the 5' side of one qa gene, qa-x, appear to be differentially regulated. Employing these and previously published data, we have identified a conserved sequence element that may mediate the activator function of the qa-1F regulatory gene. Variants of the 16-base-pair consensus sequence are consistently found within DNase I-protected regions adjacent to inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites within the gene cluster. Images PMID:2944110

  8. Effect of speckle on lidar pulse-pair ratio statistics.

    PubMed

    Mackerrow, E P; Schmitt, M J; Thompson, D C

    1997-11-20

    The ratio of temporally adjacent lidar pulse returns is commonly used in differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to reduce correlated noise. These pulses typically are generated at different wavelengths with the assumption that the dominant noise is common to both. This is not the case when the mean number of laser speckle integrated per pulse by the lidar receiver is small (namely, less than 10 speckles at each wavelength). In this case a large increase in the standard deviation of the ratio data results. We demonstrate this effect both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical value for the expected standard deviation of the pulse-pair ratio data compares well with the measured values that used a dual CO(2) laser-based lidar with a hard target. Pulse averaging statistics of the pulse-pair data obey the expected varsigma(1)/ radicalN reduction in the standard deviation, varsigma(N), for N-pulse averages. We consider the ratio before average, average before ratio, and log of the ratio before average methods for noise reduction in the lidar equation. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of dual-laser versus single-laser lidar configurations.

  9. Genome filtering using methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes with six-base pair recognition sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The large fraction of repetitive DNA in many plant genomes has complicated all aspects of DNA sequencing and assembly, and thus techniques that enrich for genes and low-copy sequences have been employed to isolate gene space. Methyl sensitive restriction enzymes with six base pair recognition sites...

  10. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  11. GOAT ROCKS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT ROADLESS AREAS, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Close, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Goat Rocks Wilderness and adjacent roadless areas are a rugged, highly forested, scenic area located on the crest of the Cascade Range in south-central Washington. Several mineral claims have been staked in the area. Mineral surveys were conducted. Geochemical, geophysical, and geologic investigations indicate that three areas have probable mineral-resource potential for base metals in porphyry-type deposits. Available data are not adequate to permit definition of the potential for oil and gas. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of other kinds of energy resources in the area. Evaluation of resource potential in the three areas identified as having probable mineral-resource potential could be improved by more detailed geochemical studies and geologic mapping.

  12. Scolopendromorpha of New Guinea and adjacent islands (Myriapoda, Chilopoda).

    PubMed

    Schileyko, Arkady A; Stoev, Pavel E

    2016-01-01

    The centipede fauna of the second largest island in the world, New Guinea, and its adjacent islands, is poorly known, with most information deriving from the first half of the 20th century. Here we present new data on the order Scolopendromorpha based on material collected in the area in the last 40 years, mainly by Bulgarian and Latvian zoologists. The collections comprise eleven species of six genera and three families. The diagnosis of Cryptops (Trigonocryptops) is emended in the light of the recent findings. The old and doubtful record of Scolopendra multidens Newport, 1844 from New Guinea is referred to S. subspinipes Leach, 1815 and the species is here excluded from the present day list of New Guinean scolopendromorphs. Cryptops nepalensis Lewis, 1999 is here recorded from New Guinea for the first time. An annotated list and an identification key to the scolopendromorphs of the studied region are presented. PMID:27515618

  13. Geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Dilamarter, R.C.

    1982-07-01

    The geomorphology of portions of western Kentucky and adjacent areas in Indiana, Illinois and Tennessee is presented as a background for interpreters evaluating the present land surface using remotely sensed imagery. Eight physiographic units were analyzed and are briefly discussed with reference to topography and surface deposits. Great diversity was found to be characteristic of the region, the result of different structural influences and geomorphic processes. The landscape bears the marks of fluvial, glacial, eolian, lacustrine and karstic environments, so a regional geomorphic history was compiled from the literature as an aid to understanding the land surface. Three smaller zones in Kentucky were analyzed in greater detail regarding topography and geomorphic development because of their potential importance in subsurface exploration.

  14. Configuration optimization of dampers for adjacent buildings under seismic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Kasra; Hare, Warren; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2012-12-01

    Passive coupling of adjacent structures is known to be an effective method to reduce undesirable vibrations and structural pounding effects. Past results have shown that reducing the number of dampers can considerably decrease the cost of implementation and does not significantly decrease the efficiency of the system. The main objective of this study was to find the optimal arrangement of a limited number of dampers to minimize interstorey drift. Five approaches to solving the resulting bi-level optimization problem are introduced and examined (exhaustive search, inserting dampers, inserting floors, locations of maximum relative velocity and a genetic algorithm) and the numerical efficiency of each method is examined. The results reveal that the inserting damper method is the most efficient and reliable method, particularly for tall structures. It was also found that increasing the number of dampers does not necessarily increase the efficiency of the system. In fact, increasing the number of dampers can exacerbate the dynamic response of the system.

  15. Reconnaissance geologic map of Kodiak Island and adjacent islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.

    2013-01-01

    Kodiak Island and its adjacent islands, located on the west side of the Gulf of Alaska, contain one of the largest areas of exposure of the flysch and melange of the Chugach terrane of southern Alaska. However, in the past 25 years, only detailed mapping covering small areas in the archipelago has been done. This map and its associated digital files (Wilson and others, 2005) present the best available mapping compiled in an integrated fashion. The map and associated digital files represent part of a systematic effort to release geologic map data for the United States in a uniform manner. The geologic data have been compiled from a wide variety of sources, ranging from state and regional geologic maps to large-scale field mapping. The map data are presented for use at a nominal scale of 1:500,000, although individual datasets (see Wilson and others, 2005) may contain data suitable for use at larger scales.

  16. 38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA 1900 MICHIGAN MACHINERY MFG. CO. PUNCH PRESS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE FACTORY BUILDING. AT THE LEFT FOREGROUND IS A MOVABLE TIRE BENDER FOR SHAPING ELI WINDMILL WHEEL RIMS. AT THE CENTER IS A FLOOR-MOUNTED CIRCA 1900 SNAG GRINDER OF THE TYPE USED FOR SMOOTHING ROUGH CASTINGS. ON THE WHEELED WORK STATION IS A SUNNEN BUSHING GRINDER, BEHIND WHICH IS A TRIPOD CHAIN VICE. IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND IS A WOODEN CHEST OF DRAWERS WHICH CONTAINS A 'RAG DRAWER' STILL FILLED WITH CLOTH RAGS PLACED IN THE FACTORY BUILDING AT THE INSISTENCE OF LOUISE (MRS. ARTHUR) KREGEL FOR THE CONVENIENCE AND CLEANLINESS OF WORKERS. IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND IS A CIRCA 1900 CROSS-CUTOFF CIRCULAR SAW. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  17. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  18. An engineered dimeric protein pore that spans adjacent lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Shiksha; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Cheley, Stephen; Sharp, Thomas H.; Bayley, Hagan

    2013-01-01

    The bottom-up construction of artificial tissues is an underexplored area of synthetic biology. An important challenge is communication between constituent compartments of the engineered tissue and between the engineered tissue and additional compartments, including extracellular fluids, further engineered tissue and living cells. Here we present a dimeric transmembrane pore that can span two adjacent lipid bilayers and thereby allow aqueous compartments to communicate. Two heptameric staphylococcal α-hemolysin (αHL) pores were covalently linked in an aligned cap-to-cap orientation. The structure of the dimer, (α7)2, was confirmed by biochemical analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-channel electrical recording. We show that one of two β barrels of (α7)2 can insert into the lipid bilayer of a small unilamellar vesicle, while the other spans a planar lipid bilayer. (α7)2 pores spanning two bilayers were also observed by TEM. PMID:23591892

  19. Physical linkage of metabolic genes in fungi is an adaptation against the accumulation of toxic intermediate compounds.

    PubMed

    McGary, Kriston L; Slot, Jason C; Rokas, Antonis

    2013-07-01

    Genomic analyses have proliferated without being tied to tangible phenotypes. For example, although coordination of both gene expression and genetic linkage have been offered as genetic mechanisms for the frequently observed clustering of genes participating in fungal metabolic pathways, elucidation of the phenotype(s) favored by selection, resulting in cluster formation and maintenance, has not been forthcoming. We noted that the cause of certain well-studied human metabolic disorders is the accumulation of toxic intermediate compounds (ICs), which occurs when the product of an enzyme is not used as a substrate by a downstream neighbor in the metabolic network. This raises the hypothesis that the phenotype favored by selection to drive gene clustering is the mitigation of IC toxicity. To test this, we examined 100 diverse fungal genomes for the simplest type of cluster, gene pairs that are both metabolic neighbors and chromosomal neighbors immediately adjacent to each other, which we refer to as "double neighbor gene pairs" (DNGPs). Examination of the toxicity of their corresponding ICs shows that, compared with chromosomally nonadjacent metabolic neighbors, DNGPs are enriched for ICs that have acutely toxic LD50 doses or reactive functional groups. Furthermore, DNGPs are significantly more likely to be divergently oriented on the chromosome; remarkably, ∼40% of these DNGPs have ICs known to be toxic. We submit that the structure of synteny in metabolic pathways of fungi is a signature of selection for protection against the accumulation of toxic metabolic intermediates.

  20. Effect of Fluoridated Sealants on Adjacent Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cagetti, M.G.; Carta, G.; Cocco, F.; Sale, S.; Congiu, G.; Mura, A.; Strohmenger, L.; Lingström, P.; Campus, G.

    2014-01-01

    A double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed in 6- to 7-yr-old schoolchildren to evaluate, in a 30-mo period, whether the caries increment on the distal surface of the second primary molars adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with fluoride release compounds would be lower with respect to those adjacent to permanent first molars sealed with a nonfluoridated sealant. In sum, 2,776 subjects were enrolled and randomly divided into 3 groups receiving sealants on sound first molars: high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (GIC group); resin-based sealant with fluoride (fluoride-RB group); and a resin-based sealant without fluoride (RB group). Caries (D1 – D3 level) was recorded on the distal surface of the second primary molar, considered the unit of analysis including only sound surfaces at the baseline. At baseline, no differences in caries prevalence were recorded in the 3 groups regarding the considered surfaces. At follow-up, the prevalence of an affected unit of analysis was statistically lower (p = .03) in the GIC and fluoride-RB groups (p = .04). In the GIC group, fewer new caries were observed in the unit of analysis respect to the other 2 groups. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were 0.70 (95% confidence interval: 0.50, 0.68; p < .01) for GIC vs. RB and 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.04; p = .005) for fluoride-RB vs. RB. Caries incidence was significantly associated with low socioeconomic status (IRR = 1.18; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.42; p = .05). Dental sealant high-viscosity GIC and fluoride-RB demonstrated protection against dental caries, and there was evidence that these materials afforded additional protection for the tooth nearest to the sealed tooth (clinical trial registration NCT01588210). PMID:24846910

  1. Subduction initiation adjacent to a relic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although plate tectonics is well established, how subduction initiates over tectonic history has remained obscure. It has been proposed that passive margins may be a possible place for subduction initiation, but there is no obvious Cenozoic example of such a scenario, including along the passive margins of the Atlantic Ocean. With a computational method that follows the deformation of a visco-elasto-plastic medium, here we show that a favourable locale for subduction initiation is the juxtaposition of an old oceanic plate adjacent to a young, but relic arc. Significant density anomalies leading to subduction initiation arise from two major factors. One is the compositional difference between the relic arc crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle; the other is the thermal difference due to the age offset between the two plates. With such a setup, we observe spontaneous subduction initiation if the oceanic crust is significantly weakened by pore fluid pressure. If the oceanic crust is relatively strong, a small amount of plate convergence is required to induce subduction. The evidence that Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermedec subduction zones both initiate adjacent to a relic island arc support our conclusions. The initiation of both subduction zones at 51-52 Ma with commensurate compression on their respective overriding plates support a causal link between both subduction initiation events through a change in Pacific Plate motion. Our results provide an explanation for the rarity of subduction initiation at the passive margins. The continental lithosphere is typically old and cold. Consequently, the thermal effects cancel the compositional buoyancy contrast between the continental crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle, making subduction initiation difficult at passive margins.

  2. Prevention of enamel demineralization adjacent to glass ionomer filling materials.

    PubMed

    Forss, H; Seppä, L

    1990-04-01

    In order to study the release of fluoride and prevention of enamel demineralization by different filling materials, standardized cavities were prepared in 80 extracted human molars. The cavities were filled as follows: 1. Fuji II F; 2. Ketac-Fil; 3. Ketac-Silver; 4. Silar. Twenty molars were used as controls (no filling). Enamel slabs with the fillings were subjected to 9 days of demineralization (30 min daily) and remineralization (artificial saliva, replaced daily). Fluoride release in the saliva was determined on days 1, 3, 5, and 9. Enamel fluoride content adjacent to the cavities was determined initially and after the de-remineralization using the acid etch technique. On day 1, the largest amount of fluoride in the saliva was released by Fuji, but on day 9 the largest amount was released by Ketac-Fil. Ketac-Silver released significantly less fluoride than Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The average initial fluoride content of enamel was 2200 ppm. After the test period, fluoride contents adjusted for biopsy depth were 1822, 1690, 1693, 1337, and 888 ppm in groups 1-5, respectively. The amounts of phosphorus dissolved by the second acid etch were 28.9 (SE 2.6), 30.2 (2.0), 34.4 (2.8), 44.1 (2.7), and 42.2 (2.4) micrograms, respectively. Softening of surface enamel during the test period was clearly reduced in teeth filled with Fuji and Ketac-Fil. The results show that glass ionomer materials release considerable amounts of fluoride and prevent demineralization of the adjacent enamel in vitro. Fuji and Ketac-Fil seem to be more effective than Ketac-Silver.

  3. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and adjacent waters, Mass. 110.140 Section 110.140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 35744, June 20, 2011. (a... adjacent waters, Mass. (a) * * * (2) Anchorage B. All waters bounded by a line beginning at 41°36′42.3″...

  4. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs), have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq) now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal samples and 9 lung cancer

  5. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST's position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed.

  6. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST’s position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed. PMID:26958435

  7. Report on Pairing-based Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Moody, Dustin; Peralta, Rene; Perlner, Ray; Regenscheid, Andrew; Roginsky, Allen; Chen, Lily

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes study results on pairing-based cryptography. The main purpose of the study is to form NIST's position on standardizing and recommending pairing-based cryptography schemes currently published in research literature and standardized in other standard bodies. The report reviews the mathematical background of pairings. This includes topics such as pairing-friendly elliptic curves and how to compute various pairings. It includes a brief introduction to existing identity-based encryption (IBE) schemes and other cryptographic schemes using pairing technology. The report provides a complete study of the current status of standard activities on pairing-based cryptographic schemes. It explores different application scenarios for pairing-based cryptography schemes. As an important aspect of adopting pairing-based schemes, the report also considers the challenges inherent in validation testing of cryptographic algorithms and modules. Based on the study, the report suggests an approach for including pairing-based cryptography schemes in the NIST cryptographic toolkit. The report also outlines several questions that will require further study if this approach is followed. PMID:26958435

  8. FIR statistics of paired galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the effects of interaction on galaxies (see reviews in this volume by Heckman and Kennicutt). Evidence for enhanced emission from galaxies in pairs first emerged in the radio (Sulentic 1976) and optical (Larson and Tinsley 1978) domains. Results in the far infrared (FIR) lagged behind until the advent of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). The last five years have seen numerous FIR studies of optical and IR selected samples of interacting galaxies (e.g., Cutri and McAlary 1985; Joseph and Wright 1985; Kennicutt et al. 1987; Haynes and Herter 1988). Despite all of this work, there are still contradictory ideas about the level and, even, the reality of an FIR enhancement in interacting galaxies. Much of the confusion originates in differences between the galaxy samples that were studied (i.e., optical morphology and redshift coverage). Here, the authors report on a study of the FIR detection properties for a large sample of interacting galaxies and a matching control sample. They focus on the distance independent detection fraction (DF) statistics of the sample. The results prove useful in interpreting the previously published work. A clarification of the phenomenology provides valuable clues about the physics of the FIR enhancement in galaxies.

  9. The 5S genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Schedl, P; Tschudi, C; Pirrotta, V; Steward, R; Gehring, W J

    1977-12-01

    We have cloned embryonic Drosophila DNA using the poly (dA-DT) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) and the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975) as a cloning vehicle. Two clones, containing hybrid plasmids with sequences complementary to a 5S RNA probe isolated from Drosophila tissue culture cells, were identified by the Grunstein and Hogness (1975) colony hybridization procedure. One hybrid plasmid has a Drosophila insert which is comprised solely of tandem repeats of the 5S gene plus spacer sequences. The other plasmid contains an insert which has about 20 tandem 5S repeat units plus an additional 4 kilobases of adjacent sequences. The size of the 5S repeat unit was determined by gel electrophoresis and was found to be approximately 375 base pairs. We present a restriction map of both plasmids, and a detailed map of of the5S repeat unit. The 5S repat unit shows slight length and sequence heterogeneity. We present evidence suggesting that the 5S genes in Drosophila melanogaster may be arranged in a single continuous cluster. PMID:413625

  10. Embryonic expression of endogenous retroviral RNAs in somatic tissues adjacent to the Oikopleura germline

    PubMed Central

    Henriet, Simon; Sumic, Sara; Doufoundou-Guilengui, Carlette; Jensen, Marit Flo; Grandmougin, Camille; Fal, Kateryna; Thompson, Eric; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Chourrout, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Selective pressure to maintain small genome size implies control of transposable elements, and most old classes of retrotransposons are indeed absent from the very compact genome of the tunicate Oikopleura dioica. Nonetheless, two families of retrotransposons are present, including the Tor elements. The gene organization within Tor elements is similar to that of LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses. In addition to gag and pol, many Tor elements carry a third gene encoding viral envelope-like proteins (Env) that may mediate infection. We show that the Tor family contains distinct classes of elements. In some classes, env mRNA is transcribed from the 5′LTR as in retroviruses. In others, env is transcribed from an additional promoter located downstream of the 5′LTR. Tor Env proteins are membrane-associated glycoproteins which exhibit some features of viral membrane fusion proteins. Whereas some elements are expressed in the adult testis, many others are specifically expressed in embryonic somatic cells adjacent to primordial germ cells. Such embryonic expression depends on determinants present in the Tor elements and not on their surrounding genomic environment. Our study shows that unusual modes of transcription and expression close to the germline may contribute to the proliferation of Tor elements. PMID:25779047

  11. Pair programming in education: a literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, Brian; Fitzgerald, Sue; McCauley, Renée; Murphy, Laurie; Zander, Carol

    2011-06-01

    This article provides a review of educational research literature focused on pair programming in the undergraduate computer science curriculum. Research suggests that the benefits of pair programming include increased success rates in introductory courses, increased retention in the major, higher quality software, higher student confidence in solutions, and improvement in learning outcomes. Moreover, there is some evidence that women, in particular, benefit from pair programming. The literature also provides evidence that the transition from paired to solo programming is easy for students. The greatest challenges for paired students appear to concern scheduling and partner compatibility. This review also considers practical issues such as assigning partners, teaching students to work in pairs, and assessing individual contributions, and concludes with a discussion of open research questions.

  12. Pair production and escape in accretion disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirelles Filho, C.; Liang, E. P.

    It is shown that, in the absence of confining mechanisms, there will be a non-negligible amount of pairs escaping from the inner region of a Comptonized soft photon two-temperature accretion disk, when pair production is not balanced by annihilation. Assuming conditions such that the photons and particles in the disk can be regarded as close to a Wien plasma (Svensson, 1984), the authors calculate the rate of pair escape from the disk for both a situation close to pair balance and a situation with the rate of escape exceeding annihilation. The pairs are assumed to be created by photon-photon processes. Within this model one can account for the 511 keV γ-ray luminosity due to pair annihilation in the ISM, as recently observed in the Einstein source.

  13. Dynamical evolution of comet pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Andrea; Fernández, Julio A.

    2016-10-01

    Some Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits (thereafter NEJFCs) show a remarkable similarity in their present orbits, like for instance 169P/NEAT and P/2003 T12 (SOHO), or 252P/LINEAR and P/2016 BA14 (PANSTARRS). By means of numerical integrations we studied the dynamical evolution of these objects. In particular, for each pair of presumably related objects, we are interested in assessing the stability of the orbital parameters for several thousand years, and to find a minimum of their relative spatial distance, coincident with a low value of their relative velocity. For those cases for which we find a well defined minimum of their relative orbital separation, we are trying to reproduce the actual orbit of the hypothetical fragment by modeling a fragmentation of the parent body. Some model parameters are the relative ejection velocity (a few m/s), the orbital point at which the fragmentation could have happened (e.g. perihelion), and the elapsed time since fragmentation. In addition, some possible fragmentation mechanisms, like thermal stress, rotational instability, or collisions, could be explored. According to Fernández J.A and Sosa A. 2015 (Planetary and Space Science 118,pp.14-24), some NEJFCs might come from the outer asteroid belt, and then they would have a more consolidated structure and a higher mineral content than that of comets coming from the trans-Neptunian belt or the Oort cloud. Therefore, such objects would have a much longer physical lifetime in the near-Earth region, and could become potential candidates to produce visible meteor showers (as for example 169P/NEAT which has been identified as the parent body of the alpha-Capricornid meteoroid stream, according to Jenniskens, P., Vaubaillon, J., 2010 (Astron. J. 139), and Kasuga, T., Balam, D.D., Wiegert, P.A., 2010 (Astron. J. 139).

  14. Two adjacent inversions maintain genomic differentiation between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Tina Graceline; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Sandve, Simen R; Baranski, Matthew; Nome, Torfinn; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Righino, Benedetta; Johansen, Torild; Otterå, Håkon; Sonesson, Anna; Lien, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Øivind

    2016-05-01

    Atlantic cod is composed of multiple migratory and stationary populations widely distributed in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Arctic cod (NEAC) population in the Barents Sea undertakes annual spawning migrations to the northern Norwegian coast. Although spawning occurs sympatrically with the stationary Norwegian coastal cod (NCC), phenotypic and genetic differences between NEAC and NCC are maintained. In this study, we resolve the enigma by revealing the mechanisms underlying these differences. Extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population divergence were demonstrated in a 17.4-Mb region on linkage group 1 (LG1) based on genotypes of 494 SNPs from 192 parents of farmed families of NEAC, NCC or NEACxNCC crosses. Linkage analyses revealed two adjacent inversions within this region that repress meiotic recombination in NEACxNCC crosses. We identified a NEAC-specific haplotype consisting of 186 SNPs that was fixed in NEAC sampled from the Barents Sea, but segregating under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in eight NCC stocks. Comparative genomic analyses determine the NEAC configuration of the inversions to be the derived state and date it to ~1.6-2.0 Mya. The haplotype block harbours 763 genes, including candidates regulating swim bladder pressure, haem synthesis and skeletal muscle organization conferring adaptation to long-distance migrations and vertical movements down to large depths. Our results suggest that the migratory ecotype experiences strong directional selection for the two adjacent inversions on LG1. Despite interbreeding between NEAC and NCC, the inversions are maintaining genetic differentiation, and we hypothesize the co-occurrence of multiple adaptive alleles forming a 'supergene' in the NEAC population.

  15. Two adjacent inversions maintain genomic differentiation between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Tina Graceline; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Sandve, Simen R; Baranski, Matthew; Nome, Torfinn; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Righino, Benedetta; Johansen, Torild; Otterå, Håkon; Sonesson, Anna; Lien, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Øivind

    2016-05-01

    Atlantic cod is composed of multiple migratory and stationary populations widely distributed in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Arctic cod (NEAC) population in the Barents Sea undertakes annual spawning migrations to the northern Norwegian coast. Although spawning occurs sympatrically with the stationary Norwegian coastal cod (NCC), phenotypic and genetic differences between NEAC and NCC are maintained. In this study, we resolve the enigma by revealing the mechanisms underlying these differences. Extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population divergence were demonstrated in a 17.4-Mb region on linkage group 1 (LG1) based on genotypes of 494 SNPs from 192 parents of farmed families of NEAC, NCC or NEACxNCC crosses. Linkage analyses revealed two adjacent inversions within this region that repress meiotic recombination in NEACxNCC crosses. We identified a NEAC-specific haplotype consisting of 186 SNPs that was fixed in NEAC sampled from the Barents Sea, but segregating under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in eight NCC stocks. Comparative genomic analyses determine the NEAC configuration of the inversions to be the derived state and date it to ~1.6-2.0 Mya. The haplotype block harbours 763 genes, including candidates regulating swim bladder pressure, haem synthesis and skeletal muscle organization conferring adaptation to long-distance migrations and vertical movements down to large depths. Our results suggest that the migratory ecotype experiences strong directional selection for the two adjacent inversions on LG1. Despite interbreeding between NEAC and NCC, the inversions are maintaining genetic differentiation, and we hypothesize the co-occurrence of multiple adaptive alleles forming a 'supergene' in the NEAC population. PMID:26923504

  16. Lax pairs for deformed Minkowski spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyono, Hideki; Sakamoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2016-01-01

    We proceed to study Yang-Baxter deformations of 4D Minkowski spacetime based on a conformal embedding. We first revisit a Melvin background and argue a Lax pair by adopting a simple replacement law invented in 1509.00173. This argument enables us to deduce a general expression of Lax pair. Then the anticipated Lax pair is shown to work for arbitrary classical r-matrices with Poincaré generators. As other examples, we present Lax pairs for pp-wave backgrounds, the Hashimoto-Sethi background, the Spradlin-Takayanagi-Volovich background.

  17. Spatiotemporal configuration dependent pairing of nerve events in dark-adapted human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Maarten A.

    2002-02-01

    In the model presented here, in the dark any single quantum absorption in a rod or cone produces a subliminal excitation. Subliminal excitations from both halves of a twin unit pair in the retina for the perception of light from the stimulus. A twin unit contains either two red or two green cones. The twin units are intertwined in triples of two red units and one green unit in a hexagon called a trion. P satellite rods surround each cone, P being approximately proportional to the square of eccentricity. A successful pairing for light perception represents-through the points of time and locations of the creation of its partners in the retina-a direction event with two possible polarities and with the orientation of the elongated shape of the twin unit. The polarity of the event depends on which of the two partners arrives first at the twin's pairing facility. Simultaneous events and successive events with the same polarity in adjacent units that are aligned along one of the three orientations of the hexagonal retinal mosaic pair in the cortex for the perception of edge and of movement. Inter-twin pairing products of the three differently oriented sets of aligned twins are independent of each other and sum vectorially in the cortex. This system of three sub-retinas is called the retrinet. Two one-quantum excitations in any of a twin's receptors make the percept colored. The odd blue cone produces already a blue signal for a single one-quantum excitation. Intra-receptor pairing in a rod, a red cone and a green cone is for white, red, and green respectively. Red and green cone products of a trion cross-pair in the retina and produce a yellow signal. Red and green cone products of a hexagon of adjacent trions cross-pair in the cortex and produce a white signal. This large hexagon with a total of seven trions is called a persepton. After subliminal excitations in a twin have paired successfully, further subliminal receptor excitations in neighboring and aligned twins are

  18. Distinctive Glycerophospholipid Profiles of Human Seminoma and Adjacent Normal Tissues by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Mattarozzi, Monica; Cheng, Liang; Beck, Stephen D. W.; Bianchi, Federica; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-08-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been successfully used to discriminate between normal and cancerous human tissue from different anatomical sites. On the basis of this, DESI-MS imaging was used to characterize human seminoma and adjacent normal tissue. Seminoma and adjacent normal paired human tissue sections (40 tissues) from 15 patients undergoing radical orchiectomy were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen and sectioned to 15 μm thickness and thaw mounted to glass slides. The entire sample was two-dimensionally analyzed by the charged solvent spray to form a molecular image of the biological tissue. DESI-MS images were compared with formalin-fixed, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides of the same material. Increased signal intensity was detected for two seminolipids [seminolipid (16:0/16:0) and seminolipid (30:0)] in the normal tubule testis tissue; these compounds were undetectable in seminoma tissue, as well as from the surrounding fat, muscle, and blood vessels. A glycerophosphoinositol [PI(18:0/20:4)] was also found at increased intensity in the normal testes tubule tissue when compared with seminoma tissue. Ascorbic acid (i.e., vitamin C) was found at increased amounts in seminoma tissue when compared with normal tissue. DESI-MS analysis was successfully used to visualize the location of several types of molecules across human seminoma and normal tissues. Discrimination between seminoma and adjacent normal testes tubules was achieved on the basis of the spatial distributions and varying intensities of particular lipid species as well as ascorbic acid. The increased presence of ascorbic acid within seminoma compared with normal seminiferous tubules was previously unknown.

  19. Investigation of the Role of the Histidine-Aspartate Pair in the Human Exonuclease III-like Abasic Endonuclease, Ape1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, David F. ); Hoyt, David W. ); Khazi, Fayaz A.; Bagu, John R. ); Lindsey, Andrea G.; Wilson, David M.

    2003-05-30

    Hydrogen bonded histidine-aspartate (His-Asp) pairs are critical constituents in several key enzymatic reactions. To date, the role that these pairs play in catalysis is best understood in serine and trypsin-like proteases, where structural and biochemical NMR studies have revealed important pKa values and hydrogen-bonding patterns within the catalytic pocket. However, the role of the His-Asp pair in metal-assisted catalysis is less clear. Here, we apply liquid state NMR to investigate the role of a critical histidine of apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1), a human DNA repair enzyme that cleaves adjacent to abasic sites in DNA using one or more divalent cations and an active site His-Asp pair. The studies within suggest that the Ape1 His- Asp pair functions as neither a general base catalyst nor a metal ligand. Rather, the pair likely stabilizes the pentavalent transition state necessary for phospho-transfer.

  20. Simultaneous assay of every Salmonella Typhi gene using one million transposon mutants

    PubMed Central

    Langridge, Gemma C.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Turner, Daniel J.; Perkins, Timothy T.; Parts, Leopold; Haase, Jana; Charles, Ian; Maskell, Duncan J.; Peters, Sarah E.; Dougan, Gordon; Wain, John; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, A. Keith

    2009-01-01

    Very high-throughput sequencing technologies need to be matched by high-throughput functional studies if we are to make full use of the current explosion in genome sequences. We have generated a very large bacterial mutant pool, consisting of an estimated 1.1 million transposon mutants and we have used genomic DNA from this mutant pool, and Illumina nucleotide sequencing to prime from the transposon and sequence into the adjacent target DNA. With this method, which we have called TraDIS (transposon directed insertion-site sequencing), we have been able to map 370,000 unique transposon insertion sites to the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi chromosome. The unprecedented density and resolution of mapped insertion sites, an average of one every 13 base pairs, has allowed us to assay simultaneously every gene in the genome for essentiality and generate a genome-wide list of candidate essential genes. In addition, the semiquantitative nature of the assay allowed us to identify genes that are advantageous and those that are disadvantageous for growth under standard laboratory conditions. Comparison of the mutant pool following growth in the presence or absence of ox bile enabled every gene to be assayed for its contribution toward bile tolerance, a trait required of any enteric bacterium and for carriage of S. Typhi in the gall bladder. This screen validated our hypothesis that we can simultaneously assay every gene in the genome to identify niche-specific essential genes. PMID:19826075

  1. Seismic responses of two adjacent buildings. I. Data and analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    1993-01-01

    In this two-part paper, responses of two, adjacent, seven-story buildings in Norwalk, California, to the Whittier-Narrows, Calif, earthquake of Oct. 1, 1987 are studied. Building A, instrumented according to code recommendations, and building B, extensively instrumented, are offset by 16.3 m from one another. The data set includes motions from the superstructure of both buildings, from a downhole below the foundation of building B, and from three free-field sites. Part I of the paper includes descriptions of the buildings, site, instrumentation, and analysis of the data of each building. System identification and spectral analysis techniques are employed in part I. Building A has identical first-mode frequencies of 0.65 Hz for both building axes. The strong-motion response characteristics of building A are considerably different than those determined from low-amplitude tests. Building B has fundamental modes at 0.76 Hz and 0.83 Hz in the major and minor axes, respectively. Torsional and diaphragm effects in building B are negligible.

  2. Snow Distribution Patterns in Clearings and Adjacent Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Douglas L.; Swanson, Robert H.

    1986-12-01

    Snow accumulation patterns were determined for clearings and adjacent forest at Marmot Creek experimental watershed and James River, Alberta. At maximum accumulation snow water equivalent (SWE) was greater in clearings than in forest whether clearings were large, as in 8- to 13-ha blocks where SWE averaged 20% more than in the forest, or small as in the ¼ to 6-H (height) diameter circular clearings where SWE was 13-45% greater than in the forest. SWE was 42 to 52% less in north than in south sectors of 2-6 H clearings. These differences increased with clearing size and time since beginning of accumulation period and are caused by snow ablation (melt and evaporation), a function of direct solar radiation reaching the snowpack. In such situations the snow that has accumulated on the ground cannot be considered a measure of the snow that has actually fallen there. For water balances and hydrologic modeling, snow measurements in partially cleared watersheds must be adjusted for temporal and spatial factors specific to the watershed.

  3. Seismic responses of two adjacent buildings. II. Interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    1993-01-01

    Presented in this part of the two-part paper is a study of the relations between earthquake motions recorded from two, adjacent, seven-story buildings, from a downhole below the foundation of one of the buildings and from three free-field sites, all within one city block. This unique data set was obtained during the Whittier-Narrows, Calif. earthquake of Oct. 1, 1987, Part I includes background information on the two buildings, the site, and the data set. Building response characteristics of a code-type instrumented building (A) and an extensively instrumented building (B) are also studied. In this part, spectral analysis techniques are used to study the relationships between the motions of the roofs and basements, the downhole and the free-field sites. It is asserted that there is building-soil-building interaction between the two buildings at a frequency of 2.35 Hz. Furthermore, the free-field motions are shown to be influenced by the presence of the buildings.

  4. Particulate Matter Levels in Ambient Air Adjacent to Industrial Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Nizam, N. M. S.; Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Lajis, A.; Kassim, A. H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Air quality in the residential areas adjacent to the industrial regions is of great concern due to the association with human health risks. In this work, the concentrations of particulate matter (PM10) in the ambient air of UTHM campus was investigated tostudy the air qualityand their compliance to the Malaysian Ambient Air Quality Guidelines (AAQG). The PM10 samples were taken over 24 hours from the most significant area at UTHM including Stadium, KolejKediamanTunDr. Ismail (KKTDI) and MakmalBahan. The meteorological parameters; temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction as well as particulate matterwere estimated by using E-Sampler Particulate Matter (PM10) Collector. The highest concentrations of PM10 (55.56 µg/m3) was recorded at MakmalBahan during the working and weekend days. However, these concentrations are less than 150 pg/m3. It can be concluded that although UTHM is surrounded by the industrial area, the air quality in the campus still within the standards limits.

  5. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  6. Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.; Squillace, P.

    1994-01-01

    Herbicide interchange between a stream and the adjacent alluvial aquifer and quantification of herbicide bank storage during high streamflow were investigated at a research site on the Cedar River flood plain, 10 km southeast of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During high streamflow in March 1990, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background in water from wells as distant as 20, 50, and 10 m from the river's edge, respectively. During high streamflow in May 1990, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor were detected at concentrations above background as distant as 20, 50, 10, and 20 m from the river's edge, respectively. Herbicide bank storage took place during high streamflow when hydraulic gradients were from the river to the alluvial aquifer and the laterally infiltrating river water contained herbicide concentrations larger than background concentrations in the aquifer. The herbicide bank storage can be quantified by multiplying herbicide concentration by the "effective area" that a well represented and an assumed porosity of 0.25. During March 1990, herbicide bank storage values were calculated to be 1.7,79, and 4.0 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor, respectively. During May 1990, values were 7.1, 54, 11, and 19 mg/m for alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, respectively. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  7. Preparation and properties of adjacency crosslinked polyurethane-urea elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuan; Cao, Yu-Yang; Wu, Shou-Peng; Li, Zai-Feng

    2012-12-01

    Adjacency crosslinked polyurethane-urea (PUU) elastomers with different crosslinking density were prepared by using hydroxyl-terminated liquid butadiene-nitrile (HTBN), toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and chain extender 3,5-dimethyl thio-toluene diamine (DMTDA) as raw materials, dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as initiator, and N,N'-m-phenylene dimaleimide (HVA-2) as the crosslinking agent. The influences of the crosslinking density and temperature on the structure and properties of such elastomers were investigated. The crosslinking density of PUU elastomer was tested by the NMR method. It is found that when the content of HVA-2 is 1.5%, the mechanical properties of polyurethane elastomer achieve optimal performance. By testing thermal performance of PUU, compared with linear PUU, the thermal stability of the elastomers has a marked improvement. With the addition of HVA-2, the loss factor tan δ decreases. FT-IR spectral studies of PUU elastomer at various temperatures were performed. From this study, heat-resistance polyurethane could be prepared, and the properties of PUU at high temperature could be improved obviously.

  8. The Current Tectonics of the Yukon and Adjacent Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndman, R. D.; Leonard, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The current tectonics across the Yukon and adjacent areas of western Northwest Territories (NWT) and northern British Columbia appear to be driven primarily by the Yakutat Terrane collision, an "indenter" in the corner of the Gulf of Alaska. GPS data show 1-10 mm/yr northward and eastward, decreasing inland. The rates from earthquake statistics are similar although there are important discrepancies. The eastern Cordillera earthquake mechanisms are mainly thrust in the Mackenzie Mountains of southwestern NWT where the Cordillera upper crust is overthrusting the craton. To the north, the mechanisms are mainly strike-slip in the Richardson Mountains that appear to lie along the edge of the craton. The deformation appears to be limited to the hot and weak Cordillera with the strong craton providing an irregular eastern boundary. For example, there is an eastward bow in the craton edge and the deformation in the Mackenzie Mountains. On the Beaufort Sea margin in the region of the Mackenzie Delta there appears to be a type of "subduction zone" with the continent very slowly overthrusting the oceanic plate, a process that has continued since at least the Cretaceous. A northward moving continental margin block is bounded by left lateral faulting in the west (Canning Displacement Zone of eastern Alaska) and right lateral faulting in the east (Richardson Mountains in eastern Yukon). There is almost no seismicity on this thrust belt but as for some other subduction zones such as Cascadia there is the potential for very infrequent great earthquakes.

  9. Adjacent level spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Sreeramalingam, Rathinavelu

    2012-05-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is rare, but the same occurring at adjacent levels without disturbing the operated level is very rare. We report a case, with 5 year followup, who underwent ACDF from C5 to C7 for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. He showed neurological improvement after surgery but developed discharging sinus after 2 weeks, which healed with antibiotics. He improved on his preoperative symptoms well for the first 2 months. He started developing progressive neck pain and myelopathy after 3 months and investigations revealed spondylodiscitis at C3 and C4 with erosion, collapse, and kyphosis, without any evidence of implant failure or graft rejection at the operated level. He underwent reexploration and implant removal at the operated level (there was good fusion from C5 to C7) followed by debridement/decompression at C3, C4 along with iliac crest bone grafting and stabilization with plate and screws after maximum correction of kyphosis. The biopsy specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa and appropriate sensitive antibiotics (gentamycin and ciprofloxacin) were given for 6 weeks. He was under regular followup for 5 years his myelopathy resolved completely and he is back to work. Complete decompression of the cord and fusion from C2 to C7 was demonstrable on postoperative imaging studies without any evidence of implant loosening or C1/C2 instability at the last followup. PMID:22719127

  10. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  11. Macrobenthos of Yenisei Bay and the adjacent Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, S. V.; Vedenin, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Trawl samples were collected in the northern region of Yenisei Bay and adjacent parts of the Kara Sea shelf. A total of eight stations were taken. We found more than 200 species of benthic organisms. A consecutive replacement of benthic communities is observed when going to the north from the Ob and Yenisei estuaries to the open parts of the sea. We could distinguish four different species complexes in the investigated area: a brackish-water complex where Saduria entomon is dominant; an intermediate complex where S. sibirica, S. sabini and Portlandia aestuariorum are dominant; a transitional complex with P. arctica as a dominant species and with a small amount of Ophiocten sericeum; a marine complex where O. sericeum is dominant. When salinity increased, some brackish-water species were replaced by related euryhaline species. One such example was the replacement of brackish-water Saduria entomon isopods by two euryhaline species: S. sibirica and S. sabini. The consecutive replacement of benthic communities showed a break near Sverdrup Island. In this area the marine complex was replaced by a transitional complex with P. arctica.

  12. Integrated miRNA–risk gene–pathway pair network analysis provides prognostic biomarkers for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Xu, Jiping; Han, Yifang; Lu, Zhengmao; Han, Ting; Ding, Yibo; Ma, Liye

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to identify molecular prognostic biomarkers for gastric cancer. Methods mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of eligible gastric cancer and control samples were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and differentially expressed miRNAs (DEmiRs), using MetaDE and limma packages, respectively. Target genes of the DEmiRs were also collected from both predictive and experimentally validated target databases of miRNAs. The overlapping genes between selected targets and DEGs were identified as risk genes, followed by functional enrichment analysis. Human pathways and their corresponding genes were downloaded from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database for the expression analysis of each pathway in gastric cancer samples. Next, co-pathway pairs were selected according to the Pearson correlation coefficients. Finally, the co-pathway pairs, miRNA–target pairs, and risk gene–pathway pairs were merged into a complex interaction network, the most important nodes (miRNAs/target genes/co-pathway pairs) of which were selected by calculating their degrees. Results Totally, 1,260 DEGs and 144 DEmiRs were identified. There were 336 risk genes found in the 9,572 miRNA–target pairs. Judging from the pathway expression files, 45 co-pathway pairs were screened out. There were 1,389 interactive pairs and 480 nodes in the integrated network. Among all nodes in the network, focal adhesion/extracellular matrix–receptor interaction pathways, CALM2, miR-19b, and miR-181b were the hub nodes with higher degrees. Conclusion CALM2, hsa-miR-19b, and hsa-miR-181b might be used as potential prognostic targets for gastric cancer. PMID:27284247

  13. Pair Programming in Education: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanks, Brian; Fitzgerald, Sue; McCauley, Renee; Murphy, Laurie; Zander, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a review of educational research literature focused on pair programming in the undergraduate computer science curriculum. Research suggests that the benefits of pair programming include increased success rates in introductory courses, increased retention in the major, higher quality software, higher student confidence in…

  14. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  15. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  16. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  17. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  18. 22 CFR 62.31 - Au pairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pair participant with child development and child safety instruction, as follows: (1) Prior to... development instruction of which no less than 4 shall be devoted to specific training for children under the... and participate directly in the home life of the host family. All au pair participants provide...

  19. Top Quark Pair Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jason

    2005-05-17

    The measurement of the top quark pair production crosssection inproton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV is a test ofquantumchromodynamics and could potentially be sensitive to newphysics beyondthe standard model. I report on the latest t-tbarcross section resultsfrom the CDF and DZero experiments in various finalstate topologies whicharise from decays of top quark pairs.

  20. Attitudes on Using Pair-Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Elizabeth V.

    2007-01-01

    During a research study conducted over four semesters, students enrolled in an introductory programming class at a commuter campus used the pair-programming approach for both in-class labs and out-of-class programming assignments. This study was a comprehensive assessment of pair-programming using multiple measures of both quantitative and…

  1. Bidirectional Synonym Ratings of 464 Noun Pairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Each of 464 noun pairs was rated for synonymy on a seven-point scale by college students to provide an extensive set of synonym pairs for use as stimuli in experiments, and to evaluate the effects of word encoding order on perceived synonymy. (SW)

  2. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  3. Spontaneous formation of inert oscillator pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, Denis; Wiesenfeld, Kurt

    2004-05-01

    We describe a peculiar type of spontaneous synchronization in a transmission line studded with nonlinear oscillators. After a transient period of complicated interactions, the elements form strongly synchronized pairs with interactions between these pairs virtually nil. The creation of these “dynamical dimers” appears to stem from the coupling intrinsic to transmission lines rather than any specific property of the nonlinear oscillators.

  4. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea.

    PubMed

    Maier, T A; Staar, P; Mishra, V; Chatterjee, U; Campuzano, J C; Scalapino, D J

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  5. Collective pairing Hamiltonian in the GCM approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, A.; Pomorski, K.; Brack, M.; Werner, E.

    1985-08-01

    Using the generator coordinate method and the gaussian overlap approximation we derived the collective Schrödinger-type equation starting from a microscopic single-particle plus pairing hamiltonian for one kind of particle. The BCS wave function was used as the generator function. The pairing energy-gap parameter Δ and the gauge transformation anglewere taken as the generator coordinates. Numerical results have been obtained for the full and the mean-field pairing hamiltonians and compared with the cranking estimates. A significant role played by the zero-point energy correction in the collective pairing potential is found. The ground-state energy dependence on the pairing strength agrees very well with the exact solution of the Richardson model for a set of equidistant doubly-degenerate single-particle levels.

  6. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, T. A.; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  7. Optical Spectroscopy of Unbound Asteroid Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duddy, Samuel; Lowry, S. C.; Christou, A.; Wolters, S. D.; Snodgrass, C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Deller, J. F.; Hainaut, O. R.; Rozitis, B.; Weissman, P. R.; Green, S. F.

    2012-10-01

    The recently discovered unbound asteroid pairs have been suggested to be the result of the decoupling of binary asteroids formed either through collision processes or, more likely, rotational fission of a rubble-pile asteroid after spin-up (Vokrouhlicky et al. 2008, AJ 136, 280; Pravec et al., 2010, Nature, 466, 1085). Much of the evidence for linkage of the asteroids in each pair relies solely on the backwards integrations of their orbits. We report new results from our continuing spectroscopic survey of the unbound asteroid pairs, including the youngest known pair, (6070) Rhineland - (54827) 2001 NQ8. The survey goal is to determine whether the asteroids in each unbound pair have similar spectra and therefore composition, expected if they have formed from a common parent body. Low-resolution spectroscopy covering the range 0.4-0.95 microns was conducted using the 3.6m ESO NTT+EFOSC2 during 2011-2012 and the 4.2m WHT+ACAM. We have attempted to maintain a high level of consistency between the observations of the components in each pair to ensure that differences in the asteroid spectra are not the result of the observing method or data reduction, but purely caused by compositional differences. Our WHT data indicates that the asteroids of unbound pair 17198 - 229056 exhibit different spectra and have been assigned different taxonomies, A and R respectively. Initial analysis of our data from the NTT suggests that the asteroids in unbound pairs 6070 - 54827 and 38707 - 32957 are likely silicate-dominated asteroids. The components of pair 23998 - 205383 are potentially X-type asteroids. We present final taxonomic classifications and the likelihood of spectral similarity in each pair.

  8. Stereo Pair: Wellington, New Zealand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand, is located on the shores of Port Nicholson, a natural harbor at the south end of North Island. The city was founded in 1840 by British emigrants and now has a regional population of more than 400,000 residents. As seen here, the natural terrain imposes strong control over the urban growth pattern (urban features generally appear gray or white in this view). Rugged hills generally rising to 300 meters (1,000 feet) help protect the city and harbor from strong winter winds

    New Zealand is seismically active and faults are readily seen in the topography. The Wellington Fault forms the straight northwestern (left) shoreline of the harbor. Toward the southwest (down) the fault crosses through the city, then forms linear canyons in the hills before continuing offshore at the bottom. Toward the northeast (upper right) the fault forms the sharp mountain front along the northern edge of the heavily populated Hutt Valley.

    This stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced true color Landsat7 satellite image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30 meter (99 foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and will provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data

  9. SRTM Stereo Pair: Fiji Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    This image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (about 200 feet) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 192 km (119 miles) x 142 km (88 miles) Location: 17.8 deg. South lat., 178.0 deg. East lon. Orientation: North at top Date Acquired: February 19, 2000 Image: NASA/JPL/NIMA

  10. Tidally influenced alongshore circulation at an inlet-adjacent shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin P.L.; List, Jeffrey H.; Erikson, Li H.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of tidal forcing to alongshore circulation inside the surfzone is investigated at a 7 km long sandy beach adjacent to a large tidal inlet. Ocean Beach in San Francisco, CA (USA) is onshore of a ∼150 km2 ebb-tidal delta and directly south of the Golden Gate, the sole entrance to San Francisco Bay. Using a coupled flow-wave numerical model, we find that the tides modulate, and in some cases can reverse the direction of, surfzone alongshore flows through two separate mechanisms. First, tidal flow through the inlet results in a barotropic tidal pressure gradient that, when integrated across the surfzone, represents an important contribution to the surfzone alongshore force balance. Even during energetic wave conditions, the tidal pressure gradient can account for more than 30% of the total alongshore pressure gradient (wave and tidal components) and up to 55% during small waves. The wave driven component of the alongshore pressure gradient results from alongshore wave height and corresponding setup gradients induced by refraction over the ebb-tidal delta. Second, wave refraction patterns over the inner shelf are tidally modulated as a result of both tidal water depth changes and strong tidal flows (∼1 m/s), with the effect from currents being larger. These tidally induced changes in wave refraction result in corresponding variability of the alongshore radiation stress and pressure gradients within the surfzone. Our results indicate that tidal contributions to the surfzone force balance can be significant and important in determining the direction and magnitude of alongshore flow.

  11. Seismotectonics of Northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Aggarwal, Y.P.

    1981-06-10

    Data for local earthquakes recorded by a network of stations in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada were analyzed to study the seismicity, the relationship between earthquakes and known faults, the state of stress, and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. In addition, portable seismographs were deployed in the field to study aftershocks. As a result, accurate locations for about 364 local earthquakes (2< or =m/sub b/< or =5) and 22 focal mechanism solutions were determined. A comparison of the spatial distribution of these events (1970--1979) with historical earthquakes (1534--1959) reveals that seismic activity in the northeast is relatively stationary in space: those areas that have had little or no seismicity historically are relatively aseismic today, whereas the historically active areas are also active today. The instrumental locations, historical seismicity, and focal mechanism solutions show an internal consistency that help us distinguish two distinct seismogenic provinces. (1) The Adirondack-western Quebec province is a northwesterly trending zone of seismic activity, about 200 km wide and at least 500 km long, extending from the SE Adirondacks into western Quebec, Canada. Thrust faulting on planes striking NNW to NW appears to predominate, and the inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression is largely uniform and trends WSW, nearly parallel to the calculated absolute plate motion of North America. Little or no seismicity is found where anorthosite outcrops at the surface. Correlations between gravity anomalies and earthquake locations suggest that seismic activity in this zone is localized to regions of steep NE or SW gradient in Bouguer anomalies. This zone does not appear to extend southeastward to Boston, as proposed by some workers. (2) The Appalachian province is a northeasterly trending zone of seismic activity extending from northern Virginia to New Brunswick, Canada.

  12. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  13. Seabed drifter movement in San Diego Bay and adjacent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Robert R.; Wallace, William J.

    1982-06-01

    The seabed drifter has been used successfully to provide valuable information in many estuarine and open sea environments. It was therefore selected for use in the San Diego area. Five hundred drifters were released in San Diego Bay and adjacent ocean waters to delineate bottom flow patterns. Four significant bottom drift regimes are differentiated: off-coastal, main bay channel, open and semi-enclosed docking basins. Mean residual bottom drift ranged between 0·17km day -1 off the coast to essentially zero in the docking basins. Off-coast drifter results (31% recovery) showed a persistent northmoving bottom current with shallow near-coast drift distances between 4 and 25 km. This nearshore north moving bottom current appears to cause a net bottom water inflow into the main San Diego Bay channel (44% recovery). In the open bay a reverse trend was observed from the 16% of the drifters recovered. At the head of the estuary, evaporative densification is believed to occur, with the heavier water sinking and moving outward, towards the estuary mouth, resulting in an area of opposing bottom water currents. In this area San Diego Gas and Electric power plant takes in an average 150 million gallons of cooling water daily which, discharged as warm surface water, is suggested as the surface divergence mode required to reconcile the observed flow. With the three San Diego Bay electric power plants utilizing more than 5% of the maximum tidal prism for cooling purposes, this flow may play a major role in the overall bay circulation and requires quantitative investigation.

  14. Vesicomyinae (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and adjacent abyssal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, Elena M.; Kamenev, Gennady M.; Vladychenskaya, Irina P.; Petrov, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Representatives of the subfamily Vesicomyinae (Bivalvia, Vesicomyidae) are tiny deep-sea molluscs distributed worldwide and reaching huge abundances of hundreds and thousands of specimens in trawl catches. During the German-Russian deep-sea expedition KuramBio (R/V Sonne, 2012) for the first time two vesicomyin species were collected from the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench from the depths of 4861-5787 m, Vesicomya pacifica (Smith, 1885) and "Vesicomya" filatovae sp.n. Two species of vesicomyins, V. sergeeviFilatova, 1971 and V. profundiFilatova, 1971, which were previously reported from the hadal of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench, were not collected at the abyssal depth despite of the close geographical proximity of the sampling area to their distribution ranges. Altogether nine species of vesicomyins are recorded now from the West and Indo-West Pacific; data on distribution and morpho-anatomical characters of these species are provided. Taxonomic description of V. pacifica is revised including information on its soft part anatomy, new localities and COI sequences. For the first time for a vesicomyin bivalve molecular data is given for a species with an explicit morphological description and unambiguous taxonomic affiliation. Molecular analysis of 160 published COI sequences of vesicomyids and newly obtained molecular data on V. pacifica showed that V. pacifica and two undescribed vesicomyin species forming a monophyletic clade which exhibits sister relationships with the Pliocardiinae, the group of chemosymbiotic vesicomyids. "Vesicomya" filatovae sp.n. is provisionally assigned to the genus Vesicomya (s.l.) until additional morphological and molecular data are obtained. It differs from Vesicomya s.s. by a broader hinge margin with more radiating teeth and the presence of only one pair of demibranchs.

  15. Environmental Factors Controlling Ostracod Distribution on the Tibetan Plateau and Adjacent Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, N.; Pröttel, R.; Glodniok, S.; Söndgerath, D.; Naumann, K.; Frenzel, P.; Mischke, S.; Schwalb, A.

    2014-12-01

    Non-marine ostracods represent a reliable tool to reconstruct past climate conditions. The investigation of environmental tolerances of modern ostracod species is therefore vital to estimate past climate conditions based on fossil assemblages. To determine the climate range of individual ostracod species their modern geographical distribution is combined with climate data sets. The overlap of modern ecological tolerances of ostracod species found in a fossil assemblage yield information about past air temperatures [1]. In our study we establish ecological tolerances of species from the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas and indicate which environmental parameter is most important for species distribution. Therefore the point biserial correlation coefficient is applied on the species distribution of 34 taxa from 364 locations based on the presence/absence of species. We use a 0.93 km gridded climate database that pairs climate parameters with modern collection sites. In total we investigated the influence of 20 different environmental parameters, such as annual temperature amplitude, July and January temperatures, precipitation, salinity and altitude. The yearly temperature range is the most important factor defining the distribution for Candona candida and Fabaeformiscandona gyirongensis. The distribution of Eucypris mareotica is also influenced by the yearly temperature range, but in addition is restricted by low salinities. Species showing no correlation to temperature variations in their distribution were also identified. The distribution of Limnocythere inopinata and Heterocypris salina is restricted by the amount of precipitation, especially during winter months, and low salinities. On the other hand, Candona neglectaseems to be unaffected by any of the studied parameters and probably only is limited by extremely high salinities. The calculated mutual climate ranges of the investigated ostracod species will be applied to ostracod assemblage data from a long

  16. Detecting a preformed pair phase: Response to a pairing forcing field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliavini, A.; Capone, M.; Toschi, A.

    2016-10-01

    The normal state of strongly coupled superconductors is characterized by the presence of "preformed" Cooper pairs well above the superconducting critical temperature. In this regime, the electrons are paired, but they lack the phase coherence necessary for superconductivity. The existence of preformed pairs implies the existence of a characteristic energy scale associated with a pseudogap. Preformed pairs are often invoked to interpret systems where some signatures of pairing are present without actual superconductivity, but an unambiguous theoretical characterization of a preformed-pair system is still lacking. To fill this gap, we consider the response to an external pairing field of an attractive Hubbard model, which hosts one of the cleanest realizations of a preformed pair phase, and a repulsive model where s -wave superconductivity cannot be realized. Using dynamical mean-field theory to study this response, we identify the characteristic features which distinguish the reaction of a preformed pair state from a normal metal without any precursor of pairing. The theoretical detection of preformed pairs is associated with the behavior of the second derivative of the order parameter with respect to the external field, as confirmed by analytic calculations in limiting cases. Our findings provide a solid test bed for the interpretation of state-of-the-art calculations for the normal state of the doped Hubbard model in terms of d -wave preformed pairs and, in perspective, of nonequilibrium experiments in high-temperature superconductors.

  17. Spatial Colocalization of Human Ohnolog Pairs Acts to Maintain Dosage-Balance

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ting; Yang, Qing-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Tao; McLysaght, Aoife; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Ohnologs –paralogous gene pairs generated by whole genome duplication– are enriched for dosage sensitive genes, that is, genes that have a phenotype due to copy number changes. Dosage sensitive genes frequently occur in the same metabolic pathway and in physically interacting proteins. Accumulating evidence reveals that functionally related genes tend to co-localize in the three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of chromosomes. We query whether the spatial distribution of ohnologs has implications for their dosage balance. We analyzed the colocalization frequency of ohnologs based on chromatin interaction datasets of seven human cell lines and found that ohnolog pairs exhibit higher spatial proximity in 3D nuclear organization than other paralog pairs and than randomly chosen ohnologs in the genome. We also found that colocalized ohnologs are more resistant to copy number variations and more likely to be disease-associated genes, which indicates a stronger dosage balance in ohnologs with high spatial proximity. This phenomenon is further supported by the stronger similarity of gene co-expression and of gene ontology terms of colocalized ohnologs. In addition, for a large fraction of ohnologs, the spatial colocalization is conserved in mouse cells, suggestive of functional constraint on their 3D positioning in the nucleus. PMID:27297469

  18. Reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR data in gastric tissues and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; dos Santos, Leonardo Caires; Gigek, Carolina de Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Assumpção, Mônica Barauna; Demachki, Sâmia; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the suitability of reference genes in gastric tissue samples and cell lines. METHODS: The suitability of genes ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, RPL29, and 18S rRNA was assessed in 21 matched pairs of neoplastic and adjacent non-neoplastic gastric tissues from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, 27 normal gastric tissues from patients without cancer, and 4 cell lines using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The ranking of the best single and combination of reference genes was determined by NormFinder, geNorm™, BestKeeper, and DataAssist™. In addition, GenEx software was used to determine the optimal number of reference genes. To validate the results, the mRNA expression of a target gene, DNMT1, was quantified using the different reference gene combinations suggested by the various software packages for normalization. RESULTS: ACTB was the best reference gene for all gastric tissues, cell lines and all gastric tissues plus cell lines. GAPDH + B2M or ACTB + B2M was the best combination of reference genes for all the gastric tissues. On the other hand, ACTB + B2M was the best combination for all the cell lines tested and was also the best combination for analyses involving all the gastric tissues plus cell lines. According to the GenEx software, 2 or 3 genes were the optimal number of references genes for all the gastric tissues. The relative quantification of DNMT1 showed similar patterns when normalized by each combination of reference genes. The level of expression of DNMT1 in neoplastic, adjacent non-neoplastic and normal gastric tissues did not differ when these samples were normalized using GAPDH + B2M (P = 0.32), ACTB + B2M (P = 0.61), or GAPDH + B2M + ACTB (P = 0.44). CONCLUSION: GAPDH + B2M or ACTB + B2M is the best combination of reference gene for all the gastric tissues, and ACTB + B2M is the best combination for the cell lines tested. PMID:24222956

  19. Cloning and sequence of the human adrenodoxin reductase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, D; Shi, Y F; Miller, W L

    1990-01-01

    Adrenodoxin reductase (ferrodoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.18.1.2) is a flavoprotein mediating electron transport to all mitochondrial forms of cytochrome P450. We cloned the human adrenodoxin reductase gene and characterized it by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. The entire gene is approximately 12 kilobases long and consists of 12 exons. The first exon encodes the first 26 of the 32 amino acids of the signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the remainder of signal peptide and the apparent FAD binding site. The remaining 10 exons are clustered in a region of only 4.3 kilobases, separated from the first two exons by a large intron of about 5.6 kilobases. Two forms of human adrenodoxin reductase mRNA, differing by the presence or absence of 18 bases in the middle of the sequence, arise from alternate splicing at the 5' end of exon 7. This alternately spliced region is directly adjacent to the NADPH binding site, which is entirely contained in exon 6. The immediate 5' flanking region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes; however, this region is rich in G + C and contains six copies of the sequence GGGCGGG, resembling promoter sequences of "housekeeping" genes. RNase protection experiments show that transcription is initiated from multiple sites in the 5' flanking region, located about 21-91 base pairs upstream from the AUG translational initiation codon. Images PMID:2236061

  20. Optical emission of a molecular nanoantenna pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, E. M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2012-06-01

    The optical emission from a pair of nanoantennas is investigated within the theoretical framework of quantum electrodynamics. The analysis of fluorescent emission from a pair of molecular antenna species in close proximity is prompted by experimental work on oriented semiconductor polymer nanostructures. Each physically different possibility for separation-dependent features in photon emission by any such pair is explored in detail, leading to the identification of three distinct mechanisms: emission from a pair-delocalized exciton state, emission that engages electrodynamic coupling through quantum interference, and correlated photon emission from the two components of the pair. Although each mechanism produces a damped oscillatory dependence on the pair separation, each of the corresponding results exhibits an analytically different form. Significant differences in the associated spatial frequencies enable an apparent ambiguity in the interpretation of experiments to be resolved. Other major differences are found in the requisite conditions, the associated selection rules, and the variation with angular disposition of the emitters, together offering grounds for experimental discrimination between the coupling mechanisms. The analysis paves the way for investigations of pair-wise coupling effects in the emission from nanoantenna arrays.

  1. Partitioning of on-demand electron pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubbelohde, Niels; Hohls, Frank; Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs; Wagner, Timo; Fricke, Lukas; Kästner, Bernd; Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W.; Haug, Rolf J.

    2015-01-01

    The on-demand generation and separation of entangled photon pairs are key components of quantum information processing in quantum optics. In an electronic analogue, the decomposition of electron pairs represents an essential building block for using the quantum state of ballistic electrons in electron quantum optics. The scattering of electrons has been used to probe the particle statistics of stochastic sources in Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiments and the recent advent of on-demand sources further offers the possibility to achieve indistinguishability between multiple sources in Hong-Ou-Mandel experiments. Cooper pairs impinging stochastically at a mesoscopic beamsplitter have been successfully partitioned, as verified by measuring the coincidence of arrival. Here, we demonstrate the splitting of electron pairs generated on demand. Coincidence correlation measurements allow the reconstruction of the full counting statistics, revealing regimes of statistically independent, distinguishable or correlated partitioning, and have been envisioned as a source of information on the quantum state of the electron pair. The high pair-splitting fidelity opens a path to future on-demand generation of spin-entangled electron pairs from a suitably prepared two-electron quantum-dot ground state.

  2. Colors of dynamically associated asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A.

    2012-09-01

    Recent dynamical studies have identified pairs of asteroids that reside in nearly identical heliocentric orbits. Possible formation scenarios for these systems include dissociation of binary asteroids, collisional disruption of a single parent body, or spin-up and rotational fission of a rubble-pile. Aside from detailed dynamical analyses and measurement of rotational light curves, little work has been done to investigate the colors or spectra of these unusual objects. A photometric and spectroscopic survey was conducted to determine the reflectance properties of asteroid pairs. New observations were obtained for a total of 34 individual asteroids. Additional photometric measurements were retrieved from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Moving Object Catalog. Colors or spectra for a total of 42 pair components are presented here. The main findings of this work are: (1) the components in the observed pair systems have the same colors within the uncertainties of this survey, and (2) the color distribution of asteroid pairs appears indistinguishable from that of all Main Belt asteroids. These findings support a scenario of pair formation from a common progenitor and suggest that pair formation is likely a compositionally independent process. In agreement with previous studies, this is most consistent with an origin via binary disruption and/or rotational fission.

  3. Altered expression of genes involved in progesterone biosynthesis, metabolism and action in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Sinreih, Maša; Hevir, Neli; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2013-02-25

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies worldwide. It is associated with prolonged exposure to estrogens that is unopposed by the protective effects of progesterone, which suggests that altered progesterone biosynthesis, metabolism and actions might be implicated in the development of EC. Our aim was to evaluate these processes through quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis in up to 47 pairs of EC tissue and adjacent control endometrium. First, we examined the expression of genes encoding proteins associated with progesterone biosynthesis: steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR); a side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1); and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/ketosteroid isomerase (HSD3B). There were 1.9- and 10.0-fold decreased expression of STAR and CYP11A1, respectively, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium, with no significant differences in the expression of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. Next, we examined expression of genes encoding five progesterone metabolizing enzymes: the 3-keto and 20-ketosteroid reductases (AKR1C1-AKR1C3) and 5α-reductases (SRD5A1 and SRD5A2); and the opposing 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B2). These genes are expressed in EC and adjacent control endometrium. No statistically significant differences were seen in mRNA levels of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3 and SRD5A1. Expression of HSD17B2 was 3.0-fold increased, and expression of SRD5A2 was 3.7-fold decreased, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium. We also examined mRNA levels of progesterone receptors A and B (PGR), and separately the expression of progesterone receptor B (PR-B). Here we saw 1.8- and 2.0-fold lower mRNA levels of PGR and PR-B, respectively, in EC versus adjacent control endometrium. This down-regulation of STAR, CYP11A1 and PGR in endometrial cancer may lead to decreased progesterone biosynthesis and actions although the effects on progesterone levels should be further studied.

  4. Afforestation alters the composition of functional genes in soil and biogeochemical processes in South American grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Berthrong, Sean T; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Pineiro, Gervasio; Jackson, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Soil microbes are highly diverse and control most soil biogeochemical reactions. We examined how microbial functional genes and biogeochemical pools responded to the altered chemical inputs accompanying land use change. We examined paired native grasslands and adjacent Eucalyptus plantations (previously grassland) in Uruguay, a region that lacked forests before European settlement. Along with measurements of soil carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial diversity, we analyzed functional genes using the GeoChip 2.0 microarray, which simultaneously quantified several thousand genes involved in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling. Plantations and grassland differed significantly in functional gene profiles, bacterial diversity, and biogeochemical pool sizes. Most grassland profiles were similar, but plantation profiles generally differed from those of grasslands due to differences in functional gene abundance across diverse taxa. Eucalypts decreased ammonification and N fixation functional genes by 11% and 7.9% (P < 0.01), which correlated with decreased microbial biomass N and more NH{sub 4}{sup +} in plantation soils. Chitinase abundance decreased 7.8% in plantations compared to levels in grassland (P = 0.017), and C polymer-degrading genes decreased by 1.5% overall (P < 0.05), which likely contributed to 54% (P < 0.05) more C in undecomposed extractable soil pools and 27% less microbial C (P < 0.01) in plantation soils. In general, afforestation altered the abundance of many microbial functional genes, corresponding with changes in soil biogeochemistry, in part through altered abundance of overall functional gene types rather than simply through changes in specific taxa. Such changes in microbial functional genes correspond with altered C and N storage and have implications for long-term productivity in these soils.

  5. A Curious Pair of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope has taken the best image ever of a strange and chaotic duo of interwoven galaxies. The images also contain some surprises -- interlopers both far and near. ESO PR Photo 11a/09 A Curious Pair of Galaxies ESO PR Video 11a/09 Arp 261 zoom in ESO PR Video 11b/09 Pan over Arp 261 Sometimes objects in the sky that appear strange, or different from normal, have a story to tell and prove scientifically very rewarding. This was the idea behind Halton Arp's catalogue of Peculiar Galaxies that appeared in the 1960s. One of the oddballs listed there is Arp 261, which has now been imaged in more detail than ever before using the FORS2 instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The image proves to contain several surprises. Arp 261 lies about 70 million light-years distant in the constellation of Libra, the Scales. Its chaotic and very unusual structure is created by the interaction of two galaxies that are engaged in a slow motion, but highly disruptive close encounter. Although individual stars are very unlikely to collide in such an event, the huge clouds of gas and dust certainly do crash into each other at high speed, leading to the formation of bright new clusters of very hot stars that are clearly seen in the picture. The paths of the existing stars in the galaxies are also dramatically disrupted, creating the faint swirls extending to the upper left and lower right of the image. Both interacting galaxies were probably dwarfs not unlike the Magellanic Clouds orbiting our own galaxy. The images used to create this picture were not actually taken to study the interacting galaxies at all, but to investigate the properties of the inconspicuous object just to the right of the brightest part of Arp 261 and close to the centre of the image. This is an unusual exploding star, called SN 1995N, that is thought to be the result of the final collapse of a massive star at the end of its life, a so-called core collapse supernova. SN 1995N is unusual because

  6. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  7. Non-adjacent visual dependency learning in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Sonnweber, Ruth; Ravignani, Andrea; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2015-05-01

    Humans have a strong proclivity for structuring and patterning stimuli: Whether in space or time, we tend to mentally order stimuli in our environment and organize them into units with specific types of relationships. A crucial prerequisite for such organization is the cognitive ability to discern and process regularities among multiple stimuli. To investigate the evolutionary roots of this cognitive capacity, we tested chimpanzees-which, along with bonobos, are our closest living relatives-for simple, variable distance dependency processing in visual patterns. We trained chimpanzees to identify pairs of shapes either linked by an arbitrary learned association (arbitrary associative dependency) or a shared feature (same shape, feature-based dependency), and to recognize strings where items related to either of these ways occupied the first (leftmost) and the last (rightmost) item of the stimulus. We then probed the degree to which subjects generalized this pattern to new colors, shapes, and numbers of interspersed items. We found that chimpanzees can learn and generalize both types of dependency rules, indicating that the ability to encode both feature-based and arbitrary associative regularities over variable distances in the visual domain is not a human prerogative. Our results strongly suggest that these core components of human structural processing were already present in our last common ancestor with chimpanzees.

  8. Results of en bloc resection for hepatocellular carcinoma extending to adjacent organs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Ming; Sui, Cheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Xu, Feng; Kan, Tong; Yang, Jia-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Background To curatively resect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with adjacent organ extension, the combined resection of these organs is inevitable. We analyzed the safety and effectiveness of en bloc resection for HCC extending to adjacent organs. Methods From December 2002 to May 2006, we compared the surgical outcomes of patients with HCC extending to adjacent organs with those of closely matched, randomly selected patients with HCC without adjacent organ extension. Results We included 42 patients whose HCC extended to adjacent organs and 126 patients whose HCC did not extend to adjacent organs. There was no significant difference in survival, operative morbidity or mortality between the groups. In patients with HCC extending to adjacent organs, histopathological examination of the specimen revealed true tumour invasion in 13 and adhesion in 29 patients. Those with tumour invasion were more likely to have a high incidence of capsule infiltration, microvascular invasion and early intrahepatic recurrence (≤ 1 yr after hepatectomy). The 5-year overall survival of patients with tumour invasion was 11.5%, whereas that of patients with tumour adhesion was 38.1% (p = 0.033). Conclusion En bloc resection is a safe and effective therapy for HCC extending to adjacent organs. Tumour invasion to adjacent organs exhibits a more aggressive clinical behaviour and is associated with worse survival than tumour adhesion. PMID:22617536

  9. Quantum State Transfer Between Any Pair of Qubits in a Quantum Network via Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hua

    2014-07-01

    We propose scheme for transferring quantum state between any pair of nodes in a quantum network. Each node consists of an atom and a cavity, with the atom acting as the quantum bit. Any two adjacent nodes are connected by an optical fiber. During the operation neither the atomic system nor the fibers are excited, which is important in view of decoherence. Under certain conditions, the probability that the cavities are excited is negligible. The method has an inherent robustness against the fluctuation perturbations in the classical control parameters and the randomness in the atomic position. The scheme can be generalized to implement quantum phase gate between any two remote qubits.

  10. Seismotectonics of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jih-Ping; Aggarwal, Yash Pal

    1981-06-01

    Data for local earthquakes recorded by a network of stations in northeastern United States and adjacent Canada were analyzed to study the seismicity, the relationship between earthquakes and known faults, the state of stress, and crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. In addition, portable seismographs were deployed in the field to study aftershocks. As a result, accurate locations for about 364 local earthquakes (2 ≤ mb ≤ 5) and 22 focal mechanism solutions were determined. A comparison of the spatial distribution of these events (1970-1979) with historical earthquakes (1534-1959) reveals that seismic activity in the northeast is relatively stationary in space: those areas that have had little or no seismicity historically are relatively aseismic today, whereas the historically active areas are also active today. The instrumental locations, historical seismicity, and focal mechanism solutions show an internal consistency that help us distinguish two distinct seismogenic provinces. (1) The Adirondack-western Quebec province is a northwesterly trending zone of seismic activity, about 200 km wide and at least 500 km long, extending from the SE Adirondacks into western Quebec, Canada. Thrust faulting on planes striking NNW to NW appears to predominate, and the inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression is largely uniform and trends WSW, nearly parallel to the calculated absolute plate motion of North America. Little or no seismicity is found where anorthosite outcrops at the surface. Correlations between gravity anomalies and earthquake locations suggest that seismic activity in this zone is localized to regions of steep NE or SW gradient in Bouguer anomalies. This zone does not appear to extend southeastward to Boston, as proposed by some workers. (2) The Appalachian province is a northeasterly trending zone of seismic activity extending from northern Virginia to New Brunswick, Canada. Highangle reverse or thrust faulting on N to NE trending planes

  11. DNA Methylation Profile and Expression of Surfactant Protein A2 gene in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grageda, Melissa; Silveyra, Patricia; Thomas, Neal J.; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the methylation profile of genes allow for the identification of biomarkers that may guide diagnosis and effective treatment of disease. Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in lung homeostasis and immunity, and is encoded by two genes (SFTPA1 and SFTPA2). The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of the SFTPA2 gene in lung cancer tissue, and to determine the correlation between the promoter’s methylation profile and gene expression. For this, we collected 28 pairs of cancerous human lung tissue and adjacent non-cancerous (NC) lung tissue: 17 adenocarcinoma (AC), 9 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 2 AC with SCC features, and we evaluated DNA methylation of the SFTPA2 promoter region by bisulfite conversion. Our results identified a higher methylation ratio in one CpG site of the SFTPA2 gene in cancerous tissue vs. NC tissue (0.36 vs. 0.11, p=0.001). When assessing AC samples, we also found cancerous tissues associated with a higher methylation ratio (0.43 vs. 0.10, p=0.02). In the SCC group, although cancerous tissue showed a higher methylation ratio (0.22 vs. 0.11), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.35). Expression of SFTPA2 mRNA and total SP-A protein was significantly lower in cancer tissue when compared to adjacent NC tissue (p<0.001), and correlated with the hypermethylated status of a SFTPA2 CpG site in AC samples. The findings of this pilot study may hold promise for future use of SFTPA2 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25514367

  12. OGtree: a tool for creating genome trees of prokaryotes based on overlapping genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Wei; Lin, Kuang-Lun; Lu, Chin Lung

    2008-07-01

    OGtree is a web-based tool for constructing genome trees of prokaryotic species based on a measure of combining overlapping-gene content and overlapping-gene order in their whole genomes. The overlapping genes (OGs) are defined as adjacent genes whose coding sequences overlap partially or entirely. In fact, OGs are ubiquitous in microbial genomes and more conserved between species than non-OGs. Based on these properties, it has been suggested that OGs can serve as better phylogenetic characters than non-OGs for reconstructing the evolutionary relationships among microbial genomes. OGtree takes the accession numbers of prokaryotic genomes as its input. It then downloads their complete genomes from the National Centre for Biotechnology Information and identifies OGs in each genome and their orthologous OGs in other genomes. Next, OGtree computes an overlapping-gene distance between each pair of input genomes based on a combination of their OG content and orthologous OG order. Finally, it utilizes distance-based methods of building tree to reconstruct the genome trees of input prokaryotic genomes according to their pairwise OG distance. OGtree is available online at http://bioalgorithm.life.nctu.edu.tw/OGtree/.

  13. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-02-14

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  14. Engineering a factorable photon pair source

    SciTech Connect

    Zielnicki, Kevin; Kwiat, Paul

    2014-12-04

    Spontaneous parametric downconversion is an important process for producing pairs of photons for quantum optics. We discuss a scheme for eliminating undesired inter-photon correlations inherent in this process, and an efficient characterization of spectral correlations.

  15. Pair-production in inhomogeneous electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shesheng

    2008-01-03

    This is a preliminary study on the rate of electron-positron pair production in spatially inhomogeneous electric fields. We study the rate in the Sauter field and compare it to the rate in the homogeneous field.

  16. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  17. Non stationary pair model in blazar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Henri, Gilles; Renaud, Nicolas

    2001-09-01

    This article shortly present an improved version of pair models for X and gamma-ray emission from blazar jets. The radiations are generated through external and synchrotron Inverse Compton mechanisms in the vicinity of a super-massive black hole by an ultra-relativistic electron-positron pair plasma pervading a non-relativistic electron-proton jet (two-flow model). Non stationary solutions are found by solving simultaneously pair creation/annihilation, soft photon absorption and particle acceleration processes along the jet. The power supply necessary to re-accelerate particles is not treated in a self-consistent procedure but parametrised. Pair creation opacity effects can lead to interesting variability effects depending on the X-ray emission regimes. Multi-wavelength observations by INTEGRAL will provide tests for the model, and also for the matter content and variability mechanisms in compact sources.

  18. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    ScienceCinema

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  19. Mixed parity pairing in a dipolar gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruun, G. M.; Hainzl, C.; Laux, M.

    2016-10-01

    We show that fermionic dipoles in a two-layer geometry form Cooper pairs with both singlet and triplet components when they are tilted with respect to the normal of the planes. The mixed parity pairing arises because the interaction between dipoles in the two different layers is not inversion symmetric. We use an efficient eigenvalue approach to calculate the zero-temperature phase diagram of the system as a function of the dipole orientation and the layer distance. The phase diagram contains purely triplet as well as mixed singlet and triplet superfluid phases. We show in detail how the pair wave function for dipoles residing in different layers smoothly changes from singlet to triplet symmetry as the orientation of the dipoles is changed. Our results indicate that dipolar quantum gases can be used to unambiguously observe mixed parity pairing.

  20. Wide angle sun sensor. [consisting of cylinder, insulation and pair of detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A single-axis sun sensor consists of a cylinder of an insulating material on which at least one pair of detectors is deposited on a circumference of the cylinder, was disclosed. At any time only one-half of the cylinder is illuminated so that the total resistance of the two detectors is a constant. Due to the round surface on which the detectors are deposited, the sensor exhibits a linear wide angle of + or - 50 deg to within an accuracy of about 2%. By depositing several pairs of detectors on adjacent circumferences, sufficient redundancy is realized to provide high reliability. A two-axis sensor is provided by depositing detectors on the surface of a sphere along at least two orthogonal great circles.

  1. In situ observation of thermal relaxation of interstitial-vacancy pair defects in a graphite gap.

    PubMed

    Urita, Koki; Suenaga, Kazu; Sugai, Toshiki; Shinohara, Hisanori; Iijima, Sumio

    2005-04-22

    Direct observation of individual defects during formation and annihilation in the interlayer gap of double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNT) is demonstrated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The interlayer defects that bridge two adjacent graphen layers in DWNT are stable for a macroscopic time at the temperature below 450 K. These defects are assigned to a cluster of one or two interstitial-vacancy pairs (I-V pairs) and often disappear just after their formation at higher temperatures due to an instantaneous recombination of the interstitial atom with vacancy. Systematic observations performed at the elevated temperatures find a threshold for the defect annihilation at 450-500 K, which, indeed, corresponds to the known temperature for the Wigner energy release. PMID:15904158

  2. Ultrabright source of entangled photon pairs.

    PubMed

    Dousse, Adrien; Suffczyński, Jan; Beveratos, Alexios; Krebs, Olivier; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Bloch, Jacqueline; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale

    2010-07-01

    A source of triggered entangled photon pairs is a key component in quantum information science; it is needed to implement functions such as linear quantum computation, entanglement swapping and quantum teleportation. Generation of polarization entangled photon pairs can be obtained through parametric conversion in nonlinear optical media or by making use of the radiative decay of two electron-hole pairs trapped in a semiconductor quantum dot. Today, these sources operate at a very low rate, below 0.01 photon pairs per excitation pulse, which strongly limits their applications. For systems based on parametric conversion, this low rate is intrinsically due to the Poissonian statistics of the source. Conversely, a quantum dot can emit a single pair of entangled photons with a probability near unity but suffers from a naturally very low extraction efficiency. Here we show that this drawback can be overcome by coupling an optical cavity in the form of a 'photonic molecule' to a single quantum dot. Two coupled identical pillars-the photonic molecule-were etched in a semiconductor planar microcavity, using an optical lithography method that ensures a deterministic coupling to the biexciton and exciton energy states of a pre-selected quantum dot. The Purcell effect ensures that most entangled photon pairs are emitted into two cavity modes, while improving the indistinguishability of the two optical recombination paths. A polarization entangled photon pair rate of 0.12 per excitation pulse (with a concurrence of 0.34) is collected in the first lens. Our results open the way towards the fabrication of solid state triggered sources of entangled photon pairs, with an overall (creation and collection) efficiency of 80%. PMID:20613838

  3. Extracting differential pair distribution functions using MIXSCAT

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, Caroline; Page, Katharine; Llobet, Anna; White, Claire E.; Proffen, Thomas

    2010-08-27

    Differently weighted experimental scattering data have been used to extract partial or differential structure factors or pair distribution functions in studying many materials. However, this is not done routinely partly because of the lack of user-friendly software. This paper presents MIXSCAT, a new member of the DISCUS program package. MIXSCAT allows one to combine neutron and X-ray pair distribution functions and extract their respective differential functions.

  4. Recognition of Short Time-Paired Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaminda, Hapugahage Thilak; Klyuev, Vitaly; Naruse, Keitaro; Osano, Minetada

    We undertake numerous activities in our daily life and for some of those we forget to complete the action as originally intended. Significant aspects while performing most of these actions might be: “pairing of both hands simultaneously” and “short time consumption”. In this work an attempt has been made to recognize those kinds of Paired Activities (PAs), which are easy to forget, and to provide a method to remind about uncompleted PAs. To represent PAs, a study was done on opening and closing of various bottles. A model to define PAs, which simulated the paired behavior of both hands, is proposed, called “Paired Activity Model” (PAM). To recognize PAs using PAM, Paired Activity Recognition Algorithm (PARA) was implemented. Paired motion capturing was done by accelerometers, which were worn by subjects on the wrist areas of both hands. Individual and correlative behavior of both hands was used to recognize exact PA among other activities. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithm was used for data categorization in PARA. ANN significantly outperformed the support vector machine algorithm in real time evaluations. In the user-independent case, PARA achieved recognition rates of 96% for only target PAs and 91% for target PAs undertaken amidst unrelated activities.

  5. Migration of helium-pair in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. L.; Geng, W. T.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a first-principles density functional theory investigation into the migration of both a single interstitial He and an interstitial He-pair in Fe, Mo, W, Cu, Pd, and Pt. We find the migration trajectories and barriers are determined predominantly by low-energy He-pair configurations which depend mainly on the energy state of a single He in different interstices. The migration barrier for a He-pair in bcc metals is always slightly higher than for a single He. Configurations of a He-pair in fcc metals are very complicated, due to the existence of interstitial sites with nearly identical energy for a single He. The migration barrier for a He-pair is slightly lower than (in Cu), or similar to (in Pd and Pt) a single He. The collective migrations of a He-pair are ensured by strong Hesbnd He interactions with strength-versus-distance forms resembling chemical bonds and can be described with Morse potentials.

  6. Formation of asteroid pairs by rotational fission.

    PubMed

    Pravec, P; Vokrouhlický, D; Polishook, D; Scheeres, D J; Harris, A W; Galád, A; Vaduvescu, O; Pozo, F; Barr, A; Longa, P; Vachier, F; Colas, F; Pray, D P; Pollock, J; Reichart, D; Ivarsen, K; Haislip, J; Lacluyze, A; Kusnirák, P; Henych, T; Marchis, F; Macomber, B; Jacobson, S A; Krugly, Yu N; Sergeev, A V; Leroy, A

    2010-08-26

    Pairs of asteroids sharing similar heliocentric orbits, but not bound together, were found recently. Backward integrations of their orbits indicated that they separated gently with low relative velocities, but did not provide additional insight into their formation mechanism. A previously hypothesized rotational fission process may explain their formation-critical predictions are that the mass ratios are less than about 0.2 and, as the mass ratio approaches this upper limit, the spin period of the larger body becomes long. Here we report photometric observations of a sample of asteroid pairs, revealing that the primaries of pairs with mass ratios much less than 0.2 rotate rapidly, near their critical fission frequency. As the mass ratio approaches 0.2, the primary period grows long. This occurs as the total energy of the system approaches zero, requiring the asteroid pair to extract an increasing fraction of energy from the primary's spin in order to escape. We do not find asteroid pairs with mass ratios larger than 0.2. Rotationally fissioned systems beyond this limit have insufficient energy to disrupt. We conclude that asteroid pairs are formed by the rotational fission of a parent asteroid into a proto-binary system, which subsequently disrupts under its own internal system dynamics soon after formation.

  7. Seniority zero pair coupled cluster doubles theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Tamar; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-06-07

    Coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations accurately describes weak electron correlation but is known to fail in cases of strong static correlation. Fascinatingly, however, pair coupled cluster doubles (p-CCD), a simplified version of the theory limited to pair excitations that preserve the seniority of the reference determinant (i.e., the number of unpaired electrons), has mean field computational cost and is an excellent approximation to the full configuration interaction (FCI) of the paired space provided that the orbital basis defining the pairing scheme is adequately optimized. In previous work, we have shown that optimization of the pairing scheme in the seniority zero FCI leads to a very accurate description of static correlation. The same conclusion extends to p-CCD if the orbitals are optimized to make the p-CCD energy stationary. We here demonstrate these results with numerous examples. We also explore the contributions of different seniority sectors to the coupled cluster doubles (CCD) correlation energy using different orbital bases. We consider both Hartree-Fock and Brueckner orbitals, and the role of orbital localization. We show how one can pair the orbitals so that the role of the Brueckner orbitals at the CCD level is retained at the p-CCD level. Moreover, we explore ways of extending CCD to accurately describe strongly correlated systems.

  8. Spectral similarity of unbound asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Stephen D.; Weissman, Paul R.; Christou, Apostolis; Duddy, Samuel R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2014-04-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy between 0.8 and 2.5 μ has been obtained for both components of three unbound asteroid pairs, using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility with the SpeX instrument. Pair primary (2110) Moore-Sitterly is classified as an S-type following the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy; the classification for secondary (44612) 1999 RP27 is ambiguous: S/Sq/Q/K/L-type. Primary (10484) Hecht and secondary (44645) 1999 RC118 are classified as V-types. IR spectra for Moore-Sitterly and Hecht are each linked with available visual photometry. The classifications for primary (88604) 2001 QH293 and (60546) 2000 EE85 are ambiguous: S/Sq/Q/K/L-type. Subtle spectral differences between them suggest that the primary may have more weathered material on its surface. Dynamical integrations have constrained the ages of formation: 2110-44612 > 782 kyr; 10484-44645 = 348 (+823,-225) kyr; 88604-60546 = 925 (+842,-754) kyr. The spectral similarity of seven complete pairs is ranked in comparison with nearby background asteroids. Two pairs, 17198-229056 and 19289-278067, have significantly different spectra between the components, compared to the similarity of spectra in the background population. The other pairs are closer than typical, supporting an interpretation of each pair's formation from a common parent body.

  9. A two-phase charge-density real-space-pairing model of high-Tc superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Humphreys

    1999-03-01

    It is usually assumed that high-T(c) superconductors have a periodic band structure and a periodic charge density, although amorphous low-T(c) superconductors are known. In this paper, it is suggested that the CuO(2) conduction planes of cuprate superconductors consist of regions of two different charge densities which do not normally repeat periodically. It is suggested that the pairing of holes occurs in real space in cuprate superconductors. It is proposed that the hole-pairing mechanism is magnetic exchange coupling and the pairing force is strong, the pairing energy being greater than kT at room temperature. The bound hole pair is essentially a bipolaron. A real-space model is very tentatively suggested in which the CuO(2) planes of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) contain nanodomains of a 3 x 3 hole lattice surrounded by interfaces one unit cell wide in which the holes are paired. In the superconducting state in this model, the existing hole pairs condense and move coherently and collectively around the insulating nanodomains, like trams running around blocks of houses, with one hole on each tramline. The hole pairs move in an elegant manner with hole pairs hopping from oxygen to oxygen via adjacent copper sites. The model explains the superconducting current being in the ab plane and it also explains the very short coherence lengths. Because the pairing force is strong, the model suggests that room-temperature superconductivity might be possible in carefully designed new oxide materials.

  10. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  11. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y.

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  12. Variable length adjacent partitioning for PTS based PAPR reduction of OFDM signal

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Zeyid T.; Rahman, Md. Mijanur; Yaakob, S. N.; Razalli, Mohammad Shahrazel; Kadhim, Rasim A.

    2015-05-15

    Peak-to-Average power ratio (PAPR) is a major drawback in OFDM communication. It leads the power amplifier into nonlinear region operation resulting into loss of data integrity. As such, there is a strong motivation to find techniques to reduce PAPR. Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS) is an attractive scheme for this purpose. Judicious partitioning the OFDM data frame into disjoint subsets is a pivotal component of any PTS scheme. Out of the existing partitioning techniques, adjacent partitioning is characterized by an attractive trade-off between cost and performance. With an aim of determining effects of length variability of adjacent partitions, we performed an investigation into the performances of a variable length adjacent partitioning (VL-AP) and fixed length adjacent partitioning in comparison with other partitioning schemes such as pseudorandom partitioning. Simulation results with different modulation and partitioning scenarios showed that fixed length adjacent partition had better performance compared to variable length adjacent partitioning. As expected, simulation results showed a slightly better performance of pseudorandom partitioning technique compared to fixed and variable adjacent partitioning schemes. However, as the pseudorandom technique incurs high computational complexities, adjacent partitioning schemes were still seen as favorable candidates for PAPR reduction.

  13. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  14. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  15. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  16. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  17. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 162.215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area....

  18. 30 CFR 282.6 - Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State. 282.6 Section 282.6 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR General § 282.6 Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State....

  19. Large subarticular cysts (geodes) adjacent to the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carter, A R; Liyanage, S P

    1975-10-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis are described, who developed very large bone cysts or geodes adjacent to the knee-joint. The existence of cysts adjacent to joints involved by rheumatoid arthritis is well recognised, but the occurrence of very large cysts is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulties. Possible aetiological factors are discussed.

  20. Learning at a Distance: I. Statistical Learning of Non-Adjacent Dependencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newport, Elissa L.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2004-01-01

    In earlier work we have shown that adults, young children, and infants are capable of computing transitional probabilities among adjacent syllables in rapidly presented streams of speech, and of using these statistics to group adjacent syllables into word-like units. In the present experiments we ask whether adult learners are also capable of such…