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Sample records for adjacent genomic regions

  1. Empires and percolation: stochastic merging of adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldous, D. J.; Ong, J. R.; Zhou, W.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model in which adjacent planar regions A, B merge stochastically at some rate λ(A, B) and observe analogies with the well-studied topics of mean-field coagulation and of bond percolation. Do infinite regions appear in finite time? We give a simple condition on λ for this hegemony property to hold, and another simple condition for it to not hold, but there is a large gap between these conditions, which includes the case λ(A, B) ≡ 1. For this case, a non-rigorous analytic argument and simulations suggest hegemony.

  2. Characterization of rat c-myc and adjacent regions.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, K; Makino, R; Kawamura, H; Arisawa, A; Yoneda, K

    1987-01-01

    Rat genomic regions covering c-myc were cloned from the DNA of both normal liver and two lines of Morris hepatomas, one of which had c-myc amplification. The three restriction maps showed perfect agreement within the overlapping regions. The 7 kb regions, which included the entire normal rat c-myc and the region 2.2 kb upstream, and one from the hepatomas, were sequenced and found to be identical. The coding regions of exons 2 and 3 were highly conserved between rat, mouse and man, but some differences in amino acids were noted. Exon 1 and the non-coding region of exon 3 showed limited homology between the three species. Rat exon 1 contained several nonsense codons in each frame and no ATG codon, indicating there to be no coding capacity in this exon. The 2.2 kb upstream regions and the introns compared showed unusual conservation between the rat and human genes. Some motifs, previously proposed as having a functional role in human c-myc, were also found in equivalent positions of the rat sequence. Nucleas S1 protection mapping revealed the second promoter to be preferentially used in most tissues or in hepatoma cells, and the second poly A addition signal to be the only one functional in all the RNA sources examined. Images PMID:3306601

  3. Best Merge Region Growing Segmentation with Integrated Non-Adjacent Region Object Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Montesano, Paul M.; Gofman, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Best merge region growing normally produces segmentations with closed connected region objects. Recognizing that spectrally similar objects often appear in spatially separate locations, we present an approach for tightly integrating best merge region growing with non-adjacent region object aggregation, which we call Hierarchical Segmentation or HSeg. However, the original implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg required excessive computing time even for moderately sized images because of the required intercomparison of each region with all other regions. This problem was previously addressed by a recursive approximation of HSeg, called RHSeg. In this paper we introduce a refined implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg that reduces the computational requirements of HSeg without resorting to the recursive approximation. In this refinement, HSeg s region inter-comparisons among non-adjacent regions are limited to regions of a dynamically determined minimum size. We show that this refined version of HSeg can process moderately sized images in about the same amount of time as RHSeg incorporating the original HSeg. Nonetheless, RHSeg is still required for processing very large images due to its lower computer memory requirements and amenability to parallel processing. We then note a limitation of RHSeg with the original HSeg for high spatial resolution images, and show how incorporating the refined HSeg into RHSeg overcomes this limitation. The quality of the image segmentations produced by the refined HSeg is then compared with other available best merge segmentation approaches. Finally, we comment on the unique nature of the hierarchical segmentations produced by HSeg.

  4. High resolution regional seismic attenuation tomography in eastern Tibetan Plateau and adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xueyang; Sandvol, Eric; Ni, James; Hearn, Thomas; Chen, Yongshun John; Shen, Yang

    2011-08-01

    The Q of regional seismic phases Lg and Pg within the crust is assumed as a proxy for crustal Qβ and Qα, which is used as a constraint of crustal rheology. We measure regional-phase Q of the eastern Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas. This method eliminates contributions from source and site responses and is an improvement on the Two-Station Method (TSM). We have generated tomographic images of crustal attenuation anomalies with resolution as high as 1°. In general we observe low Q in the northernmost portions of the Tibetan Plateau and high Q in the more tectonically stable regions such as the interior of the Qaidam basin. The calculated site responses appear to correlate with topography or sediment thickness. Furthermore the relationship between earthquake magnitudes and calculated source terms suggest that the RTM method effectively removes the source response and may be used as an alternative to source magnitude.

  5. Bicistronic and fused monocistronic transcripts are derived from adjacent loci in the Arabidopsis genome

    PubMed Central

    THIMMAPURAM, JYOTHI; DUAN, HUI; LIU, LEI; SCHULER, MARY A.

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons of full-length cDNAs and genomic DNAs available for Arabidopsis thaliana described here indicate that some adjacent loci are transcribed into extremely long RNAs spanning two annotated genes. Once expressed, some of these transcripts are post-transcriptionally spliced within their coding and intergenic sequences to generate bicistronic transcripts containing two complete open reading frames. Others are spliced to generate monocistronic transcripts coding for fusion proteins with sequences derived from both loci. RT-PCR of several P450 transcripts in this collection indicates that these extended transcripts exist side by side with shorter monocistronic transcripts derived from the individual loci in each pair. The existence of these unusual transcripts highlights variations in the processes of transcription and splicing that could not possibly have been predicted in the algorithms used for genome annotation and splice site predictions. PMID:15659355

  6. Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of Bolivia and adjacent regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sempere, T. )

    1993-02-01

    Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of the Pacific margin of western South America, particularly the Bolivian section, has been completed and new interpretations and hypotheses have been proposed as a result of data analyses of this information. The Paleozoic margin was initially passive (late Cambrian-Llanvirn, [open quotes]Puna aulacogen[close quotes]), but became active during a middle Ordovician compressional episode. Most of late Cambrian to early Triassic Bolivian rocks are of marine origin, with dark shale units recording sea level rises, whereas middle Triassic to Recent rocks were mainly deposited in continental environments (except six restricted-marine ingressions in the late Cretaceous-Danian, and one in the late Miocene, all with hydrocarbon potential). A noteworthy similarity exists between the Devonian to Jurassic stratigraphies of Bolivia and the Parana basin, suggesting that Bolivia behaved as part of the Brazilian craton from late Cambrian to late Jurassic, when it was captured into the Pacific margin geotectonic system. Organic-rich units correlate with Paleozoic highstand deposits and younger ingressions. The Bolivian Phanerozoic strata is characterized by thick layers, partly due to middle Ordovician-Carboniferous and late Cretaceous-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic foreland geometries include northeastern onlaps and, potentially, stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon generation, migration and trapping mainly depended on Cenozoic structural loading and burial and on propagation of Andean deformation which are comprised of Paleozoic shale decollements. Precise knowledge of the evolution of the Phanerozoic geodynamic contexts and basin geometries through sedimentation and subsequent deformations is crucial for hydrocarbon exploration strategies in these regions.

  7. Regional tectonics of Myanmar (Burma) and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.R.; Russell, O.R.; Staskowski, R.J.; Loyd, S.P.; Tabbutt, V.M. ); Dolan, Stein, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Analysis of 38 contiguous Landsat Multispectral Scanner scenes acquired over Myanmar (Burma) reveals numerous large-scale features associated with margins of the Burman plate, previously unidentified northeast-southwest-trending discontinuities, important extensions of previously mapped fault trends, and numerous structural features that appear favorable for petroleum exploration. A mosaic of these scenes at 1:1,000,000 scale shows a large number of tectonic elements and their spatial relationships. Within the area of investigation are portions of the Indian, Burman, Lhasa, and Shan-Thai plates, and perhaps other, smaller plates. The Himalayan front and Indo-Burman Ranges manifest effects of current and recently past plate movement. The complexity of the kinematic history accounts for the diversity of structural features in the area. The last major event in this long and violent saga, which began in middle Miocene (approximately 11 Ma) time and continues to the present, is the recent change from a collisional to a right-lateral strike-slip transform margin between the Indian and Burman plates. The complexity of the structures visible is the product of multiple plate collisions, rotation of the Indian plate and parts of the Asian plate, and long-continued convergence that changed velocity and direction tbrough time. The most obvious evidence of this complexity, which is immediately apparent on geologic maps or the Landsat mosaic of the region, is the almost right-angle relationship of the folds of the Indo-Burman Ranges and the frontal thrusts and suture zones of the Himalaya. These two sets of compressive features imply maximum compressive stress axes that lie at right angles to each other. The implications are either that the orientation of the stress field changes rapidly over a short distance or that the stress field has changed through time. Both occurrences seem to be true.

  8. Computing the Summed Adjacency Disruption Number between Two Genomes with Duplicate Genes Using Pseudo-Boolean Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, João; Lynce, Inês; Manquinho, Vasco

    The increasing number of fully sequenced genomes has led to the study of genome rearrangements. Several approaches have been proposed to solve this problem, all of them being either too complex to be solved efficiently or too simple to be applied to genomes of complex organisms. The latest challenge has been to overcome the problem of having genomes with duplicate genes. This led to the definition of matching models and similarity measures. The idea is to find a matching between genes in two genomes, in order to disambiguate the data of duplicate genes and calculate a similarity measure. The problem becomes that of finding a matching that best preserves the order of genes in two genomes, where gene order is evaluated by a chosen similarity measure. This paper presents a new pseudo-Boolean encoding for computing the exact summed adjacency disruption number for two genomes with duplicate genes. Experimental results on a γ-Proteobacteria data set illustrate the approach.

  9. New species of Amanita from the eastern Himalaya and adjacent regions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu L; Weiß, M; Oberwinkler, F

    2004-01-01

    Four new species of Amanita, Amanita-ceae (Agaricales) are described from the eastern Himalaya and adjacent regions of southwestern China. Amanita altipes and A. parvipantherina are members of section Amanita, while A. orientifulva and A. liquii are representatives of section Vaginatae. They are compared with similar species and illustrated with line drawings.

  10. Seismic Monitoring Capabilities of the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurel, Jean-Marie; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Crespo, Hector; McNamara, Dan; Huerfano, Victor

    2014-05-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions during the past 500 years. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Hundreds of thousands are currently threatened along the Caribbean coastlines. In 2005 the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) was established. It recommended the following minimum seismic performance standards for the detection and analysis of earthquakes: 1) Earthquake detection within 1 minute, 2) Minimum magnitude threshold = M4.5, and 3) Initial hypocenter error of <30 km. The implementation plan of the CARIBE EWS currently includes 115 seismic stations in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions. The NOAA National Weather Service Caribbean Tsunami Warning Program prepares and distributes monthly reports on real time and archived seismic data availability of the contributing stations at the US Tsunami Warning Centers, the Puerto Rico Seismic Network and IRIS. As of early 2014, 99 of the proposed stations are being contributed by national, regional and international seismological institutions. Recent network additions (Nicaragua, Colombia, Mexico, Cayman Islands, and Venezuela) have reduced detection threshold, time and location error throughout much of the Caribbean region and Central America. Specifically, earthquakes (>M4.0) can be detected within 1 minute throughout much of the Caribbean. The remaining exceptions to this standard for detection are portions of northern South America and Mexico. Another performance criterion is 90% data availability. Currently 60-70% of the stations meet this standard. The presentation will further report on the status of the CARIBE EWS seismic capability for the timely and accurate detection and analysis of earthquakes for tsunami warning purposes for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions.

  11. Beta-blockade improves adjacent regional sympathetic innervation during postinfarction remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C M; Nicol, P D; Rogers, W J; Seibel, P S; Park, C S; Reichek, N

    1999-10-01

    The effect of beta-blockade on left ventricular (LV) remodeling, when added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) after anterior myocardial infarction (MI), is incompletely understood. On day 2 after coronary ligation-induced anteroapical infarction, 17 sheep were randomized to ramipril (ACEI, n = 8) or ramipril and metoprolol (ACEI-beta, n = 9). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and 8 wk after MI to measure changes in LV end-diastolic, end-systolic, and stroke volume indexes, LV mass index, ejection fraction (EF), and regional percent intramyocardial circumferential shortening. (123)I-labeled m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and fluorescent microspheres before and after adenosine were infused before death at 8 wk post-MI for quantitation of sympathetic innervation, blood flow, and blood flow reserve in adjacent and remote noninfarcted regions. Infarct size, regional blood flow, blood flow reserve, and the increase in LV mass and LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes were similar between groups. However, EF fell less over the 8-wk study period in the ACEI-beta group (-13 +/- 11 vs. -22 +/- 4% in ACEI, P < 0.05). The ratio of adjacent to remote region (123)I-MIBG uptake was greater in ACEI-beta animals than in the ACEI group (0.93 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.86 +/- 0.07, P < 0.04). When added to ACE inhibition after transmural anteroapical MI, beta-blockade improves EF and adjacent regional sympathetic innervation but does not alter LV size.

  12. Digital depth horizon compilations of the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent Arctic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Data have been digitized and combined to create four detailed depth horizon grids spanning the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent offshore areas. These map horizon compilations were created to aid in petroleum system modeling and related studies. Topography/bathymetry is extracted from a recent Arctic compilation of global onshore DEM and satellite altimetry and ship soundings offshore. The Lower Cretaceous Unconformity (LCU), the top of the Triassic Shublik Formation, and the pre-Carboniferous acoustic basement horizon grids are created from numerous seismic studies, drill hole information, and interpolation. These horizons were selected because they mark critical times in the geologic evolution of the region as it relates to petroleum. The various horizons clearly show the major tectonic elements of this region including the Brooks Range, Colville Trough, Barrow Arch, Hanna Trough, Chukchi Platform, Nuwuk Basin, Kaktovik Basin, and Canada Basin. The gridded data are available in a variety of data formats for use in regional studies.

  13. Tsunami Ready Recognition Program for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions Launched in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Hinds, K.; Aliaga, B.; Brome, A.; Lopes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions over the past 500 years with 4,561 associated deaths according to the NOAA Tsunami Database. The most recent devastating tsunamis occurred in 1946 in Dominican Republic; 1865 died. With the explosive increase in residents, tourists, infrastructure, and economic activity along the coasts, the potential for human and economic loss is enormous. It has been estimated that on any day, more than 500,000 people in the Caribbean could be in harm's way just along the beaches, with hundreds of thousands more working and living in the tsunamis hazard zones. In 2005 the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission established the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG CARIBE EWS) to coordinate tsunami efforts among the 48 participating countries in territories in the region. In addition to monitoring, modeling and communication systems, one of the fundamental components of the warning system is community preparedness, readiness and resilience. Over the past 10 years 49 coastal communities in the Caribbean have been recognized as TsunamiReady® by the US National Weather Service (NWS) in the case of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands and jointly by UNESCO and NWS in the case of the non US jurisdictions of Anguilla and the British Virgin Islands. In response to the positive feedback of the implementation of TsunamiReady, the ICG CARIBE EWS in 2015 recommended the approval of the guidelines for a Community Performance Based Recognition program. It also recommended the adoption of the name "Tsunami Ready", which has been positively consulted with the NWS. Ten requirements were established for recognition and are divided among Preparedness, Mitigation and Response elements which were adapted from the proposed new US TsunamiReady guidelines and align well with emergency management functions. Both a

  14. Regional Jurassic geologic framework of Alabama coastal waters area and adjacent Federal waters area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    To date, numerous Jurassic hydrocarbon fields and pools have been discovered in the Cotton Valley Group, Haynesville Formation, Smackover Formation and Norphlet Formation in the tri-state area of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, and in Alabama State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters area. Petroleum traps are basement highs, salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines and extensional faults associated with salt movement. Reservoirs include continental and marine sandstones, limestones and dolostones. Hydrocarbon types are oil, condensate and natural gas. The onshore stratigraphic and structural information can be used to establish a regional geologic framework for the Jurassic for the State coastal waters and adjacent Federal waters areas. Evaluation of the geologic information along with the hydrocarbon data from the tri-state area indicates that at least three Jurassic hydrocarbon trends (oil, oil and gas condensate, and deep natural gas) can be identified onshore. These onshore hydrocarbon trends can be projected into the Mobile area in the Central Gulf of Mexico and into the Pensacola, Destin Dome and Apalachicola areas in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial reserves of natural gas are expected to be present in Alabama State waters and the northern portion of the Mobile area. Significant accumulations of oil and gas condensate may be encountered in the Pensacola, Destin Dome, and Apalachicola areas. ?? 1989.

  15. Quantifying 10 years of Improvements in Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; McNamara, D. E.; Saurel, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude-9.3 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake of December 26, 2004, increased global awareness to the destructive hazard of earthquakes and tsunamis. Post event assessments of global coastline vulnerability highlighted the Caribbean as a region of high hazard and risk and that it was poorly monitored. Nearly 100 tsunamis have been reported for the Caribbean region and Adjacent Regions in the past 500 years and continue to pose a threat for its nations, coastal areas along the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic seaboard of North and South America. Significant efforts to improve monitoring capabilities have been undertaken since this time including an expansion of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Global Seismographic Network (GSN) (McNamara et al., 2006) and establishment of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Intergovernmental Coordination Group (ICG) for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS). The minimum performance standards it recommended for initial earthquake locations include: 1) Earthquake detection within 1 minute, 2) Minimum magnitude threshold = M4.5, and 3) Initial hypocenter error of <30 km. In this study, we assess current compliance with performance standards and model improvements in earthquake and tsunami monitoring capabilities in the Caribbean region since the first meeting of the UNESCO ICG-Caribe EWS in 2006. The three measures of network capability modeled in this study are: 1) minimum Mw detection threshold; 2) P-wave detection time of an automatic processing system and; 3) theoretical earthquake location uncertainty. By modeling three measures of seismic network capability, we can optimize the distribution of ICG-Caribe EWS seismic stations and select an international network that will be contributed from existing real-time broadband national networks in the region. Sea level monitoring improvements both offshore and

  16. Concatemeric intermediates of equine herpesvirus type 1 DNA replication contain frequent inversions of adjacent long segments of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Slobedman, B; Simmons, A

    1997-03-17

    In common with other alpha-herpesviruses, the genome of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) comprises covalently linked long and short unique sequences of DNA, each flanked by inverted repeats. Equimolar amounts of two genomic isomers, generated by free inversion of the short segment, relative to the long segment, are packaged into EHV-1 virions. In contrast with herpes simplex virus (HSV), inversion of genomic long segments has not been described. In the current work, the structures of high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication were studied by field inversion gel electrophoresis. It is shown that adjacent long segments of the viral genome are frequently inverted in concatemeric intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication. Further, like HSV concatemers, high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 replication are flanked exclusively by the long segment of the viral genome. Hence, despite the fact that only two, rather than four, isomers of EHV-1 DNA are packaged into virions, the intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication closely resemble those of herpes simplex virus type 1 in structure. These data have implications relating to the mechanisms involved in packaging of alpha-herpesvirus DNA.

  17. Seasonal variations of transport time of freshwater exchanges between Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Shen, Jian; He, Qing; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Dai

    2015-05-01

    Seasonal variations of transport time of freshwater between the Changjiang Estuary (CJE) and its adjacent regions, Hangzhou Bay (HZB) and Jiangsu Coast (JSC), are investigated. The freshwater exchange between the CJE and HZB is controlled by the strength of the secondary plume, which initiates from the South Passage of the southernmost waterway of CJE. The transport time varies seasonally and is modulated by spring-neap tides. The water exchange between CJE and HZB exhibits a high spatial variation. A large water age is observed in the region near the southern coast of the HZB, which corresponds to high pollutant deposition and low water quality conditions observed in the field. A large exchange occurs in summer between CJE and HZB. The freshwater transported into the HZB is accumulated in the deep channel near the western shoreline of the HZB and weak horizontal exchange occurs in the southern region near the southern shoreline, resulting in an increase of water age in the southern region. Due to the increase of northerly and northwesterly winds in winter and fall, more horizontal exchange occurs, resulting in a decrease of water age. The transport time from Xuliujing to the Hangzhou Bay ranges from 30 to 60 days near Jinshanwei, and ranges from 100 to 140 days in the southern region. The advective transport is the dominant transport mechanism to move water out of the HZB, while shear-induced exchange flow transports freshwater into the HZB. Net flux is out of HZB in winter and fall, but into the HZB in summer when Changjiang discharge is high. A weak transport of freshwater between the CJE and Subei Coast exists. A portion of a freshwater plume transports freshwater northward during summer and fall. It takes approximately 60-140 days for the freshwater from Xuliujing to be transported to the Subei Coast.

  18. Stress pattern in Portugal mainland and the adjacent Atlantic region, West Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A.; Cabral, J.; Baptista, R.; Matias, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Portuguese mainland territory is located close to the Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary, in a tectonic setting responsible for significant neotectonic and seismic activities. However, few data concerning the present regional lithospheric stress field were available, as testified by recently published maps of stress indicators for the Europe and Mediterranean regions. One of the authors already presented a synthesis on this subject [Cabral, 1993], where geological and geophysical stress indicators were considered. In this paper we introduce new information, mainly a considerable amount of borehole breakout data. The updated data set comprises 32 reliable stress indicators showing a mean azimuth of 145° (standard deviation 21°) for the maximum horizontal stress direction (SHmax). On the average, the geological data are rotated clockwise and the focal mechanism data deviated anticlockwise to that azimuth, while the borehole elongation results are consistent with the mean SHmax trend. These differences in stress trend suggest a regional progressive rotation of the SHmax direction from NNW-SSE to WNW-ESE since the upper Pliocene. To estimate stress trajectories, new and published stress indicators in the adjacent Atlantic area and northern Africa were also investigated, showing a very uniform NW-SE SHmax trend in west Iberia. A high level of horizontal compressive stress acting oblique to the western Portuguese continental margin is inferred and interpreted in view of a proposed regional geodynamical model, of activation of this passive margin, with the nucleation of a subduction zone in the Atlantic SW of Iberia, at the Gorringe submarine bank, which is propagating northward along the base of the continental slope, at the transition between thinned and normal continental crust.

  19. The opossum MHC genomic region revisited.

    PubMed

    Krasnec, Katina V; Sharp, Alana R; Williams, Tracey L; Miller, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The gray short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica is one of the few marsupial species for which a high quality whole genome sequence is available and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been annotated. Previous analyses revealed only a single locus within the opossum MHC region, designated Modo-UA1, with the features expected for encoding a functionally classical class I α-chain. Nine other class I genes found within the MHC are highly divergent and have features usually associated with non-classical roles. The original annotation, however, was based on an early version of the opossum genome assembly. More recent analyses of allelic variation in individual opossums revealed too many Modo-UA1 sequences per individual to be accounted for by a single MHC class I locus found in the genome assembly. A reanalysis of a later generation assembly, MonDom5, revealed the presence of two additional loci, now designated Modo-UA3 and UA4, in a region that was expanded and more complete than in the earlier assembly. Modo-UA1, UA3, and UA4 are all transcribed, although Modo-UA4 transcripts are rarer. Modo-UA4 is also relatively non-polymorphic. Evidence presented support the accuracy of the later assembly and the existence of three related class I genes in the opossum, making opossums more typical of mammals and most tetrapods by having multiple apparent classical MHC class I loci.

  20. Teleseismic tomography of the southern Puna plateau in Argentina and adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, M.; Heit, B.; Jakovlev, A.; Yuan, X.; Kay, S. M.; Sandvol, E.; Alonso, R. N.; Coira, B.; Brown, L.; Kind, R.; Comte, D.

    2013-02-01

    We performed a teleseismic P wave tomography study using seismic events at both teleseismic and regional distances, recorded by a temporary seismic array in the Argentine Puna Plateau and adjacent regions. The tomographic images show the presence of a number of positive and negative anomalies in a depth range of 20-300 km beneath the array. The most prominent of these anomalies corresponds to a low-velocity body, located in the crust, most clearly seen in the center of the array (27°S, 67°W) between the Cerro Peinado volcano, the Cerro Blanco caldera and the Farallon Negro in the east. This anomaly (southern Puna Magmatic Body) extends from the northern most part of the array and follows the line with the highest density of stations towards the south where it becomes smaller. It is flanked by high velocities on the west and the east respectively. On the west, the high velocities might be related to the subducted Nazca plate. On the northeast the high velocity block coincides with the position of the Hombre Muerto basin in the crust and could be indicating an area of lithospheric delamination where we detected a high velocity block at 100 km depth on the eastern border of the Puna plateau, north of Galan. This block might be related to a delamination event in an area with a thick crust of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks at the border between Puna and Eastern Cordillera. In the center of the array the Southern Puna magmatic body is also flanked by high velocities but the most prominent region is located on the east and is interpreted as part of the Sierras Pampeanas lithosphere with high velocities. The position of the Sierras Pampeanas geological province is key in this area as it appears to limit the extension of the plateau towards the south.

  1. West Nile virus (WNV) genome RNAs with up to three adjacent mutations that disrupt long distance 5'-3' cyclization sequence basepairs are viable

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Mausumi; Brinton, Margo A.

    2011-03-30

    Mosquito-borne flavivirus genomes contain conserved 5' and 3' cyclization sequences (CYC) that facilitate long distance RNA-RNA interactions. In previous studies, flavivirus replicon RNA replication was completely inhibited by single or multiple mismatching CYC nt substitutions. In the present study, full-length WNV genomes with one, two or three mismatching CYC substitutions showed reduced replication efficiencies but were viable and generated revertants with increased replication efficiency. Several different three adjacent mismatching CYC substitution mutant RNAs were rescued by a second site mutation that created an additional basepair (nts 147-10913) on the internal genomic side of the 5'-3' CYC. The finding that full-length genomes with up to three mismatching CYC mutations are viable and can be rescued by a single nt spontaneous mutation indicates that more than three adjacent CYC basepair substitutions would be required to increase the safety of vaccine genomes by creating mismatches in inter-genomic recombinants.

  2. Identification guide to skates (Family Rajidae) of the Canadian Atlantic and adjacent regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sulak, Kenneth J.; MacWhirter, P. D.; Luke, K.E.; Norem, A.D.; Miller, J.M.; Cooper, J.A.; Harris, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystem-based management requires sound information on the distribution and abundance of species both common and rare. Therefore, the accurate identification for all marine species has assumed a much greater importance. The identification of many skate species is difficult as several are easily confused and has been found to be problematic in both survey data and fisheries data collection. Identification guides, in combination with training and periodic validation of taxonomic information, improve our accuracy in monitoring data required for ecosystem-based management and monitoring of populations. This guide offers a comparative synthesis of skate species known to occur in Atlantic Canada and adjacent regions. The taxonomic nomenclature and descriptions of key morphological features are based on the most up-to-date understanding of diversity among these species. Although this information will aid the user in accurate identification, some features vary geographically (such as colour) and others with life stage (most notably the proportion of tail length to body length; the presence of spines either sharper in juveniles or in some cases not yet present; and also increases in the number of tooth rows as species grow into maturity). Additional information on juvenile features are needed to facilitate problematic identifications (e.g. L. erinacea vs. L. ocellata). Information on size at maturity is still required for many of these species throughout their geographic distribution.

  3. Glacial erosion and expected permafrost thickness of Fennoscandia and adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    Linked geological, geomorphological and tectonic features of Fennoscandia with adjacent regions of East-European plain and Barents-Kara shelf indirectly influenced the history of glacial grows and decays. The first-order bedrock landscape elements (often created or exhumed during pre-glacial Cenozoic stages) were the major factors that could partly control centers of ice nucleation and basal velocities, serve natural barriers shaping ice sheet margin during some time intervals, etc. On the hand, many landforms were powerfully modified by glacial and periglacial processes, in particular by strong glacial erosion with lithological and structural control. Quantitative estimation of Plio-Pleistocene erosion and deposition was performed combining regional geological-geomorphological analysis (GA) and modeling with rate-based time-scale reconstructions (RR), and mass-balance control. Of special GA importance was to compare and extract changes of preserved elements of pre-glacial Neogene topography from areas that underwent different duration of glacial activity, in comparison with bordering non-glaciated ones. More distinct radial glacial erosion pattern and larger basal ice velocities seem likely at the beginning of the early ice-age stage, with partial widening of pre-glacial drainage elements. Few wide lowlands with meandering rivers in permafrost condition could provoke early stage onset of topographic ice-streams. Over time, further complication of the pattern from radial to "spider web" is expected due to developing of topographic ice-streams. Worth to mention is progressive exhumation of resistant formations, additional complications of the pattern by fluvioglacial activity and glacial sedimentation, "pendulum" principle, with increasing amount of glacial and interglacial sedimentation in eroded material. Approximated variable permafrost distribution seems to be additional weighty aspect, changing erosion rates at some time intervals. To estimate mean annual

  4. Hydrology, geochemistry and geothermal aspects of the thermal waters from Switzerland and adjacent alpine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuataz, François-David

    1983-11-01

    Waters of 19 thermal areas in Switzerland and adjacent alpine regions were studied to acquire a better knowledge of their deep thermal circulation, geochemistry and low-temperature geothermal potential. A systematic multisampling and multitracing program was executed over a complete hydrologic cycle for each of the 19 thermal areas. Pertinent physical, chemical and isotopic parameters were measured and analyzed on thermal and nonthermal waters during nine sampling periods. Thermal water occurrences are generally related either to Triassic evaporites or to the weathered and fractured zone between crystalline basements (or ranges) and their sedimentary cover. Emergence areas are located in faulted or overthrust zones. Sulfate and calcium are the two principal ions responsible for the mineralization of most thermal waters. Actually, gypsum and anhydrite are more often encountered in Triassic evaporites than halite. Many variations of the water geochemistry, caused by seasonal changes, have been recorded during the hydrologic cycle. From mineralization, temperature and discharge variations, it has been possible to distinguish fast or delayed responses to rain or snow-melt events and mixing between deep-thermal and shallow-cold waters. Chemical geothermometers were tested on these warm waters. The chalcedony and Na-K-Ca geothermometers seem to be the only ones which display calculated temperatures in reasonable agreement with known local geothermal gradients or bottom-hole temperatures. The majority of inferred reservoir temperatures ranges from 40° to 60°C. Oxygen-18 and deuterium results show that most thermal waters fit along the meteoric water line, with some exceptions due to Mediterranean precipitation, possible water-rock isotopic exchange or mixing with connate waters. A regional oxygen-18 gradient has been established with altitude in order to locate and determine the elevation of intake areas. Tritium is very useful in the detection of mixing between deep

  5. Late cenozoic uplift of the southwestern colorado plateau and adjacent lower colorado river region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, I.

    1979-01-01

    Rocks deposited near sea level under marine, estuarine, and lacustrine conditions, and located along the course of the lower Colorado River from the mouth of the Grand Canyon as far as the Mexican border, have been displaced to present positions as high as 880 m a.s.l. and as low as 1600 m b.s.l. The rocks include the marine and estuarine Bouse Formation and the lacustrine or marine Hualapai Limestone Member of the Muddy Creek Formation. A profile joining spot elevations that represent the highest erosional remnants of these rocks preserved at any one locality gives an approximation (in most cases a minimum value) for the uplift or downdropping of the region relative to sea level since about 5.5 m.y. ago, the K/Ar age of the most widespread and critical unit. The profile shows that most of the lower Colorado region has risen at least 550 m through broad and rather uniform upwarping and at an average rate of about 100 m/m.y. In addition to these 550 m, the nearby Colorado Plateau has risen by discrete movement along Wheeler fault, which is parallel to and about 8 km west of the plateau's edge, to a total uplift of at least 880 m, at a rate that may be as high as 160 m/m.y. Before warping and faulting, the top of the plateau was about 1100 m above the fill of adjacent basins; the top of this fill probably was at or a little below sea level. p]The profile shows two major south-facing rises in slope. The bigger one, near Yuma, occurs where the profile intersects the northwest-trending San Andreas-Salton trough system of faults; it is interpreted as rifting resulting from transcurrent movement along the faults. At the Mexican border, the base of the Bouse Formation is 1600 m b.s.l., which corresponds to a rate of subsidence since the beginning of Bouse time that may be as high as 290 m/.m.y. The top of the Bouse is at 1000 m b.s.l., corresponding to a rate of subsidence of about 180 m/m.y. In this area, the "older marine sedimentary rocks" of Olmsted et al., (1973

  6. Changes in Climate over the South China Sea and Adjacent Regions: Response to and Feedback on Global Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song

    2016-04-01

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Asian monsoon have experienced significant long-term changes in the past decades. These changes, together with other factors, have in turn led to large climate change signals over the South China Sea and adjacent regions including Southeast Asia, the western Pacific, and the tropical Indian Ocean. An attribution analysis of the feedback processes of these signals indicate the predominant importance of water vapor and cloud radiative feedbacks. Experiments with multiple earth system models also show that these regional climate change signals exert significant influences on global climate. The increases in atmospheric heating over Southeast Asia and sea surface temperature in the adjacent oceans in the past decades have weakened the Indian and African monsoons, led to a drying effect over East Asia, and generated wave-train patterns in both the northern and southern hemispheres, explaining several prominent climate features in and outside Southeast Asia.

  7. Genomic Profiling Reveals Unique Molecular Alterations in Hepatoblastomas and Adjacent Hepatocellular Carcinomas in B6C3F1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhusari, Sachin; Pandiri, Arun R; Nagai, Hiroaki; Wang, Yu; Foley, Julie; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Ton, Thai-Vu; DeVito, Michael; Shockley, Keith R; Peddada, Shyamal D; Gerrish, Kevin E; Malarkey, David E; Hooth, Michelle J; Sills, Robert C; Hoenerhoff, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    The cell of origin of hepatoblastoma (HB) in humans and mice is unknown; it is hypothesized to be a transformed hepatocyte, oval cell, or hepatic progenitor cell. In mice, current dogma is that HBs arise from preexisting hepatocellular neoplasms as a result of further neoplastic transformation. However, there is little evidence supporting this direct relationship. To better understand the relationship between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and HB and determine molecular similarities between mouse and human HB, global gene expression analysis and targeted mutation analysis were performed using HB, HCC, and adjacent liver from the same animals in a recent National Toxicology Program bioassay. There were significant differences in Hras and Ctnnb1 mutation spectra, and by microarray, HBs showed dysregulation of embryonic development, stem cell pluripotency, and genomic imprinting compared to HCC. Meta-analysis showed similarities between HB, early mouse embryonic liver, and hepatocyte-derived stem/progenitor cells compared to HCC. Our data show that there are striking differences between HB and HCC and suggest that HB is a significantly different entity that may arise from a hepatic precursor cell. Furthermore, mouse HB is similar to the human disease at the pathway level and therefore is likely a relevant model for evaluating human cancer hazard.

  8. Diets and food-web relationships of seabirds in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent marine regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanger, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Overall diets of 39 species of marine birds (four procellariiforms, three cormorants, six sea ducks, one phalarope, two jaegers, 17 gulls, two terns, and 13 alcids) inhabiting the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent marine regions are summarized with food-web diagrams, tables, and text. Diets of the Northern Fulmar, Sooty and Short-tailed Shearwaters, Pelagic Cormorant, Black-legged Kittiwake, Common and Thick-billed Murres, Marbled and Kittlitz's Murrelets, and Horned and Tufted Puffins are compared among seasons and geographic regions.

  9. Deformation Rates in the Snake River Plain and Adjacent Basin and Range Regions Based on GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, S. J.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    We estimate horizontal velocities for 405 sites using Global Positioning System (GPS) phase data collected from 1994 to 2010 within the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. The velocities reveal a slowly-deforming region within the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau in Oregon separated from the actively extending adjacent Basin and Range regions by shear. Our results show a NE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.6 ± 0.7 nanostrain/yr in the Centennial Tectonic Belt and an ~E-oriented extensional strain rate of 3.5 ± 0.2 nanostrain/yr in the Great Basin. These extensional rates contrast with the very low strain rate within the 125 km x 650 km region of the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau which is not distinguishable from zero (-0.1 ± 0.4 x nanostrain/yr). Inversions of Snake River Plain velocities with dike-opening models indicate that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones, as previously hypothesized, is not currently occurring. GPS data also disclose that rapid extension in the surrounding regions adjacent to the slowly-deforming region of the Snake River Plain drives shear between them. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.3-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic Belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic Belt. The fastest lateral shearing evident in the GPS occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where earthquakes with right-lateral strike-slip focal mechanisms are within a NE-trending zone of seismicity. The regional velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic Belt, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and eastern Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is not locally driven by Yellowstone hotspot volcanism, but instead by extension to the south across the Wasatch fault possibly due to gravitational

  10. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  11. Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of an undercut region adjacent a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The inturned flange has a plurality of apertures for directing cooling steam to cool the side wall between adjacent nozzle segments.

  12. Thorium concentrations in the lunar surface. IV - Deconvolution of the Mare Imbrium, Aristarchus, and adjacent regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etchegaray-Ramirez, M. I.; Metzger, A. E.; Haines, E. L.; Hawke, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    Several fields of orbital gamma ray spectroscopy data have been deconvolved in order to model the distribution of Th over the Mare Imbrium and northern Oceanus Procellarum portions of the Apollo 15 lunar ground track, which in combination with a prior study of the Apenninus region covers a continuous swath from 10 deg E to 60 deg W in the northwest quadrant. The crater of the Aristarchus region dominates the Th distribution, with a concentration of 20 ppm, and substantial enhancements are also found in the mare regions around Brayley and at the ejecta blankets of Timocharis and Lambert. The existence of enhanced Th concentrations in mare basalt regions suggests that reservoirs of some late stage mare basalts incorporated KREEP-rich material during formation or transit.

  13. Regions of strongly enhanced perpendicular electric fields adjacent to auroral arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opgenoorth, H. J.; Haggstrom, I.; Williams, P. J. S.; Jones, G. O. L.

    1990-08-01

    A joint campaign involving EISCAT, the Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI), and sounding rockets has observed short-lived elevations of E-region electron temperatures, indicating the presence of strong electric fields. The use of a new pulse-code technique has considerably improved the EISCAT data in regions of low ionospheric electron densities. It has been found that strong and apparently short-lived enhancements of electric fields and associated E-region electron temperatures occur more commonly than long-lived ones. However, earlier EISCAT data with simultaneous optical recordings (and also some CUPRI radar data from the ERRRIS campaign) indicate that many of these events are, in fact, not short-lived, but occur in localized regions and are associated with drifting auroral forms.

  14. Population Health in Regions Adjacent to the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    The surplus cancer mortality in this group to archived material at Dispensary Number 4 be- was 6.6 x 106 cases and coincides with biological cause...type, with feather-grass, wild oats, desert East Kazakhstan region, Semipalatinsk region, timothy-grass, and different kinds of wormwood . southern part...Ust’- tons were provided. The limits on fats, fish, vege- Kamenogorsk, severe contamination of the atmos- tables, sweets , cookies, and other products

  15. Vesicomyinae (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and adjacent abyssal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, Elena M.; Kamenev, Gennady M.; Vladychenskaya, Irina P.; Petrov, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Representatives of the subfamily Vesicomyinae (Bivalvia, Vesicomyidae) are tiny deep-sea molluscs distributed worldwide and reaching huge abundances of hundreds and thousands of specimens in trawl catches. During the German-Russian deep-sea expedition KuramBio (R/V Sonne, 2012) for the first time two vesicomyin species were collected from the abyssal plain adjacent to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench from the depths of 4861-5787 m, Vesicomya pacifica (Smith, 1885) and "Vesicomya" filatovae sp.n. Two species of vesicomyins, V. sergeeviFilatova, 1971 and V. profundiFilatova, 1971, which were previously reported from the hadal of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench, were not collected at the abyssal depth despite of the close geographical proximity of the sampling area to their distribution ranges. Altogether nine species of vesicomyins are recorded now from the West and Indo-West Pacific; data on distribution and morpho-anatomical characters of these species are provided. Taxonomic description of V. pacifica is revised including information on its soft part anatomy, new localities and COI sequences. For the first time for a vesicomyin bivalve molecular data is given for a species with an explicit morphological description and unambiguous taxonomic affiliation. Molecular analysis of 160 published COI sequences of vesicomyids and newly obtained molecular data on V. pacifica showed that V. pacifica and two undescribed vesicomyin species forming a monophyletic clade which exhibits sister relationships with the Pliocardiinae, the group of chemosymbiotic vesicomyids. "Vesicomya" filatovae sp.n. is provisionally assigned to the genus Vesicomya (s.l.) until additional morphological and molecular data are obtained. It differs from Vesicomya s.s. by a broader hinge margin with more radiating teeth and the presence of only one pair of demibranchs.

  16. Regional prospectivity of Mesozoic and Tertiary in the eastern Adriatic and adjacent area

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.; Dolan, P.; Lunn, G. )

    1988-08-01

    Post-Hercynian deposits in the eastern Adriatic and the adjacent external zones of the Dinarides and Albanian Hellenides may be subdivided into four facies groups. (1) Permian-Lower Triassic clastics and carbonates with some evaporites, (2) Middle Triassic-lower Tertiary carbonate platform facies with associated continental margin deeper marine sequences, (3) Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary flysch, and (4) middle Tertiary molasse and postorogenic Neogene sediments. The Permian to lower Tertiary section was deposited during the complex Alpine cycle, while the upper Tertiary section is the product of post-Alpine deposition. This depositional history during markedly different tectonic regimes creates two groups of petroleum plays in the eastern Adriatic: (1) Alpine cycle plays in the Permian to lower Tertiary in the thrust-faulted and folded foreland of Adria and (2) post-Alpine plays in upper Tertiary postorogenic or late synorogenic basins. Around the Adriatic, the post-Alpine plays have so far proved the most successful. Major production occurs in the onshore Po basin and its extension beneath the Adriatic. Some of this production is from deep Alpine-cycle reservoirs, but the bulk is from the upper Tertiary-Quaternary. Similar horizons produce onshore and offshore the central-southern Adriatic coast of Italy. Major Tertiary production also occurs to the northeast in the Pannonian basin of Yugoslavia and Hungary from Miocene and younger sequences. Onshore Albania produces significant quantities of hydrocarbons; although data are scarce, much of this production is presumably from upper Tertiary molasse or lower Tertiary flysch.

  17. Thorium concentrations in the lunar surface: IV. Deconvolution of the mare imbrium, aristarchus, and adjacent regions

    SciTech Connect

    Etchegaray-Ramirez, M.I.; Metzger, A.E.; Haines, E.L.; Hawke, B.R.

    1983-02-15

    The distribution of Th over the Mare Imbrium and northern Oceanus Procellarum portions of the Apollo 15 lunar ground track has been modeled by deconvolving several fields of orbital gamma ray spectroscopy data. Including a prior study of the Apenninus region, a continuous swath from 10/sup 0/E to 60/sup 0/W in the northwest quadrant has now been analyzed. In the Aristarchus region, the crater dominates the Th distribution with a concentration of 20 ppm. Other enhancements are seen on the Aristarchus Plateau and south of the plateau. The concentration across the Aristarchus Plateau is not uniform. The average Th concentration in Oceanus Procellarum is less to the west than to the east of the Aristarchus Plateau. Substantial enhancements are found in mare regions around Brayley, and at the ejecta blankets of Timocharis and Lambert. Th in the Eratosthenian mare regions is generally low with one notable exception lying rouhgly between the craters Euler and Carlini. The existence of enhanced Th concentrations in mare basalt regions suggests that reservoirs of some late stage mare basalts incorporated KREEP-rich material during formation or transit.

  18. Ground-water resources in the tri-state region adjacent to the Lower Delaware River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barksdale, Henry C.; Greenman, David W.; Lang, Solomon Max; Hilton, George Stockbridge; Outlaw, Donald E.

    1958-01-01

    The maximum beneficial utilization of the ground-water resources cannot be accomplished in haphazard fashion. It must be planned and controlled on the basis of sound, current information about the hydrology of the various aquifers. Continued and, in some areas, intensified investigations of the ground-water resources of the region should form the basis for such planning and control.

  19. Aquifer systems in the Great Basin region of Nevada, Utah, and adjacent states; a study plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrill, James R.; Welch, A.H.; Prudic, D.E.; Thomas, J.M.; Carman, R.L.; Plume, R.W.; Gates, J.S.; Mason, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Great Basin Regional Aquifer Study includes about 140,000 square miles in parts of Nevada, Utah, California, Idaho, Oregon , and Arizona within which 240 hydrographic areas occupy structural depressions formed primarily by basin-and-range faulting. The principal aquifers are in basin-fill deposits; however, significant carbonate-rock aquifers underlie much of eastern Nevada and western Utah. In October 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey started a 4-year study to: (1) describe the ground-water systems, (2) analyze the changes that have led to the systems ' present conditions, (3) tie the results of this and previous studies together in a regional analysis, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated. A plan of work is presented that describes the general approach to be taken. It defines the major tasks necessary to meet objectives and defines constraints on the scope of work. The approach has been influenced by the diverse nature of ground water flow systems and the large number of basins. A detailed appraisal of 240 individual areas would require more resources than are available. Consequently, the general approach is to study selected ' typical ' areas and key hydrologic processes. Effort during the first three years will be directed toward describing the regional hydrology, conducting detailed studies of ' type ' areas and studying selected hydrologic processes. Effort during the final year will be directed toward developing a regional analysis of results. Special studies will include evaluation of regional geochemistry , regional hydrogeology, recharge, ground-water discharge, and use of remote sensing. Areas to be studied using ground-water flow models include the regional carbonate-rock province in eastern Nevada and western Utah, six valleys--Las Vegas, Carson, Paradise, Dixie, Smith Creek, and Stagecoach--Nevada, plus Jordan Valley, the Millford area, and Tule Valley in Utah. The results will be presented in a

  20. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S.; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Woods, Nicholas T.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the Simian Virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework to identify candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in eight weeks. PMID:26658467

  1. Completion of the full-length genome sequence of Menangle virus: characterisation of the polymerase gene and genomic 5' trailer region.

    PubMed

    Bowden, T R; Boyle, D B

    2005-10-01

    Menangle virus (MenV), isolated in 1997 from stillborn piglets during an outbreak of reproductive disease at a large commercial piggery, is the only new paramyxovirus to be identified in Australia since Hendra virus in 1994. Following partial characterisation of the MenV genome, we previously showed that MenV is a novel member of the genus Rubulavirus. Here we report the characterisation of the large (L) polymerase gene and the adjacent 5' trailer region of MenV, which completes the full-length genome sequence of this novel paramyxovirus (15,516 nucleotides), and thereby confirm its taxonomic position within the family Paramyxoviridae.

  2. Genomic complexity of the variable region-containing chitin-binding proteins in amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Dishaw, Larry J; Mueller, M Gail; Gwatney, Natasha; Cannon, John P; Haire, Robert N; Litman, Ronda T; Amemiya, Chris T; Ota, Tatsuya; Rowen, Lee; Glusman, Gustavo; Litman, Gary W

    2008-01-01

    Background The variable region-containing chitin-binding proteins (VCBPs) are found in protochordates and consist of two tandem immunoglobulin variable (V)-type domains and a chitin-binding domain. We previously have shown that these polymorphic genes, which primarily are expressed in the gut, exhibit characteristics of immune genes. In this report, we describe VCBP genomic organization and characterize adjacent and intervening genetic features which may influence both their polymorphism and complex transcriptional repertoire. Results VCBP genes 1, 2, 4, and 5 are encoded in a single contiguous gene-rich chromosomal region and VCBP3 is encoded in a separate locus. The VCBPs exhibit extensive haplotype variation, including copy number variation (CNV), indel polymorphism and a markedly elevated variation in repeat type and density. In at least one haplotype, inverted repeats occur more frequently than elsewhere in the genome. Multi-animal cDNA screening, as well as transcriptional profilingusing a novel transfection system, suggests that haplotype-specific transcriptional variants may contribute to VCBP genetic diversity. Conclusion The availability of the Branchiostoma floridae genome (Joint Genome Institute, Brafl1), along with BAC and PAC screening and sequencing described here, reveal that the relatively limited number of VCBP genes present in the amphioxus genome exhibit exceptionally high haplotype variation. These VCBP haplotypes contribute a diverse pool of allelic variants, which includes gene copy number variation, pseudogenes, and other polymorphisms, while contributing secondary effects on gene transcription as well. PMID:19046437

  3. Is mammalian chromosomal evolution driven by regions of genome fragility?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Castresana, Jose; Robinson, Terence J

    2006-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in comparative genomics concerns the identification of mechanisms that underpin chromosomal change. In an attempt to shed light on the dynamics of mammalian genome evolution, we analyzed the distribution of syntenic blocks, evolutionary breakpoint regions, and evolutionary breakpoints taken from public databases available for seven eutherian species (mouse, rat, cattle, dog, pig, cat, and horse) and the chicken, and examined these for correspondence with human fragile sites and tandem repeats. Results Our results confirm previous investigations that showed the presence of chromosomal regions in the human genome that have been repeatedly used as illustrated by a high breakpoint accumulation in certain chromosomes and chromosomal bands. We show, however, that there is a striking correspondence between fragile site location, the positions of evolutionary breakpoints, and the distribution of tandem repeats throughout the human genome, which similarly reflect a non-uniform pattern of occurrence. Conclusion These observations provide further evidence that certain chromosomal regions in the human genome have been repeatedly used in the evolutionary process. As a consequence, the genome is a composite of fragile regions prone to reorganization that have been conserved in different lineages, and genomic tracts that do not exhibit the same levels of evolutionary plasticity. PMID:17156441

  4. Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

  5. Comparative Genomics of the Aeromonadaceae Core Oligosaccharide Biosynthetic Regions.

    PubMed

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2017-02-28

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are an integral part of the Gram-negative outer membrane, playing important organizational and structural roles and taking part in the bacterial infection process. In Aeromonas hydrophila, piscicola, and salmonicida, three different genomic regions taking part in the LPS core oligosaccharide (Core-OS) assembly have been identified, although the characterization of these clusters in most aeromonad species is still lacking. Here, we analyse the conservation of these LPS biosynthesis gene clusters in the all the 170 currently public Aeromonas genomes, including 30 different species, and characterise the structure of a putative common inner Core-OS in the Aeromonadaceae family. We describe three new genomic organizations for the inner Core-OS genomic regions, which were more evolutionary conserved than the outer Core-OS regions, which presented remarkable variability. We report how the degree of conservation of the genes from the inner and outer Core-OS may be indicative of the taxonomic relationship between Aeromonas species.

  6. Russian aeromagnetic surveys of the Prince Charles Mountains and adjacent regions into the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynsky, Alexander; Golynsky, Dmitry; Kiselev, Alexander; Masolov, Valery

    2014-05-01

    Russian aeromagnetic investigations in the Prince Charles Mountains (PCM) and surrounding areas, seek to contribute data on the tectonics of Precambrian igneous belts and cratonic fragments, the crustal structure of the Lambert Rift system and other major aspects of Antarctic geology, critical to understanding continental growth processes (Golynsky et al., 2006). Over the past decade, the Polar Marine Geoscience Expedition projects acquired approximately 77,400 line-km of aeromagnetic data over the largely ice-covered regions of MacRobertson Land and Princess Elizabeth Land. The airborne surveys were performed with a standard profile spacing of 5 km and tie-line interval of 15-25 km. The total amount of the Russian aeromagnetic data collected in this region exceeded more than 165,000 line-km. Together with the PCMEGA and AGAP surveys (Damaske and McLean, 2005; Ferraccioli et al., 2011) the PMGE dataset forms the longest transect ever mapped in East Antarctica exceeding 1950 km in length. Several distinct crustal subdivisions are clearly differentiated in the magnetic data. The high-amplitude positive anomalies that extend around the Vestfold Hills and Rauer Islands are likely be attributed to the southern boundary of high-grade metamorphic Late Archean craton. The northern PCM that are composed by ~1 Ga orthogneiss and charnockite display a predominantly northeasterly trending magnetic fabric that continues to the eastern shoulder of the Lambert Rift. The aeromagnetic data from the Southern PCM reveal the spatial boundary of the Archaean Ruker Terrane that is characterized by a short-wavelength anomalies and the prominent Ruker Anomaly that is associated with a banded iron formation. The prominent alternating system of linear NE-SW positive and negative anomalies over the eastern shoulder of the Lambert Rift may reflect the western boundary of the Princess Elizabeth Land cratonic(?) block, although its relationships and tectonic origin remained largely ambiguous

  7. Analysis of regional deformation and strain accumulation data adjacent to the San Andreas fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach to the understanding of crustal deformation was developed under this grant. This approach combined aspects of fractals, chaos, and self-organized criticality to provide a comprehensive theory for deformation on distributed faults. It is hypothesized that crustal deformation is an example of comminution: Deformation takes place on a fractal distribution of faults resulting in a fractal distribution of seismicity. Our primary effort under this grant was devoted to developing an understanding of distributed deformation in the continental crust. An initial effort was carried out on the fractal clustering of earthquakes in time. It was shown that earthquakes do not obey random Poisson statistics, but can be approximated in many cases by coupled, scale-invariant fractal statistics. We applied our approach to the statistics of earthquakes in the New Hebrides region of the southwest Pacific because of the very high level of seismicity there. This work was written up and published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. This approach was also applied to the statistics of the seismicity on the San Andreas fault system.

  8. Cloud-to-ground lightning over Mexico and adjacent oceanic regions: a preliminary climatology using the WWLLN dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucieńska, B.; Raga, G. B.; Rodríguez, O.

    2010-11-01

    This work constitutes the first climatological study of lightning over Mexico and adjacent oceanic areas for the period 2005-2009. Spatial and temporal distributions of cloud to ground lightning are presented and the processes that contribute to the lightning variability are analysed. The data are retrieved from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) dataset. The current WWLL network includes 40 stations which cover much of the globe and detect very low frequency radiation ("spherics") associated with lightning. The spatial distribution of the average yearly lightning over the continental region of Mexico shows the influence of orographic forcing in producing convective clouds with high lightning activity. However, a very high number of strikes is also observed in the States of Tabasco and Campeche, which are low-lying areas. This maximum is related to the climatological maximum of precipitation for the country and it may be associated with a region of persistent low-level convergence and convection in the southern portion of the Gulf of Mexico. The maps of correlation between rainfall and lightning provide insight into the microphysical processes occurring within the clouds. The maritime clouds close to the coastline exhibit similar properties to continental clouds as they produce very high lightning activity. The seasonal cycle of lightning registered by WWLLN is consistent with the LIS/OTD dataset for the selected regions. In terms of the annual distribution of cloud-to-ground strikes, July, August and September exhibit the highest number of strikes over continental Mexico. The diurnal cycle indicates that the maximum number of strikes over the continent is observed between 6 and 9 p.m. LT. The surrounding oceanic regions were subdivided into four distinct sectors: Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, Sub-tropical Pacific and Tropical Pacific. The Gulf of Mexico has the broadest seasonal distribution, since during winter lightning associated with mid

  9. Evidence that local land use practices influence regional climate, vegetation, and stream flow patterns in adjacent natural areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Chase, T.N.; Pielke, R.A.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Baron, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    We present evidence that land use practices in the plains of Colorado influence regional climate and vegetation in adjacent natural areas in the Rocky Mountains in predictable ways. Mesoscale climate model simulations using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS) projected that modifications to natural vegetation in the plains, primarily due to agriculture and urbanization, could produce lower summer temperatures in the mountains. We corroborate the RAMS simulations with three independent sets of data: (i) climate records from 16 weather stations, which showed significant trends of decreasing July temperatures in recent decades; (ii) the distribution of seedlings of five dominant conifer species in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, which suggested that cooler, wetter conditions occurred over roughly the same time period; and (iii) increased stream flow, normalized for changes in precipitation, during the summer months in four river basins, which also indicates cooler summer temperatures and lower transpiration at landscape scales. Combined, the mesoscale atmospheric/land-surface model, short-term in regional temperatures, forest distribution changes, and hydrology data indicate that the effects of land use practices on regional climate may overshadow larger-scale temperature changes commonly associated with observed increases in CO2 and other greenhouse gases.

  10. Tectonic origin of Lower Mesozoic regional unconformities: Southern Colorado Plateau and adjacent Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Palinspastic restoration of Basin and Range structural blocks to early Mesozoic positions relative to the Colorado Plateau permits correlation of lower Mesozoic regional unconformities of the Colorado Plateau across the southern Basin and Range. These unconformities correlate with tectonic reconfiguration of sedimentary basins in which enclosed depositional sequences were deposited. Lesser recognized intraformational unconformities are related to relative sea level change. The Tr-1 unconformity developed on subaerially exposed, karsted, and deeply incised Leonardian carbonates. The overlying Lower Triassic Moenkopi Formation and equivalent strata display a narrow, north-south aligned, passive-margin-type architecture subdivided by Smithian and Spathian intraformational unconformities into three depositional sequences. From basinal to inner shelf facies, Tr-1 truncates folds in Permian rocks. Initial deposition of the lowest sequence began with sea level at the base of the continental slope. Basal conglomerates of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation were deposited in northward-trending paleovalleys incised within and parallel to the Early Triassic shelf. Distribution of fluvial deposition, orientation of paleovalleys, paleocurrent indicators, and provenance indicate change from the passive-margin-bordered Early Triassic basin to an offshore active-margin basin. Continental and marine facies suggest two depositional sequences separated by an early Norian type 2( ) sequence boundary. The J-O unconformity at the base of the Lower Jurassic Glen Canyon Group marks a major change in tectonic setting of western North America as evidenced by (1) progressive southwestward downcutting of the unconformity to deformed Paleozoic rocks and Precambrian basement, (2) coincidence in time and space with Late Triassic to Early Jurassic thrust faults, and (3) initiation of calcalkaline volcanism.

  11. Climate change in the four corners and adjacent regions: Implications for environmental restoration and land-use planning

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the workshop proceedings on Climate Change in the Four Corners and Adjacent Regions: Implications for Environmental Restoration and Land-Use Planning which took place September 12-14, 1994 in Grand Junction, Colorado. The workshop addressed three ways we can use paleoenvironmental data to gain a better understanding of climate change and its effects. (1) To serve as a retrospective baseline for interpreting past and projecting future climate-induced environmental change, (2) To differentiate the influences of climate and humans on past environmental change, and (3) To improve ecosystem management and restoration practices in the future. The papers presented at this workshop contained information on the following subjects: Paleoclimatic data from the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, climate change and past cultures, and ecological resources and environmental restoration. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Reclamation by tubewell drainage in Rechna Doab and adjacent areas, Punjab region, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmberg, Glenn T.

    1975-01-01

    Around the turn of the century, a network of more than 40,000 miles of canals was constructed to divert water from the Indus River and its tributaries to about 23 million acres of largely unused desert in the Punjab region of Pakistan. The favorable climate and the perennial supply of irrigation water made available through the canals instituted the beginning of intensive farming. However, because of generally poor drainage and the high rate of canal leakage, the water table began to rise. As the population increased and agriculture expanded, the demand for irrigation water soon exceeded the available supply. Spreading of the canal supply to meet the expanded needs locally created shortages that prevented adequate leaching. Increased evaporation from the rising water table further contributed to the progressive accumulation of soluble salts in the soil. By the late 1930's the combined effect of waterlogging and salinity had reduced the agricultural productivity of the region to one of the lowest in the world. In 1954, after several unsuccessful projects were undertaken to reclaim affected areas and to stop the progressive encroachment of waterlogging and salinization, the Government of Pakistan in cooperation with the U.S. International Cooperation Administration undertook a study of the geology and hydrology of the Indus Plain that ultimately resulted in the formulation of a ground-water reclamation program. The principal feature of the program is the utilization of a network of deep wells spaced about a mile apart for the dual purpose of lowering the water table and for providing supplemental irrigation water. Through financial assistance and technical and engineering support principally from the United States, construction began in 1960 on the first of 18 proposed reclamation projects that eventually will include 21 million acres and more than 28,000 wells having an installed capacity of more than 100,000 cubic feet per second. An area of about 1.3 million acres

  13. The latent origin of replication of Epstein-Barr virus directs viral genomes to active regions of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Manuel J; Ott, Elisabeth; Papior, Peer; Schepers, Aloys

    2010-03-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus efficiently infects human B cells. The EBV genome is maintained extrachromosomally and replicates synchronously with the host's chromosomes. The latent origin of replication (oriP) guarantees plasmid stability by mediating two basic functions: replication and segregation of the viral genome. While the segregation process of EBV genomes is well understood, little is known about its chromatin association and nuclear distribution during interphase. Here, we analyzed the nuclear localization of EBV genomes and the role of functional oriP domains FR and DS for basic functions such as the transformation of primary cells, their role in targeting EBV genomes to distinct nuclear regions, and their association with epigenetic domains. Fluorescence in situ hybridization visualized the localization of extrachromosomal EBV genomes in the regions adjacent to chromatin-dense territories called the perichromatin. Further, immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated a preference of the viral genome for histone 3 lysine 4-trimethylated (H3K4me3) and histone 3 lysine 9-acetylated (H3K9ac) nuclear regions. To determine the role of FR and DS for establishment and subnuclear localization of EBV genomes, we transformed primary human B lymphocytes with recombinant mini-EBV genomes containing different oriP mutants. The loss of DS results in a slightly increased association in H3K27me3 domains. This study demonstrates that EBV genomes or oriP-based extrachromosomal vector systems are integrated into the higher order nuclear organization. We found that viral genomes are not randomly distributed in the nucleus. FR but not DS is crucial for the localization of EBV in perichromatic regions that are enriched for H3K4me3 and H3K9ac, which are hallmarks of transcriptionally active regions.

  14. Genomic Regions Required for Morphogenesis of the Drosophila Embryonic Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, D.; Scott, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila midgut is an excellent system for studying the cell migration, cell-cell communication, and morphogenetic events that occur in organ formation. Genes representative of regulatory gene families common to all animals, including homeotic, TGFβ, and Wnt genes, play roles in midgut development. To find additional regulators of midgut morphogenesis, we screened a set of genomic deficiencies for midgut phenotypes. Fifteen genomic intervals necessary for proper midgut morphogenesis were identified; three contain genes already known to act in the midgut. Three other genomic regions are required for formation of the endoderm or visceral mesoderm components of the midgut. Nine regions are required for proper formation of the midgut constrictions. The E75 ecdysone-induced gene, which encodes a nuclear receptor superfamily member, is the relevant gene in one region and is essential for proper formation of midgut constrictions. E75 acts downstream of the previously known constriction regulators or in parallel. Temporal hormonal control may therefore work in conjunction with spatial regulation by the homeotic genes in midgut development. Another genomic region is required to activate transcription of the homeotic genes Antp and Scr specifically in visceral mesoderm. The genomic regions identified by this screen provide a map to novel midgut development regulators. PMID:8582615

  15. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  16. Attenuation of monkeypox virus by deletion of genomic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopera, Juan G.; Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Monkeypox virus (MPXV) is an emerging pathogen from Africa that causes disease similar to smallpox. Two clades with different geographic distributions and virulence have been described. Here, we utilized bioinformatic tools to identify genomic regions in MPXV containing multiple virulence genes and explored their roles in pathogenicity; two selected regions were then deleted singularly or in combination. In vitro and in vivostudies indicated that these regions play a significant role in MPXV replication, tissue spread, and mortality in mice. Interestingly, while deletion of either region led to decreased virulence in mice, one region had no effect on in vitro replication. Deletion of both regions simultaneously also reduced cell culture replication and significantly increased the attenuation in vivo over either single deletion. Attenuated MPXV with genomic deletions present a safe and efficacious tool in the study of MPX pathogenesis and in the identification of genetic factors associated with virulence.

  17. Two regimes of cloud water over the Okhotsk Sea and the adjacent regions around Japan in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Teruhisa; Iwasaki, Toshiki

    2015-03-01

    This study derived two regimes of cloud water with a dipole structure between over the Okhotsk Sea and over the adjacent regions around Japan in summer by using a climate index for cool summer. When the Okhotsk high develops, clouds are confined to a thin low-level layer owing to the enhanced stability in the lower atmosphere induced by the downward motion associated with the Okhotsk high. The resulting optically thin clouds allow more downward shortwave radiation to reach the surface of the Okhotsk Sea. In contrast, the low-level easterly winds blowing toward the Japanese Islands and the Eurasian continent enhance cloud formation. This is due to the convergence of the water vapor flux induced by the easterly winds associated with the Okhotsk high and the southerly winds associated with the Baiu frontal zone and the Pacific high and due to the orographic uplift of air mass. When a cyclonic circulation occurs over the Okhotsk Sea, a thick layer of low-level clouds extending close to the sea surface is formed. The convergence of the water vapor flux over the subarctic sea surface temperature (SST) frontal zone and the cool SST promote fog formation, and upward motion associated with the cyclonic circulation supports the high cloud water content from the lower to the upper troposphere. The resulting optically thick clouds reduce the downward shortwave radiation at the surface of the Okhotsk Sea. Over the regions around Japan, water vapor flux diverges owing to dry air originating from land and cloud water decreases.

  18. Association between dental implants in the posterior region and traumatic occlusion in the adjacent premolars: a long-term follow-up clinical and radiographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the association between dental implants in the posterior region and traumatic occlusion in the adjacent premolars, using data collected during from 2002 to 2015. Methods Traumatic occlusion in the adjacent premolars was assessed by examining clinical parameters (bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, fremitus, and tooth mobility) and radiographic parameters (loss of supporting bone and widening of the periodontal ligament space) over a mean follow-up of 5 years. Clinical factors (gender, age, implant type, maxillary or mandibular position, opposing teeth, and duration of functional loading) were evaluated statistically in order to characterize the relationship between implants in the posterior region and traumatic occlusion in the adjacent premolars. Results The study inclusion criteria were met by 283 patients, who had received 347 implants in the posterior region. The incidence of traumatic occlusion in the adjacent premolars was significantly higher for splinted implants (P=0.004), implants in the maxillary region (P<0.001), and when implants were present in the opposing teeth (P<0.001). The other clinical factors of gender, age, and duration of functional loading were not significantly associated with traumatic occlusion. Conclusions This study found that the risk of traumatic occlusion in the adjacent premolars increased when splinted implants were placed in the maxillary molar region and when the teeth opposing an implant also contained implants. PMID:28050317

  19. The highly recombinogenic bz locus lies in an unusually gene-rich region of the maize genome.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Park, W; Yan, X; Zheng, Z; Shen, B; Dooner, H K

    2001-07-17

    The bronze (bz) locus exhibits the highest rate of recombination of any gene in higher plants. To investigate the possible basis of this high rate of recombination, we have analyzed the physical organization of the region around the bz locus. Two adjacent bacterial artificial chromosome clones, comprising a 240-kb contig centered around the Bz-McC allele, were isolated, and 60 kb of contiguous DNA spanning the two bacterial artificial chromosome clones was sequenced. We find that the bz locus lies in an unusually gene-rich region of the maize genome. Ten genes, at least eight of which are shown to be transcribed, are contained in a 32-kb stretch of DNA that is uninterrupted by retrotransposons. We have isolated nearly full length cDNAs corresponding to the five proximal genes in the cluster. The average intertranscript distance between them is just 1 kb, revealing a surprisingly compact packaging of adjacent genes in this part of the genome. At least 11 small insertions, including several previously described miniature inverted repeat transposable elements, were detected in the introns and 3' untranslated regions of genes and between genes. The gene-rich region is flanked at the proximal and distal ends by retrotransposon blocks. Thus, the maize genome appears to have scattered regions of high gene density similar to those found in other plants. The unusually high rate of intragenic recombination seen in bz may be related to the very high gene density of the region.

  20. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  1. Seismic hazard and seismic risk assessment based on the unified scaling law for earthquakes: Himalayas and adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasova, A. K.; Kossobokov, V. G.; Parvez, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    For the Himalayas and neighboring regions, the maps of seismic hazard and seismic risk are constructed with the use of the estimates for the parameters of the unified scaling law for earthquakes (USLE), in which the Gutenberg-Richter law for magnitude distribution of seismic events within a given area is applied in the modified version with allowance for linear dimensions of the area, namely, log N( M, L) = A + B (5 - M) + C log L, where N( M, L) is the expected annual number of the earthquakes with magnitude M in the area with linear dimension L. The spatial variations in the parameters A, B, and C for the Himalayas and adjacent regions are studied on two time intervals from 1965 to 2011 and from 1980 to 2011. The difference in A, B, and C between these two time intervals indicates that seismic activity experiences significant variations on a scale of a few decades. With a global consideration of the seismic belts of the Earth overall, the estimates of coefficient A, which determines the logarithm of the annual average frequency of the earthquakes with a magnitude of 5.0 and higher in the zone with a linear dimension of 1 degree of the Earth's meridian, differ by a factor of 30 and more and mainly fall in the interval from -1.1 to 0.5. The values of coefficient B, which describes the balance between the number of earthquakes with different magnitudes, gravitate to 0.9 and range from less than 0.6 to 1.1 and higher. The values of coefficient C, which estimates the fractal dimension of the local distribution of epicenters, vary from 0.5 to 1.4 and higher. In the Himalayas and neighboring regions, the USLE coefficients mainly fall in the intervals of -1.1 to 0.3 for A, 0.8 to 1.3 for B, and 1.0 to 1.4 for C. The calculations of the local value of the expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) from the maximal expected magnitude provided the necessary basis for mapping the seismic hazards in the studied region. When doing this, we used the local estimates of the

  2. Identification of an extended N-acetylated sequence adjacent to the protein-linkage region of fibroblast heparan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M; Steward, W P; Hampson, I N; Gallagher, J T

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of N-sulphate groups within fibroblast heparan sulphate chains was investigated. The detergent-extractable heparan sulphate proteoglycan from adult human skin fibroblasts, radiolabelled with [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulphate, was coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. After partial depolymerization of the heparan sulphate with nitrous acid, the remaining Sepharose-bound fragments were removed by treatment with alkali. These fragments, of various sizes, but all containing an intact reducing xylose residue, were fractionated on Sephacryl S-300 and the distribution of the 3H and 35S radiolabels was analysed. A decreased degree of sulphation was observed towards the reducing termini of the chains. After complete nitrous acid hydrolysis of the Sepharose-bound proteoglycan, analysis of the proximity of N-sulphation to the reducing end revealed the existence of an extended N-acetylated sequence directly adjacent to the protein-linkage sequence. The size of this N-acetylated domain was estimated by gel filtration to be approximately eight disaccharide units. This domain appears to be highly conserved, being present in virtually all the chains derived from this proteoglycan, implying the existence of a mechanism capable of generating such a non-random sequence during the post-polymeric modification of heparan sulphate. Comparison with the corresponding situation in heparin suggests that different mechanisms regulate polymer N-sulphation in the vicinity of the protein-linkage region of these chemically related glycosaminoglycans. PMID:2954540

  3. Identification of Triplophysa species from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and its adjacent regions through DNA barcodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuxuan; Wang, Ying; Jin, Huifang; Li, Wujiao; Yan, Chaochao; Yan, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiuyue; He, Shunping; Song, Zhaobin

    2017-03-20

    The genus Triplophysa is the largest and most difficult to identity morphologically fish group of superfamily Cobitoidea with 140 currently valid species, and is mainly distributed in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and adjacent regions. Most species within this genus possess highly similar morphological characteristics for adaption to the highland environment and are very difficult to be identified only based on morphology. The traditional species identification, mainly based on external morphological diagnostic characters, leads to inconsistent results in many cases. Herein, we provided a molecular method based on mitochondrial cytochrome c subunit I (COI) for the identification of Triplophysa fishes. Thirty-three Triplophysa species, 244 individuals, were used to determine whether barcoding was effective in discriminating species for this genus. The mean intraspecific and interspecific K2P distances ranged from 0 to 14.9% (mean, 2.9%) and 0 to 23.4% (mean, 9.7%), respectively. The tree-based analysis displayed most of species formed discrete clusters with strong bootstrap support values (>90%). The results showed that most of Triplophysa species could be identified by DNA barcode and indicated DNA barcode could be used as a molecular marker for these species.

  4. Virio- and bacterioplankton in the estuary zone of the Ob River and adjacent regions of the Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, A. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Zabotkina, E. A.; Romanenko, A. V.; Romanova, N. D.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of structural and functional characteristics of virioplankton in the north of the Ob River estuary and the adjacent Kara Sea shelf (between latitudes 71°44'44″ N and 73°45'24″ N) was studied with consideration of the spatial variations in the number ( N B) and productivity ( P B) of bacteria and water properties (temperature, salinity, density) by analyzing samples taken in September 2013. The number of plankton viruses ( N V), the occurrence of visible infected bacteria cells, virus-induced mortality of bacteria, and virioplankton production in the studied region varied within (214-2917) × 103 particles/mL, 0.3-5.6% of NB, 2.2-64.4% of P B, and (6-17248) × 103 particles/(mL day), respectively. These parameters were the highest in water layers with a temperature of +7.3-7.5°C, salinity of 3.75-5.41 psu, and conventional density (στ) of 2.846-4.144. The number of bacterioplankton was (614-822) × 103 cells/mL, and the N V/ N B ratio was 1.1-4.5. A large amount of virus particles were attached to bacterial cells and suspended matter. The data testify to the considerable role of viruses in controlling the number and production of heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the interaction zone of river and sea waters.

  5. Comparative Genomics of the Aeromonadaceae Core Oligosaccharide Biosynthetic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are an integral part of the Gram-negative outer membrane, playing important organizational and structural roles and taking part in the bacterial infection process. In Aeromonas hydrophila, piscicola, and salmonicida, three different genomic regions taking part in the LPS core oligosaccharide (Core-OS) assembly have been identified, although the characterization of these clusters in most aeromonad species is still lacking. Here, we analyse the conservation of these LPS biosynthesis gene clusters in the all the 170 currently public Aeromonas genomes, including 30 different species, and characterise the structure of a putative common inner Core-OS in the Aeromonadaceae family. We describe three new genomic organizations for the inner Core-OS genomic regions, which were more evolutionary conserved than the outer Core-OS regions, which presented remarkable variability. We report how the degree of conservation of the genes from the inner and outer Core-OS may be indicative of the taxonomic relationship between Aeromonas species. PMID:28264491

  6. Nucleotide diversity analysis highlights functionally important genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Chekalin, Evgeny; Nikolsky, Yuri; Bruskin, Sergey; Chebotarov, Dmitry; McNally, Kenneth L; Alexandrov, Nickolai

    2016-10-24

    We analyzed functionality and relative distribution of genetic variants across the complete Oryza sativa genome, using the 40 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) dataset from the 3,000 Rice Genomes Project (http://snp-seek.irri.org), the largest and highest density SNP collection for any higher plant. We have shown that the DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are the most conserved group of genes, whereas kinases and membrane-localized transporters are the most variable ones. TFs may be conserved because they belong to some of the most connected regulatory hubs that modulate transcription of vast downstream gene networks, whereas signaling kinases and transporters need to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. In general, the observed profound patterns of nucleotide variability reveal functionally important genomic regions. As expected, nucleotide diversity is much higher in intergenic regions than within gene bodies (regions spanning gene models), and protein-coding sequences are more conserved than untranslated gene regions. We have observed a sharp decline in nucleotide diversity that begins at about 250 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start and reaches minimal diversity exactly at the transcription start. We found the transcription termination sites to have remarkably symmetrical patterns of SNP density, implying presence of functional sites near transcription termination. Also, nucleotide diversity was significantly lower near 3' UTRs, the area rich with regulatory regions.

  7. GANESH: Software for Customized Annotation of Genome Regions

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Derek; Hummerich, Holger; Smedley, Damian; Kittivoravitkul, Sasivimol; McCarthy, Mark; Little, Peter; Sergot, Marek

    2003-01-01

    GANESH is a software package designed to support the genetic analysis of regions of human and other genomes. It provides a set of components that may be assembled to construct a self-updating database of DNA sequence, mapping data, and annotations of possible genome features. Once one or more remote sources of data for the target region have been identified, all sequences for that region are downloaded, assimilated, and subjected to a (configurable) set of standard database-searching and genome-analysis packages. The results are stored in compressed form in a relational database, and are updated automatically on a regular schedule so that they are always immediately available in their most up-to-date versions. A Java front-end, executed as a stand alone application or web applet, provides a graphical interface for navigating the database and for viewing the annotations. There are facilities for importing and exporting data in the format of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS), enabling a GANESH database to be used as a component of a DAS configuration. The system has been used to construct databases for about a dozen regions of human chromosomes and for three regions of mouse chromosomes. PMID:12952886

  8. Nucleotide diversity analysis highlights functionally important genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinova, Tatiana V.; Chekalin, Evgeny; Nikolsky, Yuri; Bruskin, Sergey; Chebotarov, Dmitry; McNally, Kenneth L.; Alexandrov, Nickolai

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed functionality and relative distribution of genetic variants across the complete Oryza sativa genome, using the 40 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) dataset from the 3,000 Rice Genomes Project (http://snp-seek.irri.org), the largest and highest density SNP collection for any higher plant. We have shown that the DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are the most conserved group of genes, whereas kinases and membrane-localized transporters are the most variable ones. TFs may be conserved because they belong to some of the most connected regulatory hubs that modulate transcription of vast downstream gene networks, whereas signaling kinases and transporters need to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. In general, the observed profound patterns of nucleotide variability reveal functionally important genomic regions. As expected, nucleotide diversity is much higher in intergenic regions than within gene bodies (regions spanning gene models), and protein-coding sequences are more conserved than untranslated gene regions. We have observed a sharp decline in nucleotide diversity that begins at about 250 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start and reaches minimal diversity exactly at the transcription start. We found the transcription termination sites to have remarkably symmetrical patterns of SNP density, implying presence of functional sites near transcription termination. Also, nucleotide diversity was significantly lower near 3′ UTRs, the area rich with regulatory regions. PMID:27774999

  9. Demarcating the gene-rich regions of the wheat genome

    PubMed Central

    Erayman, Mustafa; Sandhu, Devinder; Sidhu, Deepak; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Baenziger, P. S.; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2004-01-01

    By physically mapping 3025 loci including 252 phenotypically characterized genes and 17 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) relative to 334 deletion breakpoints, we localized the gene-containing fraction to 29% of the wheat genome present as 18 major and 30 minor gene-rich regions (GRRs). The GRRs varied both in gene number and density. The five largest GRRs physically spanning <3% of the genome contained 26% of the wheat genes. Approximate size of the GRRs ranged from 3 to 71 Mb. Recombination mainly occurred in the GRRs. Various GRRs varied as much as 128-fold for gene density and 140-fold for recombination rates. Except for a general suppression in 25–40% of the chromosomal region around centromeres, no correlation of recombination was observed with the gene density, the size, or chromosomal location of GRRs. More than 30% of the wheat genes are in recombination-poor regions thus are inaccessible to map-based cloning. PMID:15240829

  10. A novel method for discovering local spatial clusters of genomic regions with functional relationships from DNA contact maps

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xihao; Shi, Christina Huan; Yip, Kevin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The three-dimensional structure of genomes makes it possible for genomic regions not adjacent in the primary sequence to be spatially proximal. These DNA contacts have been found to be related to various molecular activities. Previous methods for analyzing DNA contact maps obtained from Hi-C experiments have largely focused on studying individual interactions, forming spatial clusters composed of contiguous blocks of genomic locations, or classifying these clusters into general categories based on some global properties of the contact maps. Results: Here, we describe a novel computational method that can flexibly identify small clusters of spatially proximal genomic regions based on their local contact patterns. Using simulated data that highly resemble Hi-C data obtained from real genome structures, we demonstrate that our method identifies spatial clusters that are more compact than methods previously used for clustering genomic regions based on DNA contact maps. The clusters identified by our method enable us to confirm functionally related genomic regions previously reported to be spatially proximal in different species. We further show that each genomic region can be assigned a numeric affinity value that indicates its degree of participation in each local cluster, and these affinity values correlate quantitatively with DNase I hypersensitivity, gene expression, super enhancer activities and replication timing in a cell type specific manner. We also show that these cluster affinity values can precisely define boundaries of reported topologically associating domains, and further define local sub-domains within each domain. Availability and implementation: The source code of BNMF and tutorials on how to use the software to extract local clusters from contact maps are available at http://yiplab.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/bnmf/. Contact: kevinyip@cse.cuhk.edu.hk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307607

  11. Upper mantle anisotropy beneath Indochina block and adjacent regions from shear wave splitting analysis of Vietnam array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, L.; Iidaka, T.; Kawakatsu, H.; Morita, Y.; Dzung, N.

    2007-12-01

    Indochina block is located at the junction of Eurasia, Indian and Pacific plates. It has a close relationship with the uplift of Tibet plateau and the spreading of South China Sea basin in the geological evolution histories. The anisotropy is considered to directly relate to deformation in the mantle, and therefore provide constraints on tectonic and geodynamic processes. In this study, we present upper mantle anisotropy beneath Indochina block and adjacent regions from shear wave splitting analysis of Vietnam array and IRIS data. The data used here recorded by Vietnam array during the period between February 2000 and October 2005. The array consists of 6 broadband seismometers. We employed a compact HDD for data storage, which enables long-term and stable observation. We also used data form three IRIS stations around Vietnam for the same period. All records are band-pass filtered between 0.02 and 1.0 Hz to eliminate background noise. The dominant time windows used are 10-15 s around SKS phases based on the predicted travel times from the iasp91 model. We used the methodology of Silver and Chan (1991) as modified by Walker (2004) to determine the fast polarization direction and the delay time between the fast and slow components. In order to find the best splitting parameters, a grid search over possible values is performed to linearize the shear wave particle motion when the effect of the anisotropy if removed. The error estimation of each combination of splitting parameters is given by 95 percent confidence level of F test. We are able to characterize the splitting patterns in greater detail because of the use of new data. The average value of delay times in Indochina block is about 1.35 s, larger than that in adjacent regions. Tomographic studies also revealed low velocity anomalies in upper mantle beneath study area (Lebedev and Nolet, 2003). We estimate that the Indochina block might be affected by the mantle convection produced by the spreading of the South

  12. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  13. Evolutionary history of the ABCB2 genomic region in teleosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palti, Y.; Rodriguez, M.F.; Gahr, S.A.; Hansen, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication, silencing and translocation have all been implicated in shaping the unique genomic architecture of the teleost MH regions. Previously, we demonstrated that trout possess five unlinked regions encoding MH genes. One of these regions harbors ABCB2 which in all other vertebrate classes is found in the MHC class II region. In this study, we sequenced a BAC contig for the trout ABCB2 region. Analysis of this region revealed the presence of genes homologous to those located in the human class II (ABCB2, BRD2, ??DAA), extended class II (RGL2, PHF1, SYGP1) and class III (PBX2, Notch-L) regions. The organization and syntenic relationships of this region were then compared to similar regions in humans, Tetraodon and zebrafish to learn more about the evolutionary history of this region. Our analysis indicates that this region was generated during the teleost-specific duplication event while also providing insight about potential MH paralogous regions in teleosts. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GRAbB: Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research.

    PubMed

    Brankovics, Balázs; Zhang, Hao; van Diepeningen, Anne D; van der Lee, Theo A J; Waalwijk, Cees; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-06-01

    GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting) is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often neglected or poorly assembled, although they contain interesting information from phylogenetic or epidemiologic perspectives, but also single copy regions can be assembled. The program is capable of targeting multiple regions within a single run. Furthermore, GRAbB can be used to extract specific loci from NGS data, based on homology, like sequences that are used for barcoding. To make the assembly specific, a known part of the region, such as the sequence of a PCR amplicon or a homologous sequence from a related species must be specified. By assembling only the region of interest, the assembly process is computationally much less demanding and may lead to assemblies of better quality. In this study the different applications and functionalities of the program are demonstrated such as: exhaustive assembly (rDNA region and mitochondrial genome), extracting homologous regions or genes (IGS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1a), as well as extracting multiple regions within a single run. The program is also compared with MITObim, which is meant for the exhaustive assembly of a single target based on a similar query sequence. GRAbB is shown to be more efficient than MITObim in terms of speed, memory and disk usage. The other functionalities (handling multiple targets simultaneously and extracting homologous regions) of the new program are not matched by other programs. The program is available with explanatory documentation at https://github.com/b-brankovics/grabb. GRAbB has been tested on Ubuntu (12.04 and 14.04), Fedora (23), CentOS (7.1.1503) and Mac OS X (10.7). Furthermore, GRAbB is available as a docker repository: brankovics/grabb (https://hub.docker.com/r/brankovics/grabb/).

  15. GRAbB: Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; van Diepeningen, Anne D.; van der Lee, Theo A. J.; Waalwijk, Cees; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2016-01-01

    GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting) is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often neglected or poorly assembled, although they contain interesting information from phylogenetic or epidemiologic perspectives, but also single copy regions can be assembled. The program is capable of targeting multiple regions within a single run. Furthermore, GRAbB can be used to extract specific loci from NGS data, based on homology, like sequences that are used for barcoding. To make the assembly specific, a known part of the region, such as the sequence of a PCR amplicon or a homologous sequence from a related species must be specified. By assembling only the region of interest, the assembly process is computationally much less demanding and may lead to assemblies of better quality. In this study the different applications and functionalities of the program are demonstrated such as: exhaustive assembly (rDNA region and mitochondrial genome), extracting homologous regions or genes (IGS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1a), as well as extracting multiple regions within a single run. The program is also compared with MITObim, which is meant for the exhaustive assembly of a single target based on a similar query sequence. GRAbB is shown to be more efficient than MITObim in terms of speed, memory and disk usage. The other functionalities (handling multiple targets simultaneously and extracting homologous regions) of the new program are not matched by other programs. The program is available with explanatory documentation at https://github.com/b-brankovics/grabb. GRAbB has been tested on Ubuntu (12.04 and 14.04), Fedora (23), CentOS (7.1.1503) and Mac OS X (10.7). Furthermore, GRAbB is available as a docker repository: brankovics/grabb (https://hub.docker.com/r/brankovics/grabb/). PMID

  16. Present-day Focal Mechanisms and Stress Field of the Sichuan-Yunnan Active Block and Its Adjacent Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhao, cuiping; luo, jun; zhou, lianqing

    2013-04-01

    Focal mechanism solutions together with the depths of 66 M 3.5 moderate earthquakes occurred in the Sichuan Yunnan active block and its adjacent regions from Aug.1st, 2007 to Sep.15th, 2012was obtained by CAP method. Furthermore, by combining the results with the focal mechanism solutions from Harvard University, we investigated the characteristics of the stress field in the study area. We discussed the spatial distribution of the focal mechanisms and the focal depths, and then analyzed its dynamics. Four conclusions are drawn as follows. (1)Focal mechanism solutions show zoning characteristic. Along the ANH-ZMH-XJ faults(the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block), the earthquakes are mostly left-lateral strike-slip mechanism. Along the HSH fault, the earthquakes are mostly right-lateral strike-slip mechanism. Around the XGLL block and in its interior, there exists remarkable normal fault mechanism with different fault striking and direction of P and T stress axis. Along the arc boundary of Sichuan-Yunnan block with the Sichuan basin, the earthquakes are reverse fault mechanism. (2) The inversed regional stress field shows complicated local feature. On and to the east side of the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block, the stress field is similar with the stress field of the Eastern China block, which is from the relative motion of Philippine plate towards the Urasia plate. Whereas to the west side of the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block, the stress field is much more complicated, indicting the strong influence of local structures to the stress field, especially the NE striking of JPS-YL over-thrusting tectonic structure located in the interior of Sichuan-Yunnan block.(3)The moment center depths of events occurred in the Sichuan-Yunnan active block are within 15km deep, and mostly among 5~15km, suggesting that the brittle seismic layer is among the depth of 5~15km in the upper and middle crust.

  17. Nucleolar organizer regions: genomic ‘dark matter’ requiring illumination

    PubMed Central

    McStay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoli form around tandem arrays of a ribosomal gene repeat, termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). During metaphase, active NORs adopt a characteristic undercondensed morphology. Recent evidence indicates that the HMG-box-containing DNA-binding protein UBF (upstream binding factor) is directly responsible for this morphology and provides a mitotic bookmark to ensure rapid nucleolar formation beginning in telophase in human cells. This is likely to be a widely employed strategy, as UBF is present throughout metazoans. In higher eukaryotes, NORs are typically located within regions of chromosomes that form perinucleolar heterochromatin during interphase. Typically, the genomic architecture of NORs and the chromosomal regions within which they lie is very poorly described, yet recent evidence points to a role for context in their function. In Arabidopsis, NOR silencing appears to be controlled by sequences outside the rDNA (ribosomal DNA) array. Translocations reveal a role for context in the expression of the NOR on the X chromosome in Drosophila. Recent work has begun on characterizing the genomic architecture of human NORs. A role for distal sequences located in perinucleolar heterochromatin has been inferred, as they exhibit a complex transcriptionally active chromatin structure. Links between rDNA genomic stability and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are now well established, and indications are emerging that this is important in aging and replicative senescence in higher eukaryotes. This, combined with the fact that rDNA arrays are recombinational hot spots in cancer cells, has focused attention on DNA damage responses in NORs. The introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into rDNA arrays leads to a dramatic reorganization of nucleolar structure. Damaged rDNA repeats move from the nucleolar interior to form caps at the nucleolar periphery, presumably to facilitate repair, suggesting that the chromosomal context of human NORs contributes to their genomic

  18. Comparison of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae in plants from disturbed and adjacent undisturbed regions of a coastal salt marsh in Clinton, Connecticut, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, John C.; Lefor, Michael W.

    1990-01-01

    Roots of salt marsh plant species Spartina alterniflora, S. patens, Distichlis spicata, and others were examined for the presence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. Samples were taken from introduced planted material in a salt marsh restoration project and from native material in adjacent marsh areas along the Indian River, Clinton, Connecticut, USA. After ten years the replanted area still has sites devoid of vegetation. The salt marsh plants introduced there were devoid of VAM fungi, while high marsh species from the adjacent undisturbed region showed consistent infection, leading the authors to suggest that VAM fungal infection of planting stocks may be a factor in the success of marsh restoration.

  19. Selective Constraint on Noncoding Regions of Hominid Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for human evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic basis of human–chimpanzee differences. One influential idea holds that such differences depend, to a large extent, on adaptive changes in gene expression. An important step in assessing this hypothesis involves gaining a better understanding of selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes. In noncoding sequence, functional elements are frequently small and can be separated by large nonfunctional regions. For this reason, constraint in hominid genomes is likely to be patchy. Here we use conservation in more distantly related mammals and amniotes as a way of identifying small sequence windows that are likely to be functional. We find that putatively functional noncoding elements defined in this manner are subject to significant selective constraint in hominids. PMID:16362073

  20. Transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration.

    PubMed Central

    Scherdin, U; Rhodes, K; Breindl, M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the transcriptional activity of cellular target sequences for Moloney murine leukemia virus integration in mouse fibroblasts. At least five of the nine random, unselected integration target sequences studied showed direct evidence for transcriptional activity by hybridization to nuclear run-on transcripts prepared from uninfected cells. At least four of the sequences contained multiple recognition sites for several restriction enzymes that cut preferentially in CpG-rich islands, indicating integration into 5' or 3' ends or flanking regions of genes. Assuming that only a minor fraction (less than 20%) of the genome is transcribed in mammalian cells, we calculated the probability that this association of retroviral integration sites with transcribed sequences is due to chance to be very low (1.6 x 10(-2]. Thus, our results strongly suggest that transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration. Images PMID:2296087

  1. Selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes.

    PubMed

    Bush, Eliot C; Lahn, Bruce T

    2005-12-01

    An important challenge for human evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic basis of human-chimpanzee differences. One influential idea holds that such differences depend, to a large extent, on adaptive changes in gene expression. An important step in assessing this hypothesis involves gaining a better understanding of selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes. In noncoding sequence, functional elements are frequently small and can be separated by large nonfunctional regions. For this reason, constraint in hominid genomes is likely to be patchy. Here we use conservation in more distantly related mammals and amniotes as a way of identifying small sequence windows that are likely to be functional. We find that putatively functional noncoding elements defined in this manner are subject to significant selective constraint in hominids.

  2. Correlation between Focal Nodular Low Signal Changes in Hoffa's Fat Pad Adjacent to Anterior Femoral Cartilage and Focal Cartilage Defect Underlying This Region and Its Possible Implication

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigates the association between focal nodular mass with low signal in Hoffa's fat pad adjacent to anterior femoral cartilage of the knee (FNMHF) and focal cartilage abnormality in this region. Method. The magnetic resonance fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence (MR FIESTA) sagittal and axial images of the B1 and C1 region (described later) of 148 patients were independently evaluated by two reviewers and categorized into four categories: normal, FNMHF with underlying focal cartilage abnormality, FNMHF with normal cartilage, and cartilage abnormality with no FNMHF. Results. There was a significant association (p = 0.00) between FNMHF and immediate adjacent focal cartilage abnormality with high interobserver agreement. The absence of focal nodular lesions next to the anterior femoral cartilage has a very high negative predictive value for chondral injury (97.8%). Synovial biopsy of focal nodular lesion done during arthroscopy revealed some fibrocollagenous tissue and no inflammatory cells. Conclusion. We postulate that the FNMHF adjacent to the cartilage defects is a form of normal healing response to the cartilage damage. One patient with FHMHF and underlying cartilage abnormality was rescanned six months later. In this patient, the FNMHF disappeared and normal cartilage was observed in the adjacent region which may support this theory. PMID:27213085

  3. New Target Regions for Human Hypertension via Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Monika; Kwitek-Black, Anne E.; Cowley, Allen W.; Harris, Eugenie L.; Harrap, Stephen B.; Krieger, José E.; Printz, Morton P.; Provoost, Abraham P.; Sassard, Jean; Jacob, Howard J.

    2000-01-01

    Models of human disease have long been used to understand the basic pathophysiology of disease and to facilitate the discovery of new therapeutics. However, as long as models have been used there have been debates about the utility of these models and their ability to mimic clinical disease at the phenotypic level. The application of genetic studies to both humans and model systems allows for a new paradigm, whereby a novel comparative genomics strategy combined with phenotypic correlates can be used to bridge between clinical relevance and model utility. This study presents a comparative genomic map for “candidate hypertension loci in humans” based on translating QTLs between rat and human, predicting 26 chromosomal regions in the human genome that are very likely to harbor hypertension genes. The predictive power appears robust, as several of these regions have also been implicated in mouse, suggesting that these regions represent primary targets for the development of SNPs for linkage disequilibrium testing in humans and/or provide a means to select specific models for additional functional studies and the development of new therapeutics. PMID:10779487

  4. Variants in Adjacent Oxytocin/Vasopressin Gene Region and Associations with ASD Diagnosis and Other Autism Related Endophenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Sunday M.; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Yan, Zhongyu; Guter, Stephen; Cook, Edwin H.; Jacob, Suma

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been increasing interest in oxytocin (peptide: OT, gene: OXT) as a treatment pathway for neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Neurodevelopmental disorders affect functional, social, and intellectual abilities. With advances in molecular biology, research has connected multiple gene regions to the clinical presentation of ASD. Studies have also shown that the neuropeptide hormones OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP) influence mammalian social and territorial behaviors and may have treatment potential for neurodevelopmental disorders. Published data examining molecular and phenotypic variation in ASD, such as cognitive abilities, are limited. Since most studies have focused on the receptors in the OT-AVP system, we investigated genetic variation within peptide genes for association with phenotypic ASD features that help identify subgroups within the spectrum. Methods: In this study, TDT analysis was carried out utilizing FBAT in 207 probands (156 trios) and a European Ancestry (EA) subsample (108 trios).The evolutionarily related and adjacent genes of OXT and AVP were studied for associations between the tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms and ASD diagnosis, social abilities, restrictive and repetitive behaviors, and IQ for cognitive abilities. Additionally, relationships with whole blood serotonin (WB5HT) were explored because of the developmental relationships connecting plasma levels of OT and WB5HT within ASD. Results: Results indicate significant association between OXT rs6084258 (p = 0.001) and ASD. Associations with several endophenotypes were also noted: OXT rs6133010 was associated with IQ (full scale IQ, p = 0.008; nonverbal IQ, p = 0.010, verbal IQ, p = 0.006); and OXT rs4813625 and OXT rs877172 were associated with WB5HT levels (EA, p = 0.027 and p = 0.033, respectively). Additionally, we measured plasma OT (pOT) levels in a subsample (N = 54). Results show the three polymorphisms, OXT rs6084258, OXT

  5. The structure of the human tRNALys3 anticodon bound to the HIV genome is stabilized by modified nucleosides and adjacent mismatch base pairs.

    PubMed

    Bilbille, Yann; Vendeix, Franck A P; Guenther, Richard; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Ariza, Xavier; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Agris, Paul F

    2009-06-01

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) requires base pairing of the reverse transcriptase primer, human tRNA(Lys3), to the viral RNA. Although the major complementary base pairing occurs between the HIV primer binding sequence (PBS) and the tRNA's 3'-terminus, an important discriminatory, secondary contact occurs between the viral A-rich Loop I, 5'-adjacent to the PBS, and the modified, U-rich anticodon domain of tRNA(Lys3). The importance of individual and combined anticodon modifications to the tRNA/HIV-1 Loop I RNA's interaction was determined. The thermal stabilities of variously modified tRNA anticodon region sequences bound to the Loop I of viral sub(sero)types G and B were analyzed and the structure of one duplex containing two modified nucleosides was determined using NMR spectroscopy and restrained molecular dynamics. The modifications 2-thiouridine, s(2)U(34), and pseudouridine, Psi(39), appreciably stabilized the interaction of the anticodon region with the viral subtype G and B RNAs. The structure of the duplex results in two coaxially stacked A-form RNA stems separated by two mismatched base pairs, U(162)*Psi(39) and G(163)*A(38), that maintained a reasonable A-form helix diameter. The tRNA's s(2)U(34) stabilized the interaction between the A-rich HIV Loop I sequence and the U-rich anticodon, whereas the tRNA's Psi(39) stabilized the adjacent mismatched pairs.

  6. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Genome-Wide Analysis in Brazilians Reveals Highly Differentiated Native American Genome Regions.

    PubMed

    Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Havt, Alexandre; Nayak, Uma; Pinkerton, Relana; Farber, Emily; Concannon, Patrick; Lima, Aldo A; Guerrant, Richard L

    2017-03-01

    Despite its population, geographic size, and emerging economic importance, disproportionately little genome-scale research exists into genetic factors that predispose Brazilians to disease, or the population genetics of risk. After identification of suitable proxy populations and careful analysis of tri-continental admixture in 1,538 North-Eastern Brazilians to estimate individual ancestry and ancestral allele frequencies, we computed 400,000 genome-wide locus-specific branch length (LSBL) Fst statistics of Brazilian Amerindian ancestry compared to European and African; and a similar set of differentiation statistics for their Amerindian component compared with the closest Asian 1000 Genomes population (surprisingly, Bengalis in Bangladesh). After ranking SNPs by these statistics, we identified the top 10 highly differentiated SNPs in five genome regions in the LSBL tests of Brazilian Amerindian ancestry compared to European and African; and the top 10 SNPs in eight regions comparing their Amerindian component to the closest Asian 1000 Genomes population. We found SNPs within or proximal to the genes CIITA (rs6498115), SMC6 (rs1834619), and KLHL29 (rs2288697) were most differentiated in the Amerindian-specific branch, while SNPs in the genes ADAMTS9 (rs7631391), DOCK2 (rs77594147), SLC28A1 (rs28649017), ARHGAP5 (rs7151991), and CIITA (rs45601437) were most highly differentiated in the Asian comparison. These genes are known to influence immune function, metabolic and anthropometry traits, and embryonic development. These analyses have identified candidate genes for selection within Amerindian ancestry, and by comparison of the two analyses, those for which the differentiation may have arisen during the migration from Asia to the Americas.

  8. Admixture mapping identifies introgressed genomic regions in North American canids.

    PubMed

    vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Kays, Roland; Pollinger, John P; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones typically contain novel gene combinations that can be tested by natural selection in a unique genetic context. Parental haplotypes that increase fitness can introgress beyond the hybrid zone, into the range of parental species. We used the Affymetrix canine SNP genotyping array to identify genomic regions tagged by multiple ancestry informative markers that are more frequent in an admixed population than expected. We surveyed a hybrid zone formed in the last 100 years as coyotes expanded their range into eastern North America. Concomitant with expansion, coyotes hybridized with wolves and some populations became more wolflike, such that coyotes in the northeast have the largest body size of any coyote population. Using a set of 3102 ancestry informative markers, we identified 60 differentially introgressed regions in 44 canines across this admixture zone. These regions are characterized by an excess of exogenous ancestry and, in northeastern coyotes, are enriched for genes affecting body size and skeletal proportions. Further, introgressed wolf-derived alleles have penetrated into Southern US coyote populations. Because no wolves currently exist in this area, these alleles are unlikely to have originated from recent hybridization. Instead, they probably originated from intraspecific gene flow or ancient admixture. We show that grey wolf and coyote admixture has far-reaching effects and, in addition to phenotypically transforming admixed populations, allows for the differential movement of alleles from different parental species to be tested in new genomic backgrounds.

  9. The Human OligoGenome Resource: a database of oligonucleotide capture probes for resequencing target regions across the human genome.

    PubMed

    Newburger, Daniel E; Natsoulis, Georges; Grimes, Sue; Bell, John M; Davis, Ronald W; Batzoglou, Serafim; Ji, Hanlee P

    2012-01-01

    Recent exponential growth in the throughput of next-generation DNA sequencing platforms has dramatically spurred the use of accessible and scalable targeted resequencing approaches. This includes candidate region diagnostic resequencing and novel variant validation from whole genome or exome sequencing analysis. We have previously demonstrated that selective genomic circularization is a robust in-solution approach for capturing and resequencing thousands of target human genome loci such as exons and regulatory sequences. To facilitate the design and production of customized capture assays for any given region in the human genome, we developed the Human OligoGenome Resource (http://oligogenome.stanford.edu/). This online database contains over 21 million capture oligonucleotide sequences. It enables one to create customized and highly multiplexed resequencing assays of target regions across the human genome and is not restricted to coding regions. In total, this resource provides 92.1% in silico coverage of the human genome. The online server allows researchers to download a complete repository of oligonucleotide probes and design customized capture assays to target multiple regions throughout the human genome. The website has query tools for selecting and evaluating capture oligonucleotides from specified genomic regions.

  10. Detailed comparative map of human chromosome 19q and related regions of the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, L; Carver, E A; Shannon, M E; Kim, J; Geisler, J; Generoso, E E; Stanford, B G; Dunn, W C; Mohrenweiser, H; Zimmermann, W; Watt, S M; Ashworth, L K

    1996-08-01

    One of the larger contiguous blocks of mouse-human genomic homology includes the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 7 and the long arm of human chromosome 19. Previous studies have demonstrated the close relationship between the two regions, but have also indicated significant rearrangements in the relative orders of homologous mouse and human genes. Here we present the genetic locations of the homologs of 42 human chromosome 19q markers in the mouse, with an emphasis on genes also included in the human chromosome 19 physical map. Our results demonstrate that despite an overall inversion of sequences relative to the centromere, apparent "transpositions" of three gene-rich segments, and a local inversion of markers mapping near the 19q telomere, gene content, order, and spacing are remarkably well conserved throughout the lengths of these related mouse and human regions. Although most human 19q markers have remained genetically linked in mouse, one small human segment forms a separate region of homology between human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 17. Three of the four rearrangements of mouse versus human 19q sequences involve segments that are located directly adjacent to each other in 19q13.3-q13.4, suggesting either the coincident occurrence of these events or their common association with unstable DNA sequences. These data permit an unusually in-depth examination of this large region of mouse-human genomic homology and provide an important new tool to aid in the mapping of genes and associated phenotypes in both species.

  11. Domestication footprints anchor genomic regions of agronomic importance in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingpeng; Zhao, Xue; Liu, Dongyuan; Li, Yinghui; Lightfoot, David A; Yang, Zhijiang; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhikun; Huang, Long; Zhang, Zhiwu; Qiu, Lijuan; Zheng, Hongkun; Li, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Present-day soybeans consist of elite cultivars and landraces (Glycine max, fully domesticated (FD)), annual wild type (Glycine soja, nondomesticated (ND)), and semi-wild type (semi-domesticated (SD)). FD soybean originated in China, although the details of its domestication history remain obscure. More than 500 diverse soybean accessions were sequenced using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) to address fundamental questions regarding soybean domestication. In total, 64,141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequencies (MAFs) > 0.05 were found among the 512 tested accessions. The results indicated that the SD group is not a hybrid between the FD and ND groups. The initial domestication region was pinpointed to central China (demarcated by the Great Wall to the north and the Qinling Mountains to the south). A total of 800 highly differentiated genetic regions and > 140 selective sweeps were identified, and these were three- and twofold more likely, respectively, to encompass a known quantitative trait locus (QTL) than the rest of the soybean genome. Forty-three potential quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs; including 15 distinct traits) were identified by genome-wide association mapping. The results of the present study should be beneficial for soybean improvement and provide insight into the genetic architecture of traits of agronomic importance.

  12. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome-wide expression during mid-exponential growth on rich (LB) and minimal (M9) medium. The identified TARs account for 77.3% of the genes as they are currently annotated and additionally we find 84 putative non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and 127 antisense transcripts. One ncRNA, ncr22, is predicted to act as a translational control on cstA and an antisense transcript was observed opposite the housekeeping sigma factor sigA. Through this work we have discovered a long conserved 3′ untranslated region (UTR) in a group of membrane-associated genes that is predicted to fold into a large and highly stable secondary structure. One of the genes having this tail is efeN, which encodes a target of the twin-arginine translocase (Tat) protein translocation system. PMID:19682248

  13. Contribution of the upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea to the heavy metal pollution in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Yin, Su; Wu, Yuehan; Xu, Wei; Li, Yangyang; Shen, Zhenyao; Feng, Chenghong

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether the discharge control of heavy metals in the Yangtze River basin can significantly change the pollution level in the estuary, this study analyzed the sources (upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea) of ten heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn) in dissolved and particulate phases in the surface water of the estuary during wet, normal, and dry seasons. Metal sources inferred from section fluxes agree with those in statistical analysis methods. Heavy metal pollution in the surface water of Yangtze Estuary primarily depends on the sediment suspension and the wastewater discharge from estuary cities. Upper river only constitutes the main source of dissolved heavy metals during the wet season, while the estuarine region and the adjacent sea (especially the former) dominate the dissolved metal pollution in the normal and dry seasons. Particulate metals are mainly derived from sediment suspension in the estuary and the adjacent sea, and the contribution of the upper river can be neglected. Compared with the hydrologic seasons, flood-ebb tides exert a more obvious effect on the water flow directions in the estuary. Sediment suspension, not the upper river, significantly affects the suspended particulate matter concentration in the estuary.

  14. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  15. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, S. J.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Within the Northern Basin and Range Province, USA, we estimate horizontal velocities for 405 sites using Global Positioning System (GPS) phase data collected from 1994 to 2010. The velocities, together with geologic, volcanic, and earthquake data, reveal a slowly deforming region within the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau in Oregon separated from the actively extending adjacent Basin and Range regions by shear. Our results show a NE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.6 ± 0.7 × 10-9 yr-1 in the Centennial Tectonic Belt and an ˜E-oriented extensional strain rate of 3.5 ± 0.2 × 10-9 yr-1 in the Great Basin. These extensional rates contrast with the very low strain rate within the 125 km × 650 km region of the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, which is indistinguishable from zero (-0.1 ± 0.4 × 10-9 yr-1). Inversions of the velocities with dyke-opening models indicate that rapid extension by dyke intrusion in volcanic rift zones, as previously hypothesized, is not currently occurring in the Snake River Plain. This slow internal deformation, in contrast to the rapidly extending adjacent Basin and Range regions, indicates shear along the boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.3-1.4 mm yr-1 along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic Belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm yr-1 along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic Belt. The fastest lateral shearing evident in the GPS occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic Belt, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and eastern Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is not locally driven by Yellowstone hotspot volcanism, but instead by extension to the

  16. TFM-Explorer: mining cis-regulatory regions in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tonon, Laurie; Varré, Jean-Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in transcription regulation, and computational approaches that help in elucidating complex mechanisms governing this basic biological process are of great use. In this perspective, we present the TFM-Explorer web server that is a toolbox to identify putative TF binding sites within a set of upstream regulatory sequences of genes sharing some regulatory mechanisms. TFM-Explorer finds local regions showing overrepresentation of binding sites. Accepted organisms are human, mouse, rat, chicken and drosophila. The server employs a number of features to help users to analyze their data: visualization of selected binding sites on genomic sequences, and selection of cis-regulatory modules. TFM-Explorer is available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/TFM. PMID:20522509

  17. The mantle transition zone beneath the Afar Depression and adjacent regions: implications for mantle plumes and hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Gao, S. S.; Liu, K. H.; Yu, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Afar Depression and its adjacent areas are underlain by an upper mantle marked by some of the world's largest negative velocity anomalies, which are frequently attributed to the thermal influences of a lower-mantle plume. In spite of numerous studies, however, the existence of a plume beneath the area remains enigmatic, partially due to inadequate quantities of broad-band seismic data and the limited vertical resolution at the mantle transition zone (MTZ) depth of the techniques employed by previous investigations. In this study, we use an unprecedented quantity (over 14 500) of P-to-S receiver functions (RFs) recorded by 139 stations from 12 networks to image the 410 and 660 km discontinuities and map the spatial variation of the thickness of the MTZ. Non-linear stacking of the RFs under a 1-D velocity model shows robust P-to-S conversions from both discontinuities, and their apparent depths indicate the presence of an upper-mantle low-velocity zone beneath the entire study area. The Afar Depression and the northern Main Ethiopian Rift are characterized by an apparent 40-60 km depression of both MTZ discontinuities and a normal MTZ thickness. The simplest and most probable interpretation of these observations is that the apparent depressions are solely caused by velocity perturbations in the upper mantle and not by deeper processes causing temperature or hydration anomalies within the MTZ. Thickening of the MTZ on the order of 15 km beneath the southern Arabian Plate, southern Red Sea and western Gulf of Aden, which comprise the southward extension of the Afro-Arabian Dome, could reflect long-term hydration of the MTZ. A 20 km thinning of the MTZ beneath the western Ethiopian Plateau is observed and interpreted as evidence for a possible mantle plume stem originating from the lower mantle.

  18. High-Throughput resequencing of maize landraces at genomic regions associated with flowering time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the reduction in the price of sequencing, it remains expensive to sequence and assemble whole, complex genomes of multiple samples for population studies, particularly for large genomes like those of many crop species. Enrichment of target genome regions coupled with next generation sequenci...

  19. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Eun-Heui; Zhang, Enji; Ko, Youngkwon; Sim, Woo Seog; Moon, Dong Eon; Yoon, Keon Jung; Hong, Jang Hee; Lee, Won Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II) and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05). Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP), l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10−4). The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression. PMID:24244504

  20. On the tectonic problems of the southern East China Sea and adjacent regions: Evidence from gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Luning; Zhang, Xunhua; Han, Bo; Du, Runlin

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, two sets of gravity and magnetic data were used to study the tectonics of the southern East China Sea and Ryukyu trench-arc system: one data set was from the `Geological-geophysical map series of China Seas and adjacent areas' database and the other was newly collected by R/V Kexue III in 2011. Magnetic and gravity data were reorganized and processed using the software MMDP, MGDP and RGIS. In addition to the description of the anomaly patterns in different areas, deep and shallow structure studies were performed by using several kinds of calculation, including a spectrum analysis, upward-continuation of the Bouguer anomaly and horizontal derivatives of the total-field magnetic anomaly. The depth of the Moho and magnetic basement were calculated. Based on the above work, several controversial tectonic problems were discussed. Compared to the shelf area and Ryukyu Arc, the Okinawa Trough has an obviously thinned crust, with the thinnest area having thickness less than 14 km in the southern part. The Taiwan-Sinzi belt, which terminates to the south by the NW-SE trending Miyako fault belt, contains the relic volcanic arc formed by the splitting of the paleo Ryukyu volcanic arc as a result of the opening of the Okinawa Trough. As an important tectonic boundary, the strike-slip type Miyako fault belt extends northwestward into the shelf area and consists of several discontinuous segments. A forearc terrace composed of an exotic terrane collided with the Ryukyu Arc following the subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate. Mesozoic strata of varying thicknesses exist beneath the Cenozoic strata in the shelf basin and significantly influence the magnetic pattern of this area. The gravity and magnetic data support the existence of a Great East China Sea, which suggests that the entire southern East China Sea shelf area was a basin in the Mesozoic without alternatively arranged uplifts and depressions, and might have extended southwestward and connected with the

  1. Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

  2. Evidence of low density sub-crustal underplating beneath western continental region of India and adjacent Arabian Sea: Geodynamical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, O. P.; Agrawal, P. K.; Negi, J. G.

    1996-07-01

    The known high mobility of the Indian subcontinent during the period from 80 to 53 Ma has evoked considerable interest in recent times. It appears to have played an important role in shaping the subcontinental structures of western India and the adjoining Arabian Sea. During this period, a major catastrophic event took place in the form of Deccan volcanism, which coincides with the biological mass extinction at the K-T boundary, including the death of dinosaurs. The origin of Deccan volcanism is still being debated. Geophysically, western India and its offshore regions exhibit numerous prominent anomalies which testify to the abnormal nature of the underlying crust-lithosphere. In this work, we develop a two-dimensional structural model of these areas along two long profiles extending from the eastern basin of the Arabian Sea to about 1000 km inland. The model, derived from the available gravity data in the oceanic and continental regions, is constrained by seismic and other relevant information in the area, and suggests, for the first time, the presence of an extensive low-density (2.95-3.05 g/cm 3) sub-crustal underplating. Such a layer is found to occur between depths of 11 and 20 km in the eastern basin of the Arabian Sea, and betweeen 45 and 60 km in the continental region where it is sandwiched in the lower lithosphere. The low density may have been caused as a result of serpentinization or fractionation of magma by a process related in some way to the Deccan volcanic event. Substantial depletion of both oceanic and continental lithosphere is indicated. We hypothesize that the present anatomy of the deformed lithosphere of the region at the K-T boundary is the result of substantial melt generated owing to frictional heat possibly giving rise to a hot cell like condition at the base of the lithosphere, resulting from the rapid movement of the Indian subcontinent between 80 and 53 Ma.

  3. Crustal structure beneath Liaoning province and the Bohai Sea and its adjacent region in China based on ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Guang-hua; Feng, Ji-Kun; Lin, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The velocity structure of the crust beneath Liaoning province and the Bohai sea in China was imaged using ambient seismic noise recorded by 73 regional broadband stations. All available three-component time series from the 12-month span between January and December 2013 were cross-correlated to yield empirical Green's functions for Rayleigh and Love waves. Phase-velocity dispersion curves for the Rayleigh waves and the Love waves were measured by applying the frequency-time analysis method. Dispersion measurements of the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave were then utilized to construct 2D phase-velocity maps for the Rayleigh wave at 8-35 s periods and the Love wave at 9-32 s periods, respectively. Both Rayleigh and Love phase-velocity maps show significant lateral variations that are correlated well with known geological features and tectonics units in the study region. Next, phase dispersion curves of the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave extracted from each cell of the 2D Rayleigh wave and Love wave phase-velocity maps, respectively, were inverted simultaneously to determine the 3D shear wave velocity structures. The horizontal shear wave velocity images clearly and intuitively exhibit that the earthquake swarms in the Haicheng region and the Tangshan region are mainly clustered in the transition zone between the low- and high-velocity zones in the upper crust, coinciding with fault zones, and their distribution is very closely associated with these faults. The vertical shear wave velocity image reveals that the lower crust downward to the uppermost mantle is featured by distinctly high velocities, with even a high-velocity thinner layer existing at the bottom of the lower crust near Moho in central and northern the Bohai sea along the Tanlu fault, and these phenomena could be caused by the intrusion of mantle material, indicating the Tanlu fault could be just as the uprising channel of deep materials.

  4. MHC class I–associated peptides derive from selective regions of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Hillary; Granados, Diana Paola; Durette, Chantal; Bonneil, Eric; Courcelles, Mathieu; Rodenbrock, Anja; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Caroline; Thibault, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    MHC class I–associated peptides (MAPs) define the immune self for CD8+ T lymphocytes and are key targets of cancer immunosurveillance. Here, the goals of our work were to determine whether the entire set of protein-coding genes could generate MAPs and whether specific features influence the ability of discrete genes to generate MAPs. Using proteogenomics, we have identified 25,270 MAPs isolated from the B lymphocytes of 18 individuals who collectively expressed 27 high-frequency HLA-A,B allotypes. The entire MAP repertoire presented by these 27 allotypes covered only 10% of the exomic sequences expressed in B lymphocytes. Indeed, 41% of expressed protein-coding genes generated no MAPs, while 59% of genes generated up to 64 MAPs, often derived from adjacent regions and presented by different allotypes. We next identified several features of transcripts and proteins associated with efficient MAP production. From these data, we built a logistic regression model that predicts with good accuracy whether a gene generates MAPs. Our results show preferential selection of MAPs from a limited repertoire of proteins with distinctive features. The notion that the MHC class I immunopeptidome presents only a small fraction of the protein-coding genome for monitoring by the immune system has profound implications in autoimmunity and cancer immunology. PMID:27841757

  5. Density and magnetic suseptibility values for rocks in the Talkeetna Mountains and adjacent region, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanger, Elizabeth A.; Glen, Jonathan M.G.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a compilation and statistical analysis of 306 density and 706 magnetic susceptibility measurements of rocks from south-central Alaska that were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS) scientists between the summers of 1999 and 2002. This work is a product of the USGS Talkeetna Mountains Transect Project and was supported by USGS projects in the Talkeetna Mountains and Iron Creek region, and by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) projects in the Delta River Mining District that aim to characterize the subsurface structures of the region. These data were collected to constrain potential field models (i.e., gravity and magnetic) that are combined with other geophysical methods to identify and model major faults, terrane boundaries, and potential mineral resources of the study area. Because gravity and magnetic field anomalies reflect variations in the density and magnetic susceptibility of the underlying lithology, these rock properties are essential components of potential field modeling. In general, the average grain density of rocks in the study region increases from sedimentary, felsic, and intermediate igneous rocks, to mafic igneous and metamorphic rocks. Magnetic susceptibility measurements performed on rock outcrops and hand samples from the study area also reveal lower magnetic susceptibilities for sedimentary and felsic intrusive rocks, moderate susceptibility values for metamorphic, felsic extrusive, and intermediate igneous rocks, and higher susceptibility values for mafic igneous rocks. The density and magnetic properties of rocks in the study area are generally consistent with general trends expected for certain rock types.

  6. Phylogeny Inference of Closely Related Bacterial Genomes: Combining the Features of Both Overlapping Genes and Collinear Genomic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Cong; Lin, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Overlapping genes (OGs) represent one type of widespread genomic feature in bacterial genomes and have been used as rare genomic markers in phylogeny inference of closely related bacterial species. However, the inference may experience a decrease in performance for phylogenomic analysis of too closely or too distantly related genomes. Another drawback of OGs as phylogenetic markers is that they usually take little account of the effects of genomic rearrangement on the similarity estimation, such as intra-chromosome/genome translocations, horizontal gene transfer, and gene losses. To explore such effects on the accuracy of phylogeny reconstruction, we combine phylogenetic signals of OGs with collinear genomic regions, here called locally collinear blocks (LCBs). By putting these together, we refine our previous metric of pairwise similarity between two closely related bacterial genomes. As a case study, we used this new method to reconstruct the phylogenies of 88 Enterobacteriale genomes of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Our results demonstrated that the topological accuracy of the inferred phylogeny was improved when both OGs and LCBs were simultaneously considered, suggesting that combining these two phylogenetic markers may reduce, to some extent, the influence of gene loss on phylogeny inference. Such phylogenomic studies, we believe, will help us to explore a more effective approach to increasing the robustness of phylogeny reconstruction of closely related bacterial organisms. PMID:26715828

  7. Augmenting Chinese hamster genome assembly by identifying regions of high confidence.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Nandita; Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Fu, Hsu-Yuan; Sharma, Mohit; Johnson, Kathryn C; Mudge, Joann; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Onsongo, Getiria; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Jacob, Nitya M; Le, Huong; Karypis, George; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines are the dominant industrial workhorses for therapeutic recombinant protein production. The availability of genome sequence of Chinese hamster and CHO cells will spur further genome and RNA sequencing of producing cell lines. However, the mammalian genomes assembled using shot-gun sequencing data still contain regions of uncertain quality due to assembly errors. Identifying high confidence regions in the assembled genome will facilitate its use for cell engineering and genome engineering. We assembled two independent drafts of Chinese hamster genome by de novo assembly from shotgun sequencing reads and by re-scaffolding and gap-filling the draft genome from NCBI for improved scaffold lengths and gap fractions. We then used the two independent assemblies to identify high confidence regions using two different approaches. First, the two independent assemblies were compared at the sequence level to identify their consensus regions as "high confidence regions" which accounts for at least 78 % of the assembled genome. Further, a genome wide comparison of the Chinese hamster scaffolds with mouse chromosomes revealed scaffolds with large blocks of collinearity, which were also compiled as high-quality scaffolds. Genome scale collinearity was complemented with EST based synteny which also revealed conserved gene order compared to mouse. As cell line sequencing becomes more commonly practiced, the approaches reported here are useful for assessing the quality of assembly and potentially facilitate the engineering of cell lines.

  8. Comprehensive Repertoire of Foldable Regions within Whole Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Guilhem; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    In order to get a comprehensive repertoire of foldable domains within whole proteomes, including orphan domains, we developed a novel procedure, called SEG-HCA. From only the information of a single amino acid sequence, SEG-HCA automatically delineates segments possessing high densities in hydrophobic clusters, as defined by Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA). These hydrophobic clusters mainly correspond to regular secondary structures, which together form structured or foldable regions. Genome-wide analyses revealed that SEG-HCA is opposite of disorder predictors, both addressing distinct structural states. Interestingly, there is however an overlap between the two predictions, including small segments of disordered sequences, which undergo coupled folding and binding. SEG-HCA thus gives access to these specific domains, which are generally poorly represented in domain databases. Comparison of the whole set of SEG-HCA predictions with the Conserved Domain Database (CDD) also highlighted a wide proportion of predicted large (length >50 amino acids) segments, which are CDD orphan. These orphan sequences may either correspond to highly divergent members of already known families or belong to new families of domains. Their comprehensive description thus opens new avenues to investigate new functional and/or structural features, which remained so far uncovered. Altogether, the data described here provide new insights into the protein architecture and organization throughout the three kingdoms of life. PMID:24204229

  9. Genome assemblies for 11 Yersinia pestis strains isolated in the Caucasus region

    DOE PAGES

    Zhgenti, Ekaterine; Johnson, Shannon L.; Davenport, Karen W.; ...

    2015-09-17

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to the Caucasus region but few reference strain genome sequences from that region are available. We present the improved draft or finished assembled genomes from 11 strains isolated in the nation of Georgia and surrounding countries.

  10. Genome assemblies for 11 Yersinia pestis strains isolated in the Caucasus region

    SciTech Connect

    Zhgenti, Ekaterine; Johnson, Shannon L.; Davenport, Karen W.; Chanturia, Gvantsa; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Chain, Patrick S.; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.

    2015-09-17

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is endemic to the Caucasus region but few reference strain genome sequences from that region are available. We present the improved draft or finished assembled genomes from 11 strains isolated in the nation of Georgia and surrounding countries.

  11. Multi-Scale Interactions Associated with the Monsoon Onset Over South China Sea and Adjacent Regions during SCSMEX-98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Li, X.; Wu, H.-T.

    1999-01-01

    Using data collected during The South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) (1998) as well as from the TRMM Microwave-Imager (TMI) and precipitation radar (PR), we have studied the multi-scale interactions (meso-synoptic-intraseasonal) associated with monsoon onset over South China Sea (SCS) and its subsequent evolution. Results show that the monsoon onset (defined by development of steady wind direction and heavy precipitation) over the northern SCS occurred around May 15 -17. Prevailing southerlies and southwesterlies developed over the central SCS after May 20. Shortly after, monsoon convection developed over the whole SCS region around May 23-27. The entire onset process appeared to be delayed by about a week to 10 days compared with climatology. During late spring of 1998, mid-latitude frontal systems were particularly active. These systems strongly impacted the northern SCS convection and may have been instrumental in triggering the onset of the SCS monsoon. The Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) and Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) radar showed a wide variety of convective systems over the Intensive Flux Array, from frontal bands to shear-banded structure, deep convection, pop-corn type shallow convection, slow moving "fine lines" to water spout. Analysis of SSM/I wind and moisture data suggested that the delayed convective activity over the SCS may be linked to the weakened northward propagation of monsoon rain band, hence contributing to a persistence of the rainband south of the Yangtze River and the disastrous flood that occurred over this region during mid to late June, 1998.

  12. Seismic structure beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and adjacent areas based on the tomographic inversion of regional earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khrepy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan; Al-Arifi, Nassir; Petrunin, Alexey G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first 3-D model of seismic P and S velocities in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Gulf of Aqaba and surrounding areas based on the results of passive travel time tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed based on travel time data from ˜ 9000 regional earthquakes provided by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN), and this was complemented with data from the International Seismological Centre (ISC). The resulting P and S velocity patterns were generally consistent with each other at all depths. Beneath the northern part of the Red Sea, we observed a strong high-velocity anomaly with abrupt limits that coincide with the coastal lines. This finding may indicate the oceanic nature of the crust in the Red Sea, and it does not support the concept of gradual stretching of the continental crust. According to our results, in the middle and lower crust, the seismic anomalies beneath the Gulf of Aqaba seem to delineate a sinistral shift (˜ 100 km) in the opposite flanks of the fault zone, which is consistent with other estimates of the left-lateral displacement in the southern part of the Dead Sea Transform fault. However, no displacement structures were visible in the uppermost lithospheric mantle.

  13. Genetic Structure and Evolutionary History of Three Alpine Sclerophyllous Oaks in East Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Li; Zheng, Qi-Jian; Qian, Zeng-Qiang; Yang, Jia; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhong-Hu; Zhao, Gui-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The East Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains (EH-HM) region has a high biodiversity and harbors numerous endemic alpine plants. This is probably the result of combined orographic and climate oscillations occurring since late Tertiary. Here, we determined the genetic structure and evolutionary history of alpine oak species (including Quercus spinosa, Quercus aquifolioides, and Quercus rehderiana) using both cytoplasmic-nuclear markers and ecological niche models (ENMs), and elucidated the impacts of climate oscillations and environmental heterogeneity on their population demography. Our results indicate there were mixed genetic structure and asymmetric contemporary gene flow within them. The ENMs revealed a similar demographic history for the three species expanded their ranges from the last interglacial (LIG) to the last glacial maximum (LGM), which was consistent with effective population sizes changes. Effects of genetic drift and fragmentation of habitats were responsible for the high differentiation and the lack of phylogeographic structure. Our results support that geological and climatic factors since Miocene triggered the differentiation, evolutionary origin and range shifts of the three oak species in the studied area and also emphasize that a multidisciplinary approach combining molecular markers, ENMs and population genetics can yield deep insights into diversification and evolutionary dynamics of species. PMID:27891142

  14. Genetic Structure and Evolutionary History of Three Alpine Sclerophyllous Oaks in East Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains and Adjacent Regions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Zheng, Qi-Jian; Qian, Zeng-Qiang; Yang, Jia; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Zhong-Hu; Zhao, Gui-Fang

    2016-01-01

    The East Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains (EH-HM) region has a high biodiversity and harbors numerous endemic alpine plants. This is probably the result of combined orographic and climate oscillations occurring since late Tertiary. Here, we determined the genetic structure and evolutionary history of alpine oak species (including Quercus spinosa, Quercus aquifolioides, and Quercus rehderiana) using both cytoplasmic-nuclear markers and ecological niche models (ENMs), and elucidated the impacts of climate oscillations and environmental heterogeneity on their population demography. Our results indicate there were mixed genetic structure and asymmetric contemporary gene flow within them. The ENMs revealed a similar demographic history for the three species expanded their ranges from the last interglacial (LIG) to the last glacial maximum (LGM), which was consistent with effective population sizes changes. Effects of genetic drift and fragmentation of habitats were responsible for the high differentiation and the lack of phylogeographic structure. Our results support that geological and climatic factors since Miocene triggered the differentiation, evolutionary origin and range shifts of the three oak species in the studied area and also emphasize that a multidisciplinary approach combining molecular markers, ENMs and population genetics can yield deep insights into diversification and evolutionary dynamics of species.

  15. Sedimentary and crustal thicknesses and Poisson's ratios for the NE Tibetan Plateau and its adjacent regions based on dense seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilai; Wu, Jianping; Fang, Lihua; Lai, Guijuan; Cai, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The sedimentary and crustal thicknesses and Poisson's ratios of the NE Tibetan Plateau and its adjacent regions are estimated by the h- κ stacking and CCP image of receiver functions from the data of 1,317 stations. The horizontal resolution of the obtained results is as high as 0.5° × 0.5°, which can be used for further high resolution model construction in the region. The crustal thicknesses from Airy's equilibrium are smaller than our results in the Sichuan Basin, Qilian tectonic belt, northern Alxa block and Qaidam Basin, which is consistent with the high densities in the mantle lithosphere and may indicate that the high-density lithosphere drags crust down overall. High Poisson's ratios and low velocity zones are found in the mid- and lower crust beneath eastern Qilian tectonic belt and the boundary areas of the Ordos block, indicating that partial melting may exist in these regions. Low Poisson's ratios and low-velocity anomalies are observed in the crust in the NE Tibetan Plateau, implying that the mafic lower crust is thinning or missing and that the mid- and lower crust does not exhibit melting or partial melting in the NE Tibetan Plateau, and weak flow layers are not likely to exist in this region.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 to determine strain-specific genomic regions and gentisate biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Madsen, Eugene L; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

    2011-10-01

    The comparative genomics of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 assayed with A. baylyi ADP1, A. calcoaceticus PHEA-2, and A. baumannii ATCC 17978 revealed that the incorporation of phage-related genomic regions and the absence of transposable elements have contributed to the large size (4.15 Mb) of the DR1 genome. A horizontally transferred genomic region and a higher proportion of transcriptional regulator- and signal peptide-coding genes were identified as characteristics of the DR1 genome. Incomplete glucose metabolism, metabolic pathways of aromatic compounds, biofilm formation, antibiotics and metal resistance, and natural competence genes were conserved in four compared genomes. Interestingly, only strain DR1 possesses gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (nagI) and grows on gentisate, whereas other species cannot. Expression of the nagI gene was upregulated during gentisate utilization, and four downstream open reading frames (ORFs) were cotranscribed, supporting the notion that gentisate metabolism is a unique characteristic of strain DR1. The genomic analysis of strain DR1 provides additional insights into the function, ecology, and evolution of Acinetobacter species.

  17. Origin of the CMS gene locus in rapeseed cybrid mitochondria: active and inactive recombination produces the complex CMS gene region in the mitochondrial genomes of Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masao; Kikuchi, Rie; Imamura, Jun; Handa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    CMS (cytoplasmic male sterile) rapeseed is produced by asymmetrical somatic cell fusion between the Brassica napus cv. Westar and the Raphanus sativus Kosena CMS line (Kosena radish). The CMS rapeseed contains a CMS gene, orf125, which is derived from Kosena radish. Our sequence analyses revealed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed originated from recombination between the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region by way of a 63 bp repeat. A precise sequence comparison among the related sequences in CMS rapeseed, Kosena radish and normal rapeseed showed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed consisted of the Kosena orf125/orfB region and the rapeseed nad1C/ccmFN1 region, even though Kosena radish had both the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region in its mitochondrial genome. We also identified three tandem repeat sequences in the regions surrounding orf125, including a 63 bp repeat, which were involved in several recombination events. Interestingly, differences in the recombination activity for each repeat sequence were observed, even though these sequences were located adjacent to each other in the mitochondrial genome. We report results indicating that recombination events within the mitochondrial genomes are regulated at the level of specific repeat sequences depending on the cellular environment.

  18. The Application of DNA Barcodes for the Identification of Marine Crustaceans from the North Sea and Adjacent Regions.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Michael J; Barco, Andrea; Steinke, Dirk; Beermann, Jan; Laakmann, Silke; Mohrbeck, Inga; Neumann, Hermann; Kihara, Terue C; Pointner, Karin; Radulovici, Adriana; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Wesse, Christina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    During the last years DNA barcoding has become a popular method of choice for molecular specimen identification. Here we present a comprehensive DNA barcode library of various crustacean taxa found in the North Sea, one of the most extensively studied marine regions of the world. Our data set includes 1,332 barcodes covering 205 species, including taxa of the Amphipoda, Copepoda, Decapoda, Isopoda, Thecostraca, and others. This dataset represents the most extensive DNA barcode library of the Crustacea in terms of species number to date. By using the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), unique BINs were identified for 198 (96.6%) of the analyzed species. Six species were characterized by two BINs (2.9%), and three BINs were found for the amphipod species Gammarus salinus Spooner, 1947 (0.4%). Intraspecific distances with values higher than 2.2% were revealed for 13 species (6.3%). Exceptionally high distances of up to 14.87% between two distinct but monophyletic clusters were found for the parasitic copepod Caligus elongatus Nordmann, 1832, supporting the results of previous studies that indicated the existence of an overlooked sea louse species. In contrast to these high distances, haplotype-sharing was observed for two decapod spider crab species, Macropodia parva Van Noort & Adema, 1985 and Macropodia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1761), underlining the need for a taxonomic revision of both species. Summarizing the results, our study confirms the application of DNA barcodes as highly effective identification system for the analyzed marine crustaceans of the North Sea and represents an important milestone for modern biodiversity assessment studies using barcode sequences.

  19. The Application of DNA Barcodes for the Identification of Marine Crustaceans from the North Sea and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Barco, Andrea; Steinke, Dirk; Beermann, Jan; Laakmann, Silke; Mohrbeck, Inga; Neumann, Hermann; Kihara, Terue C.; Pointner, Karin; Radulovici, Adriana; Segelken-Voigt, Alexandra; Wesse, Christina; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    During the last years DNA barcoding has become a popular method of choice for molecular specimen identification. Here we present a comprehensive DNA barcode library of various crustacean taxa found in the North Sea, one of the most extensively studied marine regions of the world. Our data set includes 1,332 barcodes covering 205 species, including taxa of the Amphipoda, Copepoda, Decapoda, Isopoda, Thecostraca, and others. This dataset represents the most extensive DNA barcode library of the Crustacea in terms of species number to date. By using the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD), unique BINs were identified for 198 (96.6%) of the analyzed species. Six species were characterized by two BINs (2.9%), and three BINs were found for the amphipod species Gammarus salinus Spooner, 1947 (0.4%). Intraspecific distances with values higher than 2.2% were revealed for 13 species (6.3%). Exceptionally high distances of up to 14.87% between two distinct but monophyletic clusters were found for the parasitic copepod Caligus elongatus Nordmann, 1832, supporting the results of previous studies that indicated the existence of an overlooked sea louse species. In contrast to these high distances, haplotype-sharing was observed for two decapod spider crab species, Macropodia parva Van Noort & Adema, 1985 and Macropodia rostrata (Linnaeus, 1761), underlining the need for a taxonomic revision of both species. Summarizing the results, our study confirms the application of DNA barcodes as highly effective identification system for the analyzed marine crustaceans of the North Sea and represents an important milestone for modern biodiversity assessment studies using barcode sequences. PMID:26417993

  20. Correlative anatomy for the electrophysiologist: ablation for atrial fibrillation. Part II: regional anatomy of the atria and relevance to damage of adjacent structures during AF ablation.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Paula G; Kapa, Suraj; Mears, Jennifer A; Fratianni, Amy; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2010-07-01

    Ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation have become an established and increasingly used option for managing patients with symptomatic arrhythmia. The anatomic structures relevant to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation and ablation procedures are varied and include the pulmonary veins, other thoracic veins, the left atrial myocardium, and autonomic ganglia. Exact regional anatomic knowledge of these structures is essential to allow correlation with fluoroscopy and electrograms and, importantly, to avoid complications from damage of adjacent structures within the chest. We present this information as a series of 2 articles. In a prior issue, we have discussed the thoracic vein anatomy relevant to paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the present article, we focus on the atria themselves, the autonomic ganglia, and anatomic issues relevant for minimizing complications during atrial fibrillation ablation.

  1. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  2. cDNA sequence, genomic organization, and evolutionary conservation of a novel gene from the WAGR region

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.; Eisenman, R.; Knoll, J.; Bruns, G.

    1995-09-20

    A new gene (239FB) with predominant and differential expression in fetal brain has recently been isolated from a chromosome 11p13-p14 boundary area near FSHB. The corresponding mRNA has an open reading frame of 294 amino acids, a 3` untranslated region of 1247 nucleotides, and a highly GC-rich 5` untranslated region. The coding and 3` UT sequence is specified by 6 exons within nearly 87 kb of isolated genomic locus. The 5` end region of the transcript maps adjacent to the only genomically defined CpG island in a chromosomal subregion that may be associated with part of the mental retardation of some WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) syndrome patients. In addition to nucleotide and amino acid similarity to an EST from a normalized infant brain cDNA library, the predicted protein has extensive similarity to Caenorhbditis elegans polypeptides of, as yet, unknown function. The 239FB locus is, therefore, likely part of a family of genes with two members expressed in human brain. The extensive conservation of the predicted protein suggests a fundamental function of the gene product and will enable evaluation of the role of the 239FB gene in neurogenesis in model organisms. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Database of Periodic DNA Regions in Major Genomes.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Felix E; Korotkova, Maria A; Korotkov, Eugene V

    2017-01-01

    Summary. We analyzed several prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes looking for the periodicity sequences availability and employing a new mathematical method. The method envisaged using the random position weight matrices and dynamic programming. Insertions and deletions were allowed inside periodicities, thus adding a novelty to the results we obtained. A periodicity length, one of the key periodicity features, varied from 2 to 50 nt. Totally over 60,000 periodicity sequences were found in 15 genomes including some chromosomes of the H. sapiens (partial), C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and A. thaliana genomes.

  4. Database of Periodic DNA Regions in Major Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Summary. We analyzed several prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes looking for the periodicity sequences availability and employing a new mathematical method. The method envisaged using the random position weight matrices and dynamic programming. Insertions and deletions were allowed inside periodicities, thus adding a novelty to the results we obtained. A periodicity length, one of the key periodicity features, varied from 2 to 50 nt. Totally over 60,000 periodicity sequences were found in 15 genomes including some chromosomes of the H. sapiens (partial), C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and A. thaliana genomes. PMID:28182099

  5. Characterization of strong polar mutations in a region immediately adjacent to the L-arabinose operator in Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Eleuterio, M; Griffin, B; Sheppard, D E

    1972-08-01

    Seven l-arabinose-negative mutations are described that map in three genetically distinct regions immediately adjacent to the araO (operator) region of the l-arabinose operon. All seven mutants revert spontaneously, exhibit a cis-dominant, trans-recessive polarity effect upon the expression of l-arabinose isomerase (gene araA), and fail to respond to amber, ochre, or UGA suppressors. Three of these mutants exhibit absolute polarity and are not reverted by the mutangens 2-aminopurine, diethyl sulfate, and ICR-191. These may have arisen as a consequence of an insertion mutation in gene araB or in the initiator region of the l-arabinose operon. The four remaining mutants exhibit strong but not absolute polarity on gene araA and respond to the mutagens diethyl sulfate and ICR-191. Three of these mutants are suppressible by two independently isolated suppressors that fail to suppress known nonsense codons. Partially polar Ara(+) revertants with lesions linked to ara are obtained from three of the same four mutants. These polar mutants, their external suppressors, and their partially polar revertants are discussed in terms of the mechanism of initiation of expression of the l-arabinose operon.

  6. Annotation of the Protein Coding Regions of the Equine Genome.

    PubMed

    Hestand, Matthew S; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S; Coleman, Stephen J; Zeng, Zheng; Liu, Jinze; Orlando, Ludovic; MacLeod, James N

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced mRNA from a pool of forty-three different tissues. From these, we derived the structures of 68,594 transcripts. In addition, we identified 301,829 positions with SNPs or small indels within these transcripts relative to EquCab2. Interestingly, 780 variants extend the open reading frame of the transcript and appear to be small errors in the equine reference genome, since they are also identified as homozygous variants by genomic DNA resequencing of the reference horse. Taken together, we provide a resource of equine mRNA structures and protein coding variants that will enhance equine and cross-species transcriptional and genomic comparisons.

  7. Annotation of the Protein Coding Regions of the Equine Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Coleman, Stephen J.; Zeng, Zheng; Liu, Jinze; Orlando, Ludovic; MacLeod, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced mRNA from a pool of forty-three different tissues. From these, we derived the structures of 68,594 transcripts. In addition, we identified 301,829 positions with SNPs or small indels within these transcripts relative to EquCab2. Interestingly, 780 variants extend the open reading frame of the transcript and appear to be small errors in the equine reference genome, since they are also identified as homozygous variants by genomic DNA resequencing of the reference horse. Taken together, we provide a resource of equine mRNA structures and protein coding variants that will enhance equine and cross-species transcriptional and genomic comparisons. PMID:26107351

  8. Identification of Low-Confidence Regions in the Pig Reference Genome (Sscrofa10.2)

    PubMed Central

    Warr, Amanda; Robert, Christelle; Hume, David; Archibald, Alan L.; Deeb, Nader; Watson, Mick

    2015-01-01

    Many applications of high throughput sequencing rely on the availability of an accurate reference genome. Variant calling often produces large data sets that cannot be realistically validated and which may contain large numbers of false-positives. Errors in the reference assembly increase the number of false-positives. While resources are available to aid in the filtering of variants from human data, for other species these do not yet exist and strict filtering techniques must be employed which are more likely to exclude true-positives. This work assesses the accuracy of the pig reference genome (Sscrofa10.2) using whole genome sequencing reads from the Duroc sow whose genome the assembly was based on. Indicators of structural variation including high regional coverage, unexpected insert sizes, improper pairing and homozygous variants were used to identify low quality (LQ) regions of the assembly. Low coverage (LC) regions were also identified and analyzed separately. The LQ regions covered 13.85% of the genome, the LC regions covered 26.6% of the genome and combined (LQLC) they covered 33.07% of the genome. Over half of dbSNP variants were located in the LQLC regions. Of copy number variable regions identified in a previous study, 86.3% were located in the LQLC regions. The regions were also enriched for gene predictions from RNA-seq data with 42.98% falling in the LQLC regions. Excluding variants in the LQ, LC, or LQLC from future analyses will help reduce the number of false-positive variant calls. Researchers using WGS data should be aware that the current pig reference genome does not give an accurate representation of the copy number of alleles in the original Duroc sow’s genome. PMID:26640477

  9. Identification of Low-Confidence Regions in the Pig Reference Genome (Sscrofa10.2).

    PubMed

    Warr, Amanda; Robert, Christelle; Hume, David; Archibald, Alan L; Deeb, Nader; Watson, Mick

    2015-01-01

    Many applications of high throughput sequencing rely on the availability of an accurate reference genome. Variant calling often produces large data sets that cannot be realistically validated and which may contain large numbers of false-positives. Errors in the reference assembly increase the number of false-positives. While resources are available to aid in the filtering of variants from human data, for other species these do not yet exist and strict filtering techniques must be employed which are more likely to exclude true-positives. This work assesses the accuracy of the pig reference genome (Sscrofa10.2) using whole genome sequencing reads from the Duroc sow whose genome the assembly was based on. Indicators of structural variation including high regional coverage, unexpected insert sizes, improper pairing and homozygous variants were used to identify low quality (LQ) regions of the assembly. Low coverage (LC) regions were also identified and analyzed separately. The LQ regions covered 13.85% of the genome, the LC regions covered 26.6% of the genome and combined (LQLC) they covered 33.07% of the genome. Over half of dbSNP variants were located in the LQLC regions. Of copy number variable regions identified in a previous study, 86.3% were located in the LQLC regions. The regions were also enriched for gene predictions from RNA-seq data with 42.98% falling in the LQLC regions. Excluding variants in the LQ, LC, or LQLC from future analyses will help reduce the number of false-positive variant calls. Researchers using WGS data should be aware that the current pig reference genome does not give an accurate representation of the copy number of alleles in the original Duroc sow's genome.

  10. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R.W. King; S.A. Kattenhorn

    2012-04-01

    We evaluate horizontal Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities together with geologic, volcanic, and seismic data to interpret extension, shear, and contraction within the Snake River Plain and the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. We estimate horizontal surface velocities using GPS data collected at 385 sites from 1994 to 2009 and present an updated velocity field within the Stable North American Reference Frame (SNARF). Our results show an ENE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.9 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Centennial Tectonic belt and an E-oriented extensional strain rate of 6.2 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Intermountain Seismic belt combined with the northern Great Basin. These extensional strain rates contrast with the regional north-south contraction of -2.6 {+-} 1.1 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} calculated in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau over a 125 x 650 km region. Tests that include dike-opening reveal that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones does not occur in the Snake River Plain at present. This slow internal deformation in the Snake River Plain is in contrast to the rapidly-extending adjacent Basin and Range provinces and implies shear along boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of <0.5 to 1.7 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic belt. The fastest lateral shearing occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional GPS velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic belt, Idaho batholith, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and central Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is driven by extension to the

  11. A Genome-wide Association Study of Bipolar Disorder with Comorbid Eating Disorder Replicates the SOX2-OT Region

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Kelsoe, John R.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous mood disorder associated with several important clinical comorbidities, such as eating disorders. This clinical heterogeneity complicates the identification of genetic variants contributing to bipolar susceptibility. Here we investigate comorbidity of eating disorders as a subphenotype of bipolar disorder to identify genetic variation that is common and unique to both disorders. Methods We performed a genome-wide association analysis contrasting 184 bipolar subjects with eating disorder comorbidity against both 1,370 controls and 2,006 subjects with bipolar disorder only from the Bipolar Genome Study (BiGS). Results The most significant genome-wide finding was observed bipolar with comorbid eating disorder vs. controls within SOX2-OT (p=8.9×10−8 for rs4854912) with a secondary peak in the adjacent FXR1 gene (p=1.2×10−6 for rs1805576) on chromosome 3q26.33. This region was also the most prominent finding in the case-only analysis (p=3.5×10−7 and 4.3×10−6, respectively). Several regions of interest containing genes involved in neurodevelopment and neuroprotection processes were also identified. Limitations While our primary finding did not quite reach genome-wide significance, likely due to the relatively limited sample size, these results can be viewed as a replication of a recent study of eating disorders in a large cohort. Conclusions These findings replicate the prior association of SOX2-OT with eating disorders and broadly support the involvement of neurodevelopmental/neuroprotective mechanisms in the pathophysiology of both disorders. They further suggest that different clinical manifestations of bipolar disorder may reflect differential genetic contributions and argue for the utility of clinical subphenotypes in identifying additional molecular pathways leading to illness. PMID:26433762

  12. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning is orchestrated by genomic regions associated with DNase I hypersensitivity in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2014-05-01

    Nucleosome positioning dictates the DNA accessibility for regulatory proteins, and thus is critical for gene expression and regulation. It has been well documented that only a subset of nucleosomes are reproducibly positioned in eukaryotic genomes. The most prominent example of phased nucleosomes is the context of genes, where phased nucleosomes flank the transcriptional starts sites (TSSs). It is unclear, however, what factors determine nucleosome positioning in regions that are not close to genes. We mapped both nucleosome positioning and DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) datasets across the rice genome. We discovered that DHSs located in a variety of contexts, both genic and intergenic, were flanked by strongly phased nucleosome arrays. Phased nucleosomes were also found to flank DHSs in the human genome. Our results suggest the barrier model may represent a general feature of nucleosome organization in eukaryote genomes. Specifically, regions bound with regulatory proteins, including intergenic regions, can serve as barriers that organize phased nucleosome arrays on both sides. Our results also suggest that rice DHSs often span a single, phased nucleosome, similar to the H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes observed in DHSs in the human genome.

  13. Breaking Good: Accounting for Fragility of Genomic Regions in Rearrangement Distance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Biller, Priscila; Guéguen, Laurent; Knibbe, Carole; Tannier, Eric

    2016-05-22

    Models of evolution by genome rearrangements are prone to two types of flaws: One is to ignore the diversity of susceptibility to breakage across genomic regions, and the other is to suppose that susceptibility values are given. Without necessarily supposing their precise localization, we call "solid" the regions that are improbably broken by rearrangements and "fragile" the regions outside solid ones. We propose a model of evolution by inversions where breakage probabilities vary across fragile regions and over time. It contains as a particular case the uniform breakage model on the nucleotidic sequence, where breakage probabilities are proportional to fragile region lengths. This is very different from the frequently used pseudouniform model where all fragile regions have the same probability to break. Estimations of rearrangement distances based on the pseudouniform model completely fail on simulations with the truly uniform model. On pairs of amniote genomes, we show that identifying coding genes with solid regions yields incoherent distance estimations, especially with the pseudouniform model, and to a lesser extent with the truly uniform model. This incoherence is solved when we coestimate the number of fragile regions with the rearrangement distance. The estimated number of fragile regions is surprisingly small, suggesting that a minority of regions are recurrently used by rearrangements. Estimations for several pairs of genomes at different divergence times are in agreement with a slowly evolvable colocalization of active genomic regions in the cell.

  14. Genomic evaluation of regional dairy cattle breeds in single-breed and multibreed contexts.

    PubMed

    Jónás, D; Ducrocq, V; Fritz, S; Baur, A; Sanchez, M-P; Croiseau, P

    2017-02-01

    An important prerequisite for high prediction accuracy in genomic prediction is the availability of a large training population, which allows accurate marker effect estimation. This requirement is not fulfilled in case of regional breeds with a limited number of breeding animals. We assessed the efficiency of the current French routine genomic evaluation procedure in four regional breeds (Abondance, Tarentaise, French Simmental and Vosgienne) as well as the potential benefits when the training populations consisting of males and females of these breeds are merged to form a multibreed training population. Genomic evaluation was 5-11% more accurate than a pedigree-based BLUP in three of the four breeds, while the numerically smallest breed showed a < 1% increase in accuracy. Multibreed genomic evaluation was beneficial for two breeds (Abondance and French Simmental) with maximum gains of 5 and 8% in correlation coefficients between yield deviations and genomic estimated breeding values, when compared to the single-breed genomic evaluation results. Inflation of genomic evaluation of young candidates was also reduced. Our results indicate that genomic selection can be effective in regional breeds as well. Here, we provide empirical evidence proving that genetic distance between breeds is only one of the factors affecting the efficiency of multibreed genomic evaluation.

  15. Identification and characterization of conserved and variable regions of lime witches' broom phytoplasma genome.

    PubMed

    Siampour, Majid; Izadpanah, Keramatollah; Marzachi, Cristina; Salehi Abarkoohi, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Several segments (∼20  kbp) of the lime witches' broom (LWB) phytoplasma genome (16SrII group) were sequenced and analysed. A 5.7  kbp segment (LWB-C) included conserved genes whose phylogenetic tree was consistent with that generated using 16S rRNA genes. Another 6.4  kbp LWB phytoplasma genome segment (LWB-NC) was structurally similar to the putative mobile unit or sequence variable mosaic genomic region of phytoplasmas, although it represented a new arrangement of genes or pseudogenes such as phage-related protein genes and tra5 insertion sequences. Sequence- and phylogenetic-based evidence suggested that LWB-NC is a genomic region which includes horizontally transferred genes and could be regarded as a hot region to incorporate more foreign genes into the genome of LWB phytoplasma. The presence of phylogenetically related fragments of retroelements was also verified in the LWB phytoplasma genome. Putative intragenomic retrotransposition or retrohoming of these elements might have been determinant in shaping and manipulating the LWB phytoplasma genome. Altogether, the results of this study suggested that the genome of LWB phytoplasma is colonized by a variety of genes that have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer events, which may have further affected the genome through intragenomic mobility and insertion at cognate or incognate sites. Some of these genes are expected to have been involved in the development of features specific to LWB phytoplasma.

  16. Genomic regions associated with necrotic enteritis resistance in Fayoumi and White Leghorn chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we used two breeds of chicken to identify genomic regions corresponding to necrotic enteritis (NE) resistance. We scanned the genomes of a resistant and susceptible line of Fayoumi and White Leghorn chicken using a chicken 60K Illumina SNP panel. A total of 235 loci with divergently ...

  17. Detailed Analysis of a Contiguous 22-Mb Region of the Maize Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fusheng; Stein, Joshua C.; Liang, Chengzhi; Zhang, Jianwei; Fulton, Robert S.; Baucom, Regina S.; De Paoli, Emanuele; Zhou, Shiguo; Yang, Lixing; Han, Yujun; Pasternak, Shiran; Narechania, Apurva; Zhang, Lifang; Yeh, Cheng-Ting; Ying, Kai; Nagel, Dawn H.; Collura, Kristi; Kudrna, David; Currie, Jennifer; Lin, Jinke; Kim, HyeRan; Angelova, Angelina; Scara, Gabriel; Wissotski, Marina; Golser, Wolfgang; Courtney, Laura; Kruchowski, Scott; Graves, Tina A.; Rock, Susan M.; Adams, Stephanie; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fronick, Catrina; Courtney, William; Kramer, Melissa; Spiegel, Lori; Nascimento, Lydia; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Chaparro, Cristian; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Miguel, Phillip San; Jiang, Ning; Wessler, Susan R.; Green, Pamela J.; Yu, Yeisoo; Schwartz, David C.; Meyers, Blake C.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Martienssen, Robert A.; McCombie, W. Richard; Aluru, Srinivas; Clifton, Sandra W.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ware, Doreen; Wilson, Richard K.; Wing, Rod A.

    2009-01-01

    Most of our understanding of plant genome structure and evolution has come from the careful annotation of small (e.g., 100 kb) sequenced genomic regions or from automated annotation of complete genome sequences. Here, we sequenced and carefully annotated a contiguous 22 Mb region of maize chromosome 4 using an improved pseudomolecule for annotation. The sequence segment was comprehensively ordered, oriented, and confirmed using the maize optical map. Nearly 84% of the sequence is composed of transposable elements (TEs) that are mostly nested within each other, of which most families are low-copy. We identified 544 gene models using multiple levels of evidence, as well as five miRNA genes. Gene fragments, many captured by TEs, are prevalent within this region. Elimination of gene redundancy from a tetraploid maize ancestor that originated a few million years ago is responsible in this region for most disruptions of synteny with sorghum and rice. Consistent with other sub-genomic analyses in maize, small RNA mapping showed that many small RNAs match TEs and that most TEs match small RNAs. These results, performed on ∼1% of the maize genome, demonstrate the feasibility of refining the B73 RefGen_v1 genome assembly by incorporating optical map, high-resolution genetic map, and comparative genomic data sets. Such improvements, along with those of gene and repeat annotation, will serve to promote future functional genomic and phylogenomic research in maize and other grasses. PMID:19936048

  18. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  19. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  20. Molecular Dissection of the 5' Region of no-on-transientA of Drosophila melanogaster Reveals cis-Regulation by Adjacent dGpi1 Sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sandrelli, F; Campesan, S; Rossetto, M; Benna, C; Zieger, E; Megighian, A; Couchman, M; Kyriacou, C; Costa, R

    2001-01-01

    The nonA gene of Drosophila melanogaster is important for normal vision, courtship song, and viability and lies approximately 350 bp downstream of the dGpi1 gene. Full rescue of nonA mutant phenotypes can be achieved by transformation with a genomic clone that carries approximately 2 kb of 5' regulatory material and that encodes most of the coding sequence of dGpi1. We have analyzed this 5' region by making a series of deleted fragments, fusing them to yeast GAL4 sequences, and driving UAS-nonA expression in a mutant nonA background. Regions that both silence and enhance developmental tissue-specific expression of nonA and that are necessary for generating optomotor visual responses are identified. Some of these overlap the dGpi1 sequences, revealing cis-regulation by neighboring gene sequences. The largest 5' fragment was unable to rescue the normal electroretinogram (ERG) consistently, and no rescue at all was observed for the courtship song phenotype. We suggest that sequences within the nonA introns that were missing in the UAS-nonA cDNA may carry enhancer elements for these two phenotypes. Finally, we speculate on the striking observation that some of the cis-regulatory regions of nonA appear to be embedded within the coding regions of dGpi1. PMID:11156995

  1. Genomics of the hop psuedo-autosomal regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop is one of the few crop species with female and male plants with sex being determined by either XX or XY chromosomes. Hop cones are only produced in female hops with or without fertilization. This has lead to most genomic research being directed toward female plants. Very little work has been don...

  2. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Loots, Gabriela G. [LLNL; Ovcharenko, I. [LLNL

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. This database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a comprehensive collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes generated using multiple sources of gene annotation. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in evolutionary conserved and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and fugu genomes. (taken from paper in Journal: Bioinformatics, November 7, 2006, pp. 122-124

  3. Tandem Repeat Regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei Genome and their Application for High-Resolution Genotyping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    BioMed CentralBMC Microbiology ssOpen AcceResearch article Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application...facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Large tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their

  4. The 1.4-Mb CMT1A duplication/HNPP deletion genomic region reveals unique genome architectural features and provides insights into the recent evolution of new genes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Dewar, K; Katsanis, N; Reiter, L T; Lander, E S; Devon, K L; Wyman, D W; Lupski, J R; Birren, B

    2001-06-01

    Duplication and deletion of the 1.4-Mb region in 17p12 that is delimited by two 24-kb low copy number repeats (CMT1A-REPs) represent frequent genomic rearrangements resulting in two common inherited peripheral neuropathies, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). CMT1A and HNPP exemplify a paradigm for genomic disorders wherein unique genome architectural features result in susceptibility to DNA rearrangements that cause disease. A gene within the 1.4-Mb region, PMP22, is responsible for these disorders through a gene-dosage effect in the heterozygous duplication or deletion. However, the genomic structure of the 1.4-Mb region, including other genes contained within the rearranged genomic segment, remains essentially uncharacterized. To delineate genomic structural features, investigate higher-order genomic architecture, and identify genes in this region, we constructed PAC and BAC contigs and determined the complete nucleotide sequence. This CMT1A/HNPP genomic segment contains 1,421,129 bp of DNA. A low copy number repeat (LCR) was identified, with one copy inside and two copies outside of the 1.4-Mb region. Comparison between physical and genetic maps revealed a striking difference in recombination rates between the sexes with a lower recombination frequency in males (0.67 cM/Mb) versus females (5.5 cM/Mb). Hypothetically, this low recombination frequency in males may enable a chromosomal misalignment at proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs and promote unequal crossing over, which occurs 10 times more frequently in male meiosis. In addition to three previously described genes, five new genes (TEKT3, HS3ST3B1, NPD008/CGI-148, CDRT1, and CDRT15) and 13 predicted genes were identified. Most of these predicted genes are expressed only in embryonic stages. Analyses of the genomic region adjacent to proximal CMT1A-REP indicated an evolutionary mechanism for the formation of proximal CMT1A-REP and the

  5. Genome characterization of a bovine papillomavirus type 5 from cattle in the Amazon region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Flavio R C; Daudt, Cíntia; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Varela, Ana Paula M; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2017-02-01

    Papillomaviruses are small and complex viruses with circular DNA genome that belongs to the Papillomavirus family, which comprises at least 39 genera. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) causes an infectious disease that is characterized by chronic and proliferative benign tumors that affect cattle worldwide. In the present work, the full genome sequence of BPV type 5, an Epsilonpapillomavirus, is reported. The genome was recovered from papillomatous lesions excised from cattle raised in the Amazon region, Northern Brazil. The genome comprises 7836 base pairs and exhibits the archetypal organization of the Papillomaviridae. This is of significance for the study of BPV biology, since currently available full BPV genome sequences are scarce. The availability of genomic information of BPVs can provide better understanding of the differences in genetics and biology of papillomaviruses.

  6. Upper mantle anisotropy beneath Indochina block and adjacent regions from shear-wave splitting analysis of Vietnam broadband seismograph array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ling; Iidaka, Takashi; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Morita, Yuichi; Dzung, N. Q.

    2009-09-01

    The Indochina block is located at the junction of four major plates. It has a close relationship with the uplift of Tibet plateau and the sea-floor spreading of the South China Sea in the geological evolution histories. We deployed a temporary broadband seismograph array in Vietnam from February 2000 to October 2005, and measured shear-wave splitting of core-refracted phases to investigate the upper mantle anisotropy beneath the Indochina block and adjacent regions. The observed delay times of up to 1.5 s are large, indicating a mantle source for the anisotropy. Two distinct regimes of seismic anisotropy are revealed. The fast polarization directions in the northern Indochina block with a main trend of N100°E are almost consistent with the direction of both the surface displacement and the absolute plate motion. These observations suggest the anisotropy is possibly generated by the present-day asthenospheric flow caused by the India-Eurasia collision. The fast polarization directions in the southern Indochina block and the Hainan island are nearly N60°E. The anisotropy in this area may reflect a combination of the India-Eurasia collision and the past orogenies in the lithosphere, or an abrupt variation in the asthenospheric flow.

  7. Seismicity and S-wave velocity structure of the crust and the upper mantle in the Baikal rift and adjacent regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkina, Alena; Kozhevnikov, Vladimir; Melnikova, Valentina; Solovey, Oksana

    2016-12-01

    Correlations between seismicity, seismotectonic deformation (STD) field and velocity structure of the crust and the upper mantle in the Baikal rift and the adjacent areas of the Siberian platform and the Mongol-Okhotsk fold belt have been investigated. The 3D S-wave velocity structure up to the depths of 500 km has been modeled using a representative sample of Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves (about 3200 paths) at periods from 10 to 250 s. The STD pattern has been reconstructed from mechanisms of large earthquakes, and is in good agreement with GPS and structural data. Analysis of the results has shown that most of large shallow earthquakes fall in regions of low S-wave velocities in the uppermost mantle (western Mongolia and areas of recent mountain building in southern Siberia) and in zones of their relatively high lateral variations (northeastern flank of the Baikal rift). In the first case the dominant STD regime is compression manifested in a mixture of thrust and strike-slip deformations. In the second case we observe a general predominance of extension.

  8. Plant molecular phylogeography in China and adjacent regions: Tracing the genetic imprints of Quaternary climate and environmental change in the world's most diverse temperate flora.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ying-Xiong; Fu, Cheng-Xing; Comes, Hans Peter

    2011-04-01

    The Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) of East Asia harbors the most diverse of the world's temperate flora, and was the most important glacial refuge for its Tertiary representatives ('relics') throughout Quaternary ice-age cycles. A steadily increasing number of phylogeographic studies in the SJFR of mainland China and adjacent areas, including the Qinghai-Tibetan-Plateau (QTP) and Sino-Himalayan region, have documented the population histories of temperate plant species in these regions. Here we review this current literature that challenges the oft-stated view of the SJFR as a glacial sanctuary for temperate plants, instead revealing profound effects of Quaternary changes in climate, topography, and/or sea level on the current genetic structure of such organisms. There are three recurrent phylogeographic scenarios identified by different case studies that broadly agree with longstanding biogeographic or palaeo-ecological hypotheses: (i) postglacial re-colonization of the QTP from (south-)eastern glacial refugia; (ii) population isolation and endemic species formation in Southwest China due to tectonic shifts and river course dynamics; and (iii) long-term isolation and species survival in multiple localized refugia of (warm-)temperate deciduous forest habitats in subtropical (Central/East/South) China. However, in four additional instances, phylogeographic findings seem to conflict with a priori predictions raised by palaeo-data, suggesting instead: (iv) glacial in situ survival of some hardy alpine herbs and forest trees on the QTP platform itself; (v) long-term refugial isolation of (warm-)temperate evergreen taxa in subtropical China; (vi) 'cryptic' glacial survival of (cool-)temperate deciduous forest trees in North China; and (vii) unexpectedly deep (Late Tertiary/early-to-mid Pleistocene) allopatric-vicariant differentiation of disjunct lineages in the East China-Japan-Korea region due to past sea transgressions. We discuss these and other consequences

  9. QTLs Regulating the Contents of Antioxidants, Phenolics, and Flavonoids in Soybean Seeds Share a Common Genomic Region

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man-Wah; Muñoz, Nacira B.; Wong, Chi-Fai; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Wong, Kwong-Sen; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Qi, Xinpeng; Li, Kwan-Pok; Ng, Ming-Sin; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seeds are a rich source of phenolic compounds, especially isoflavonoids, which are important nutraceuticals. Our study using 14 wild- and 16 cultivated-soybean accessions shows that seeds from cultivated soybeans generally contain lower total antioxidants compared to their wild counterparts, likely an unintended consequence of domestication or human selection. Using a recombinant inbred population resulting from a wild and a cultivated soybean parent and a bin map approach, we have identified an overlapping genomic region containing major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the seed contents of total antioxidants, phenolics, and flavonoids. The QTL for seed antioxidant content contains 14 annotated genes based on the Williams 82 reference genome (Gmax1.01). None of these genes encodes functions that are related to the phenylpropanoid pathway of soybean. However, we found three putative Multidrug And Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter genes within this QTL and one adjacent to it (GmMATE1-4). Moreover, we have identified non-synonymous changes between GmMATE1 and GmMATE2, and that GmMATE3 encodes an antisense transcript that expresses in pods. Whether the polymorphisms in GmMATE proteins are major determinants of the antioxidant contents, or whether the antisense transcripts of GmMATE3 play important regulatory roles, awaits further functional investigations. PMID:27379137

  10. QTLs Regulating the Contents of Antioxidants, Phenolics, and Flavonoids in Soybean Seeds Share a Common Genomic Region.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Wah; Muñoz, Nacira B; Wong, Chi-Fai; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Wong, Kwong-Sen; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Qi, Xinpeng; Li, Kwan-Pok; Ng, Ming-Sin; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seeds are a rich source of phenolic compounds, especially isoflavonoids, which are important nutraceuticals. Our study using 14 wild- and 16 cultivated-soybean accessions shows that seeds from cultivated soybeans generally contain lower total antioxidants compared to their wild counterparts, likely an unintended consequence of domestication or human selection. Using a recombinant inbred population resulting from a wild and a cultivated soybean parent and a bin map approach, we have identified an overlapping genomic region containing major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the seed contents of total antioxidants, phenolics, and flavonoids. The QTL for seed antioxidant content contains 14 annotated genes based on the Williams 82 reference genome (Gmax1.01). None of these genes encodes functions that are related to the phenylpropanoid pathway of soybean. However, we found three putative Multidrug And Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter genes within this QTL and one adjacent to it (GmMATE1-4). Moreover, we have identified non-synonymous changes between GmMATE1 and GmMATE2, and that GmMATE3 encodes an antisense transcript that expresses in pods. Whether the polymorphisms in GmMATE proteins are major determinants of the antioxidant contents, or whether the antisense transcripts of GmMATE3 play important regulatory roles, awaits further functional investigations.

  11. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  12. Genome Scans for Transmission Ratio Distortion Regions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Joaquim; Gularte, Rodrigo J.; Farber, Charles R.; Varona, Luis; Mehrabian, Margarete; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldon J.; Attie, Alan D.; Yandell, Brian S.; Medrano, Juan F.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission ratio distortion (TRD) is the departure from the expected genotypic frequencies under Mendelian inheritance. This departure can be due to multiple physiological mechanisms during gametogenesis, fertilization, fetal and embryonic development, and early neonatal life. Although a few TRD loci have been reported in mouse, inheritance patterns have never been evaluated for TRD. In this article, we developed a Bayesian binomial model accounting for additive and dominant deviation TRD mechanisms. Moreover, this model was used to perform genome-wide scans for TRD quantitative trait loci (QTL) on six F2 mouse crosses involving between 296 and 541 mice and between 72 and 1854 genetic markers. Statistical significance of each model was checked at each genetic marker with Bayes factors. Genome scans revealed overdominance TRD QTL located in mouse chromosomes 1, 2, 12, 13, and 14 and additive TRD QTL in mouse chromosomes 2, 3, and 15, although these results did not replicate across mouse crosses. This research contributes new statistical tools for the analysis of specific genetic patterns involved in TRD in F2 populations, our results suggesting a relevant incidence of TRD phenomena in mouse with important implications for both statistical analyses and biological research. PMID:22367040

  13. Isolation of Specific Genomic Regions and Identification of Associated Molecules by enChIP

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The identification of molecules associated with specific genomic regions of interest is required to understand the mechanisms of regulation of the functions of these regions. To enable the non-biased identification of molecules interacting with a specific genomic region of interest, we recently developed the engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) technique. Here, we describe how to use enChIP to isolate specific genomic regions and identify the associated proteins and RNAs. First, a genomic region of interest is tagged with a transcription activator-like (TAL) protein or a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) complex consisting of a catalytically inactive form of Cas9 and a guide RNA. Subsequently, the chromatin is crosslinked and fragmented by sonication. The tagged locus is then immunoprecipitated and the crosslinking is reversed. Finally, the proteins or RNAs that are associated with the isolated chromatin are subjected to mass spectrometric or RNA sequencing analyses, respectively. This approach allows the successful identification of proteins and RNAs associated with a genomic region of interest. PMID:26862718

  14. Genomic shotgun array: a procedure linking large-scale DNA sequencing with regional transcript mapping.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Hui; Li, Jian-Chiuan; Lin, Yung-Feng; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2004-02-11

    To facilitate transcript mapping and to investigate alterations in genomic structure and gene expression in a defined genomic target, we developed a novel microarray-based method to detect transcriptional activity of the human chromosome 4q22-24 region. Loss of heterozygosity of human 4q22-24 is frequently observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen well-characterized genes have been identified from this region. We took previously sequenced shotgun subclones as templates to amplify overlapping sequences for the genomic segment and constructed a chromosome-region-specific microarray. Using genomic DNA fragments as probes, we detected transcriptional activity from within this region among five different tissues. The hybridization results indicate that there are new transcripts that have not yet been identified by other methods. The existence of new transcripts encoded by genes in this region was confirmed by PCR cloning or cDNA library screening. The procedure reported here allows coupling of shotgun sequencing with transcript mapping and, potentially, detailed analysis of gene expression and chromosomal copy of the genomic sequence for the putative HCC tumor suppressor gene(s) in the 4q candidate region.

  15. Differentially Methylated Genomic Regions in Birth-Weight Discordant Twin Pairs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mubo; Baumbach, Jan; Vandin, Fabio; Röttger, Richard; Barbosa, Eudes; Dong, Mingchui; Frost, Morten; Christiansen, Lene; Tan, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Poor nutrition during critical growth phases may alter the structural and physiologic development of vital organs thus "programming" the susceptibility to adult-onset diseases and disease-related health conditions. Epigenome-wide association studies have been performed in birth-weight discordant twin pairs to find evidence for such "programming" effects, but no significant results emerged. We further investigated this issue using a new computational approach: Instead of probing single genomic sites for significant alterations in epigenetic marks, we scan for differentially methylated genomic regions. Whole genome DNA methylation levels were measured in whole blood from 150 pairs of adult identical twins discordant for birth-weight. Intrapair differential DNA methylation was associated with qualitative (large or small) and quantitative (percentage) birth-weight discordance at each genomic site using regression models adjusting for age and sex. Based on the regression results, genomic regions with consistent alteration patterns of DNA methylation were located and tested for significant robustness using computational permutation tests. This yielded an interesting genomic region on chromosome 1, which is significantly differentially methylated for quantitative birth-weight discordance. The region covers two genes (TYW3 and CRYZ) both reportedly associated with metabolism. We conclude that prenatal conditions for birth-weight discordance may result in persistent epigenetic modifications potentially affecting even adult health.

  16. Climatic stress events in the source region of modern man - Matching the last 20 ka of the Chew Bahir climate record with occupation history of adjacent refugia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, Verena; Vogelsang, Ralf; Junginger, Annett; Asrat, Asfawossen; Lamb, Henry F.; Viehberg, Finn; Trauth, Martin H.; Schaebitz, Frank

    2014-05-01

    A rapidly changing environment is considered an important driver not just for human evolution but also for cultural and technological innovation and migration. To evaluate the impact that climatic shifts on different timescales might have had on the living conditions of prehistoric humans is one of the cornerstones in current research, but continuous paleo-climate records in the vicinity of archaeological sites are still rare. As a contribution towards a better understanding of this human-climate interaction we here present a match between the last 20 ka of the just recently developed paleo-climate record from Chew Bahir in southern Ethiopia and the settlement history of adjacent possible refugia. The Chew Bahir basin, as a newly explored reliable climatic archive, lies in a biogeographically highly sensitive transition zone between the Main Ethiopian Rift and the Omo-Turkana basin and hence represents an ideal site to study climatic variability in the source region of modern man. The climatic history with a temporal resolution of up to 3 years is showing besides orbitally driven long-term transitions in and out of favourable living conditions several short abrupt excursions towards drier or wetter episodes. Comparing the frequency of archaeological findings as a parameter for human occupation to this close-by climate record that allows us to outline how complex the interplay between humans and environment during the last 20 ka really was, which dynamics might have been involved and which role the temporal dimension of environmental changes could have played for the adaption of humans.

  17. Retrotransposons Within Syntenic Regions Between Soybean and Medicago Truncatula and Their Contribution to Local Genome Evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome analyses have described the extent of gene level macro and microsynteny among closely related legume species. Yet the organization of the intergenic regions within syntenic blocks and the involvement of retrotransposons in the evolution of these regions have not been studied in d...

  18. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  19. An entropy-based approach for the identification of phylogenetically informative genomic regions of Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Batista, Marcus V A; Ferreira, Tiago A E; Freitas, Antonio C; Balbino, Valdir Q

    2011-12-01

    The papillomaviruses form a highly diverse group that infect mammals, birds and reptiles. We know little about their genetic diversity and therefore the evolutionary mechanisms that drive the diversity of these viruses. Genomic sequences of papillomaviruses are highly divergent and so it is important to develop methods that select the most phylogenetic informative sites. This study aimed at making use of a novel approach based on entropy to select suitable genomic regions from which to infer the phylogeny of papillomavirus. Comparative genomic analyzes were performed to assess the genetic variability of each gene of Papillomaviridae family members. Regions with low entropy were selected to reconstruct papillomavirus phylogenetic trees based on four different methods. This methodology allowed us to identify regions that are conserved among papillomaviruses that infect different hosts. This is important because, despite the huge variation among all papillomaviruses genomes, we were able to find regions that are clearly shared among them, presenting low complexity levels of information from which phylogenetic predictions can be made. This approach allowed us to obtain robust topologies from relatively small datasets. The results indicate that the entropy approach can successfully select regions of the genome that are good markers from which to infer phylogenetic relationships, using less computational time, making the estimation of large phylogenies more accessible.

  20. Mutational analysis of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum common nod genes and further nod box-linked genomic DNA regions.

    PubMed

    Göttfert, M; Lamb, J W; Gasser, R; Semenza, J; Hennecke, H

    1989-02-01

    By insertional and deletional marker replacement mutagenesis the common nod region of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was examined for the presence of additional, essential nodulation genes. An open reading frame located in the 800 bp large intergenic region between nodD1 and nodA did not appear to be essential for nodulation of soybean. Furthermore, a strain with a deletion of the nodI- and nodJ-like genes downstream of nodC had a Nod+ phenotype. A mutant with a 1.7 kb deletion immediately downstream of nodD1 considerably delayed the onset of nodulation. This region carried a second copy of nodD (nodD2). A nodD1-nodD2 double mutant had a similar phenotype to the nodD2 mutant. Using a 22-mer oligonucleotide probe partially identical to the nod box sequence, a total of six hybridizing regions were identified in B. japonicum genomic DNA and isolated from a cosmid library. Sequencing of the hybridizing regions revealed that at least three of them represented true nod box sequences whereas the others showed considerable deviations from the consensus sequence. One of the three nod box sequences was the one known to be associated with nodA, whereas the other two were located 60 to 70 kb away from nif cluster I. A deletion of one of these two sequences plus adjacent DNA material (mutant delta 308) led to a reduced nodulation on Vigna radiata but not on soybean. Thus, this region is probably involved in the determination of host specificity.

  1. Transcription restores DNA repair to heterochromatin, determining regional mutation rates in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Christina L; Wang, Nicholas J; Chung, Jongsuk; Moslehi, Homayoun; Sanborn, J Zachary; Hur, Joseph S; Collisson, Eric A; Vemula, Swapna S; Naujokas, Agne; Chiotti, Kami E; Cheng, Jeffrey B; Fassihi, Hiva; Blumberg, Andrew J; Bailey, Celeste V; Fudem, Gary M; Mihm, Frederick G; Cunningham, Bari B; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Liao, Wilson; Oh, Dennis H; Cleaver, James E; LeBoit, Philip E; Costello, Joseph F; Lehmann, Alan R; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T; Arron, Sarah T; Huh, Nam; Purdom, Elizabeth; Cho, Raymond J

    2014-11-20

    Somatic mutations in cancer are more frequent in heterochromatic and late-replicating regions of the genome. We report that regional disparities in mutation density are virtually abolished within transcriptionally silent genomic regions of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs) arising in an XPC(-/-) background. XPC(-/-) cells lack global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER), thus establishing differential access of DNA repair machinery within chromatin-rich regions of the genome as the primary cause for the regional disparity. Strikingly, we find that increasing levels of transcription reduce mutation prevalence on both strands of gene bodies embedded within H3K9me3-dense regions, and only to those levels observed in H3K9me3-sparse regions, also in an XPC-dependent manner. Therefore, transcription appears to reduce mutation prevalence specifically by relieving the constraints imposed by chromatin structure on DNA repair. We model this relationship among transcription, chromatin state, and DNA repair, revealing a new, personalized determinant of cancer risk.

  2. De Novo Identification of Regulatory Regions in Intergenic Spaces of Prokaryotic Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E; Mcloughlin, K; Ovcharenko, I

    2007-02-20

    This project was begun to implement, test, and experimentally validate the results of a novel algorithm for genome-wide identification of candidate transcription-factor binding sites in prokaryotes. Most techniques used to identify regulatory regions rely on conservation between different genomes or have a predetermined sequence motif(s) to perform a genome-wide search. Therefore, such techniques cannot be used with new genome sequences, where information regarding such motifs has not yet been discovered. This project aimed to apply a de novo search algorithm to identify candidate binding-site motifs in intergenic regions of prokaryotic organisms, initially testing the available genomes of the Yersinia genus. We retrofitted existing nucleotide pattern-matching algorithms, analyzed the candidate sites identified by these algorithms as well as their target genes to screen for meaningful patterns. Using properly annotated prokaryotic genomes, this project aimed to develop a set of procedures to identify candidate intergenic sites important for gene regulation. We planned to demonstrate this in Yersinia pestis, a model biodefense, Category A Select Agent pathogen, and then follow up with experimental evidence that these regions are indeed involved in regulation. The ability to quickly characterize transcription-factor binding sites will help lead to a better understanding of how known virulence pathways are modulated in biodefense-related organisms, and will help our understanding and exploration of regulons--gene regulatory networks--and novel pathways for metabolic processes in environmental microbes.

  3. Internal genomic regions mobilized for telomere maintenance in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chuna; Sung, Sanghyun; Lee, Junho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because DNA polymerase cannot replicate telomeric DNA at linear chromosomal ends, eukaryotes have developed specific telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMMs). A major TMM involves specialized reverse transcriptase, telomerase. However, there also exist various telomerase-independent TMMs (TI-TMMs), which can arise both in pathological conditions (such as cancers) and during evolution. The TI-TMM in cancer cells is called alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), whose mechanism is not fully understood. We generated stably maintained telomerase-independent survivors from C. elegans telomerase mutants and found that, unlike previously described survivors in worms, these survivors “mobilize” specific internal sequence blocks for telomere lengthening, which we named TALTs (templates for ALT). The cis-duplication of internal genomic TALTs produces “reservoirs” of TALTs, whose trans-duplication occurs at all chromosome ends in the ALT survivors. Our discovery that different TALTs are utilized in different wild isolates provides insight into the molecular events leading to telomere evolution. PMID:27073737

  4. OcculterCut: A Comprehensive Survey of AT-Rich Regions in Fungal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Alison C.; Oliver, Richard P.; Hane, James K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to measure the local GC-content bias in genomes and a survey of published fungal species. The method, enacted as “OcculterCut” (https://sourceforge.net/projects/occultercut, last accessed April 30, 2016), identified species containing distinct AT-rich regions. In most fungal taxa, AT-rich regions are a signature of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), which targets repetitive DNA and decreases GC-content though the conversion of cytosine to thymine bases. RIP has in turn been identified as a driver of fungal genome evolution, as RIP mutations can also occur in single-copy genes neighboring repeat-rich regions. Over time RIP perpetuates “two speeds” of gene evolution in the GC-equilibrated and AT-rich regions of fungal genomes. In this study, genomes showing evidence of this process are found to be common, particularly among the Pezizomycotina. Further analysis highlighted differences in amino acid composition and putative functions of genes from these regions, supporting the hypothesis that these regions play an important role in fungal evolution. OcculterCut can also be used to identify genes undergoing RIP-assisted diversifying selection, such as small, secreted effector proteins that mediate host-microbe disease interactions. PMID:27289099

  5. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for the protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspot motifs were also identified suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in an increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination.

  6. Genomic variation in the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable region

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Schwartz, John C.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Production of a vast antibody repertoire is essential for protection against pathogens. Variable region germline complexity contributes to repertoire diversity and is a standard feature of mammalian immunoglobulin loci, but functional V region genes are limited in swine. For example, the porcine lambda light chain locus is composed of 23 variable (V) genes and 4 joining (J) genes, but only 10 or 11 V and 2 J genes are functional. Allelic variation in V and J may increase overall diversity within a population, yet lead to repertoire holes in individuals lacking key alleles. Previous studies focused on heavy chain genetic variation, thus light chain allelic diversity is not known. We characterized allelic variation of the porcine immunoglobulin lambda variable (IGLV) region genes. All intact IGLV genes in 81 pigs were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed to determine their allelic variation and functionality. We observed mutational variation across the entire length of the IGLV genes, in both framework and complementarity determining regions (CDRs). Three recombination hotspots were also identified, suggesting that non-allelic homologous recombination is an evolutionarily alternative mechanism for generating germline antibody diversity. Functional alleles were greatest in the most highly expressed families, IGLV3 and IGLV8. At the population level, allelic variation appears to help maintain the potential for broad antibody repertoire diversity in spite of reduced gene segment choices and limited germline sequence modification. The trade-off may be a reduction in repertoire diversity within individuals that could result in increased variation in immunity to infectious disease and response to vaccination. PMID:26791019

  7. Acute hepatitis C in a chronically HIV-infected patient: Evolution of different viral genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Flichman, Diego; Kott, Veronica; Sookoian, Silvia; Campos, Rodolfo

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the molecular evolution of different viral genomic regions of HCV in an acute HCV infected patient chronically infected with HIV through a 42-month follow-up. METHODS: Serum samples of a chronically HIV infected patient that seroconverted to anti HCV antibodies were sequenced, from the event of superinfection through a period of 17 mo and in a late sample (42nd month). Hypervariable genomic regions of HIV (V3 loop of the gp120) and HCV (HVR-1 on the E2 glycoprotein gene) were studied. In order to analyze genomic regions involved in different biological functions and with the cellular immune response, HCV core and NS5A were also chosen to be sequenced. Amplification of the different regions was done by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Confirmation of sequences was done on reamplified material. Nucleotide sequences of the different time points were aligned with CLUSTAL W 1.5, and the corresponding amino acid ones were deduced. RESULTS: Hypervariable genomic regions of both viruses (HVR1 and gp120 V3 loop) presented several nonsynonymous changes but, while in the gp120 V3 loop mutations were detected in the sample obtained right after HCV superinfection and maintained throughout, they occurred following a sequential and cumulative pattern in the HVR1. In the NS5A region of HCV, two amino acid changes were detected during the follow-up period, whereas the core region presented several amino acid replacements, once the HCV chronic infection had been established. CONCLUSION: During the HIV-HCV superinfection, each genomic region analyzed shows a different evolutionary pattern. Most of the nucleotide substitutions observed are non-synonymous and clustered in previously described epitopes, thus suggesting an immune-driven evolutionary process. PMID:12854149

  8. Allosteric modulation of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 association site by adjacent gp120 variable region 1 (V1) N-glycans linked to neutralization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Heidi E; Hill, Melissa K; Maerz, Anne L; Wood, Stephanie; Ramsland, Paul A; Mak, Johnson; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 gp120-gp41 complex, which mediates viral fusion and cellular entry, undergoes rapid evolution within its external glycan shield to enable escape from neutralizing antibody (NAb). Understanding how conserved protein determinants retain functionality in the context of such evolution is important for their evaluation and exploitation as potential drug and/or vaccine targets. In this study, we examined how the conserved gp120-gp41 association site, formed by the N- and C-terminal segments of gp120 and the disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of gp41, adapts to glycan changes that are linked to neutralization sensitivity. To this end, a DSR mutant virus (K601D) with defective gp120-association was sequentially passaged in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to select suppressor mutations. We reasoned that the locations of suppressors point to structural elements that are functionally linked to the gp120-gp41 association site. In culture 1, gp120 association and viral replication was restored by loss of the conserved glycan at Asn¹³⁶ in V1 (T138N mutation) in conjunction with the L494I substitution in C5 within the association site. In culture 2, replication was restored with deletion of the N¹³⁹INN sequence, which ablates the overlapping Asn¹⁴¹-Asn¹⁴²-Ser-Ser potential N-linked glycosylation sequons in V1, in conjunction with D601N in the DSR. The 136 and 142 glycan mutations appeared to exert their suppressive effects by altering the dependence of gp120-gp41 interactions on the DSR residues, Leu⁵⁹³, Trp⁵⁹⁶ and Lys⁶⁰¹. The 136 and/or 142 glycan mutations increased the sensitivity of HIV-1 pseudovirions to the glycan-dependent NAbs 2G12 and PG16, and also pooled IgG obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals. Thus adjacent V1 glycans allosterically modulate the distal gp120-gp41 association site. We propose that this represents a mechanism for functional adaptation of the gp120-gp41 association site to an evolving glycan shield in a

  9. Combining microarray-based genomic selection (MGS) with the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to sequence diploid target regions.

    PubMed

    Okou, David T; Locke, Adam E; Steinberg, Karyn M; Hagen, Katie; Athri, Prashanth; Shetty, Amol C; Patel, Viren; Zwick, Michael E

    2009-09-01

    Novel methods of targeted sequencing of unique regions from complex eukaryotic genomes have generated a great deal of excitement, but critical demonstrations of these methods efficacy with respect to diploid genotype calling and experimental variation are lacking. To address this issue, we optimized microarray-based genomic selection (MGS) for use with the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA). A set of 202 fragments (304 kb total) contained within a 1.7 Mb genomic region on human chromosome X were MGS/IGA sequenced in ten female HapMap samples generating a total of 2.4 GB of DNA sequence. At a minimum coverage threshold of 5X, 93.9% of all bases and 94.9% of segregating sites were called, while 57.7% of bases (57.4% of segregating sites) were called at a 50X threshold. Data accuracy at known segregating sites was 98.9% at 5X coverage, rising to 99.6% at 50X coverage. Accuracy at homozygous sites was 98.7% at 5X sequence coverage and 99.5% at 50X coverage. Although accuracy at heterozygous sites was modestly lower, it was still over 92% at 5X coverage and increased to nearly 97% at 50X coverage. These data provide the first demonstration that MGS/IGA sequencing can generate the very high quality sequence data necessary for human genetics research. All sequences generated in this study have been deposited in NCBI Short Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Traces/sra, Accession # SRA007913).

  10. Isoxazole moiety in the linker region of HDAC inhibitors adjacent to the Zn-chelating group: effects on HDAC biology and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Tapadar, Subhasish; He, Rong; Luchini, Doris N; Billadeau, Daniel D; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2009-06-01

    A series of hydroxamic acid based histone deacetylase inhibitors 6-15, containing an isoxazole moiety adjacent to the Zn-chelating hydroxamic acid, is reported herein. Some of these compounds showed nanomolar activity in the HDAC isoform inhibitory assay and exhibited micro molar inhibitory activity against five pancreatic cancer cell lines.

  11. Genetics/Genomics Research in the Central Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Genetics-based research within the Biological Resources Discipline (BRD) Science Centers in the Central Region incorporates many aspects of the field of genetics. Research activities range from documenting patterns of genetic variation in order to investigate relationships among species, populations and individuals to investigating the structure, function and expression of genes and their response to environmental stressors. Research in the broad areas of genetics requires multidisciplinary expertise and specialized equipment and instrumentation. Brief summaries of the capabilities of the five BRD Centers are given below.

  12. Genome-wide association and genome partitioning reveal novel genomic regions underlying variation in gastrointestinal nematode burden in a wild bird.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Marius A; James, Marianne C; Douglas, Alex; Piertney, Stuart B

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the genetic architecture underlying complex phenotypes is a notoriously difficult problem that often impedes progress in understanding adaptive eco-evolutionary processes in natural populations. Host-parasite interactions are fundamentally important drivers of evolutionary processes, but a lack of understanding of the genes involved in the host's response to chronic parasite insult makes it particularly difficult to understand the mechanisms of host life history trade-offs and the adaptive dynamics involved. Here, we examine the genetic basis of gastrointestinal nematode (Trichostrongylus tenuis) burden in 695 red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) individuals genotyped at 384 genome-wide SNPs. We first use genome-wide association to identify individual SNPs associated with nematode burden. We then partition genome-wide heritability to identify chromosomes with greater heritability than expected from gene content, due to harbouring a multitude of additive SNPs with individually undetectable effects. We identified five SNPs on five chromosomes that accounted for differences of up to 556 worms per bird, but together explained at best 4.9% of the phenotypic variance. These SNPs were closely linked to genes representing a range of physiological processes including the immune system, protein degradation and energy metabolism. Genome partitioning indicated genome-wide heritability of up to 29% and three chromosomes with excess heritability of up to 4.3% (total 8.9%). These results implicate SNPs and novel genomic regions underlying nematode burden in this system and suggest that this phenotype is somewhere between being based on few large-effect genes (oligogenic) and based on a large number of genes with small individual but large combined effects (polygenic).

  13. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Three Veroniceae Species (Plantaginaceae): Comparative Analysis and Highly Divergent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Chung, Myong Gi; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of Veronica and related genera were weakly supported by molecular and paraphyletic taxa. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Veronica nakaiana and the related species Veronica persica and Veronicastrum sibiricum. The chloroplast genome length of V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum ranged from 150,198 bp to 152,930 bp. A total of 112 genes comprising 79 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes were observed in three chloroplast genomes. The total number of SSRs was 48, 51, and 53 in V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum, respectively. Two SSRs (10 bp of AT and 12 bp of AATA) were observed in the same regions (rpoC2 and ndhD) in three chloroplast genomes. A comparison of coding genes and non-coding regions between V. nakaiana and V. persica revealed divergent sites, with the greatest variation occurring petD-rpoA region. The complete chloroplast genome sequence information regarding the three Veroniceae will be helpful for elucidating Veroniceae phylogenetic relationships. PMID:27047524

  14. Genome-Based Identification of Chromosomal Regions Specific for Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen-Wester, Imke; Hensel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Acquisition of genomic elements by horizontal gene transfer represents an important mechanism in the evolution of bacterial species. Pathogenicity islands are a subset of horizontally acquired elements present in various pathogens. These elements are frequently located adjacent to tRNA genes. We performed a comparative genome analysis of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Typhimurium and Escherichia coli and scanned tRNA loci for the presence of species-specific, horizontally acquired genomic elements. A large number of species-specific elements were identified. Here, we describe the characteristics of four large chromosomal insertions at tRNA genes of Salmonella spp. The tRNA-associated elements harbor various genes previously identified as single virulence genes, indicating that these genes have been acquired with large chromosomal insertions. Southern blot analyses confirmed that the tRNA-associated elements are specific to Salmonella and also indicated a heterogeneous distribution within the salmonellae. Systematic scanning for insertions at tRNA genes thus represents a tool for the identification of novel pathogenicity islands. PMID:11953370

  15. Identification of novel SNPs by next-generation sequencing of the genomic region containing the APC gene in colorectal cancer patients in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yin; Wang, Jun; Shao, Jiaofang; Chen, Qiyun; Mo, Fan; Ma, Liang; Han, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Cixiong; Lin, Shuyong; Yu, Jiekai; Zheng, Shu; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Lin, Biaoyang

    2010-06-01

    We described an approach of identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in complete genomic regions of key genes including promoters, exons, introns, and downstream sequences by combining long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or NimbleGen sequence capture with next-generation sequencing. Using the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene as an example, we identified 210 highly reliable SNPs by next-generation sequencing analysis program MAQ and Samtools, of which 69 were novel ones, in the 123-kb APC genomic region in 27 pair of colorectal cancers and normal adjacent tissues. We confirmed all of the eight randomly selected high-quality SNPs by allele-specific PCR, suggesting that our false discovery rate is negligible. We identified 11 SNPs in the exonic region, including one novel SNP that was not previously reported. Although 10 of them are synonymous, they were predicted to affect splicing by creating or removing exonic splicing enhancers or exonic splicing silencers. We also identified seven SNPs in the upstream region of the APC gene, three of which were only identified in the cancer tissues. Six of these upstream SNPs were predicted to affect transcription factor binding. We also observed that long-range PCR was better in capturing GC-rich regions than the NimbleGen sequence capture technique.

  16. Detection of structural variants involving repetitive regions in the reference genome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heewook; Popodi, Ellen; Foster, Patricia L; Tang, Haixu

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques are now commonly used to characterize structural variations (SVs) in population genomics and elucidate their associations with phenotypes. Many of the computational tools developed for detecting structural variations work by mapping paired-end reads to a reference genome and identifying the discordant read-pairs whose mapped loci in the reference genome deviate from the expected insert size and orientation. However, repetitive regions in the reference genome represent a major challenge in SV detection, because the paired-end reads from these regions may be mapped to multiple loci in the reference genome, resulting in spuriously discordant read-pairs. To address this issue, we have developed an algorithmic approach for read mapping and SV detection based on the framework of A-Bruijn graphs. Instead of mapping reads to a linear sequence of the reference genome, we propose to map reads onto the A-Bruijn graph constructed from the reference genome in which all instances of the same repeat are collapsed into a single edge. As a result, any given read, either from repetitive regions or not, will be mapped to a unique location in the A-Bruijn graph, and each discordant read-pair in the A-Bruijn graph indicates a potentially true SV event. We also developed a simple clustering algorithm to derive valid clusters of these discordant read-pairs, each supporting a different SV event. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this approach, compared to existing approaches, by identifying transposition events of insertion sequence (IS) elements, a class of simple mobile genetic elements (MGEs), in E. coli by using simulated and real paired-end sequence data acquired from E. coli mutation accumulation lines.

  17. Regulation of sex determination in mice by a non-coding genomic region.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Valerie A; Fleming, Alice; Barseghyan, Hayk; Délot, Emmanuèle; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Vilain, Eric

    2014-07-01

    To identify novel genomic regions that regulate sex determination, we utilized the powerful C57BL/6J-Y(POS) (B6-Y(POS)) model of XY sex reversal where mice with autosomes from the B6 strain and a Y chromosome from a wild-derived strain, Mus domesticus poschiavinus (Y(POS)), show complete sex reversal. In B6-Y(POS), the presence of a 55-Mb congenic region on chromosome 11 protects from sex reversal in a dose-dependent manner. Using mouse genetic backcross designs and high-density SNP arrays, we narrowed the congenic region to a 1.62-Mb genomic region on chromosome 11 that confers 80% protection from B6-Y(POS) sex reversal when one copy is present and complete protection when two copies are present. It was previously believed that the protective congenic region originated from the 129S1/SviMJ (129) strain. However, genomic analysis revealed that this region is not derived from 129 and most likely is derived from the semi-inbred strain POSA. We show that the small 1.62-Mb congenic region that protects against B6-Y(POS) sex reversal is located within the Sox9 promoter and promotes the expression of Sox9, thereby driving testis development within the B6-Y(POS) background. Through 30 years of backcrossing, this congenic region was maintained, as it promoted male sex determination and fertility despite the female-promoting B6-Y(POS) genetic background. Our findings demonstrate that long-range enhancer regions are critical to developmental processes and can be used to identify the complex interplay between genome variants, epigenetics, and developmental gene regulation.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions.

  19. Functions of the 3' and 5' genome RNA regions of members of the genus Flavivirus.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Margo A; Basu, Mausumi

    2015-08-03

    The positive sense genomes of members of the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae are ∼ 11 kb in length and have a 5' type I cap but no 3' poly-A. The 3' and 5' terminal regions contain short conserved sequences that are proposed to be repeated remnants of an ancient sequence. However, the functions of most of these conserved sequences have not yet been determined. The terminal regions of the genome also contain multiple conserved RNA structures. Functional data for many of these structures have been obtained. Three sets of complementary 3' and 5' terminal region sequences, some of which are located in conserved RNA structures, interact to form a panhandle structure that is required for initiation of minus strand RNA synthesis with the 5' terminal structure functioning as the promoter. How the switch from the terminal RNA structure base pairing to the long distance RNA-RNA interaction is triggered and regulated is not well understood but evidence suggests involvement of a cell protein binding to three sites on the 3' terminal RNA structures and a cis-acting metastable 3' RNA element in the 3' terminal RNA structure. Cell proteins may also be involved in facilitating exponential replication of nascent genomic RNA within replication vesicles at later times of the infection cycle. Other conserved RNA structures and/or sequences in the 3' and 5' terminal regions have been proposed to regulate genome translation. Additional functions of the 3' and 5' terminal sequences have also been reported.

  20. Non-coding RNAs match the deleted genomic regions in humans

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    RNA is transcribed from DNA, and therefore, there should be no RNA transcript from the deleted DNA region. Our study attempted to analyse whether any RNA cache that maps the deleted regions is present in human cells. Using data from the 1000 genome project, we selected 41 CEPH (CEU) and 38 Yoruba (YRI) samples that included the data for the entire genome sequence and ncRNA and mRNA sequences. Aligning the ncRNA reads against the genomic DNA in individual samples has revealed that 229 out of 1114 homozygous deletions have ncRNA reads that map to them. Further analysis has revealed that ncRNA reads that map the deleted regions are enriched around the deletion ends and at genic regions of the genome. The read enrichment at deletion ends suggests that these ncRNAs are likely some form of double-strand break induced RNAs. Our analysis suggests that human cells may contain a residual ncRNA cache that is possibly propagated across generations. PMID:27853310

  1. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter iguaniorum to Unravel Genetic Regions Associated with Reptilian Hosts.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Kik, Marja; Zomer, Aldert L; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-10-05

    Campylobacter iguaniorum is most closely related to the species C fetus, C hyointestinalis, and C lanienae Reptiles, chelonians and lizards in particular, appear to be a primary reservoir of this Campylobacter species. Here we report the genome comparison of C iguaniorum strain 1485E, isolated from a bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and strain 2463D, isolated from a green iguana (Iguana iguana), with the genomes of closely related taxa, in particular with reptile-associated C fetus subsp. testudinum In contrast to C fetus, C iguaniorum is lacking an S-layer encoding region. Furthermore, a defined lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis locus, encoding multiple glycosyltransferases and bounded by waa genes, is absent from C iguaniorum Instead, multiple predicted glycosylation regions were identified in C iguaniorum One of these regions is > 50 kb with deviant G + C content, suggesting acquisition via lateral transfer. These similar, but non-homologous glycosylation regions were located at the same position on the genome in both strains. Multiple genes encoding respiratory enzymes not identified to date within the C. fetus clade were present. C iguaniorum shared highest homology with C hyointestinalis and C fetus. As in reptile-associated C fetus subsp. testudinum, a putative tricarballylate catabolism locus was identified. However, despite colonizing a shared host, no recent recombination between both taxa was detected. This genomic study provides a better understanding of host adaptation, virulence, phylogeny, and evolution of C iguaniorum and related Campylobacter taxa.

  2. Genomic regions responsible for amenability to Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in barley

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Different plant cultivars of the same genus and species can exhibit vastly different genetic transformation efficiencies. However, the genetic factors underlying these differences in transformation rate remain largely unknown. In barley, ‘Golden Promise’ is one of a few cultivars reliable for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. By contrast, cultivar ‘Haruna Nijo’ is recalcitrant to genetic transformation. We identified genomic regions of barley important for successful transformation with Agrobacterium, utilizing the ‘Haruna Nijo’ × ‘Golden Promise’ F2 generation and genotyping by 124 genome-wide SNP markers. We observed significant segregation distortions of these markers from the expected 1:2:1 ratio toward the ‘Golden Promise’-type in regions of chromosomes 2H and 3H, indicating that the alleles of ‘Golden Promise’ in these regions might contribute to transformation efficiency. The same regions, which we termed Transformation Amenability (TFA) regions, were also conserved in transgenic F2 plants generated from a ‘Morex’ × ‘Golden Promise’ cross. The genomic regions identified herein likely include necessary factors for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in barley. The potential to introduce these loci into any haplotype of barley opens the door to increasing the efficiency of transformation for target alleles into any haplotype of barley by the TFA-based methods proposed in this report. PMID:27874056

  3. The regional structural setting of the 2008 Wells earthquake and Town Creek Flat Basin: implications for the Wells earthquake fault and adjacent structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Christopher S.; Colgan, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    The 2008 Wells earthquake occurred on a northeast-striking, southeast-dipping fault that is clearly delineated by the aftershock swarm to a depth of 10-12 km below sea level. However, Cenozoic rocks and structures around Wells primarily record east-west extension along north- to north-northeast-striking, west-dipping normal faults that formed during the middle Miocene. These faults are responsible for the strong eastward tilt of most basins and ranges in the area, including the Town Creek Flat basin (the location of the earthquake) and the adjacent Snake Mountains and western Windermere Hills. These older west-dipping faults are locally overprinted by a younger generation of east-dipping, high-angle normal faults that formed as early as the late Miocene and have remained active into the Quaternary. The most prominent of these east-dipping faults is the set of en-échelon, north-striking faults that bounds the east sides of the Ruby Mountains, East Humboldt Range, and Clover Hill (about 5 km southwest of Wells). The northeastern-most of these faults, the Clover Hill fault, projects northward along strike toward the Snake Mountains and the approximately located surface projection of the Wells earthquake fault as defined by aftershock locations. The Clover Hill fault also projects toward a previously unrecognized, east-facing Quaternary fault scarp and line of springs that appear to mark a significant east-dipping normal fault along the western edge of Town Creek Flat. Both western and eastern projections may be northern continuations of the Clover Hill fault. The Wells earthquake occurred along this east-dipping fault system. Two possible alternatives to rupture of a northern continuation of the Clover Hill fault are that the earthquake fault (1) is antithetic to an active west-dipping fault or (2) reactivated a Mesozoic thrust fault that dips east as a result of tilting by the west-dipping faults along the west side of the Snake Mountains. Both alternatives are

  4. Crust structure of the Northern Margin of North China Craton and adjacent region from Sinoprobe-02 North China seismic WAR/R experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gao, R.; Keller, G. R.; Li, Q.; Cox, C. M.; Hou, H.; Guan, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Central Asian Orogen Belt (CAOB) or Altaids, situated between the Siberian craton(SC) to the north and north China craton (NCC) with tarim to the south, is one of the world's largest accretionary orogens formed by subduction and accretion of juvenile material from the Neoproterozoic through the Paleozoic. The NCC is the oldest craton in China, which suffered Yanshan intercontinental orogenic process and lithosphere thinning in Mesozoic. In the past 20 years, remarkable studies about this region have been carried out and different tectonic models were proposed, however, some crucial geologic problems remain controversial. In order to obtain better knowledge of deep structure and properties of crust on the northern margin of north China craton, a 450 km long WAR/R section was completed jointly by Institute of Geology, CAGS and University of Oklahoma. Our 450 km long NW-SE WAR/R line extends from west end of the Yanshan orogen, across the Bainaimiao arc, Ondor sum subduction accretion complex to the Solonker suture zone. The recording of seismic waves from 8 explorations was conducted in 4 deployments of 300 reftek-125A records and single-channel 4.5Hz geophones with station spacing of 1km. The shooting procedure was employ 500 or 1500kg explosives in 4-5 or 15-23 boreholes at 40-45m depth. The sampling rate was 100 HZ, and recording time window was 1200s. The P wave field on the sections got high quality data for most part of the profile, but have low signal-to-noise for the south end, where closed to Beijing with a lot of ambient noise from traffic, industry and human activity. Arrivals from of refracted and reflected waves from sediments and basement (Pg), intracrust (Pcp, Plp) and Moho (Pmp) were typically observed, but Pn phase through the upper most mantle was only observed for 2 shots. Identification and correlation of seismic phases was done manually on computer screen Zplot software. Each trace has been bandpass filtered (1-20Hz) and normalized with AGC

  5. Identification and analysis of genomic regions with large between-population differentiation in humans.

    PubMed

    Myles, S; Tang, K; Somel, M; Green, R E; Kelso, J; Stoneking, M

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of genetic association and linkage studies is to identify genetic variants that contribute to phenotypic variation within human populations. Since the overwhelming majority of human genetic variation is found within populations, these methods are expected to be effective and can likely be extrapolated from one human population to another. However, they may lack power in detecting the genetic variants that contribute to phenotypes that differ greatly between human populations. Phenotypes that show large differences between populations are expected to be associated with genomic regions exhibiting large allele frequency differences between populations. Thus, from genome-wide polymorphism data genomic regions with large allele frequency differences between populations can be identified, and evaluated as candidates for large between-population phenotypic differences. Here we use allele frequency data from approximately 1.5 million SNPs from three human populations, and present an algorithm that identifies genomic regions containing SNPs with extreme Fst. We demonstrate that our candidate regions have reduced heterozygosity in Europeans and Chinese relative to African-Americans, and are likely enriched with genes that have experienced positive natural selection. We identify genes that are likely responsible for phenotypes known to differ dramatically between human populations and present several candidates worthy of future investigation. Our list of high Fst genomic regions is a first step in identifying the genetic variants that contribute to large phenotypic differences between populations, many of which have likely experienced positive natural selection. Our approach based on between population differences can compliment traditional within population linkage and association studies to uncover novel genotype-phenotype relationships.

  6. Identification of genomic regions associated with phenotypic variation between dog breeds using selection mapping.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, Amaury; Ratnakumar, Abhirami; Derrien, Thomas; Axelsson, Erik; Rosengren Pielberg, Gerli; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Fall, Tove; Seppälä, Eija H; Hansen, Mark S T; Lawley, Cindy T; Karlsson, Elinor K; Bannasch, Danika; Vilà, Carles; Lohi, Hannes; Galibert, Francis; Fredholm, Merete; Häggström, Jens; Hedhammar, Ake; André, Catherine; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hitte, Christophe; Webster, Matthew T

    2011-10-01

    The extraordinary phenotypic diversity of dog breeds has been sculpted by a unique population history accompanied by selection for novel and desirable traits. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis using multiple test statistics to identify regions under selection in 509 dogs from 46 diverse breeds using a newly developed high-density genotyping array consisting of >170,000 evenly spaced SNPs. We first identify 44 genomic regions exhibiting extreme differentiation across multiple breeds. Genetic variation in these regions correlates with variation in several phenotypic traits that vary between breeds, and we identify novel associations with both morphological and behavioral traits. We next scan the genome for signatures of selective sweeps in single breeds, characterized by long regions of reduced heterozygosity and fixation of extended haplotypes. These scans identify hundreds of regions, including 22 blocks of homozygosity longer than one megabase in certain breeds. Candidate selection loci are strongly enriched for developmental genes. We chose one highly differentiated region, associated with body size and ear morphology, and characterized it using high-throughput sequencing to provide a list of variants that may directly affect these traits. This study provides a catalogue of genomic regions showing extreme reduction in genetic variation or population differentiation in dogs, including many linked to phenotypic variation. The many blocks of reduced haplotype diversity observed across the genome in dog breeds are the result of both selection and genetic drift, but extended blocks of homozygosity on a megabase scale appear to be best explained by selection. Further elucidation of the variants under selection will help to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits and disease.

  7. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  8. [Comparative analysis of variable regions in the genomes of variola virus].

    PubMed

    Babkin, I V; Nepomniashchikh, T S; Maksiutov, R A; Gutorov, V V; Babkina, I N; Shchelkunov, S N

    2008-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of two extended segments of the terminal variable regions in variola virus genome were determined. The size of the left segment was 13.5 kbp and of the right, 10.5 kbp. Totally, over 540 kbp were sequenced for 22 variola virus strains. The conducted phylogenetic analysis and the data published earlier allowed us to find the interrelations between 70 variola virus isolates, the character of their clustering, and the degree of intergroup and intragroup variations of the clusters of variola virus strains. The most polymorphic loci of the genome segments studied were determined. It was demonstrated that that these loci are localized to either noncoding genome regions or to the regions of destroyed open reading frames, characteristic of the ancestor virus. These loci are promising for development of the strategy for genotyping variola virus strains. Analysis of recombination using various methods demonstrated that, with the only exception, no statistically significant recombinational events in the genomes of variola virus strains studied were detectable.

  9. Evaluation of Apis mellifera syriaca Levant region honeybee conservation using comparative genome hybridization.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nizar Jamal; Batainh, Ahmed; Saini, Deepti; Migdadi, Osama; Aiyaz, Mohamed; Manchiganti, Rushiraj; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Al-Shagour, Banan; Brake, Mohammad; Bourgeois, Lelania; De Guzman, Lilia; Rinderer, Thomas; Hamouri, Zayed Mahoud

    2016-06-01

    Apis mellifera syriaca is the native honeybee subspecies of Jordan and much of the Levant region. It expresses behavioral adaptations to a regional climate with very high temperatures, nectar dearth in summer, attacks of the Oriental wasp and is resistant to Varroa mites. The A. m. syriaca control reference sample (CRS) in this study was originally collected and stored since 2001 from "Wadi Ben Hammad", a remote valley in the southern region of Jordan. Morphometric and mitochondrial DNA markers of these honeybees had shown highest similarity to reference A. m. syriaca samples collected in 1952 by Brother Adam of samples collected from the Middle East. Samples 1-5 were collected from the National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension breeding apiary which was established for the conservation of A. m. syriaca. Our objective was to determine the success of an A. m. syriaca honey bee conservation program using genomic information from an array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform to evaluate genetic similarities to a historic reference collection (CRS). Our results had shown insignificant genomic differences between the current population in the conservation program and the CRS indicated that program is successfully conserving A. m. syriaca. Functional genomic variations were identified which are useful for conservation monitoring and may be useful for breeding programs designed to improve locally adapted strains of A. m. syriaca.

  10. Analysis of genomic regions of Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 related to biomass degradation.

    PubMed

    Crucello, Aline; Sforça, Danilo Augusto; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Vincentz, Michel; Kuroshu, Reginaldo Massanobu; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 secretes high levels of cellulolytic-active enzymes and is therefore a promising strain for use in biotechnological applications in second-generation bioethanol production. However, the T. harzianum biomass degradation mechanism has not been well explored at the genetic level. The present work investigates six genomic regions (~150 kbp each) in this fungus that are enriched with genes related to biomass conversion. A BAC library consisting of 5,760 clones was constructed, with an average insert length of 90 kbp. The assembled BAC sequences revealed 232 predicted genes, 31.5% of which were related to catabolic pathways, including those involved in biomass degradation. An expression profile analysis based on RNA-Seq data demonstrated that putative regulatory elements, such as membrane transport proteins and transcription factors, are located in the same genomic regions as genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and exhibit similar expression profiles. Thus, we demonstrate a rapid and efficient tool that focuses on specific genomic regions by combining a BAC library with transcriptomic data. This is the first BAC-based structural genomic study of the cellulolytic fungus T. harzianum, and its findings provide new perspectives regarding the use of this species in biomass degradation processes.

  11. Analysis of Genomic Regions of Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 Related to Biomass Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Crucello, Aline; Sforça, Danilo Augusto; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Vincentz, Michel; Kuroshu, Reginaldo Massanobu; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 secretes high levels of cellulolytic-active enzymes and is therefore a promising strain for use in biotechnological applications in second-generation bioethanol production. However, the T. harzianum biomass degradation mechanism has not been well explored at the genetic level. The present work investigates six genomic regions (~150 kbp each) in this fungus that are enriched with genes related to biomass conversion. A BAC library consisting of 5,760 clones was constructed, with an average insert length of 90 kbp. The assembled BAC sequences revealed 232 predicted genes, 31.5% of which were related to catabolic pathways, including those involved in biomass degradation. An expression profile analysis based on RNA-Seq data demonstrated that putative regulatory elements, such as membrane transport proteins and transcription factors, are located in the same genomic regions as genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and exhibit similar expression profiles. Thus, we demonstrate a rapid and efficient tool that focuses on specific genomic regions by combining a BAC library with transcriptomic data. This is the first BAC-based structural genomic study of the cellulolytic fungus T. harzianum, and its findings provide new perspectives regarding the use of this species in biomass degradation processes. PMID:25836973

  12. Identification of genomic regions for grain yield and yield stability and their epistatic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Deepmala; Autrique, Enrique; Singh, Ravi; Ellis, Marc; Singh, Sukhwinder; Dreisigacker, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    The task of identifying genomic regions conferring yield stability is challenging in any crop and requires large experimental data sets in conjunction with complex analytical approaches. We report findings of a first attempt to identify genomic regions with stable expression and their individual epistatic interactions for grain yield and yield stability in a large elite panel of wheat under multiple environments via a genome wide association mapping (GWAM) approach. Seven hundred and twenty lines were genotyped using genotyping-by-sequencing technology and phenotyped for grain yield and phenological traits. High gene diversity (0.250) and a moderate genetic structure (five groups) in the panel provided an excellent base for GWAM. The mixed linear model and multi-locus mixed model analyses identified key genomic regions on chromosomes 2B, 3A, 4A, 5B, 7A and 7B. Further, significant epistatic interactions were observed among loci with and without main effects that contributed to additional variation of up to 10%. Simple stepwise regression provided the most significant main effect and epistatic markers resulting in up to 20% variation for yield stability and up to 17% gain in yield with the best allelic combination. PMID:28145508

  13. Divergence is focused on few genomic regions early in speciation: incipient speciation of sunflower ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rose L; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2013-09-01

    Early in speciation, as populations undergo the transition from local adaptation to incipient species, is when a number of transient, but potentially important, processes appear to be most easily detected. These include signatures of selective sweeps that can point to asymmetry in selection between habitats, divergence hitchhiking, and associations of adaptive genes with environments. In a genomic comparison of ecotypes of the prairie sunflower, Helianthus petiolaris, occurring at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (Colorado), we found that selective sweeps were mainly restricted to the dune ecotype and that there was variation across the genome in whether proximity to the nondune population constrained or promoted divergence. The major regions of divergence were few and large between ecotypes, in contrast with an interspecific comparison between H. petiolaris and a sympatric congener, Helianthus annuus. In general, the large regions of divergence observed in the ecotypic comparison swamped locus-specific associations with environmental variables. In both comparisons, regions of high divergence occurred in portions of the genetic map with high marker density, probably reflecting regions of low recombination. The difference in genomic distributions of highly divergent regions between ecotypic and interspecific comparisons highlights the value of studies spanning the spectrum of speciation in related taxa.

  14. "Replicated" genome wide association for dependence on illegal substances: genomic regions identified by overlapping clusters of nominally positive SNPs.

    PubMed

    Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine A; Nino, Michelle; Drgonova, Jana; Walther, Donna M; Uhl, George R

    2011-03-01

    Declaring "replication" from results of genome wide association (GWA) studies is straightforward when major gene effects provide genome-wide significance for association of the same allele of the same SNP in each of multiple independent samples. However, such unambiguous replication may be unlikely when phenotypes display polygenic genetic architecture, allelic heterogeneity, locus heterogeneity, and when different samples display linkage disequilibria with different fine structures. We seek chromosomal regions that are tagged by clustered SNPs that display nominally significant association in each of several independent samples. This approach provides one "nontemplate" approach to identifying overall replication of groups of GWA results in the face of difficult genetic architectures. We apply this strategy to 1 million (1M) SNP Affymetrix and Illumina GWA results for dependence on illegal substances. This approach provides high confidence in rejecting the null hypothesis that chance alone accounts for the extent to which clustered, nominally significant SNPs from samples of the same racial/ethnic background identify the same chromosomal regions. There is more modest confidence in: (a) identification of individual chromosomal regions and genes and (b) overlap between results from samples of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. The strong overlap identified among the samples with similar racial/ethnic backgrounds, together with prior work that identified overlapping results in samples of different racial/ethnic backgrounds, support contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to addictions that come from both relatively older allelic variants that are common in many current human populations and newer allelic variants that are common in fewer current human populations.

  15. Further evidence of microcolinearity between barley and rice genomes at two orthologous regions.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Jin; Dixit, Anupam; Yoo, Jae-Woong; Bennetzen, Jeff

    2004-06-30

    Two genetic markers, BCD135 and RZ567 were used to select clones from genomic BAC libraries of barley and rice for sequencing and subsequent sequence comparisons. A set of two orthologous BACs each from barley and rice was selected by hybridization with BCD135 and RZ567 cDNA probes. A total of 556-kb stretch including two barley BACs (773K135 and 745C13) and two orthologous rice BACs (24K23 and 49D11) was completely sequenced. Comparative sequence analysis between orthologous BACs from the two species revealed presence of two conserved genes at BCD135 region and only one gene at the RZ567 regions. The two conserved genes were in the same order and orientation in both the species however, separated by significantly larger distance in barley. The larger distance between two barley genes was mainly due to presence of different retrotransposable elements and their derivatives (78.9% of the intergenic region) that expanded the barley BCD135 region at the rate of 9.1X. An additional gene of unknown function was also inserted along with several retrotransposable elements between two conserved genes at barley BCD135 region. More genome expansion rate (10X) around barley RZ567 locus was estimated by extremely high proportion (> 70%) of retrotransposons. Among different retrotransposons, the Sabrina elements rather than BARE were more prevalent in both the regions. Contrary to it, the BCD135 region of rice was composed of only 17.1% retrotransposable elements and no significant retrotransposons except 14 miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) were observed in its RZ567 region. The sequence comparison between orthologous regions of rice and barley genomes was useful for gene identification and determination of individual gene structure indicating the possibility of effective utilization of rice genome sequences in understanding the large genome of barley. (The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under the accession

  16. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods.

  17. Genomic evolution and polymorphism: segmental duplications and haplotypes at 108 regions on 21 chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McLure, Craig A; Hinchliffe, Peter; Lester, Susan; Williamson, Joseph F; Millman, John A; Keating, Peter J; Stewart, Brent J; Dawkins, Roger L

    2013-07-01

    We describe here extensive, previously unknown, genomic polymorphism in 120 regions, covering 19 autosomes and both sex chromosomes. Each contains duplication within multigene clusters. Of these, 108 are extremely polymorphic with multiple haplotypes. We used the genomic matching technique (GMT), previously used to characterise the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and regulators of complement activation (RCA). This genome-wide extension of this technique enables the examination of many underlying cis, trans and epistatic interactions responsible for phenotypic differences especially in relation to individuality, evolution and disease susceptibility. The extent of the diversity could not have been predicted and suggests a new model of primate evolution based on conservation of polymorphism rather than de novo mutation.

  18. Comparative genomics of Lupinus angustifolius gene-rich regions: BAC library exploration, genetic mapping and cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The narrow-leafed lupin, Lupinus angustifolius L., is a grain legume species with a relatively compact genome. The species has 2n = 40 chromosomes and its genome size is 960 Mbp/1C. During the last decade, L. angustifolius genomic studies have achieved several milestones, such as molecular-marker development, linkage maps, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries. Here, these resources were integratively used to identify and sequence two gene-rich regions (GRRs) of the genome. Results The genome was screened with a probe representing the sequence of a microsatellite fragment length polymorphism (MFLP) marker linked to Phomopsis stem blight resistance. BAC clones selected by hybridization were subjected to restriction fingerprinting and contig assembly, and 232 BAC-ends were sequenced and annotated. BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH) identified eight single-locus clones. Based on physical mapping, cytogenetic localization, and BAC-end annotation, five clones were chosen for sequencing. Within the sequences of clones that hybridized in FISH to a single-locus, two large GRRs were identified. The GRRs showed strong and conserved synteny to Glycine max duplicated genome regions, illustrated by both identical gene order and parallel orientation. In contrast, in the clones with dispersed FISH signals, more than one-third of sequences were transposable elements. Sequenced, single-locus clones were used to develop 12 genetic markers, increasing the number of L. angustifolius chromosomes linked to appropriate linkage groups by five pairs. Conclusions In general, probes originating from MFLP sequences can assist genome screening and gene discovery. However, such probes are not useful for positional cloning, because they tend to hybridize to numerous loci. GRRs identified in L. angustifolius contained a low number of interspersed repeats and had a high level of synteny to the genome of the model legume G. max. Our results showed that

  19. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  20. A statistical framework to predict functional non-coding regions in the human genome through integrated analysis of annotation data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiongshi; Hu, Yiming; Sun, Jiehuan; Cheng, Yuwei; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-05-27

    Identifying functional regions in the human genome is a major goal in human genetics. Great efforts have been made to functionally annotate the human genome either through computational predictions, such as genomic conservation, or high-throughput experiments, such as the ENCODE project. These efforts have resulted in a rich collection of functional annotation data of diverse types that need to be jointly analyzed for integrated interpretation and annotation. Here we present GenoCanyon, a whole-genome annotation method that performs unsupervised statistical learning using 22 computational and experimental annotations thereby inferring the functional potential of each position in the human genome. With GenoCanyon, we are able to predict many of the known functional regions. The ability of predicting functional regions as well as its generalizable statistical framework makes GenoCanyon a unique and powerful tool for whole-genome annotation. The GenoCanyon web server is available at http://genocanyon.med.yale.edu.

  1. Ants of three adjacent habitats of a transition region between the cerrado and caatinga biomes: the effects of heterogeneity and variation in canopy cover.

    PubMed

    Neves, F S; Queiroz-Dantas, K S; da Rocha, W D; Delabie, J H C

    2013-06-01

    Habitat heterogeneity and complexity associated with variations in climatic conditions are important factors determining the structure of ant communities in different terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to describe the horizontal and vertical distribution patterns of the ant community associated with three adjacent habitats in a transition area between the Cerrado and Caatinga biomes at the Pandeiros River, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) the richness and composition of ant species and functional group structure changes between different habitats and strata; (2) habitats with higher tree species richness and density support higher ant species richness; and (3) habitats with lower variation in canopy cover support higher ant species richness. Sampling was conducted in three adjacent habitats and at three vertical strata. Ant species richness was significantly different among vertical strata. Ant species composition was different among both habitats and vertical strata and functional group structure was divergent among habitats. Partitioning of the diversity revealed that the diversity for the three components was statistically different from the one expected by the null model; α and β 2 were higher and β 1 was lower than the values expected by chance. Tree density and variation in canopy cover negatively affected ant species richness. The occurrence of different species and the changing of functional group structures in different habitats and strata suggest an ecological-evolutionary relationship between ants and their habitats and emphasize the need to implement local conservation strategies in the ecotones between biomes.

  2. The Evolution of Orphan Regions in Genomes of a Fungal Pathogen of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Plissonneau, Clémence; Stürchler, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal plant pathogens rapidly evolve virulence on resistant hosts through mutations in genes encoding proteins that modulate the host immune responses. The mutational spectrum likely includes chromosomal rearrangements responsible for gains or losses of entire genes. However, the mechanisms creating adaptive structural variation in fungal pathogen populations are poorly understood. We used complete genome assemblies to quantify structural variants segregating in the highly polymorphic fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. The genetic basis of virulence in Z. tritici is complex, and populations harbor significant genetic variation for virulence; hence, we aimed to identify whether structural variation led to functional differences. We combined single-molecule real-time sequencing, genetic maps, and transcriptomics data to generate a fully assembled and annotated genome of the highly virulent field isolate 3D7. Comparative genomics analyses against the complete reference genome IPO323 identified large chromosomal inversions and the complete gain or loss of transposable-element clusters, explaining the extensive chromosomal-length polymorphisms found in this species. Both the 3D7 and IPO323 genomes harbored long tracts of sequences exclusive to one of the two genomes. These orphan regions contained 296 genes unique to the 3D7 genome and not previously known for this species. These orphan genes tended to be organized in clusters and showed evidence of mutational decay. Moreover, the orphan genes were enriched in genes encoding putative effectors and included a gene that is one of the most upregulated putative effector genes during wheat infection. Our study showed that this pathogen species harbored extensive chromosomal structure polymorphism that may drive the evolution of virulence. PMID:27795389

  3. Read clouds uncover variation in complex regions of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Alex; Liu, Yuling; Weng, Ziming; Kashef-Haghighi, Dorna; Newburger, Daniel E; West, Robert; Sidow, Arend; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2015-10-01

    Although an increasing amount of human genetic variation is being identified and recorded, determining variants within repeated sequences of the human genome remains a challenge. Most population and genome-wide association studies have therefore been unable to consider variation in these regions. Core to the problem is the lack of a sequencing technology that produces reads with sufficient length and accuracy to enable unique mapping. Here, we present a novel methodology of using read clouds, obtained by accurate short-read sequencing of DNA derived from long fragment libraries, to confidently align short reads within repeat regions and enable accurate variant discovery. Our novel algorithm, Random Field Aligner (RFA), captures the relationships among the short reads governed by the long read process via a Markov Random Field. We utilized a modified version of the Illumina TruSeq synthetic long-read protocol, which yielded shallow-sequenced read clouds. We test RFA through extensive simulations and apply it to discover variants on the NA12878 human sample, for which shallow TruSeq read cloud sequencing data are available, and on an invasive breast carcinoma genome that we sequenced using the same method. We demonstrate that RFA facilitates accurate recovery of variation in 155 Mb of the human genome, including 94% of 67 Mb of segmental duplication sequence and 96% of 11 Mb of transcribed sequence, that are currently hidden from short-read technologies.

  4. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Mia E.; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S. V.; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog’s human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders. PMID:27685260

  5. Gene organization in the UL region and inverted repeats of the canine herpesvirus genome.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M; Sheldrick, P; Lebreton, F; Nardeux, P; Foulon, T

    1996-01-01

    Restriction mapping and the determination of scattered nucleotide sequences have permitted a description of the global structure and evolutionary affinities of the canine herpesvirus (CHV) genome. The global structure closely resembles that of the totally sequenced genomes of varicella-zoster virus and equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) in having a 37 bp inverted repeat flanking a long unique region (UL) of approximately 100,000 bp, and a 10,100-10,700 bp inverted repeat flanking a short unique region (U8) of roughly 7,400-8,600 bp. On the basis of the sequences obtained, 35 homologues to previously identified herpesvirus gene products were found in UL and the major inverted repeat, and the level of the similarities indicated that CHV belongs to the genus Varicellovirus. Within the genus, CHV appears to be most closely related to EHV-1, pseudorabies virus and feline herpesvirus. Surprisingly, genes for both subunits of the viral ribonucleotide reductase were found to be missing from their equivalent place in other herpesvirus genomes. Either they have been translocated to another position in the CHV genome or, we think more likely, they have been lost.

  6. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders.

    PubMed

    Persson, Mia E; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S V; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-09-29

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog's human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders.

  7. Investigation of malaria susceptibility determinants in the IFNG/IL26/IL22 genomic region.

    PubMed

    Koch, O; Rockett, K; Jallow, M; Pinder, M; Sisay-Joof, F; Kwiatkowski, D

    2005-06-01

    Interferon-gamma, encoded by IFNG, is a key immunological mediator that is believed to play both a protective and a pathological role in malaria. Here, we investigate the relationship between IFNG variation and susceptibility to malaria. We began by analysing West African and European haplotype structure and patterns of linkage disequilibrium across a 100 kb genomic region encompassing IFNG and its immediate neighbours IL22 and IL26. A large case-control study of severe malaria in a West Africa population identified several weak associations with individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the IFNG and IL22 genes, and defined two IL22 haplotypes that are, respectively, associated with resistance and susceptibility. These data provide a starting point for functional and genetic analysis of the IFNG genomic region in malaria and other infectious and inflammatory conditions affecting African populations.

  8. Two genomic regions contribute disproportionately to geographic differentiation in wild barley.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhou; Gonzales, Ana M; Clegg, Michael T; Smith, Kevin P; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Steffenson, Brian J; Morrell, Peter L

    2014-04-22

    Genetic differentiation in natural populations is driven by geographic distance and by ecological or physical features within and between natural habitats that reduce migration. The primary population structure in wild barley differentiates populations east and west of the Zagros Mountains. Genetic differentiation between eastern and western populations is uneven across the genome and is greatest on linkage groups 2H and 5H. Genetic markers in these two regions demonstrate the largest difference in frequency between the primary populations and have the highest informativeness for assignment to each population. Previous cytological and genetic studies suggest there are chromosomal structural rearrangements (inversions or translocations) in these genomic regions. Environmental association analyses identified an association with both temperature and precipitation variables on 2H and with precipitation variables on 5H.

  9. Genome-wide methylation analysis identified sexually dimorphic methylated regions in hybrid tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Lin, Grace; Wang, Le; Lin, Valerie C. L.; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism is an interesting biological phenomenon. Previous studies showed that DNA methylation might play a role in sexual dimorphism. However, the overall picture of the genome-wide methylation landscape in sexually dimorphic species remains unclear. We analyzed the DNA methylation landscape and transcriptome in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) using whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We found 4,757 sexually dimorphic differentially methylated regions (DMRs), with significant clusters of DMRs located on chromosomal regions associated with sex determination. CpG methylation in promoter regions was negatively correlated with the gene expression level. MAPK/ERK pathway was upregulated in male tilapia. We also inferred active cis-regulatory regions (ACRs) in skeletal muscle tissues from WGBS datasets, revealing sexually dimorphic cis-regulatory regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation contribute to sex-specific phenotypes and serve as resources for further investigation to analyze the functions of these regions and their contributions towards sexual dimorphisms. PMID:27782217

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Multiple Regions Associated with Head Size in Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xin; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Bao, Lisui; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Chao; Wang, Ruijia; Sha, Jin; Zeng, Peng; Zhi, Degui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Skull morphology is fundamental to evolution and the biological adaptation of species to their environments. With aquaculture fish species, head size is also important for economic reasons because it has a direct impact on fillet yield. However, little is known about the underlying genetic basis of head size. Catfish is the primary aquaculture species in the United States. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study using the catfish 250K SNP array with backcross hybrid catfish to map the QTL for head size (head length, head width, and head depth). One significantly associated region on linkage group (LG) 7 was identified for head length. In addition, LGs 7, 9, and 16 contain suggestively associated regions for head length. For head width, significantly associated regions were found on LG9, and additional suggestively associated regions were identified on LGs 5 and 7. No region was found associated with head depth. Head size genetic loci were mapped in catfish to genomic regions with candidate genes involved in bone development. Comparative analysis indicated that homologs of several candidate genes are also involved in skull morphology in various other species ranging from amphibian to mammalian species, suggesting possible evolutionary conservation of those genes in the control of skull morphologies. PMID:27558670

  11. Differentially transcribed regions of Haloferax volcanii genome depending on the medium salinity.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, C; Mojica, F J; Juez, G; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1996-01-01

    To identify genomic regions involved in osmoregulation in the extremely halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii, we used a technique which involves hybridization of cDNAs obtained at different salinities against a cosmid library of the organism. Both low and high salt concentrations trigger differential expression; however, adaptation to low salinities seems to elicit a wider response. The presence of a large domain within the largest of the megaplasmids with a strong response to low salt concentrations is noteworthy. PMID:8550436

  12. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein‐Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT For next‐generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base‐pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole‐genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole‐exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single‐base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x–160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87‐fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose. PMID:25973577

  13. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  14. Genomic mapping of binding regions for the Ecdysone receptor protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Gauhar, Zareen; Sun, Ling V.; Hua, Sujun; Mason, Christopher E.; Fuchs, Florian; Li, Tong-Ruei; Boutros, Michael; White, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the physical locations of the heterodimeric Ecdysone receptor/Ultraspiracle (ECR/USP) nuclear hormone receptor complex throughout the entire nonrepetitive genome of Drosophila melanogaster using a cell line (Kc167) that differentiates in response to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE). 20-HE, the natural ligand of this complex, controls major aspects of insect development, including molting, metamorphosis, and reproduction. Direct gene targets of 20-HE signaling were identified by combining this physical binding-site profiling with gene expression profiling after treatment with 20-HE. We found 502 significant regions of ECR/USP binding throughout the genome. Only 42% of these regions are nearby genes that are 20-HE responsive in these cells. However, at least three quarters of the remaining ECR/USP regions are near 20-HE-regulated genes in other tissue and cell types during metamorphosis, suggesting that binding at many regulatory elements in the genome is largely noncell-type specific. The majority (21/26) of the early targets of 20-HE encode transcriptional regulatory factors. To determine whether any of these targets are required for the morphological differentiation of these cells, we used RNAi to reduce the expression of each of the 26 early genes. Accordingly, we found that three direct targets of ECR/USP—hairy, vrille, and Hr4—are required for cellular differentiation in response to the hormone. Initial mutational analysis of vrille in vivo reveals that it is required for metamorphosis. PMID:19237466

  15. Genome-Wide Chromatin Remodeling Identified at GC-Rich Long Nucleosome-Free Regions

    PubMed Central

    Hochreiter, Sepp

    2012-01-01

    To gain deeper insights into principles of cell biology, it is essential to understand how cells reorganize their genomes by chromatin remodeling. We analyzed chromatin remodeling on next generation sequencing data from resting and activated T cells to determine a whole-genome chromatin remodeling landscape. We consider chromatin remodeling in terms of nucleosome repositioning which can be observed most robustly in long nucleosome-free regions (LNFRs) that are occupied by nucleosomes in another cell state. We found that LNFR sequences are either AT-rich or GC-rich, where nucleosome repositioning was observed much more prominently in GC-rich LNFRs — a considerable proportion of them outside promoter regions. Using support vector machines with string kernels, we identified a GC-rich DNA sequence pattern indicating loci of nucleosome repositioning in resting T cells. This pattern appears to be also typical for CpG islands. We found out that nucleosome repositioning in GC-rich LNFRs is indeed associated with CpG islands and with binding sites of the CpG-island-binding ZF-CXXC proteins KDM2A and CFP1. That this association occurs prominently inside and also prominently outside of promoter regions hints at a mechanism governing nucleosome repositioning that acts on a whole-genome scale. PMID:23144837

  16. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein-Coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Stefan H; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A; Gilissen, Christian

    2015-08-01

    For next-generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base-pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole-genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole-exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single-base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x-160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87-fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose.

  17. Maps of context-dependent putative regulatory regions and genomic signal interactions.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Klev; Umer, Husen M; Kruczyk, Marcin; Dąbrowski, Michał J; Cavalli, Marco; Wadelius, Claes; Komorowski, Jan

    2016-11-02

    Gene transcription is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs). ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics provide global binding profiles of TFs, which can be used to identify regulatory regions. To this end we implemented a method to systematically construct cell-type and species-specific maps of regulatory regions and TF-TF interactions. We illustrated the approach by developing maps for five human cell-lines and two other species. We detected ∼144k putative regulatory regions among the human cell-lines, with the majority of them being ∼300 bp. We found ∼20k putative regulatory elements in the ENCODE heterochromatic domains suggesting a large regulatory potential in the regions presumed transcriptionally silent. Among the most significant TF interactions identified in the heterochromatic regions were CTCF and the cohesin complex, which is in agreement with previous reports. Finally, we investigated the enrichment of the obtained putative regulatory regions in the 3D chromatin domains. More than 90% of the regions were discovered in the 3D contacting domains. We found a significant enrichment of GWAS SNPs in the putative regulatory regions. These significant enrichments provide evidence that the regulatory regions play a crucial role in the genomic structural stability. Additionally, we generated maps of putative regulatory regions for prostate and colorectal cancer human cell-lines.

  18. Polymorphic simple sequence repeat regions in chloroplast genomes: applications to the population genetics of pines.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, W; Morgante, M; McDevitt, R; Vendramin, G G; Rafalski, J A

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), consisting of tandemly repeated multiple copies of mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide motifs, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and are frequently used as genetic markers, taking advantage of their length polymorphism. We have examined the polymorphism of such sequences in the chloroplast genomes of plants, by using a PCR-based assay. GenBank searches identified the presence of several (dA)n.(dT)n mononucleotide stretches in chloroplast genomes. A chloroplast (cp) SSR was identified in three pine species (Pinus contorta, Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus thunbergii) 312 bp upstream of the psbA gene. DNA amplification of this repeated region from 11 pine species identified nine length variants. The polymorphic amplified fragments were isolated and the DNA sequence was determined, confirming that the length polymorphism was caused by variation in the length of the repeated region. In the pines, the chloroplast genome is transmitted through pollen and this PCR assay may be used to monitor gene flow in this genus. Analysis of 305 individuals from seven populations of Pinus leucodermis Ant. revealed the presence of four variants with intrapopulational diversities ranging from 0.000 to 0.629 and an average of 0.320. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cpDNA on the same populations previously failed to detect any variation. Population subdivision based on cpSSR was higher (Gst = 0.22, where Gst is coefficient of gene differentiation) than that revealed in a previous isozyme study (Gst = 0.05). We anticipate that SSR loci within the chloroplast genome should provide a highly informative assay for the analysis of the genetic structure of plant populations. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7644491

  19. Application of Selection Mapping to Identify Genomic Regions Associated with Dairy Production in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Gil, Beatriz; Arranz, Juan Jose; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; García-Gámez, Elsa; Kijas, James; Wiener, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    In Europe, especially in Mediterranean areas, the sheep has been traditionally exploited as a dual purpose species, with income from both meat and milk. Modernization of husbandry methods and the establishment of breeding schemes focused on milk production have led to the development of “dairy breeds.” This study investigated selective sweeps specifically related to dairy production in sheep by searching for regions commonly identified in different European dairy breeds. With this aim, genotypes from 44,545 SNP markers covering the sheep autosomes were analysed in both European dairy and non-dairy sheep breeds using two approaches: (i) identification of genomic regions showing extreme genetic differentiation between each dairy breed and a closely related non-dairy breed, and (ii) identification of regions with reduced variation (heterozygosity) in the dairy breeds using two methods. Regions detected in at least two breeds (breed pairs) by the two approaches (genetic differentiation and at least one of the heterozygosity-based analyses) were labeled as core candidate convergence regions and further investigated for candidate genes. Following this approach six regions were detected. For some of them, strong candidate genes have been proposed (e.g. ABCG2, SPP1), whereas some other genes designated as candidates based on their association with sheep and cattle dairy traits (e.g. LALBA, DGAT1A) were not associated with a detectable sweep signal. Few of the identified regions were coincident with QTL previously reported in sheep, although many of them corresponded to orthologous regions in cattle where QTL for dairy traits have been identified. Due to the limited number of QTL studies reported in sheep compared with cattle, the results illustrate the potential value of selection mapping to identify genomic regions associated with dairy traits in sheep. PMID:24788864

  20. Two genomic regions associated with fiber quality traits in Chinese upland cotton under apparent breeding selection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junji; Li, Libei; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Wang, Caixiang; Song, Meizhen; Wang, Hantao; Zhao, Shuqi; Zhang, Chi; Mao, Guangzhi; Huang, Long; Wang, Chengshe; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-01-01

    Fiber quality is one of the most important agronomic traits of cotton, and understanding the genetic basis of its target traits will accelerate improvements to cotton fiber quality. In this study, a panel comprising 355 upland cotton accessions was used to perform genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of five fiber quality traits in four environments. A total of 16, 10 and 7 SNPs were associated with fiber length (FL), fiber strength (FS) and fiber uniformity (FU), respectively, based on the mixed linear model (MLM). Most importantly, two major genomic regions (MGR1 and MGR2) on chromosome Dt7 and four potential candidate genes for FL were identified. Analyzing the geographical distribution of favorable haplotypes (FHs) among these lines revealed that two favorable haplotype frequencies (FHFs) were higher in accessions from low-latitude regions than in accessions from high-latitude regions. However, the genetic diversity of lines from the low-latitude regions was lower than the diversity of lines from the high-latitude regions in China. Furthermore, the FHFs differed among cultivars developed during different breeding periods. These results indicate that FHs have undergone artificial selection during upland cotton breeding in recent decades in China and provide a foundation for the further improvement of fiber quality traits. PMID:27924947

  1. Cooperative enhancement of translation by two adjacent microRNA-122/Argonaute 2 complexes binding to the 5' untranslated region of hepatitis C virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Nieder-Röhrmann, Anika; Dünnes, Nadia; Gerresheim, Gesche K; Shalamova, Lyudmila A; Herchenröther, Andreas; Niepmann, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) binds to two conserved binding sites in the 5' UTR of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA. This binding was reported to enhance HCV RNA replication, translation and stability. We have analysed binding of miR-122/Argonaute 2 (Ago2) complexes to these sites using anti-Ago2 co-immunoprecipitation of radioactively labelled HCV RNAs along with ectopic miR-122 in HeLa cells. Our results show that the miR-122 target sites can be addressed separately. When both target sites were addressed simultaneously, we observed a synergistic binding of both miR/Ago2 complexes. Consistently, simultaneous binding of both miR-122/Ago2 complexes results in cooperative translation stimulation. In the binding assays as well as in the translation assays, binding site 1 has a stronger effect than binding site 2. We also analysed the overall RNA stability as well as the 5' end integrity of these HCV RNAs in the presence of miR-122. Surprisingly, using short HCV reporter RNAs, we did not find effects of miR-122 binding on overall RNA stability or 5' end integrity over up to 36 h. In contrast, using full-length HCV genomes that are incapable of replication, we found a positive influence of miR-122 on RNA stability, indicating that features of the full-length HCV genome that do not reside in the 5' and 3' UTRs may render HCV RNA genome stability miR-122 dependent.

  2. Natural selection among Eurasians at genomic regions associated with HIV-1 control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV susceptibility and pathogenicity exhibit both interindividual and intergroup variability. The etiology of intergroup variability is still poorly understood, and could be partly linked to genetic differences among racial/ethnic groups. These genetic differences may be traceable to different regimes of natural selection in the 60,000 years since the human radiation out of Africa. Here, we examine population differentiation and haplotype patterns at several loci identified through genome-wide association studies on HIV-1 control, as determined by viral-load setpoint, in European and African-American populations. We use genome-wide data from the Human Genome Diversity Project, consisting of 53 world-wide populations, to compare measures of FST and relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH) at these candidate loci to the rest of the respective chromosome. Results We find that the Europe-Middle East and Europe-South Asia pairwise FST in the most strongly associated region are elevated compared to most pairwise comparisons with the sub-Saharan African group, which exhibit very low FST. We also find genetic signatures of recent positive selection (higher REHH) at these associated regions among all groups except for sub-Saharan Africans and Native Americans. This pattern is consistent with one in which genetic differentiation, possibly due to diversifying/positive selection, occurred at these loci among Eurasians. Conclusions These findings are concordant with those from earlier studies suggesting recent evolutionary change at immunity-related genomic regions among Europeans, and shed light on the potential genetic and evolutionary origin of population differences in HIV-1 control. PMID:21689440

  3. A method for detecting significant genomic regions associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma using aCGH.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Yeol; Kim, Jin; Kim, Hyung Jun; Nam, Woong; Cha, In-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) provides a genome-wide technique for identifying chromosomal aberrations in human diseases, including cancer. Chromosomal aberrations in cancers are defined as regions that contain an increased or decreased DNA copy number, relative to normal samples. The identification of genomic regions associated with systematic aberrations provides insights into initiation and progression of cancer, and improves diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy strategies. The McNemar test can be used to detect differentially expressed genes after discretization of gene expressions in a microarray experiment for the matched dataset. In this study, we propose a method to detect significantly altered DNA regions, shifted McNemar test, which is based on the standard McNemar test and takes into account changes in copy number variations and the region size throughout the whole genome. In addition, this novel method can be used to detect genomic regions associated with the progress of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The performance of the proposed method was evaluated based on the homogeneity within the selected regions and the classification accuracies of the selected regions. This method might be useful for identifying new candidate genes that neighbor known genes based on the whole-genomic variation because it detects significant chromosomal regions, not independent probes.

  4. Physical mapping of black spot disease resistance/susceptibility-related genome regions in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) by BAC-FISH.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Terakami, Shingo; Takada, Norio; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    Black spot disease, caused by Alternaria alternata Japanese pear pathotype, is one of the most harmful diseases in Japanese pear cultivation. In the present study, the locations of black spot disease resistance/susceptibility-related genome regions were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization using BAC clone (BAC-FISH) on Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia (Burm. f.) Nakai) chromosomes. Root tips of self-pollinated seedlings of 'Osa Gold' were used as materials. Chromosome samples were prepared by the enzymatic maceration and air-drying method. The BAC clone adjacent to the black spot disease-related gene was labeled as a probe for FISH analysis. Black spot disease-related genome regions were detected in telomeric positions of two medium size chromosomes. These two sites and six telomeric 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA sites were located on different chromosomes as determined from the results of multi-color FISH. The effectiveness of the physical mapping of useful genes on pear chromosomes achieved by the BAC-FISH method was unequivocally demonstrated.

  5. Variability among the Most Rapidly Evolving Plastid Genomic Regions is Lineage-Specific: Implications of Pairwise Genome Comparisons in Pyrus (Rosaceae) and Other Angiosperms for Marker Choice

    PubMed Central

    Ter-Voskanyan, Hasmik; Allgaier, Martin; Borsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plastid genomes exhibit different levels of variability in their sequences, depending on the respective kinds of genomic regions. Genes are usually more conserved while noncoding introns and spacers evolve at a faster pace. While a set of about thirty maximum variable noncoding genomic regions has been suggested to provide universally promising phylogenetic markers throughout angiosperms, applications often require several regions to be sequenced for many individuals. Our project aims to illuminate evolutionary relationships and species-limits in the genus Pyrus (Rosaceae)—a typical case with very low genetic distances between taxa. In this study, we have sequenced the plastid genome of Pyrus spinosa and aligned it to the already available P. pyrifolia sequence. The overall p-distance of the two Pyrus genomes was 0.00145. The intergenic spacers between ndhC–trnV, trnR–atpA, ndhF–rpl32, psbM–trnD, and trnQ–rps16 were the most variable regions, also comprising the highest total numbers of substitutions, indels and inversions (potentially informative characters). Our comparative analysis of further plastid genome pairs with similar low p-distances from Oenothera (representing another rosid), Olea (asterids) and Cymbidium (monocots) showed in each case a different ranking of genomic regions in terms of variability and potentially informative characters. Only two intergenic spacers (ndhF–rpl32 and trnK–rps16) were consistently found among the 30 top-ranked regions. We have mapped the occurrence of substitutions and microstructural mutations in the four genome pairs. High AT content in specific sequence elements seems to foster frequent mutations. We conclude that the variability among the fastest evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific and thus cannot be precisely predicted across angiosperms. The often lineage-specific occurrence of stem-loop elements in the sequences of introns and spacers also governs lineage-specific mutations

  6. Electron microscopic analysis of synaptic inputs from the median preoptic nucleus and adjacent regions to the supraoptic nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, W E; Tian, M; Wong, H

    1996-09-16

    The median preoptic nucleus (MnPo) is critical for normal fluid balance, mediating osmotically evoked drinking and neurohypophysial hormone secretion. The influence of the MnPo on vasopressin and oxytocin release is in part through direct connections to the supraoptic and paraventricular nucleus. In the present investigation the synaptic contacts between the MnPo and supraoptic neurons were investigated in rats by ultrastructural examination of terminals labeled anterogradely with the tracers Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin or biotinylated dextran. At the light microscopic level, labeled fibers within the supraoptic nucleus branched frequently, were punctuated by varicosities, and were distributed throughout the nucleus without preference for the known distributions of oxytocin and vasopressin neurons. At the ultrastructural level, synapses were associated with many of these varicosities. The ratio of labeled axodendritic to axosomatic synapses encountered was roughly consistent with a uniform innervation of dendrites and somata. The great majority of synapses were characterized by symmetrical contacts. Similar results were found for a few injections made in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, just rostral to the MnPo, and in the immediately adjacent periventricular preoptic area. Coupled with other recent anatomical and electrophysiological evidence, these results suggest there is a strong monosynaptic pathway from structures along the ventral lamina terminalis to the supraoptic nucleus.

  7. The mitochondrial genome of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana: analysis of the ribosomal RNA region.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, T A; Hegedus, D D; Khachatourians, G G

    1993-01-01

    The 28.5-kbp mitochondrial (mt) genome from the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana was studied using restriction enzyme analysis, gene probe hybridization, and DNA sequence comparisons. A detailed restriction enzyme map allowed cloning of the entire genome into a number of segments. Hybridization of heterologous gene probes to the mtDNA resulted in the identification of the large ribosomal RNA (lrRNA) and small ribosomal RNA (srRNA) genes. Gene probes derived from several yeasts and fungi failed to identify any additional genes. However, partial DNA sequence analysis revealed the lrRNA and srRNA genes as well as four protein-encoding genes: the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NAD1), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (NAD6), cytochrome oxidase subunit 3 (CO3), and ATPase subunit 6 (ATP6) genes. The ATPase subunit 9 (ATP9) gene was not identified by hybridization to mtDNA, but could be detected by hybridization to total cellular DNA. The portions of the genes sequenced were homologous to the equivalent genes from yeast and other filamentous fungi, most notably Aspergillus nidulans. No introns were identified in these regions. The organization of the sequenced region of the B. bassiana mt genome more closely resembled that of A. nidulans than that of Podospora anserina or Neurospora crassa.

  8. Region-specific DNA methylation in the preimplantation embryo as a target for genomic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Thurston, A; Lucas, E S; Allegrucci, C; Steele, W; Young, L E

    2007-09-01

    It has been long known that the unique genetic sequence each embryo inherits is not the sole determinant of phenotype. However, only recently have epigenetic modifications to DNA been implicated in providing potential developmental plasticity to the embryonic and fetal genome, with environmental influences directly altering the epigenetic modifications that contribute to tissue-specific gene regulation. Most is known about the potential environmental regulation of DNA methylation, epigenetic addition of methyl groups to cytosine residues in DNA that acts in the long-term silencing of affected sequences. While most attention has been paid to the methylation of imprinted gene sequences, in terms of developmental plasticity there are many more parts of the genome that are methylated and that could be affected. This review explores the distribution of cytosine methylation in the genome and discusses the potential effects of regional plasticity on subsequent development. Widening our consideration of potentially plastic regions is likely to greatly enhance our understanding of how individuals are shaped not only by DNA sequence, but by the environment in which pluripotent embryonic cells are transformed into the many cell types of the body.

  9. Complete genomic sequence of a new Human polyomavirus 9 strain with an altered noncoding control region.

    PubMed

    Lednicky, John A; Butel, Janet S; Luetke, Maya C; Loeb, Julia C

    2014-12-01

    A complete Human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9) genome, designated HPyV9 UF-1, was amplified by rolling circle DNA amplification from DNA extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of an AIDS patient. The noncoding control (enhancer/promoter) region (NCCR) of HPyV9 UF-1 has one less AML-1a binding site and three more potential Sp1/GC box binding sites than the NCCRs of two previously described HPyV9 genomes. Nucleotide polymorphisms within the coding regions result in two amino acid differences in the deduced VP2 and VP3 proteins of HPyV9 UF-1 relative to those of the two previously described HPyV9 genomes. Exhaustive attempts to detect HPyV9 in DNA samples extracted from the PBMC of 40 healthy humans and 9 other AIDS patients were unsuccessful, highlighting the need for improved search strategies and optimal specimens for the detection of HPyV9 in humans.

  10. COUGER—co-factors associated with uniquely-bound genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Alina; Ohler, Uwe; Gordân, Raluca

    2014-01-01

    Most transcription factors (TFs) belong to protein families that share a common DNA binding domain and have very similar DNA binding preferences. However, many paralogous TFs (i.e. members of the same TF family) perform different regulatory functions and interact with different genomic regions in the cell. A potential mechanism for achieving this differential in vivo specificity is through interactions with protein co-factors. Computational tools for studying the genomic binding profiles of paralogous TFs and identifying their putative co-factors are currently lacking. Here, we present an interactive web implementation of COUGER, a classification-based framework for identifying protein co-factors that might provide specificity to paralogous TFs. COUGER takes as input two sets of genomic regions bound by paralogous TFs, and it identifies a small set of putative co-factors that best distinguish the two sets of sequences. To achieve this task, COUGER uses a classification approach, with features that reflect the DNA-binding specificities of the putative co-factors. The identified co-factors are presented in a user-friendly output page, together with information that allows the user to understand and to explore the contributions of individual co-factor features. COUGER can be run as a stand-alone tool or through a web interface: http://couger.oit.duke.edu. PMID:24861628

  11. Genomic Regions Associated with Feed Efficiency Indicator Traits in an Experimental Nellore Cattle Population

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Bianca Ferreira; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti; Cyrillo, Joslaine Noely dos Santos Gonçalves; Branco, Renata Helena; Bonilha, Sarah Figueiredo Martins; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão; Silva, Rafael Medeiros de Oliveira; Baldi, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify genomic regions and metabolic pathways associated with dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake in an experimental Nellore cattle population. The high-density SNP chip (Illumina High-Density Bovine BeadChip, 777k) was used to genotype the animals. The SNP markers effects and their variances were estimated using the single-step genome wide association method. The (co)variance components were estimated by Bayesian inference. The chromosome segments that are responsible for more than 1.0% of additive genetic variance were selected to explore and determine possible quantitative trait loci. The bovine genome Map Viewer was used to identify genes. In total, 51 genomic regions were identified for all analyzed traits. The heritability estimated for feed efficiency was low magnitude (0.13±0.06). For average daily gain, dry matter intake and residual feed intake, heritability was moderate to high (0.43±0.05; 0.47±0.05, 0.18±0.05, respectively). A total of 8, 17, 14 and 12 windows that are responsible for more than 1% of the additive genetic variance for dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake, respectively, were identified. Candidate genes GOLIM4, RFX6, CACNG7, CACNG6, CAPN8, CAPN2, AKT2, GPRC6A, and GPR45 were associated with feed efficiency traits. It was expected that the response to selection would be higher for residual feed intake than for feed efficiency. Genomic regions harboring possible QTL for feed efficiency indicator traits were identified. Candidate genes identified are involved in energy use, metabolism protein, ion transport, transmembrane transport, the olfactory system, the immune system, secretion and cellular activity. The identification of these regions and their respective candidate genes should contribute to the formation of a genetic basis in Nellore cattle for feed efficiency indicator traits, and these results would support

  12. Genomic Regions Associated with Feed Efficiency Indicator Traits in an Experimental Nellore Cattle Population.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Bianca Ferreira; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti; Cyrillo, Joslaine Noely Dos Santos Gonçalves; Branco, Renata Helena; Bonilha, Sarah Figueiredo Martins; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão; Silva, Rafael Medeiros de Oliveira; Baldi, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify genomic regions and metabolic pathways associated with dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake in an experimental Nellore cattle population. The high-density SNP chip (Illumina High-Density Bovine BeadChip, 777k) was used to genotype the animals. The SNP markers effects and their variances were estimated using the single-step genome wide association method. The (co)variance components were estimated by Bayesian inference. The chromosome segments that are responsible for more than 1.0% of additive genetic variance were selected to explore and determine possible quantitative trait loci. The bovine genome Map Viewer was used to identify genes. In total, 51 genomic regions were identified for all analyzed traits. The heritability estimated for feed efficiency was low magnitude (0.13±0.06). For average daily gain, dry matter intake and residual feed intake, heritability was moderate to high (0.43±0.05; 0.47±0.05, 0.18±0.05, respectively). A total of 8, 17, 14 and 12 windows that are responsible for more than 1% of the additive genetic variance for dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake, respectively, were identified. Candidate genes GOLIM4, RFX6, CACNG7, CACNG6, CAPN8, CAPN2, AKT2, GPRC6A, and GPR45 were associated with feed efficiency traits. It was expected that the response to selection would be higher for residual feed intake than for feed efficiency. Genomic regions harboring possible QTL for feed efficiency indicator traits were identified. Candidate genes identified are involved in energy use, metabolism protein, ion transport, transmembrane transport, the olfactory system, the immune system, secretion and cellular activity. The identification of these regions and their respective candidate genes should contribute to the formation of a genetic basis in Nellore cattle for feed efficiency indicator traits, and these results would support

  13. Molecular characterization of a genomic region associated with virulence in Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, M E; Strugnell, R A; Rood, J I

    1992-01-01

    The major pathogen implicated in footrot, a highly contagious disease of sheep, is the strict anaerobe Dichelobacter nodosus (formerly Bacteroides nodosus). Sequence analysis of a 2,262-bp segment of the D. nodosus genome which is more prevalent in virulent isolates than in other isolates showed the presence of four open reading frames which appeared to have consensus transcriptional and translational start signals. These virulence-associated genes have been designated vapABCD. Two of the three copies of the vap region in the genome of the reference strain D. nodosus A198 were shown to carry all of the vap genes, whereas one copy contained only the vapD gene. The VapD protein was gel purified, shown to contain the predicted amino-terminal sequence, and used to raise rabbit antibodies. Western blots (immunoblots) showed that all of the D. nodosus strains tested that contained the vap region produced the VapD protein. The VapD protein had significant amino acid sequence identity with open reading frame 5 from the cryptic plasmid of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and the vapBC operon had sequence similarity with the trbH region of the Escherichia coli F plasmid. It is proposed that these gene regions evolved from the integration of a conjugative plasmid from another bacterial species into the D. nodosus chromosome. Images PMID:1398971

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker.

    PubMed

    Fopa Fomeju, Berline; Falentin, Cyril; Lassalle, Gilles; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J; Delourme, Régine

    2015-01-01

    All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U, and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling, or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the resistance phenotype.

  15. High-density linkage mapping and distribution of segregation distortion regions in the oak genome

    PubMed Central

    Bodénès, Catherine; Chancerel, Emilie; Ehrenmann, François; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We developed the densest single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage genetic map to date for the genus Quercus. An 8k gene-based SNP array was used to genotype more than 1,000 full-sibs from two intraspecific and two interspecific full-sib families of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. A high degree of collinearity was observed between the eight parental maps of the two species. A composite map was then established with 4,261 SNP markers spanning 742 cM over the 12 linkage groups (LGs) of the oak genome. Nine genomic regions from six LGs displayed highly significant distortions of segregation. Two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying segregation distortion are discussed: genetic load vs. reproductive barriers. Our findings suggest a predominance of pre-zygotic to post-zygotic barriers. PMID:27013549

  16. Overlapping Regions in HIV-1 Genome Act as Potential Sites for Host–Virus Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Deeya; Podder, Soumita; Ghosh, Tapash C.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade, overlapping genes in RNA viruses became a subject of research which has explored various effect of gene overlapping on the evolution and function of viral genomes like genome size compaction. Additionally, overlapping regions (OVRs) are also reported to encode elevated degree of protein intrinsic disorder (PID) in unspliced RNA viruses. With the aim to explore the roles of OVRs in HIV-1 pathogenesis, we have carried out an in-depth analysis on the association of gene overlapping with PID in 35 HIV1- M subtypes. Our study reveals an over representation of PID in OVR of HIV-1 genomes. These disordered residues endure several vital, structural features like short linear motifs (SLiMs) and protein phosphorylation (PP) sites which are previously shown to be involved in massive host–virus interaction. Moreover, SLiMs in OVRs are noticed to be more functionally potential as compared to that of non-overlapping region. Although, density of experimentally verified SLiMs, resided in 9 HIV-1 genes, involved in host–virus interaction do not show any bias toward clustering into OVR, tat and rev two important proteins mediates host–pathogen interaction by their experimentally verified SLiMs, which are mostly localized in OVR. Finally, our analysis suggests that the acquisition of SLiMs in OVR is mutually exclusive of the occurrence of disordered residues, while the enrichment of PPs in OVR is solely dependent on PID and not on overlapping coding frames. Thus, OVRs of HIV-1 genomes could be demarcated as potential molecular recognition sites during host–virus interaction. PMID:27867372

  17. High-Throughput Resequencing of Maize Landraces at Genomic Regions Associated with Flowering Time.

    PubMed

    Jamann, Tiffany M; Sood, Shilpa; Wisser, Randall J; Holland, James B

    2017-01-01

    Despite the reduction in the price of sequencing, it remains expensive to sequence and assemble whole, complex genomes of multiple samples for population studies, particularly for large genomes like those of many crop species. Enrichment of target genome regions coupled with next generation sequencing is a cost-effective strategy to obtain sequence information for loci of interest across many individuals, providing a less expensive approach to evaluating sequence variation at the population scale. Here we evaluate amplicon-based enrichment coupled with semiconductor sequencing on a validation set consisting of three maize inbred lines, two hybrids and 19 landrace accessions. We report the use of a multiplexed panel of 319 PCR assays that target 20 candidate loci associated with photoperiod sensitivity in maize while requiring 25 ng or less of starting DNA per sample. Enriched regions had an average on-target sequence read depth of 105 with 98% of the sequence data mapping to the maize 'B73' reference and 80% of the reads mapping to the target interval. Sequence reads were aligned to B73 and 1,486 and 1,244 variants were called using SAMtools and GATK, respectively. Of the variants called by both SAMtools and GATK, 30% were not previously reported in maize. Due to the high sequence read depth, heterozygote genotypes could be called with at least 92.5% accuracy in hybrid materials using GATK. The genetic data are congruent with previous reports of high total genetic diversity and substantial population differentiation among maize landraces. In conclusion, semiconductor sequencing of highly multiplexed PCR reactions is a cost-effective strategy for resequencing targeted genomic loci in diverse maize materials.

  18. High-Throughput Resequencing of Maize Landraces at Genomic Regions Associated with Flowering Time

    PubMed Central

    Jamann, Tiffany M.; Sood, Shilpa; Wisser, Randall J.; Holland, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the reduction in the price of sequencing, it remains expensive to sequence and assemble whole, complex genomes of multiple samples for population studies, particularly for large genomes like those of many crop species. Enrichment of target genome regions coupled with next generation sequencing is a cost-effective strategy to obtain sequence information for loci of interest across many individuals, providing a less expensive approach to evaluating sequence variation at the population scale. Here we evaluate amplicon-based enrichment coupled with semiconductor sequencing on a validation set consisting of three maize inbred lines, two hybrids and 19 landrace accessions. We report the use of a multiplexed panel of 319 PCR assays that target 20 candidate loci associated with photoperiod sensitivity in maize while requiring 25 ng or less of starting DNA per sample. Enriched regions had an average on-target sequence read depth of 105 with 98% of the sequence data mapping to the maize ‘B73’ reference and 80% of the reads mapping to the target interval. Sequence reads were aligned to B73 and 1,486 and 1,244 variants were called using SAMtools and GATK, respectively. Of the variants called by both SAMtools and GATK, 30% were not previously reported in maize. Due to the high sequence read depth, heterozygote genotypes could be called with at least 92.5% accuracy in hybrid materials using GATK. The genetic data are congruent with previous reports of high total genetic diversity and substantial population differentiation among maize landraces. In conclusion, semiconductor sequencing of highly multiplexed PCR reactions is a cost-effective strategy for resequencing targeted genomic loci in diverse maize materials. PMID:28045987

  19. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2) from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Daudt, Cíntia; da Silva, Flavio RC; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Varela, Ana Paula M; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2) from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8) and two late (L1 and L2) genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available. PMID:27074259

  20. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  1. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular systematic studies of Lepidoptera, particularly at the intrafamilial level, and our new set of primers now provides a route to generating phylogenomic datasets using traditional methods. PMID:27408580

  2. Thyroid abnormality trend over time in northeastern regions of Kazakstan, adjacent to the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site: a case review of pathological findings for 7271 patients.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Z; Gusev, B I; Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Kimura, A; Hayakawa, N; Takeichi, N

    2000-03-01

    From 1949 through 1989 nuclear weapons testing carried out by the former Soviet Union at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) resulted in local fallout affecting the residents of Semipalatinsk, Ust-Kamenogorsk and Pavlodar regions of Kazakstan. To investigate the possible relationship between radiation exposure and thyroid gland abnormalities, we conducted a case review of pathological findings of 7271 urban and rural patients who underwent surgery from 1966-96. Of the 7271 patients, 761 (10.5%) were men, and 6510 (89.5%) were women. The age of the patients varied from 15 to 90 years. Overall, a diagnosis of adenomatous goiter (most frequently multinodular) was found in 1683 patients (63.4%) of Semipalatinsk region, in 2032 patients (68.6%) of Ust-Kamenogorsk region and in 1142 patients (69.0%) of Pavlodar region. In the period 1982-96, as compared before, there was a noticeable increase in the number of cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis and thyroid cancer. Among histological forms of thyroid cancer, papillary (48.1%) and follicular (33.1%) predominated in the Semipalatinsk region. In later periods (1987-96), an increased frequency of abnormal cases occurred among patients less than 40 years of age, with the highest proportion among patients below 20 in Semipalatinsk and Ust-Kamenogorsk regions of Kazakstan. Given the positive findings of a significant cancer-period interaction, and a significant trend for the proportion of cancer to increase over time, we recommend more detailed and etiologic studies of thyroid disease among populations exposed to radiation fallout from the SNTS in comparison to non-exposed population.

  3. Gene map of large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) provides insights into teleost genome evolution and conserved regions associated with growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shijun; Wang, Panpan; Zhang, Yan; Fang, Lujing; Liu, Yang; Li, Jiong-Tang; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2015-12-22

    The genetic map of a species is essential for its whole genome assembly and can be applied to the mapping of important traits. In this study, we performed RNA-seq for a family of large yellow croakers (Larimichthys crocea) and constructed a high-density genetic map. In this map, 24 linkage groups comprised 3,448 polymorphic SNP markers. Approximately 72.4% (2,495) of the markers were located in protein-coding regions. Comparison of the croaker genome with those of five model fish species revealed that the croaker genome structure was closer to that of the medaka than to the remaining four genomes. Because the medaka genome preserves the teleost ancestral karyotype, this result indicated that the croaker genome might also maintain the teleost ancestral genome structure. The analysis also revealed different genome rearrangements across teleosts. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently identified growth-related QTL regions and associated genes. Orthologs of the associated genes in other species were demonstrated to regulate development, indicating that these genes might regulate development and growth in croaker. This gene map will enable us to construct the croaker genome for comparative studies and to provide an important resource for selective breeding of croaker.

  4. Regional long-term model of radioactivity dispersion and fate in the Northwestern Pacific and adjacent seas: application to the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident.

    PubMed

    Maderich, V; Bezhenar, R; Heling, R; de With, G; Jung, K T; Myoung, J G; Cho, Y-K; Qiao, F; Robertson, L

    2014-05-01

    The compartment model POSEIDON-R was modified and applied to the Northwestern Pacific and adjacent seas to simulate the transport and fate of radioactivity in the period 1945-2010, and to perform a radiological assessment on the releases of radioactivity due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident for the period 2011-2040. The model predicts the dispersion of radioactivity in the water column and in sediments, the transfer of radionuclides throughout the marine food web, and subsequent doses to humans due to the consumption of marine products. A generic predictive dynamic food-chain model is used instead of the biological concentration factor (BCF) approach. The radionuclide uptake model for fish has as a central feature the accumulation of radionuclides in the target tissue. The three layer structure of the water column makes it possible to describe the vertical structure of radioactivity in deep waters. In total 175 compartments cover the Northwestern Pacific, the East China and Yellow Seas and the East/Japan Sea. The model was validated from (137)Cs data for the period 1945-2010. Calculated concentrations of (137)Cs in water, bottom sediments and marine organisms in the coastal compartment, before and after the accident, are in close agreement with measurements from the Japanese agencies. The agreement for water is achieved when an additional continuous flux of 3.6 TBq y(-1) is used for underground leakage of contaminated water from the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP, during the three years following the accident. The dynamic food web model predicts that due to the delay of the transfer throughout the food web, the concentration of (137)Cs for piscivorous fishes returns to background level only in 2016. For the year 2011, the calculated individual dose rate for Fukushima Prefecture due to consumption of fishery products is 3.6 μSv y(-1). Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident the collective dose due to ingestion of marine products for Japan increased in 2011 by a

  5. Pedigree-based analysis of derivation of genome segments of an elite rice reveals key regions during its breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Degui; Chen, Wei; Lin, Zechuan; Chen, Haodong; Wang, Chongrong; Li, Hong; Yu, Renbo; Zhang, Fengyun; Zhen, Gang; Yi, Junliang; Li, Kanghuo; Liu, Yaoguang; Terzaghi, William; Tang, Xiaoyan; He, Hang; Zhou, Shaochuan; Deng, Xing Wang

    2016-02-01

    Analyses of genome variations with high-throughput assays have improved our understanding of genetic basis of crop domestication and identified the selected genome regions, but little is known about that of modern breeding, which has limited the usefulness of massive elite cultivars in further breeding. Here we deploy pedigree-based analysis of an elite rice, Huanghuazhan, to exploit key genome regions during its breeding. The cultivars in the pedigree were resequenced with 7.6× depth on average, and 2.1 million high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were obtained. Tracing the derivation of genome blocks with pedigree and information on SNPs revealed the chromosomal recombination during breeding, which showed that 26.22% of Huanghuazhan genome are strictly conserved key regions. These major effect regions were further supported by a QTL mapping of 260 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of Huanghuazhan and a very dissimilar cultivar, Shuanggui 36, and by the genome profile of eight cultivars and 36 elite lines derived from Huanghuazhan. Hitting these regions with the cloned genes revealed they include numbers of key genes, which were then applied to demonstrate how Huanghuazhan were bred after 30 years of effort and to dissect the deficiency of artificial selection. We concluded the regions are helpful to the further breeding based on this pedigree and performing breeding by design. Our study provides genetic dissection of modern rice breeding and sheds new light on how to perform genomewide breeding by design.

  6. Differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by PCR amplification of genomic regions of difference.

    PubMed

    Warren, R M; Gey van Pittius, N C; Barnard, M; Hesseling, A; Engelke, E; de Kock, M; Gutierrez, M C; Chege, G K; Victor, T C; Hoal, E G; van Helden, P D

    2006-07-01

    Differentiation of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by conventional mycobacteriological methods is time consuming, making surveillance of species-specific disease difficult. A two-step, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method based on genomic regions of difference (RD1, RD1(mic), RD2(seal), RD4, RD9 and RD12) was developed for the differentiation of M. canettii, M. tuberculosis, M. africanum, M. microti, M. pinnipedii, M. caprae, M. bovis and M. bovis BCG. The size of the respective multiplex PCR amplification products corresponded to the presence of the different M. tuberculosis complex members. This method allows for rapid differentiation, making it suitable for routine laboratories and surveillance purposes.

  7. Functional annotation of HOT regions in the human genome: implications for human disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Chen, Hebing; Liu, Feng; Ren, Chao; Wang, Shengqi; Bo, Xiaochen; Shu, Wenjie

    2015-06-26

    Advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale sequencing studies have resulted in an impressive and growing list of disease- and trait-associated genetic variants. Most studies have emphasised the discovery of genetic variation in coding sequences, however, the noncoding regulatory effects responsible for human disease and cancer biology have been substantially understudied. To better characterise the cis-regulatory effects of noncoding variation, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic variants in HOT (high-occupancy target) regions, which are considered to be one of the most intriguing findings of recent large-scale sequencing studies. We observed that GWAS variants that map to HOT regions undergo a substantial net decrease and illustrate development-specific localisation during haematopoiesis. Additionally, genetic risk variants are disproportionally enriched in HOT regions compared with LOT (low-occupancy target) regions in both disease-relevant and cancer cells. Importantly, this enrichment is biased toward disease- or cancer-specific cell types. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells generally acquire cancer-specific HOT regions at oncogenes through diverse mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the key roles of HOT regions in human disease and cancer and represent a critical step toward further understanding disease biology, diagnosis, and therapy.

  8. In Silico Prediction of Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions in Large Genomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Matthias; Frech, Kornelie; Klingenhoff, Andreas; Cartharius, Kerstin; Liebich, Ines; Werner, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are essential regulatory DNA elements of eukaryotic cells. They are major determinants of locus control of gene expression and can shield gene expression from position effects. Experimental detection of S/MARs requires substantial effort and is not suitable for large-scale screening of genomic sequences. In silico prediction of S/MARs can provide a crucial first selection step to reduce the number of candidates. We used experimentally defined S/MAR sequences as the training set and generated a library of new S/MAR-associated, AT-rich patterns described as weight matrices. A new tool called SMARTest was developed that identifies potential S/MARs by performing a density analysis based on the S/MAR matrix library (http://www.genomatix.de/cgi-bin/smartest_pd/smartest.pl). S/MAR predictions were evaluated by using six genomic sequences from animal and plant for which S/MARs and non-S/MARs were experimentally mapped. SMARTest reached a sensitivity of 38% and a specificity of 68%. In contrast to previous algorithms, the SMARTest approach does not depend on the sequence context and is suitable to analyze long genomic sequences up to the size of whole chromosomes. To demonstrate the feasibility of large-scale S/MAR prediction, we analyzed the recently published chromosome 22 sequence and found 1198 S/MAR candidates. PMID:11827955

  9. Mitochondrial genome of the Levant Region honeybee, Apis mellifera syriaca (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nizar Jamal

    2016-11-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of Levant Region honeybee, Apis mellifera syriaca, is analyzed and presented for the public for the first time. The genome of this honeybee is 15,428 bp in its length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. The overall base composition is A (42.88%), C (9.97%), G (5.85%), and T (41.3%), the percentage of A and T being higher than that of G and C. Percentage of non-ATGC characters is 0.007. All the genes are encoded on H-strand, except for four subunit genes (ND1, ND4, ND4L, and ND5), two rRNA genes and eight tRNA genes. The publication of the mitochondrial genome sequence will play a vital role in the conservation genetic projects of A. mellifera, in general, and Apis mellifera syriaca, in particular; moreover, it will be useful for further phylogenetic analysis.

  10. [Topological Conflicts in Phylogenetic Analysis of Different Regions of the Sable (Martes zibellina L.) Mitochondrial Genome].

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, B A; Derenko, M V; Denisova, G A; Litvinov, A N

    2015-08-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of different regions of the mitochondrial genome of the sable showed the presence of several topologies of phylogenetic trees, but the most statistically significant topology is A-BC, which was obtained as a result of the analysis of the mitochondrial genome as a whole, as well as of the individual CO1, ND4, and ND5 genes. Analysis of the intergroup divergence of the mtDNA haplotypes (Dxy) indicated that the maximum Dxy values between A and BC groups were accompanied by minimum differences between B and C groups only for six genes showing the A-BC topology (12S rRNA; CO1, CO2, ND4, ND5, and CYTB). It is assumed that the topological conflicts observed in the analysis of individual sable mtDNA genes are associated with the uneven distribution of mutations along the mitochondrial genome and the mitochondrial tree. This may be due to random causes, as well as the nonuniform effect of selection.

  11. The 1987 estimate of undiscovered uranium endowment in solution-collapse breccia pipes in the Grand Canyon region of northern Arizona and adjacent Uta

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, W.I.; Sutphin, H.B.; Pierson, C.T.; McCammon, R.B.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This book is based on a new method published in U.S. Geological Survey Circular 994 and is the second assessment made in accordance with the 1984 Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Energy. The first estimate was published as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 80-2. The endowment estimates are reported for 26 areas in the following 1{degrees} {times} 2{degrees} guadrangles: Grand Canyon, Marble Canyon, Williams, Flagstaff, Prescott, Holbrook, and St. Johns, Ariz., and Cedar City, Utah. The total uranium endowment is about eight times larger than reported in 1980 by the Department of Energy. The Grand Canyon region has the potential of becoming the second most important domestic uranium producer after the most production San Juan Basin uranium region in New Mexico.

  12. Integrating surface and mantle constraints for palaeo-ocean evolution: a tour of the Arctic and adjacent regions (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace E.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions heavily rely on absolute motions derived from hotspot trails or palaeomagnetic data and ocean-floor magnetic anomaies and fracture-zone geometries to constrain the detailed history of ocean basins. However, as oceanic lithosphere is progressively recycled into the mantle, kinematic data regarding the history of these now extinct-oceans is lost. In order to better understand their evolution, novel workflows, which integrate a wide range of complementary yet independent geological and geophysical datasets from both the surface and deep mantle, must be utilised. In particular, the emergence of time-dependent, semi or self-consistent geodynamic models of ever-increasing temporal and spatial resolution are revealing some critical constraints on the evolution and fate of oceanic slabs. The tectonic evolution of the circum-Arctic is no exception; since the breakup of Pangea, this enigmatic region has seen major plate reorganizations and the opening and closure of several ocean basins. At the surface, a myriad of potential kinematic scenarios including polarity, timing, geometry and location of subduction have emerged, including for systems along continental margins and intra-oceanic settings. Furthermore, recent work has reignited a debate about the origins of 'anchor' slabs, such as the Farallon and Mongol-Okhotsk slabs, which have been used to refine absolute plate motions. Moving to the mantle, seismic tomography models reveal a region peppered with inferred slabs, however assumptions about their affinities and subduction location, timing, geometry and polarity are often made in isolation. Here, by integrating regional plate reconstructions with insights from seismic tomography, satellite derived gravity gradients, slab sinking rates and geochemistry, I explore some Mesozoic examples from the palaeo-Arctic, northern Panthalassa and western margin of North America, including evidence for a discrete and previously undescribed slab under

  13. Influence of tectonic terranes adjacent to Precambrian Wyoming province of petroleum source and reservoir rock stratigraphy in northern Rocky Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnsen, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    The perimeter of the Archean Precambrian Wyoming province can be generally defined. A Proterozoic suture belt separates the province from the Archean Superior province to the east. The western margin of the Precambrian rocks lies under the western Overthrust belt, but the Precambrian province extends at least as far west as southwest Montana and southeast Idaho. The province is bounded on the north and south by more regionally extensive Proterozoic mobile belts. In the northern belt, Archean rocks have been remobilized by Proterozoic tectonic events, but the southern belt does not appear to contain rocks as old as Archean. The tectonic response of these Precambrian terranes to cratonic and continental margin vertical and horizontal forces has exerted a profound influence on Phanerozoic sedimentation and stratigraphic facies distributions. Petroleum source rock and reservoir rock stratigraphy of the Northern Rocky Mountain region has been correlated with this structural history. In particular, the Devonian, Permian, and Jurassic sedimentation patterns can be shown to have been influenced by articulation among the different terranes comprising the ancient substructure. Depositional patterns in the Chester-Morrow carbonate and clastic sequence in the Central Montana trough are also related to this substructure. Further, a correlation between these tectonic terranes and the localization of regional hydrocarbon accumulations has been observed and has been useful in basin analyses for exploration planning.

  14. Full-genome sequences of hepatitis B virus subgenotype D3 isolates from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Natália; Mello, Francisco Ca; Araujo, Natalia Motta

    2015-02-13

    The Brazilian Amazon Region is a highly endemic area for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, little is known regarding the genetic variability of the strains circulating in this geographical region. Here, we describe the first full-length genomes of HBV isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region; these genomes are also the first complete HBV subgenotype D3 genomes reported for Brazil. The genomes of the five Brazilian isolates were all 3,182 base pairs in length and the isolates were classified as belonging to subgenotype D3, subtypes ayw2 (n = 3) and ayw3 (n = 2). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Brazilian sequences are not likely to be closely related to European D3 sequences. Such results will contribute to further epidemiological and evolutionary studies of HBV.

  15. Full-genome sequences of hepatitis B virus subgenotype D3 isolates from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Natália; Mello, Francisco C A; Araujo, Natalia Motta

    2015-02-01

    The Brazilian Amazon Region is a highly endemic area for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, little is known regarding the genetic variability of the strains circulating in this geographical region. Here, we describe the first full-length genomes of HBV isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region; these genomes are also the first complete HBV subgenotype D3 genomes reported for Brazil. The genomes of the five Brazilian isolates were all 3,182 base pairs in length and the isolates were classified as belonging to subgenotype D3, subtypes ayw2 (n = 3) and ayw3 (n = 2). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Brazilian sequences are not likely to be closely related to European D3 sequences. Such results will contribute to further epidemiological and evolutionary studies of HBV.

  16. Dynamic Nucleotide Mutation Gradients and Control Region Usage in Squamate Reptile Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, T.A.; Gu, W.; de Koning, A.P.J.; Daza, J.M.; Jiang, Z.J.; Parkinson, C.L.; Pollock, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients of nucleotide bias and substitution rates occur in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes due to the asymmetric nature of the replication process. The evolution of these gradients has previously been studied in detail in primates, but not in other vertebrate groups. From the primate study, the strengths of these gradients are known to evolve in ways that can substantially alter the substitution process, but it is unclear how rapidly they evolve over evolutionary time or how different they may be in different lineages or groups of vertebrates. Given the importance of mitochondrial genomes in phylogenetics and molecular evolutionary research, a better understanding of how asymmetric mitochondrial substitution gradients evolve would contribute key insights into how this gradient evolution may mislead evolutionary inferences, and how it may also be incorporated into new evolutionary models. Most snake mitochondrial genomes have an additional interesting feature, 2 nearly identical control regions, which vary among different species in the extent that they are used as origins of replication. Given the expanded sampling of complete snake genomes currently available, together with 2 additional snakes sequenced in this study, we reexamined gradient strength and CR usage in alethinophidian snakes as well as several lizards that possess dual CRs. Our results suggest that nucleotide substitution gradients (and corresponding nucleotide bias) and CR usage is highly labile over the ∼200 m.y. of squamate evolution, and demonstrates greater overall variability than previously shown in primates. The evidence for the existence of such gradients, and their ability to evolve rapidly and converge among unrelated species suggests that gradient dynamics could easily mislead phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary inferences, and argues strongly that these dynamics should be incorporated into phylogenetic models. PMID:20215734

  17. Dynamic nucleotide mutation gradients and control region usage in squamate reptile mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Castoe, T A; Gu, W; de Koning, A P J; Daza, J M; Jiang, Z J; Parkinson, C L; Pollock, D D

    2009-01-01

    Gradients of nucleotide bias and substitution rates occur in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes due to the asymmetric nature of the replication process. The evolution of these gradients has previously been studied in detail in primates, but not in other vertebrate groups. From the primate study, the strengths of these gradients are known to evolve in ways that can substantially alter the substitution process, but it is unclear how rapidly they evolve over evolutionary time or how different they may be in different lineages or groups of vertebrates. Given the importance of mitochondrial genomes in phylogenetics and molecular evolutionary research, a better understanding of how asymmetric mitochondrial substitution gradients evolve would contribute key insights into how this gradient evolution may mislead evolutionary inferences, and how it may also be incorporated into new evolutionary models. Most snake mitochondrial genomes have an additional interesting feature, 2 nearly identical control regions, which vary among different species in the extent that they are used as origins of replication. Given the expanded sampling of complete snake genomes currently available, together with 2 additional snakes sequenced in this study, we reexamined gradient strength and CR usage in alethinophidian snakes as well as several lizards that possess dual CRs. Our results suggest that nucleotide substitution gradients (and corresponding nucleotide bias) and CR usage is highly labile over the approximately 200 m.y. of squamate evolution, and demonstrates greater overall variability than previously shown in primates. The evidence for the existence of such gradients, and their ability to evolve rapidly and converge among unrelated species suggests that gradient dynamics could easily mislead phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary inferences, and argues strongly that these dynamics should be incorporated into phylogenetic models.

  18. Selection for Unequal Densities of Sigma70 Promoter-like Signalsin Different Regions of Large Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, Araceli M.; Francino, M. Pilar; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-03-01

    The evolutionary processes operating in the DNA regions that participate in the regulation of gene expression are poorly understood. In Escherichia coli, we have established a sequence pattern that distinguishes regulatory from nonregulatory regions. The density of promoter-like sequences, that are recognizable by RNA polymerase and may function as potential promoters, is high within regulatory regions, in contrast to coding regions and regions located between convergently-transcribed genes. Moreover, functional promoter sites identified experimentally are often found in the subregions of highest density of promoter-like signals, even when individual sites with higher binding affinity for RNA polymerase exist elsewhere within the regulatory region. In order to investigate the generality of this pattern, we have used position weight matrices describing the -35 and -10 promoter boxes of E. coli to search for these motifs in 43 additional genomes belonging to most established bacterial phyla, after specific calibration of the matrices according to the base composition of the noncoding regions of each genome. We have found that all bacterial species analyzed contain similar promoter-like motifs, and that, in most cases, these motifs follow the same genomic distribution observed in E. coli. Differential densities between regulatory and nonregulatory regions are detectable in most bacterial genomes, with the exception of those that have experienced evolutionary extreme genome reduction. Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of this pattern mirrors that of genes and other genomic features that require weak selection to be effective in order to persist. On this basis, we suggest that the loss of differential densities in the reduced genomes of host-restricted pathogens and symbionts is the outcome of a process of genome degradation resulting from the decreased efficiency of purifying selection in highly structured small populations. This implies that the differential

  19. Structural organization of the barley D-hordein locus in comparison with its orthologous regions of wheat genomes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong Qiang; Anderson, Olin D; Londeorë, Cynthia F; Kong, Xiuying; Chibbar, Ravindra N; Lazo, Gerard R

    2003-12-01

    D hordein, a prolamin storage protein of barley endosperms, is highly homologous to the high molecular weight (HWM) glutenin subunits, which are the major determinants of bread-making quality in wheat flour. In hexaploid wheat (AABBDD), each genome contains two paralogous copies of HMW-glutenin genes that encode the x- and y-type HMW-glutenin subunits. Previously, we reported the sequence analysis of a 102-kb genomic region that contains the HMW-glutenin locus of the D genome from Aegilops tauschii, the donor of the D genome of hexaploid wheat. Here, we present the sequence analysis of a 120-kb D-hordein region of the barley genome, a more distantly related member of the Triticeae grass tribe. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that gene content and order are generally conserved. Genes included in both of these orthologous regions are arranged in the following order: a Xa21-like receptor kinase, an endosperm globulin, an HMW prolamin, and a serine (threonine) protein kinase. However, in the wheat D genome, a region containing both the globulin and HMW-glutenin gene was duplicated, indicating that this duplication event occurred after the separation of the wheat and barley genomes. The intergenic regions are divergent with regard to the sequence and structural organization. It was found that different types of retroelements are responsible for the intergenic structure divergence in the wheat and barley genomes. In the barley region, we identified 16 long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons in three distinct nested clusters. These retroelements account for 63% of the contig sequence. In addition, barley D hordein was compared with wheat HMW glutenins in terms of cysteine residue conservation and repeat domain organization.

  20. Characterization and organization of DNA sequences adjacent to the human telomere associated repeat (TTAGGG)n.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, B; Collins, C; Robbins, C; Magenis, R E; Delaney, A D; Gray, J W; Hayden, M R

    1990-01-01

    We present a strategy for the cloning of DNA sequences adjacent to the tandemly repeated DNA sequence (TTAGGG)n. Sequence analysis of 14 independently isolated clones revealed the presence of non-repetitive sequences immediately adjacent to or flanked by blocks of the simple repeat (TTAGGG)n. In addition, we provide sequence information on two previously undescribed tandemly repeated sequences, including a 9 bp repeat and a modification of the (TTAGGG)n repeat. Using different mapping approaches six sub-clones, free of the TTAGGG repeat, were assigned to a single human chromosome. Moreover, in situ hybridization mapped one of these subclones, G2 - 1H, definitively to the telomeric band on chromosome 4q. However, Bal 31 insensitivity suggests a location in a more subterminal region. All the (TTAGGG)n-adjacent unique sequences tested are highly conserved among primates but are not present in other mammalian species. Identification and mapping of TTAGGG-adjacent sequences will provide a refined insight into the genomic organization of the (TTAGGG)n repeat. The isolation of chromosome specific TTAGGG-adjacent sequences from subtelomeric regions of all human chromosomes will serve as important end points for the genetic maps and will be useful for the molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving telomeres. Images PMID:2356126

  1. Climatic Factors Drive Population Divergence and Demography: Insights Based on the Phylogeography of a Riparian Plant Species Endemic to the Hengduan Mountains and Adjacent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Shao-Tian; Nie, Ze-Long; Zhang, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhuo; Deng, Tao; Sun, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary climatic factors have played a significant role in population divergence and demography. Here we investigated the phylogeography of Osteomeles schwerinae, a dominant riparian plant species of the hot/warm-dry river valleys of the Hengduan Mountains (HDM), Qinling Mountains (QLM) and Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau (YGP). Three chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions (trnD-trnT, psbD-trnT, petL-psbE), one single copy nuclear gene (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase; G3pdh), and climatic data during the Last Interglacial (LIG; c. 120–140 ka), Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; c. 21 ka), and Current (c. 1950–2000) periods were used in this study. Six cpDNA haplotypes and 15 nuclear DNA (nDNA) haplotypes were identified in the 40 populations of O. schwerinae. Spatial Analysis of Molecular Variance, median-joining networks, and Bayesian phylogenetic trees based on the cpDNA and nDNA datasets, all suggested population divergence between the QLM and HDM-YGP regions. Our climatic analysis identified significant heterogeneity of the climatic factors in the QLM and HDM-YGP regions during the aforementioned three periods. The divergence times based on cpDNA and nDNA haplotypes were estimated to be 466.4–159.4 ka and 315.8–160.3 ka, respectively, which coincide with the time of the weakening of the Asian monsoons in these regions. In addition, unimodal pairwise mismatch distribution curves, expansion times, and Ecological Niche Modeling suggested a history of population expansion (rather than contraction) during the last glaciation. Interestingly, the expansion times were found being well consistent with the intensification of the Asian monsoons during this period. We inferred that the divergence between the two main lineages is probably caused by disruption of more continuous distribution because of weakening of monsoons/less precipitation, whilst subsequent intensification of the Asian monsoons during the last glaciation facilitated the expansion of O. schwerinae

  2. Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV Strains from China with Other Strains from Different Geographic Regions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV strains have been published in GenBank, including one strain from China, and nineteen strains from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 strains from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 strains were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG strain established close relationships with the Australian strain SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG strain with the sequences of SA2 and K317 strains as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV strains were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV strains from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV strains from different geographic regions.

  3. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Caro-Astorga, Joaquín; Pérez-García, Alejandro; de Vicente, Antonio; Romero, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed (i) the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and (ii) the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog.

  4. Ordovician of the Sauk megasequence in the Ozark region of northern Arkansas and parts of Missouri and adjacent states: Chapter 11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ethington, Raymond L.; Repetski, John E.; Derby, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The oldest formation that crops out in the region is the Jefferson City Dolomite, which may be present in outcrops along incised river valleys near the Missouri-Arkansas border. Rare fossil gastropods, bivalves, brachiopods, conodonts, and trilobites permit correlation of the Cotter through Powell Dolomites with Ibexian strata elsewhere in Laurentia. Conodonts in the Black Rock Limestone Member of the Smithville Formation and the upper part of the Powell Dolomite confirm regional relationships that have been suggested for these units; those of the Black Rock Limestone Member are consistent with deposition under more open marine conditions than existed when older and younger units were forming. Brachiopods and conodonts from the overlying Everton Formation assist in interpreting complex facies within that formation and its correlation to equivalent rocks elsewhere. The youngest conodonts in the Everton Formation provide an age limit for the Sauk-Tippecanoe unconformity near the southern extremity of the great American carbonate bank. The correlation to coeval strata in the Ouachita Mountains of central Arkansas and in the Arbuckle Mountains of Oklahoma and to rocks penetrated in wells drilled in the Reelfoot rift basin has been improved greatly in recent years by integration of biostratigraphic data with lithologic information.

  5. The Enhancer of Split Complex and Adjacent Genes in the 96f Region of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Required for Segregation of Neural and Epidermal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schrons, H.; Knust, E.; Campos-Ortega, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] of Drosophila melanogaster is located in the 96F region of the third chromosome and comprises at least seven structurally related genes, HLH-mδ, HLH-mγ, HLH-mβ, HLH-m3, HLH-m5, HLH-m7 and E(spl). The functions of these genes are required during early neurogenesis to give neuroectodermal cells access to the epidermal pathway of development. Another gene in the 96F region, namely groucho, is also required for this process. However, groucho is not structurally related to, and appears to act independently of, the genes of the E(spl)-C; the possibility is discussed that groucho acts upstream to the E(spl)-C genes. Indirect evidence suggests that a neighboring transcription unit (m4) may also take part in the process. Of all these genes, only gro is essential; m4 is a dispensable gene, the deletion of which does not produce detectable morphogenetic abnormalities, and the genes of the E(spl)-C are to some extent redundant and can partially substitute for each other. This redundancy is probably due to the fact that the seven genes of the E(spl)-C encode highly conserved putative DNA-binding proteins of the bHLH family. The genes of the complex are interspersed among other genes which appear to be unrelated to the neuroepidermal lineage dichotomy. PMID:1427039

  6. Revision of Errhomeninae and Aphrodinae (Hemiptera, Cicadomorpha) in Italy with remarks on their variability and distribution in adjacent regions and description of three new taxa.

    PubMed

    Guglielmino, Adalgisa; Bückle, Christoph

    2015-01-15

    A revision of the subfamilies Errhomeninae and Aphrodinae in Italy is presented. Two new species, Anoscopus gorloppus and Anoscopus carlebippus, and one new subspecies Anoscopus albifrons mappus are described. Anoscopus dubius Gębicki & Bednarzyk is established as subspecies of Anoscopus flavostriatus (Donovan) (stat. nov.), Aphrodes siracusae (Matsumura) is transferred to the genus Anoscopus (comb. nov.). Anoscopus samuricus Tshmir is recorded in Italy for the first time. Information concerning ecology and regional distribution is given for all taxa present in Italy. Genital morphology and variability of colouration are figured for many taxa. A morphometric analysis based on measurements of aedeagus and body is conducted for the taxa of the Aphrodes bicincta group. Keys for the Italian species of Aphrodes and Anoscopus are given. Distribution and specific characters of Anoscopus assimilis (Signoret) and Anoscopus alpinus (Wagner) are presented. Differences between Italian populations and conspecific ones in other European regions, and reasons for the particularly high variability in the Alpine areas of Italy are discussed. A list of 19 species and two subspecies, presently recorded from Italy is given. 

  7. Lost region in amyloid precursor protein (APP) through TALEN-mediated genome editing alters mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Wu, Fengyi; Pan, Haining; Zheng, Wenzhong; Feng, Chi; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Luo, Jie; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ plaques are produced through sequential β/γ cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), of which there are three main APP isoforms: APP695, APP751 and APP770. KPI-APPs (APP751 and APP770) are known to be elevated in AD, but the reason remains unclear. Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) induce mutations with high efficiency at specific genomic loci, and it is thus possible to knock out specific regions using TALENs. In this study, we designed and expressed TALENs specific for the C-terminus of APP in HeLa cells, in which KPI-APPs are predominantly expressed. The KPI-APP mutants lack a 12-aa region that encompasses a 5-aa trans-membrane (TM) region and 7-aa juxta-membrane (JM) region. The mutated KPI-APPs exhibited decreased mitochondrial localization. In addition, mitochondrial morphology was altered, resulting in an increase in spherical mitochondria in the mutant cells through the disruption of the balance between fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including decreased ATP levels, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation and impaired mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, was also found. These results suggest that specific regions of KPI-APPs are important for mitochondrial localization and function.

  8. Pattern of diversity in the genomic region near the maize domestication gene tb1

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Richard M.; Linton, Eric; Messing, Joachim; Doebley, John F.

    2004-01-01

    Domesticated maize and its wild ancestor (teosinte) differ strikingly in morphology and afford an opportunity to examine the connection between strong selection and diversity in a major crop species. The tb1 gene largely controls the increase in apical dominance in maize relative to teosinte, and a region of the tb1 locus 5′ to the transcript sequence was a target of selection during maize domestication. To better characterize the impact of selection at a major “domestication” locus, we have sequenced the upstream tb1 genomic region and systematically sampled nucleotide diversity for sites located as far as 163 kb upstream to tb1. Our analyses define a selective sweep of ≈60–90 kb 5′ to the tb1 transcribed sequence. The selected region harbors a mixture of unique sequences and large repetitive elements, but it contains no predicted genes. Diversity at the nearest 5′ gene to tb1 is typical of that for neutral maize loci, indicating that selection at tb1 has had a minimal impact on the surrounding chromosomal region. Our data also show low intergenic linkage disequilibrium in the region and suggest that selection has had a minor role in shaping the pattern of linkage disequilibrium that is observed. Finally, our data raise the possibility that maize-like tb1 haplotypes are present in extant teosinte populations, and our findings also suggest a model of tb1 gene regulation that differs from traditional views of how plant gene expression is controlled. PMID:14701910

  9. Mitochondrial genome of Pogona vitticepes (Reptilia; Agamidae): control region duplication and the origin of Australasian agamids.

    PubMed

    Amer, Sayed A M; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2005-02-14

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence for an Australian agamid Pogona vitticepes was determined. Twenty-two tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, thirteen protein-coding genes, and two control regions were identified in this mitochondrial genome. The second control region was inserted between NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 and 6 genes. The duplication of the control region was found in all Australasian agamids examined and was not found in other Asian or African taxa. The two control regions had nearly identical sequences within species but they were divergent among species, suggesting their concerted sequence evolution. Phylogenetic analyses including divergence time estimation without assuming the molecular clock suggested that the duplication of the control region occurred on a lineage leading to the Australasian agamids 25-45 million years ago after their divergence from a Southeast Asian Physignathus cocincinus. Our finding thus supports the recent dispersal origin of Australasian agamids in connection with plate tectonic movement of Australia to the proximity of Southeast Asia.

  10. DMRT gene cluster analysis in the platypus: new insights into genomic organization and regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Wakefield, Matthew; Deakin, Janine E; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Grützner, Frank; Alsop, Amber; Ezaz, Tariq; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    We isolated and characterized a cluster of platypus DMRT genes and compared their arrangement, location, and sequence across vertebrates. The DMRT gene cluster on human 9p24.3 harbors, in order, DMRT1, DMRT3, and DMRT2, which share a DM domain. DMRT1 is highly conserved and involved in sexual development in vertebrates, and deletions in this region cause sex reversal in humans. Sequence comparisons of DMRT genes between species have been valuable in identifying exons, control regions, and conserved nongenic regions (CNGs). The addition of platypus sequences is expected to be particularly valuable, since monotremes fill a gap in the vertebrate genome coverage. We therefore isolated and fully sequenced platypus BAC clones containing DMRT3 and DMRT2 as well as DMRT1 and then generated multispecies alignments and ran prediction programs followed by experimental verification to annotate this gene cluster. We found that the three genes have 58-66% identity to their human orthologues, lie in the same order as in other vertebrates, and colocate on 1 of the 10 platypus sex chromosomes, X5. We also predict that optimal annotation of the newly sequenced platypus genome will be challenging. The analysis of platypus sequence revealed differences in structure and sequence of the DMRT gene cluster. Multispecies comparison was particularly effective for detecting CNGs, revealing several novel potential regulatory regions within DMRT3 and DMRT2 as well as DMRT1. RT-PCR indicated that platypus DMRT1 and DMRT3 are expressed specifically in the adult testis (and not ovary), but DMRT2 has a wider expression profile, as it does for other mammals. The platypus DMRT1 expression pattern, and its location on an X chromosome, suggests an involvement in monotreme sexual development.

  11. Micropaleontological Record of Post-glacial History in Lake Champlain and Adjacent Regions: Implications for Glacial Lake Drainage and Abrupt Climate Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; Manley, P. L.; Guilbault, J.; Berke, M.; Rayburn, J. A.; Franzi, D. A.; Knuepfer, P. L.

    2005-12-01

    Post-glacial lacustrine and marine sediments of the Lake Champlain region range from 20 to >50 meters in thickness presenting an opportunity to assess the timing of North American glacial lake drainage at multidecadal timescales and evaluate its effect on North Atlantic salinity and abrupt climate events 13.5 to 10 kyr B.P. High-resolution analysis of foraminifera and ostracodes from cores taken onshore in the Plattsburgh, N.Y. vicinity and southern Quebec and offshore in southern Lake Champlain reveal complex changes in salinity during and after the transition from pro-glacial Lake Vermont (Lake Candona in Canada) to marine sedimentation in the Champlain Sea. The microfaunal sequence (bottom to top) includes: non-marine ostracodes ( Candona) in lacustrine varves, foraminiferal assemblages (common Cassidulina reniforme), another interval of Candona-bearing sediments (sometimes containing foraminifera), and, finally, sediments from the main phase of the Champlain sea episode containing diverse foraminiferal and marine ostracode assemblages. A decrease in salinity during the Champlain Sea is also in evidence from the shift in dominance of distinct variants of Elphidium in the deep basin. The marine episode ended with a progressive salinity decrease and the formation of Lake Champlain about 10 kyr B.P. Observed salinity changes could be caused by catastrophic fresh-water influx from large glacial lakes west of the Lake Champlain region, meltwater from the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet margin, diminished influx of marine water from the St. Lawrence due to changes in the position of the ice sheet margin and isostatic adjustment, or a combination of factors. The ages of these events were determined by estimating the reservoir effect on radiocarbon dates on marine shells through comparison with AMS dates on plant material and palynology, and shed light on the hypothesis that glacial lake discharges catalyzed abrupt climate events.

  12. In silico screening of the chicken genome for overlaps between genomic regions: microRNA genes, coding and non-coding transcriptional units, QTL, and genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Zorc, Minja; Kunej, Tanja

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional regulation of target genes. Regulation requires complementarity between target mRNA and the mature miRNA seed region, responsible for their recognition and binding. It has been estimated that each miRNA targets approximately 200 genes, and genetic variability of miRNA genes has been reported to affect phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility in humans, livestock species, and model organisms. Polymorphisms in miRNA genes could therefore represent biomarkers for phenotypic traits in livestock animals. In our previous study, we collected polymorphisms within miRNA genes in chicken. In the present study, we identified miRNA-related genomic overlaps to prioritize genomic regions of interest for further functional studies and biomarker discovery. Overlapping genomic regions in chicken were analyzed using the following bioinformatics tools and databases: miRNA SNiPer, Ensembl, miRBase, NCBI Blast, and QTLdb. Out of 740 known pre-miRNA genes, 263 (35.5 %) contain polymorphisms; among them, 35 contain more than three polymorphisms The most polymorphic miRNA genes in chicken are gga-miR-6662, containing 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pre-miRNA region, including five consecutive SNPs, and gga-miR-6688, containing ten polymorphisms including three consecutive polymorphisms. Several miRNA-related genomic hotspots have been revealed in chicken genome; polymorphic miRNA genes are located within protein-coding and/or non-coding transcription units and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with production traits. The present study includes the first description of an exonic miRNA in a chicken genome, an overlap between the miRNA gene and the exon of the protein-coding gene (gga-miR-6578/HADHB), and the first report of a missense polymorphism located within a mature miRNA seed region. Identified miRNA-related genomic hotspots in chicken can serve researchers as a

  13. Phylogeographic Structure of a Tethyan Relict Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae) Traces Pleistocene Geologic and Climatic Changes in the Western Himalayas, Tianshan Mountains, and Adjacent Desert Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ming-Li; Yin, Lin-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Complex geological movements more or less affected or changed floristic structures, while the alternation of glacials and interglacials is presumed to have further shaped the present discontinuous genetic pattern of temperate plants. Here we consider Capparis spinosa, a xeromorphic Tethyan relict, to discuss its divergence pattern and explore how it responded in a stepwise fashion to Pleistocene geologic and climatic changes. 267 individuals from 31 populations were sampled and 24 haplotypes were identified, based on three cpDNA fragments (trnL-trnF, rps12-rpl20, and ndhF). SAMOVA clustered the 31 populations into 5 major clades. AMOVA suggests that gene flow between them might be restricted by vicariance. Molecular clock dating indicates that intraspecific divergence began in early Pleistocene, consistent with a time of intense uplift of the Himalaya and Tianshan Mountains, and intensified in mid-Pleistocene. Species distribution modeling suggests range reduction in the high mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of cold climates when glacier advanced, while gorges at midelevations in Tianshan appear to have served as refugia. Populations of low-altitude desert regions, on the other hand, probably experienced only marginal impacts from glaciation, according to the high levels of genetic diversity. PMID:27314028

  14. Phylogeographic Structure of a Tethyan Relict Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae) Traces Pleistocene Geologic and Climatic Changes in the Western Himalayas, Tianshan Mountains, and Adjacent Desert Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Ming-Li; Yin, Lin-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Complex geological movements more or less affected or changed floristic structures, while the alternation of glacials and interglacials is presumed to have further shaped the present discontinuous genetic pattern of temperate plants. Here we consider Capparis spinosa, a xeromorphic Tethyan relict, to discuss its divergence pattern and explore how it responded in a stepwise fashion to Pleistocene geologic and climatic changes. 267 individuals from 31 populations were sampled and 24 haplotypes were identified, based on three cpDNA fragments (trnL-trnF, rps12-rpl20, and ndhF). SAMOVA clustered the 31 populations into 5 major clades. AMOVA suggests that gene flow between them might be restricted by vicariance. Molecular clock dating indicates that intraspecific divergence began in early Pleistocene, consistent with a time of intense uplift of the Himalaya and Tianshan Mountains, and intensified in mid-Pleistocene. Species distribution modeling suggests range reduction in the high mountains during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) as a result of cold climates when glacier advanced, while gorges at midelevations in Tianshan appear to have served as refugia. Populations of low-altitude desert regions, on the other hand, probably experienced only marginal impacts from glaciation, according to the high levels of genetic diversity.

  15. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in sediments from three adjacent regions of the Yellow River using metal chemical fractions and multivariate analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zuo, Hang; Tian, Mengjing; Zhang, Liyang; Meng, Jia; Zhou, Xuening; Min, Na; Chang, Xinyuan; Liu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Metal chemical fractions obtained by optimized BCR three-stage extraction procedure and multivariate analysis techniques were exploited for assessing 7 heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Cd, Co, Cu, Zn and Ni) in sediments from Gansu province, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions of the Yellow River in Northern China. The results indicated that higher susceptibility and bioavailability of Cr and Cd with a strong anthropogenic source were due to their higher availability in the exchangeable fraction. A portion of Pb, Cd, Co, Zn, and Ni in reducible fraction may be due to the fact that they can form stable complexes with Fe and Mn oxides. Substantial amount of Pb, Co, Ni and Cu was observed as oxidizable fraction because of their strong affinity to the organic matters so that they can complex with humic substances in sediments. The high geo-accumulation indexes (I(geo)) for Cr and Cd showed their higher environmental risk to the aquatic biota. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that high toxic Cr and Cd in polluted sites (Cd in S10, S11 and Cr in S13) may be contributed to anthropogenic sources, it was consistent with the results of dual hierarchical clustering analysis (DHCA), which could give more details about contributing sources.

  16. Differentially Methylated Region-Representational Difference Analysis (DMR-RDA): A Powerful Method to Identify DMRs in Uncharacterized Genomes.

    PubMed

    Sasheva, Pavlina; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2017-01-01

    Over the last years, it has become increasingly clear that environmental influences can affect the epigenomic landscape and that some epigenetic variants can have heritable, phenotypic effects. While there are a variety of methods to perform genome-wide analyses of DNA methylation in model organisms, this is still a challenging task for non-model organisms without a reference genome. Differentially methylated region-representational difference analysis (DMR-RDA) is a sensitive and powerful PCR-based technique that isolates DNA fragments that are differentially methylated between two otherwise identical genomes. The technique does not require special equipment and is independent of prior knowledge about the genome. It is even applicable to genomes that have high complexity and a large size, being the method of choice for the analysis of plant non-model systems.

  17. HIV latency is influenced by regions of the viral genome outside of the long terminal repeats and regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Burke, Bryan P; Zack, Jerome A

    2011-09-01

    We have previously described an in vitro primary thymocyte model for HIV latency that recapitulates several important aspects of latently infected cells obtained from patients. Our original model included a truncated HIV genome expressing only Tat, Rev, and Vpu along with a reporter gene. We have now expanded these studies to include reporter viruses encoding more complete viral genomes. We show here that regions of the viral genome outside of the long terminal repeat promoter and Tat/Rev regulatory genes can substantially affect both the basal level of HIV transcription prior to stimulation, and also the level of viral expression following costimulation via CD3 and CD28 ligation. These differences in latency phenotype between truncated and more complete HIV genomes demonstrate the importance of accessory genes in the context of HIV latency and indicate that care should be taken when interpreting data derived from heavily modified HIV genomes in latency models.

  18. The genomic fingerprinting of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene in Leishmania identification.

    PubMed

    Luis, L; Ramírez, A; Aguilar, C M; Eresh, S; Barker, D C; Mendoza-León, A

    1998-06-01

    We have demonstrated the polymorphism of the beta-tubulin gene region in Leishmania and its value in the identification of the parasite. In this work we have shown that the coding region of the gene has sufficient variation to accurately discriminate these parasites at the subgenus level. Nevertheless, intrasubgenus diversity, for particular restriction enzymes, was found in New World Leishmania belonging to the Leishmania subgenus. For instance, differences were found between mexicana and amazonensis strains. A unique pattern at the species level was found in particular species of both subgenera, e.g. L. (L.) major strain P and L. (L.) tropica belonging to the Leishmania subgenus, and L. (V.) panamensis strain LS94 from the Viannia subgenus. Particular endonucleases are diagnostic in Leishmania species discrimination as in the case of PvuII for the mexicana and amazonensis. This variation evidenced in the beta-tubulin gene region of Leishmania also occurred in other Kinetoplastida e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi, Leptomonas spp. and Crithidia spp. Moreover, these organisms showed a different genomic fingerprinting for the beta-tubulin gene among them and also Leishmania. Thus, the polymorphism of the coding region of the beta-tubulin gene can be used as a molecular marker for the identification of Leishmania.

  19. Core and region-enriched networks of behaviorally regulated genes and the singing genome

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Osceola; Pfenning, Andreas R.; Howard, Jason T.; Blatti, Charles A; Liu, Fang; Ward, James M.; Wang, Rui; Audet, Jean-Nicolas; Kellis, Manolis; Mukherjee, Sayan; Sinha, Saurabh; Hartemink, Alexander J.; West, Anne E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds represent an important model organism for elucidating molecular mechanisms that link genes with complex behaviors, in part because they have discrete vocal learning circuits that have parallels with those that mediate human speech. We found that ~10% of the genes in the avian genome were regulated by singing, and we found a striking regional diversity of both basal and singing-induced programs in the four key song nuclei of the zebra finch, a vocal learning songbird. The region-enriched patterns were a result of distinct combinations of region-enriched transcription factors (TFs), their binding motifs, and presinging acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) enhancer activity in the regulatory regions of the associated genes. RNA interference manipulations validated the role of the calcium-response transcription factor (CaRF) in regulating genes preferentially expressed in specific song nuclei in response to singing. Thus, differential combinatorial binding of a small group of activity-regulated TFs and predefined epigenetic enhancer activity influences the anatomical diversity of behaviorally regulated gene networks. PMID:25504732

  20. Mitochondrial Genome Analyses Suggest Multiple Trichuris Species in Humans, Baboons, and Pigs from Different Geographical Regions

    PubMed Central

    Hawash, Mohamed B. F.; Andersen, Lee O.; Gasser, Robin B.; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found in primates. Methods and Findings We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois’ leaf-monkey (China) were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively) suggesting that they represented different species. Trichuris from the olive baboon in US was genetically related to human Trichuris in China, while the other from the hamadryas baboon in Denmark was nearly identical to human Trichuris from Uganda. Baboon-derived Trichuris was genetically distinct from Trichuris from françois’ leaf monkey, suggesting multiple whipworm species circulating among non-human primates. The genetic and protein distances between pig Trichuris from Denmark and other regions were roughly 9% and 6%, respectively, while Chinese and Ugandan whipworms were more closely related. Conclusion and Significance Our results indicate that Trichuris species infecting humans and pigs are phylogenetically distinct across geographical regions, which might have important implications for the implementation of suitable and effective control strategies in different regions. Moreover, we provide support for the hypothesis that Trichuris infecting primates represents a complex of cryptic species with some species being able to infect both humans and non-human primates

  1. Regional heritability mapping and genome-wide association identify loci for complex growth, wood and disease resistance traits in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Resende, Rafael Tassinari; Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Azevedo, Camila Ferreira; Takahashi, Elizabete Keiko; Silva-Junior, Orzenil Bonfim; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2017-02-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided valuable insights into the decoding of the relationships between sequence variation and complex phenotypes, they have explained little heritability. Regional heritability mapping (RHM) provides heritability estimates for genomic segments containing both common and rare allelic effects that individually contribute too little variance to be detected by GWAS. We carried out GWAS and RHM for seven growth, wood and disease resistance traits in a breeding population of 768 Eucalyptus hybrid trees using EuCHIP60K. Total genomic heritabilities accounted for large proportions (64-89%) of pedigree-based trait heritabilities, providing additional evidence that complex traits in eucalypts are controlled by many sequence variants across the frequency spectrum, each with small contributions to the phenotypic variance. RHM detected 26 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) encompassing 2191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whereas GWAS detected 13 single SNP-trait associations. RHM and GWAS QTLs individually explained 5-15% and 4-6% of the genomic heritability, respectively. RHM was superior to GWAS in capturing larger proportions of genomic heritability. Equated to previously mapped QTLs, our results highlighted genomic regions for further examination towards gene discovery. RHM-QTLs bearing a combination of common and rare variants could be useful enhancements to incorporate prior knowledge of the underlying genetic architecture in genomic prediction models.

  2. Functional and structural analyses of mouse genomic regions screened by the morphological specific-locus test.

    PubMed

    Russell, L B

    1989-05-01

    Genetic analyses of certain classes of mutations recovered in the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) have characterized arrays of deletions, overlapping at the marked loci. Complementation maps, generated for several of the regions, have identified a number of functional units surrounding each marked locus and have ordered the mutations into complementation groups. Molecular entry to all but one of the marked regions has been achieved by (1) identifying proviral integrations in, or close to, the specific loci (d, se, a, c); (2) mapping random anonymous clones from appropriately enriched libraries to the longest deleted segments, then submapping to more limited segments on the basis of complementation and deletion-breakpoint maps (c, p); (3) similarly mapping known clones thought to be located in pertinent chromosomal regions (p, c, d); and (4) cloning specific genes that reside in regions corresponding to the deletions (b, c, p). The molecular analyses have confirmed that genetically-inferred deletions are structural deletions of DNA. The emerging physical maps are concordant with the complementation maps, and in several cases have discriminated among members of a complementation group with respect to breakpoint positions. Deletion-breakpoint-fusion fragments have prove to be highly useful for making large chromosomal jumps to facilitate physical mapping. The recent advances toward correlating physical and functional maps of specific regions of the mouse genome owe much to the existence of arrays of mutations involving loci marked in the SLT. In turn, the characterizations of these regions have made it possible to demonstrate qualitative differences among mutations resulting from different treatments. This new capability for qualitative analysis, which will increase as the molecular studies proceed, further enhances the value of the SLT, which has been extensively used for quantitative studies in germ-cell mutagenesis.

  3. Direct selection: a method for the isolation of cDNAs encoded by large genomic regions.

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, M; Kere, J; Hinton, L M

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a strategy for the rapid enrichment and identification of cDNAs encoded by large genomic regions. The basis of this "direct selection" scheme is the hybridization of an entire library of cDNAs to an immobilized genomic clone. Nonspecific hybrids are eliminated and selected cDNAs are eluted. These molecules are then amplified and are either cloned or subjected to further selection/amplification cycles. This scheme was tested using a 550-kilobase yeast artificial chromosome clone that contains the EPO gene. Using this clone and a fetal kidney cDNA library, we have achieved a 1000-fold enrichment of EPO cDNAs in one cycle of enrichment. More significantly, we have further investigated one of the "anonymous" cDNAs that was selectively enriched. We confirmed that this cDNA was encoded by the yeast artificial chromosome. Its frequency in the starting library was 1 in 1 x 10(5) cDNAs and after selection comprised 2% of the selected library. DNA sequence analysis of this cDNA and of the yeast artificial chromosome clone revealed that this gene encodes the beta 2 subunit of the human guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins. Restriction mapping and hybridization data position this gene (GNB2) to within 30-70 kilobases of the EPO gene. The selective isolation and mapping of GNB2 confirms the feasibility of this direct selection strategy and suggests that it will be useful for the rapid isolation of cDNAs, including disease-related genes, across extensive portions of the human genome. Images PMID:1946378

  4. Genomic regions affecting backfat thickness and cannon bone circumference identified by genome-wide association study in a Duroc pig population.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naohiko; Matsumoto, Toshimi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Hirose, Kensuke; Fukawa, Kazuo; Itou, Tetsuya; Uenishi, Hirohide; Mikawa, Satoshi; Awata, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study using the porcine 60K SNP array to detect QTL regions for nine traits in a three-generational Duroc samples (n = 651), viz. generations 1, 2 and 3 from a population selected over five generations using a closed nucleus breeding scheme. We applied a linear mixed model for association mapping to detect SNP effects, adjusting for fixed effects (sex and season) and random polygenic effects (reflecting genetic relatedness), and derived a likelihood ratio statistic for each SNP using the efficient mixed-model association method. We detected a region on SSC6 for backfat thickness (BFT) and on SSC7 for cannon bone circumference (CANNON), with a genome-wide significance of P < 0.01 after Bonferroni correction. These regions had been detected previously in other pig populations. Six genes are located in the BFT-associated region, while the CANNON-associated region includes 66 genes. In the future, significantly associated SNPs, derived by sequencing the coding regions of the six genes in the BFT region, can be used in marker-assisted selection of BFT, whereas haplotypes constructed from the SSC7 region with strong LD can be used to select for the CANNON trait in our resource family.

  5. Characterizing regions in the human genome unmappable by next-generation-sequencing at the read length of 1000 bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Repetitive and redundant regions of a genome are particularly problematic for mapping sequencing reads. In the present paper, we compile a list of the unmappable regions in the human genome based on the following definition: hypothetical reads with length 1 kb which cannot be uniquely mapped with zero-mismatch alignment for the described regions, considering both the forward and reverse strand. The respective collection of unmappable regions covers 0.77% of the sequence of human autosomes and 8.25% of the sex chromosomes in the reference genome GRCh37/hg19 (overall 1.23%). Not surprisingly, our unmappable regions overlap greatly with segmental duplication, transposable elements, and structural variants. About 99.8% of bases in our unmappable regions are part of either segmental duplication or transposable elements and 98.3% overlap structural variant annotations. Notably, some of these regions overlap units with important biological functions, including 4% of protein-coding genes. In contrast, these regions have zero intersection with the ultraconserved elements, very low overlap with microRNAs, tRNAs, pseudogenes, CpG islands, tandem repeats, microsatellites, sensitive non-coding regions, and the mapping blacklist regions from the ENCODE project.

  6. Genome analysis: Assigning protein coding regions to three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed Central

    Salamov, A. A.; Suwa, M.; Orengo, C. A.; Swindells, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the results of a procedure for maximizing the number of sequences that can be reliably linked to a protein of known three-dimensional structure. Unlike other methods, which try to increase sensitivity through the use of fold recognition software, we only use conventional sequence alignment tools, but apply them in a manner that significantly increases the number of relationships detected. We analyzed 11 genomes and found that, depending on the genome, between 23 and 32% of the ORFs had significant matches to proteins of known structure. In all cases, the aligned region consisted of either >100 residues or >50% of the smaller sequence. Slightly higher percentages could be attained if smaller motifs were also included. This is significantly higher than most previously reported methods, even those that have a fold-recognition component. We survey the biochemical and structural characteristics of the most frequently occurring proteins, and discuss the extent to which alignment methods can realistically assign function to gene products. PMID:10211823

  7. Genomic regions associated with ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis in pig.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, K K; Gregersen, V R; Christensen, O F; Velander, I H; Bendixen, C

    2011-08-01

    Ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis can be a result of pleuropneumonia and enzootic pneumonia. These diseases cause severe losses in intensive pig production worldwide, but host resistance is difficult to breed for. It could be beneficial to use marker-assisted selection, and a step towards this is to identify genomic regions associated with the trait. For this purpose, 7304 pigs from 11 boar families were analysed for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis. The pigs were genotyped by the use of the iSelect Custom 7 K porcine SNP Chip. Quantitative trait loci (QTL), significant at the chromosome-wide level, were identified on Sus scrofa chromosomes (SSC) 2, 4, 11, 12 and 13 in four different boar families. The QTL on SSC 4 in family G was also significant at the genome-wide threshold according to Bonferroni correction. We have identified a number of candidate genes, but the causative mutations still need to be identified. Markers closely associated with the resistance traits have a strong potential for use in breeding towards animals with improved characteristics concerning ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis.

  8. QTL Mapping of Genome Regions Controlling Temephos Resistance in Larvae of the Mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe del Carmen; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Suarez, Adriana Flores; Black, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae. aegypti larval populations but resistance has evolved in many locations. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) controlling temephos survival in Ae. aegypti larvae were mapped in a pair of F3 advanced intercross lines arising from temephos resistant parents from Solidaridad, México and temephos susceptible parents from Iquitos, Peru. Two sets of 200 F3 larvae were exposed to a discriminating dose of temephos and then dead larvae were collected and preserved for DNA isolation every two hours up to 16 hours. Larvae surviving longer than 16 hours were considered resistant. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified at 23 single copy genes and 26 microsatellite loci of known physical positions in the Ae. aegypti genome. In both reciprocal crosses, Multiple Interval Mapping identified eleven QTL associated with time until death. In the Solidaridad×Iquitos (SLD×Iq) cross twelve were associated with survival but in the reciprocal IqxSLD cross, only six QTL were survival associated. Polymorphisms at acetylcholine esterase (AchE) loci 1 and 2 were not associated with either resistance phenotype suggesting that target site insensitivity is not an organophosphate resistance mechanism in this region of México. Conclusions/Significance Temephos resistance is under the control of many metabolic genes of small effect and dispersed throughout the Ae. aegypti genome. PMID:25330200

  9. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/.

  10. Somatic Mutation Patterns in Hemizygous Genomic Regions Unveil Purifying Selection during Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Swaraj; Larsson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Identification of cancer driver genes using somatic mutation patterns indicative of positive selection has become a major goal in cancer genomics. However, cancer cells additionally depend on a large number of genes involved in basic cellular processes. While such genes should in theory be subject to strong purifying (negative) selection against damaging somatic mutations, these patterns have been elusive and purifying selection remains inadequately explored in cancer. Here, we hypothesized that purifying selection should be evident in hemizygous genomic regions, where damaging mutations cannot be compensated for by healthy alleles. Using a 7,781-sample pan-cancer dataset, we first confirmed this in POLR2A, an essential gene where hemizygous deletions are known to confer elevated sensitivity to pharmacological suppression. We next used this principle to identify several genes and pathways that show patterns indicative of purifying selection to avoid deleterious mutations. These include the POLR2A interacting protein INTS10 as well as genes involved in mRNA splicing, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and other RNA processing pathways. Many of these genes belong to large protein complexes, and strong overlaps were observed with recent functional screens for gene essentiality in human cells. Our analysis supports that purifying selection acts to preserve the remaining function of many hemizygously deleted essential genes in tumors, indicating vulnerabilities that might be exploited by future therapeutic strategies. PMID:28027311

  11. Complete coding region of the mitochondrial genome of Monochamus alternatus hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Ye; Feng, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    The Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus Hope, 1842, an important forest pest, mainly occurs in Far East. It is the main vector of pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which causes pine wilt disease. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome coding region of M. alternatus using long PCR and conserved primer walking. Our results show that the entire mitogenome coding region is 14,649 bp long, with 78.22% A+T content [deposited in GenBank (JX987292)]. Positions and arrangement of the 37 genes encoded by the coding region are identical to those of two other longhorn beetles (Psacothea hilaris and Anoplophora glabripennis) for which the complete gene content and arrangement are known. All protein-coding genes start with a typical initiation codon ATN in insects. All tRNAs show standard clover-leaf structure, except the tRNA(Ser) (AGN), which lacks dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. The most unusual feature found is the use of TCT as tRNA(Ser) (AGN) anticodon instead of GCT, which is used in most other arthropods. This provides further insights into the diversity and evolution of the Cerambycidae family of long-horned beetles.

  12. Genome-wide association analysis to identify chromosomal regions determining components of earliness in wheat.

    PubMed

    Le Gouis, J; Bordes, J; Ravel, C; Heumez, E; Faure, S; Praud, S; Galic, N; Remoué, C; Balfourier, F; Allard, V; Rousset, M

    2012-02-01

    The modification of flowering date is considered an important way to escape the current or future climatic constraints that affect wheat crops. A better understanding of its genetic bases would enable a more efficient and rapid modification through breeding. The objective of this study was to identify chromosomal regions associated with earliness in wheat. A 227-wheat core collection chosen to be highly contrasted for earliness was characterized for heading date. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions and in the field for 3 years to break down earliness in the component traits: photoperiod sensitivity, vernalization requirement and narrow-sense earliness. Whole-genome association mapping was carried out using 760 molecular markers and taking into account the five ancestral group structure. We identified 62 markers individually associated to earliness components corresponding to 33 chromosomal regions. In addition, we identified 15 other significant markers and seven more regions by testing marker pair interactions. Co-localizations were observed with the Ppd-1, Vrn-1 and Rht-1 candidate genes. Using an independent set of lines to validate the model built for heading date, we were able to explain 34% of the variation using the structure and the significant markers. Results were compared with already published data using bi-parental populations giving an insight into the genetic architecture of flowering time in wheat.

  13. Genome-wide profiling of untranslated regions by paired-end ditag sequencing reveals unexpected transcriptome complexity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ya-Ni; Lai, Deng-Pan; Ooi, Hong Sain; Shen, Ting-Ting; Kou, Yao; Tian, Jing; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2015-02-01

    The identification of structural and functional elements encoded in a genome is a challenging task. Although the transcriptome of budding yeast has been extensively analyzed, the boundaries and untranslated regions of yeast genes remain elusive. To address this least-explored field of yeast genomics, we performed a transcript profiling analysis through paired-end ditag (PET) approach coupled with deep sequencing. With 562,133 PET sequences we accurately defined the boundaries and untranslated regions of 3,409 ORFs, suggesting many yeast genes have multiple transcription start sites (TSSs). We also identified 85 previously uncharacterized transcripts either in intergenic regions or from the opposite strand of reported genomic features. Furthermore, our data revealed the extensive 3' end heterogeneity of yeast genes and identified a novel putative motif for polyadenylation. Our results indicate the yeast transcriptome is more complex than expected. This study would serve as an invaluable resource for elucidating the regulation and evolution of yeast genes.

  14. Multi-generational genome wide association studies identify chromosomal regions associated with ascites phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, K J; Dey, S; Kinney, R; Anthony, N B; Rhoads, D D

    2017-02-21

    Ascites is a multi-faceted disease commonly observed in fast growing broilers, which is initiated when the body is insufficiently oxygenated. A series of events follow, including an increase in pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity and pericardium. Advances in management practices along with improved selection programs have decreased ascites incidence in modern broilers. However, ascites syndrome remains an economically important disease throughout the world, causing estimated losses of $100 million per year. In this study, a 60 K Illumina SNP BeadChip was used to perform a series of genome wide association studies (GWAS) on the 16th and 18th generation of our relaxed (REL) line descended from a commercial elite broiler line beginning in 1995. Regions significantly associated with ascites incidence were identified on chromosome 2 around 70 megabase pairs (Mbp) and on chromosome Z around 60 Mbp. Five candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were evaluated as indicators for these 2 regions in order to identify association with ascites and right ventricle to total ventricle weight (RVTV) ratios. Chromosome 2 SNP showed an association with RVTV ratios in males phenotyped as ascites resistant and ascites susceptible (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). The chromosome Z region also indicates an association with resistant female RVTV values (P = 0.02). Regions of significance identified on chromosomes 2 and Z described in this study will be used as proposed candidate regions for further investigation into the genetics of ascites. This information will lead to a better understanding of the underlying genetics and gene networks contributing to ascites, and thus advances in ascites reduction through commercial breeding schemes.

  15. Differential DNA Methylation Regions in Cytokine and Transcription Factor Genomic Loci Associate with Childhood Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew J.; Caramaschi, Doretta; Wang, Dongsha; Hallett, Michael; Vitaro, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal and human studies suggest that inflammation is associated with behavioral disorders including aggression. We have recently shown that physical aggression of boys during childhood is strongly associated with reduced plasma levels of cytokines IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, later in early adulthood. This study tests the hypothesis that there is an association between differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine genes in T cells and monocytes DNA in adult subjects and a trajectory of physical aggression from childhood to adolescence. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the methylation profiles of the entire genomic loci encompassing the IL-1α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-8 and three of their regulatory transcription factors (TF) NFkB1, NFAT5 and STAT6 genes in adult males on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA) and males with the same background who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory (control group) from childhood to adolescence. We used the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation with comprehensive cytokine gene loci and TF loci microarray hybridization, statistical analysis and false discovery rate correction. We found differentially methylated regions to associate with CPA in both the cytokine loci as well as in their transcription factors loci analyzed. Some of these differentially methylated regions were located in known regulatory regions whereas others, to our knowledge, were previously unknown as regulatory areas. However, using the ENCODE database, we were able to identify key regulatory elements in many of these regions that indicate that they might be involved in the regulation of cytokine expression. Conclusions We provide here the first evidence for an association between differential DNA methylation in cytokines and their regulators in T cells and monocytes and male physical aggression. PMID:23977113

  16. Genome-wide association study identified a narrow chromosome 1 region associated with chicken growth traits.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liang; Luo, Chenglong; Zhang, Chengguang; Zhang, Rong; Tang, Jun; Nie, Qinghua; Ma, Li; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning; Da, Yang; Zhang, Xiquan

    2012-01-01

    Chicken growth traits are important economic traits in broilers. A large number of studies are available on finding genetic factors affecting chicken growth. However, most of these studies identified chromosome regions containing putative quantitative trait loci and finding causal mutations is still a challenge. In this genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified a narrow 1.5 Mb region (173.5-175 Mb) of chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome (GGA) 1 to be strongly associated with chicken growth using 47,678 SNPs and 489 F2 chickens. The growth traits included aggregate body weight (BW) at 0-90 d of age measured weekly, biweekly average daily gains (ADG) derived from weekly body weight, and breast muscle weight (BMW), leg muscle weight (LMW) and wing weight (WW) at 90 d of age. Five SNPs in the 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region at GGA1 had the highest significant effects for all growth traits in this study, including a SNP at 8.9 Kb upstream of FOXO1A for BW at 22-48 d and 70 d, a SNP at 1.9 Kb downstream of FOXO1A for WW, a SNP at 20.9 Kb downstream of ENSGALG00000022732 for ADG at 29-42 d, a SNP in INTS6 for BW at 90 d, and a SNP in KPNA3 for BMW and LMW. The 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region contained two microRNA genes that could bind to messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of IGF1, FOXO1A and KPNA3. It was further indicated that the 1.5 Mb GGA1 region had the strongest effects on chicken growth during 22-42 d.

  17. Genome-Wide Analyses of Recombination Prone Regions Predict Role of DNA Structural Motif in Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2009-01-01

    HapMap findings reveal surprisingly asymmetric distribution of recombinogenic regions. Short recombinogenic regions (hotspots) are interspersed between large relatively non-recombinogenic regions. This raises the interesting possibility of DNA sequence and/or other cis- elements as determinants of recombination. We hypothesized the involvement of non-canonical sequences that can result in local non-B DNA structures and tested this using the G-quadruplex DNA as a model. G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a unique form of four-stranded non-B DNA structure that engages certain G-rich sequences, presence of such motifs has been noted within telomeres. In support of this hypothesis, genome-wide computational analyses presented here reveal enrichment of potential G4 (PG4) DNA forming sequences within 25618 human hotspots relative to 9290 coldspots (p<0.0001). Furthermore, co-occurrence of PG4 DNA within several short sequence elements that are associated with recombinogenic regions was found to be significantly more than randomly expected. Interestingly, analyses of more than 50 DNA binding factors revealed that co-occurrence of PG4 DNA with target DNA binding sites of transcription factors c-Rel, NF-kappa B (p50 and p65) and Evi-1 was significantly enriched in recombination-prone regions. These observations support involvement of G4 DNA in recombination, predicting a functional model that is consistent with duplex-strand separation induced by formation of G4 motifs in supercoiled DNA and/or when assisted by other cellular factors. PMID:19198658

  18. siRNA Targeting the 2Apro Genomic Region Prevents Enterovirus 71 Replication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Zhenzhen; Shao, Qixiang; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Chen, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the most important etiological agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children, which is associated with severe neurological complications and has caused significant mortalities in recent HFMD outbreaks in Asia. However, there is no effective antiviral therapy against EV71. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) was used as an antiviral strategy to inhibit EV71 replication. Three small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the 2Apro region of the EV71 genome were designed and synthesized. All the siRNAs were transfected individually into rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which were then infected with strain EV71-2006-52-9. The cytopathic effects (CPEs) in the infected RD cells, cell viability, viral titer, and viral RNA and protein expression were examined to evaluate the specific viral inhibition by the siRNAs. The results of cytopathogenicity and MTT tests indicated that the RD cells transfected with the three siRNAs showed slight CPEs and significantly high viability. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) values demonstrated that the viral titer of the groups treated with three siRNAs were lower than those of the control groups. qRT–PCR and western blotting revealed that the levels of viral RNA and protein in the RD cells treated with the three siRNAs were lower than those in the controls. When RD cells transfected with siRNAs were also infected with strain EV71-2008-43-16, the expression of the VP1 protein was significantly inhibited. The levels of interferon α (IFN-α) and IFN-β did not differ significantly in any group. These results suggest that siRNAs targeting the 2Apro region of the EV71 genome exerted antiviral effects in vitro. PMID:26886455

  19. Significant association between body composition phenotypes and the osteocalcin genomic region in normative human population.

    PubMed

    Korostishevsky, Michael; Malkin, Ida; Trofimov, Svetlana; Pei, Yufang; Deng, Hong-Wen; Livshits, Gregory

    2012-10-01

    Osteocalcin, a major inorganic component of bone matrix and marker of bone formation, is also involved in regulation of glucose and fat mass metabolism. However, much uncertainty remains about whether the above effect on fat mass has a genetic component. Our main aim was to test whether a variation of body composition phenotypes is associated with BGLAP genomic region variants. To achieve this aim, we used an ethnically homogeneous discovery sample of 230 families consisting of 1112 apparently healthy individuals (561 males and 551 females) of European origin. We conducted association analysis between six SNPs and five obesity-related phenotypes: plasma levels of leptin, anthropometrical fat mass (FM), principal component scores of eight skinfold (SK_PC) and nine circumference (CR_PC) measurements, and body mass index (BMI). Two powerful and robust tools were applied: the pedigree disequilibrium test and variance component models, taking into account both familial and genetic effects. Significant association results were observed for all phenotypes. The most significant results were observed between the haplotype composed of three SNPs (rs2758605-rs1543294-rs2241106) and BMI (p=8.07(-7)), and CR_PC (p=5.29(-5)). The association with BMI was tested and confirmed in our replication study, including 2244 unrelated adult US Caucasians, who were previously assessed for whole genome SNP data. In addition, we obtained an evidence of potential non-additive interactions between the above three SNPs concerning their association with BMI. Bioinformatics sources suggest that the aforementioned interaction could originate from different genetic loci in this region; however, ascertaining the exact circumstances requires a detailed molecular-genetic study.

  20. Relationship between microRNA genes incidence and cancer-associated genomic regions in canine tumors: a comprehensive bioinformatics study.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancer biology has been confirmed on a genome-wide scale through the high incidence of these genes in cancer-associated regions. We analyzed the association between canine miRNA genes and cancer-associated regions (deleted and amplified regions) using previously published array of comparative genomic hybridization data on 268 canine cancer samples-comprising osteosarcoma, breast cancer, leukemia, and colorectal cancer. We also assessed this relationship apropos the incidence of miRNA genes in the CpG islands of the canine genome assembly. The association was evaluated using the mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis. Our analyses revealed that 135 miRNA genes were exactly located in the aberrated regions: 77 (57 %) in the loss and 58 (43 %) in amplified regions. Our findings indicated that the miRNA genes were located more frequently in the deleted regions as well as in the CpG islands than in all other regions. Additionally, with the exception of leukemia, the amplified regions significantly contained higher numbers of miRNA genes than did all the other regions.

  1. Genome-based identification of active prophage regions by next generation sequencing in Bacillus licheniformis DSM13.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Robert; Rodríguez, David Pintor; Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Dietrich, Sascha; Leimbach, Andreas; Hoppert, Michael; Liesegang, Heiko; Volland, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Prophages are viruses, which have integrated their genomes into the genome of a bacterial host. The status of the prophage genome can vary from fully intact with the potential to form infective particles to a remnant state where only a few phage genes persist. Prophages have impact on the properties of their host and are therefore of great interest for genomic research and strain design. Here we present a genome- and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for identification and activity evaluation of prophage regions. Seven prophage or prophage-like regions were identified in the genome of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13. Six of these regions show similarity to members of the Siphoviridae phage family. The remaining region encodes the B. licheniformis orthologue of the PBSX prophage from Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of isolated phage particles (induced by mitomycin C) from the wild-type strain and prophage deletion mutant strains revealed activity of the prophage regions BLi_Pp2 (PBSX-like), BLi_Pp3 and BLi_Pp6. In contrast to BLi_Pp2 and BLi_Pp3, neither phage DNA nor phage particles of BLi_Pp6 could be visualized. However, the ability of prophage BLi_Pp6 to generate particles could be confirmed by sequencing of particle-protected DNA mapping to prophage locus BLi_Pp6. The introduced NGS-based approach allows the investigation of prophage regions and their ability to form particles. Our results show that this approach increases the sensitivity of prophage activity analysis and can complement more conventional approaches such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  2. Genome-Based Identification of Active Prophage Regions by Next Generation Sequencing in Bacillus licheniformis DSM13

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Robert; Rodríguez, David Pintor; Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Dietrich, Sascha; Leimbach, Andreas; Hoppert, Michael; Liesegang, Heiko; Volland, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Prophages are viruses, which have integrated their genomes into the genome of a bacterial host. The status of the prophage genome can vary from fully intact with the potential to form infective particles to a remnant state where only a few phage genes persist. Prophages have impact on the properties of their host and are therefore of great interest for genomic research and strain design. Here we present a genome- and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for identification and activity evaluation of prophage regions. Seven prophage or prophage-like regions were identified in the genome of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13. Six of these regions show similarity to members of the Siphoviridae phage family. The remaining region encodes the B. licheniformis orthologue of the PBSX prophage from Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of isolated phage particles (induced by mitomycin C) from the wild-type strain and prophage deletion mutant strains revealed activity of the prophage regions BLi_Pp2 (PBSX-like), BLi_Pp3 and BLi_Pp6. In contrast to BLi_Pp2 and BLi_Pp3, neither phage DNA nor phage particles of BLi_Pp6 could be visualized. However, the ability of prophage BLi_Pp6 to generate particles could be confirmed by sequencing of particle-protected DNA mapping to prophage locus BLi_Pp6. The introduced NGS-based approach allows the investigation of prophage regions and their ability to form particles. Our results show that this approach increases the sensitivity of prophage activity analysis and can complement more conventional approaches such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:25811873

  3. Comparative Genomics and Phylogenetic Analyses of Newly Cloned Genomic Regions From the Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB)-associated Bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening disease, caused by Candidatus Liberibacter species, is a serious threat to citrus production worldwide. The pathogen is a gram negative, unculturable, phloem-limited bacterium, with little known genomic information. Here, we report cloning and characterizatio...

  4. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: The Adh region

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburner, M.; Misra, S.; Roote, J.; Lewis, S.E.; Blazej, R.; Davis, T.; Doyle, C.; Galle, R.; George, R.; Harris, N.; Hartzell, G.; Harvey, D.; Hong, L.; Houston, K.; Hoskins, R.; Johnson, G.; Martin, C.; Moshrefi, A.; Palazzolo, M.; Reese, M.G.; Spradling, A.; Tsang, G.; Wan, K.; Whitelaw, K.; Kimmel, B.; Celniker, S.; Rubin, G.M.

    1999-03-24

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized

  5. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd L.; Scott, William K.; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H.; Beecham, Gary W.; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M.; Martin, Eden R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies have also implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7×10−8; genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17–1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6×10−8; genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62–0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR% = 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD. PMID:20070850

  6. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Todd L; Scott, William K; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M; Martin, Eden R

    2010-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17-1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62-0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR%= 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD.

  7. Covariation in levels of nucleotide diversity in homologous regions of the avian genome long after completion of lineage sorting.

    PubMed

    Dutoit, Ludovic; Vijay, Nagarjun; Mugal, Carina F; Bossu, Christen M; Burri, Reto; Wolf, Jochen; Ellegren, Hans

    2017-02-22

    Closely related species may show similar levels of genetic diversity in homologous regions of the genome owing to shared ancestral variation still segregating in the extant species. However, after completion of lineage sorting, such covariation is not necessarily expected. On the other hand, if the processes that govern genetic diversity are conserved, diversity may potentially covary even among distantly related species. We mapped regions of conserved synteny between the genomes of two divergent bird species-collared flycatcher and hooded crow-and identified more than 600 Mb of homologous regions (66% of the genome). From analyses of whole-genome resequencing data in large population samples of both species we found nucleotide diversity in 200 kb windows to be well correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.407). The correlation remained highly similar after excluding coding sequences. To explain this covariation, we suggest that a stable avian karyotype and a conserved landscape of recombination rate variation render the diversity-reducing effects of linked selection similar in divergent bird lineages. Principal component regression analysis of several potential explanatory variables driving heterogeneity in flycatcher diversity levels revealed the strongest effects from recombination rate variation and density of coding sequence targets for selection, consistent with linked selection. It is also possible that a stable karyotype is associated with a conserved genomic mutation environment contributing to covariation in diversity levels between lineages. Our observations imply that genetic diversity is to some extent predictable.

  8. Covariation in levels of nucleotide diversity in homologous regions of the avian genome long after completion of lineage sorting

    PubMed Central

    Dutoit, Ludovic; Vijay, Nagarjun; Mugal, Carina F.; Bossu, Christen M.; Burri, Reto; Wolf, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Closely related species may show similar levels of genetic diversity in homologous regions of the genome owing to shared ancestral variation still segregating in the extant species. However, after completion of lineage sorting, such covariation is not necessarily expected. On the other hand, if the processes that govern genetic diversity are conserved, diversity may potentially covary even among distantly related species. We mapped regions of conserved synteny between the genomes of two divergent bird species—collared flycatcher and hooded crow—and identified more than 600 Mb of homologous regions (66% of the genome). From analyses of whole-genome resequencing data in large population samples of both species we found nucleotide diversity in 200 kb windows to be well correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.407). The correlation remained highly similar after excluding coding sequences. To explain this covariation, we suggest that a stable avian karyotype and a conserved landscape of recombination rate variation render the diversity-reducing effects of linked selection similar in divergent bird lineages. Principal component regression analysis of several potential explanatory variables driving heterogeneity in flycatcher diversity levels revealed the strongest effects from recombination rate variation and density of coding sequence targets for selection, consistent with linked selection. It is also possible that a stable karyotype is associated with a conserved genomic mutation environment contributing to covariation in diversity levels between lineages. Our observations imply that genetic diversity is to some extent predictable. PMID:28202815

  9. Assembling the Setaria italica L. Beauv. genome into nine chromosomes and insights into regions affecting growth and drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kevin J.; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Yang, Kai-Jung; Li, Mengyun; Teng, Yuchuan; Chen, Shihmay; Ku, Maurice S. B.; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    The diploid C4 plant foxtail millet (Setaria italica L. Beauv.) is an important crop in many parts of Africa and Asia for the vast consumption of its grain and ability to grow in harsh environments, but remains understudied in terms of complete genomic architecture. To date, there have been only two genome assembly and annotation efforts with neither assembly reaching over 86% of the estimated genome size. We have combined de novo assembly with custom reference-guided improvements on a popular cultivar of foxtail millet and have achieved a genome assembly of 477 Mbp in length, which represents over 97% of the estimated 490 Mbp. The assembly anchors over 98% of the predicted genes to the nine assembled nuclear chromosomes and contains more functional annotation gene models than previous assemblies. Our annotation has identified a large number of unique gene ontology terms related to metabolic activities, a region of chromosome 9 with several growth factor proteins, and regions syntenic with pearl millet or maize genomic regions that have been previously shown to affect growth. The new assembly and annotation for this important species can be used for detailed investigation and future innovations in growth for millet and other grains. PMID:27734962

  10. Genome size and base composition of five Pinus species from the Balkan region.

    PubMed

    Bogunic, F; Muratovic, E; Brown, S C; Siljak-Yakovlev, S

    2003-08-01

    The 2C DNA content and base composition of five Pinus (2 n=24) species and two Pinus subspecies from the Balkan region have been estimated by flow cytometry. P. heldreichii (five populations) and P. peuce (one population) were assessed for the first time, as also were subspecies of P. nigra (three populations-two of subspecies nigra and one of subspecies dalmatica) along with P. sylvestris, and P. mugo from the same region. The 2C DNA values of these Pinus ranged from 42.5 pg to 54.9 pg (41.7-53.8 x 10(9)bp), and the base composition was quite stable (about 39.5% GC). Significant differences were observed between two subspecies of P. nigra and even between two populations of subsp. nigra. The two other species (P. sylvestris and P. mugo) had 2C values of 42.5 pg and 42.8 pg, respectively, while that of P. peuce was 54.9 pg. These genome sizes are in accordance with published values except for P. sylvestris, which was 20% below estimates made by other authors.

  11. Selection Under Domestication: Evidence for a Sweep in the Rice Waxy Genomic Region

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M.; Caicedo, Ana L.; Polato, Nicholas; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated by Asian Neolithic farmers >11,000 years ago, and different cultures have selected for divergent starch qualities in the rice grain during and after the domestication process. An intron 1 splice donor site mutation of the Waxy gene is responsible for the absence of amylose in glutinous rice varieties. This mutation appears to have also played an important role in the origin of low amylose, nonglutinous temperate japonica rice varieties, which form a primary component of Northeast Asian cuisines. Waxy DNA sequence analyses indicate that the splice donor mutation is prevalent in temperate japonica rice varieties, but rare or absent in tropical japonica, indica, aus, and aromatic varieties. Sequence analysis across a 500-kb genomic region centered on Waxy reveals patterns consistent with a selective sweep in the temperate japonicas associated with the mutation. The size of the selective sweep (>250 kb) indicates very strong selection in this region, with an inferred selection coefficient that is higher than similar estimates from maize domestication genes or wild species. These findings demonstrate that selection pressures associated with crop domestication regimes can exceed by one to two orders of magnitude those observed for genes under even strong selection in natural systems. PMID:16547098

  12. Positive selection of the TRIM family regulatory region in primate genomes.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-Dan; Lu, Yueer; Gittelman, Rachel; Jin, Yabin; Ling, Fei; Joshua, Akey

    2016-10-12

    Viral selection pressure has acted on restriction factors that play an important role in the innate immune system by inhibiting the replication of viruses during primate evolution. Tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) family members are some of these restriction factors. It is becoming increasingly clear that gene expression differences, rather than protein-coding regions changes, could play a vital role in the anti-retroviral immune mechanism. Increasingly, recent studies have created genome-scale catalogues of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA. To improve our understanding of the molecular evolution mechanism of antiviral differences between species, we leveraged 14 130 DHSs derived from 145 cell types to characterize the regulatory landscape of the TRIM region. Subsequently, we compared the alignments of the DHSs across six primates and found 375 DHSs that are conserved in non-human primates but exhibit significantly accelerated rates of evolution in the human lineage (haDHSs). Furthermore, we discovered 31 human-specific potential transcription factor motifs within haDHSs, including the KROX and SP1, that both interact with HIV-1 Importantly, the corresponding haDHS was correlated with antiviral factor TRIM23 Thus, our results suggested that some viruses may contribute, through regulatory DNA differences, to organismal evolution by mediating TRIM gene expression to escape immune surveillance.

  13. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Profiling of Region-Specific Vulnerability to Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinkun; Pal, Ranu; Chen, Xue-wen; Kumar, Keshava N.; Kim, Ok-Jin; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2007-01-01

    Neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress (OS), whereas those in CA3 are resistant. To uncover mechanisms for selective CA1 vulnerability to OS, we treated organotypic hippocampal slices with duroquinone and compared transcriptional profiles of CA1 vs. CA3 cells at various intervals. Gene Ontology and biological pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes showed that at all time points, CA1 had higher transcriptional activity of stress/inflammatory response, transition metal transport, ferroxidase, and pre-synaptic signaling activity, while CA3 had higher GABA-signaling, postsynaptic, and calcium and potassium channel activity. Real-time PCR and immunoblots confirmed the transcriptome data and the induction of OS by duroquinone in both hippocampal regions. Our functional genomics approach has identified in CA1 cells molecular pathways as well as unique genes, such as, guanosine deaminase, lipocalin2, synaptotagmin 4, and latrophilin 2, whose time-dependent induction following the initiation of OS may represent attempts at neurite outgrowth, synaptic recovery, and resistance against OS. PMID:17553663

  14. Genome-wide function of H2B ubiquitylation in promoter and genic regions.

    PubMed

    Batta, Kiran; Zhang, Zhenhai; Yen, Kuangyu; Goffman, David B; Pugh, B Franklin

    2011-11-01

    Nucleosomal organization in and around genes may contribute substantially to transcriptional regulation. The contribution of histone modifications to genome-wide nucleosomal organization has not been systematically evaluated. In the present study, we examine the role of H2BK123 ubiquitylation, a key regulator of several histone modifications, on nucleosomal organization at promoter, genic, and transcription termination regions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using high-resolution MNase chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing (ChIP-seq), we map nucleosome positioning and occupancy in mutants of the H2BK123 ubiquitylation pathway. We found that H2B ubiquitylation-mediated nucleosome formation and/or stability inhibits the assembly of the transcription machinery at normally quiescent promoters, whereas ubiquitylation within highly active gene bodies promotes transcription elongation. This regulation does not proceed through ubiquitylation-regulated histone marks at H3K4, K36, and K79. Our findings suggest that mechanistically similar functions of H2B ubiquitylation (nucleosome assembly) elicit different functional outcomes on genes depending on its positional context in promoters (repressive) versus transcribed regions (activating).

  15. Low recombination activity of R region located at both ends of the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Jankowska, Anna; Alejska, Magdalena; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Although two strand transfer events are indispensable for the synthesis of double-stranded DNA and establishing HIV-1 infection, the molecular basis of these phenomena is still unclear. The first obligatory template switching event occurs just at the beginning of the virus replication cycle and involves two copies of the 97-nucleotide long R region, located one each at the both ends of the HIV-1 genome (HIV-1 R). Thus, one can expect that the molecular mechanism of this process is similar to the mechanism of homologous recombination which operates in RNA viruses. To verify the above-mentioned hypothesis, we attempted to assess the recombination activity of HIV-1 R. To this end, we tested in vitro, how effectively it induces template switching by HIV-1 RT in comparison with another well-characterized sequence supporting frequent homologous crossovers in an unrelated virus (R region derived from Brome mosaic virus--BMV R). We also examined if the RNA sequences neighboring HIV-1 R influence its recombination activity. Finally, we tested if HIV-1 R could cause BMV polymerase complex to switch between RNA templates in vivo. Overall, our results have revealed a relatively low recombination activity of HIV-1 R as compared to BMV R. This observation suggests that different factors modulate the efficiency of the first obligatory strand transfer in HIV-1 and the homology-driven recombination in RNA viruses.

  16. [Mutation frequencies in HIV-1 subtype-A genome in regions containing efficient RNAi targets].

    PubMed

    Kravatsky, Y V; Chechetkin, V R; Fedoseeva, D M; Gorbacheva, M A; Kretova, O V; Tchurikov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The development of gene-therapy technology using RNAi for AIDS/HIV-1 treatment is a prospective alternative to traditional anti-retroviral therapy. RNAi targets could be selected in HIV-1 transcripts and in CCR5 mRNA. Previously, we experimentally selected a number of efficient siRNAs that target HIV-1 RNAs. The viral genome mutates frequently, and RNAi strength is very sensitive, even for a single mismatches. That is why it is important to study nucleotide sequences of targets in clinical isolates of HIV-1. In the present study, we analyzed mutations in 6 of about 300-bp regions containing RNAi targets from HIV-1 subtype A isolates in Russia. Estimates of the mean frequencies of mutations in the targets were obtained and the frequencies of mutations in the different codon positions were compared. The frequencies of mutations in the vicinity of the targets and directly within the targets were also compared and have been shown to be approximately the same. The frequencies of indels in the chosen regions have been assessed. Their frequencies have proved to be two to three orders of magnitude less compared to that for mutations.

  17. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Yan, Chao-Chao; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-09-16

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3'UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5'UTRs > CDSs > 3'UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions.

  18. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-01-01

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3′UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5′UTRs > CDSs > 3′UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions. PMID:27644032

  19. Sequencing of a QTL-rich region of the Theobroma cacao genome using pooled BACs and the identification of trait specific candidate genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: BAC-based physical maps provide for sequencing across an entire genome or selected sub-genome regions of biological interest. Using the minimum tiling path as a guide, it is possible to select specific BAC clones from prioritized genome sections such as a genetically defined QTL interv...

  20. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Multiple Genomic Regions Associated with Susceptibility to and Control of Ovine Lentivirus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-17

    General Transcription Factor IIH, polypeptide 5), the gene order does not agree with other mammal genomes including cow , human, dog, and mouse, and it may...ES, Kirkpatrick BW (2009) Linkage disequilibrium in the North American Holstein population. Anim Genet 40: 279–288. 22. Qanbari S, Pimentel EC, Tetens...J, Thaller G, Lichtner P, et al. (2010) The pattern of linkage disequilibrium in German Holstein cattle. Anim Genet 41: 346–356. 23. Badke YM, Bates

  1. Structure comparison of control region in Stromateoidei and complete mitochondrial genome of the bluefin driftfish Psenes pellucidus (Perciformes, Nomeidae).

    PubMed

    Wei, Tao; Zhang, Bo; Sun, Yuena

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the bluefin driftfish Psenes pellucidus was determined first. The genome was 16,572 bp in length and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 main non-coding regions. The mitochondrial genome of bluefin driftfish had common features about gene arrangement, base composition and tRNA structures compared with those of most of the bony fishes. In the control region, a termination-associated sequence, the central conserved block (CSB-F, CSB-E and CSB-D) and the conserved sequence blocks (CSB-1, CSB-2 and CSB-3) were determined. Meanwhile, the conserved motif 5'-GCCGG-3' was identified in the origin of light strand replication of bluefin driftfish. This mitogenome sequence data would play key role in phylogenetic analysis of Stromateoidei.

  2. Demographically-Based Evaluation of Genomic Regions under Selection in Domestic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Adam H.; Schweizer, Rena M.; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; Han, Eunjung; Davis, Brian W.; Gronau, Ilan; Silva, Pedro M.; Galaverni, Marco; Fan, Zhenxin; Marx, Peter; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Ramirez, Oscar; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Vilà, Carles; Squire, Kevin; Geffen, Eli; Kusak, Josip; Boyko, Adam R.; Parker, Heidi G.; Lee, Clarence; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Siepel, Adam; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Wayne, Robert K.; Novembre, John

    2016-01-01

    Controlling for background demographic effects is important for accurately identifying loci that have recently undergone positive selection. To date, the effects of demography have not yet been explicitly considered when identifying loci under selection during dog domestication. To investigate positive selection on the dog lineage early in the domestication, we examined patterns of polymorphism in six canid genomes that were previously used to infer a demographic model of dog domestication. Using an inferred demographic model, we computed false discovery rates (FDR) and identified 349 outlier regions consistent with positive selection at a low FDR. The signals in the top 100 regions were frequently centered on candidate genes related to brain function and behavior, including LHFPL3, CADM2, GRIK3, SH3GL2, MBP, PDE7B, NTAN1, and GLRA1. These regions contained significant enrichments in behavioral ontology categories. The 3rd top hit, CCRN4L, plays a major role in lipid metabolism, that is supported by additional metabolism related candidates revealed in our scan, including SCP2D1 and PDXC1. Comparing our method to an empirical outlier approach that does not directly account for demography, we found only modest overlaps between the two methods, with 60% of empirical outliers having no overlap with our demography-based outlier detection approach. Demography-aware approaches have lower-rates of false discovery. Our top candidates for selection, in addition to expanding the set of neurobehavioral candidate genes, include genes related to lipid metabolism, suggesting a dietary target of selection that was important during the period when proto-dogs hunted and fed alongside hunter-gatherers. PMID:26943675

  3. Genomic characterization of Sinorhizobium meliloti AK21, a wild isolate from the Aral Sea Region.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; López-Contreras, José Antonio; Toro, Nicolás; Fernández-López, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti has been widely studied due to its ability to improve crop yields through direct interactions with leguminous plants. S. meliloti AK21 is a wild type strain that forms nodules on Medicago plants in saline and drought conditions in the Aral Sea Region. The aim of this work was to establish the genetic similarities and differences between S. meliloti AK21 and the reference strain S. meliloti 1021. Comparative genome hybridization with the model reference strain S. meliloti 1021 yielded 365 variable genes, grouped into 11 regions in the three main replicons in S. meliloti AK21. The most extensive regions of variability were found in the symbiotic plasmid pSymA, which also contained the largest number of orthologous and polymorphic sequences identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. This procedure identified a large number of divergent sequences and others without homology in the databases, the further investigation of which could provide new insight into the alternative metabolic pathways present in S. meliloti AK21. We identified a plasmid replication module from the repABC replicon family, together with plasmid mobilization-related genes (traG and a VirB9-like protein), which suggest that this indigenous isolate harbors an accessory plasmid. Furthermore, the transcriptomic profiles reflected differences in gene content and regulation between S. meliloti AK21 and S. meliloti 1021 (ExpR and PhoB regulons), but provided evidence for an as yet unknown, alternative mechanism involving activation of the cbb3 terminal oxidase. Finally, phenotypic microarrays characterization revealed a greater versatility of substrate use and chemical degradation than for S. meliloti 1021.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Haloferax sp. Strain ATB1, Isolated from a Semi-Arid Region in the Brazilian Caatinga.

    PubMed

    Castro, Wendel de Oliveira; Torres-Ballesteros, Adriana Maria; Nakayama, Cristina Rossi; Melo, Itamar Soares; Pellizari, Vivian Helena; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá

    2014-08-14

    Organisms in the Haloferax genus are extreme halophiles that grow in environments with pH values between 4 and 12, and temperatures between 0°C and 60°C. In the present study, a draft of the first Haloferax sp. strain ATB1 genome isolated from the region of Cariri (in Paraíba State, Brazil) is presented.

  5. High-resolution physical mapping in Pennisetum squamulatum reveals extensive chromosomal heteromorphism of the genomic region associated with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yukio; Conner, Joann A; Goel, Shailendra; Morishige, Daryl T; Mullet, John E; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2004-04-01

    Gametophytic apomixis is asexual reproduction as a consequence of parthenogenetic development of a chromosomally unreduced egg. The trait leads to the production of embryos with a maternal genotype, i.e. progeny are clones of the maternal plant. The application of the trait in agriculture could be a tremendous tool for crop improvement through conventional and nonconventional breeding methods. Unfortunately, there are no major crops that reproduce by apomixis, and interspecific hybridization with wild relatives has not yet resulted in commercially viable germplasm. Pennisetum squamulatum is an aposporous apomict from which the gene(s) for apomixis has been transferred to sexual pearl millet by backcrossing. Twelve molecular markers that are linked with apomixis coexist in a tight linkage block called the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), and several of these markers have been shown to be hemizygous in the polyploid genome of P. squamulatum. High resolution genetic mapping of these markers has not been possible because of low recombination in this region of the genome. We now show the physical arrangement of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing apomixis-linked molecular markers by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization on pachytene chromosomes. The size of the ASGR, currently defined as the entire hemizygous region that hybridizes with apomixis-linked bacterial artificial chromosomes, was estimated on pachytene and mitotic chromosomes to be approximately 50 Mbp (a quarter of the chromosome). The ASGR includes highly repetitive sequences from an Opie-2-like retrotransposon family that are particularly abundant in this region of the genome.

  6. New Virus Genome Sequences of the Guama Serogroup (Genus Orthobunyavirus, Family Bunyaviridae), Isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Márcio R. T.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; Lima, Clayton P. S.; Inada, Davi T.; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Vianez, João L. S. G.; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiro; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is the first announcement of two nearly complete viral genome sequences belonging to the Guama serogroup (genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae) isolated in the Brazilian Amazon region: Mirim virus (MIRV; BEAN7722) and Ananindeua virus (ANUV; BEAN109303). PMID:28254992

  7. Fractionation of Synteny in a Genomic Region Containing Tandemly Duplicated Genes Across Glycine max, Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extended comparison of gene sequences found on homeologous soybean BACs to Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequences demonstrated a network of synteny within conserved regions interrupted by gene addition and/or deletions. Consolidation of gene order among all three species prov...

  8. Lung Adenocarcinoma of Never Smokers and Smokers Harbor Differential Regions of Genetic Alteration and Exhibit Different Levels of Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Chari, Raj; Zhang, Wei; Lockwood, William W.; English, John C.; Fu, Rong; Wang, Pei; Feng, Ziding; MacAulay, Calum E.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the observed clinical distinctions between lung tumors in smokers and never smokers (NS) extend beyond specific gene mutations, such as EGFR, EML4-ALK, and KRAS, some of which have been translated into targeted therapies. However, the molecular alterations identified thus far cannot explain all of the clinical and biological disparities observed in lung tumors of NS and smokers. To this end, we performed an unbiased genome-wide, comparative study to identify novel genomic aberrations that differ between smokers and NS. High resolution whole genome DNA copy number profiling of 69 lung adenocarcinomas from smokers (n = 39) and NS (n = 30) revealed both global and regional disparities in the tumor genomes of these two groups. We found that NS lung tumors had a greater proportion of their genomes altered than those of smokers. Moreover, copy number gains on chromosomes 5q, 7p, and 16p occurred more frequently in NS. We validated our findings in two independently generated public datasets. Our findings provide a novel line of evidence distinguishing genetic differences between smoker and NS lung tumors, namely, that the extent of segmental genomic alterations is greater in NS tumors. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that these lung tumors are globally and genetically different, which implies they are likely driven by distinct molecular mechanisms. PMID:22412972

  9. Draft genome sequence of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), a vegetable and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical regions.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Naoya; Takagi, Hiroki; Natsume, Satoshi; Uemura, Aiko; Taniai, Naoki; Miyagi, Norimichi; Fukushima, Mai; Suzuki, Shouta; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Tamaki, Moritoshi; Sakamoto, Moriaki; Terauchi, Ryohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-02-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is an important vegetable and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical regions globally. In this study, the draft genome sequence of a monoecious bitter gourd inbred line, OHB3-1, was analyzed. Through Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly, scaffolds of 285.5 Mb in length were generated, corresponding to ∼84% of the estimated genome size of bitter gourd (339 Mb). In this draft genome sequence, 45,859 protein-coding gene loci were identified, and transposable elements accounted for 15.3% of the whole genome. According to synteny mapping and phylogenetic analysis of conserved genes, bitter gourd was more related to watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) than to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) or melon (C. melo). Using RAD-seq analysis, 1507 marker loci were genotyped in an F2 progeny of two bitter gourd lines, resulting in an improved linkage map, comprising 11 linkage groups. By anchoring RAD tag markers, 255 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map. Comparative analysis of genome sequences and predicted genes determined that putative trypsin-inhibitor and ribosome-inactivating genes were distinctive in the bitter gourd genome. These genes could characterize the bitter gourd as a medicinal plant.

  10. Draft genome sequence of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), a vegetable and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical regions

    PubMed Central

    Urasaki, Naoya; Takagi, Hiroki; Natsume, Satoshi; Uemura, Aiko; Taniai, Naoki; Miyagi, Norimichi; Fukushima, Mai; Suzuki, Shouta; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Tamaki, Moritoshi; Sakamoto, Moriaki; Terauchi, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is an important vegetable and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical regions globally. In this study, the draft genome sequence of a monoecious bitter gourd inbred line, OHB3-1, was analyzed. Through Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly, scaffolds of 285.5 Mb in length were generated, corresponding to ∼84% of the estimated genome size of bitter gourd (339 Mb). In this draft genome sequence, 45,859 protein-coding gene loci were identified, and transposable elements accounted for 15.3% of the whole genome. According to synteny mapping and phylogenetic analysis of conserved genes, bitter gourd was more related to watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) than to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) or melon (C. melo). Using RAD-seq analysis, 1507 marker loci were genotyped in an F2 progeny of two bitter gourd lines, resulting in an improved linkage map, comprising 11 linkage groups. By anchoring RAD tag markers, 255 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map. Comparative analysis of genome sequences and predicted genes determined that putative trypsin-inhibitor and ribosome-inactivating genes were distinctive in the bitter gourd genome. These genes could characterize the bitter gourd as a medicinal plant. PMID:28028039

  11. Genome-Wide Association Identifies SLC2A9 and NLN Gene Regions as Associated with Entropion in Domestic Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mousel, Michelle R.; Reynolds, James O.; White, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    Entropion is an inward rolling of the eyelid allowing contact between the eyelashes and cornea that may lead to blindness if not corrected. Although many mammalian species, including humans and dogs, are afflicted by congenital entropion, no specific genes or gene regions related to development of entropion have been reported in any mammalian species to date. Entropion in domestic sheep is known to have a genetic component therefore, we used domestic sheep as a model system to identify genomic regions containing genes associated with entropion. A genome-wide association was conducted with congenital entropion in 998 Columbia, Polypay, and Rambouillet sheep genotyped with 50,000 SNP markers. Prevalence of entropion was 6.01%, with all breeds represented. Logistic regression was performed in PLINK with additive allelic, recessive, dominant, and genotypic inheritance models. Two genome-wide significant (empirical P<0.05) SNP were identified, specifically markers in SLC2A9 (empirical P = 0.007; genotypic model) and near NLN (empirical P = 0.026; dominance model). Six additional genome-wide suggestive SNP (nominal P<1x10-5) were identified including markers in or near PIK3CB (P = 2.22x10-6; additive model), KCNB1 (P = 2.93x10-6; dominance model), ZC3H12C (P = 3.25x10-6; genotypic model), JPH1 (P = 4.68x20-6; genotypic model), and MYO3B (P = 5.74x10-6; recessive model). This is the first report of specific gene regions associated with congenital entropion in any mammalian species, to our knowledge. Further, none of these genes have previously been associated with any eyelid traits. These results represent the first genome-wide analysis of gene regions associated with entropion and provide target regions for the development of sheep genetic markers for marker-assisted selection. PMID:26098909

  12. Genome-Wide Association Identifies SLC2A9 and NLN Gene Regions as Associated with Entropion in Domestic Sheep.

    PubMed

    Mousel, Michelle R; Reynolds, James O; White, Stephen N

    2015-01-01

    Entropion is an inward rolling of the eyelid allowing contact between the eyelashes and cornea that may lead to blindness if not corrected. Although many mammalian species, including humans and dogs, are afflicted by congenital entropion, no specific genes or gene regions related to development of entropion have been reported in any mammalian species to date. Entropion in domestic sheep is known to have a genetic component therefore, we used domestic sheep as a model system to identify genomic regions containing genes associated with entropion. A genome-wide association was conducted with congenital entropion in 998 Columbia, Polypay, and Rambouillet sheep genotyped with 50,000 SNP markers. Prevalence of entropion was 6.01%, with all breeds represented. Logistic regression was performed in PLINK with additive allelic, recessive, dominant, and genotypic inheritance models. Two genome-wide significant (empirical P<0.05) SNP were identified, specifically markers in SLC2A9 (empirical P = 0.007; genotypic model) and near NLN (empirical P = 0.026; dominance model). Six additional genome-wide suggestive SNP (nominal P<1x10(-5)) were identified including markers in or near PIK3CB (P = 2.22x10(-6); additive model), KCNB1 (P = 2.93x10(-6); dominance model), ZC3H12C (P = 3.25x10(-6); genotypic model), JPH1 (P = 4.68x20(-6); genotypic model), and MYO3B (P = 5.74x10(-6); recessive model). This is the first report of specific gene regions associated with congenital entropion in any mammalian species, to our knowledge. Further, none of these genes have previously been associated with any eyelid traits. These results represent the first genome-wide analysis of gene regions associated with entropion and provide target regions for the development of sheep genetic markers for marker-assisted selection.

  13. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant.

  14. Genome-wide analyses in bacteria show small-RNA enrichment for long and conserved intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael; Contreras, Lydia M

    2015-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms.

  15. Genome-Wide Analyses in Bacteria Show Small-RNA Enrichment for Long and Conserved Intergenic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms. PMID:25313390

  16. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P.; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M.; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence–absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains’ core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification. PMID:27358423

  17. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires.

    PubMed

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-07-02

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence-absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains' core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification.

  18. Functional Interactions between Unlinked Muscle Genes within Haploinsufficient Regions of the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Homyk-Jr., T.; Emerson-Jr., C. P.

    1988-01-01

    Mutations in 13 genes affecting muscle development in Drosophila have been examined in pairwise combinations for evidence of genetic interactions. Heterozygous combinations of mutations in five genes, including the gene coding for myosin heavy chain, result in more severe phenotypes than respective single heterozygous mutant controls. The various mutant interactions include examples showing allele-specific intergenic interactions, gene specific interactions, and allele-specific intragenic complementations, suggesting that some interactions result from the manner in which mutant gene products associate. Interactions that result from alterations in ``+'' gene copy number were also uncovered, suggesting that normal myofibril development requires that the relative amounts of respective gene products produced be tightly regulated. The importance of the latter parameter is substantiated by the finding that all five interacting loci map to disperse haploinsufficient or haplolethal regions of the genome. The implications of the present findings are discussed in relation to pursuing the phenomena involving genetic interactions to identify new genes encoding interacting myofibrillar proteins, to examine the nature of intermolecular interactions in mutant and normal development and to decipher the quantitative and temporal regulation of a large family of functionally related gene products. PMID:3135237

  19. Genomic variability of Helicobacter pylori isolates of gastric regions from two Colombian populations

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Andrés Jenuer; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo; Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andrés; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the genomic variability and the multiple colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients with chronic gastritis from two Colombian populations with contrast in the risk of developing gastric cancer (GC): Túquerres-Nariño (High risk) and Tumaco-Nariño (Low risk). METHODS Four hundred and nine patients from both genders with dyspeptic symptoms were studied. Seventy-two patients were included in whom H. pylori was isolated from three anatomic regions of the gastric mucosa, (31/206) of the high risk population of GC (Túquerres) and (41/203) of the low risk population of GC (Tumaco). The isolates were genotyped by PCR-RAPD. Genetic diversity between the isolates was evaluated by conglomerates analysis and multiple correspondence analyses. RESULTS The proportion of virulent genotypes of H. pylori was 99% in Túquerres and 94% in Tumaco. The coefficient of similarity of Nei-Li showed greater genetic diversity among isolates of Túquerres (0.13) than those of Tumaco (0.07). After adjusting by age, gender and type of gastritis, the multiple colonization was 1.7 times more frequent in Túquerres than in Tumaco (P = 0.05). CONCLUSION In Túquerres, high risk of GC there was a greater probability of multiple colonization by H. pylori. From the analysis of the results of the PCR-RAPD, it was found higher genetic variability in the isolates of H. pylori in the population of high risk for the development of GC. PMID:28223724

  20. Narrowing and genomic annotation of the commonly deleted region of the 5q- syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Boultwood, Jacqueline; Fidler, Carrie; Strickson, Amanda J.; Watkins, Fiona; Gama, Susana; Kearney, Lyndal; Tosi, Sabrina; Kasprzyk, Arek; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Jaju, Rina J.; Wainscoat, James S.

    2002-01-15

    The 5q syndrome is the most distinct of the myelodysplastic syndromes, and the molecular basis for this disorder remains unknown. We describe the narrowing of the common deleted region (CDR) of the 5q syndrome to the approximately 1.5-megabases interval at 5q32 flanked by D5S413 and the GLRA1 gene. The Ensemblgene prediction program has been used for the complete genomic annotation of the CDR. The CDR is gene rich and contains 24 known genes and 16 novel (predicted) genes. Of 40 genes in the CDR, 33 are expressed in CD34 cells and, therefore, represent candidate genes since they are expressed within the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment. A number of the genes assigned to the CDR represent good candidates for the 5q syndrome, including MEGF1, G3BP, and several of the novel gene predictions. These data now afford a comprehensive mutational/expression analysis of all candidate genes assigned to the CDR.

  1. Genomic and network patterns of schizophrenia genetic variation in human evolutionary accelerated regions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E; Pollard, Katherine S; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-05-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia.

  2. The 5' nontranslated region of potato virus X RNA affects both genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K H; Hemenway, C

    1996-01-01

    A tobacco protoplast system was developed to analyze cis-acting sequences required for potato virus X (PVX) replication. Protoplasts inoculated with transcripts derived from a PVX cDNA clone or from clones containing mutations in their 5' nontranslated regions (NTRs) were assayed for RNA production by S1 nuclease protection assays. A time course of plus- and minus-strand-RNA accumulation indicated that both minus- and plus-strand PVX RNAs were detectable at 0.5 h postinoculation. Although minus-strand RNAs accumulated more rapidly than plus-strand RNAs, maximum levels of plus-strand RNAs were 40- to 80-fold higher. On the basis of these data, time points were chosen for determination of RNA levels in protoplasts inoculated with PVX clones containing deletions or an insertion in their 5' NTRs. Deletions of more than 12 nucleotides from the 5' end, internal deletions, and one insertion in the 5' NTR resulted in substantially decreased levels of plus-strand-RNA production. In contrast, all modified transcripts were functional for minus-strand-RNA synthesis, suggesting that elements in the 5' NTR were not essential for minus-strand-RNA synthesis. Further analysis of the 5' NTR deletion mutants indicated that all mutations that decreased genomic plus-strand-RNA synthesis also decreased synthesis of the two major subgenomic RNAs. These data indicate that cis-acting elements from different regions of the 5' NTR are required for plus-strand-RNA synthesis and that this process may be linked to synthesis of subgenomic RNAs. PMID:8764066

  3. Identification of genomic regions involved in resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from wild Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jiaqin; Ding, Yijuan; Lu, Kun; Wei, Dayong; Liu, Yao; Disi, Joseph Onwusemu; Li, Jiana; Liu, Liezhao; Liu, Shengyi; McKay, John; Qian, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The lack of resistant source has greatly restrained resistance breeding of rapeseed (Brassica napus, AACC) against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum which causes severe yield losses in rapeseed production all over the world. Recently, several wild Brassica oleracea accessions (CC) with high level of resistance have been identified (Mei et al. in Euphytica 177:393-400, 2011), bringing a new hope to improve Sclerotinia resistance of rapeseed. To map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Sclerotinia resistance from wild B. oleracea, an F2 population consisting of 149 genotypes, with several clones of each genotypes, was developed from one F1 individual derived from the cross between a resistant accession of wild B. oleracea (B. incana) and a susceptible accession of cultivated B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The F2 population was evaluated for Sclerotinia reaction in 2009 and 2010 under controlled condition. Significant differences among genotypes and high heritability for leaf and stem reaction indicated that genetic components accounted for a large portion of the phenotypic variance. A total of 12 QTL for leaf resistance and six QTL for stem resistance were identified in 2 years, each explaining 2.2-28.4 % of the phenotypic variation. The combined effect of alleles from wild B. oleracea reduced the relative susceptibility by 22.5 % in leaves and 15 % in stems on average over 2 years. A 12.8-cM genetic region on chromosome C09 of B. oleracea consisting of two major QTL intervals for both leaf and stem resistance was assigned into a 2.7-Mb genomic region on chromosome A09 of B. rapa, harboring about 30 putative resistance-related genes. Significant negative corrections were found between flowering time and relative susceptibility of leaf and stem. The association of flowering time with Sclerotinia resistance is discussed.

  4. Allelic Variation in a Willow Warbler Genomic Region Is Associated with Climate Clines

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Keith W.; Liedvogel, Miriam; Addison, BriAnne; Kleven, Oddmund; Laskemoen, Terje; Lifjeld, Jan T.; Lundberg, Max; Åkesson, Susanne; Bensch, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1) that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1) allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2) these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3) the northern-allele or “altitude variant” of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios. PMID:24788148

  5. Shared Genomic Regions Between Derivatives of a Large Segregating Population of Maize Identified Using Bulked Segregant Analysis Sequencing and Traditional Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nicholas J.; Beissinger, Timothy; Hirsch, Candice N.; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Deshpande, Shweta; Barry, Kerrie; Buell, C. Robin; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; de Leon, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Delayed transition from the vegetative stage to the reproductive stage of development and increased plant height have been shown to increase biomass productivity in grasses. The goal of this project was to detect quantitative trait loci using extremes from a large synthetic population, as well as a related recombinant inbred line mapping population for these two traits. Ten thousand individuals from a B73 × Mo17 noninbred population intermated for 14 generations (IBM Syn14) were grown at a density of approximately 16,500 plants ha−1. Flowering time and plant height were measured within this population. DNA was pooled from the 46 most extreme individuals from each distributional tail for each of the traits measured and used in bulk segregant analysis (BSA) sequencing. Allelic divergence at each of the ∼1.1 million SNP loci was estimated as the difference in allele frequencies between the selected extremes. Additionally, 224 intermated B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred lines were concomitantly grown at a similar density adjacent to the large synthetic population and were assessed for flowering time and plant height. Using the BSA sequencing method, 14 and 13 genomic regions were identified for flowering time and plant height, respectively. Linkage mapping with the RIL population identified eight and three regions for flowering time and plant height, respectively. Of the regions identified, three colocalized between the two populations for flowering time and two colocalized for plant height. This study demonstrates the utility of using BSA sequencing for the dissection of complex quantitative traits important for production of lignocellulosic ethanol. PMID:26038364

  6. Self-Confirmation and Ascertainment of the Candidate Genomic Regions of Complex Trait Loci – A None-Experimental Solution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lishi; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengchen; Gu, Weikuan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past half century, thousands of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified by using animal models and plant populations. However, the none-reliability and imprecision of the genomic regions of these loci have remained the major hurdle for the identification of the causal genes for the correspondent traits. We used a none-experimental strategy of strain number reduction for testing accuracy and ascertainment of the candidate region for QTL. We tested the strategy in over 400 analyses with data from 47 studies. These studies include: 1) studies with recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice. We first tested two previously mapped QTL with well-defined genomic regions; We then tested additional four studies with known QTL regions; and finally we examined the reliability of QTL in 38 sets of data which are produced from relatively large numbers of RI strains, derived from C57BL/6J (B6) X DBA/2J (D2), known as BXD RI mouse strains; 2) studies with RI strains of rats and plants; and 3) studies using F2 populations in mice, rats and plants. In these cases, our method identified the reliability of mapped QTL and localized the candidate genes into the defined genomic regions. Our data also suggests that LRS score produced by permutation tests does not necessarily confirm the reliability of the QTL. Number of strains are not the reliable indicators for the accuracy of QTL either. Our strategy determines the reliability and accuracy of the genomic region of a QTL without any additional experimental study such as congenic breeding. PMID:27203862

  7. Permian to Triassic I to S-type magmatic switch in the northeast Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and adjacent regions, Colombian Caribbean: Tectonic setting and implications within Pangea paleogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Garzón, A.; Montes, C.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Late Paleozoic to Triassic tectonics of northwestern South America have major implications for the understanding of Laurentia-Gondwana interactions that formed Pangea, and the origin of several tectonostratigraphic terranes dispersed by the break-up of this supercontinent during the formation of the Caribbean. Two mylonitic and orthogneissic granitoid suites have been recognized in the northeastern segment of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, the lower Magdalena basin and the Guajira Serranias, within the Caribbean region of Colombia. For the Santa Marta region U/Pb LAM-ICP-MS analysis yielded zircon crystallization ages of 288.1 ± 4.5 Ma, 276.5 ± 5,1 Ma and 264.9 ± 4.0 Ma, related to the magmatic intrusion. Geochemical and modal variations show a compositional spectrum between diorite and granite, whereas LREE enrichment, Ti and Nb anomalies and geochemical discrimination suggest that this granitoid suite was formed within a magmatic arc setting. Inherited zircons suggest that this Early Permian plutonism was formed with the participation of Neoproterozoic and Grenvillian basement proximal to the South American continent. Evidence of a superimposed Early Triassic (ca. 250 Ma) deformational event in Santa Marta, together with a well defined S-type magmatism in the basement rocks from the adjacent lower Magdalena Valley and Guajira Peninsula regions are related to a major shift in the regional tectonic evolution. It's envisioned that this event records either terrane accretion or strong plate coupling during the final stages of Pangea agglutination. Connections with the main Alleghanian-Ouachitan Pangean orogen are precluded due to their timing differences. The plutons temporally and compositionally correlate with an arc found in the northern Andes and Mexican Gondwana terranes, and represent a broader magmatic event formed at the proto-Pacific margin, outside the nucleus of the Laurentia-Gondwana Alleghanian-Oachitan orogens. Evidence of lower temperature

  8. Origins of the Xylella fastidiosa prophage-like regions and their impact in genome differentiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram negative plant pathogen causing many economically important diseases, and analyses of completely sequenced X. fastidiosa genome strains allowed the identification of many prophage-like elements and possibly phage remnants, accounting for up to 15% of the genome compositi...

  9. Coding DNA repeated throughout intergenic regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome: Evolutionary footprints of RNA silencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyknons are non-random sequence patterns significantly repeated throughout non-coding genomic DNA that also appear at least once among genes. They are interesting because they portend an unforeseen connection between coding and non-coding DNA. Pyknons have only been discovered in the human genome,...

  10. Mitochondrial genome phylogeny among Asiatic black bear Ursus thibetanus subspecies and comprehensive analysis of their control regions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Hwa; Kim, Sang Ki; Ryu, Shi Hyun; Jang, Kuem Hee; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2010-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (16,824 bp) of an Asiatic black bear Ursus thibetanus ussuricus (Mammalia, Carnivora, Ursidae) was newly sequenced and characterized in detail. It is the second mitochondrial genome from this subspecies which has been completely sequenced. The two U. t. ussuricus individuals were compared with each other and then with individuals from the other four U. thibetanus subspecies and the other nine ursid species, focusing especially on the control regions in the 14 mitochondrial genomes. Within these control regions, tandem repeats of basically 10 bp (5'-ACGCACGTGT-3' or its derivatives) were found in Domain II. Plausible secondary structures of the repeat region were compared between the North and South Korean individuals of U. t. ussuricus. According to the maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees inferred from the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding and two rRNA genes, the ursine members within the monophyletic ursid clade can be divided into at least three groups: A, B, and C. According to this analysis, U. thibetanus subspecies were found with Ursus americanus and Ursus malayanus within Group A, showing the following relationships with nodal bootstrap values above 91% and Bayesian posterior probabilities of 1.00: ([(U. t. thibetanus, U. t. formosanus), U. t. spp.], U. t. ussuricus), U. t. mupinensis. In addition, we present a hypothetical scenario of the evolution of the major repeat motifs in the control region.

  11. Detection of selection signatures of population-specific genomic regions selected during domestication process in Jinhua pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengcao; Chen, Jiucheng; Wang, Zhen; Pan, Yuchun; Wang, Qishan; Xu, Ningying; Wang, Zhengguang

    2016-12-01

    Chinese pigs have been undergoing both natural and artificial selection for thousands of years. Jinhua pigs are of great importance, as they can be a valuable model for exploring the genetic mechanisms linked to meat quality and other traits such as disease resistance, reproduction and production. The purpose of this study was to identify distinctive footprints of selection between Jinhua pigs and other breeds utilizing genome-wide SNP data. Genotyping by genome reducing and sequencing was implemented in order to perform cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity to reveal strong signatures of selection for those economically important traits. This work was performed at a 2% genome level, which comprised 152 006 SNPs genotyped in a total of 517 individuals. Population-specific footprints of selective sweeps were searched for in the genome of Jinhua pigs using six native breeds and three European breeds as reference groups. Several candidate genes associated with meat quality, health and reproduction, such as GH1, CRHR2, TRAF4 and CCK, were found to be overlapping with the significantly positive outliers. Additionally, the results revealed that some genomic regions associated with meat quality, immune response and reproduction in Jinhua pigs have evolved directionally under domestication and subsequent selections. The identified genes and biological pathways in Jinhua pigs showed different selection patterns in comparison with the Chinese and European breeds.

  12. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Arif, Muhammad; Simon, Leonardo C.; Pauls, K. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was initiated to investigate the effects of plant genotype on the performance characteristics of soybean stem fibers when incorporated into a polypropylene (PP) matrix using a selective phenotyping approach. Fibers from 50 lines of a recombinant inbred line population (169 RILs) grown in different environments were incorporated into PP at 20% (wt/wt) by extrusion. Test samples were injection molded and characterized for their mechanical properties. The performance of stem fibers in the composites was significantly affected by genotype and environment. Fibers from different genotypes had significantly different chemical compositions, thus composites prepared with these fibers displayed different physical properties. This study demonstrates that thermoplastic composites with soybean stem-derived fibers have mechanical properties that are equivalent or better than wheat straw fiber composites currently being used for manufacturing interior automotive parts. The addition of soybean stem residues improved flexural, tensile and impact properties of the composites. Furthermore, by linkage and in silico mapping we identified genomic regions to which quantitative trait loci (QTL) for compositional and functional properties of soybean stem fibers in thermoplastic composites, as well as genes for cell wall synthesis, were co-localized. These results may lead to the development of high value uses for soybean stem residue. PMID:26167917

  13. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites.

    PubMed

    Reinprecht, Yarmilla; Arif, Muhammad; Simon, Leonardo C; Pauls, K Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was initiated to investigate the effects of plant genotype on the performance characteristics of soybean stem fibers when incorporated into a polypropylene (PP) matrix using a selective phenotyping approach. Fibers from 50 lines of a recombinant inbred line population (169 RILs) grown in different environments were incorporated into PP at 20% (wt/wt) by extrusion. Test samples were injection molded and characterized for their mechanical properties. The performance of stem fibers in the composites was significantly affected by genotype and environment. Fibers from different genotypes had significantly different chemical compositions, thus composites prepared with these fibers displayed different physical properties. This study demonstrates that thermoplastic composites with soybean stem-derived fibers have mechanical properties that are equivalent or better than wheat straw fiber composites currently being used for manufacturing interior automotive parts. The addition of soybean stem residues improved flexural, tensile and impact properties of the composites. Furthermore, by linkage and in silico mapping we identified genomic regions to which quantitative trait loci (QTL) for compositional and functional properties of soybean stem fibers in thermoplastic composites, as well as genes for cell wall synthesis, were co-localized. These results may lead to the development of high value uses for soybean stem residue.

  14. Gap Closing/Finishing by Targeted Genomic Region Enrichment and Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff; Trice, Hope; Pennacchio, Len A.; Chen, Feng

    2010-05-27

    Gap Closing/Finishing of draft genome assemblies is a labor and cost intensive process where several rounds of repetitious amplification and sequencing are required. Here we demonstrate a high throughput procedure where custom primers flanking gaps in draft genomes are designed. Primer libraries containing up to 4,000 unique pairs in independent droplets are merged with a fragmented genomic template. From this millions of picoliter scale droplets are formed, each one being the functional equivalent of an individual PCR reaction. The PCR products are concatenated and sequenced by Illumina which is then assembled and used for gap closure. Here we present an overall experimental strategy, primer design algorithm and initial results.

  15. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  16. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  17. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  18. GC content evolution in coding regions of angiosperm genomes: a unifying hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Glémin, Sylvain; Clément, Yves; David, Jacques; Ressayre, Adrienne

    2014-07-01

    In angiosperms (as in other species), GC content varies along and between genes, within a genome, and between genomes of different species, but the reason for this distribution is still an open question. Grass genomes are particularly intriguing because they exhibit a strong bimodal distribution of genic GC content and a sharp 5'-3' decreasing GC content gradient along most genes. Here, we propose a unifying model to explain the main patterns of GC content variation at the gene and genome scale. We argue that GC content patterns could be mainly determined by the interactions between gene structure, recombination patterns, and GC-biased gene conversion. Recent studies on fine-scale recombination maps in angiosperms support this hypothesis and previous results also fit this model. We propose that our model could be used as a null hypothesis to search for additional forces that affect GC content in angiosperms.

  19. Identification of conserved genomic regions and variation therein amongst Cetartiodactyla species using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has created an opportunity to genetically characterize an individual both inexpensively and comprehensively. In earlier work produced in our collaboration [1], it was demonstrated that, for animals without a reference genome, their Next Generation Sequence data ...

  20. QTL Mapping in Three Rice Populations Uncovers Major Genomic Regions Associated with African Rice Gall Midge Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nasser; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Semagn, Kassa; Sow, Mounirou; Nwilene, Francis; Kolade, Olufisayo; Bocco, Roland; Oyetunji, Olumoye; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    African rice gall midge (AfRGM) is one of the most destructive pests of irrigated and lowland African ecologies. This study aimed to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with AfRGM pest incidence and resistance in three independent bi-parental rice populations (ITA306xBW348-1, ITA306xTOG7106 and ITA306xTOS14519), and to conduct meta QTL (mQTL) analysis to explore whether any genomic regions are conserved across different genetic backgrounds. Composite interval mapping (CIM) conducted on the three populations independently uncovered a total of 28 QTLs associated with pest incidence (12) and pest severity (16). The number of QTLs per population associated with AfRGM resistance varied from three in the ITA306xBW348-1 population to eight in the ITA306xTOG7106 population. Each QTL individually explained 1.3 to 34.1% of the phenotypic variance. The major genomic region for AfRGM resistance had a LOD score and R2 of 60.0 and 34.1% respectively, and mapped at 111 cM on chromosome 4 (qAfrGM4) in the ITA306xTOS14519 population. The meta-analysis reduced the number of QTLs from 28 to 17 mQTLs, each explaining 1.3 to 24.5% of phenotypic variance, and narrowed the confidence intervals by 2.2 cM. There was only one minor effect mQTL on chromosome 1 that was common in the TOS14519 and TOG7106 genetic backgrounds; all other mQTLs were background specific. We are currently fine-mapping and validating the major effect genomic region on chromosome 4 (qAfRGM4). This is the first report in mapping the genomic regions associated with the AfRGM resistance, and will be highly useful for rice breeders.

  1. Browsing repeats in genomes: Pygram and an application to non-coding region analysis

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Patrick; Mahé, Frédéric; Valin, Anne-Sophie; Nicolas, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Background A large number of studies on genome sequences have revealed the major role played by repeated sequences in the structure, function, dynamics and evolution of genomes. In-depth repeat analysis requires specialized methods, including visualization techniques, to achieve optimum exploratory power. Results This article presents Pygram, a new visualization application for investigating the organization of repeated sequences in complete genome sequences. The application projects data from a repeat index file on the analysed sequences, and by combining this principle with a query system, is capable of locating repeated sequences with specific properties. In short, Pygram provides an efficient, graphical browser for studying repeats. Implementation of the complete configuration is illustrated in an analysis of CRISPR structures in Archaea genomes and the detection of horizontal transfer between Archaea and Viruses. Conclusion By proposing a new visualization environment to analyse repeated sequences, this application aims to increase the efficiency of laboratories involved in investigating repeat organization in single genomes or across several genomes. PMID:17067389

  2. Geochemistry and geochronology of the Late Permian mafic intrusions along the boundary area of Jiamusi and Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range massifs and adjacent regions, northeastern China: Petrogenesis and implications for the tectonic evolution of the Mudanjiang Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu; Ge, Wen-chun; Yang, Hao; Xu, Wen-liang; Bi, Jun-hui; Wang, Zhi-hui

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock major and trace element data, and Hf isotope data for the metagabbros from the Zhushan pluton and gabbros from the Taiping pluton along the boundary area of Jiamusi and Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range massifs and adjacent regions, which will not only place important constraints on the rock-forming ages, source characteristics and tectonic setting of these gabbros, but will also provide insights into understanding the Permian tectonic evolution between the Jiamusi Massif and the Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif. Zircon U-Pb dating, determined using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and secondary-ion mass spectrometry, indicates that the magmatic zircons from the Zhushan and Taiping plutons yield 206Pb/238U ages of 256 ± 2 Ma and 259 ± 3 Ma, respectively, interpreted as the emplacement ages of the intrusions. The metagabbros from the Zhushan pluton display the geochemical characteristics of calc-alkaline series rocks, and are enriched in light rare earth and large ion lithophile elements, and depleted in Nb, Ta, P, Zr and Hf. The εHf(t) values of magmatic zircons in these metagabbros vary from - 5.47 to + 0.74. All these geochemical features indicate that the primary magma of the Zhushan pluton was derived from an enriched lithospheric mantle source that was metasomatized by subducted slab-derived fluids. The gabbros from the Taiping pluton are also enriched in large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Rb, Ba and U) relative to high field strength elements, and have negative Nb-Ta-P anomalies, with εHf(t) values of - 4.02 to - 1.70. It is inferred that they also formed from a primary magma generated by the partial melting of enriched lithospheric mantle that was metasomatized by subducted slab-derived fluids. The rocks from the Zhushan and Taiping plutons have similar petrogenetic processes, but their primary magmas are likely to be derived from two distinct magma sources based on geochemical and

  3. Extensive Pyrosequencing Reveals Frequent Intra-Genomic Variations of Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dezhu; Sun, Yongzhen; Niu, Yunyun; Chen, Zhiduan; Luo, Hongmei; Pang, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhiying; Liu, Chang; Lv, Aiping; Deng, Youping; Larson-Rabin, Zachary; Wilkinson, Mike; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background Internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) is already one of the most popular phylogenetic and DNA barcoding markers. However, the existence of its multiple copies has complicated such usage and a detailed characterization of intra-genomic variations is critical to address such concerns. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used sequence-tagged pyrosequencing and genome-wide analyses to characterize intra-genomic variations of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) regions from 178 plant species. We discovered that mutation of ITS2 is frequent, with a mean of 35 variants per species. And on average, three of the most abundant variants make up 91% of all ITS2 copies. Moreover, we found different congeneric species share identical variants in 13 genera. Interestingly, different species across different genera also share identical variants. In particular, one minor variant of ITS2 in Eleutherococcus giraldii was found identical to the ITS2 major variant of Panax ginseng, both from Araliaceae family. In addition, DNA barcoding gap analysis showed that the intra-genomic distances were markedly smaller than those of the intra-specific or inter-specific variants. When each of 5543 variants were examined for its species discrimination efficiency, a 97% success rate was obtained at the species level. Conclusions Identification of identical ITS2 variants across intra-generic or inter-generic species revealed complex species evolutionary history, possibly, horizontal gene transfer and ancestral hybridization. Although intra-genomic multiple variants are frequently found within each genome, the usage of the major variants alone is sufficient for phylogeny construction and species determination in most cases. Furthermore, the inclusion of minor variants further improves the resolution of species identification. PMID:22952830

  4. Regions of very low H3K27me3 partition the Drosophila genome into topological domains

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Rosalyn; Choo, Siew Woh

    2017-01-01

    It is now well established that eukaryote genomes have a common architectural organization into topologically associated domains (TADs) and evidence is accumulating that this organization plays an important role in gene regulation. However, the mechanisms that partition the genome into TADs and the nature of domain boundaries are still poorly understood. We have investigated boundary regions in the Drosophila genome and find that they can be identified as domains of very low H3K27me3. The genome-wide H3K27me3 profile partitions into two states; very low H3K27me3 identifies Depleted (D) domains that contain housekeeping genes and their regulators such as the histone acetyltransferase-containing NSL complex, whereas domains containing moderate-to-high levels of H3K27me3 (Enriched or E domains) are associated with regulated genes, irrespective of whether they are active or inactive. The D domains correlate with the boundaries of TADs and are enriched in a subset of architectural proteins, particularly Chromator, BEAF-32, and Z4/Putzig. However, rather than being clustered at the borders of these domains, these proteins bind throughout the H3K27me3-depleted regions and are much more strongly associated with the transcription start sites of housekeeping genes than with the H3K27me3 domain boundaries. While we have not demonstrated causality, we suggest that the D domain chromatin state, characterised by very low or absent H3K27me3 and established by housekeeping gene regulators, acts to separate topological domains thereby setting up the domain architecture of the genome. PMID:28282436

  5. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: the Adh region.

    PubMed Central

    Ashburner, M; Misra, S; Roote, J; Lewis, S E; Blazej, R; Davis, T; Doyle, C; Galle, R; George, R; Harris, N; Hartzell, G; Harvey, D; Hong, L; Houston, K; Hoskins, R; Johnson, G; Martin, C; Moshrefi, A; Palazzolo, M; Reese, M G; Spradling, A; Tsang, G; Wan, K; Whitelaw, K; Celniker, S

    1999-01-01

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized "Adh region." A computational analysis of the sequence predicts 218 protein-coding genes, 11 tRNAs, and 17 transposable element sequences. At least 38 of the protein-coding genes are arranged in clusters of from 2 to 6 closely related genes, suggesting extensive tandem duplication. The gene density is one protein-coding gene every 13 kb; the transposable element density is one element every 171 kb. Of 73 genes in this region identified by genetic analysis, 49 have been located on the sequence; P-element insertions have been mapped to 43 genes. Ninety-five (44%) of the known and predicted genes match a Drosophila EST, and 144 (66%) have clear similarities to proteins in other organisms. Genes known to have mutant phenotypes are more likely to be represented in cDNA libraries, and far more likely to have products similar to proteins of other organisms, than are genes with no known mutant phenotype. Over 650 chromosome aberration breakpoints map to this chromosome region, and their nonrandom distribution on the genetic map reflects variation in gene spacing on the DNA. This is the first large-scale analysis of the genome of D. melanogaster at the sequence level. In addition to the direct results obtained, this analysis has allowed us to develop and test methods that will be needed to interpret the complete sequence of the genome of this species.Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it. Milne 1926 PMID:10471707

  6. Evolution of the vertebrate genome as reflected in paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, L.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Gene constellations on several human chromosomes are interpreted as indications of large regional duplications that took place during evolution of the vertebrate genome. Four groups of paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse are suggested and are believed to be conserved remnants of the two or three rounds of tetraploidization that are likely to have occurred during evolution of the vertebrates. The phenomenon of differential silencing of genes is described. The importance of conservation of linkage of particular genes is discussed in relation to genetic regulation and cell differentiation. 120 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  8. Genomic Regions Associated with Root Traits under Drought Stress in Tropical Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, P. H.; Krishna, Girish; Krishnamurthy, L.; Gajanan, S.; Babu, Raman; Zerka, M.; Vinayan, M. T.; Vivek, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    An association mapping panel, named as CIMMYT Asia association mapping (CAAM) panel, involving 396 diverse tropical maize lines were phenotyped for various structural and functional traits of roots under drought and well-watered conditions. The experiment was conducted during Kharif (summer-rainy) season of 2012 and 2013 in root phenotyping facility at CIMMYT-Hyderabad, India. The CAAM panel was genotyped to generate 955, 690 SNPs through GBS v2.7 using Illumina Hi-seq 2000/2500 at Institute for Genomic Diversity, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA. GWAS analysis was carried out using 331,390 SNPs filtered from the entire set of SNPs revealed a total of 50 and 67 SNPs significantly associated for root functional (transpiration efficiency, flowering period water use) and structural traits (rooting depth, root dry weight, root length, root volume, root surface area and root length density), respectively. In addition to this, 37 SNPs were identified for grain yield and shoot biomass under well-watered and drought stress. Though many SNPs were found to have significant association with the traits under study, SNPs that were common for more than one trait were discussed in detail. A total 18 SNPs were found to have common association with more than one trait, out of which 12 SNPs were found within or near the various gene functional regions. In this study we attempted to identify the trait specific maize lines based on the presence of favorable alleles for the SNPs associated with multiple traits. Two SNPs S3_128533512 and S7_151238865 were associated with transpiration efficiency, shoot biomass and grain yield under well-watered condition. Based on favorable allele for these SNPs seven inbred lines were identified. Similarly, four lines were identified for transpiration efficiency and shoot biomass under drought stress based on the presence of favorable allele for the common SNPs S1_211520521, S2_20017716, S3_57210184 and S7_130878458 and three lines were identified

  9. Genetic variation between Schistosoma japonicum lineages from lake and mountainous regions in China revealed by resequencing whole genomes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingbo; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Bin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhong; Feng, Zheng; Han, Ze-Guang; Hu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Schistosomiasis japonica is endemic in mainland China along the Yangtze River, typically distributed in two geographical categories of lake and mountainous regions. Study on schistosome genetic diversity is of interest in respect of understanding parasite biology and transmission, and formulating control strategy. Certain genetic variations may be associated with adaptations to different ecological habitats. The aim of this study is to gain insight into Schistosoma japonicum genetic variation, evolutionary origin and associated causes of different geographic lineages through examining homozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) based on resequenced genome data. We collected S. japonicum samples from four sites, three in the lake regions (LR) of mid-east (Guichi and Tonglin in Anhui province, Laogang in Hunan province) and one in mountainous region (MR) (Xichang in Sichuan province) of south-west of China, resequenced their genomes using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology, and made use of the available database of S. japonicum draft genomic sequence as a reference in genome mapping. A total of 14,575 SNPs from 2059 genes were identified in the four lineages. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed significant genetic variation exhibited between the different geographical lineages, and further revealed that the MR Xichang lineage is phylogenetically closer to LR Guich lineage than to other two LR lineages, and the MR lineage might be evolved from LR lineages. More than two thirds of detected SNPs were nonsynonymous; functional annotation of the SNP-containing genes showed that they are involved mainly in biological processes such as signaling and response to stimuli. Notably, unique nonsynonymous SNP variations were detected in 66 genes of MR lineage, inferring possible genetic adaption to mountainous ecological condition.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of runs of homozygosity identifies new susceptibility regions of lung cancer in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Xu, Zhengfeng; Jin, Guangfu; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jiang, Yue; Hu, Lingmin; Chu, Minjie; Cao, Songyu; Shen, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    Runs of homozygosity (ROHs) are a class of important but poorly studied genomic variations and may be involved in individual susceptibility to diseases. To better understand ROH and its relationship with lung cancer, we performed a genome-wide ROH analysis of a subset of a previous genome-wide case-control study (1,473 cases and 1,962 controls) in a Han Chinese population. ROHs were classified into two classes, based on lengths, intermediate and long ROHs, to evaluate their association with lung cancer risk using existing genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We found that the overall level of intermediate ROHs was significantly associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio = 0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.51-0.77; P = 4.78×10−6 ), while the long ROHs seemed to be a risk factor of lung cancer. We also identified one ROH region at 14q23.1 that was consistently associated with lung cancer risk in the study. These results indicated that ROHs may be a new class of variation which may be associated with lung cancer risk, and genetic variants at 14q23.1 may be involved in the development of lung cancer. PMID:23720676

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Shubham K; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit; Sharma, Vineet K

    2017-02-02

    The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii Strain MB3, a Denitrifying Aerobic Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Mangrove Trees in the Andaman Islands, India

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Shubham K.; Saxena, Rituja; Mittal, Parul; Gupta, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome sequence of Pseudomonas hussainii MB3, isolated from the rhizospheric region of mangroves in the Andaman Islands, is comprised of 3,644,788 bp and 3,159 protein coding genes. Draft genome analysis indicates that MB3 is an aerobic bacterium capable of performing assimilatory sulfate reduction, dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and denitrification. PMID:28153890

  13. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  14. Genome-environment association study suggests local adaptation to climate at the regional scale in Fagus sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Pluess, Andrea R; Frank, Aline; Heiri, Caroline; Lalagüe, Hadrien; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary potential of long-lived species, such as forest trees, is fundamental for their local persistence under climate change (CC). Genome-environment association (GEA) analyses reveal if species in heterogeneous environments at the regional scale are under differential selection resulting in populations with potential preadaptation to CC within this area. In 79 natural Fagus sylvatica populations, neutral genetic patterns were characterized using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and genomic variation (144 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) out of 52 candidate genes) was related to 87 environmental predictors in the latent factor mixed model, logistic regressions and isolation by distance/environmental (IBD/IBE) tests. SSR diversity revealed relatedness at up to 150 m intertree distance but an absence of large-scale spatial genetic structure and IBE. In the GEA analyses, 16 SNPs in 10 genes responded to one or several environmental predictors and IBE, corrected for IBD, was confirmed. The GEA often reflected the proposed gene functions, including indications for adaptation to water availability and temperature. Genomic divergence and the lack of large-scale neutral genetic patterns suggest that gene flow allows the spread of advantageous alleles in adaptive genes. Thereby, adaptation processes are likely to take place in species occurring in heterogeneous environments, which might reduce their regional extinction risk under CC.

  15. Non-coding genomic regions possessing enhancer and silencer potential are associated with healthy aging and exceptional survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangkyu; Welsh, David A; Myers, Leann; Cherry, Katie E; Wyckoff, Jennifer; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2015-02-28

    We have completed a genome-wide linkage scan for healthy aging using data collected from a family study, followed by fine-mapping by association in a separate population, the first such attempt reported. The family cohort consisted of parents of age 90 or above and their children ranging in age from 50 to 80. As a quantitative measure of healthy aging, we used a frailty index, called FI34, based on 34 health and function variables. The linkage scan found a single significant linkage peak on chromosome 12. Using an independent cohort of unrelated nonagenarians, we carried out a fine-scale association mapping of the region suggestive of linkage and identified three sites associated with healthy aging. These healthy-aging sites (HASs) are located in intergenic regions at 12q13-14. HAS-1 has been previously associated with multiple diseases, and an enhancer was recently mapped and experimentally validated within the site. HAS-2 is a previously uncharacterized site possessing genomic features suggestive of enhancer activity. HAS-3 contains features associated with Polycomb repression. The HASs also contain variants associated with exceptional longevity, based on a separate analysis. Our results provide insight into functional genomic networks involving non-coding regulatory elements that are involved in healthy aging and longevity.

  16. In vitro dynamics of HIV-1 BF intersubtype recombinants genomic regions involved in the regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Carobene, Mauricio G; Rodrígues, Christian Rodríguez; De Candia, Cristian A; Turk, Gabriela; Salomón, Horacio

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 intersubtype recombination is a very common phenomenon that has been shown to frequently affect different viral genomic regions. Vpr and Tat are viral proteins known to interact with viral promoter (LTR) during the replication cycle. This interaction is mainly involved in the regulation of viral gene expression, so, any structural changes in the LTR and/or these regulatory proteins may have an important impact on viral replication and spread. It has been reported that these genetic structures underwent recombination in BF variants widely spread in South America. To gain more insight of the consequences of the BF intersubtype recombination phenomenon on these different but functionally related genomic regions we designed and performed and in vitro study that allowed the detection and recovery of intersubtype recombinants sequences and its subsequent analysis. Our results indicate that recombination affects differentially these regions, showing evidence of a time-space relationship between the changes observed in the viral promoter and the ones observed in the Vpr/Tat coding region. This supports the idea of intersubtype recombination as a mechanism that promotes biological adaptation and compensates fitness variations. PMID:19607724

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Genomic Regions for Virulence in the Non-Model Organism Heterobasidion annosum s.s

    PubMed Central

    Dalman, Kerstin; Himmelstrand, Kajsa; Olson, Åke; Lind, Mårten; Brandström-Durling, Mikael; Stenlid, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) panels needed for genome wide association (GWA) studies have hitherto been expensive to establish and use on non-model organisms. To overcome this, we used a next generation sequencing approach to both establish SNPs and to determine genotypes. We conducted a GWA study on a fungal species, analysing the virulence of Heterobasidion annosum s.s., a necrotrophic pathogen, on its hosts Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris. From a set of 33,018 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 23 haploid isolates, twelve SNP markers distributed on seven contigs were associated with virulence (P<0.0001). Four of the contigs harbour known virulence genes from other fungal pathogens and the remaining three harbour novel candidate genes. Two contigs link closely to virulence regions recognized previously by QTL mapping in the congeneric hybrid H. irregulare × H. occidentale. Our study demonstrates the efficiency of GWA studies for dissecting important complex traits of small populations of non-model haploid organisms with small genomes. PMID:23341945

  18. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stram, Daniel O; Berndt, Sonja I; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis A; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Isaacs, William B; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Henderson, Brian E; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Haiman, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10(-4)-5.6 × 10(-3)) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10(-6)) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation.

  19. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Stram, Daniel O.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C.; Key, Timothy J.; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Strom, Sara S.; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Isaacs, William B.; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Murphy, Adam B.; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M. Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L.; Hunter, David J.; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Henderson, Brian E.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10−4–5.6 × 10−3) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10−6) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation. PMID:26162851

  20. Development and validation of new SSR markers from expressed regions in the garlic genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited number of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers is available for the genome of garlic (Allium sativum L.) although SSR markers have become one of the most preferred marker systems because they are typically co-dominant, reproducible, cross species transferable and highly polymorphic. In this ...

  1. Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequences were determined for two Pierce’s disease (PD) causing Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strains, one from Florida and one from Taiwan. The Florida strain was ATCC 35879, the type of strain used as a standard reference for related taxonomy research. By contrast, the Taiwan strain used was only...

  2. Recent artificial selection in U.S. Jersey cattle impacts autozygosity levels of specific genomic regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome signatures of artificial selection in U.S. Jersey cattle were identified by examining changes in haplotype homozygosity for a resource population of animals born between 1962 and 2005. Genetic merit of this population changed dramatically during this period for a number of traits, especially ...

  3. Comparative genomics of Campylobacter iguaniorum to unravel genetic regions associated with reptilian hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter iguaniorum is genetically related to the species C. fetus, C. hyointestinalis, and C. lanienae. Reptiles, chelonians and lizards in particular, appear to be the primary reservoir of this Campylobacter species. Here we report the genome comparison of C. iguaniorum strain 1485E, isolated...

  4. [Variation in evolutionary unstable regions of the chloroplast genome in plants obtained in anther culture of dihaploid wheat lines].

    PubMed

    Mozgova, G V; Orlov, P A; Shalygo, N V

    2006-02-01

    In dihaploid wheats, two evolutionarily unstable regions of the chloroplast genome were examined. These regions include the following genes, changes in which could be associated with albinism in anther culture: rbcL, encoding the large Rubisco subunit; psaA, encoding p700 apoprotein Ia; petA, encoding cytochrome f; atpB and atpE, encoding respectively beta and epsilon subunits of the CF1 ATPase complex; trnE, encoding glutamine tRNA; and cemA, encoding a cell membrane protein. Using PCR, we have shown that atpB was the gene most often not detected in the lines examined. These results suggest that regeneration of albino plants is accompanied by a deletion of a chloroplast DNA region harboring this gene.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii, Reptilia; Agamidae), another squamate with two control regions.

    PubMed

    Ujvari, Beata; Madsen, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Using PCR, the complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced in three frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii). The mitochondria spanned over 16,761bp. As in other vertebrates, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 13 protein coding genes were identified. However, similar to some other squamate reptiles, two control regions (CRI and CRII) were identified, spanning 801 and 812 bp, respectively. Our results were compared with another Australian member of the family Agamidae, the bearded dragon (Pogana vitticeps). The overall base composition of the light-strand sequence largely mirrored that observed in P vitticeps. Furthermore, similar to P. vitticeps, we observed an insertion 801 bp long between the ND5 and ND6 genes. However, in contrast to P vitticeps we did not observe a conserved sequence block III region. Based on a comparison among the three frillneck lizards, we also present data on the proportion of variable sites within the major mitochondrial regions.

  6. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Šedová, Lucie; Pravenec, Michal; Křenová, Drahomíra; Kazdová, Ludmila; Zídek, Václav; Krupková, Michaela; Liška, František; Křen, Vladimír; Šeda, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16) and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx) into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18–28 mmHg difference) and diastolic (10–15 mmHg difference) blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001). The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes) are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1). Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic syndrome

  7. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Šedová, Lucie; Pravenec, Michal; Křenová, Drahomíra; Kazdová, Ludmila; Zídek, Václav; Krupková, Michaela; Liška, František; Křen, Vladimír; Šeda, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16) and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx) into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference) and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference) blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001). The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes) are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1). Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic syndrome.

  8. Genome-wide coexpression of steroid receptors in the mouse brain: Identifying signaling pathways and functionally coordinated regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Weert, Lisa T. C. M.; Mol, Isabel M.; Sips, Hetty C. M.; van den Heuvel, José K.; Datson, Nicole A.; Visser, Jenny A.; Meijer, Onno C.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid receptors are pleiotropic transcription factors that coordinate adaptation to different physiological states. An important target organ is the brain, but even though their effects are well studied in specific regions, brain-wide steroid receptor targets and mediators remain largely unknown due to the complexity of the brain. Here, we tested the idea that novel aspects of steroid action can be identified through spatial correlation of steroid receptors with genome-wide mRNA expression across different regions in the mouse brain. First, we observed significant coexpression of six nuclear receptors (NRs) [androgen receptor (Ar), estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1), estrogen receptor beta (Esr2), glucocorticoid receptor (Gr), mineralocorticoid receptor (Mr), and progesterone receptor (Pgr)] with sets of steroid target genes that were identified in single brain regions. These coexpression relationships were also present in distinct other brain regions, suggestive of as yet unidentified coordinate regulation of brain regions by, for example, glucocorticoids and estrogens. Second, coexpression of a set of 62 known NR coregulators and the six steroid receptors in 12 nonoverlapping mouse brain regions revealed selective downstream pathways, such as Pak6 as a mediator for the effects of Ar and Gr on dopaminergic transmission. Third, Magel2 and Irs4 were identified and validated as strongly responsive targets to the estrogen diethylstilbestrol in the mouse hypothalamus. The brain- and genome-wide correlations of mRNA expression levels of six steroid receptors that we provide constitute a rich resource for further predictions and understanding of brain modulation by steroid hormones. PMID:26811448

  9. Identification, characterization and phylogenic analysis of conserved genes within the p74 gene region of Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus genome.

    PubMed

    Rashidan, Kianoush Khajeh; Nassoury, Nasha; Giannopoulos, Paresa N; Mauffette, Yves; Guertin, Claude

    2004-11-30

    The genes located within the p74 gene region of the Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus (ChfuGV) were identified by sequencing an 8.9 kb BamHI restriction fragment on the ChfuGV genome. The global guanine-cytosine (GC) content of this region of the genome was 33.02%. This paper presents the ORFs within the p74 gene region along with their transcriptional orientations. This region contains a total of 15 open reading frames (ORFs). Among those, 8 ORFs were found to be homologues to the baculoviral ORFs: Cf-i-p , Cf-vi, Cf-vii, Cf-viii (ubiquitin), Cf-xi (pp31), Cf-xii (lef-11), Cf-xiii (sod) and Cf-xv-p (p74). To date, no specific function has been assigned to the ORFs: Cf-i, Cf-ii, Cf-iii, Cf-iv, Cf-v, Cf-vi, Cf-vii, Cf-ix and Cf-x. The most noticeable ORFs located in this region of the ChfuGV genome were ubiquitin, lef-11, sod, fibrillin and p74. The phylogenetic trees (constructed using conceptual products of major conserved ORFs) and gene arrangement in this region were used to further examine the classification of the members of the granulovirus genus. Comparative studies demonstrated that ChfuGV along with the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV), Phthorimaea operculella granulovirus (PhopGV), Adoxophyes orana granulovirus (AoGV) and Cryptophlebia leucotreta granulovirus (ClGV) share a high degree of amino acids sequence and gene arrangement preservation within the studied region. These results support a previous report, which classified a granuloviruses into 2 distinct groups: Group I: ChfuGV, CpGV, PhopGV and AoGV and Group II: Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus (XcGV) and Plutella xylostella granulovirus (PxGV). The phylogenetic and gene arrangement studies also placed ClGV as a novel member of the Group I granuloviruses.

  10. Malignant canine mammary tumours: Preliminary genomic insights using oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridisation analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marta; Dias-Pereira, Patrícia; Williams, Christina; Lopes, Carlos; Breen, Matthew

    2017-03-28

    Neoplastic mammary disease in female dogs represents a major health concern for dog owners and veterinarians, but the genomic basis of the disease is poorly understood. In this study, we performed high resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridisation (oaCGH) to assess genome wide DNA copy number changes in 10 malignant canine mammary tumours from seven female dogs, including multiple tumours collected at one time from each of three female dogs. In all but two tumours, genomic imbalances were detected, with losses being more common than gains. Canine chromosomes 9, 22, 26, 27, 34 and X were most frequently affected. Dissimilar oaCGH ratio profiles were observed in multiple tumours from the same dogs, providing preliminary evidence for probable independent pathogenesis. Analysis of adjacent samples of one tumour revealed regional differences in the number of genomic imbalances, suggesting heterogeneity within tumours.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of bighead croaker, Collichthys niveatus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae): structure of control region and phylogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian-Jun; Cheng, Yuan-Zhi; Sun, Yue-Na; Shi, Ge; Wang, Ri-Xin

    2011-10-01

    Sciaenidae is a diverse, commercially important family. To understand the phylogenetic position of Collichthys niveatus in this family, we present its complete mitochondrial genome sequence. The genome is 16469 bp in length and contains 37 mitochondrial genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes) and a control region (CR) as in other bony fishes. Further sequencing for the complete control region was performed on Collichthys lucida. Although the conserved sequence domains such as extend termination associated sequence (ETAS) and conserved sequence block domains (CSB-1, CSB-2 and CSB-3) are recognized in the control region of the two congeneric species, the typical central conserved blocks (CSB-F, CSB-E and CSB-D) could not be detected, while they are found in Miichthys miiuy and Cynoscion acoupa of Sciaenidae and other Percoidei fishes. Phylogenetic analyses do not support the monophyly of Pseudosciaeniae, which is against with the morphological results. C. niveatus is most closely related to Larimichthys polyactis, and Collichthys and Larimichthys may be merged into one genus, based on the current datasets.

  12. Identification of genomic regions determining the phenological development leading to floral transition in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Båga, Monica; Fowler, D. Brian; Chibbar, Ravindra N.

    2009-01-01

    Autumn-seeded winter cereals acquire tolerance to freezing temperatures and become vernalized by exposure to low temperature (LT). The level of accumulated LT tolerance depends on the cold acclimation rate and factors controlling timing of floral transition at the shoot apical meristem. In this study, genomic loci controlling the floral transition time were mapped in a winter wheat (T. aestivum L.) doubled haploid (DH) mapping population segregating for LT tolerance and rate of phenological development. The final leaf number (FLN), days to FLN, and days to anthesis were determined for 142 DH lines grown with and without vernalization in controlled environments. Analysis of trait data by composite interval mapping (CIM) identified 11 genomic regions that carried quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the developmental traits studied. CIM analysis showed that the time for floral transition in both vernalized and non-vernalized plants was controlled by common QTL regions on chromosomes 1B, 2A, 2B, 6A and 7A. A QTL identified on chromosome 4A influenced floral transition time only in vernalized plants. Alleles of the LT-tolerant parent, Norstar, delayed floral transition at all QTLs except at the 2A locus. Some of the QTL alleles delaying floral transition also increased the length of vegetative growth and delayed flowering time. The genes underlying the QTLs identified in this study encode factors involved in regional adaptation of cold hardy winter wheat. PMID:19553371

  13. An improved protocol for sequencing of repetitive genomic regions and structural variations using mutagenesis and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Botond; Massingham, Tim; Stütz, Adrian M; Goldman, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The rise of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has transformed de novo genome sequencing into an accessible research tool, but obtaining high quality eukaryotic genome assemblies remains a challenge, mostly due to the abundance of repetitive elements. These also make it difficult to study nucleotide polymorphism in repetitive regions, including certain types of structural variations. One solution proposed for resolving such regions is Sequence Assembly aided by Mutagenesis (SAM), which relies on the fact that introducing enough random mutations breaks the repetitive structure, making assembly possible. Sequencing many different mutated copies permits the sequence of the repetitive region to be inferred by consensus methods. However, this approach relies on molecular cloning in order to isolate and amplify individual mutant copies, making it hard to scale-up the approach for use in conjunction with high-throughput sequencing technologies. To address this problem, we propose NG-SAM, a modified version of the SAM protocol that relies on PCR and dilution steps only, coupled to a NGS workflow. NG-SAM therefore has the potential to be scaled-up, e.g. using emerging microfluidics technologies. We built a realistic simulation pipeline to study the feasibility of NG-SAM, and our results suggest that under appropriate experimental conditions the approach might be successfully put into practice. Moreover, our simulations suggest that NG-SAM is capable of reconstructing robustly a wide range of potential target sequences of varying lengths and repetitive structures.

  14. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus.

  15. Multiple recent horizontal transfers of a large genomic region in cheese making fungi.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Kevin; Ropars, Jeanne; Renault, Pierre; Dupont, Joëlle; Gouzy, Jérôme; Branca, Antoine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Ceppi, Maurizio; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Debuchy, Robert; Malagnac, Fabienne; Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Lacoste, Sandrine; Sallet, Erika; Bensimon, Aaron; Giraud, Tatiana; Brygoo, Yves

    2014-01-01

    While the extent and impact of horizontal transfers in prokaryotes are widely acknowledged, their importance to the eukaryotic kingdom is unclear and thought by many to be anecdotal. Here we report multiple recent transfers of a huge genomic island between Penicillium spp. found in the food environment. Sequencing of the two leading filamentous fungi used in cheese making, P. roqueforti and P. camemberti, and comparison with the penicillin producer P. rubens reveals a 575 kb long genomic island in P. roqueforti--called Wallaby--present as identical fragments at non-homologous loci in P. camemberti and P. rubens. Wallaby is detected in Penicillium collections exclusively in strains from food environments. Wallaby encompasses about 250 predicted genes, some of which are probably involved in competition with microorganisms. The occurrence of multiple recent eukaryotic transfers in the food environment provides strong evidence for the importance of this understudied and probably underestimated phenomenon in eukaryotes.

  16. QTL Mapping in Three Rice Populations Uncovers Major Genomic Regions Associated with African Rice Gall Midge Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Semagn, Kassa; Sow, Mounirou; Nwilene, Francis; Kolade, Olufisayo; Bocco, Roland; Oyetunji, Olumoye; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Ndjiondjop, Marie-Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    African rice gall midge (AfRGM) is one of the most destructive pests of irrigated and lowland African ecologies. This study aimed to identify the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with AfRGM pest incidence and resistance in three independent bi-parental rice populations (ITA306xBW348-1, ITA306xTOG7106 and ITA306xTOS14519), and to conduct meta QTL (mQTL) analysis to explore whether any genomic regions are conserved across different genetic backgrounds. Composite interval mapping (CIM) conducted on the three populations independently uncovered a total of 28 QTLs associated with pest incidence (12) and pest severity (16). The number of QTLs per population associated with AfRGM resistance varied from three in the ITA306xBW348-1 population to eight in the ITA306xTOG7106 population. Each QTL individually explained 1.3 to 34.1% of the phenotypic variance. The major genomic region for AfRGM resistance had a LOD score and R2 of 60.0 and 34.1% respectively, and mapped at 111 cM on chromosome 4 (qAfrGM4) in the ITA306xTOS14519 population. The meta-analysis reduced the number of QTLs from 28 to 17 mQTLs, each explaining 1.3 to 24.5% of phenotypic variance, and narrowed the confidence intervals by 2.2 cM. There was only one minor effect mQTL on chromosome 1 that was common in the TOS14519 and TOG7106 genetic backgrounds; all other mQTLs were background specific. We are currently fine-mapping and validating the major effect genomic region on chromosome 4 (qAfRGM4). This is the first report in mapping the genomic regions associated with the AfRGM resistance, and will be highly useful for rice breeders. PMID:27508500

  17. Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics ofPhytophthora ramorum and P. sojae

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore,Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of theoomycetes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were determined during thecourse of their complete nuclear genome sequencing (Tyler, et al. 2006).Both are circular, with sizes of 39,314 bp for P. ramorum and 42,975 bpfor P. sojae. Each contains a total of 37 identifiable protein-encodinggenes, 25 or 26 tRNAs (P. sojae and P. ramorum, respectively)specifying19 amino acids, and a variable number of ORFs (7 for P. ramorum and 12for P. sojae) which are potentially additional functional genes.Non-coding regions comprise approximately 11.5 percent and 18.4 percentof the genomes of P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively. Relative to P.sojae, there is an inverted repeat of 1,150 bp in P. ramorum thatincludes an unassigned unique ORF, a tRNA gene, and adjacent non-codingsequences, but otherwise the gene order in both species is identical.Comparisons of these genomes with published sequences of the P. infestansmitochondrial genome reveals a number of similarities, but the gene orderin P. infestans differs in two adjacent locations due to inversions.Sequence alignments of the three genomes indicated sequence conservationranging from 75 to 85 percent and that specific regions were morevariable than others.

  18. AnABlast: a new in silico strategy for the genome-wide search of novel genes and fossil regions

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan; Duncan, Caia D. S.; Gallardo, María; Mata, Juan; Perez-Pulido, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    Genome annotation, assisted by computer programs, is one of the great advances in modern biology. Nevertheless, the in silico identification of small and complex coding sequences is still challenging. We observed that amino acid sequences inferred from coding—but rarely from non-coding—DNA sequences accumulated alignments in low-stringency BLAST searches, suggesting that this alignments accumulation could be used to highlight coding regions in sequenced DNA. To investigate this possibility, we developed a computer program (AnABlast) that generates profiles of accumulated alignments in query amino acid sequences using a low-stringency BLAST strategy. To validate this approach, all six-frame translations of DNA sequences between every two annotated exons of the fission yeast genome were analysed with AnABlast. AnABlast-generated profiles identified three new copies of known genes, and four new genes supported by experimental evidence. New pseudogenes, ancestral carboxyl- and amino-terminal subtractions, complex gene rearrangements, and ancient fragments of mitDNA and of bacterial origin, were also inferred. Thus, this novel in silico approach provides a powerful tool to uncover new genes, as well as fossil-coding sequences, thus providing insight into the evolutionary history of annotated genomes. PMID:26494834

  19. Generation of Recombinant Polioviruses Harboring RNA Affinity Tags in the 5' and 3' Noncoding Regions of Genomic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Flather, Dylan; Cathcart, Andrea L; Cruz, Casey; Baggs, Eric; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D; Semler, Bert L

    2016-02-04

    Despite being intensely studied for more than 50 years, a complete understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle remains elusive. Specifically, only a handful of cellular proteins have been shown to be involved in the RNA replication cycle of these viruses. In an effort to isolate and identify additional cellular proteins that function in enteroviral RNA replication, we have generated multiple recombinant polioviruses containing RNA affinity tags within the 3' or 5' noncoding region of the genome. These recombinant viruses retained RNA affinity sequences within the genome while remaining viable and infectious over multiple passages in cell culture. Further characterization of these viruses demonstrated that viral protein production and growth kinetics were unchanged or only slightly altered relative to wild type poliovirus. However, attempts to isolate these genetically-tagged viral genomes from infected cells have been hindered by high levels of co-purification of nonspecific proteins and the limited matrix-binding efficiency of RNA affinity sequences. Regardless, these recombinant viruses represent a step toward more thorough characterization of enterovirus ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in RNA replication.

  20. Genomic regions showing copy number variations associate with resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yali; Liu, George E; Bickhart, Derek M; Matukumalli, Lakshmi K; Li, Congjun; Song, Jiuzhou; Gasbarre, Louis C; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Sonstegard, Tad S

    2012-03-01

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. We previously reported an initial analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in Angus cattle selected for resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes. In this study, we performed a large-scale analysis of CNVs using SNP genotyping data from 472 animals of the same population. We detected 811 candidate CNV regions, which represent 141.8 Mb (~4.7%) of the genome. To investigate the functional impacts of CNVs, we created 2 groups of 100 individual animals with extremely low or high estimated breeding values of eggs per gram of feces and referred to these groups as parasite resistant (PR) or parasite susceptible (PS), respectively. We identified 297 (~51 Mb) and 282 (~48 Mb) CNV regions from PR and PS groups, respectively. Approximately 60% of the CNV regions were specific to the PS group or PR group of animals. Selected PR- or PS-specific CNVs were further experimentally validated by quantitative PCR. A total of 297 PR CNV regions overlapped with 437 Ensembl genes enriched in immunity and defense, like WC1 gene which uniquely expresses on gamma/delta T cells in cattle. Network analyses indicated that the PR-specific genes were predominantly involved in gastrointestinal disease, immunological disease, inflammatory response, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, lymphoid tissue development, and cell death. By contrast, the 282 PS CNV regions contained 473 Ensembl genes which are overrepresented in environmental interactions. Network analyses indicated that the PS-specific genes were particularly enriched for inflammatory response, immune cell trafficking, metabolic disease, cell cycle, and cellular organization and movement.

  1. Repeated sequence homogenization between the control and pseudo-control regions in the mitochondrial genomes of the subfamily Aquilinae.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, Luis; Pinsker, Wilhelm; Negro, Juan José; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Urios, Vicente; Haring, Elisabeth

    2009-05-15

    In birds, the noncoding control region (CR) and its flanking genes are the only parts of the mitochondrial (mt) genome that have been modified by intragenomic rearrangements. In raptors, two noncoding regions are present: the CR has shifted to a new position with respect to the "ancestral avian gene order," whereas the pseudo-control region (PsiCR) is located at the original genomic position of the CR. As possible mechanisms for this rearrangement, duplication and transposition have been considered. During characterization of the mt gene order in Bonelli's eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus, we detected intragenomic sequence similarity between the two regions supporting the duplication hypothesis. We performed intra- and intergenomic sequence comparisons in H. fasciatus and other falconiform species to trace the evolution of the noncoding mtDNA regions in Falconiformes. We identified sections displaying different levels of similarity between the CR and PsiCR. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, we outline an evolutionary scenario of the underlying mutation events involving duplication and homogenization processes followed by sporadic deletions. Apparently, homogenization may easily occur if sufficient sequence similarity between the CR and PsiCR exists. Moreover, homogenization itself allows perpetuation of this continued equalization, unless this process is stopped by deletion. The Pandionidae and the Aquilinae seem to be the only two lineages of Falconiformes where homology between both regionsis still detectable, whereas in other raptors no similarity was found so far. In these two lineages, the process of sequence degeneration may have slowed down by homogenization events retaining high sequence similarity at least in some sections.

  2. Comparative genomics approach to detecting split-coding regions in a low-coverage genome: lessons from the chimaera Callorhinchus milii (Holocephali, Chondrichthyes).

    PubMed

    Dessimoz, Christophe; Zoller, Stefan; Manousaki, Tereza; Qiu, Huan; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2011-09-01

    Recent development of deep sequencing technologies has facilitated de novo genome sequencing projects, now conducted even by individual laboratories. However, this will yield more and more genome sequences that are not well assembled, and will hinder thorough annotation when no closely related reference genome is available. One of the challenging issues is the identification of protein-coding sequences split into multiple unassembled genomic segments, which can confound orthology assignment and various laboratory experiments requiring the identification of individual genes. In this study, using the genome of a cartilaginous fish, Callorhinchus milii, as test case, we performed gene prediction using a model specifically trained for this genome. We implemented an algorithm, designated ESPRIT, to identify possible linkages between multiple protein-coding portions derived from a single genomic locus split into multiple unassembled genomic segments. We developed a validation framework based on an artificially fragmented human genome, improvements between early and recent mouse genome assemblies, comparison with experimentally validated sequences from GenBank, and phylogenetic analyses. Our strategy provided insights into practical solutions for efficient annotation of only partially sequenced (low-coverage) genomes. To our knowledge, our study is the first formulation of a method to link unassembled genomic segments based on proteomes of relatively distantly related species as references.

  3. A computational tool for the genomic identification of regions of unusual compositional properties and its utilization in the detection of horizontally transferred sequences.

    PubMed

    Putonti, Catherine; Luo, Yi; Katili, Charles; Chumakov, Sergey; Fox, George E; Graur, Dan; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2006-10-01

    Similarity Plot (S-plot) is a Windows-based application for large-scale comparisons and 2-dimensional visualization of compositional similarities between genomic sequences. This application combines 2 approaches widely used in genomics: window analysis of statistical characteristics along genomes and dot-plot visual representation. S-plot is effective in identifying highly similar regions between genomes as well as regions with unusual compositional properties (RUCPs) within a single genome, which may be indicative of horizontal gene transfer or of locus-specific selective forces. We use S-plot to identify regions that may have originated through horizontal gene transfer through a 2-step approach, by first comparing a genomic sequence to itself and, subsequently, comparing it to the genomic sequence of a closely related taxon. Moreover, by comparing these suspect sequences to one another, we can estimate a minimum number of sources for these putative xenologous sequences. We illustrate the uses of S-plot in a comparison involving Escherichia coli K12 and E. coli O157:H7. In O157:H7, we found 145 regions that have most probably originated through horizontal gene transfer. By using S-plot to compare each of these regions with 277 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, 1 sequence was found to have similar compositional properties to the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genome, indicating a transfer from a Yersinia or Yersinia relative. Based upon our analysis of RUCPs in O157:H7, we infer that there were at least 53 sources of horizontally transferred sequences.

  4. PIXE analysis of elements in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qixin; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Lingnuo; Xu, Yongling; Ye, Simao

    1990-04-01

    The elemental regional distributions in 20 resected human stomach tissues were obtained using PIXE analysis. The samples were pathologically divided into four types: normal, adjacent mucosa A, adjacent mucosa B and cancer. The targets for PIXE analysis were prepared by wet digestion with a pressure bomb system. P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se were measured and statistically analysed. We found significantly higher concentrations of P, K, Cu, Zn and a higher ratio of Cu compared to Zn in cancer tissue as compared with normal tissue, but statistically no significant difference between adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue was found.

  5. Varied interactions between proviruses and adjacent host chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, K F; Groudine, M

    1986-01-01

    Retroviruses integrated at unique locations in the host genome can be expressed at different levels. We have analyzed the preintegration sites of three transcriptionally competent avian endogenous proviruses (evs) to determine whether the various levels of provirus expression correlate with their location in active or inactive regions of chromatin. Our results show that in three of four cell types, the chromatin conformation (as defined by relative nuclease sensitivity) of virus preintegration sites correlates with the level of expression of the resident provirus in ev+ cells: two inactive proviruses (ev-1 and ev-2) reside in nuclease-resistant chromatin domains and one active provirus (ev-3) resides in a nuclease-sensitive domain. Nuclear runoff transcription assays reveal that the preintegration sites of the active and inactive viruses are not transcribed. However, in erythrocytes of 15-day-old chicken embryos (15d RBCs), the structure and activity of the ev-3 provirus is independent of the conformation of its preintegration site. In this cell type, the ev-3 preintegration site is organized in a nuclease-resistant conformation, while the ev-3 provirus is in a nuclease-sensitive conformation and is transcribed. In addition, the nuclease sensitivity of host sequences adjacent to ev-3 is altered in ev-3+ 15d RBCs relative to that found in 15d RBCs that lack ev-3. These data suggest that the relationship between preintegration site structure and retrovirus expression is more complex than previously described. Images PMID:3025623

  6. Structural and Functional Divergence of a 1-Mb Duplicated Region in the Soybean (Glycine max) Genome and Comparison to an Orthologous Region from Phaseolus vulgaris[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jer-Young; Stupar, Robert M.; Hans, Christian; Hyten, David L.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) has undergone at least two rounds of polyploidization, resulting in a paleopolyploid genome that is a mosaic of homoeologous regions. To determine the structural and functional impact of these duplications, we sequenced two ~1-Mb homoeologous regions of soybean, Gm8 and Gm15, derived from the most recent ~13 million year duplication event and the orthologous region from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), Pv5. We observed inversions leading to major structural variation and a bias between the two chromosome segments as Gm15 experienced more gene movement (gene retention rate of 81% in Gm15 versus 91% in Gm8) and a nearly twofold increase in the deletion of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons via solo LTR formation. Functional analyses of Gm15 and Gm8 revealed decreases in gene expression and synonymous substitution rates for Gm15, for instance, a 38% increase in transcript levels from Gm8 relative to Gm15. Transcriptional divergence of homoeologs was found based on expression patterns among seven tissues and developmental stages. Our results indicate asymmetric evolution between homoeologous regions of soybean as evidenced by structural changes and expression variances of homoeologous genes. PMID:20729383

  7. Genome-Wide Mapping of 5mC and 5hmC Identified Differentially Modified Genomic Regions in Late-Onset Severe Preeclampsia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lisha; Lv, Ruitu; Kong, Lingchun; Cheng, Haidong; Lan, Fei; Li, Xiaotian

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. However, as a common form of PE, the etiology of late-onset PE is elusive. We analyzed 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) levels in the placentas of late-onset severe PE patients (n = 4) and normal controls (n = 4) using a (hydroxy)methylated DNA immunoprecipitation approach combined with deep sequencing ([h]MeDIP-seq), and the results were verified by (h)MeDIP-qPCR. The most significant differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were verified by MassARRAY EppiTYPER in an enlarged sample size (n = 20). Bioinformatics analysis identified 714 peaks of 5mC that were associated with 403 genes and 119 peaks of 5hmC that were associated with 61 genes, thus showing significant differences between the PE patients and the controls (>2-fold, p<0.05). Further, only one gene, PTPRN2, had both 5mC and 5hmC changes in patients. The ErbB signaling pathway was enriched in those 403 genes that had significantly different5mC level between the groups. This genome-wide mapping of 5mC and 5hmC in late-onset severe PE and normal controls demonstrates that both 5mC and 5hmC play epigenetic roles in the regulation of the disease, but work independently. We reveal the genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation and DNA hydroxymethylation in late-onset PE placentas for the first time, and the identified ErbB signaling pathway and the gene PTPRN2 may be relevant to the epigenetic pathogenesis of late-onset PE. PMID:26214307

  8. Genomic regions of pufferfishes responsible for host specificity of a monogenean parasite, Heterobothrium okamotoi.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Sho; Kido, Shinichi; Hirabayashi, Yo; Kai, Wataru; Kinami, Ryuhei; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuo; Suetake, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Yuzuru

    2013-10-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying host specificity of parasitic infections are largely unknown. After hatching, the larvae of the monogenean parasite, Heterobothrium okamotoi, attach to the gill filaments of hosts and the post-larval worms develop there by consuming nutrients from the host. The susceptibility to H. okamotoi infection differs markedly among fish species. While this parasite can grow on tiger pufferfish (also called fugu), Takifugu rubripes, it appears to be rejected by a close congener, grass pufferfish, Takifugu niphobles, after initial attachment to the gills. To determine the genetic architecture of the pufferfish responsible for this host specificity, we performed genome-wide quantitative trait loci analysis. We raised second generation (F2) hybrids of the two pufferfish species and experimentally infected them with the monogenean in vivo. To assess possible differences in host mechanisms between early and later periods of infection, we sampled fish three h and 21days after exposure. Genome scanning of fish from the 3h infection trial revealed suggestive quantitative trait loci on linkage groups 2 and 14, which affected the number of parasites on the gill. However, analysis of fish 21days p.i. detected a significant quantitative trait locus on linkage group 9 and three other suggestive quantitative trait loci on linkage groups 7, 18 and 22. These results indicated the polygenic nature of the host mechanisms involved in the infection/rejection of H. okamotoi. Moreover the analyses suggested that host factors may play a more important role during the growth period of the parasite than during initial host recognition at the time of attachment. Within the 95% confidence interval of the linkage group 9 quantitative trait locus in the fugu genome, there were 214 annotated protein-coding genes, including immunity-related genes such as Irak4, Muc2 and Muc5ac.

  9. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused by homozygous genomic deletion in the PSORS1 region encompassing the CDSN gene.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Furio, Laetitia; Igawa, Satomi; Honma, Masaru; Tron, Elodie; Malan, Valerie; Murakami, Masamoto; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) type B is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by lifelong widespread, reddish peeling of the skin with pruritus. The disease is caused by small-scale mutations in the Corneodesmosin gene (CDSN) leading to premature termination codons. We report for the first time a Japanese case resulting from complete deletion of CDSN. Corneodesmosin was undetectable in the epidermis, and CDSN was unamplifiable by PCR. QMPSF analysis demonstrated deletion of CDSN exons inherited from each parent. Deletion mapping using microsatellite haplotyping, CGH array and PCR analysis established that the genomic deletion spanned 49-72 kb between HCG22 and TCF19, removing CDSN as well as five other genes within the psoriasis susceptibility region 1 (PSORS1) on 6p21.33. This observation widens the spectrum of molecular defects underlying PSS type B and shows that loss of these five genes from the PSORS1 region does not result in an additional cutaneous phenotype.

  10. Segment-Wise Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies a Candidate Region Associated with Schizophrenia in Three Independent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Breuer, René; Schulze, Thomas G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Levinson, Douglas; Shi, Jianxin; Gejman, Pablo V.; Cichon, Sven; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that variation in complex disorders (e.g., schizophrenia) is explained by a large number of genetic variants with small effect size (Odds Ratio∼1.05–1.1). The statistical power to detect these genetic variants in Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies with large numbers of cases and controls (∼15,000) is still low. As it will be difficult to further increase sample size, we decided to explore an alternative method for analyzing GWA data in a study of schizophrenia, dramatically reducing the number of statistical tests. The underlying hypothesis was that at least some of the genetic variants related to a common outcome are collocated in segments of chromosomes at a wider scale than single genes. Our approach was therefore to study the association between relatively large segments of DNA and disease status. An association test was performed for each SNP and the number of nominally significant tests in a segment was counted. We then performed a permutation-based binomial test to determine whether this region contained significantly more nominally significant SNPs than expected under the null hypothesis of no association, taking linkage into account. Genome Wide Association data of three independent schizophrenia case/control cohorts with European ancestry (Dutch, German, and US) using segments of DNA with variable length (2 to 32 Mbp) was analyzed. Using this approach we identified a region at chromosome 5q23.3-q31.3 (128–160 Mbp) that was significantly enriched with nominally associated SNPs in three independent case-control samples. We conclude that considering relatively wide segments of chromosomes may reveal reliable relationships between the genome and schizophrenia, suggesting novel methodological possibilities as well as raising theoretical questions. PMID:22723893

  11. Unique and conserved genome regions in Vibrio harveyi and related species in comparison with the shrimp pathogen Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Valles, Iliana; Vora, Gary J; Lin, Baochuan; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; González-Castillo, Adrián; Ussery, Dave; Høj, Lone; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792 is a marine bacterial strain that causes mortality in farmed shrimp in north-west Mexico, and the identification of virulence genes in this strain is important for understanding its pathogenicity. The aim of this work was to compare the V. harveyi CAIM 1792 genome with related genome sequences to determine their phylogenic relationship and explore unique regions in silico that differentiate this strain from other V. harveyi strains. Twenty-one newly sequenced genomes were compared in silico against the CAIM 1792 genome at nucleotidic and predicted proteome levels. The proteome of CAIM 1792 had higher similarity to those of other V. harveyi strains (78%) than to those of the other closely related species Vibrio owensii (67%), Vibrio rotiferianus (63%) and Vibrio campbellii (59%). Pan-genome ORFans trees showed the best fit with the accepted phylogeny based on DNA-DNA hybridization and multi-locus sequence analysis of 11 concatenated housekeeping genes. SNP analysis clustered 34/38 genomes within their accepted species. The pangenomic and SNP trees showed that V. harveyi is the most conserved of the four species studied and V. campbellii may be divided into at least three subspecies, supported by intergenomic distance analysis. blastp atlases were created to identify unique regions among the genomes most related to V. harveyi CAIM 1792; these regions included genes encoding glycosyltransferases, specific type restriction modification systems and a transcriptional regulator, LysR, reported to be involved in virulence, metabolism, quorum sensing and motility.

  12. Analysis of the Escherichia coli genome VI: DNA sequence of the region from 92.8 through 100 minutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burland, V; Plunkett, G; Sofia, H J; Daniels, D L; Blattner, F R

    1995-01-01

    The 338.5 kb of the Escherichia coli genome described here together with previously described segments bring the total of contiguous finished sequence of this genome to > 1 Mb. Of 319 open reading frames (ORFs) found in this 338.5 kb segment, 147 (46%) are potential new genes. The positions of several genes which had been previously located here by mapping or partial sequencing have been confirmed. Several ORFs have functions suggested by similarities to other characterised genes but cannot be assigned with certainty. Fifteen of the ORFs of unknown function had been previously sequenced. Eight transfer RNAs are encoded in the region and there are two grey holes in which no features were found. The attachment site for phage P4 and three insertion sequences were located. The region was also analysed for chi sites, bend sites, REP elements and other repeats. A computer search identified potential promoters and tentative transcription units were assigned. The occurrence of the rare tetramer CTAG was analysed in 1.6 Mb of contiguous E.coli sequence. Hypotheses addressing the rarity and distribution of CTAG are discussed. PMID:7610040

  13. Prospection of genomic regions divergently selected in racing line of Quarter Horses in relation to cutting line.

    PubMed

    Meira, C T; Curi, R A; Farah, M M; de Oliveira, H N; Béltran, N A R; Silva, J A V; Mota, M D S da

    2014-11-01

    Selection of Quarter Horses for different purposes has led to the formation of lines, including racing and cutting horses. The objective of this study was to identify genomic regions divergently selected in racing line of Quarter Horses in relation to cutting line applying relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH) analysis, an extension of extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) analysis, and the fixation index (F ST) statistic. A total of 188 horses of both sexes, born between 1985 and 2009 and registered at the Brazilian Association of Quarter Horse Breeders, including 120 of the racing line and 68 of the cutting line, were genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. On the basis of 27 genomic regions identified as selection signatures by REHH and F ST statistics, functional annotations of genes were made in order to identify those that could have been important during formation of the racing line and that could be used subsequently for the development of selection tools. Genes involved in muscle growth (n=8), skeletal growth (n=10), muscle energy metabolism (n=15), cardiovascular system (n=14) and nervous system (n=23) were identified, including the FKTN, INSR, GYS1, CLCN1, MYLK, SYK, ANG, CNTFR and HTR2B.

  14. Whole Genome Comparisons Suggest Random Distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans Genotypes in a Buruli Ulcer Endemic Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ablordey, Anthony S.; Vandelannoote, Koen; Frimpong, Isaac A.; Ahortor, Evans K.; Amissah, Nana Ama; Eddyani, Miriam; Durnez, Lies; Portaels, Françoise; de Jong, Bouke C.; Leirs, Herwig; Porter, Jessica L.; Mangas, Kirstie M.; Lam, Margaret M. C.; Buultjens, Andrew; Seemann, Torsten; Tobias, Nicholas J.; Stinear, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to control the spread of Buruli ulcer – an emerging ulcerative skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans - have been hampered by our poor understanding of reservoirs and transmission. To help address this issue, we compared whole genomes from 18 clinical M. ulcerans isolates from a 30km2 region within the Asante Akim North District, Ashanti region, Ghana, with 15 other M. ulcerans isolates from elsewhere in Ghana and the surrounding countries of Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Contrary to our expectations of finding minor DNA sequence variations among isolates representing a single M. ulcerans circulating genotype, we found instead two distinct genotypes. One genotype was closely related to isolates from neighbouring regions of Amansie West and Densu, consistent with the predicted local endemic clone, but the second genotype (separated by 138 single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] from other Ghanaian strains) most closely matched M. ulcerans from Nigeria, suggesting another introduction of M. ulcerans to Ghana, perhaps from that country. Both the exotic genotype and the local Ghanaian genotype displayed highly restricted intra-strain genetic variation, with less than 50 SNP differences across a 5.2Mbp core genome within each genotype. Interestingly, there was no discernible spatial clustering of genotypes at the local village scale. Interviews revealed no obvious epidemiological links among BU patients who had been infected with identical M. ulcerans genotypes but lived in geographically separate villages. We conclude that M. ulcerans is spread widely across the region, with multiple genotypes present in any one area. These data give us new perspectives on the behaviour of possible reservoirs and subsequent transmission mechanisms of M. ulcerans. These observations also show for the first time that M. ulcerans can be mobilized, introduced to a new area and then spread within a population. Potential reservoirs of M. ulcerans thus might include

  15. Evaluation of Apis mellifera syriaca Levant Region honeybee conservation using Comparative Genome Hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apis mellifera syriaca is the native honeybee subspecies of Jordan and much of the Levant Region. It expresses behavioral adaptations to a regional climate with very high temperatures, nectar dearth in summer, attacks of the Oriental wasp and is resistant to Varroa mites. The A. m. syriaca control r...

  16. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome.

    PubMed

    Beh, Leslie Y; Müller, Manuel M; Muir, Tom W; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F

    2015-11-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these "seed" nucleosomes--together with trans-acting factors--may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences.

  17. Population genomic tests of models of adaptive radiation in Lake Victoria region cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Bezault, Etienne; Mwaiko, Salome; Seehausen, Ole

    2011-12-01

    Adaptive radiation is usually thought to be associated with speciation, but the evolution of intraspecific polymorphisms without speciation is also possible. The radiation of cichlid fish in Lake Victoria (LV) is perhaps the most impressive example of a recent rapid adaptive radiation, with 600+ very young species. Key questions about its origin remain poorly characterized, such as the importance of speciation versus polymorphism, whether species persist on evolutionary time scales, and if speciation happens more commonly in small isolated or in large connected populations. We used 320 individuals from 105 putative species from Lakes Victoria, Edward, Kivu, Albert, Nabugabo and Saka, in a radiation-wide amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genome scan to address some of these questions. We demonstrate pervasive signatures of speciation supporting the classical model of adaptive radiation associated with speciation. A positive relationship between the age of lakes and the average genomic differentiation of their species, and a significant fraction of molecular variance explained by above-species level taxonomy suggest the persistence of species on evolutionary time scales, with radiation through sequential speciation rather than a single starburst. Finally the large gene diversity retained from colonization to individual species in every radiation suggests large effective population sizes and makes speciation in small geographical isolates unlikely.

  18. The Genomic Ancestry of Individuals from Different Geographical Regions of Brazil Is More Uniform Than Expected

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Di Pietro, Giuliano; Fuchshuber-Moraes, Mateus; Genro, Julia Pasqualini; Hutz, Mara H.; Kehdy, Fernanda de Souza Gomes; Kohlrausch, Fabiana; Magno, Luiz Alexandre Viana; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Moraes, Manoel Odorico; de Moraes, Maria Elisabete Amaral; de Moraes, Milene Raiol; Ojopi, Élida B.; Perini, Jamila A.; Racciopi, Clarice; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos; Rios-Santos, Fabrício; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    Based on pre-DNA racial/color methodology, clinical and pharmacological trials have traditionally considered the different geographical regions of Brazil as being very heterogeneous. We wished to ascertain how such diversity of regional color categories correlated with ancestry. Using a panel of 40 validated ancestry-informative insertion-deletion DNA polymorphisms we estimated individually the European, African and Amerindian ancestry components of 934 self-categorized White, Brown or Black Brazilians from the four most populous regions of the Country. We unraveled great ancestral diversity between and within the different regions. Especially, color categories in the northern part of Brazil diverged significantly in their ancestry proportions from their counterparts in the southern part of the Country, indicating that diverse regional semantics were being used in the self-classification as White, Brown or Black. To circumvent these regional subjective differences in color perception, we estimated the general ancestry proportions of each of the four regions in a form independent of color considerations. For that, we multiplied the proportions of a given ancestry in a given color category by the official census information about the proportion of that color category in the specific region, to arrive at a “total ancestry” estimate. Once such a calculation was performed, there emerged a much higher level of uniformity than previously expected. In all regions studied, the European ancestry was predominant, with proportions ranging from 60.6% in the Northeast to 77.7% in the South. We propose that the immigration of six million Europeans to Brazil in the 19th and 20th centuries - a phenomenon described and intended as the “whitening of Brazil” - is in large part responsible for dissipating previous ancestry dissimilarities that reflected region-specific population histories. These findings, of both clinical and sociological importance for Brazil, should also be

  19. Analysis of the nonstructural and structural polyprotein regions, and complete genome sequences of Israel acute paralysis viruses identified from honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Kim, Young-Ha; Yoo, Mi Sun; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Jung, Suk-Chan; Quyen, Dong Van; Kang, Seung-Won

    2013-09-01

    Phylogenetic trees were constructed for 24 partial nucleotide sequences of the nonstructural polyprotein (ORF1) and structural polyprotein regions (ORF2) of Korean IAPV genotypes, as well as eight previously reported IAPV sequences from various countries. Most of the Korean genotypes formed a distinct cluster, separate from other country genotypes. To investigate this phenomenon in more detail, three complete IAPV genome sequences were identified from different regions in Korea, i.e., Korea1, Korea2, and Korea3. These sequences were aligned with eight previously reported complete genome sequences and various genome regions were compared. The Korean IAPVs were very similar to those from China and Israel, but highly diverged from USA and Australian genotypes. Interestingly, they showed greater variability than the USA and Australian genotypes in ORF1, but highly similar to the Australian genotype in the ORF2 region. Thus, genetic recombination may account for the spatial distance between the Korean IAPV genotypes and those from other countries.

  20. QTL mapping in white spruce: gene maps and genomic regions underlying adaptive traits across pedigrees, years and environments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genomic architecture of bud phenology and height growth remains poorly known in most forest trees. In non model species, QTL studies have shown limited application because most often QTL data could not be validated from one experiment to another. The aim of our study was to overcome this limitation by basing QTL detection on the construction of genetic maps highly-enriched in gene markers, and by assessing QTLs across pedigrees, years, and environments. Results Four saturated individual linkage maps representing two unrelated mapping populations of 260 and 500 clonally replicated progeny were assembled from 471 to 570 markers, including from 283 to 451 gene SNPs obtained using a multiplexed genotyping assay. Thence, a composite linkage map was assembled with 836 gene markers. For individual linkage maps, a total of 33 distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were observed for bud flush, 52 for bud set, and 52 for height growth. For the composite map, the corresponding numbers of QTL clusters were 11, 13, and 10. About 20% of QTLs were replicated between the two mapping populations and nearly 50% revealed spatial and/or temporal stability. Three to four occurrences of overlapping QTLs between characters were noted, indicating regions with potential pleiotropic effects. Moreover, some of the genes involved in the QTLs were also underlined by recent genome scans or expression profile studies. Overall, the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by each QTL ranged from 3.0 to 16.4% for bud flush, from 2.7 to 22.2% for bud set, and from 2.5 to 10.5% for height growth. Up to 70% of the total character variance could be accounted for by QTLs for bud flush or bud set, and up to 59% for height growth. Conclusions This study provides a basic understanding of the genomic architecture related to bud flush, bud set, and height growth in a conifer species, and a useful indicator to compare with Angiosperms. It will serve as a basic reference to functional and

  1. 3. 6-Mb genomic and YAC physical map of the Down syndrome chromosome region on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne-Zacharia, M.C.; Dahmane, N.; Theophile, D.; Orti, R.; Chettouh, Z.; Sinet, P.M.; Delabar, J.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The Down syndrome chromosome region (DCR) on chromosome 21 has been shown to contain a gene(s) important in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. The authors constructed a long-range restriction map of the D21S55-D21S65 region covering the proximal part of the DCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of lymphocyte DNA digested with three rare cutting enzymes, NotI, NruI, and Mlu1, was used to establish two physical linkage groups of 5 and 7 markers, respectively, spanning 4.6 Mb on the NotI map. Mapping analysis of 40 YACs allowed the selection of 13 YACs covering 95% of the D21S55-D21S65 region and spanning 3.6 Mb. The restriction maps of these YACs and their positioning on the genomic map allowed 19 markers to be ordered, including 4 NotI linking clones, 9 polymorphic markers, the CBR gene, and the AML1 gene. The distances between markers could also be estimated. This physical map and the location of eight NotI sites between D21S55 and D21S17 should facilitate the isolation of previously unidentified genes in this region. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Rearrangements of archetypal regulatory regions in JC virus genomes from urine.

    PubMed

    Agostini, H T; Ryschkewitsch, C F; Stoner, G L

    1998-01-01

    The regulatory region of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-type JC virus (JCV) is rearranged in each host by a process of deletion and duplication. Of the more than 40 that have been examined, no two regulatory regions have been rearranged identically in the brain. The substrate for this rearrangement appears to be a highly stable archetypal regulatory region excreted in the urine. Its role as the transmissible form of the virus, although inferred, has never been proven. We have now amplified by PCR and cycle-sequenced the regulatory regions from 48 urinary strains of the virus. We find that the urinary form of the regulatory region is not entirely stable. Short deletions and duplications in the range of 2-16 bp were observed in seven of these strains. One of these, an inverted repeat, is a pattern of rearrangement not yet found in the brain. Two others (#208 and 230) showed a 2-bp deletion at position nos. 221 and 222, and an unusual mutation at position no. 219. These two urines were collected in different states of the USA at different times and analysed months apart. It is very unlikely that these unusual changes represent sample contamination or that they arose independently. This finding indicates that archetypal forms of the JCV regulatory region are infectious, despite their relative inactivity in tissue culture. While changes in the archetypal structure can be found, it is clear that rearrangements in the kidney are rare or rarely infectious.

  3. Genesis of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus: sequence analysis reveals recombination points and potential leukaemogenic determinant on parental leukaemia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, J D; Connor, J; Avery, R J

    1984-01-01

    The genome of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus was formed by recombination between Kirsten murine leukaemia virus sequences, and rat sequences derived from a retrovirus-like '30S' (VL30) genetic element encompassing the Kras oncogene. Using cloned DNAs we have determined the nucleotide sequences of the long terminal repeats and adjacent regions, extending across the points of recombination on the sarcoma and leukaemia virus genomes. Our results suggest that discrete regions of homology and other cryptic sequence features, may have constituted recombinational hot-spots involved in the genesis of the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus genome. We have also compared the sequence of the Kirsten murine leukaemia virus p15 env and adjacent long terminal repeat with the corresponding regions of the AKV and Gross A murine leukaemia virus genomes. This comparison has identified a leukaemogenic determinant in the U3 domain of the long terminal repeat, possibly within a enhancer-like sequence element. PMID:6091040

  4. Evidence that the large noncoding sequence is the main control region of maternally and paternally transmitted mitochondrial genomes of the marine mussel (Mytilus spp.).

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liqin; Kenchington, Ellen; Zouros, Eleftherios; Rodakis, George C

    2004-01-01

    Both the maternal (F-type) and paternal (M-type) mitochondrial genomes of the Mytilus species complex M. edulis/galloprovincialis contain a noncoding sequence between the l-rRNA and the tRNA(Tyr) genes, here called the large unassigned region (LUR). The LUR, which is shorter in M genomes, is capable of forming secondary structures and contains motifs of significant sequence similarity with elements known to have specific functions in the sea urchin and the mammalian control region. Such features are not present in other noncoding regions of the F or M Mytilus mtDNA. The LUR can be divided on the basis of indels and nucleotide variation in three domains, which is reminiscent of the tripartite structure of the mammalian control region. These features suggest that the LUR is the main control region of the Mytilus mitochondrial genome. The middle domain has diverged by only 1.5% between F and M genomes, while the average divergence over the whole molecule is approximately 20%. In contrast, the first domain is among the most divergent parts of the genome. This suggests that different parts of the LUR are under different selection constraints that are also different from those acting on the coding parts of the molecule. PMID:15238532

  5. Identification and characterization of genomic regions on chromosomes 4 and 8 that control the rate of photosynthesis in rice leaves.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Yukiko; Nito, Naoko; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Toshio; Ebitani, Takeshi; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2011-03-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection appears to be a promising strategy for improving rates of leaf photosynthesis in rice. The rate of leaf photosynthesis was significantly higher in a high-yielding indica variety, Habataki, than in the most popular Japanese variety, Koshihikari, at the full heading stage as a result of the higher level of leaf nitrogen at the same rate of application of nitrogen and the higher stomatal conductance even when the respective levels of leaf nitrogen were the same. The higher leaf nitrogen content of Habataki was caused by the greater accumulation of nitrogen by plants. The higher stomatal conductance of Habataki was caused by the higher hydraulic conductance. Using progeny populations and selected lines derived from a cross between Koshihikari and Habataki, it was possible to identify the genomic regions responsible for the rate of photosynthesis within a 2.1 Mb region between RM17459 and RM17552 and within a 1.2 Mb region between RM6999 and RM22529 on the long arm of chromosome 4 and on the short arm of chromosome 8, respectively. The designated region on chromosome 4 of Habataki was responsible for both the increase in the nitrogen content of leaves and hydraulic conductance in the plant by increasing the root surface area. The designated region on chromosome 8 of Habataki was responsible for the increase in hydraulic conductance by increasing the root hydraulic conductivity. The results suggest that it may be possible to improve photosynthesis in rice leaves by marker-assisted selection that focuses on these regions of chromosomes 4 and 8.

  6. Reselection of a genomic upstream open reading frame in mouse hepatitis coronavirus 5'-untranslated-region mutants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Su, Yu-Pin; Fan, Yi-Hsin; Brian, David A

    2014-01-01

    An AUG-initiated upstream open reading frame (uORF) encoding a potential polypeptide of 3 to 13 amino acids (aa) is found within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of >75% of coronavirus genomes based on 38 reference strains. Potential CUG-initiated uORFs are also found in many strains. The AUG-initiated uORF is presumably translated following genomic 5'-end cap-dependent ribosomal scanning, but its function is unknown. Here, in a reverse-genetics study with mouse hepatitis coronavirus, the following were observed. (i) When the uORF AUG-initiating codon was replaced with a UAG stop codon along with a U112A mutation to maintain a uORF-harboring stem-loop 4 structure, an unimpaired virus with wild-type (WT) growth kinetics was recovered. However, reversion was found at all mutated sites within five virus passages. (ii) When the uORF was fused with genomic (main) ORF1 by converting three in-frame stop codons to nonstop codons, a uORF-ORF1 fusion protein was made, and virus replicated at WT levels. However, a frameshifting G insertion at virus passage 7 established a slightly 5'-extended original uORF. (iii) When uAUG-eliminating deletions of 20, 30, or 51 nucleotides (nt) were made within stem-loop 4, viable but debilitated virus was recovered. However, a C80U mutation in the first mutant and an A77G mutation in the second appeared by passage 10, which generated alternate uORFs that correlated with restored WT growth kinetics. In vitro, the uORF-disrupting nondeletion mutants showed enhanced translation of the downstream ORF1 compared with the WT. These results together suggest that the uORF represses ORF1 translation yet plays a beneficial but nonessential role in coronavirus replication in cell culture.

  7. An Effective Counterselection System for Listeria monocytogenes and Its Use To Characterize the Monocin Genomic Region of Strain 10403S.

    PubMed

    Argov, Tal; Rabinovich, Lev; Sigal, Nadejda; Herskovits, Anat A

    2017-03-15

    Construction of Listeria monocytogenes mutants by allelic exchange has been laborious and time-consuming due to lack of proficient selection markers for the final recombination event, that is, a marker conveying substance sensitivity to the bacteria bearing it, enabling the exclusion of merodiploids and selection for plasmid loss. In order to address this issue, we engineered a counterselection marker based on a mutated phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase gene (pheS*). This mutation renders the phenylalanine-binding site of the enzyme more promiscuous and allows the binding of the toxic p-chloro-phenylalanine analog (p-Cl-phe) as a substrate. When pheS* is introduced into L. monocytogenes and highly expressed under control of a constitutively active promoter, the bacteria become sensitive to p-Cl-phe supplemented in the medium. This enabled us to utilize pheS* as a negative selection marker and generate a novel, efficient suicide vector for allelic exchange in L. monocytogenes We used this vector to investigate the monocin genomic region in L. monocytogenes strain 10403S by constructing deletion mutants of the region. We have found this region to be active and to cause bacterial lysis upon mitomycin C treatment. The future applications of such an effective counterselection system, which does not require any background genomic alterations, are vast, as it can be modularly used in various selection systems (e.g., genetic screens). We expect this counterselection marker to be a valuable genetic tool in research on L. monocytogenesIMPORTANCEL. monocytogenes is an opportunistic intracellular pathogen and a widely studied model organism. An efficient counterselection marker is a long-standing need in Listeria research for improving the ability to design and perform various genetic manipulations and screening systems for different purposes. We report the construction and utilization of an efficient suicide vector for allelic exchange which can be conjugated, leaves no marker in

  8. Identification of markers linked to disease-resistance genes by bulked segregant analysis: a rapid method to detect markers in specific genomic regions by using segregating populations.

    PubMed Central

    Michelmore, R W; Paran, I; Kesseli, R V

    1991-01-01

    We developed bulked segregant analysis as a method for rapidly identifying markers linked to any specific gene or genomic region. Two bulked DNA samples are generated from a segregating population from a single cross. Each pool, or bulk, contains individuals that are identical for a particular trait or genomic region but arbitrary at all unlinked regions. The two bulks are therefore genetically dissimilar in the selected region but seemingly heterozygous at all other regions. The two bulks can be made for any genomic region and from any segregating population. The bulks are screened for differences using restriction fragment length polymorphism probes or random amplified polymorphic DNA primers. We have used bulked segregant analysis to identify three random amplified polymorphic DNA markers in lettuce linked to a gene for resistance to downy mildew. We showed that markers can be reliably identified in a 25-centimorgan window on either side of the targeted locus. Bulked segregant analysis has several advantages over the use of near-isogenic lines to identify markers in specific regions of the genome. Genetic walking will be possible by multiple rounds of bulked segregation analysis; each new pair of bulks will differ at a locus identified in the previous round of analysis. This approach will have widespread application both in those species where selfing is possible and in those that are obligatorily outbreeding. Images PMID:1682921

  9. Genomic organization of the human PAX 3 gene: DNA sequence analysis of the region disrupted in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Macina, R.A.; Galili, N.; Riethman, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    Mutations in the human PAX3 gene have previously been associated with two distinct diseases, Waardenburg syndrome and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In this report the authors establish that the normal human PAX3 gene is encoded by 8 exons. Intron-exon boundary sequences were obtained for PAX 3 exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and together with previous work provide the complete genomic sequence organization for PAX3. Difficulties in obtaining overlapping genomic clone coverage of PAX3 were circumvented in part by RARE cleavage mapping, which showed that the entire PAX3 gene spans 100 kb of chromosome 2. Sequence analysis of the last intron of PAX3, which contains the previously mapped t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation breakpoints of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, revealed the presence of a pair of inverted Alu repeats and a pair of inverted (GT){sub n}-rich microsatellite repeats with in a 5k-kb region. This work establishes the complete structure of PAX 3 and will permit high-resolution analyses of this locus for mutations associated with Waardenburg syndrome, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, and other phenotypes for which PAX3 may be a candidate locus.31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A Gene-Oriented Haplotype Comparison Reveals Recently Selected Genomic Regions in Temperate and Tropical Maize Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Yongxiang; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Hongwei; Yang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Guoying

    2017-01-01

    The extensive genetic variation present in maize (Zea mays) germplasm makes it possible to detect signatures of positive artificial selection that occurred during temperate and tropical maize improvement. Here we report an analysis of 532,815 polymorphisms from a maize association panel consisting of 368 diverse temperate and tropical inbred lines. We developed a gene-oriented approach adapting exonic polymorphisms to identify recently selected alleles by comparing haplotypes across the maize genome. This analysis revealed evidence of selection for more than 1100 genomic regions during recent improvement, and included regulatory genes and key genes with visible mutant phenotypes. We find that selected candidate target genes in temperate maize are enriched in biosynthetic processes, and further examination of these candidates highlights two cases, sucrose flux and oil storage, in which multiple genes in a common pathway can be cooperatively selected. Finally, based on available parallel gene expression data, we hypothesize that some genes were selected for regulatory variations, resulting in altered gene expression. PMID:28099470

  11. Identification and characterization of regions of difference between the Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Gallinarum and the Salmonella Gallinarum biovar Pullorum genomes.

    PubMed

    Batista, Diego Felipe Alves; Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Oliveira, Marcos Túlio de; Almeida, Adriana Maria; Ferraudo, Antonio Sergio; Berchieri, Angelo

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella Gallinarum is the causative agent of fowl typhoid, a severe septicaemic disease that affects birds of all ages, whereas S. Pullorum causes pullorum disease, a systemic disorder affecting primarily young birds. A proportion of birds with pullorum disease become carriers and are thereby able to transmit S. Pullorum vertically. Although these two pathogens cause distinct diseases, they are otherwise phenotypically and genetically similar. Therefore, the small variations that lead to the differences in virulence must have a genetic basis which currently is unknown. In the present study, we compared the genome sequences of S. Gallinarum (strains: SG287/91 and SG9) and S. Pullorum (strains: SP_CDC, SP_RKS, SP_FCAV, SP_S06) and identified 223 regions of difference (RODs), characterized by indels which were detected by using the software Artemis Comparison Tool. Some of the RODs led to pseudogenes frequently formed by frameshifts and premature stop codons in genes primarily involved in virulence and metabolism. We further verified the presence of some conserved RODs by PCR in 26 isolates of S. Gallinarum and 17 of S. Pullorum in order to extrapolate data analyses from genome comparison to field strains. The variations observed in virulence-related genes of S. Gallinarum and S. Pullorum appear not to be sufficient to explain the differences between the distinct biology of infection of fowl typhoid and pullorum disease. Thus, we suggest that the identified pseudogenes affecting metabolism might play a greater role during infection than previously thought.

  12. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3) genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Marius; Villoing, Stephane; Rimstad, Espen; Nylund, Are

    2009-10-27

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6). Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR) of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE). Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  13. Genome-scale high-resolution mapping of activating and repressive nucleotides in regulatory regions

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Jason; Melnikov, Alexandre; Zhang, Xiaolan; Wang, Li; Rogov, Peter; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Kellis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel reporter assays (MPRA) enable nucleotide-resolution dissection of transcriptional regulatory regions, such as enhancers, but only few regions at a time. Here, we present a combined experimental and computational approach, Sharpr-MPRA, that allows high-resolution analysis of thousands of regions simultaneously. Sharpr-MPRA combines dense tiling of overlapping MPRA constructs with a probabilistic graphical model to recognize functional regulatory nucleotides, and to distinguish activating and repressive nucleotides, using their inferred contribution to reporter gene expression. We use Sharpr-MPRA to test 4.6 million nucleotides spanning 15,000 putative regulatory regions tiled at 5-nucleotide resolution in two human cell types. Our results recover known cell type-specific regulatory motifs and evolutionarily-conserved nucleotides, and distinguish known activating and repressive motifs. Our results also show that endogenous chromatin state and DNA accessibility are both predictive of regulatory function in reporter assays, identify retroviral elements with activating roles, and uncover ‘attenuator’ motifs with repressive roles in active chromatin. PMID:27701403

  14. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE.

  15. Genetic and molecular characterization of genomic regions surrounding specific loci of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations detected by the mouse specific-locus test (SLT) include multilocus deletions as well as intragenic lesions. Genetic analyses have characterized sets of presumed overlapping deletions and have mapped previously unrecognized genes to the regions surrounding each of several specific loci. Molecular entry to one of these regions, d se, was achieved by utilizing a viral integration at, or near, a marker locus. Presumed deletions were shown to be, in fact deleted for DNA sequences, and the physical map was oriented relative to the earlier functional map. Presently, a random-clone approach is being used for initiating molecular characterization of regions, which, in aggregate, span a minimum of 9 cM. Mapping to subregions already identified by functional units will facilitate the generation of comprehensive molecular maps and the identification of numerous structure-function correlations for the regions. Results of the genetic and molecular analyses of multilocus deletions have enhanced the value of the SLT by adding qualitative to quantitative capabilities. Studies of the heterozygous effects of deletions (which are the predominant lesions induced by many mutagens) provide information important to assessment of genetic risk. Long deletions are, further, providing tools for targeted mutagenesis studies that will generate information on the number of loci within segments of defined length that are capable of mutating to detectable alleles, as well as providing new mutations important for strategies of refining molecular and functional maps. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Sequence Level Analysis of Recently Duplicated Regions in the Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single recessive gene, rxp, on linkage group (LG) D2 controls bacterial leaf pustule resistance in soybean. Markers linked to rxp were used to develop BAC contigs spanning the Rxp region. We identified two homoeologous contigs (GmA and GmA’) composed of five bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC...

  17. The compact Brachypodium genome conserves centromeric regions of a common ancestor with wheat and rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of five chromosomes of Brachypodium distachyon from a 12-chromosome ancestor of all grasses by dysploidy raises an interesting question about the fate of redundant centromeres. Three independent but complementary approaches were pursued to study centromeric region homologies among the ...

  18. Computational tools and resources for prediction and analysis of gene regulatory regions in the chick genome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohsin A F; Soto-Jimenez, Luz Mayela; Howe, Timothy; Streit, Andrea; Sosinsky, Alona; Stern, Claudio D

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of cis-regulatory elements is a challenging problem in bioinformatics, owing to distal locations and context-specific roles of these elements in controlling gene regulation. Here we review the current bioinformatics methodologies and resources available for systematic discovery of cis-acting regulatory elements and conserved transcription factor binding sites in the chick genome. In addition, we propose and make available, a novel workflow using computational tools that integrate CTCF analysis to predict putative insulator elements, enhancer prediction, and TFBS analysis. To demonstrate the usefulness of this computational workflow, we then use it to analyze the locus of the gene Sox2 whose developmental expression is known to be controlled by a complex array of cis-acting regulatory elements. The workflow accurately predicts most of the experimentally verified elements along with some that have not yet been discovered. A web version of the CTCF tool, together with instructions for using the workflow can be accessed from http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/mkhan1980/ctcf_analysis. For local installation of the tool, relevant Perl scripts and instructions are provided in the directory named "code" in the supplementary materials.

  19. Comparative Genomics of the Conjugation Region of F-like Plasmids: Five Shades of F.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lopez, Raul; de Toro, Maria; Moncalian, Gabriel; Garcillan-Barcia, M Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The F plasmid is the foremost representative of a large group of conjugative plasmids, prevalent in Escherichia coli, and widely distributed among the Enterobacteriaceae. These plasmids are of clinical relevance, given their frequent association with virulence determinants, colicins, and antibiotic resistance genes. Originally defined by their sensitivity to certain male-specific phages, IncF plasmids share a conserved conjugative system and regulatory circuits. In order to determine whether the genetic architecture and regulation circuits are preserved among these plasmids, we analyzed the natural diversity of F-like plasmids. Using the relaxase as a phylogenetic marker, we identified 256 plasmids belonging to the IncF/ MOBF12group, present as complete DNA sequences in the NCBI database. By comparative