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Sample records for adjacent metal atoms

  1. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  2. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  3. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  4. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  5. Atom scattering from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W. W.

    In the initial portion of this dissertation studies of Ar scattering from Ru(0001) at thermal and hyperthermal energies are compared to calculations with classical scattering theory. These data exhibited a number of characteristics that are unusual in comparison to other systems for which atomic beam experiments have been carried out under similar conditions. The measured energy losses were unusually small. Some of the angular distributions exhibited an anomalous shoulder feature in addition to a broad peak near the specular direction and quantum mechanical diffraction was observed under conditions for which it was not expected. Many of the unusual features observed in the measurements are explained, but only upon using an effective surface mass of 2.3 Ru atomic masses, which implies collective effects in the Ru crystal. The large effective mass, because it leads to substantially larger Debye-Waller factors, explains and confirms the observations of diffraction features. It also leads to the interesting conclusion that Ru is a metal for which atomic beam scattering measurements in the purely quantum mechanical regime, where diffraction and single-phonon creation are dominant, should be possible not only with He atoms, but with many other atomic species with larger masses. A useful theoretical expression for interpreting and analyzing observed scattering intensity spectra for atomic and molecular collisions with surfaces is the differential reflection coefficient for a smooth, vibrating surface. This differential reflection coefficient depends on a parameter, usually expressed in dimensions of velocity, that arises due to correlated motions of neighboring regions of the surface and can be evaluated if the polarization vectors of the phonons near the surface are known. As a part of this dissertation experimental conditions are suggested under which this velocity paramenter may be more precisely measured than it has been in the past. Experimental data for scattering

  6. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  7. 38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. METAL WORKING TOOLS AND MACHINES ADJACENT TO THE CIRCA 1900 MICHIGAN MACHINERY MFG. CO. PUNCH PRESS NEAR THE CENTER OF THE FACTORY BUILDING. AT THE LEFT FOREGROUND IS A MOVABLE TIRE BENDER FOR SHAPING ELI WINDMILL WHEEL RIMS. AT THE CENTER IS A FLOOR-MOUNTED CIRCA 1900 SNAG GRINDER OF THE TYPE USED FOR SMOOTHING ROUGH CASTINGS. ON THE WHEELED WORK STATION IS A SUNNEN BUSHING GRINDER, BEHIND WHICH IS A TRIPOD CHAIN VICE. IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND IS A WOODEN CHEST OF DRAWERS WHICH CONTAINS A 'RAG DRAWER' STILL FILLED WITH CLOTH RAGS PLACED IN THE FACTORY BUILDING AT THE INSISTENCE OF LOUISE (MRS. ARTHUR) KREGEL FOR THE CONVENIENCE AND CLEANLINESS OF WORKERS. IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND IS A CIRCA 1900 CROSS-CUTOFF CIRCULAR SAW. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  8. Atomic oxygen effects on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, Albert T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of specimen geometry on the attack of metals by atomic oxygen is addressed. This is done by extending the coupled-currents approach in metal oxidation to spherical and cylindrical geometries. Kinetic laws are derived for the rates of oxidation of samples having these geometries. It is found that the burn-up time for spherical particles of a given diameter can be as much as a factor of 3 shorter than the time required to completely oxidize a planar sample of the same thickness.

  9. Assessment of heavy metal levels in surface sediments of estuaries and adjacent coastal areas in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Li, Deliang; Song, Guisheng

    2016-05-01

    This article investigates the variations of contamination levels of heavy metals such as copper, lead, chromium, cadmium, zinc, arsenic, and mercury over time in surface sediments of the Changjiang River Estuary (CRE), Yellow River Estuary (YRE), Pearl River Estuary (PRE), and their adjacent coastal areas in China. The contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and geoaccumulation index (I geo) are used to evaluate the quality of the surface sediments in the study areas. The results showed that the CRE, YRE, and their adjacent coastal areas were at a low risk of contamination in terms of heavy metals, while the PRE and its adjacent coastal area were at a moderate level. By comparison, the concentrations of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the YRE and its adjacent coastal area were relatively lower than those in the CRE, PRE, and their adjacent coastal areas.

  10. Atomic Dynamics in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Levashov, Valentin A; Aga, Rachel S; Morris, James R

    2007-01-01

    How atoms move in metallic glasses and liquids is an important question in discussing atomic transport, glass formation, structural relaxation and other properties of metallic glasses. While the concept of free-volume has long been used in describing atomic transport, computer simulations and isotope measurements have shown that atomic transport occurs by a much more collective process than assumed in the free-volume theory. We introduce a new approach to describe the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses, in terms of local energy landscapes related to fluctuations in the topology of atomic connectivity. This approach may form the basis for a new paradigm for discussing the structure-properties relationship in metallic glasses.

  11. Long-Term Retention of an Intraorbital Metallic Foreign Body Adjacent to the Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Andrew N.; Deng, Jie; Miller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic 47 year-old male patient who suffered a penetrating wound from a metallic foreign body that became embedded adjacent to the optic nerve for over thirty years, as well as the associated examination, imaging, and fundus photography. Intraorbital metallic foreign bodies can be well tolerated and may not require surgical intervention despite proximity to important structures.

  12. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  13. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  14. Ultrahigh stability of atomically thin metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, C. R.; Huang, K. Q.; Zhao, N. J.; Sun, Y. T.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, L. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Zheng, D. N. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Wang, W. H. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-07-07

    We report the fabrication and study of thermal stability of atomically thin ZrCu-based metallic glass films. The ultrathin films exhibit striking dynamic properties, ultrahigh thermal stability, and unique crystallization behavior with discrete crystalline nanoparticles sizes. The mechanisms for the remarkable high stability and crystallization behaviors are attributed to the dewetting process of the ultrathin film. We demonstrated a promising avenue for understanding some fundamental issues such as glassy structure, crystallization, deformation, and glass formation through atomic resolution imaging of the two dimensional like metallic glasses.

  15. Fabrication of crystals from single metal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Nicolas P. E.; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Sanchez, Ana M.; Dove, Andrew P.; Procter, Richard J.; Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J.; Kirby, Nigel; Hands-Portman, Ian; Smith, Corinne J.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.; Beanland, Richard; Sadler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanocrystals offer new concepts for the design of nanodevices with a range of potential applications. Currently the formation of metal nanocrystals cannot be controlled at the level of individual atoms. Here we describe a new general method for the fabrication of multi-heteroatom-doped graphitic matrices decorated with very small, ångström-sized, three-dimensional (3D)-metal crystals of defined size. We irradiate boron-rich precious-metal-encapsulated self-spreading polymer micelles with electrons and produce, in real time, a doped graphitic support on which individual osmium atoms hop and migrate to form 3D-nanocrystals, as small as 15 Å in diameter, within 1 h. Crystal growth can be observed, quantified and controlled in real time. We also synthesize the first examples of mixed ruthenium–osmium 3D-nanocrystals. This technology not only allows the production of ångström-sized homo- and hetero-crystals, but also provides new experimental insight into the dynamics of nanocrystals and pathways for their assembly from single atoms. PMID:24861089

  16. Fabrication of crystals from single metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Sanchez, Ana M; Dove, Andrew P; Procter, Richard J; Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J; Kirby, Nigel; Hands-Portman, Ian; Smith, Corinne J; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Beanland, Richard; Sadler, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanocrystals offer new concepts for the design of nanodevices with a range of potential applications. Currently the formation of metal nanocrystals cannot be controlled at the level of individual atoms. Here we describe a new general method for the fabrication of multi-heteroatom-doped graphitic matrices decorated with very small, ångström-sized, three-dimensional (3D)-metal crystals of defined size. We irradiate boron-rich precious-metal-encapsulated self-spreading polymer micelles with electrons and produce, in real time, a doped graphitic support on which individual osmium atoms hop and migrate to form 3D-nanocrystals, as small as 15 Å in diameter, within 1 h. Crystal growth can be observed, quantified and controlled in real time. We also synthesize the first examples of mixed ruthenium-osmium 3D-nanocrystals. This technology not only allows the production of ångström-sized homo- and hetero-crystals, but also provides new experimental insight into the dynamics of nanocrystals and pathways for their assembly from single atoms.

  17. Atomic defects and diffusion in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    The tracer self-diffusion data for fcc and refractory bcc metals are briefly reviewed with respect to (i) the available monovacancy formation and migration properties and (ii) the high-temperature diffusion enhancement above that expected for mass transport via atomic exchange with monovacancies. While the atomic-defect mechanism for low-temperature self-diffusion can be reliably attributed to monovacancies, the mechanisms responsible for high-temperature mass transport are not so easily defined at this time; both divacancies and interstitials must be seriously considered. Possibilities for improving our understanding in this area are discussed. 68 references, 7 figures.

  18. Assessment of dissolved heavy metal in the Yangtze River estuary and its adjacent sea, China.

    PubMed

    An, Qiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Zhien

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the concentrations of dissolved heavy metals namely mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and copper (Cu) and to investigate the relationships between nutrients (nitrate-nitrogen and phosphate) and dissolved heavy metals. For this purpose, the concentrations of dissolved heavy metals were measured through 51 voyages form 1984 to 2006 in the Yangtze river estuary and its adjacent sea. Results analysis showed that dissolved heavy metals were not the main pollutants in the Yangtze river estuary, and the main source of heavy metal contamination was industrial wastewater from terrestrial pollution during the past 20 years. Heavy metal values showed significant abundance in the south branch of the Yangtze River estuary and Hangzhou Bay. In addition, Pb showed negative correlation with nutrients, while the positive correlations between Hg, Cd, and nutrients were shown. The obtained molar ratios, DeltaCd/DeltaN = 1.68 x 10(-5) and DeltaCd/DeltaP = 1.66 x 10(-4), are close to those in plankton, showing the biogeochemical behavior and process of dissolved cadmium.

  19. A motif for infinite metal atom wires.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xi; Warren, Steven A; Pan, Yung-Tin; Tsao, Kai-Chieh; Gray, Danielle L; Bertke, Jeffery; Yang, Hong

    2014-12-15

    A new motif for infinite metal atom wires with tunable compositions and properties is developed based on the connection between metal paddlewheel and square planar complex moieties. Two infinite Pd chain compounds, [Pd4(CO)4(OAc)4Pd(acac)2] 1 and [Pd4(CO)4(TFA)4Pd(acac)2] 2, and an infinite Pd-Pt heterometallic chain compound, [Pd4(CO)4(OAc)4Pt(acac)2] 3, are identified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In these new structures, the paddlewheel moiety is a Pd four-membered ring coordinated by bridging carboxylic ligands and μ2 carbonyl ligands. The planar moiety is either Pd(acac)2 or Pt(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate). These moieties are connected by metallophilic interactions. The results showed that these one-dimensional metal wire compounds have photoluminescent properties that are tunable by changing ligands and metal ions. 3 can also serve as a single source precursor for making Pd4Pt bimetallic nanostructures with precise control of metal composition.

  20. Trends in trace organic and metal concentrations in the Pechora and Kara Seas and adjacent rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.M.; Champ, M.A.; Wade, T.L.; Kennicutt, M.C. II; Chambers, L.; Davis, T.

    1995-12-31

    Trace organic (pesticides, PCBs, PAHs and dioxin/furan) and trace metal concentrations have been measured in surficial sediment and tissue (i.e., clam, fish liver and flesh) samples from the Pechora and Kara Seas and their adjacent rivers -- Pechora, Ob and Yenisey Rivers. Total PAH, PCB and total DDT and chlordane concentrations ranged in surficial sediments from n.d. to 810 ppb, n.d.--8.7 ppb, n.d.--1.2 ppb, and n.d.--1.2 ppb, respectively, in a suite of 40 samples from the Kara Sea and its adjacent rivers. The highest concentrations of many of the trace organic and metal contaminants were found in the lower part of the Yenisey River below the salt wedge. Some trace metals (As for example) were elevated in the Pechora River dispositional plume region. Dioxin ranged from 1.36 to 413 ppt in a subset of 20 sediment samples. Higher trace organic contaminant concentrations compared to sediments were found in tissue samples from the region, especially fish liver samples. Concentrations as high as 1,114 ppb total PAHs, 89 ppb chlordane, 1,011 ppb for total DDT and 663 ppb PCBs were found in some fish liver samples. Dioxin concentrations in tissue samples ranged from 11.7 to 61 ppt. Concentrations of many trace organic and metal contaminants in these Russian marginal seas are influenced by inputs from these large Arctic rivers. Many organic contaminant concentrations in sediments are low, however detecting these compounds in tissue show they are bioavailable.

  1. Carbon nanotube-clamped metal atomic chain

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Yin, Li-Chang; Li, Feng; Liu, Chang; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wu, Bo; Lee, Young-Hee; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Metal atomic chain (MAC) is an ultimate one-dimensional structure with unique physical properties, such as quantized conductance, colossal magnetic anisotropy, and quantized magnetoresistance. Therefore, MACs show great potential as possible components of nanoscale electronic and spintronic devices. However, MACs are usually suspended between two macroscale metallic electrodes; hence obvious technical barriers exist in the interconnection and integration of MACs. Here we report a carbon nanotube (CNT)-clamped MAC, where CNTs play the roles of both nanoconnector and electrodes. This nanostructure is prepared by in situ machining a metal-filled CNT, including peeling off carbon shells by spatially and elementally selective electron beam irradiation and further elongating the exposed metal nanorod. The microstructure and formation process of this CNT-clamped MAC are explored by both transmission electron microscopy observations and theoretical simulations. First-principles calculations indicate that strong covalent bonds are formed between the CNT and MAC. The electrical transport property of the CNT-clamped MAC was experimentally measured, and quantized conductance was observed. PMID:20427743

  2. Metal Atom Lability in Polynuclear Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Emily V.; Sánchez, Raúl Hernández

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric oxidation product [(PhL)Fe3(µ-Cl)]2 [PhLH6 = MeC(CH2NHPh-o-NHPh)3], where each trinuclear core is comprised of an oxidized diiron unit [Fe2]5+ and an isolated trigonal pyramidal ferrous site, reacts with MCl2 salts to afford heptanuclear bridged structures of the type (PhL)2Fe6M(µ-Cl)4(thf)2, where M = Fe or Co. Zero-field, 57Fe Mössbauer analysis revealed the Co resides within the trinuclear core subunits, not at the octahedral, halide-bridged MCl4(thf)2 position indicating Co migration into the trinuclear subunits has occurred. Reaction of [(PhL)Fe3(µ-Cl)]2 with CoCl2 (2 or 5 equivalents) followed by precipitation via addition of acetonitrile afforded trinuclear products where one or two irons, respectively, can be substituted within the trinuclear core. Metal atom substitution was verified by 1H NMR, 57Fe Mossbauer, single crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and magnetometry analysis. Spectroscopic analysis revealed that the Co atom(s) substitute into the oxidized dimetal unit ([M2]5+), while the M2+ site remains iron-substituted. Magnetic data acquired for the series are consistent with this analysis revealing the oxidized dimetal unit comprises a strongly coupled S = 1 unit ([FeCo]5+) or S = ½ ([Co2]5+) that is weakly antiferromagnetically coupled to the high spin (S = 2) ferrous site. The kinetic pathway for metal substitution was probed via reaction of [(PhL)Fe3(µ-Cl)]2 with isotopically enriched 57FeCl2(thf)2, the results of which suggest rapid equilibration of 57Fe into both the M2+ site and oxidized diiron site, achieving a 1:1 mixture. PMID:23642178

  3. Acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups by metal-ligand cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Akiyama, Midori; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-12-18

    Unprecedented direct acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups to form α,β-unsaturated compounds has been accomplished by using a new class of group 9 metal complexes. Metal-ligand cooperation operated by the hydroxycyclopentadienyl ligand was proposed to play a major role in the catalytic transformation. PMID:24299029

  4. Atom Probe Tomography and Its Application to Refractory Metal Nuggets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, L.; Bland, P. A.; Forman, L. V.; Reddy, S. M.; Rickard, W. D. A.; Saxey, D. W.; La Fontaine, A.; Yang, L.; Trimby, P. W.; Cairney, J.; Ringer, S.; Schaefer, B. F.

    2016-08-01

    Atom probe tomography is capable of achieving atomic resolution. This allows us to accurately measure the chemistry of refractory metal nuggets in situ, revealing nanometre scale variations in their chemistry and the presence of sulphur in the alloy.

  5. Toxicity and bioavailability of metals in the Missouri River adjacent to a lead refinery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.; Allert, Ann L.; Fairchild, James F.; May, Thomas W.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Callahan, Edward V.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of the potential environmental impacts of contaminated groundwater from the ASARCO metals refining facility adjacent to the Missouri River in Omaha, Nebraska. Surface waters, sediments, and sediment pore waters were collected from the Burt-Izard drain, which transects the facility, and from the Missouri River adjacent to the facility. Groundwater was also collected from the facility. Waters and sediments were analyzed for inorganic contaminants, and the toxicity of the waters was evaluated with the Ceriodaphnia dubia 7-day test. Concentrations of several elemental contaminants were highly elevated in the groundwater, but not in river sediment pore waters. Lead concentrations were moderately elevated in whole sediment at one site, but lead concentrations in pore waters were low due to apparent sequestration by acid-volatile sulfides. The groundwater sample was highly toxic to C. dubia, causing 100% mortality. Even at the lowest groundwater concentration tested (6.25%) C. dubia survival was reduced; however, at that concentration, reproduction was not significantly different from upstream porewater reference samples. Sediment pore waters were not toxic, except reproduction in pore water collected from one downstream site was somewhat reduced. The decrease in reproduction could not be attributed to measured elemental contaminants.

  6. A Lindemann criterion for the atomization of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsanov, S. S.

    2012-11-01

    A thermodynamic variation of the Lindemann criterion for the vaporization of metals is proposed. It is shown that the critical amplitude of vibrations of atoms at the boiling point averages 1.42 bond lengths. Close values of interatomic distances result from the Vinet universal equation for the atomization of metals under the action of high temperatures (1.48) and negative pressures (1.50). The last value corresponds to the Van der Waals distances between metal atoms.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  8. Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface.

    PubMed

    Oliver, David J; Maassen, Jesse; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Hagedorn, Till; Miyahara, Yoichi; Qi, Yue; Guo, Hong; Grütter, Peter

    2012-11-20

    A mechanically formed electrical nanocontact between gold and tungsten is a prototypical junction between metals with dissimilar electronic structure. Through atomically characterized nanoindentation experiments and first-principles quantum transport calculations, we find that the ballistic conduction across this intermetallic interface is drastically reduced because of the fundamental mismatch between s wave-like modes of electron conduction in the gold and d wave-like modes in the tungsten. The mechanical formation of the junction introduces defects and disorder, which act as an additional source of conduction losses and increase junction resistance by up to an order of magnitude. These findings apply to nanoelectronics and semiconductor device design. The technique that we use is very broadly applicable to molecular electronics, nanoscale contact mechanics, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  9. Conductivity of an atomically defined metallic interface

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, David J.; Maassen, Jesse; El Ouali, Mehdi; Paul, William; Hagedorn, Till; Miyahara, Yoichi; Qi, Yue; Guo, Hong; Grütter, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A mechanically formed electrical nanocontact between gold and tungsten is a prototypical junction between metals with dissimilar electronic structure. Through atomically characterized nanoindentation experiments and first-principles quantum transport calculations, we find that the ballistic conduction across this intermetallic interface is drastically reduced because of the fundamental mismatch between s wave-like modes of electron conduction in the gold and d wave-like modes in the tungsten. The mechanical formation of the junction introduces defects and disorder, which act as an additional source of conduction losses and increase junction resistance by up to an order of magnitude. These findings apply to nanoelectronics and semiconductor device design. The technique that we use is very broadly applicable to molecular electronics, nanoscale contact mechanics, and scanning tunneling microscopy. PMID:23129661

  10. Structure-dependent response of a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector for organic compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Zhao, Jiang; Leopold, Kyle; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-01-15

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries is indispensable for drug discovery research. However, the HTS data quality for lead discovery, lead optimization, and quantitative structure activity relationship studies has been severely compromised due to the uncertain compound concentrations in screening plates. In order to address this issue, we compared various high-throughput technologies for quantification of compounds in microtiter plate format without the need for authentic compounds as standards and identified the chemiluminescence nitrogen detector (CLND) as the method of choice at the present time. However, the structure dependence of this detector has not been well studied. A proposed rule suggested that the only exception to equimolar response is for compounds that contain adjacent nitrogen atoms. The response should be zero when the adjacent nitrogen atoms are connected by a double bond and 0.5 when they are connected by a single bond. In this investigation, we studied a broad range of compounds with isolated and adjacent nitrogen atoms. We confirmed that compounds with isolated nitrogen atoms produce an equimolar response with a 15-20% variation depending on structures and compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a double bond giving nearly zero response. We discovered that the CLND response for compounds containing adjacent nitrogen atoms that are connected with a single bond is highly structure dependent. Substitutions on the nitrogen atoms or nearby in the molecule can increase the CLND response to approach a value higher than the predicted value 0.5 (maximal value 0.82/nitrogen atom). Without substitution, much lower values than predicted (minimal value 0.0-0.08/nitrogen atom) are obtained. Therefore, the prediction of response of 0.5/nitrogen atom for compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond should be abandoned. Compounds with similar structures should be used to generate calibration curves for

  11. Direct observation of local atomic order in a metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Guan, Pengfei; Fujita, Takeshi; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Inoue, Akihisa; Yavari, Alain Reza; Sakurai, Toshio; Chen, Mingwei

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the atomic configuration of metallic glasses is a long-standing problem in materials science and solid-state physics. So far, only average structural information derived from diffraction and spectroscopic methods has been obtained. Although various atomic models have been proposed in the past fifty years, a direct observation of the local atomic structure in disordered materials has not been achieved. Here we report local atomic configurations of a metallic glass investigated by nanobeam electron diffraction combined with ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Distinct diffraction patterns from individual atomic clusters and their assemblies, which have been theoretically predicted as short- and medium-range order, can be experimentally observed. This study provides compelling evidence of the local atomic order in the disordered material and has important implications in understanding the atomic mechanisms of metallic-glass formation and properties.

  12. Bonds Between Metal Atoms: A New Mode of Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, F. Albert; Chisholm, Malcolm H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses polynuclear metal clusters (containing two or more metal atoms bonded to one another as well as to nonmetallic elements), including their formation and applications. Studies of bonds between metal atoms reveal superconductors, organic-reaction catalysts, and photosensitive complexes that may play a role in solar energy. (JN)

  13. Atomizing apparatus for making polymer and metal powders and whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Otaigbe, Joshua U.; McAvoy, Jon M.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ting, Jason; Mi, Jia; Terpstra, Robert

    2003-03-18

    Method for making polymer particulates, such as spherical powder and whiskers, by melting a polymer material under conditions to avoid thermal degradation of the polymer material, atomizing the melt using gas jet means in a manner to form atomized droplets, and cooling the droplets to form polymer particulates, which are collected for further processing. Atomization parameters can be controlled to produce polymer particulates with controlled particle shape, particle size, and particle size distribution. For example, atomization parameters can be controlled to produce spherical polymer powders, polymer whiskers, and combinations of spherical powders and whiskers. Atomizing apparatus also is provided for atoomizing polymer and metallic materials.

  14. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  15. Quantum stability and magic lengths of metal atom wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lan, Haiping; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Niu, Qian; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-06-01

    Metal atom wires represent an important class of nanomaterials in the development of future electronic devices and other functional applications. Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we carry out a systematic study of the quantum stability of freestanding atom wires consisting of prototypical metal elements with s -, s p -, and s d -valence electrons. We explore how the quantum mechanically confined motion and local bonding of the valence electrons in these different wire systems can dictate their overall structural stability and find that the formation energy of essentially all the wires oscillates with respect to their length measured by the number n of atoms contained in the wires, establishing the existence of highly preferred (or magic) lengths. Furthermore, different wire classes exhibit distinctively different oscillatory characteristics and quantum stabilities. Alkali metal wires possessing an unpaired s valence electron per atom exhibit simple damped even-odd oscillations. In contrast, Al and Ga wires containing three s2p1 valence electrons per atom generally display much larger and undamped even-odd energy oscillations due to stronger local bonding of the p orbitals. Among the noble metals, the s -dominant Ag wires behave similarly to the linear alkali metal wires, while Au and Pt wires distinctly prefer to be structurally zigzagged due to strong relativistic effects. These findings are discussed in connection with existing experiments and should also be instrumental in future experimental realization of different metal atom wires in freestanding or supported environments with desirable functionalities.

  16. Endohedral metal atoms in pristine and functionalized fullerene cages.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michio; Akasaka, Takeshi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2010-01-19

    Fullerene, an allotropic form of carbon made up of spherical molecules formed from pentagonal and hexagonal rings, was first discovered in 1985. Because fullerenes have spacious inner cavities, atoms and clusters can be encapsulated inside the fullerene cages to form endohedral fullerenes. In particular, the unique structural and electronic properties of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), where metal atoms are encapsulated within the fullerene, have attracted wide interest from physicists and chemists as well as materials scientists and biologists. The remarkable characteristics of these molecules originate in the electron transfer from the encapsulated metal atoms to the carbon cage. The positions and movements of the encapsulated metal atoms are important determinants of the chemical and physical properties of EMFs. In this Account, we specifically describe the positions and dynamic behavior of the metal atoms encapsulated in pristine and functionalized fullerene cages. First, we examined whether the metal atoms are attached rigidly to cage carbons or move around. Our systematic investigations of EMFs, including M@C(2v)-C(82), M(2)@D(2)(10611)-C(72), M(2)@D(3h)(5)-C(78), M(2)@I(h)-C(80), and M(2)@D(5h)-C(80), revealed that the metal positions and movements vary widely with different cage structures and numbers of metal atoms. Second, we wanted to understand whether we could control the positions and movements of the untouchable metal atoms in EMFs. One possible way to modulate this behavior was through attachment of a molecule to the outer surface of the cage. We developed synthetic methods to modify EMFs and have examined the metal positions and movements in the functionalized carbon cages. Remarkably, we could alter the dynamic behavior of the encaged metal atoms in M(2)@I(h)-C(80) drastically through chemical modification of the outer cage. We anticipate that the control of metal atom structures and dynamics within a cage could be valuable for designing

  17. The shells of atomic structure in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S. P.; Feng, S. D.; Qiao, J. W.; Dong, B. S.; Qin, J. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We proposed a scheme to describe the spatial correlation between two atoms in metallic glasses. Pair distribution function in a model iron was fully decomposed into several shells and can be presented as the spread of nearest neighbor correlation via distance. Moreover, angle distribution function can also be decomposed into groups. We demonstrate that there is close correlation between pair distribution function and angle distribution function for metallic glasses. We think that our results are very helpful understanding the atomic structure of metallic glasses.

  18. Atomic interactions and phase transition in hydrogen metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical mechanical behavior of H in pure metals and metal alloys is investigated using elasticity theory and lattice-gas models. The interactions between H atoms are separated into elastic and electronic contributions, and only the elastic contributions are evaluated. Three studies are reported: trapping of H by interstitial and substitutional impurities in bbc metals; modeling of H in impure metals; and modeling of H in concentration metal hydrides. The elastic interactions between H and interstitial and substitutional impurities in bbc metals are calculated using the method of lattice statics. Comparison with experimentally-measured trapping energies indicates that trapping by interstitial impurities is due solely to elastic energy, whereas both elastic and electronic interactions contribute to trapping by substitutional impurities. To include the effect of substitutional trapping on the phase transitions of H in metal alloys, the random-field lattice-gas model is developed. Interactions between H atoms are determined using the effective metal atom approximation. Hydrogen-impurity interactions are treated as a random field, in analogy with the random-field Ising model. Phase diagrams of the Nb/sub .95/Mo/sub .05/-H and Nb/sub .85/Mo/sub .15/-H systems are calculated by Monte Carlo simulation using the random-field model. The model gives qualitatively correct predictions of the phase behavior when the random field is included.

  19. Metal elements in the bottom sediments of the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent continental shelf of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Hong, Gi Hoon; Liu, Sumei

    2015-06-15

    The metal elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Ca) in the bottom sediment of the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent continental shelf of the East China Sea were studied to map their spatial distribution and to assess their potential risk to the marine biota. These metal concentrations except Ca were generally higher in the inner shelf and northeastern part, and were found to decrease from the coast to the offshore of the Changjiang Estuary. Sedimentary Ca was most abundant in the outer shelf sediments and decreased in inner shelf. Arsenic (As) appeared to be contaminated due to economic development from 1980s in the inner shelf overall, but the potential ecological risk from the selected metals was low in the coastal sea off the Changjiang.

  20. Heavy metals accumulation in parts of paddy Oryza sativa L. grown in paddy field adjacent to ultrabasic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadif, Waqeed Mahdi; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Sahid, Ismail; Bhuiyan, Atiqur Rahman; Ibrahim, Izyanti

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the accumulation and translocation of heavy metals from soil around the root zone to various parts of the paddy plant, namely the roots, stems, leaves and rice grains. This study was conducted in 2014 in paddy field adjacent to ultrabasic soil (field 1 and 2) located in Ranau, Sabah and one field (Field 3) taken as control located at the UKM experimental plot in peninsular of Malaysia. The plant species used in the present investigation is Paddy Batu. The heavy metals studied were Chromium (Cr), Iron (Fe) and Nickel (Ni). Heavy metals in soil and plant were extracted by wet digestion method. Heavy metals present in paddy plants and soils extract were measured using the ICP-MS. Heavy metals concentrations in the plant parts in descending order is the root > leaves > stem > rice grain. Lower concentration of all heavy metals in soils and plant parts was shown by the control site (Field 3) in UKM Bangi. Higher concentration of heavy metals occurred in the roots compared to other above ground parts (stem, leaves, and grains) of the paddy plant in all of the paddy field. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of heavy metals in all locations were recorded in descending order as Ni > Cr > Fe, the BAF values for all metals in the rice grains were low, whereas the BAF values were recorded high for Ni in all locations. The results also showed that Fe was the most predominant metal ion in the roots, followed by Ni then Cr.

  1. Distinct metallization and atomization transitions in dense liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-03-13

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations driven by accurate quantum Monte Carlo forces on dense liquid hydrogen. There is a recent report of a complete atomization transition between a mixed molecular-atomic liquid and a completely dissociated fluid in an almost unaccessible pressure range [Nat. Commun. 5, 3487 (2014)]. Here, instead, we identify a different transition between the fully molecular liquid and the mixed-atomic fluid at ∼400  GPa, i.e., in a much more interesting pressure range. We provide numerical evidence supporting the metallic behavior of this intermediate phase. Therefore, we predict that the metallization at finite temperature occurs in this partially dissociated molecular fluid, well before the complete atomization of the liquid. At high temperature this first-order transition becomes a crossover, in very good agreement with the experimental observation. Several systematic tests supporting the quality of our large scale calculations are also reported.

  2. Interaction potential between a helium atom and metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takada, Y.; Kohn, W.

    1985-01-01

    By employing an S-matrix theory for evanescent waves, the repulsive potential between a helium atom and corrugated metal surfaces has been calculated. P-wave interactions and intra-atomic correlation effects were found to be very important. The corrugation part of the interaction potential is much weaker than predicted by the effective-medium theory. Application to Cu, Ni, and Ag (110) surfaces gives good agreement with experiment without any adjustable parameters.

  3. Design of ductile bulk metallic glasses by adding ''soft'' atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, N.; Pauly, S.; Calin, M.; Gemming, T.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.; Eckert, J.

    2012-04-02

    We propose a strategy for the design of ductile bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) through minor substitution using relatively large atoms, which make the bonding nature become more metallic and with it less shear resistant. Such a locally modified structure results in topological heterogeneity, which appears to be crucial for achieving enhanced plasticity. This strategy is verified for Ti-Zr-Cu-Pd glassy alloys, in which Cu was replaced by In, and seems to be extendable to other BMG systems. The atomic-scale heterogeneity in BMGs is somewhat analog to defects in crystalline alloys and helps to improve the overall plasticity of BMGs.

  4. Liquid-metal atomization for hot working preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid quenching of a liquid metal by atomization or splat cooling overcomes the major limitation of most solidification processes, namely, the segregation of alloying elements, impurities, and constituent phases. The cooling rates of different atomizing processes are related to the dendrite arm spacings and to the microstructure of the atomized powders. The increased solubility limits and the formation of metastable compounds in splat-cooled alloys are discussed. Consolidation of the powders by hot isostatic compaction, hot extrusion, or hot forging and rolling processes yields billets with properties equivalent to or better than those of the wrought alloys. The application of this powder processing technology to high-performance alloys is reviewed.

  5. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  6. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices.

  7. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Atomic Layer Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Ra; Kim, Yonghun; Nam, Jaewook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Kim, Dong Jae; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Park, Sang Won; Park, Jucheol; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Byoung Hun; Park, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-03-01

    Heterostructures of compositionally and electronically variant two-dimensional (2D) atomic layers are viable building blocks for ultrathin optoelectronic devices. We show that the composition of interfacial transition region between semiconducting WSe2 atomic layer channels and metallic NbSe2 contact layers can be engineered through interfacial doping with Nb atoms. WxNb1-xSe2 interfacial regions considerably lower the potential barrier height of the junction, significantly improving the performance of the corresponding WSe2-based field-effect transistor devices. The creation of such alloyed 2D junctions between dissimilar atomic layer domains could be the most important factor in controlling the electronic properties of 2D junctions and the design and fabrication of 2D atomic layer devices. PMID:26839956

  8. Bioaccessibility of heavy metals in soils cannot be predicted by a single model in two adjacent areas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Yang, Fen; Wei, Chaoyang; Liang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether a single model could be used to predict the bioaccessibility of heavy metals in soils in two adjacent areas and to determine the feasibility of using existing data sets of total metal concentrations and soil property parameters (e.g., pH, total organic carbon, and soil texture) when predicting heavy metal bioaccessibility. A total of 103 topsoil samples were collected from two adjacent areas (Baotou and Bayan Obo). A total of 76 samples were collected from Baotou, and 27 were collected from Bayan Obo. The total and bioaccessible concentrations of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were measured following complete composite acid digestion and a simple bioaccessibility extraction test. The average total concentrations of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn were 8.95, 27.53, 28.40, and 79.50 mg/kg, respectively, in Baotou and 18.12, 30.75, 38.09, and 87.62 mg/kg in Bayan Obo. Except for As, these values were similar in both areas. The average bioaccessible heavy metal concentrations (Bio-HMs) for each target HM were also similar. In Baotou, the average Bio-HM values for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn were 1.16, 3.76, 16.31, and 16.10 mg/kg, respectively, and 1.26, 2.51, 14.31, and 8.68 mg/kg in Bayan Obo. However, the relative bioaccessibilities for each HM in Baotou were greater than those in Bayan Obo, with mean values for Pb, Zn, Cu, and As of 57, 20, 17, and 12 %, respectively, in Baotou and 40, 11, 9, and 8 % in Bayan Obo. In both areas, prediction models were successfully created using heavy metal concentrations and soil physicochemical parameters; however, models of the same target element differed between the areas, which indicated that a common model for both sites does not exist. Bio-HMs were highly affected by soil properties, which were found to differ between the adjacent areas. In addition, soil properties with large variations played major roles in the predictive models. This study highlights the importance

  9. Evolution of atomic rearrangements in deformation in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Shang, B S; Li, M Z; Yao, Y G; Lu, Y J; Wang, W H

    2014-10-01

    Atomic rearrangements induced by shear stress are fundamental for understanding deformation mechanisms in metallic glasses (MGs). Using molecular dynamic simulation, the atomic rearrangements characterized by nonaffine displacements (NADs) and their spatial distribution and evolution with tensile stress in Cu50Zr50 MG were investigated. It was found that in the elastic regime the atomic rearrangements with the largest NADs are relatively homogeneous in space, but exhibit strong spatial correlation, become localized and inhomogeneous, and form large clusters as strain increases, which may facilitate the so-called shear transformation zones. Furthermore, initially they prefer to take place around Cu atoms which have more nonicosahedral configurations. As strain increases, the preference decays and disappears in the plastic regime. The atomic rearrangements with the smallest NADs are preferentially located around Cu atoms, too, but with more icosahedral or icosahedral-like atomic configurations. The preference is maintained in the whole deformation process. In contrast, the atomic rearrangements with moderate NADs distribute homogeneously, and do not show explicit preference or spatial correlation, acting as matrix during deformation. Among the atomic rearrangements with different NADs, those with largest and smallest NADs are nearest neighbors initially, but separating with increasing strain, while those with largest and moderate NADs always avoid to each other. The correlations in the fluctuations of the NADs confirm the long-range strain correlation and the scale-free characteristic of NADs in both elastic and plastic deformation, which suggests a universality of the scaling in the plastic flow in MGs.

  10. Occurrence and distribution of heavy metals in surface sediments of the Changhua River Estuary and adjacent shelf (Hainan Island).

    PubMed

    Hu, Bangqi; Cui, Ruyong; Li, Jun; Wei, Helong; Zhao, Jingtao; Bai, Fenglong; Song, Weiyu; Ding, Xue

    2013-11-15

    Heavy metal (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in surface sediments from the Changhua River Estuary and adjacent shelf, western Hainan Island, were conducted to evaluate the level of contamination. Numerical Sediment Quality Guidelines (TEL and PEL) were applied to assess adverse biological effects of these metals, suggesting that occasional biological effect may occur due to As, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb. Enrichment factors shown that the significant As and Pb contaminations in the study area. Multivariate analysis indicated that the sources of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni and Zn resulted primarily from natural weathering processes, whereas As and Pb were mainly attributed to anthropogenic sources. The results of this study would provide a useful aid for sustainable marine management in the region.

  11. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses.

  12. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  13. Elastic properties and atomic bonding character in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2015-07-28

    The elastic properties of glasses from different metallic systems were studied in the light of the atomic packing density and bonding character. We found that the electronegativity mismatch (Δe{sup −}) between the host- and the major solute-elements provides a plausible explanation to the large variation observed for Poisson's ratio (ν) among metallic glasses (MGs) (from 0.28 for Fe-based to 0.43 for Pd-based MGs), notwithstanding a similar atomic packing efficiency (C{sub g}). Besides, it is found that ductile MGs correspond to Δe{sup −} smaller than 0.5 and to a relatively steep atomic potential well. Ductility is, thus, favored in MGs exhibiting a weak bond directionality on average and opposing a strong resistance to volume change.

  14. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  15. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  16. Theory of catalytic dissociation of hydrogen atoms on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, O. V. Dymnikov, V. D.; Mittsev, M. A.

    2008-08-15

    The model of hydrogen atom ionization near a metal surface is discussed on the basis of a comparison between the metal work function and the atom ionization energy. In the theoretical calculation, it is shown that the hydrogen atom ionization energy decreases when the atom approaches the metal surface. The ionization energy vanishes when the distance between proton and the metal surface is somewhat less than the Bohr radius.

  17. The concentration of radionuclides and metals in vegetation adjacent to and in the SRL Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C. E. Jr.

    1992-12-14

    In 1991 the trees on the dikes surrounding the SRL Seepage Basins were sampled and analyzed to inventory the contaminants transported from the basins into the vegetation. Tree leaves and wood were collected and analyzed for {sup 90}Sr, {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 242,244}Cm, {sup 241}Am, Ba, Cr, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Pb. The concentrations of contaminants were influenced by sample type (leaves versus wood), species type (pines versus hardwoods), and location relative to distance from the basin. The total inventory of each contaminant in the trees was estimated. The relationships between leaf and wood, pines and hardwood, location, and mass of the material in each of these classes were used to weight the total inventory estimate. The radionuclide with the largest inventory was 0.7 mCi for {sup 90}Sr. The metallic contaminant with the largest inventory was Mn at 200 gm.

  18. The concentration of radionuclides and metals in vegetation adjacent to and in the SRL Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C. E. Jr.

    1992-12-14

    In 1991 the trees on the dikes surrounding the SRL Seepage Basins were sampled and analyzed to inventory the contaminants transported from the basins into the vegetation. Tree leaves and wood were collected and analyzed for [sup 90]Sr, [sup 60]Co, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 238]Pu, [sup 239,240]Pu, [sup 242,244]Cm, [sup 241]Am, Ba, Cr, Hg, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Pb. The concentrations of contaminants were influenced by sample type (leaves versus wood), species type (pines versus hardwoods), and location relative to distance from the basin. The total inventory of each contaminant in the trees was estimated. The relationships between leaf and wood, pines and hardwood, location, and mass of the material in each of these classes were used to weight the total inventory estimate. The radionuclide with the largest inventory was 0.7 mCi for [sup 90]Sr. The metallic contaminant with the largest inventory was Mn at 200 gm.

  19. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  20. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  1. Measured atomic ground-state polarizabilities of 35 metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lei; Indergaard, John; Zhang, Baiqian; Larkin, Ilia; Moro, Ramiro; de Heer, Walt A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced pulsed cryogenic molecular-beam electric deflection methods involving position-sensitive mass spectrometry and 7.87-eV ionizing radiation were used to measure the polarizabilities of more than half of the metallic elements in the Periodic Table. Concurrent Stern-Gerlach deflection measurements verified the ground-state condition of the measured atoms. Comparison with state-of-the-art calculations exposes significant systematic and isolated discrepancies throughout the Periodic Table.

  2. Measured Atomic Ground State Polarizabilities of 35 Metallic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indergaard, John; Ma, Lei; Zhang, Baiqian; Larkin, Ilia; Moro, Ramiro; de Heer, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Advanced pulsed cryogenic molecular beam electric deflection methods utilizing a position-sensitive mass spectrometer and 7.87 eV ionizing radiation were used to measure the polarizabilities of more than half of the metallic elements in the periodic table for the first time. These measurements increase the total number of experimentally obtained atomic polarizabilities from 23 to 57. Concurrent Stern-Gerlach deflection measurements verified the ground state condition of the measured atoms. Generating higher temperature beams allowed for the comparison of relative populations of the ground and excited states in order to extract the true temperature of the atomic beam, which followed the nominal temperature closely over a wide temperature range. Comparison of newly measured polarizabilities with state-of-the-art calculations exposes significant systematic and isolated discrepancies throughout the periodic table. Cluster Lab at Georgia Tech.

  3. Atomically Precise Colloidal Metal Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles: Fundamentals and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongchao; Zeng, Chenjie; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Yuxiang

    2016-09-28

    Colloidal nanoparticles are being intensely pursued in current nanoscience research. Nanochemists are often frustrated by the well-known fact that no two nanoparticles are the same, which precludes the deep understanding of many fundamental properties of colloidal nanoparticles in which the total structures (core plus surface) must be known. Therefore, controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision and solving their total structures have long been major dreams for nanochemists. Recently, these goals are partially fulfilled in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least in the ultrasmall size regime (1-3 nm in diameter, often called nanoclusters). This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties of atomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles (such as the stability, metal-ligand interfacial bonding, ligand assembly on particle surfaces, aesthetic structural patterns, periodicities, and emergence of the metallic state) and to develop a range of potential applications such as in catalysis, biomedicine, sensing, imaging, optics, and energy conversion. Although most of the research activity currently focuses on thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters, important progress has also been achieved in other ligand-protected gold, silver, and bimetal (or alloy) nanoclusters. All of these types of unique nanoparticles will bring unprecedented opportunities, not only in understanding the fundamental questions of nanoparticles but also in opening up new horizons for scientific studies of nanoparticles. PMID:27585252

  4. Atomically Precise Colloidal Metal Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles: Fundamentals and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongchao; Zeng, Chenjie; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Yuxiang

    2016-09-28

    Colloidal nanoparticles are being intensely pursued in current nanoscience research. Nanochemists are often frustrated by the well-known fact that no two nanoparticles are the same, which precludes the deep understanding of many fundamental properties of colloidal nanoparticles in which the total structures (core plus surface) must be known. Therefore, controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision and solving their total structures have long been major dreams for nanochemists. Recently, these goals are partially fulfilled in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least in the ultrasmall size regime (1-3 nm in diameter, often called nanoclusters). This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties of atomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles (such as the stability, metal-ligand interfacial bonding, ligand assembly on particle surfaces, aesthetic structural patterns, periodicities, and emergence of the metallic state) and to develop a range of potential applications such as in catalysis, biomedicine, sensing, imaging, optics, and energy conversion. Although most of the research activity currently focuses on thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters, important progress has also been achieved in other ligand-protected gold, silver, and bimetal (or alloy) nanoclusters. All of these types of unique nanoparticles will bring unprecedented opportunities, not only in understanding the fundamental questions of nanoparticles but also in opening up new horizons for scientific studies of nanoparticles.

  5. [Distribution patterns of heavy metals in surface sediments of the Yangtze estuary and its adjacent areas and environmental quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ju-jiang; Fan, De-jiang; Yang, Dong-fang; Qi, Hong-yan; Xu, Lin

    2008-09-01

    The concentrations of six heavy metals were determined in the fine fraction ( < 63 microm) of surface sediments in the Yangtze Estuary and its adjacent areas by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The average contents of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr and Zn are 10.47, 0.19, 37.68, 36.86, 97.80 and 98.65 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The contents of As, Cd and Cu appear gradually degressive from west to east, while the contents of Pb, Cr and Zn appear no apparent difference. In generally, the concentrations of heavy metals are higher in the south sea areas than those in the north sea areas. Environmental assessment with single factor method suggests that As, Cu, Pb, Cr and Zn are moderately contaminated, while Cd is not polluted. The values of As,Cu and Cr are between effect range-low (ERL) and effect range-median (ERM), which indicate they occasionally bring adverse biological effect at most stations, and the values of Cd,Pb and Zn are below ERL mean they rarely bring adverse biological effect by sediment quality guidelines assessment. From the results of factor analysis and cluster analysis, we conclude that the outer sea areas of the Yangtze Estuary and the Hangzhou Bay have lower sediment environmental quality, therefore much attention should be paid to these areas.

  6. Sources of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments and an Ecological Risk Assessment from Two Adjacent Plateau Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Binbin; Wang, Guoqiang; Wu, Jin; Fu, Qing; Liu, Changming

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu) and arsenic (As)) in surface water and sediments were investigated in two adjacent drinking water reservoirs (Hongfeng and Baihua Reservoirs) on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau in Southwest China. Possible pollution sources were identified by spatial and statistical analyses. For both reservoirs, Cd was most likely from industrial activities, and As was from lithogenic sources. For the Hongfeng Reservoir, Pb, Cr and Cu might have originated from mixed sources (traffic pollution and residual effect of former industrial practices), and the sources of Hg included the inflows, which were different for the North (industrial activities) and South (lithogenic origin) Lakes, and atmospheric deposition resulting from coal combustion. For the Baihua Reservoir, the Hg, Cr and Cu were primarily derived from industrial activities, and the Pb originated from traffic pollution. The Hg in the Baihua Reservoir might also have been associated with coal combustion pollution. An analysis of ecological risk using sediment quality guidelines showed that there were moderate toxicological risks for sediment-dwelling organisms in both reservoirs, mainly from Hg and Cr. Ecological risk analysis using the Hakanson index suggested that there was a potential moderate to very high ecological risk to humans from fish in both reservoirs, mainly because of elevated levels of Hg and Cd. The upstream Hongfeng Reservoir acts as a buffer, but remains an important source of Cd, Cu and Pb and a moderately important source of Cr, for the downstream Baihua Reservoir. This study provides a replicable method for assessing aquatic ecosystem health in adjacent plateau reservoirs. PMID:25010771

  7. Quantum chemical simulations of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides and metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye

    Scaling of SiO2 gate dielectrics to extend the miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices in accordance with Moore's Law has resulted in unacceptable tunneling current leakage levels. The projection that this challenge could significantly limit CMOS performance has prompted the intense search for alternative gate dielectric materials that can achieve high capacitances with physically thicker films which minimize tunneling leakage current. Atomic layer deposition is an ideal deposition method for high-k films because it controls the film thickness with atomic layer precision and can achieve high film conformality and uniformity. We use density functional theory (DFT) to explore chemical reactions involved in ALD processes at the atomic level. We have investigated different metal precursors for ALD process. Compared to halides, metal alkylamides are more favorable on nitrided silicon surfaces and subsequent film growth. Likewise, hafnium alkylamide is more favorable than water to initiate the nucleation on hydrogen terminated silicon surfaces. For deposition on organic self-assembled monolayers, different end groups significantly affect the selectivity towards ALD reactions. The chemical mechanisms involved in ALD of hafnium nitride, aluminum nitride are developed which provide an understanding to the difficulty in producing oxygen free metal nitrides by ALD. By combining ALD of metal oxide and metal nitride, a new method for incorporating nitrogen into oxide films is proposed. In TMA and ozone reaction, it's found that by-product water can be a catalyzer for this reaction.

  8. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  9. Atomic and electronic properties of neutral and cationic metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolchin, Andrew Marc

    2000-10-01

    We find optimal atomic and electronic structures for neutral and singly, positively charged clusters of beryllium and beryllium-lithium (of the form BeLik) using density functional theory in the local spin density approximation. Ions are moved with a steepest descent method, and the electronic wave functions optimized using a fictitious dynamics with simulated annealing, as conceived by Car and Parrinello. Shell-like orbitals, filling angular momentum states in the order: 1s 2p 2s 1d, are obtained for the beryllium clusters. The same ordering is found for the BeLik clusters which indicates a departure from the ordering found in pure alkali clusters by the lowering of the 2s level to below the 1d level due to the larger electron affinity of the Be impurity. We similarly calculate an atomic basis to which we relate these shell-like orbitals, and employ a Mulliken population analysis to visualize how the atomic orbitals might hybridize to create them. This analysis also allows us to observe an increasingly metallic behavior with cluster size, by associating the electron density distribution, and in the case of a charged cluster, the distribution of the hole, with atomic sites, and with regions of overlap between atom pairs. We quantitatively show the increase in density associated with bonding as cluster size increases, and the tendency of the hole to distribute itself near the most exterior atomic sites in clusters of high symmetry. Our results are compared with the predictions of the shell/jellium model in the context of our calculated binding energies and ionization potentials.

  10. Rhenium-catalysed dehydrogenative borylation of primary and secondary C(sp3)-H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Omura, Tetsuya; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-18

    Rhenium-catalysed C(sp(3))-H bond borylation in the absence of any oxidant, hydrogen acceptor, or external ligand, with the generation of H2 as the sole byproduct is described. The transformation, which represents a rare example of rhenium-catalysed C(sp(3))-H bond functionalisation, features high atom efficiency and simple reaction conditions. PMID:25688385

  11. Rhenium-catalysed dehydrogenative borylation of primary and secondary C(sp3)-H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Omura, Tetsuya; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-18

    Rhenium-catalysed C(sp(3))-H bond borylation in the absence of any oxidant, hydrogen acceptor, or external ligand, with the generation of H2 as the sole byproduct is described. The transformation, which represents a rare example of rhenium-catalysed C(sp(3))-H bond functionalisation, features high atom efficiency and simple reaction conditions.

  12. Contribution of the upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea to the heavy metal pollution in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Yin, Su; Wu, Yuehan; Xu, Wei; Li, Yangyang; Shen, Zhenyao; Feng, Chenghong

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether the discharge control of heavy metals in the Yangtze River basin can significantly change the pollution level in the estuary, this study analyzed the sources (upper river, the estuarine region, and the adjacent sea) of ten heavy metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn) in dissolved and particulate phases in the surface water of the estuary during wet, normal, and dry seasons. Metal sources inferred from section fluxes agree with those in statistical analysis methods. Heavy metal pollution in the surface water of Yangtze Estuary primarily depends on the sediment suspension and the wastewater discharge from estuary cities. Upper river only constitutes the main source of dissolved heavy metals during the wet season, while the estuarine region and the adjacent sea (especially the former) dominate the dissolved metal pollution in the normal and dry seasons. Particulate metals are mainly derived from sediment suspension in the estuary and the adjacent sea, and the contribution of the upper river can be neglected. Compared with the hydrologic seasons, flood-ebb tides exert a more obvious effect on the water flow directions in the estuary. Sediment suspension, not the upper river, significantly affects the suspended particulate matter concentration in the estuary. PMID:27155472

  13. Atomic picture of elastic deformation in a metallic glass

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X. D.; Aryal, S.; Zhong, C.; Ching, W. Y.; Sheng, H. W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, D. X.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2015-03-17

    The tensile behavior of a Ni₆₀Nb₄₀ metallic glass (MG) has been studied by using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculation with a large cell containing 1024 atoms (614 Ni and 410 Nb). We provide insight into how a super elastic limit can be achieved in a MG. Spatially inhomogeneous responses of single atoms and also major polyhedra are found to change greatly with increasing external stress when the strain is over 2%, causing the intrinsically viscoelastic behavior. We uncover the origin of the observed super elastic strain limit under tension (including linear and viscoelastic strains) in small-sized MG samples,more » mainly caused by inhomogeneous distribution of excess volumes in the form of newly formed subatomic cavities.« less

  14. Atomic-level level dislocation dynamics in irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2015-01-01

    Primary damage and microstructure evolution in structural nuclear materials operating under conditions of a high flux of energetic atomic particles and high temperature and stress lead to formation of a high concentration, non-homogeneous distribution of defect clusters in the form of dislocation loops, voids, gas-filled bubbles and radiation-induced precipitates of nanometer scale. They cause changes in many material properties. Being obstacles to dislocation glide, they strongly affect mechanical properties in particular. This gives rise to an increase in yield and flow stress and a reduction in ductility. Atomic-scale computer simulation can provide details of how these effects are influenced by obstacle structure, applied stress, strain rate and temperature. Processes such as obstacle cutting, transformation, absorption and drag are observed. Some recent results for body-centered and face-centered cubic metals are described in this review and, where appropriate, comparisons drawn with predictions based on elasticity theory of crystal defects.

  15. Atomic picture of elastic deformation in a metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. D.; Aryal, S.; Zhong, C.; Ching, W. Y.; Sheng, H. W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, D. X.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2015-03-17

    The tensile behavior of a Ni₆₀Nb₄₀ metallic glass (MG) has been studied by using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculation with a large cell containing 1024 atoms (614 Ni and 410 Nb). We provide insight into how a super elastic limit can be achieved in a MG. Spatially inhomogeneous responses of single atoms and also major polyhedra are found to change greatly with increasing external stress when the strain is over 2%, causing the intrinsically viscoelastic behavior. We uncover the origin of the observed super elastic strain limit under tension (including linear and viscoelastic strains) in small-sized MG samples, mainly caused by inhomogeneous distribution of excess volumes in the form of newly formed subatomic cavities.

  16. Interface of transition metal oxides at the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Tong-Tong; Liu, Xin-Yu; Gu, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Remarkable phenomena arise at well-defined heterostructures, composed of transition metal oxides, which is absent in the bulk counterpart, providing us a paradigm for exploring the various electron correlation effects. The functional properties of such heterostructures have attracted much attention in the microelectronic and renewable energy fields. Exotic and unexpected states of matter could arise from the reconstruction and coupling among lattice, charge, orbital and spin at the interfaces. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is a powerful tool to visualize the lattice structure and electronic structure at the atomic scale. In the present study some novel phenomena of oxide heterostructures at the atomic scale are summarized and pointed out from the perspective of electron microscopy.

  17. Alkali-Metal Atoms as Spin Labels on Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Ratschek, Martin; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2010-06-01

    We have recently achieved electron spin resonance (ESR) of single alkali-metal atoms isolated on helium (He) nanodroplets A two-laser pump/probe setup for optically detected magnetic resonance is applied, which is based on magnetic circular dichroism to selectively address spin states. The influence of the helium droplet on the alkali-metal valence-electron wave function is directly noticeable as a shift of the ESR transitions with respect to that of free atoms. This perturbation depends on the size of the droplets and can be modeled with an increase of the hyperfine constant, that is an increase of the Fermi contact interaction. After careful characterization of the Rb--He-droplet system the method is being developed into a more universal diagnostic tool to study spin dynamics. ESR silent species located inside the droplet can be investigated by utilizing the surface Rb atom as spin label, and the droplet size is a convenient handle to control the distance between the two. In case of species with a nuclear spin (e.g., 129Xe) spin exchange between the optically pumped Rb atom and the nuclear spin can be studied. We are also extending our method to study magnetically active materials of technological importance, such as Cr, Cu, and small clusters thereof, and we strive to present the first results at the meeting. M. Koch, G. Auböck, C. Callegari, and W.E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 035302 (2009) M. Koch, J. Lanzersdorfer, C. Callegari, J.S. Muenter, and W.E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 13347 (2009) M. Koch, C. Callegari, and W.E. Ernst, Mol. Phys., in press.

  18. Application of Density Functional Theory to Systems Containing Metal Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy of density functional theory (DFT) for problems involving metal atoms is considered. The DFT results are compared with experiment as well as results obtained using the coupled cluster approach. The comparisons include geometries, frequencies, and bond energies. The systems considered include MO2, M(OH)+n, MNO+, and MCO+2. The DFT works well for frequencies and geometries, even in case with symmetry breaking; however, some examples have been found where the symmetry breaking is quite severe and the DFT methods do not work well. The calculation of bond energies is more difficult and examples of successes as well as failures of DFT will be given.

  19. Quantum computing with alkaline-Earth-metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Daley, Andrew J; Boyd, Martin M; Ye, Jun; Zoller, Peter

    2008-10-24

    We present a complete scheme for quantum information processing using the unique features of alkaline-earth-metal atoms. We show how two completely independent lattices can be formed for the 1S0 and 3P0 states, with one used as a storage lattice for qubits encoded on the nuclear spin, and the other as a transport lattice to move qubits and perform gate operations. We discuss how the 3P2 level can be used for addressing of individual qubits, and how collisional losses from metastable states can be used to perform gates via a lossy blockade mechanism.

  20. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    PubMed

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  1. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys

    PubMed Central

    Middleburgh, S. C.; King, D. M.; Lumpkin, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)—making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance. PMID:26064629

  2. Zero-Temperature Structures of Atomic Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeffrey; Ceperley, David

    2011-03-01

    Since the first prediction of an atomic metallic phase of hydrogen by Wigner and Huntington over 75 years ago, there have been many theoretical efforts aimed at determining the crystal structures of the zero-temperature phases. We present results from ab initio random structure searching with density functional theory performed to determine the ground state structures from 500 GPa to 5 TPa. We estimate that molecular hydrogen dissociates into a monatomic body-centered tetragonal structure near 500 GPa (rs = 1.225), which then remains stable to 2.5 TPa (rs = 0.969). At higher pressures, hydrogen stabilizes in an . . . ABCABC . . . planar structure that is remarkably similar to the ground state of lithium, which compresses to the face-centered cubic lattice beyond 5 TPa (rs < 0.86). Our results provide a complete ab initio description of the atomic metallic crystal structures of hydrogen, resolving one of the most fundamental and long outstanding issues concerning the structures of the elements.

  3. Linear indices of the "molecular pseudograph's atom adjacency matrix": definition, significance-interpretation, and application to QSAR analysis of flavone derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a new set of molecular descriptors of relevance to QSAR/QSPR studies and drug design, atom linear indices fk(xi). These atomic level chemical descriptors are based on the calculation of linear maps on Rn[fk(xi): Rn--> Rn] in canonical basis. In this context, the kth power of the molecular pseudograph's atom adjacency matrix [Mk(G)] denotes the matrix of fk(xi) with respect to the canonical basis. In addition, a local-fragment (atom-type) formalism was developed. The kth atom-type linear indices are calculated by summing the kth atom linear indices of all atoms of the same atom type in the molecules. Moreover, total (whole-molecule) linear indices are also proposed. This descriptor is a linear functional (linear form) on Rn. That is, the kth total linear indices is a linear map from Rn to the scalar R[ fk(x): Rn --> R]. Thus, the kth total linear indices are calculated by summing the atom linear indices of all atoms in the molecule. The features of the kth total and local linear indices are illustrated by examples of various types of molecular structures, including chain-lengthening, branching, heteroatoms-content, and multiple bonds. Additionally, the linear independence of the local linear indices to other 0D, 1D, 2D, and 3D molecular descriptors is demonstrated by using principal component analysis for 42 very heterogeneous molecules. Much redundancy and overlapping was found among total linear indices and most of the other structural indices presently in use in the QSPR/QSAR practice. On the contrary, the information carried by atom-type linear indices was strikingly different from that codified in most of the 229 0D-3D molecular descriptors used in this study. It is concluded that the local linear indices are an independent indices containing important structural information to be used in QSPR/QSAR and drug design studies. In this sense, atom, atom-type, and total linear indices were used for the prediction of pIC50 values for the cleavage

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of Metal Oxide Thin Films on Metallic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi Abari, Ali

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful ultra-thin film deposition technique that uses sequential self-limiting surface reactions to provide conformal atomic scale film growth. Deposition of ALD films on many substrate systems has been studied before; however, limited data is available on deposition on metallic surfaces. The investigation of the growth of Al 2O3, HfO2, and ZrO2 as three technologically important metal oxides on metallic substrates is the subject of this thesis. Al2O3, HfO2, and ZrO2 films were grown by ALD on silicon, as a well-studied substrate, in different operating conditions to investigate the effect of process parameters on film properties. To study the growth of oxides on metals, thin metallic substrates were prepared by sputter deposition on silicon wafers and then were transferred to the ALD chamber where the film growth was monitored by in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The transfer was performed via a load lock system without breaking the vacuum to preserve the pristine metal surface. Formation of a thin interfacial layer of metal oxide was observed during the initial moments of plasma enhanced ALD, that was due to the exposure of metal surface to oxygen plasma. In-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to accurately measure the thickness change of the growing films including the interfacial layer. The thickness of this interfacial oxide layer depended on various process parameters including deposition temperature, order of precursors and plasma pulse length. The interfacial oxide layer was absent during the conventional thermal ALD. However, thermal ALD of oxides on metals exhibited substrate-inhibited growth, especially at higher deposition temperatures. With the knowledge of ALD growth characteristics on metals, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) devices were fabricated by both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD and electrically characterized. The presence of the interfacial oxide layer altered the device performance by changing the

  5. Half-Collision Dynamics of Excited Metal Atom Quenching Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ingvar Axel, II

    Half-collision studies of the quenching of excited states of Zn by Xe and Cd by H_2, CH_4 and i-C_4H _{10} have been undertaken and have provided information concerning the role of alignment of the excited metal atom p-orbital as well as other dynamical information and details about the potential energy surfaces (curves) involved in the quenching process. Van der Waals complexes of a single metal atom with a rare gas atom or quencher molecule are prepared using a supersonic expansion of the metal vapor, carrier gas and quencher gas. To provide a more detailed understanding of van der Waals bonding involving closed shell metal atoms, spectroscopic investigations of the MgcdotNe, Zncdot Ar and ZncdotKr C ^1Pi_1 and X^1 Sigma_0^+ states as well as the ZncdotXe D^1Sigma _0^+ and X^1Sigma _0^+ states via laser induced fluorescence have also been performed. No fluorescence is observed from the Zn cdotXe C^1Pi_1 state which predissociates to Zn(4s4p^3 P_{rm J}) + Xe, permitting the C state to be characterized via a Zn(4s4p^3P_2) "action spectrum." Modeling of the deeply bound C state and the shallow D state using Morse potentials suggests that the long range tail of the C state curve crosses the inner wall of the D state curve. For the CdcdotCH _4 and CdcdotC _4H_{10} complexes, fluorescence is not observed from either the C or D states. However, Cd(5s5p^3P _{rm J}) action spectra are obtained for C and D state excitation. A Cd(5s5p ^3P_0) action spectrum is observed as a result of CdcdotCH _4 A and B state excitation. Rotational structure is observed in the vibrational bands and has permitted characterization of the Cdcdot CH_4 X and A states within a pseudodiatomic approximation and provided evidence for hindered rotation of the methane molecule. When CdcdotH_2 or CdcdotD_2 is excited to the red of the Cd(5s5p^1 P_1 >=ts 5s5s^1S_0) atomic transition, fluorescence is again absent while Cd(5s5p ^3P_{rm J}) action spectra are observed. The observation in the spectra of

  6. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites: Dynamic Formation and In Situ Observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-11-23

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation at low temperature. This work provides a general strategy for designing atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites.

  7. Superradiance of several atoms near a metal nanosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protsenko, I. E.; Uskov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Assuming that the number of emitters (atoms) near a spherical metal nanoparticle is large (more than a few hundred), so that their interaction with each other is strong and sufficient for the emergence of their collective states (Dicke states), it is shown that the nanoparticle accelerates the superradiance of the emitters in a similar way as it accelerates the spontaneous emission of a single emitter. In this case, part of the energy stored by the emitters is absorbed by a nanoparticle, and the rest of the energy is radiated as a superradiance pulse. For the parameters selected in this paper, the energy absorbed by the nanoparticle is approximately equal to the emitted energy. We have found the collective states of the emitters and nanoparticle and have derived expressions for the time dependence of the superradiance pulse power, pulse duration and time delay with respect to the moment of excitation of the emitters.

  8. Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibadov, S.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

  9. Magnetism and surface structure of atomically controlled ultrathin metal films.

    SciTech Connect

    Shiratsuchi, Yu.; Yamamoto, M.; Bader, S. D.; Materials Science Division; Osaka Univ.

    2007-01-01

    We review the correlation of magnetism and surface structure in ultrathin metal films, including the tailoring of novel magnetic properties using atomic scale control of the nanostructure. We provide an overview of modern fabrication and characterization techniques used to create and explore these fascinating materials, and highlight important phenomena of interest. We also discuss techniques that control and characterize both the magnetic and structural properties on an atomic scale. Recent advances in the development and applications of these techniques allow nanomagnetism to be investigated in an unprecedented manner. A system cannot necessarily retain a two-dimensional structure as it enters the ultrathin region, but it can transform into a three-dimensional, discontinuous structure due to the Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. This structural transformation can give rise to superparamagnetism. During this evolution, competing factors such as interparticle interactions and the effective magnetic anisotropy govern the magnetic state. These magnetic parameters are influenced by the nanostructure of the film. In particular, controlling the magnetic anisotropy is critical for determining the magnetic properties. Surface effects play especially important roles in influencing both the magnitude and direction of the magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin films. By properly altering the surface structure, the strength and direction of the magnetic anisotropy are controlled via spin-orbit and/or dipole interactions.

  10. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. M.; Festersen, S.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  11. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Festersen, S; Magnussen, O M

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation. PMID:27301317

  12. The Atomic scale structure of liquid metal-electrolyte interfaces.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Festersen, S; Magnussen, O M

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemical interfaces between immiscible liquids have lately received renewed interest, both for gaining fundamental insight as well as for applications in nanomaterial synthesis. In this feature article we demonstrate that the atomic scale structure of these previously inaccessible interfaces nowadays can be explored by in situ synchrotron based X-ray scattering techniques. Exemplary studies of a prototypical electrochemical system - a liquid mercury electrode in pure NaCl solution - reveal that the liquid metal is terminated by a well-defined atomic layer. This layering decays on length scales of 0.5 nm into the Hg bulk and displays a potential and temperature dependent behaviour that can be explained by electrocapillary effects and contributions of the electronic charge distribution on the electrode. In similar studies of nanomaterial growth, performed for the electrochemical deposition of PbFBr, a complex nucleation and growth behaviour is found, involving a crystalline precursor layer prior to the 3D crystal growth. Operando X-ray scattering measurements provide detailed data on the processes of nanoscale film formation.

  13. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  14. Production of Fine Metallic Powders by Hybrid Atomization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Kazumi; Liu, Yunzhong; Kakisawa, Hideki; Halada, Kohmei

    Hybrid Atomization is a recently developed powder-making process that combines effectively free-fall gas atomization and centrifugal atomization. This technique can produce very fine spherical powders with mean diameters of around 10 micrometers, and in high yields. The present report discusses the concept and basic principles of hybrid atomization. Process experiments were carried out and the optimal processing conditions were obtained. The results show that the influences of processing parameters and optimum conditions differ greatly between the proposed and the conventional atomization processes. A new correlation of atomization equation applicable to hybrid atomization is proposed and discussed.

  15. The atomic level journey from aqueous polyoxometalate to metal oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yu; Fast, Dylan B.; Ruther, Rose E.; Amador, Jenn M.; Fullmer, Lauren B.; Decker, Shawn R.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Dolgos, Michelle R. Nyman, May

    2015-01-15

    Aqueous precursors tailored for the deposition of thin film materials are desirable for sustainable, simple, low energy production of advanced materials. Yet the simple practice of using aqueous precursors is complicated by the multitude of interactions that occur between ions and water during dehydration. Here we use lithium polyoxoniobate salts to investigate the fundamental interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to oxide film. Small-angle X-ray scattering of solutions, total X-ray scattering of intermediate gels, and morphological and structural characterization of the lithium niobate thin films reveal the atomic level transitions between these states. The studies show that (1) lithium–[H{sub 2}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 6−} has drastically different solution behaviour than lithium–[Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 8−}, linked to the precursor salt structure (2) in both compositions, the intermediate gel preserves the polyoxoniobate clusters and show similar local order and (3) the morphology and phases of deposited films reflect the ions behaviour throughout the journey from cluster solution to metal oxide. - Graphical abstract: Aqueous lithium polyoxoniobate salts were used to prepare lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) thin films. Fundamental studies were performed to investigate the interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to the oxide film. It was found that acid–base and ion-association chemistries of the aqueous and gel systems significantly affect the key processes in this atom-level journey. - Highlights: • Lithium polyoxoniobate clusters were synthesized with control over Li:Nb ratio as precursors for LiNbO{sub 3} films. • X-ray scattering studies in solution and the solid-state revealed differences controlled by Li:Nb ratio. • Film deposition studies revealed phase, composition and morphology is controlled by Li:Nb ratio. • Cluster to film transformation was revealed using total X-ray scattering and TGA.

  16. Fullerene film on metal surface: Diffusion of metal atoms and interface model

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-jie; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Wang, Jia-Ou; Wu, Rui; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2014-05-12

    We try to understand the fact that fullerene film behaves as n-type semiconductor in electronic devices and establish a model describing the energy level alignment at fullerene/metal interfaces. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) system was taken as a prototype and studied with photoemission measurements. The photoemission spectra revealed that the Ag atoms of the substrate diffused far into C{sub 60} film and donated electrons to the molecules. So the C{sub 60} film became n-type semiconductor with the Ag atoms acting as dopants. The C{sub 60}/Ag(100) interface should be understood as two sub-interfaces on both sides of the molecular layer directly contacting with the substrate. One sub-interface is Fermi level alignment, and the other is vacuum level alignment.

  17. The atomic level journey from aqueous polyoxometalate to metal oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yu; Fast, Dylan B.; Ruther, Rose E.; Amador, Jenn M.; Fullmer, Lauren B.; Decker, Shawn R.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Dolgos, Michelle R.; Nyman, May

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous precursors tailored for the deposition of thin film materials are desirable for sustainable, simple, low energy production of advanced materials. Yet the simple practice of using aqueous precursors is complicated by the multitude of interactions that occur between ions and water during dehydration. Here we use lithium polyoxoniobate salts to investigate the fundamental interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to oxide film. Small-angle X-ray scattering of solutions, total X-ray scattering of intermediate gels, and morphological and structural characterization of the lithium niobate thin films reveal the atomic level transitions between these states. The studies show that (1) lithium-[H2Nb6O19]6- has drastically different solution behaviour than lithium-[Nb6O19]8-, linked to the precursor salt structure (2) in both compositions, the intermediate gel preserves the polyoxoniobate clusters and show similar local order and (3) the morphology and phases of deposited films reflect the ions behaviour throughout the journey from cluster solution to metal oxide.

  18. Ionization of Rydberg atoms colliding with a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sjakste, J.; Borisov, A. G.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    2006-04-15

    We report on a theoretical study of the ionization process of Xe* Rydberg atoms colliding with a metal surface, in the presence of an external electric field. The evolution of the Xe* outer electron is studied by a wave packet propagation approach, allowing to include all dynamical aspects of the collision, in particular nonadiabatic inter-Rydberg transitions. We investigate how the different Xe* Stark states formed in the external field couple together and ionize on the surface and how the different polarizations of the electronic cloud in the Xe* states are reflected in their ionization properties. We show that the presence of the external electric field can significantly perturb the dynamics of the ionization process. Our results account for recent results from Dunning et al. [Nucl. Inst. Meth. B 203, 69 (2003)]. In particular, it is explained how the external electric field present in the experimental procedure of Dunning et al. leads to the apparent absence of a polarization effect in the ionization process.

  19. Structures of the gauche conformers of somE substituted dimethyl ethers. Effect of adjacent atom lone pairs on methyl group asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, James E.; Altman, Michael; Cordell, Floyd R.; Dai, Yuanfang

    The complete equilibrium structures of CH 3OCH 3 and of the gauche conformers of CH 30CH 2F, HOCH,F, CH,OCH,Cl and CH,OCH,CN have been determined by ab initio gradient computation at the Hartree-Fock, double zeta-plus-polarization level. The very large asymmetries in CH bond distances previously reported from microwave substitution structures are shown to be non-existent in the equilibrium structures and are presumably artifacts. Small differences, different in direction from those reported from the experiments and nearly an order of magnitude smaller in size, do exist. They reflect three factors: (1) a lengthening of a CH bond which is trans to a lone pair on an adjacent atom, (2) a general shortening of CH bonds originating at a carbon atom bearing a highly electronegative substituent, and (3) a specific interaction in which a CX substituent shortens the nearly parallel CH bond on the other methyl group. The last interaction, not previously reported, is mediated by withdrawal of electron density from the oxygen lone pair which is trans to both groups. Other structural features derived from the microwave studies are supported by the new results. Inclusion of polarization functions in the basis set for oxygen is essential for correct determination of the COC angle and the dihedral angles. The dihedral angles of CH 3OCH 2F and HOCH 2F are not correctly determined by the computation even at this level, although the computed values are improved when d functions are used for oxygen and still more by use of two sets of oxygen d functions. Polarization functions on carbon or on fluorine have no effect on the computed torsional angles. There is no problem in computing the correct dihedral angles with the CI or CN derivatives.

  20. Metastability and structural polymorphism in noble metals: the role of composition and metal atom coordination in mono- and bimetallic nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Sergio I; Small, Matthew W; Bozin, Emil S; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zuo, Jian-Min; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2013-02-26

    This study examines structural variations found in the atomic ordering of different transition metal nanoparticles synthesized via a common, kinetically controlled protocol: reduction of an aqueous solution of metal precursor salt(s) with NaBH₄ at 273 K in the presence of a capping polymer ligand. These noble metal nanoparticles were characterized at the atomic scale using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (C(s)-STEM). It was found for monometallic samples that the third row, face-centered-cubic (fcc), transition metal [(3M)-Ir, Pt, and Au] particles exhibited more coherently ordered geometries than their second row, fcc, transition metal [(2M)-Rh, Pd, and Ag] analogues. The former exhibit growth habits favoring crystalline phases with specific facet structures while the latter samples are dominated by more disordered atomic arrangements that include complex systems of facets and twinning. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) measurements further confirmed these observations, establishing that the 3M clusters exhibit longer ranged ordering than their 2M counterparts. The assembly of intracolumn bimetallic nanoparticles (Au-Ag, Pt-Pd, and Ir-Rh) using the same experimental conditions showed a strong tendency for the 3M atoms to template long-ranged, crystalline growth of 2M metal atoms extending up to over 8 nm beyond the 3M core.

  1. PREPARATION OF OXALATES OF METALS OF ATOMIC NUMBER GREATER THAN 88

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of oxalates of metals of atomic number greater than 88. A solid peroxide of the heavy metal is contacted with an aqueous oxalic acid solution ai a temperature of about 50 C for a period of time sufficient to form the insoluble metal oxalate which is subsequentiy recovered as a pures crystalline compound.

  2. Selective silver atom interaction at β-SiC(100) surfaces: From anisotropic diffusion to metal atomic wires and stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, M.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.

    2007-07-01

    Silver (Ag) atom interaction on β-SiC(100) surface reconstructions is investigated by atom-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy. On the 3×2 (Si-rich) reconstruction, the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction is dominant with no surface wetting, leading to Ag cluster formation. In contrast, on the c(4×2) Si-terminated reconstruction, almost equivalent Ag-Ag and Ag-surface interactions allow selective one dimensional nano-object formation including Ag atomic wires and stripes following the substrate registry. Their orientation is mediated by anisotropic Ag atom diffusion occurring along Si-dimer rows at 25°C and perpendicularly to them at elevated temperatures, suggesting dimer flipping as diffusion barrier. These metal nanowires potentially open up cross-wiring capability in massively parallel Si atomic lines network.

  3. Structure of ultrathin oxide layers on metal surfaces from grazing scattering of fast atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H.; Seifert, J.; Blauth, D.; Busch, M.; Schüller, A.; Wethekam, S.

    2009-10-01

    The structure of ultrathin oxide layers grown on metal substrates is investigated by grazing scattering of fast atoms from the film surface. We present three recent experimental techniques which allow us to study the structure of ordered oxide films on metal substrates in detail. (1) A new variant of a triangulation method with fast atoms based on the detection of emitted electrons, (2) rainbow scattering under axial surface channeling conditions, and (3) fast atom diffraction (FAD) for studies on the structure of oxide films. Our examples demonstrate the attractive features of grazing fast atom scattering as a powerful analytical tool in surface physics.

  4. Method and apparatus for atomization and spraying of molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1988-07-19

    A method and device for dispersing molten metal into fine particulate spray, the method comprises applying an electric current through the molten metal and simultaneously applying a magnetic field to the molten metal in a plane perpendicular to the electric current, whereby the molten metal is caused to form into droplets at an angle perpendicular to both the electric current and the magnetic field. The device comprises a structure for providing a molten metal, appropriately arranged electrodes for applying an electric current through the molten metal, and a magnet for providing a magnetic field in a plane perpendicular to the electric current. 11 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for atomization and spraying of molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.; Alexeff, Igor; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    A method and device for dispersing molten metal into fine particulate spray, the method comprises applying an electric current through the molten metal and simultaneously applying a magnetic field to the molten metal in a plane perpendicular to the electric current, whereby the molten metal is caused to form into droplets at an angle perpendicular to both the electric current and the magnetic field. The device comprises a structure for providing a molten metal, appropriately arranged electrodes for applying an electric current through the molten metal, and a magnet for providing a magnetic field in a plane perpendicular to the electric current.

  6. [Spatial distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in the tidal reach and its adjacent sea estuary of Daliaohe area, China ].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Yan-wen; Ma, Ying-qun; Zhao, Yan-min; Shi, Yao

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the pollution level of heavy metals in the tidal reach and its adjacent sea estuary of Daliaohe area. The contents and spatial distribution of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ph and Zn in surface water, suspended solids and surface sediments were analyzed respectively. The integrated pollution index and geoaccumulation index were used to evaluate the contamination degree of heavy metals in surface water and surface sediments respectively. The results indicated that the contents of heavy metals in surface water was in the order of Pb < Cu < Cd < Cr < As < Zn. The heavy metal contents in surface water increased from river to sea. Compared with the contents of heavy metals in surface water of the typical domestic estuary in China, the overall contents of heavy metals in surface water were at a higher level. The contents of heavy metals in suspended solids was in the order of Cd < Cu < As < Cr metals in surface sediments was in the order of Cd metals in water, suspended solids and sediment. In particular, the effects of salinity and suspended solids matter were most significant. The integrated pollution index assessment showed that the water quality was good except individual stations. The geoaccumulation index assessment showed that As was the major pollution element in surface sediments.

  7. Consumption of unsafe food in the adjacent area of Hazaribag tannery campus and Buriganga River embankments of Bangladesh: heavy metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Islam, G M Rabiul; Khan, Faysal Elahi; Hoque, Md Mozammel; Jolly, Yeasmin Nahar

    2014-11-01

    The concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Hg, and As in water, poultry meat, fish, vegetables, and rice plants obtained from the area adjacent to the Hazaribag tannery campus, Dhaka, Bangladesh, were estimated and compared with permissible levels established by the WHO and FAO and levels reported previously by other authors. The metal contents were in the following order according to the concentration in contaminated irrigation water: Cr > Pb > As > Hg > Cd. Mean concentrations of Cr, Pb, Hg, and As in irrigated water were above the permissible levels, whereas the results were below the permissible levels for Cd. The metal concentrations in poultry meat, fish, rice, and vegetables were in the following orders: Pb > Cr > Cd > Hg > As, Pb > Cr > Cd > As > Hg, Pb > As, and Cr > Pb > Cd > As > Hg, respectively. The mean concentrations of metals in poultry meat, fish, rice, and vegetables were much higher than the permissible levels. The trends of weekly intake of heavy metals (WIMs) from poultry meat, fish, rice, and vegetables were as follows: Pb > Cr > Cd > Hg > As, Pb > Cr > Cd > As > Hg, Pb > As, and Cr > Pb > Cd > As > Hg, respectively. WIMs for all the metals were lower than the provisional maximum weekly intake recommended by WHO/FAO and USNAS.

  8. Aluminum conducts better than copper at the atomic scale: a first-principles study of metallic atomic wires.

    PubMed

    Simbeck, Adam J; Lanzillo, Nick; Kharche, Neerav; Verstraete, Matthieu J; Nayak, Saroj K

    2012-12-21

    Using a first-principles density functional method, we have studied the electronic structure, electron-phonon coupling, and quantum transport properties of atomic wires of Ag, Al, Au, and Cu. Non-equilibrium Green's function-based transport studies of finite atomic wires suggest that the conductivity of Al atomic wires is higher than that of Ag, Au, and Cu in contrast to the bulk where Al has the lowest conductivity among these systems. This is attributed to the higher number of eigenchannels in Al wires, which becomes the determining factor in the ballistic limit. On the basis of density functional perturbation theory, we find that the electron-phonon coupling constant of the Al atomic wire is lowest among the four metals studied, and more importantly, that the value is reduced by a factor of 50 compared to the bulk. PMID:23083218

  9. Thermochemical analyses of the oxidative vaporization of metals and oxides by oxygen molecules and atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Leisz, D. M.; Fryburg, G. C.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium thermochemical analyses are employed to describe the vaporization processes of metals and metal oxides upon exposure to molecular and atomic oxygen. Specific analytic results for the chromium-, platinum-, aluminum-, and silicon-oxygen systems are presented. Maximum rates of oxidative vaporization predicted from the thermochemical considerations are compared with experimental results for chromium and platinum. The oxidative vaporization rates of chromium and platinum are considerably enhanced by oxygen atoms.

  10. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  11. Metal debris concentrations in soft tissues adjacent to loosened femoral stems is higher in uncemented than cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are still many questions related to aseptic femoral stem loosening. Systemic and local immune responses to the implanted “foreign body” is one of the reasons for loosening. The purpose of the study was to measure metal ion concentration (Ti, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Al) around loosened femoral stems and compare their levels around uncemented and cemented implants. Methods This paper reports 50 hips operated for isolated stem loosening, in 50 patients at the mean age of 57 years (from 21 to 87). There were 25 cemented (Co,Cr29,Mo,Ni) and 25 uncemented (Ti, Al) stems. The mean follow-up from primary hip replacement to revision was 10.1 years (from 0.5 to 17). During the procedure, scar tissue around the stem was taken for analysis of metal ions. Results The concentrations of titanium and aluminium in soft tissues around uncemented loosened stems were higher than cemented ones (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between both types of stems in terms of ions of the metal of which cemented implants had been made of (Co, Cr, Mo, Ni). Conclusions In soft tissue around a loosened stem, the concentrations of metal ions from implants are much higher in case of uncemented stems than of cemented ones. Metal ions from vitalium femoral heads were found around uncemented stems in similar values to cemented streams. PMID:25098913

  12. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  13. Spin coupling between cold atoms and the thermal fluctuations of a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Jones, M P A; Vale, C J; Sahagun, D; Hall, B V; Hinds, E A

    2003-08-22

    We describe an experiment in which Bose-Einstein condensates and cold atom clouds are held by a microscopic magnetic trap near a room-temperature metal wire 500 microm in diameter. The lifetime for atoms to remain in the microtrap is measured over a range of distances down to 27 microm from the surface of the metal. We observe the loss of atoms from the microtrap due to spin flips. These are induced by radio-frequency thermal fluctuations of the magnetic field near the surface, as predicted but not previously observed.

  14. Atomic transport at liquid metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2000-10-12

    In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to identify the controlling transport mechanisms at metal/oxide interfaces and measure the corresponding diffusivities. Interfacial transport rates in our experiments are two to four orders of magnitude faster than any previously reported rates for the oxide surface. The interfacial diffusivities and the degree of interfacial anisotropy depend on the oxygen activity of the system. Atomic transport at metal/oxide interfaces plays a defining role in many technological processes, and these experiments provide fundamental data for the formulation of the atomic theory needed to explain many of the observed phenomena.

  15. Atomic-scale heterogeneity of a multicomponent bulk metallic glass with excellent glass forming ability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Konno, K; Zhang, W; Kumar, V; Matsuura, M; Inoue, A; Sakurai, T; Chen, M W

    2009-08-14

    We report the atomic structure of a multicomponent Cu45Zr45Ag10 bulk metallic glass investigated by state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. In comparison with a binary Cu50Zr50 metallic glass, Zr-rich interpenetrating clusters centered by paired and stringed Ag atoms and Cu-rich icosahedra are widely observed in the ternary Cu45Zr45Ag10 alloy. The atomic-scale heterogeneity caused by chemical short- and medium-range order is found to play a key role in stabilizing the liquid phase and in improving the glass forming ability of the multicomponent alloy.

  16. Magic wavelengths for the np-ns transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2007-11-15

    Extensive calculations of the electric-dipole matrix elements in alkali-metal atoms are conducted using the relativistic all-order method. This approach is a linearized version of the coupled-cluster method, which sums infinite sets of many-body perturbation theory terms. All allowed transitions between the lowest ns, np{sub 1/2}, np{sub 3/2} states and a large number of excited states are considered in these calculations and their accuracy is evaluated. The resulting electric-dipole matrix elements are used for the high-precision calculation of frequency-dependent polarizabilities of the excited states of alkali-metal atoms. We find 'magic' wavelengths in alkali-metal atoms for which the ns and np{sub 1/2} and np{sub 3/2} atomic levels have the same ac Stark shifts, which facilitates state-insensitive optical cooling and trapping.

  17. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed N -atom transfer reactions of azides

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer reactions of azides provide efficient ways to construct new carbon–nitrogen and sulfur–nitrogen bonds. These reactions are inherently green: no additive besides catalyst is needed to form the nitrenoid reactive intermediate, and the by-product of the reaction is environmentally benign N2 gas. As such, azides can be useful precursors for transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer to sulfides, olefins and C–H bonds. These methods offer competitive selectivities and comparable substrate scope as alternative processes to generate metal nitrenoids. PMID:20617243

  18. Electron transfer and multi-atom abstraction reactions between atomic metal anions and NO, NO2 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, J. M.; Curtis, S.; Mayer, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    The atomic metal anions Fe-, Cs-, Cu- and Ag- were reacted with NO, NO2 and SO2 to form intact NO-, NO2- and SO2- with no fragmentation. Yields for the molecular anions ranged from 4 to 97% and were found to correlate to the exothermicity of the electron transfer process. Sequential oxygen atom extraction was found to take place between the metal anions and NO and NO2. Reactions between NO2 and Fe- resulted in FeO-, FeO2- and FeO3- while reactions of Cu- with NO2 resulted in CuO- and CuO2-. Reactions of Cu- and Ag- with NO resulted in CuO- and AgO- respectively.

  19. Retrieval of metal atom and ion number densities in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langowski, Martin; Von Savigny, Christian; Burrows, John

    2016-07-01

    When meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere with velocities of several 10 km/s, they heat up due to frictional heating and meteoric material is ablated in the upper atmosphere at around 100 km. A certain part of this ablated material are metal atoms and ions, which form layers of about 10 km width at altitudes between 80 to 110 km. The metal atoms and ions are strong emitters of dayglow coming from resonance fluorescence. From satellite observations of these emission signature, densities of the metal atom and ion layers can be retrieved. From the densities of the metal layers in combination with model simulations the input rate of meteoric material can be estimated, which still shows a large uncertainty range between 1 to 300 tons per day. We will present results of the number density retrievals from the SCIAMACHY limb mesosphere and lower thermosphere measurements from 2008 to 2012 for Mg, Mg^{+} and Na.

  20. Change in atomic coordination in a heavily deformed metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Schumacher, G.; Riesemeier, H.; Banhart, J.

    2014-05-28

    The local structure around Ni and La atoms in Al{sub 85}Ni{sub 10}La{sub 5} amorphous powder after ball milling was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A continuous decrease in coordination number of Ni and La as a function of milling time was observed, while the nearest neighbour distance and the mean square atomic displacement did not change, pointing at the creation of free volume around the Ni and La atoms. These structural changes resemble those of a liquid upon temperature increase. The results are described by a shear band model in which the coordination numbers of Ni and La are different within and outside a shear band.

  1. Note: Design principles of a linear array multi-channel effusive metal-vapor atom source

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, B.; Majumder, A.; Thakur, K. B.; Das, A. K.

    2013-10-15

    Atomic beams can easily be produced by allowing atoms to effuse through a channel. In an earlier investigation [A. Majumder et al., Vacuum 83, 989 (2009)], we had designed, fabricated, and characterized an effusive metal-vapor source using collinear-array of multi-channel. In this note, we describe the theoretical basis of designing the source. Atom density in atomic beam has been estimated using a set of analytical expressions for long-channel operated in transparent mode. Parametric studies on aspect ratio of channel, inter-channel separation, beam width, and vertical distance from the source are carried out. They are useful in providing physical picture and optimizing design parameters.

  2. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  3. Dynamic dependence of interaction potentials for keV atoms at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, A.; Adamov, G.; Wethekam, S.; Maass, K.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.

    2004-05-01

    He and N atoms are scattered with keV energies under a grazing angle of incidence from clean and flat Ag(111) and Al(111) surfaces. For incidence along low index crystallographic directions in the surface plane, atomic projectiles are steered by rows of atoms (''axial surface channeling'') giving rise to characteristic rainbows in their angular distribution. From the analysis of this effect we derive effective scattering potentials which reveal pronounced dynamical effects. We attribute our observation to the embedding energy for penetration of atoms in the electron gas of a metal.

  4. Analytical study of ultrasound influence on the molten metals atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonnikova, A.; Arkhipov, V.; Boiko, V.; Basalaev, S.; Konovalenko, A.; Zolotorev, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the study of influence of ultrasound on liquid atomization using ejection nozzles. Two principles of influence of ultrasound on the atomization process such as a change of conditions on gas-liquid boundary during the generation of ultrasound oscillation in the gas and liquid jet (film) disintegration under the action of capillary forces in cases of generation of ultrasound oscillation in the liquid are considered. The optimal values of the ultrasound oscillation frequencies are calculated. Two constructions of the nozzles patented are proposed.

  5. Magnetism and electronic phase transitions in monoclinic transition metal dichalcogenides with transition metal atoms embedded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xianqing; Ni, Jun

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the energetic, electronic, and magnetic properties of substitutional 3d transition metal dopants in monoclinic transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as topological insulators ( 1 T ' - MX 2 with M = (Mo, W) and X = (S, Se)). We find various favorite features in these doped systems to introduce magnetism and other desirable electronic properties: (i) The Mn embedded monoclinic TMDs are magnetic, and the doped 1 T ' - MoS 2 still maintains the semiconducting character with high concentration of Mn, while an electronic phase transition occurs in other Mn doped monoclinic TMDs with an increasing concentration of Mn. Two Mn dopants prefer the ferromagnetic coupling except for substitution of the nearest Mo atoms in 1 T ' - MoS 2 , and the strength of exchange interaction shows anisotropic behavior with dopants along one Mo zigzag chain having much stronger coupling. (ii) The substitutional V is a promising hole dopant, which causes little change to the energy dispersion around the conduction and valence band edges in most systems. In contrast, parts of the conduction band drop for the electron dopants Co and Ni due to the large structural distortion. Moreover, closing band gaps of the host materials are observed with increasing carrier concentration. (iii) Single Fe dopant has a magnetic moment, but it also dopes electrons. When two Fe dopants have a small distance, the systems turn into nonmagnetic semiconductors. (iv) The formation energies of all dopants are much lower than those in hexagonal TMDs and are all negative in certain growth conditions, suggesting possible realization of the predicted magnetism, electronic phase transitions as well as carrier doping in 1 T ' - MX 2 based topological devices.

  6. Self-assembly of metal atoms (Na, K, Ca) on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shunhong; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2015-01-01

    A thorough search of the distribution pattern of Na, K, and Ca atoms on graphene surface, carried out using a synergistic combination of density functional theory and particle swarm optimization algorithm, yielded some unusual results. The equilibrium distribution is concentration and metal dependent; the metal atoms distribute uniformly when their coverage ratio M : C (M = Na, K, Ca) is 1 : 6, but Na and Ca atoms self-assemble to form parallel quasi-one-dimensional chains when their coverage is reduced to 1 : 8. At the higher concentration (M : C = 1 : 6), electron-phonon coupling calculations further show that the NaC6 is a superconductor with critical temperature of 5.8 K, which is the highest value among all the stable alkali or alkaline-earth metal decorated monolayer graphene systems studied to-date. At the lower concentration (M : C = 1 : 8) and depending on metal species, well-aligned atomic metal chains interact with graphene with varying intensity, making it possible to achieve either rigid or non-rigid band doping in graphene.A thorough search of the distribution pattern of Na, K, and Ca atoms on graphene surface, carried out using a synergistic combination of density functional theory and particle swarm optimization algorithm, yielded some unusual results. The equilibrium distribution is concentration and metal dependent; the metal atoms distribute uniformly when their coverage ratio M : C (M = Na, K, Ca) is 1 : 6, but Na and Ca atoms self-assemble to form parallel quasi-one-dimensional chains when their coverage is reduced to 1 : 8. At the higher concentration (M : C = 1 : 6), electron-phonon coupling calculations further show that the NaC6 is a superconductor with critical temperature of 5.8 K, which is the highest value among all the stable alkali or alkaline-earth metal decorated monolayer graphene systems studied to-date. At the lower concentration (M : C = 1 : 8) and depending on metal species, well-aligned atomic metal chains interact with

  7. Stable isolated metal atoms as active sites for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Chen, Jian Fu; Li, Yu Hang; Yuan, Wen Tao; Zhou, Ying; Zheng, Li Rong; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P; Wang, Yun; Zhao, Hui Jun; Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-02-17

    The process of using solar energy to split water to produce hydrogen assisted by an inorganic semiconductor is crucial for solving our energy crisis and environmental problems in the future. However, most semiconductor photocatalysts would not exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity without loading suitable co-catalysts. Generally, the noble metals have been widely applied as co-catalysts, but always agglomerate during the loading process or photocatalytic reaction. Therefore, the utilization efficiency of the noble co-catalysts is still very low on a per metal atom basis if no obvious size effect exists, because heterogeneous catalytic reactions occur on the surface active atoms. Here, for the first time, we have synthesized isolated metal atoms (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) stably by anchoring on TiO2 , a model photocatalystic system, by a facile one-step method. The isolated metal atom based photocatalysts show excellent stability for H2 evolution and can lead to a 6-13-fold increase in photocatalytic activity over the metal clusters loaded on TiO2 by the traditional method. Furthermore, the configurations of isolated atoms as well as the originality of their unusual stability were analyzed by a collaborative work from both experiments and theoretical calculations.

  8. Tuning inter-dot tunnel coupling of an etched graphene double quantum dot by adjacent metal gates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Da; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Luo, Gang; Zheng, Zhi-Xiong; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Graphene double quantum dots (DQDs) open to use charge or spin degrees of freedom for storing and manipulating quantum information in this new electronic material. However, impurities and edge disorders in etched graphene nano-structures hinder the ability to control the inter-dot tunnel coupling, tC, the most important property of the artificial molecule. Here we report measurements of tC in an all-metal-side-gated graphene DQD. We find that tC can be controlled continuously about a factor of four by employing a single gate. Furthermore, tC, can be changed monotonically about another factor of four as electrons are gate-pumped into the dot one by one. The results suggest that the strength of tunnel coupling in etched graphene DQDs can be varied in a rather broad range and in a controllable manner, which improves the outlook to use graphene as a base material for qubit applications. PMID:24213723

  9. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  10. Determination of metals in phospholipids by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Montford, B; Cribbs, S C

    1969-07-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and manganese in phospholipids by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. The method uses a solution of phospholipid in isopentyl acetate; phosphate interference is controlled by the addition of aqueous lanthanum chloride solution homogenized with ethanol. Standards are prepared in a similar solvent mixture. A comparison between the described method and that of standard additions show it to be free of phospholipid matrix effects. PMID:18960604

  11. Novel laser atomic fluorescence spectrometer for environmental and biomedical analyses of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Parmer, Keith D.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the development of a novel experimental set-up using laser atomic fluorescence for detection and concentration measurements of heavy metal atoms for environmental and biomedical analyses. This spectrometer is based on the application of tunable LiF:F2+** and LiF:F2- color center and alexandrite lasers with nonlinear converters for narrowband excitation of atomic fluorescence and the use of gated multichannel CCD detectors for fluorescence measurements. A standard graphite furnace module was used for sample atomization. The laser sources used provide narrowband selective laser excitation continuously tunable in the 200 - 400 nm range and are therefore suitable for resonant excitation of atomic transitions in practically all known heavy metal atoms. In the first experiments, water samples containing Cu, Pb and Fe impurities were studied and detection levels of less than 1 ppb were observed. Comparison of the results of atomic laser fluorescence analysis and traditional atomic absorption spectrometry showed good qualitative agreement between these two methods. It is projected that full optimization of our experimental set up will allow for improved detection levels of several orders of magnitude. Possible optimization and simplification of the spectrometer are discussed in the context of developing a portable instrument for field use.

  12. Matrix isolation spectra of metal atoms and ions: Ti, Zr, and Mo in Ar and Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrüchel, Christoph; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1981-01-01

    UV-absorption spectra are reported of neutral atoms and ions of Ti, Zr, and Mo in Ar and Kr matrices. The matrix-isolated species are produced by ion bombardment of a bulk metal target. Thermal and photoannealing experiments indicate that sputtered neutral atoms may occupy one or two distinct matrix sites, depending on the system. Sputtered ions, after being neutralized in the matrix, either go preferentially into the higher energy site, i.e., the site whose absorption bands are shifted farther to the blue, when atoms already populate two sites, or they create a new site at higher energy when there is only one site for atoms. Deconvolution of matrix isolation spectra into contributions from individual sites shows that spectra due to atoms in a particular site correspond much better to gas phase spectra than do total matrix isolation spectra. Matrix shifts of atomic absorption bands for both sites can be rationalized using a model by McCarty and Robinson if allowance is made for matrix distortion around solute atoms. The blue, or close-packed, site is found to correspond to a solute atom replacing a single matrix atom without inducing appreciable matrix distortion, whereas the red, or expanded, site requires the cage around a solute atom to be enlarged by a few percent.

  13. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on the reconstructed graphene-like BN single sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Zheng-Jia; Wang, Yu-Fang; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jiang, Run; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2015-12-01

    A graphene-like BN single sheet with absorbed alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms have been investigated by using a first-principles method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic structure of BN sheet with adsorbed metal atoms is mainly determined by the metal electronic state which is near to the Fermi level owing to the wide band gap of pure BN sheet. So, we calculated the adsorption energy, charge transfer and work function after the metal adsorbed on BN sheet. We found that the interaction between the metal atoms and BN surface was very strong, and the stable adsorption site for all the adsorbed atoms concluded was high-coordination surface site (H-center) rather than the surface dangling bond sites from the perspective of simple bond-counting arguments. Our results indicate that the interaction of BN sheet with metal atoms could help in the development of metallic nanoscale devices.

  14. Theoretical research program to predict the properties of molecules and clusters containing transition metal atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S.

    1984-01-01

    The primary focus of this research has been the theoretical study of transition metal (TM) chemistry. A major goal of this work is to provide reliable information about the interaction of H atoms with iron metal. This information is needed to understand the effect of H atoms on the processes of embrittlement and crack propagation in iron. The method in the iron hydrogen studies is the cluster method in which the bulk metal is modelled by a finite number of iron atoms. There are several difficulties in the application of this approach to the hydrogen iron system. First the nature of TM-TM and TM-H bonding for even diatomic molecules was not well understood when these studies were started. Secondly relatively large iron clusters are needed to provide reasonable results.

  15. A model of optical trapping cold atoms using a metallic nano wire with surface plasmon effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Phuong Lan, Nguyen; Thi Nga, Do; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we construct a new model of optical trapping cold atoms with a metallic nano wire by using surface plasmon effect generated by strong field of laser beams. Using the skin effect, we send a strong oscillated electromagnetic filed through the surface of a metallic nano wire. The local field generated by evanescent effect creates an effective attractive potential near the surface of metallic nano wires. The consideration of some possible boundary and frequency conditions might lead to non-trivial bound state solution for a cold atom. We discus also the case of the laser reflection optical trap with shell-core design, and compare our model with another recent schemes of cold atom optical traps using optical fibers and carbon nanotubes.

  16. Metal content monitoring in Hypericum perforatum pharmaceutical derivatives by atomic absorption and emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gomez, María R; Soledad, Cerutti; Olsina, Roberto A; Silva, María F; Martínez, Luis D

    2004-02-18

    Metals have been investigated in different plant materials in order to establish their normal concentration range and consider their role in plants as part of human medicinal treatment. Metal monitoring as a pattern recognition method is a promising tool in the characterization and/or standardization of phytomedicines. In the present work measurable amounts of Ca, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn were detected in phytopharmaceutical derivatives of Hypericum perforatum by atomic techniques. Atomic methodologies like flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) allow reliable determination of mineral content in pharmaceutical quality control of medicinal plants. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis (CE) patterns of characteristic components (fingerprints) have been performed for the search of adulterants in phytopharmaceutical products. PMID:15127813

  17. The importance of atomic and molecular correlation on the bonding in transition metal compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of accurate spectroscopic parameters for molecular systems containing transition metal atoms is shown to require extensive data sets and a high level correlation treatment, and techniques and their limitations are considered. Extensive results reported on the transition metal atoms, hydrides, oxides, and dimers makes possible the design of a calculation to correctly describe the mixing of different atomic asymptotes, and to give a correct balance between molecular bonding and exchange interactions. Examples considered include the dipole moment of the 2Delta state of NiH, which can help determine the mixture of 3d(8)4s(2) and 3d(9)4s(1) in the NiH wavefunction, and the bonding in CrO, where an equivalent description of the relative energies associated with the Cr 3d-3d atomic exchange and the Cr-O bond is important.

  18. 'Doubly Magic' Conditions in Magic-Wavelength Trapping of Ultracold Alkali-Metal Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-07-16

    In experiments with trapped atoms, atomic energy levels are shifted by the trapping optical and magnetic fields. Regardless of this strong perturbation, precision spectroscopy may be still carried out using specially crafted, 'magic' trapping fields. Finding these conditions for particularly valuable microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms has so far remained an open challenge. Here I demonstrate that the microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms may be indeed made impervious to both trapping laser intensity and fluctuations of magnetic fields. I consider driving multiphoton transitions between the clock levels and show that these 'doubly magic' conditions are realized at special values of trapping laser wavelengths and fixed values of relatively weak magnetic fields. This finding has implications for precision measurements and quantum information processing with qubits stored in hyperfine manifolds.

  19. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  20. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce3+ upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-01

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce(3+), while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  1. a Theory of the Metallization of Semiconductor Surfaces by Alkali Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te, Ronald Lim

    Experimental evidence suggest that alkali metal atoms adsorbed on a semiconductor substrate undergo a transition from insulating to metallic at low coverage. The electrons in the adlayer initially occupy isolated exponentially localized atomic orbitals, and become metallic with increasing coverage. Several investigations have shown that the onset of metallization occurs at less than a quarter of a monolayer. Interpretation of second-harmonic data, where the signal increases sharply at 1/6 monolayer, suggests a metallization transition due to the delocalization of surface electrons. This dissertation provides a theoretical framework for understanding the metallization of alkali overlayers. The adlayer is simulated using a rectangular lattice with more than 80,000 sites that are randomly occupied by atomic-like orbitals up to densities commensurate with the different coverages. A new computational technique called dynamic recursion was developed to handle calculations with large numbers of basis orbitals. Each alkali orbital is taken to have the same on-site energy; however, the orbital interactions involve several nearest neighbors and are an exponentially decreasing function of the orbitals' separation. This model gives a tight-binding Hamiltonian with random off-diagonal disorder. An investigation of states at the Fermi level shows a sharp transition between strongly and weakly localized states as a function of coverage. This numerically observed transition is indicative of an Anderson-type metal-insulator transition where disorder causes states of different degrees of localization to cross the Fermi level. The Hamiltonian studied exhibits a delocalization transition for states at the Fermi level, and is proposed as a model for the metallization of the alkali metal atoms adsorbed on a semiconductor substrate. These results are consistent with other work which show the existence of a mobility edge that separates exponentially localized from power-law localized

  2. Comparison of heavy metal concentrations in tissues of red foxes from adjacent urban, suburban, and rural areas.

    PubMed

    Dip, R; Stieger, C; Deplazes, P; Hegglin, D; Müller, U; Dafflon, O; Koch, H; Naegeli, H

    2001-05-01

    The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is a representative of the canid family with wide distribution in the Northern Hemisphere and Australia. The increasing utilization of urbanized habitats by red foxes prompted us to test whether this species may be used to monitor the presence of anthropogenic pollutants in cities or suburbs. For that purpose, we compared the concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn) in foxes from urban, suburban, and rural areas within the municipality of Zürich (Switzerland). The kidney and liver of suburban and rural foxes contained the highest Cd concentrations, whereas urban foxes contained the highest Pb levels. In the kidney of suburban foxes, Cd concentrations increased from a median value of 0.73 mg/kg in juvenile animals to 1.82 mg/kg in adults. Similarly, the liver of suburban foxes contained increasing Cd levels from a median of 0.21 mg/kg in juvenile animals to 0.94 mg/kg in adults. An age-dependent storage of Cd was also found in foxes from the rural surroundings, but no such accumulation occurred in urban foxes from the city center, where even adult animals contained very low Cd levels. Conversely, foxes from the urban center were characterized by elevated Pb concentrations during the first 2 years of life, but this transient Pb accumulation was absent in suburban or rural animals. The liver of juvenile foxes contained a median Pb concentration of 0.99 mg/kg in the city compared to only 0.47 and 0.37 mg/kg in the suburban and rural area, respectively. Thus, we found that animals from separate environmental compartments contain different patterns of tissue residues, implying that red foxes may serve as a bioindicator species to detect certain toxic hazards in urbanized habitats. PMID:11525499

  3. Dynamic decoupling and local atomic order of a model multicomponent metallic glass-former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of multicomponent metallic alloys is spatially heterogeneous near glass transition. The diffusion coefficient of one component of the metallic alloys may also decouple from those of other components, i.e., the diffusion coefficient of each component depends differently on the viscosity of metallic alloys. In this work we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity and decoupling of a model system for multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts by using a hard sphere model that considers the size disparity of alloys but does not take chemical effects into account. We also study how such dynamic behaviors would relate to the local atomic structure of metallic alloys. We find, from molecular dynamics simulations, that the smallest component P of multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts becomes dynamically heterogeneous at a translational relaxation time scale and that the largest major component Pd forms a slow subsystem, which has been considered mainly responsible for the stabilization of amorphous state of alloys. The heterogeneous dynamics of P atoms accounts for the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation and also leads to the dynamic decoupling of P and Pd atoms. The dynamically heterogeneous P atoms decrease the lifetime of the local short-range atomic orders of both icosahedral and close-packed structures by orders of magnitude.

  4. Dynamic decoupling and local atomic order of a model multicomponent metallic glass-former.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2015-06-17

    The dynamics of multicomponent metallic alloys is spatially heterogeneous near glass transition. The diffusion coefficient of one component of the metallic alloys may also decouple from those of other components, i.e., the diffusion coefficient of each component depends differently on the viscosity of metallic alloys. In this work we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity and decoupling of a model system for multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts by using a hard sphere model that considers the size disparity of alloys but does not take chemical effects into account. We also study how such dynamic behaviors would relate to the local atomic structure of metallic alloys. We find, from molecular dynamics simulations, that the smallest component P of multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts becomes dynamically heterogeneous at a translational relaxation time scale and that the largest major component Pd forms a slow subsystem, which has been considered mainly responsible for the stabilization of amorphous state of alloys. The heterogeneous dynamics of P atoms accounts for the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation and also leads to the dynamic decoupling of P and Pd atoms. The dynamically heterogeneous P atoms decrease the lifetime of the local short-range atomic orders of both icosahedral and close-packed structures by orders of magnitude.

  5. Understanding the Properties and Structure of Metallic Glasses at the Atomic Level

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.

    2010-01-01

    Liquids and glasses have been well known to human kind for millennia. And yet major mysteries remain in the behavior of glasses and liquids at the atomic level, and identifying the microscopic mechanisms that control the properties of glasses is one of the most challenging unsolved problems in physical sciences. For this reason, applying simplistic approaches to explain the behavior of metallic glasses can lead to serious errors. On the other hand because metallic glasses are atomic glasses with relatively simple structure, they may offer better opportunities to advance our fundamental understanding on the nature of the glass. The difficulties inherent to the problem and some recent advances are reviewed here.

  6. Distribution and assessment of heavy metals off the Changjiang River mouth and adjacent area during the past century and the relationship of the heavy metals with anthropogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Gang; Bi, Shipu; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Yong; Mei, Xi; Li, Anchun

    2015-07-15

    Forty-three surface sediment samples and one gravity core obtained from the offshore area of the Changjiang River were analyzed for selected heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Hg) to evaluate the spatial distribution and potential ecological risk during the last century. The results indicated that the sediments are composed of silty sand, sandy silt and silt and were deposited in a relatively stable environment over the last century. The studied marine sediments are fine and easily adsorb heavy metals from aquatic systems. The heavy metal concentrations were found to be enriched in the sediments and were generally closely related to anthropogenic activities. However, the data analysis demonstrated that the levels of heavy metal contamination were below background values during the last century, indicating low ecological risk. Spatially, a higher concentration was found at the entrance to the Changjiang River, while it decreased to the northeast. The vertical distribution of contamination levels and ecological risk can be divided into four periods based on the downcore variation in heavy metals: pre-1940s, 1940s-1970s, 1970s-1990s and the late 1990s to the present. These conclusions form the basis for implementing appropriate policies to protect marine sediment quality. PMID:26002099

  7. The atomic nature of polymer-metal interactions in adhesion, friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Adhesion experiments with polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyimide contacting tungsten indicate that the polymers bond chemically to the clean metal surface. Polymer chain fragments which transfer to the surface of tungsten in field ion microscopy adhesion studies are highly oriented. Auger emission spectroscopy of PTFE transfer films to various metal surfaces indicates that the PTFE is bonded to the metal surface via the carbon atom. With PTFE in sliding contact with different orientations of aluminum, metal orientation is found to influence surfaces in sliding. The lowest friction and least amount of surface damage is detected on the highest atomic density (111) plane. The friction process itself can initiate polymer film formation from simple organic molecules.

  8. Characteristics of flows of energetic atoms reflected from metal targets during ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmichev, A.; Perevertaylo, V.; Tsybulsky, L.; Volpian, O.

    2016-07-01

    Particle number and energy reflection coefficients for energetic neutralized gas ions (Ar and O atoms) backscattered from metal targets during ion bombardment have been calculated using TRIM code. The energy distributions of reflected atoms are computed, too, and their dependence on the primary ion energy and the angle of ion incidence is determined. The obtained data confirm the possibility of employing energetic atoms reflection for generation of high energy neutral beams and point out to take this phenomenon into account under analysis of the ion technology for coating deposition.

  9. Optically promoted bipartite atomic entanglement in hybrid metallic carbon nanotube systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, M. F.; Bondarev, I. V.; Meliksetyan, A. V.

    2014-02-14

    We study theoretically a pair of spatially separated extrinsic atomic type species (extrinsic atoms, ions, molecules, or semiconductor quantum dots) near a metallic carbon nanotube, that are coupled both directly via the inter-atomic dipole-dipole interactions and indirectly by means of the virtual exchange by resonance plasmon excitations on the nanotube surface. We analyze how the optical preparation of the system by using strong laser pulses affects the formation and evolution of the bipartite atomic entanglement. Despite a large number of possible excitation regimes and evolution pathways, we find a few generic scenarios for the bipartite entanglement evolution and formulate practical recommendations on how to optimize and control the robust bipartite atomic entanglement in hybrid carbon nanotube systems.

  10. Unveiling atomic-scale features of inherent heterogeneity in metallic glass by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. C.; Guan, P. F.; Li, M. Z.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneity is commonly believed to be intrinsic to metallic glasses (MGs). Nevertheless, how to distinguish and characterize the heterogeneity at the atomic level is still debated. Based on the extensive molecular dynamics simulations that combine isoconfigurational ensemble and atomic pinning methods, we directly reveal that MG contains flow units and the elastic matrix which can be well distinguished by their distinctive atomic-level responsiveness and mechanical performance. The microscopic features of the flow units, such as the shape, spatial distribution dimensionality, and correlation length, are characterized from atomic position analyses. Furthermore, the correlation between the flow units and the landscape of energy state, free volume, atomic-level stress, and especially the local bond orientational order parameter is discussed.

  11. Correlation between atomic structure evolution and strength in a bulk metallic glass at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Wang, G; Liu, Z Y; Bednarčík, J; Gao, Y L; Zhai, Q J; Mattern, N; Eckert, J

    2014-01-28

    A model Zr41.25Ti13.75Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) is selected to explore the structural evolution on the atomic scale with decreasing temperature down to cryogenic level using high energy X-ray synchrotron radiation. We discover a close correlation between the atomic structure evolution and the strength of the BMG and find out that the activation energy increment of the concordantly atomic shifting at lower temperature is the main factor influencing the strength. Our results might provide a fundamental understanding of the atomic-scale structure evolution and may bridge the gap between the atomic-scale physics and the macro-scale fracture strength for BMGs.

  12. Charge distributions and effective atomic charges in transition-metal complexes using generalized atomic polar tensors and topological analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cioslowski, J.; Hay, P.J.; Ritchie, J.P. )

    1990-01-11

    Advantages and shortcomings of three different definitions of the atomic charges, namely, the Mulliken, the generalized atomic polar tensors (GAPT), and the topological ones, are judged by applying them to the results of ab initio calculations on the TiF{sub 4}, Ni(CO){sub 4}, and FeH{sub 6}{sup 4{minus}} molecules. In agreement with previous reports, we find that the Mulliken charges vary widely with the choice of basis sets and therefore their utilization for the analysis of electronic structure of the transition-metal complexes is of little practical importance. On the other hand, both the GAPT and Bader's charges show a remarkable insensitivity to the quality of the basis sets.

  13. Pressure effects on hydrogen atoms near the metal plane in the HCP phase of rare-earth metal trihydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunghathaithip, N.; Pakornchote, T.; Phaisangittisakul, N.; Bovornratanaraks, T.; Pinsook, U.

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth metal trihydrides, REH3 (RE=Sc, Y, La), in the hcp phase were investigated under high pressure by the ab initio method. We concentrated on the behavior of hydrogen atoms which is affected by pressure. Two-thirds of the hydrogen atoms near the metal plane (Hm) were found to displace away from the metal plane as pressure increases. The trajectory of these squeezed hydrogen atoms is from a site near the metal plane, and moves past the plane of the tetragonal sites, and heads toward the nearest octahedral site. However, the rate of displacement depends on the local environment. LaH3 exhibits the least impediment on the Hm displacement while YH3 and ScH3 exhibit stronger impediment. Furthermore, our calculated Raman and IR active modes are in general agreement with the experimental data. The displacement of Hm can be used to explain the behavior of the Ov peak in Raman spectra, where it exists at low pressure and disappears at higher pressure in YH3 and ScH3.

  14. Controlling Magnetism of a Complex Metallic System Using Atomic Individualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Y.; Paudyal, D.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A., Jr.; Misra, S.; Miller, G. J.

    2010-08-01

    When the complexity of a metallic compound reaches a certain level, a specific location in the structure may be critically responsible for a given fundamental property of a material while other locations may not play as much of a role in determining such a property. The first-principles theory has pinpointed a critical location in the framework of a complex intermetallic compound—Gd5Ge4—that resulted in a controlled alteration of the magnetism of this compound using precise chemical tools.

  15. Investigation of the Interactions and Bonding between Carbon and Group VIII Metals at the Atomic Scale.

    PubMed

    Zoberbier, Thilo; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Suyetin, Mikhail; Majouga, Alexander G; Besley, Elena; Kaiser, Ute; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-03-23

    The nature and dynamics of bonding between Fe, Ru, Os, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is studied by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AC-HRTEM). The metals catalyze a wide variety of different transformations ranging from ejection of carbon atoms from the nanotube sidewall to the formation of hollow carbon shells or metal carbide within the SWNT, depending on the nature of the metal. The electron beam of AC-HRTEM serves the dual purpose of providing energy to the specimen and simultaneously enabling imaging of chemical transformations. Careful control of the electron beam parameters, energy, flux, and dose allowed direct comparison between the metals, demonstrating that their chemical reactions with SWNTs are determined by a balance between the cohesive energy of the metal particles and the strength of the metal-carbon σ- or π-bonds. The pathways of transformations of a given metal can be drastically changed by applying different electron energies (80, 40, or 20 keV), thus demonstrating AC-HRTEM as a new tool to direct and study chemical reactions. The understanding of interactions and bonding between SWNT and metals revealed by AC-HRTEM at the atomic level has important implications for nanotube-based electronic devices and catalysis.

  16. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels. PMID:17386783

  17. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; de Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the

  18. Interaction of 3d transition metal atoms with charged ion projectiles from Electron Nuclear Dynamics computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Computational results on atomic scattering between charged projectiles and transition metal target atoms are presented. This work aims at obtaining detailed information about charge, spin and energy transfer processes that occur between the interacting particles. An in-depth understanding of these phenomena is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the interpretation of various types of ion beam experiments, ranging from gas phase chromatography to spectroscopic observations of fast ions in ferromagnetic media. This contribution focuses on the scattering of light projectiles ranging from He to O, that are prepared in various initial charge states, by 3d transition metal atoms. The presented computations are performed in the framework of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END)^1 theory which incorporates the coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom without reliance on the computationally cumbersome and frequently intractable determination of potential energy surfaces. In the present application of END theory to ion - transition metal atom scattering, a supermolecule approach is utilized in conjunction with a spin-unrestricted single determinantal wave function describing the electronic system. Integral scattering, charge and spin exchange cross sections are discussed as functions of the elementary parameters of the problem, such as projectile and target atomic numbers as well as projectile charge and initial kinetic energy. ^1 E.Deumens, A.Diz, R.Longo, Y.Oehrn, Rev.Mod.Phys. 66, 917 (1994)

  19. Phase transition into the metallic state in hypothetical (without molecules) dense atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2013-10-15

    A simple physical model of the metal-dielectric (vapor-liquid) phase transition in hypothetical (without molecules) atomic hydrogen is proposed. The reason for such a transition is the quantum collective cohesive energy occurring due to quantum electron-electron exchange similar to the cohesive energy in the liquid-metal phase of alkali metals. It is found that the critical parameters of the transition are P{sub c} ∼ 41000 atm, ρ{sub c} ∼ 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}, and T{sub c} ∼ 9750 K.

  20. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter; Van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; De Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source.

  2. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  3. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  4. Electronic and nuclear dynamics in the frustrated photodesorption of alkali atoms from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2001-03-01

    Electronic and nuclear dynamics of alkali atom covered noble metal surfaces are investigated by the interferometric time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique [1]. Photoinduced charge transfer turns on the repulsive Coulomb force between the alkali atom and the metal surface thereby initiating the expulsion of alkali atoms from the surface. The resulting nuclear motion of alkali atoms is detected through changes in the surface electronic structure. In the extreme case of Cs/Cu(111), the alkali atom motion can be observed for up to 200 fs, which according to a Newton’s law model corresponds to the stretching of the Cu-Cs bond by 0.3 Å [2]. However, wave packet spreading due to the recoil-induced phonon generation retards the desorption process. Systematic dependence of the alkali atom lifetime on the crystal face, the substrate material, and the adsorbate polarizability provides insights into factors that stabilize adsorbates with respect to decay via the resonant charge transfer and inelastic electron-electron scattering [3]. 1 S. Ogawa, H. Nagano, and H. Petek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1931 (1999). 2 H. Petek, H. Nagano, M. J. Weida, and S. Ogawa, Science 288, 1402 (2000). 3 J. P. Gauyacq et al., Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 117 (2000).

  5. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  6. Does soil water saturation mobilize metals from riparian soils to adjacent surface water? A field monitoring study in a metal contaminated region.

    PubMed

    Van Laer, Liesbeth; Smolders, Erik

    2013-06-01

    In the Noorderkempen (NW Belgium), a large area (about 280 km(2)) is contaminated with cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) due to historical pollution by the Zn smelters. Direct aquatic emissions of metals have diminished over time, however the surface water metal concentration largely exceeds quality standards, mainly during winter periods. Monitoring data were analyzed to reveal whether these fluctuations are related to seasonal redox reactions in associated contaminated riparian soils that drain into the rivers. A field survey was set up with soil pore-water and groundwater monitored for three years in transects of soil monitoring points perpendicular to rivers at contaminated and non-contaminated sites. Site averaged surface water concentrations of a 15 year dataset exceeded local quality standards 4 to 200-fold. Winter averaged metal concentrations significantly exceeded the corresponding summer values 1.3-1.8 (Zn) and 1.5-2.4 fold (Cd). Zinc and Cd concentrations in water were positively related to Fe and Mn but not to Ca, K or Na suggesting that redox reactions and not dilution processes are involved. In ground- and pore-water of the associated riparian soils, the concentrations of Zn fluctuate by the same order of magnitude as in surface water but were generally smaller than in the corresponding contaminated rivers. In addition, correlations of dissolved Zn with Fe and Mn were lacking. This analysis suggests that redox reactions in streams, and not in riparian soils, explain the seasonal trends of Zn and Cd in surface water. Hence, river sediments and not riparian soils may be the cause of the winter peaks of Zn and Cd in these rivers.

  7. Atomic collisions in suprafluid helium-nanodroplets: timescales for metal-cluster formation derived from He-density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Alexander; Thaler, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Collision times for the coinage metal atoms Cu, Ag and Au in He-droplets are derived from helium density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The strength of the attractive interaction between the metal atoms turns out to be less important than the mass of the propagating metal atoms. Even for small droplets consisting of a few thousand helium atoms, the collision times are shortest for Cu, followed by Ag and Au, despite the higher binding energy of Au2 compared to Cu2. PMID:25812719

  8. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in sediments from three adjacent regions of the Yellow River using metal chemical fractions and multivariate analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zuo, Hang; Tian, Mengjing; Zhang, Liyang; Meng, Jia; Zhou, Xuening; Min, Na; Chang, Xinyuan; Liu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Metal chemical fractions obtained by optimized BCR three-stage extraction procedure and multivariate analysis techniques were exploited for assessing 7 heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Cd, Co, Cu, Zn and Ni) in sediments from Gansu province, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions of the Yellow River in Northern China. The results indicated that higher susceptibility and bioavailability of Cr and Cd with a strong anthropogenic source were due to their higher availability in the exchangeable fraction. A portion of Pb, Cd, Co, Zn, and Ni in reducible fraction may be due to the fact that they can form stable complexes with Fe and Mn oxides. Substantial amount of Pb, Co, Ni and Cu was observed as oxidizable fraction because of their strong affinity to the organic matters so that they can complex with humic substances in sediments. The high geo-accumulation indexes (I(geo)) for Cr and Cd showed their higher environmental risk to the aquatic biota. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that high toxic Cr and Cd in polluted sites (Cd in S10, S11 and Cr in S13) may be contributed to anthropogenic sources, it was consistent with the results of dual hierarchical clustering analysis (DHCA), which could give more details about contributing sources.

  9. Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metallic surface: Stark regime and ionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Inarrea, Manuel; Salas, J. Pablo; Lanchares, Victor; Pascual, Ana Isabel; Palacian, Jesus F.; Yanguas, Patricia

    2007-11-15

    We investigate the classical dynamics of a hydrogen atom near a metallic surface in the presence of a uniform electric field. To describe the atom-surface interaction we use a simple electrostatic image model. Owing to the axial symmetry of the system, the z-component of the canonical angular momentum P{sub {phi}} is an integral and the electronic dynamics is modeled by a two degrees of freedom Hamiltonian in cylindrical coordinates. The structure and evolution of the phase space as a function of the electric field strength is explored extensively by means of numerical techniques of continuation of families of periodic orbits and Poincare surfaces of section. We find that, due to the presence of the electric field, the atom is strongly polarized through two consecutive pitchfork bifurcations that strongly change the phase space structure. Finally, by means of the phase space transition state theory and the classical spectral theorem, the ionization dynamics of the atom is studied.

  10. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-03-15

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10{sup -16}-10{sup -4} a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature.

  11. Measuring the van der Waals forces between a Rydberg atom and a metallic surface

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.; Haroche, S.; Hinds, E.A.; Jhe, W.; Meschede, D.

    1988-05-01

    We have observed the deflection of Rydberg atoms towards a metallic surface by the van der Waals force. Cs and Na atoms in states of principal quantum number n were sent between two parallel gold-coated mirrors, spaced by a gap w (2.1 ..mu..mless than or equal towless than or equal to8.5 ..mu..m). We measured the value n/sub m/ at which the transmission cuts off and from the variation of n/sub m/ versus w, we obtained a measure of the atom-surface interaction. For 12atoms, and it obeys the scaling laws of the Lennard-Jones model.

  12. Tunable meta-atom using liquid metal embedded in stretchable polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Peng; Yang, Siming; Wang, Qiugu; Jiang, Huawei; Song, Jiming; Dong, Liang; Jain, Aditya; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-07-07

    Reconfigurable metamaterials have great potential to alleviate complications involved in using passive metamaterials to realize emerging electromagnetic functions, such as dynamical filtering, sensing, and cloaking. This paper presents a new type of tunable meta-atoms in the X-band frequency range (8–12 GHz) toward reconfigurable metamaterials. The meta-atom is made of all flexible materials compliant to the surface of an interaction object. It uses a liquid metal-based split-ring resonator as its core constituent embedded in a highly flexible elastomer. We demonstrate that simple mechanical stretching of the meta-atom can lead to the great flexibility in reconfiguring its resonance frequency continuously over more than 70% of the X-band frequency range. The presented meta-atom technique provides a simple approach to dynamically tune response characteristics of metamaterials over a broad frequency range.

  13. Multiphoton ionization studies of metal atom-solvent interactions from thevan der Waals dimer to the mesoscopic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotts, James Michael

    A unified molecular-level description of solute-solvent interactions within condensed-phase systems has remained elusive despite recent advances towards the detailed understanding of the fundamental electrostatic interactions between the atomic and/or molecular moieties that compose a bulk system. Through the use of simplified cluster model systems such as those employing metal atoms solvated by a rare gas solvent, however, microscopic details pertaining to the intrinsic composite nature of the atomic orbital interactions can be effectively dissected away from the complexity inherent to condensed- phase systems. This thesis work presents a systematic spectroscopic investigation of Al/cdot Arn/ (n /leq 60) clusters generated by standard laser ablation techniques using 1/sp'UV + 1vis two-color and 2vis+1vis single-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in the vicinity of the Al(3d) gets Al(3p) atomic transitions. UV absorption spectra were collected for Al/cdot Arn cluster sizes corresponding to solvation within the first icosahedral solvation shell ( 1/leq n/leq12) as well as the second icosahedral solvation shell (13/leq n/leq 54). These spectra exhibited significant red-shifted absorption features whose absolute peak positions were noted to be highly sensitive to the degree of solvation. Such behavior was strongly suggestive of an aluminum atom surface binding site. Nevertheless, classical Monte Carlo simulations failed to reproduce the observed magnitude of the spectral shifts. Consequently, the underlying origin of this anomalous spectral behavior was believed to derive from electronic state mixing interactions between those states originating from the Al(3d) and Al(4p) electronic manifolds. Evidence for such a coupling was sought at the level of the diatomic AlċAr molecule using both 1/sp'UV+1vis and 2vis+1vis REMPI to characterize all electronic states arising from the Al(3d)ċAr and Al(4p)ċAr asymptotes. Strong evidence for state mixing was

  14. Bonding between strongly repulsive metal atoms: an oxymoron made real in a confined space of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Popov, Alexey A; Avdoshenko, Stas M; Pendás, Angel Martín; Dunsch, Lothar

    2012-08-21

    Endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) are able to encapsulate up to four metal atoms. In EMFs, metal atoms are positively charged because of the electron transfer from the endohedral metal atoms to the carbon cage. It results in the strong Coulomb repulsion between the positively charged ions trapped in the confined inner space of the fullerene. At the same time, in many EMFs, such as Lu(2)@C(76), Y(2)@C(79)N, M(2)@C(82) (M = Sc, Y, Lu, etc.), Y(3)@C(80), or Sc(4)O(2)@C(80), metals do not adopt their highest oxidation states, thus yielding a possibility of the covalent metal-metal bonding. In some other EMFs (e.g., La(2)@C(80)), metal-metal bonding evolves as the result of the electrochemical or chemical reduction, which leads to the population of the metal-based LUMO with pronounced metal-metal bonding character. This article highlights different aspects of the metal-metal bonding in EMFs. It is concluded that the valence state of the metal atoms in dimetallofullerenes is not dependent on their third ionization potential, but is determined by their ns(2)(n- 1)d(1)→ns(1)(n- 1)d(2) excitation energies. Peculiarities of the metal-metal bonding in EMFs are described in terms of molecular orbital analysis as well as topological approaches such as Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules and Electron Localization Function. Interplay of Coulomb repulsion and covalent bonding is analyzed in the framework of the Interacting Quantum Atom approach.

  15. Metal-atom fluorescence from the quenching of metastable rare gases by metal carbonyls

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was used to study the metal fluorescence resulting from the quenching of metastable rare-gas states by metal carbonyls. The data from the quenching or argon, neon, and helium by iron and nickel carbonyl agreed well with a restricted degree of freedom model indicating a concerted bond-breaking dissociation.

  16. Atomic-scale roughness of Li metal surface evident in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prendergast, David; Wan, Liwen; Liang, Yufeng; Chuang, Yi-De; Qiao, Ruimin; Yan, Shishen; Yang, Wanli

    2015-03-01

    Realizing Li metal electrodes depends on fundamental understanding and efficient control of surface properties, which requires reliable characterization of the Li metal surface. Controlled experiments of Li K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveal evidence of steady oxidation of the Li metal surface even under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The XAS of the short-lived Li metal surface, prepared by in-situ scratching, exhibits a prominent peak at 55.6 eV, more intense and at a slightly higher energy than the first peak expected for bulk Li metal at 55 eV. First-principles XAS calculations explain the origin of both the increased intensity and energy shift. This required the use of surface structural models with under-coordinated Li atoms and an estimated 4 Åinelastic mean-free-path for Auger electrons, implying extreme surface sensitivity of the measurements to the first 2-3 atomic layers. This work provides a benchmark on both experiment and theory for further studies of Li and other reactive metal surfaces, which are currently under scrutiny for next-generation energy storage devices. DP, LW, and YL acknowledge support from the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Tuning electronic properties of metallic atom in bondage to a nanospace.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Xing, Gengmei; Yuan, Hui; Cao, Wenbin; Jing, Long; Gao, Xingfa; Qu, Li; Cheng, Yue; Ye, Chang; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Ibrahim, Kurash; Qian, Haijie; Su, Run

    2005-05-12

    The possibility of modulating the electronic configurations of the innermost atoms inside a nanospace, nano sheath with chemical modification was investigated using synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Systems of definite nanostructures were chosen for this study. Systematic variations in energy, intensity, and width of pi and sigma O 1s core level spectra, in absorption characteristics of C 1s-->pi transition, in photoabsorption of pre-edge and resonance regions of the Gd 4d-->4f transition, were observed for Gd@C(82) (an isolated nanospace for Gd), Gd@C(82)(OH)(12) (a modified nanospace for Gd), and Gd@C(82)(OH)(22) (a differently modified nanospace for Gd), and the reference materials Gd-DTPA (a semi-closed space for Gd) and Gd(2)O(3). A sandwich-type electronic interaction along [outer modification group]-[nano sheaths]-[inner metallic atom] was observed in the molecules of modifications. This makes it possible to control electron-donation directions, either from the innermost metallic atom toward the outer nano sheaths or the reverse. The results suggest that one may effectively tune the fine structures of electronic configurations of such a metallic atom being astricted into nanostructures through changing the number or category of outer groups of chemical modifications. This may open a door to realizing the desired designs for electronic and magnetic properties of functionalized nanomaterials. PMID:16852042

  18. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  19. Second-Nearest-Neighbor Correlations from Connection of Atomic Packing Motifs in Metallic Glasses and Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Jun; Ma, Evan; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-11-30

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the atomic correlations characterizing the second peak in the radial distribution function (RDF) of metallic glasses and liquids. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of different connection schemes of atomic packing motifs, based on the number of shared atoms between two linked coordination polyhedra. The results demonstrate that the cluster connections by face-sharing, specifically with three common atoms, are most favored when transitioning from the liquid to glassy state, and exhibit the stiffest elastic response during shear deformation. These properties of the connections and the resultant atomic correlations are generally the same for different types of packing motifs in different alloys. Splitting of the second RDF peak was observed for the inherent structure of the equilibrium liquid, originating solely from cluster connections; this trait can then be inherited in the metallic glass formed via subsequent quenching of the parent liquid through the glass transition, in the absence of any additional type of local structural order. In conclusion, increasing ordering and cluster connection during cooling, however, may tune the position and intensity of the split peaks.

  20. Second-Nearest-Neighbor Correlations from Connection of Atomic Packing Motifs in Metallic Glasses and Liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Jun; Ma, Evan; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-11-30

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the atomic correlations characterizing the second peak in the radial distribution function (RDF) of metallic glasses and liquids. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of different connection schemes of atomic packing motifs, based on the number of shared atoms between two linked coordination polyhedra. The results demonstrate that the cluster connections by face-sharing, specifically with three common atoms, are most favored when transitioning from the liquid to glassy state, and exhibit the stiffest elastic response during shear deformation. These properties of the connections and the resultant atomic correlations are generally the samemore » for different types of packing motifs in different alloys. Splitting of the second RDF peak was observed for the inherent structure of the equilibrium liquid, originating solely from cluster connections; this trait can then be inherited in the metallic glass formed via subsequent quenching of the parent liquid through the glass transition, in the absence of any additional type of local structural order. In conclusion, increasing ordering and cluster connection during cooling, however, may tune the position and intensity of the split peaks.« less

  1. Second-Nearest-Neighbor Correlations from Connection of Atomic Packing Motifs in Metallic Glasses and Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Ma, Evan; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the atomic correlations characterizing the second peak in the radial distribution function (RDF) of metallic glasses and liquids. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of different connection schemes of atomic packing motifs, based on the number of shared atoms between two linked coordination polyhedra. The results demonstrate that the cluster connections by face-sharing, specifically with three common atoms, are most favored when transitioning from the liquid to glassy state, and exhibit the stiffest elastic response during shear deformation. These properties of the connections and the resultant atomic correlations are generally the same for different types of packing motifs in different alloys. Splitting of the second RDF peak was observed for the inherent structure of the equilibrium liquid, originating solely from cluster connections; this trait can then be inherited in the metallic glass formed via subsequent quenching of the parent liquid through the glass transition, in the absence of any additional type of local structural order. Increasing ordering and cluster connection during cooling, however, may tune the position and intensity of the split peaks. PMID:26616762

  2. Second-Nearest-Neighbor Correlations from Connection of Atomic Packing Motifs in Metallic Glasses and Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Ma, Evan; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-11-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the atomic correlations characterizing the second peak in the radial distribution function (RDF) of metallic glasses and liquids. The analysis was conducted from the perspective of different connection schemes of atomic packing motifs, based on the number of shared atoms between two linked coordination polyhedra. The results demonstrate that the cluster connections by face-sharing, specifically with three common atoms, are most favored when transitioning from the liquid to glassy state, and exhibit the stiffest elastic response during shear deformation. These properties of the connections and the resultant atomic correlations are generally the same for different types of packing motifs in different alloys. Splitting of the second RDF peak was observed for the inherent structure of the equilibrium liquid, originating solely from cluster connections; this trait can then be inherited in the metallic glass formed via subsequent quenching of the parent liquid through the glass transition, in the absence of any additional type of local structural order. Increasing ordering and cluster connection during cooling, however, may tune the position and intensity of the split peaks.

  3. Nozzle extraction geometry of a liquid metal atomizer optimized by computer simulation of electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetkovic, S.R.; Balachandran, W.; Arnold, P.G.; Kleveland, B.; Wilson, F.G.; Zhao, A.P.

    1996-07-01

    Experimental measurements are compared with results obtained using a dedicated computer program for finite element modeling of electric fields in the vicinity of a liquid metal atomizer nozzle/tip. Good agreement between the experiment and the computer model has been achieved for two different nozzle geometries (Taylor cone and rounded tip), while paying particular attention to accuracy of the numerical solution near the tip (for equipotentials as well as derived values of field strength). In addition, the potential distribution has been calculated for several different positions of extractor voltage observed for each case. Finally, the assessment of suitability of the computer technique for qualitative consideration of the atomization process itself is presented.

  4. Strengthening effect of single-atomic-layer graphene in metal-graphene nanolayered composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youbin; Lee, Jinsup; Yeom, Min Sun; Shin, Jae Won; Kim, Hyungjun; Cui, Yi; Kysar, Jeffrey W; Hone, James; Jung, Yousung; Jeon, Seokwoo; Han, Seung Min

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a single-atomic-layer material with excellent mechanical properties and has the potential to enhance the strength of composites. Its two-dimensional geometry, high intrinsic strength and modulus can effectively constrain dislocation motion, resulting in the significant strengthening of metals. Here we demonstrate a new material design in the form of a nanolayered composite consisting of alternating layers of metal (copper or nickel) and monolayer graphene that has ultra-high strengths of 1.5 and 4.0 GPa for copper-graphene with 70-nm repeat layer spacing and nickel-graphene with 100-nm repeat layer spacing, respectively. The ultra-high strengths of these metal-graphene nanolayered structures indicate the effectiveness of graphene in blocking dislocation propagation across the metal-graphene interface. Ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy compression tests and molecular dynamics simulations confirm a build-up of dislocations at the graphene interface. PMID:23820590

  5. Molecular-dynamics simulations of collisions between energetic clusters of atoms and metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Horngming; Averback, R. S.; Sellers, Harrell; Flynn, C. P.

    1992-02-01

    The collisional dynamics between clusters of Cu, Ni, or Al atoms, with energies of 92 eV to 1.0 keV and sizes of 4 to 92 atoms, and substrates of these same metals were studied using molecular-dynamics computer simulations. A diverse behavior was observed, depending sensitively on the size and energy of the cluster, the elastic and chemical properties of the cluster-substrate combination, and the relative mass of the cluster and substrate atoms. For the 92-atom Cu clusters impacting a Cu substrate, the cluster can form a ``glob'' on the surface at low energy, while penetrating the substrate and heavily deforming it at high energies. When the cluster energy exceeds ~=25 eV/atom, the substrate suffers radiation damage. The 92-atom Al clusters do not much deform Ni substrates, but rather tend to spread epitaxially over the surface, despite the 15% lattice mismatch. For 1-keV collisions, several Al atoms dissociate from the cluster, either reflecting into the vacuum or scattering over the surface. 326-eV Ni clusters embed themselves almost completely within Al substrates and form localized amorphous zones. The potentials for these simulations were derived from the embedded-atom method, although modified to treat the higher-energy events. IAb initioP linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals-molecular-orbitals calculations were employed to test these potentials over a wide range of energies. A simple model for the expected macroscopic behavior of cluster-solid interactions is included as an appendix for a comparison with the atomistic description offered by the simulations.

  6. Optimization of a hydride generation metallic furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-MF-AAS) method for tin determination: analytical and morphological parameters of a metallic atomizer.

    PubMed

    Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2013-12-15

    The present work describes a metallic tube as hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry. Its performance is evaluated through tin determination, and the accuracy of the method assessed through the analysis of sediment and water samples. Some chemical parameters (referring to the generation of the hydride) such as acid, NaOH and THB concentrations, as well as physical parameters (referring to the transport of the hydride) such as carrier, acetylene, air flow-rates, flame composition, coil length, tube hole area, among others, are evaluated for optimization of the method. Scanning electron microscopy is used for evaluating morphological parameters in both new and used (after 150 h) tube atomizers. The method presents linear Sn concentration from 50 to 1000 µg L(-1) (r>0.9995; n=3) and the analytical frequency of ca. 40 h(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) is 7.1 µg L(-1) and the precision, expressed as RSD is less than 4% (200 µg L(-1); n=10). The accuracy is evaluated through reference materials, and the results are similar at 95% confidence level according to the t-test.

  7. Probing the role of encapsulated alkaline earth metal atoms in endohedral metallofullerenes M@C76 (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) by first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Xu, Qian; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Wei-Wei; Li, Sheng-Tao

    2012-05-01

    By means of density functional theory and statistical mechanics, we investigate the geometric and electronic structures, thermodynamic stability and infrared (IR) vibrational frequencies of alkaline earth metal endohedral fullerenes, M@C(76) (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba). The results reveal that M@C(1)(17,459)-C(76) possesses the lowest energy followed by M@C(2v)(19,138)-C(76) with a very small energy difference. Both the structures have a pair of adjacent pentagons and are related by a single Stone-Wales transformation. Equilibrium statistical thermodynamic analyses based on Gibbs energy treatments suggest that M@C(1)(17,459)-C(76) has a prominent thermodynamic stability at higher temperatures, in contrast with M@C(2v)(19,138)-C(76) whose thermodynamic stability is affected by the encapsulated metal atom. The encapsulated metallic atoms as well as cage structures significantly influence the electronic properties of endohedral fullerenes such as electron affinities and ionization potentials. On the other hand, the singlet-triplet splitting energy ΔE(S-T) depends on the cage structures. In addition, IR spectra and chemical shifts of these compounds have been computed to assist further experimental characterization.

  8. Modeling STM tips by single absorbed atoms on W(100) films: 3d and 4d transition-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, W. A.; Redinger, J.; Podloucky, R.

    2001-09-01

    In order to provide comprehensive data on the electronic structure of realistic STM tips we have studied tungsten (100) films with adsorbed single 3d and 4d transition-metal atoms by ab initio molecular-dynamics and full potential methods. Molecular dynamics using ultrasoft pseudopotentials has been used to determine the relaxation of adsorbate and surface layers. Subsequently the electronic structure of the relaxed model tip has been calculated with an all-electron full potential method. The results suggest that the chemical nature of the tip apex to a high degree determines achievable corrugations and that results for current and corrugation values in a perturbation approach might be considerably improved by including the electronic structure of the tip.

  9. Copper Benzenetricarboxylate Metal-Organic Framework Nucleation Mechanisms on Metal Oxide Powders and Thin Films formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Paul C; Zhao, Junjie; Williams, Philip S; Walls, Howard J; Shepherd, Sarah D; Losego, Mark D; Peterson, Gregory W; Parsons, Gregory N

    2016-04-13

    Chemically functional microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals are attractive for filtration and gas storage applications, and recent results show that they can be immobilized on high surface area substrates, such as fiber mats. However, fundamental knowledge is still lacking regarding initial key reaction steps in thin film MOF nucleation and growth. We find that thin inorganic nucleation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) can promote solvothermal growth of copper benzenetricarboxylate MOF (Cu-BTC) on various substrate surfaces. The nature of the ALD material affects the MOF nucleation time, crystal size and morphology, and the resulting MOF surface area per unit mass. To understand MOF nucleation mechanisms, we investigate detailed Cu-BTC MOF nucleation behavior on metal oxide powders and Al2O3, ZnO, and TiO2 layers formed by ALD on polypropylene substrates. Studying both combined and sequential MOF reactant exposure conditions, we find that during solvothermal synthesis ALD metal oxides can react with the MOF metal precursor to form double hydroxy salts that can further convert to Cu-BTC MOF. The acidic organic linker can also etch or react with the surface to form MOF from an oxide metal source, which can also function as a nucleation agent for Cu-BTC in the mixed solvothermal solution. We discuss the implications of these results for better controlled thin film MOF nucleation and growth.

  10. Formation of Cu-Zr-M ternary bulk metallic glasses based on atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. H.; Wang, Q.; Wu, J.; Dong, C.

    2008-02-01

    Ternary Cu-Zr-M (M= Al, Ti and Ag) bulk metallic glasses are investigated using a cluster line approach. New bulk metallic glass rods with compositions lying along the cluster line Cu5Zr6-M were fabricated by copper mould suction, where binary cluster Cu5Zr6 is an Archimedean octahedral antiprism, M being about 4~13.2 at.% for Al, 8.3 at.% for Ti and 9 at.% for Ag. The relevant mechanism was discussed in the light of the cluster-plus-glue-atom model.

  11. Solute-atom segregation at symmetric twist and tilt boundaries in binary metallic alloys on an atomic-scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rittner, J.D.; Udler, D.; Seidman, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    Monte Carlo and overlapping distributions Monte Carlo (ODMC) techniques are employed to simulate grain boundary (GB) segregation in a number of single-phase binary metallic alloys - the Au-Pt, Cu-Ni, Ni-Pd, and Ni-Pt systems. For a series of symmetric [001] twist and [001] tilt boundaries, with coincident site lattice (CSL) structures, we demonstrate that the Gibbsian interfacial excess of solute is a systematic function of the misorientation angle. We also explore in detail whether the GB solid solution behavior is ideal or nonideal by comparing the results of Monte Carlo and ODMC simulations. The range of binding free energies of specific atomic sites at GBs for solute atoms is also studied. The simulational results obtained demonstrate that the thermodynamic and statistical thermodynamic models commonly used to explain GB segregation are too simple to account for the microscopic segregation patterns observed, and that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to extract the observed microscopic information employing macroscopic models. 45 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Submolecular Imaging by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy with an Oxygen Atom Rigidly Connected to a Metallic Probe.

    PubMed

    Mönig, Harry; Hermoso, Diego R; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Todorović, Milica; Timmer, Alexander; Schüer, Simon; Langewisch, Gernot; Pérez, Rubén; Fuchs, Harald

    2016-01-26

    In scanning probe microscopy, the imaging characteristics in the various interaction channels crucially depend on the chemical termination of the probe tip. Here we analyze the contrast signatures of an oxygen-terminated copper tip with a tetrahedral configuration of the covalently bound terminal O atom. Supported by first-principles calculations we show how this tip termination can be identified by contrast analysis in noncontact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (NC-AFM, STM) on a partially oxidized Cu(110) surface. After controlled tip functionalization by soft indentations of only a few angstroms in an oxide nanodomain, we demonstrate that this tip allows imaging an organic molecule adsorbed on Cu(110) by constant-height NC-AFM in the repulsive force regime, revealing its internal bond structure. In established tip functionalization approaches where, for example, CO or Xe is deliberately picked up from a surface, these probe particles are only weakly bound to the metallic tip, leading to lateral deflections during scanning. Therefore, the contrast mechanism is subject to image distortions, artifacts, and related controversies. In contrast, our simulations for the O-terminated Cu tip show that lateral deflections of the terminating O atom are negligible. This allows a detailed discussion of the fundamental imaging mechanisms in high-resolution NC-AFM experiments. With its structural rigidity, its chemically passivated state, and a high electron density at the apex, we identify the main characteristics of the O-terminated Cu tip, making it a highly attractive complementary probe for the characterization of organic nanostructures on surfaces.

  13. Formation and atomic configuration of binary metallic glasses studied by ion beam mixing and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-06-15

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Ag-Nb system with overall composition ranging from 25 to 90 at. % of Nb by ion beam mixing. Interestingly, the diffraction analysis shows that the formed Nb-rich metallic glass features are two distinct atomic configurations. In atomistic modeling, an n-body Ag-Nb potential is derived, under the assistance of ab initio calculation, and then applied in molecular dynamics simulations. An atomic configuration is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, and as well as an icosahedral ordering observed in the Ag-Nb metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems. Simulations confirm that the two dominate local atomic packing units are formed through a structural phase transition from the Nb-based bcc and fcc solid solutions, respectively, suggesting a concept of structural heredity that the crystalline structure of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the resultant metallic glasses.

  14. Understanding glass-forming ability through sluggish crystallization of atomically thin metallic glassy films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y. T.; Cao, C. R.; Huang, K. Q.; Zhao, N. J.; Gu, L. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Zheng, D. N. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Wang, W. H. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-08-04

    The glass-forming ability (GFA) of an alloy, closely related to its ability to resist crystallization, is a crucial issue in condensed matter physics. So far, the studies on GFA are mostly statistical and empirical guides. Benefiting from the ultrahigh thermal stability of ultrathin metallic glassy film and high resolution spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, the crystallization of atomically thin ZrCu and its microalloyed ZrCuAl glasses with markedly different GFA was investigated at the atomic scale. We find the Zr diffusivity estimated from the density of nuclei is dramatically decreased by adding of Al, which is the major reason for the much better GFA of the ZrCuAl metallic glass.

  15. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  16. An optically trapped mixture of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Adonis; Mishra, Hari Prasad; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold collisions between alkali-metal and metastable triplet helium (He*) atoms provide the opportunity to study Feshbach resonances in the presence of a strong loss channel, namely Penning ionization, which strongly depends on the internal spin-states of the atoms. Recently we have realized the first optically trapped alkali-metal-metastable helium mixture. To prepare the ultracold 87 Rb+4 He* mixture in a single beam optical dipole trap (ODT), we apply evaporative cooling in a strong quadrupole magnetic trap (QMT) for both species and subsequent transfer to the ODT via a hybrid trap. We will present lifetime measurements of different spin-state mixtures, testing the application of the universal loss model to this interesting multichannel collision system.

  17. Barrier-free subsurface incorporation of 3d metal atoms into Bi(111) films

    DOE PAGES

    Klein, C.; Vollmers, N. J.; Gerstmann, U.; Zahl, P.; Lukermann, D.; Jnawali, G.; Pfnur, H.; Sutter, P.; Tegenkamp, C.; Schmidt, W. G.; et al

    2015-05-27

    By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with density functional theory it is shown that the Bi(111) surface provides a well-defined incorporation site in the first bilayer that traps highly coordinating atoms such as transition metals (TMs) or noble metals. All deposited atoms assume exactly the same specific sevenfold coordinated subsurface interstitial site while the surface topography remains nearly unchanged. Notably, 3d TMs show a barrier-free incorporation. The observed surface modification by barrier-free subsorption helps to suppress aggregation in clusters. Thus, it allows a tuning of the electronic properties not only for the pure Bi(111) surface, but may also be observed formore » topological insulators formed by substrate-stabilized Bi bilayers.« less

  18. Point-defect properties in HCP rare earth metals with analytic modified embedded atom potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wangyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Yuan, Xiaojian; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2003-08-01

    The analytic embedded atom method (EAM) type many-body potentials of hcp rare earth metals (Dy, Er, Gd, Ho, Nd, Pr, and Tb) have been constructed. The hcp lattice is shown to be energetically most stable when compared with the fcc and bcc structure, and the hcp lattice with ideal c/a. The mechanical stability of the corresponding hcp lattice with respect to large change of density and c/a ratio is examined. The phonon spectra, stacking fault and surface energy are calculated. The activation energy for vacancy diffusion in these metals has been calculated and the most possible diffusion paths are predicted. Finally, the self-interstitial atom (SIA) formation energy and volume have been evaluated for eight possible sites. This calculation suggests that the crowdion and basal split are the most stable configurations. The SIA formation energy increases linearly with the increase of the melting temperature.

  19. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters: an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal quantum clusters (NMQCs) are the missing link between isolated noble metal atoms and nanoparticles. NMQCs are sub-nanometer core sized clusters composed of a group of atoms, most often luminescent in the visible region, and possess intriguing photo-physical and chemical properties. A trend is observed in the use of ligands, ranging from phosphines to functional proteins, for the synthesis of NMQCs in the liquid phase. In this review, we briefly overview recent advancements in the synthesis of protein protected NMQCs with special emphasis on their structural and photo-physical properties. In view of the protein protection, coupled with direct synthesis and easy functionalization, this hybrid QC-protein system is expected to have numerous optical and bioimaging applications in the future, pointers in this direction are visible in the literature. PMID:22312454

  20. Giant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of an individual atom on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odkhuu, Dorj

    2016-08-01

    Exploring magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in otherwise nonmagnetic two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, is at the heart of spintronics research. Herein, using first-principles calculations we explore the possibility of reaching an atomic-scale perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by carefully exploring the large spin-orbit coupling, orbital magnetism, and ligand field in a suitable choice of a two-dimensional structure with transition metal adatoms. More specifically, we demonstrate perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies up to an order of 100 meV per atom in individual ruthenium and osmium adatoms at a monosulfur vacancy in molybdenum disulfide. We further propose a phenomenological model where a spin state transition that involves hybridization between molybdenum a1 and adatomic e' orbitals is a possible mechanism for magnetization reversal from an in-plane to perpendicular orientation.

  1. High-temperature properties of fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Gurarie, Victor; Hermele, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria

    2012-04-01

    We calculate experimentally relevant properties of trapped fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms in an optical lattice, modeled by the SU(N) Hubbard model. We employ a high-temperature expansion that is accurate when the temperature is larger than the tunneling rate, similar to current regimes in ultracold atom experiments. In addition to exploring the Mott insulator-metal crossover, we calculate final temperatures achieved by the standard experimental protocol of adiabatically ramping from a noninteracting gas, as a function of initial gas temperature. Of particular experimental interest, we find that increasing N for fixed particle numbers and initial temperatures gives substantially colder Mott insulators after the adiabatic ramping, up to more than a factor of 5 for relevant parameters. This cooling happens for all N, fixing the initial entropy, or for all N≲20 (the exact value depends on dimensionality), at fixed, experimentally relevant initial temperatures.

  2. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  3. Properties of the triplet metastable states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2004-11-01

    The static and dynamic properties of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms in their metastable state are computed in a configuration interaction approach with a semiempirical model potential for the core. Among the properties determined are the scalar and tensor polarizabilities, the quadrupole moment, some of the oscillator strengths, and the dispersion coefficients of the van der Waals interaction. A simple method for including the effect of the core on the dispersion parameters is described.

  4. Superconductivity, cohesive energy density, and electron-atom ratio in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Lawson, D. D.; Hrubes, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that superconductivity above 8 K occurs in alloys and metallic compounds within relatively narrow regions of cohesive energy density with a sharp peak which includes Nb3Ge, SiV3, Nb3Ga, and NbN. When cross-correlated with the electron-atom ratio, high-temperature superconductivity can be observed in only a few regions. This suggests a search for superconductors with high-transition temperatures and critical fields within these regions.

  5. Probing the Kondo lattice model with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Foss-Feig, Michael; Hermele, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria

    2010-05-15

    We study transport properties of alkaline-earth-metal atoms governed by the Kondo lattice Hamiltonian plus a harmonic confining potential, and suggest simple dynamical probes of several different regimes of the phase diagram that can be implemented with current experimental techniques. In particular, we show how Kondo physics at strong coupling, at low density, and in the heavy fermion phase is manifest in the dipole oscillations of the conduction band upon displacement of the trap center.

  6. One-Dimensional Confined Motion of Single Metal Atoms inside Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Jamie H.; Ito, Yasuhiro; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Shinohara, Hisanori; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2009-05-01

    Peapods containing La@C82 metallofullerenes are transformed into double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) using in situ electron beam irradiation at 80 kV. Using this low accelerating voltage we find no damage to the outer single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) within this time period and the complete formation of an inner nanotube within 5-7 min of irradiation. The La metal atoms are restricted to the interior of the inner SWNT and remain trapped. We demonstrate that energy from electron beam irradiation can drive the lateral confined motion of single La atoms. The interplay between two La atoms confined within the interior of a DWNT is examined and we find large La-La separation unique to this 1D environment. We also demonstrate the formation of TWNTs from DWNT peapods.

  7. Energy transfer from PO excited states to alkali metal atoms in the phosphorus chemiluminescence flame

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahsan U.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorus chemiluminescence under ambient conditions of a phosphorus oxidation flame is found to offer an efficient electronic energy transferring system to alkali metal atoms. The lowest resonance lines, 2P3 / 2,½→2S½, of potassium and sodium are excited by energy transfer when an argon stream at 80°C carrying potassium or sodium atoms intersects a phosphorus vapor stream, either at the flame or in the postflame region. The lowest electronically excited metastable 4IIi state of PO or the (PO[unk]PO)* excimer is considered to be the probable energy donor. The (PO[unk]PO)* excimer results from the interaction of the 4IIi state of one PO molecule with the ground 2IIr state of another. Metastability of the donor state is strongly indicated by the observation of intense sensitized alkali atom fluorescence in the postflame region. PMID:16592925

  8. Optical Coherence in Atomic-Monolayer Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides Limited by Electron-Phonon Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dey, P; Paul, J; Wang, Z; Stevens, C E; Liu, C; Romero, A H; Shan, J; Hilton, D J; Karaiskaj, D

    2016-03-25

    We systematically investigate the excitonic dephasing of three representative transition-metal dichalcogenides, namely, MoS_{2}, MoSe_{2}, and WSe_{2} atomic monolayer thick and bulk crystals, in order to gain a proper understanding of the factors that determine the optical coherence in these materials. Coherent nonlinear optical spectroscopy and temperature dependent absorption, combined with theoretical calculations of the phonon spectra, indicate electron-phonon interactions, to be the limiting factor. Surprisingly, the excitonic dephasing, differs only slightly between atomic monolayers and high quality bulk crystals, which indicates that material imperfections are not the limiting factor in atomically thin monolayer samples. The temperature dependence of the electronic band gap and the excitonic linewidth combined with "ab initio" calculations of the phonon energies and the phonon density of states reveal a strong interaction with the E' and E" phonon modes.

  9. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization. PMID:26787443

  10. Metal oxide nanoparticle growth on graphene via chemical activation with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Johns, James E; Alaboson, Justice M P; Patwardhan, Sameer; Ryder, Christopher R; Schatz, George C; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-12-01

    Chemically interfacing the inert basal plane of graphene with other materials has limited the development of graphene-based catalysts, composite materials, and devices. Here, we overcome this limitation by chemically activating epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) using atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen produces epoxide groups on graphene, which act as reactive nucleation sites for zinc oxide nanoparticle growth using the atomic layer deposition precursor diethyl zinc. In particular, exposure of epoxidized graphene to diethyl zinc abstracts oxygen, creating mobile species that diffuse on the surface to form metal oxide clusters. This mechanism is corroborated with a combination of scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory and can likely be generalized to a wide variety of related surface reactions on graphene.

  11. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. K.; Fu, H. M.; Sha, P. F.; Zhu, Z. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously. PMID:25758910

  12. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization.

  13. Composition-dependent metallic glass alloys correlate atomic mobility with collective glass surface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Zhu, Zhi-Guang; Pringle, Brian; Lyding, Joseph; Wang, Wei-Hua; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-22

    Glassy metallic alloys are richly tunable model systems for surface glassy dynamics. Here we study the correlation between atomic mobility, and the hopping rate of surface regions (clusters) that rearrange collectively on a minute to hour time scale. Increasing the proportion of low-mobility copper atoms in La-Ni-Al-Cu alloys reduces the cluster hopping rate, thus establishing a microscopic connection between atomic mobility and dynamics of collective rearrangements at a glass surface made from freshly exposed bulk glass. One composition, La60Ni15Al15Cu10, has a surface resistant to re-crystallization after three heating cycles. When thermally cycled, surface clusters grow in size from about 5 glass-forming units to about 8 glass-forming units, evidence of surface aging without crystal formation, although its bulk clearly forms larger crystalline domains. Such kinetically stable glass surfaces may be of use in applications where glassy coatings stable against heating are needed.

  14. Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides as atomically thin semiconductors: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xidong; Wang, Chen; Pan, Anlian; Yu, Ruqin; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-21

    The discovery of graphene has ignited intensive interest in two-dimensional layered materials (2DLMs). These 2DLMs represent a new class of nearly ideal 2D material systems for exploring fundamental chemistry and physics at the limit of single-atom thickness, and have the potential to open up totally new technological opportunities beyond the reach of existing materials. In general, there are a wide range of 2DLMs in which the atomic layers are weakly bonded together by van der Waals interactions and can be isolated into single or few-layer nanosheets. The van der Waals interactions between neighboring atomic layers could allow much more flexible integration of distinct materials to nearly arbitrarily combine and control different properties at the atomic scale. The transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) (e.g., MoS2, WSe2) represent a large family of layered materials, many of which exhibit tunable band gaps that can undergo a transition from an indirect band gap in bulk crystals to a direct band gap in monolayer nanosheets. These 2D-TMDs have thus emerged as an exciting class of atomically thin semiconductors for a new generation of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Recent studies have shown exciting potential of these atomically thin semiconductors, including the demonstration of atomically thin transistors, a new design of vertical transistors, as well as new types of optoelectronic devices such as tunable photovoltaic devices and light emitting devices. In parallel, there have also been considerable efforts in developing diverse synthetic approaches for the rational growth of various forms of 2D materials with precisely controlled chemical composition, physical dimension, and heterostructure interface. Here we review the recent efforts, progress, opportunities and challenges in exploring the layered TMDs as a new class of atomically thin semiconductors.

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg{sup +}/Dy{sup +}, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  17. Quantum thermopower of metallic atomic-size contacts at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Evangeli, Charalambos; Matt, Manuel; Rincón-García, Laura; Pauly, Fabian; Nielaba, Peter; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás

    2015-02-11

    We report conductance and thermopower measurements of metallic atomic-size contacts, namely gold and platinum, using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at room temperature. We find that few-atom gold contacts have an average negative thermopower, whereas platinum contacts present a positive thermopower, showing that for both metals, the sign of the thermopower in the nanoscale differs from that of bulk wires. We also find that the magnitude of the thermopower exhibits minima at the maxima of the conductance histogram in the case of gold nanocontacts while for platinum it presents large fluctuations. Tight-binding calculations and Green's function techniques, together with molecular dynamics simulations, show that these observations can be understood in the context of the Landauer-Büttiker picture of coherent transport in atomic-scale wires. In particular, we show that the differences in the thermopower between these two metals are due to the fact that the elastic transport is dominated by the 6s orbitals in the case of gold and by the 5d orbitals in the case of platinum. PMID:25607343

  18. Long-range interacting many-body systems with alkaline-earth-metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Olmos, B; Yu, D; Singh, Y; Schreck, F; Bongs, K; Lesanovsky, I

    2013-04-01

    Alkaline-earth-metal atoms can exhibit long-range dipolar interactions, which are generated via the coherent exchange of photons on the (3)P(0) - (3)D(1) transition of the triplet manifold. In the case of bosonic strontium, which we discuss here, this transition has a wavelength of 2.6 μm and a dipole moment of 4.03 D, and there exists a magic wavelength permitting the creation of optical lattices that are identical for the states (3)P(0) and (3)D(1). This interaction enables the realization and study of mixtures of hard-core lattice bosons featuring long-range hopping, with tunable disorder and anisotropy. We derive the many-body master equation, investigate the dynamics of excitation transport, and analyze spectroscopic signatures stemming from coherent long-range interactions and collective dissipation. Our results show that lattice gases of alkaline-earth-metal atoms permit the creation of long-lived collective atomic states and constitute a simple and versatile platform for the exploration of many-body systems with long-range interactions. As such, they represent an alternative to current related efforts employing Rydberg gases, atoms with large magnetic moment, or polar molecules.

  19. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  20. Fabrication and design of metal nano-accordion structures using atomic layer deposition and interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, J.-H.; Bagal, A.; Mundy, J. Z.; Oldham, C. J.; Wu, B.-I.; Parsons, G. N.; Chang, C.-H.

    2016-02-01

    Metal nanostructures have attractive electrical and thermal properties as well as structural stability, and are important for applications in flexible conductors. In this study, we have developed a method to fabricate and control novel complex platinum nanostructures with accordion-like profile using atomic layer deposition on lithographically patterned polymer templates. The template removal process results in unique structural transformation of the nanostructure profile, which has been studied and modeled. Using different template duty cycles and aspect ratios, we have demonstrated a wide variety of cross-sectional profiles from wavy geometry to pipe array patterns. These complex thin metal nanostructures can find applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, photonics and nanofluidics.Metal nanostructures have attractive electrical and thermal properties as well as structural stability, and are important for applications in flexible conductors. In this study, we have developed a method to fabricate and control novel complex platinum nanostructures with accordion-like profile using atomic layer deposition on lithographically patterned polymer templates. The template removal process results in unique structural transformation of the nanostructure profile, which has been studied and modeled. Using different template duty cycles and aspect ratios, we have demonstrated a wide variety of cross-sectional profiles from wavy geometry to pipe array patterns. These complex thin metal nanostructures can find applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, photonics and nanofluidics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08566g

  1. Metallic Transport and Anderson Localization on In Atomic Layers on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shiro; Hosomura, Yoshikazu; Matsuda, Iwao; Hobara, Rei; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2008-03-01

    Metallic temperature dependence of electrical resistance have not been observed except extremely limited number of examples[1] below 100K in atomic-scale low-dimensional metal systems due to Anderson localization. Si(111)-√7 x√3 -In surface reconstruction consist of 1.2 ML In atoms. According to ARPES study, the surface is 2D metal with the large Fermi wave number (kF=14nm-1) and the large electron density (4.6x10^14eV-1cm-2), leading to a low resistance [2]. By using variable-temperature micro-four-point probe method [3], low resistance and metallic transport was found down to 10 K. It is quantitatively explained by the ARPES result by using Boltzmann equation R2D=4π^2λm^*e^2kF^2 kBT. By introducing defect, it shows semiconducting temperature dependence of variable range hopping due to Anderson localization. [1]K. Lee, et al. , Nature 441, 65 (2006). [2]E. Rotenberg, et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 246404 (2003). [3]T. Tanikawa, et al. , e-J. Surf. Sci. Nanotech. 1, 50 (2003)

  2. Monolacunary Keggin polyoxometalates connected to ten 4d or 4f metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Pang, Haijun; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Peng, Jun; Ma, Huiyuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Wu, Qingyin

    2013-12-21

    The rational self-assembly of mono-lacunary Keggin clusters with 4d and 4f metal salts via a conventional method has yielded two novel polyoxometalate-based 4d-4f heterometallic compounds containing lacunary Keggin anions connected to ten metal atoms: {[Ag{Ag2(H2O)4}{Ln(H2O)6}2H ⊂ {SiW11Ln(H2O)4O39}2]·nH2O (Ln = Ce and n = 7 for 1, Ln = Pr and n = 3 for 2). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. A structural feature in 1 and 2 is that each [SiW11O39](8-) cluster (SiW11) is connected to ten metals (five Ag(+) and five Ln(3+) cations), representing the highest number of connected metal atoms to any mono-lacunary Keggin anion to date. This large connectivity leads to a structure with a purely inorganic 3D framework with two kinds of channels along the [100] and [010] directions. The magnetic properties of both compounds show the expected magnetic moments (0.8 and 1.6 amu K mol(-1) per Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ion, respectively) and confirm the presence of isolated Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ions.

  3. Angular distribution of atoms ejected by laser ablation of different metals

    SciTech Connect

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Asaoka, T.

    2009-07-01

    Angular distributions of 13 different metals ejected by laser ablation using fourth harmonics (wavelength=266 nm) of neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser and a fluence close to near-threshold value (2.3 J/cm{sup 2}) have been investigated with a high angular resolution. The angular distribution which is characterized by the exponent n of cos{sup n} theta distribution showed very broad range of values between 3 and 24 for different metals. A simple relation that the exponent n is proportional to the square root of particle atomic weight as reported previously has not been observed. Instead, a general trend has been found that the metals with higher sublimation energy such as Ta and Zr show narrower angular distribution than those with lower sublimation energy such as Sn and In. While the sublimation energy of metals has a great influence on the angular distribution of ejected atoms, a simple consideration suggests that their thermal conductivity and specific heat have little effect on it.

  4. Monolacunary Keggin polyoxometalates connected to ten 4d or 4f metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Pang, Haijun; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Peng, Jun; Ma, Huiyuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Wu, Qingyin

    2013-12-21

    The rational self-assembly of mono-lacunary Keggin clusters with 4d and 4f metal salts via a conventional method has yielded two novel polyoxometalate-based 4d-4f heterometallic compounds containing lacunary Keggin anions connected to ten metal atoms: {[Ag{Ag2(H2O)4}{Ln(H2O)6}2H ⊂ {SiW11Ln(H2O)4O39}2]·nH2O (Ln = Ce and n = 7 for 1, Ln = Pr and n = 3 for 2). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. A structural feature in 1 and 2 is that each [SiW11O39](8-) cluster (SiW11) is connected to ten metals (five Ag(+) and five Ln(3+) cations), representing the highest number of connected metal atoms to any mono-lacunary Keggin anion to date. This large connectivity leads to a structure with a purely inorganic 3D framework with two kinds of channels along the [100] and [010] directions. The magnetic properties of both compounds show the expected magnetic moments (0.8 and 1.6 amu K mol(-1) per Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ion, respectively) and confirm the presence of isolated Ce(3+) and Pr(3+) ions. PMID:24067933

  5. Multilayer cyclic C{sub 6} structures intercalated with metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, Stanislav; Duley, Walter W.

    2011-02-15

    A new type of tubular inorganic metal-carbon sandwich molecule based on cyclic C{sub 6} is proposed. These consist of multiple layers of cyclic C{sub 6} with intercalated metal atoms. Structures and electronic properties of these molecules have been calculated using first-principles density functional techniques. We have evaluated all metals in the first six periods of the periodic table, except for the lanthanides, as possible components of such molecules. Our calculations show high bond energy and small energy gaps in many of these structures. We suggest that the high structural stability and high conductivity in these sandwich compounds make them very promising for use in nanoelectronic applications.

  6. Ruthenium based metals using atomic vapor deposition for gate electrode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhwan; Ando, Takashi; Narayanan, Vijay

    2011-02-01

    The impacts of ruthenium-based metal gate electrodes (Ru,RuOx,RuSiOx) with atomic vapor deposition (AVD) on flatband voltage (VFB) and equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are demonstrated using a low temperature (<400 °C) process. Increasing thickness of Ru and RuOx exhibits higher VFB, attributed to filling oxygen vacancies [Vo] in high-k gate dielectric with oxygen supplied from AVD metal gate electrodes upon annealing. Ru is efficient to attain a higher work-function and thinner EOT compared to RuOx and RuSiOx. Subsequent physical-vapor-deposition (PVD) TiN capping on AVD metals blocks oxygen out-diffusion, leading to higher VFB than PVD W or AVD TiN capping.

  7. Ballistic thermal transport in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: Role of atomic mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinlong; Li, Wu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the ballistic thermal transport of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which is crucial for the thermal management of their potential applications in nanoelectronics. We find the thermal conductance is mainly affected by the atomic masses of TMDs. As a consequence, the temperature dependences of thermal conductances of different TMDs cross: At low temperatures below ˜50 K, the thermal conductance increases with the atomic mass, while it exhibits the opposite trend at high temperatures. The crossing behavior of temperature dependent thermal conductance is characteristic of the atomic mass effect, and TMDs provide a model system demonstrating that the thermal conductance can be effectively manipulated via the atomic mass by selecting appropriate atom. In addition, we clarify that in any two dimensional system such as monolayer TMDs and graphene, due to quadratic dispersion of the out-of-plane modes, the thermal conductance and specific heat in the low temperature limit are proportional to T3/2 and T, respectively. Mainly because of much smaller group velocities of in-plane acoustic phonons, the high temperature thermal conductances of monolayer TMDs are much smaller than graphene. However, due to comparable group velocities of out-of-plane acoustic phonons, below 100 K thermal conductances of monolayer TMDs are rather comparable to graphene if taking the same layer thickness for comparison.

  8. Icositetrahedral and icosahedral atomic configurations observed in the Nb-Ag metallic glasses synthesized by ion beam mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Lai, W. S.; Liu, B. X.

    2006-08-28

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Nb-Ag system by ion beam mixing and an atomic configuration in the amorphous structure is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, which, together with an icosahedral ordering also observed in the Nb-Ag metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems, helps in formulating a structural spectrum of the amorphous solids. The experimental characterization and atomistic modeling with an ab initio derived Nb-Ag potential demonstrate the significance of structural heredity, i.e., the crystalline structures of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the metallic glasses in the system.

  9. Development of light source using micro hollow cathode plasma for monitoring absolute densities of metal atoms in magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Ito, Masafumi; Takashima, Seigo; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Hori, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of metal atoms is important for understanding the chemistry and controlling the conditions in sputtering process. The light source, which emits multi-atomic lines simultaneously, is required for diagnostics of behaviors of many kind of metallic atom at the same time. In this study, a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp for simultaneous monitoring of multi-metal atoms in sputtering process was developed. The emissions of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mo for analysis were simultaneously obtained from 4 hollows. The Cu and Mo densities in the magnetron sputtering were measured using absorption spectroscopy employing the multi-micro hollow cathode lamp. Those densities were measured to be from 10^9 to 10^10 cm-3 in the RF power range from 0 to 100 W at a pressure of 5 Pa. The simultaneous measurement of the atomic densities in the sputtering plasma has been performed.

  10. Carbon clusters containing two metals atoms: Structures, growth mechanism, and fullerene formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shelimov, K.B.; Jarrold, M.F.

    1996-02-07

    Gas phase ion mobility measurments have been used to probe the structures and interconversion of La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1-100) isomers. The smallest La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} clusters (n = 10) appear to be planar rings. However, planar mono and bicylic rings (the dominant isomers for C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +}, n = 30, clusters) are not observed for the larger La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} species. Instead, isomers which appear to be three-dimensional ring complexes dominate for unannealed La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n + 17) clusters. The formation of these complexes is probably driven by electrostatic forces. For n = 30 the three-dimensional ring complexes isomerize into metallofullerenes (and metal-containing graphite sheets for n = 30-37). The estimated activation energies for these isomerization processes are about 1eV lower than those estimated for similar processes for planar C{sub n}{sup +} and LaC{sub n}{sup +} rings. Metallofullerenes with two non-endohedral metal atoms (for n = 28-29), one endohedral metal atom (for n = 31-100), and two endohedral metal atoms (for n > 64, only even n), are identified. Fullerene derivatives (presumably fullerene + ring complexes) are abundant in the unannealed isomer distributions for La{sub 2}C{sub n}{sup +} (n > 50) clusters, but readily isomerize into regular fullerenes upon collisional heating. 47 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Atomic Resolution of the Structure of a Metal Support Interface: Triosmium Clusters on MgO (110)

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Nigel D.; Chi, Miaofang; Gates, Bruce C.; kulkarni, Apoorva; Ortalan, Volkan

    2010-01-01

    Aberration-corrected STEM images of MgO-supported triosmium clusters show that the osmium atoms reside atop magnesium atoms. On the basis of the results, structural models of the clusters that include the metal-support interaction are derived.

  12. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kozen, Alexander C; Lin, Chuan-Fu; Pearse, Alexander J; Schroeder, Marshall A; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang-Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Noked, Malachi

    2015-06-23

    Lithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode for next-generation batteries due to its high energy density of 3840 mAh g(-1). However, the extreme reactivity of the Li surface can induce parasitic reactions with solvents, contamination, and shuttled active species in the electrolyte, reducing the performance of batteries employing Li metal anodes. One promising solution to this issue is application of thin chemical protection layers to the Li metal surface. Using a custom-made ultrahigh vacuum integrated deposition and characterization system, we demonstrate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of protection layers directly on Li metal with exquisite thickness control. We demonstrate as a proof-of-concept that a 14 nm thick ALD Al2O3 layer can protect the Li surface from corrosion due to atmosphere, sulfur, and electrolyte exposure. Using Li-S battery cells as a test system, we demonstrate an improved capacity retention using ALD-protected anodes over cells assembled with bare Li metal anodes for up to 100 cycles. PMID:25970127

  13. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kozen, Alexander C; Lin, Chuan-Fu; Pearse, Alexander J; Schroeder, Marshall A; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang-Bok; Rubloff, Gary W; Noked, Malachi

    2015-06-23

    Lithium metal is considered to be the most promising anode for next-generation batteries due to its high energy density of 3840 mAh g(-1). However, the extreme reactivity of the Li surface can induce parasitic reactions with solvents, contamination, and shuttled active species in the electrolyte, reducing the performance of batteries employing Li metal anodes. One promising solution to this issue is application of thin chemical protection layers to the Li metal surface. Using a custom-made ultrahigh vacuum integrated deposition and characterization system, we demonstrate atomic layer deposition (ALD) of protection layers directly on Li metal with exquisite thickness control. We demonstrate as a proof-of-concept that a 14 nm thick ALD Al2O3 layer can protect the Li surface from corrosion due to atmosphere, sulfur, and electrolyte exposure. Using Li-S battery cells as a test system, we demonstrate an improved capacity retention using ALD-protected anodes over cells assembled with bare Li metal anodes for up to 100 cycles.

  14. Ultrathin two-dimensional atomic crystals as stable interfacial layer for improvement of lithium metal anode.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Gao, Teng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Yao, Hongbin; Wang, Haotian; Lu, Zhenda; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Zheng; Liu, Zhongfan; Chu, Steven; Cui, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Stable cycling of lithium metal anode is challenging due to the dendritic lithium formation and high chemical reactivity of lithium with electrolyte and nearly all the materials. Here, we demonstrate a promising novel electrode design by growing two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal layers including hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene directly on Cu metal current collectors. Lithium ions were able to penetrate through the point and line defects of the 2D layers during the electrochemical deposition, leading to sandwiched lithium metal between ultrathin 2D layers and Cu. The 2D layers afford an excellent interfacial protection of Li metal due to their remarkable chemical stability as well as mechanical strength and flexibility, resulting from the strong intralayer bonds and ultrathin thickness. Smooth Li metal deposition without dendritic and mossy Li formation was realized. We showed stable cycling over 50 cycles with Coulombic efficiency ∼97% in organic carbonate electrolyte with current density and areal capacity up to the practical value of 2.0 mA/cm(2)and 5.0 mAh/cm(2), respectively, which is a significant improvement over the unprotected electrodes in the same electrolyte.

  15. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J.; D'Angelo, Marie D.; Enriquez, Hanna B.; Silly, Mathieu G.

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  16. Nanochemistry at the atomic scale revealed in hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization.

    PubMed

    Derycke, Vincent; Soukiassian, Patrick G; Amy, Fabrice; Chabal, Yves J; D'angelo, Marie D; Enriquez, Hanna B; Silly, Mathieu G

    2003-04-01

    Passivation of semiconductor surfaces against chemical attack can be achieved by terminating the surface-dangling bonds with a monovalent atom such as hydrogen. Such passivation invariably leads to the removal of all surface states in the bandgap, and thus to the termination of non-metallic surfaces. Here we report the first observation of semiconductor surface metallization induced by atomic hydrogen. This result, established by using photo-electron and photo-absorption spectroscopies and scanning tunnelling techniques, is achieved on a Si-terminated cubic silicon carbide (SiC) surface. It results from competition between hydrogen termination of surface-dangling bonds and hydrogen-generated steric hindrance below the surface. Understanding the ingredient for hydrogen-stabilized metallization directly impacts the ability to eliminate electronic defects at semiconductor interfaces critical for microelectronics, provides a means to develop electrical contacts on high-bandgap chemically passive materials, particularly for interfacing with biological systems, and gives control of surfaces for lubrication, for example of nanomechanical devices.

  17. Charge-correlation effects in calculations of atomic short-range order in metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinski, F. J.; Staunton, J. B.; Johnson, D. D.

    1998-06-01

    The ``local'' chemical environment that surrounds an atom directly influences its electronic charge density. These atomic charge correlations play an important role in describing the Coulomb and total energies for random substitutional alloys. Although the electronic structure may be well represented by a single-site theory, such as the coherent potential approximation, the electrostatic energy is not as well represented when these charge correlations are ignored. For metals, including the average effect from the charge correlation coming from only the nearest-neighbor shell has been shown to be sufficient to determine accurately the energy of formation. In this paper, we incorporate such charge correlations into the concentration-wave approach for calculating the atomic short-range order in random (substitutional) alloys. We present changes within the formalism, and apply the resulting equations to equiatomic nickel platinum. By including these effects, we obtain significantly better agreement with experimental data. In fact, particular to NiPt, a consequence of the charge correlation is a screening which cancels much of the electrostatic contribution to the energy and thus to the atomic short-range order, resulting in agreement with a picture originally outlined using only ``band-energy'' contributions.

  18. Flat metallic surface gratings with sub-10 nm gaps controlled by atomic-layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Borui; Ji, Dengxin; Cheney, Alec; Zhang, Nan; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Thomay, Tim; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Cartwright, Alexander

    2016-09-16

    Atomic layer lithography is a recently reported new technology to fabricate deep-subwavelength features down to 1-2 nm, based on combinations of electron beam lithography (EBL) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the patterning area is relatively small as limited by EBL, and the fabrication yield is not very high due to technical challenges. Here we report an improved procedure to fabricate flat metallic surfaces with sub-10 nm features based on ALD processes. To demonstrate the scalability of the new manufacturing method, we combine the ALD process with large area optical interference patterning, which is particularly promising for the development of practical applications for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics with extremely strong confinement of electromagnetic fields.

  19. Properties of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms calculated using an accurate effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Robin; Christ, Kevin V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2004-04-01

    The first three electronically excited states in the alkaline-earth-metal atoms magnesium, calcium, and strontium comprise the (nsnp){sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}(J=0,1,2) fine-structure manifold. All three states are metastable and are of interest for optical atomic clocks as well as for cold-collision physics. An efficient technique--based on a physically motivated potential that models the presence of the ionic core--is employed to solve the Schroedinger equation for the two-electron valence shell. In this way, radiative lifetimes, laser-induced clock shifts, and long-range interaction parameters are calculated for metastable Mg, Ca, and Sr.

  20. Flat metallic surface gratings with sub-10 nm gaps controlled by atomic-layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Borui; Ji, Dengxin; Cheney, Alec; Zhang, Nan; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Thomay, Tim; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Cartwright, Alexander

    2016-09-16

    Atomic layer lithography is a recently reported new technology to fabricate deep-subwavelength features down to 1-2 nm, based on combinations of electron beam lithography (EBL) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the patterning area is relatively small as limited by EBL, and the fabrication yield is not very high due to technical challenges. Here we report an improved procedure to fabricate flat metallic surfaces with sub-10 nm features based on ALD processes. To demonstrate the scalability of the new manufacturing method, we combine the ALD process with large area optical interference patterning, which is particularly promising for the development of practical applications for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics with extremely strong confinement of electromagnetic fields. PMID:27505713

  1. Atomic diffusion processes in heteroepitaxial metallic systems using SLKMC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Islamuddin; Karim, Altaf

    We have examined the diffusion of small islands of Cu on Ag(111) surface using a self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (SLKMC-II) method with an improved pattern recognition scheme. Due to strain generated at the interface between metals with different bulk lattice constants, interesting single atom, multi-atom and concerted diffusion processes are automatically revealed in the simulations. Here we will report various processes for small islands in the case of Cu/Ag(111) system. Key processes responsible for island diffusion and their energetics together with trends in effective energy barriers as well as diffusion constants for small islands will also be provided. In addition to 2-D diffusion processes, as an application of SLKMC-II to the 3-dimensional heteroepitaxial systems, we will also report energy barriers of some of the 3-dimensional processes including down the A- and B-steps and exchange processes

  2. Flat metallic surface gratings with sub-10 nm gaps controlled by atomic-layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Borui; Ji, Dengxin; Cheney, Alec; Zhang, Nan; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Thomay, Tim; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Cartwright, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Atomic layer lithography is a recently reported new technology to fabricate deep-subwavelength features down to 1-2 nm, based on combinations of electron beam lithography (EBL) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the patterning area is relatively small as limited by EBL, and the fabrication yield is not very high due to technical challenges. Here we report an improved procedure to fabricate flat metallic surfaces with sub-10 nm features based on ALD processes. To demonstrate the scalability of the new manufacturing method, we combine the ALD process with large area optical interference patterning, which is particularly promising for the development of practical applications for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics with extremely strong confinement of electromagnetic fields.

  3. Atomic-level mechanism of elastic deformation in the Zr-Cu metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonowicz, J.; Pietnoczka, A.; Evangelakis, G. A.; Mathon, O.; Kantor, I.; Pascarelli, S.; Kartouzian, A.; Shinmei, T.; Irifune, T.

    2016-04-01

    To explore the microscopic response of a metallic glass (MG) to an applied hydrostatic load we performed a high-pressure extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study of the Zr66.7Cu33.3 amorphous alloy. EXAFS fitting revealed that on compression, Zr-Zr pairs are strained preferentially. Strong Zr-Cu interactions contribute to the stiffness of dominant Cu-centered clusters and the overall compressibility of the MG is mostly determined by the softer bonds between the Zr atoms belonging to the clusters' outer shell. Stress accommodation is accompanied by a variation of bonding preferences, which is consistent with the observed hierarchy of elastic constants of different atomic pairs.

  4. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a metallic sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, J. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    A wavepacket propagation study is reported for the charge transfer of low principal quantum number (n = 2) hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at an isolated metallic sphere. Such a sphere acts as a model for a nanoparticle. The three-dimensional confinement of the sphere yields discrete surface-localized ‘well-image’ states, the energies of which vary with sphere radius. When the Rydberg atom energy is degenerate with one of the quantized nanoparticle states, charge transfer is enhanced, whereas for off-resonant cases little to no charge transfer is observed. Greater variation in charge-transfer probability is seen between the resonant and off-resonant examples in this system than for any other Rydberg-surface system theoretically investigated thus far. The results presented here indicate that it may be possible to use Rydberg-surface ionization as a probe of the surface electronic structure of a nanoparticle, and nanostructures in general.

  5. Flat metallic surface gratings with sub-10 nm gaps controlled by atomic-layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Borui; Ji, Dengxin; Cheney, Alec; Zhang, Nan; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Thomay, Tim; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Cartwright, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Atomic layer lithography is a recently reported new technology to fabricate deep-subwavelength features down to 1–2 nm, based on combinations of electron beam lithography (EBL) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the patterning area is relatively small as limited by EBL, and the fabrication yield is not very high due to technical challenges. Here we report an improved procedure to fabricate flat metallic surfaces with sub-10 nm features based on ALD processes. To demonstrate the scalability of the new manufacturing method, we combine the ALD process with large area optical interference patterning, which is particularly promising for the development of practical applications for nanoelectronics and nanophotonics with extremely strong confinement of electromagnetic fields.

  6. Structurally Well-Defined Sigmoidal Gold Clusters: Probing the Correlation between Metal Atom Arrangement and Chiroptical Response.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Wang, Yuechao; Jiang, Hong; Zhao, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetric arrangement of metal atoms is crucial for understanding the chirality origin of chiral metal nanoclusters and facilitating the design and development of new chiral catalysts and chiroptical devices. Here, we describe the construction of four asymmetric gold and gold-silver clusters by chirality transfer from diimido ligands. The acquired metal clusters show strong circular dichroism (CD) response with large anisotropy factors of up to 6 × 10(-3), larger than the values of most reported chiral gold nanoclusters. Regardless of the same absolute configuration of the applied three diimido ligands, sigmoidal and reverse-sigmoidal arrangements of gold atoms both can be achieved, which resultantly produce an opposite Cotton effect within a specific absorption range. On the basis of the detailed structural characterization via X-ray crystallography and contrast experiments, the chirality contribution of the imido ligand, the asymmetrically arranged metal cluster, and the chiral arrangement of aromatic rings of phosphine ligands have been qualitatively evaluated. Time-dependent DFT calculations reveal that the chiroptical property of the acquired metal clusters is mainly influenced by the asymmetrically arranged metal atoms. Correlation of asymmetric arrangements of metal atoms in clusters with their chiroptical response provides a viable means of fabricating a designable chiral surface of metal nanoclusters and opens a broader prospect for chiral cluster application.

  7. An all-atom force field developed for Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxin; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    An all-atom force field is developed for metal organic frameworks Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ by fitting to quantum mechanics data. Molecular simulations are conducted to validate the force field by calculating thermal expansion coefficients, crystal bulk and Young's moduli, power spectra, self-diffusion coefficients, and activation energies of self-diffusions for benzene and n-hexane. The calculated results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The proposed force field is suitable for simulations of adsorption or diffusion of organic molecules with flexible frameworks. PMID:24562858

  8. Electric dipole polarizabilities of Rydberg states of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Buhmann, S. Y.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Calculations of the static electric-dipole scalar and tensor polarizabilities are presented for two alkali-metal atoms, Rb and Cs, for the n S , n P½,3 /2 , and n D3 /2 ,5 /2 states with large principal quantum numbers up to n =50 . The calculations are performed within an effective one-electron approximation, based on the Dirac-Fock Hamiltonian with a semiempirical core-polarization potential. The obtained results are compared with those from a simpler semiempirical approach and with available experimental data.

  9. Preconcentration of heavy metals in urine and quantification by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Artíguez, M; Cameán, A; Repetto, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the determination of heavy metals (Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Pb) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method proposed requires purification of the samples with activated charcoal under acidic conditions before preconcentration by complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The formed complexes are extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and the resulting residue is finally digested under acid oxidant conditions. Because of its low detection limit (below 10 micrograms/L), this procedure can be applied conveniently for toxicological diagnostic purposes. PMID:8429621

  10. Atomic Scale Modeling of High Strain Rate Deformation and Failure of HCP Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenchery, Karoon; Agarwal, Garvit; Dongare, Avinash

    2015-06-01

    A fundamental understanding of the microstructure effects on the defect evolution at the atomic resolution and the related contribution to plasticity at the macro-scales is needed to obtain a reliable performance of metallic materials in extreme environments. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to characterize the dynamic evolution of defect/damage structures during the deformation and failure behavior of HCP (Mg, Ti) metallic systems (single crystal and nanocrystalline at high strain rates as well as under shock loading conditions. The evolution of various types of dislocations, twins, faults, etc. and the related deformation and failure response (nucleation and growth of voids/cracks) will be discussed. The effects of strain rates on relationships between the microstructure and the strength of these materials at high strain rates and the underlying micromechanisms related to deformation and failure will be discussed.

  11. Theory of metal atom-water interactions and alkali halide dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.; Kurtz, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the interactions of metal atoms with water and some of its isoelectronic analogs, and of the properties of alkali halides and their aggregates are discussed. Results are presented of ab initio calculations of the heats of reaction of the metal-water adducts and hydroxyhydrides of Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, and Al, and of the bond lengths and angles an; the heats of reaction for the insertion of Al into HF, H2O, NH3, H2S and CH3OH, and Be and Mg into H2O. Calculations of the electron affinities and dipole moments and polarizabilities of selected gas phase alkali halide monomers and dimers are discussed, with particular attention given to results of calculations of the polarizability of LiF taking into account electron correlation effects, and the polarizability of the dimer (LiF)2.

  12. Study of the embedded atom method of atomistic calculations for metals and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    Two projects were completed in the past year. The stability of a series of binary alloys was calculated using the embedded-atom method (EAM) with an analytic form for two-body potentials derived previously. Both disordered alloys and intermetallic compounds with the L1{sub 0} and L1{sub 2} structures were studied. The calculated heats of solution of alloys of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, and Pt were satisfactory, while results for alloys containing Pd were too high. Atomistic calculations using the EAM were also carried out for point defects in hcp metals. By comparison with results in the literature, it was found that many body effects from the EAM significantly alter predicted physical properties of hcp metals. For example, the EAM calculations yield anisotropic vacancy diffusion with greater vacancy mobility in the basal plane, and imply that diffusion will start at a lower fraction of the melting temperature.

  13. Fabrication and design of metal nano-accordion structures using atomic layer deposition and interference lithography.

    PubMed

    Min, J-H; Bagal, A; Mundy, J Z; Oldham, C J; Wu, B-I; Parsons, G N; Chang, C-H

    2016-03-01

    Metal nanostructures have attractive electrical and thermal properties as well as structural stability, and are important for applications in flexible conductors. In this study, we have developed a method to fabricate and control novel complex platinum nanostructures with accordion-like profile using atomic layer deposition on lithographically patterned polymer templates. The template removal process results in unique structural transformation of the nanostructure profile, which has been studied and modeled. Using different template duty cycles and aspect ratios, we have demonstrated a wide variety of cross-sectional profiles from wavy geometry to pipe array patterns. These complex thin metal nanostructures can find applications in flexible/stretchable electronics, photonics and nanofluidics. PMID:26863903

  14. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  15. Compact metal probes: A solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, R. D.; Sheremet, E.; Müller, S.; Gordan, O. D.; Villabona, A.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  16. Higher-order C{sub n} dispersion coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2005-04-01

    The van der Waals coefficients, from C{sub 11} through to C{sub 16} resulting from second-, third-, and fourth-order perturbation theory are estimated for the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) atoms. The dispersion coefficients are also computed for all possible combinations of the alkali-metal atoms and hydrogen. The parameters are determined from sum rules after diagonalizing a semiempirical fixed core Hamiltonian in a large basis. Comparisons of the radial dependence of the C{sub n}/r{sup n} potentials give guidance as to the radial regions in which the various higher-order terms can be neglected. It is seen that including terms up to C{sub 10}/r{sup 10} results in a dispersion interaction that is accurate to better than 1% whenever the inter-nuclear spacing is larger than 20a{sub 0}. This level of accuracy is mainly achieved due to the fortuitous cancellation between the repulsive (C{sub 11},C{sub 13},C{sub 15}) and attractive (C{sub 12},C{sub 14},C{sub 16}) dispersion forces.

  17. Atomic resolution study of reversible conversion reaction in metal oxide electrodes for lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Xu, Junming; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2014-11-25

    Electrode materials based on conversion reactions with lithium ions have shown much higher energy density than those based on intercalation reactions. Here, nanocubes of a typical metal oxide (Co3O4) were grown on few-layer graphene, and their electrochemical lithiation and delithiation were investigated at atomic resolution by in situ transmission electron microscopy to reveal the mechanism of the reversible conversion reaction. During lithiation, a lithium-inserted Co3O4 phase and a phase consisting of nanosized Co-Li-O clusters are identified as the intermediate products prior to the subsequent formation of Li2O crystals. In delithiation, the reduced metal nanoparticles form a network and breakdown into even smaller clusters that act as catalysts to prompt reduction of Li2O, and CoO nanoparticles are identified as the product of the deconversion reaction. Such direct real-space, real-time atomic-scale observations shed light on the phenomena and mechanisms in reaction-based electrochemical energy conversion and provide impetus for further development in electrochemical charge storage devices.

  18. A Unified Picture of Adsorption on Transition Metals through Different Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Montemore, Matthew M.; Medlin, James W.

    2014-07-02

    A key issue in catalyst design is understanding how adsorption energies of surface intermediates vary across both different surfaces and various types of adsorbing atoms. In this work, we examine trends in adsorption energies of a wide variety of adsorbates that attach to transition metal surfaces through different atoms (H, C, N, O, F, S, etc.). All adsorption energies, as calculated by density functional theory, have nearly identical dependence on the metal bands (the d-band center and the number of p electrons) and the adsorbates’ highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies. However, the dependence on the adsorbate-surface coupling and the d-band filling varies with the energy of the HOMO. Adsorbates with low HOMOs experience a higher level of Pauli repulsion than those with higher HOMOs. This leads to a classification of adsorbates into two groups, where adsorption energies in each group correlate. Even across the groups, adsorbates with similar HOMO energies are likely to have correlated adsorption energies.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposition Route To Tailor Nanoalloys of Noble and Non-noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Dendooven, Jolien; Filez, Matthias; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Fonda, Emiliano; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim; Marin, Guy B; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-09-27

    Since their early discovery, bimetallic nanoparticles have revolutionized various fields, including nanomagnetism and optics as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Knowledge buildup in the past decades has witnessed that the nanoparticle size and composition strongly impact the nanoparticle's properties and performance. Yet, conventional synthesis strategies lack proper control over the nanoparticle morphology and composition. Recently, atomically precise synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles has been achieved by atomic layer deposition (ALD), alleviating particle size and compositional nonuniformities. However, this bimetal ALD strategy applies to noble metals only, a small niche within the extensive class of bimetallic alloys. We report an ALD-based approach for the tailored synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles containing both noble and non-noble metals, here exemplified for Pt-In. First, a Pt/In2O3 bilayer is deposited by ALD, yielding precisely defined Pt-In nanoparticles after high-temperature H2 reduction. The nanoparticles' In content can be accurately controlled over the whole compositional range, and the particle size can be tuned from micrometers down to the nanometer scale. The size and compositional flexibility provided by this ALD-approach will trigger the fabrication of fully tailored bimetallic nanomaterials, including superior nanocatalysts. PMID:27585708

  20. Atomic scale alignment of copper-germanide contacts for ge nanowire metal oxide field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Burchhart, T; Lugstein, A; Hyun, Y J; Hochleitner, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2009-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the formation, of copper-germanide/germanium nanowire (NW) heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces. The copper-germanide (Cu3Ge) formation process is enabled by a chemical reaction between metallic Cu pads and vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown Ge-NWs. The atomic scale aligned formation of the Cu3Ge segments is controlled by in situ SEM monitoring at 310 degrees C thereby enabling length control of the intrinsic Ge-NW down to a few nanometers. The single crystal Cu3Ge/Ge/Cu3Ge heterostructures were used to fabricate p-type Ge-NW field effect transistors with Schottky Cu3Ge source/drain contacts. Temperature dependent I /V measurements revealed the metallic properties of the Cu3Ge contacts with a maximum current density of 5 x 10(7) A/cm2. According to the thermoionic emission theory, we determined an effective Schottky barrier height of 218 meV.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition Route To Tailor Nanoalloys of Noble and Non-noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ranjith K; Dendooven, Jolien; Filez, Matthias; Galvita, Vladimir V; Poelman, Hilde; Solano, Eduardo; Minjauw, Matthias M; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Fonda, Emiliano; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Bras, Wim; Marin, Guy B; Detavernier, Christophe

    2016-09-27

    Since their early discovery, bimetallic nanoparticles have revolutionized various fields, including nanomagnetism and optics as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Knowledge buildup in the past decades has witnessed that the nanoparticle size and composition strongly impact the nanoparticle's properties and performance. Yet, conventional synthesis strategies lack proper control over the nanoparticle morphology and composition. Recently, atomically precise synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles has been achieved by atomic layer deposition (ALD), alleviating particle size and compositional nonuniformities. However, this bimetal ALD strategy applies to noble metals only, a small niche within the extensive class of bimetallic alloys. We report an ALD-based approach for the tailored synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles containing both noble and non-noble metals, here exemplified for Pt-In. First, a Pt/In2O3 bilayer is deposited by ALD, yielding precisely defined Pt-In nanoparticles after high-temperature H2 reduction. The nanoparticles' In content can be accurately controlled over the whole compositional range, and the particle size can be tuned from micrometers down to the nanometer scale. The size and compositional flexibility provided by this ALD-approach will trigger the fabrication of fully tailored bimetallic nanomaterials, including superior nanocatalysts.

  2. Three-photon process for producing a degenerate gas of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, D. S.; Pisenti, N. C.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method for creating a quantum degenerate gas of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms. This has yet to be achieved due to inelastic collisions that limit evaporative cooling in the metastable states. Quantum degenerate samples prepared in the 1S0 ground state can be rapidly transferred to either the 3P2 or 3P0 state via a coherent three-photon process. Numerical integration of the density-matrix evolution for the fine structure of bosonic alkaline-earth-metal atoms shows that transfer efficiencies of ≃90 % can be achieved with experimentally feasible laser parameters in both Sr and Yb. Importantly, the three-photon process can be set up such that it imparts no net momentum to the degenerate gas during the excitation, which will allow for studies of metastable samples outside the Lamb-Dicke regime. We discuss several experimental challenges to successfully realizing our scheme, including the minimization of differential ac Stark shifts between the four states connected by the three-photon transition.

  3. Slurry sampling techniques for the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Kaneco, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tohru; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Ohta, Kiyohisa

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer has been applied to the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples. The slurry sampling conditions, such as slurry stabilizing agent, slurry concentration, pyrolysis temperature for the slurried fish samples, particle size and ultrasonic agitation time, were optimized for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with the Mo tube atomizer. Thiourea was used as the chemical modifier for the interference of matrix elements. The detection limit was 53 fg (3S/N). The determined amount of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples was consistent with those measured in the dissolved acid-digested samples. The advantages of the proposed methods are easy calibration, simplicity, low cost and rapid analysis.

  4. 1D coordination polymers with polychalcogenides as linkers between metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kysliak, Oleksandr; Beck, Johannes

    2013-07-15

    The reactions of zinc metal with elemental selenium and selenium/sulfur mixtures in liquid ammonia or methylamine under solvothermal conditions in closed glass ampoules at 50 °C lead within some days specifically to [Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Se{sub 4}]{sub n} (1), [Zn(MeNH{sub 2}){sub 2}Se{sub 4}]{sub n} (2), [Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}Se{sub 2.23}S{sub 1.77}]{sub n} (3). From MnCl{sub 2}, Rb{sub 2}Se and excess Se in n-butylamine [Mn({sup n}BuNH{sub 2}){sub 4}Se{sub 6}]{sub n} (4) is obtained after prolonged reaction time at ambient temperature. The compounds are sensitive towards air and loss of NH{sub 3} or the amine ligands. The crystal structures were determined by single crystal diffraction at low temperatures. As a common structural feature, all compounds represent 1D coordination polymers with polychalcogenide chains as linkers between the metal atoms and consist of infinite [M–Ch{sub m}–]{sub n} chains (M=Zn, Mn; Ch{sub m}=Se{sub 4}, (S/Se){sub 4}, Se{sub 6}). The Zn central atoms in 1–3 have tetrahedral coordination with two amine ligands, the Mn atoms in 4 have octahedral coordination with four amine ligands and cis position of the two Se atoms. Raman spectra of 1–3 show the stretching mode vibrations of the Ch{sub 4} groups. The observation of S–S, S–Se, and Se–Se vibration bands in the spectrum of 3 indicates the presence of mixed S/Se polyanions. An optical band gap of 1.86(5) eV was determined for 2 by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: The reaction of Zn and Se in liquid methylamine yields dark red [Zn(NH{sub 2}CH{sub 3})Se{sub 4}], a 1D coordination polymer consisting of helical Zn–Se{sub 4}–Zn– chains. - Highlights: • A series of 1D coordination polymers consisting of metal amine complexes concatenated by polychalcogenide ions is presented. • Syntheses were performed as solvothermal reactions in liquid ammonia, liquid methylamine and n-butylamine. • Crystal structures are dominated by helices [M–Ch{sub m

  5. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested. PMID:27480496

  6. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C.; Zhang, H.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, X. D.; Zhang, D. X.; Ramamurty, U.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and “liquid-like” regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  7. Symmetry-derived half-metallicity in atomic and molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Smogunov, Alexander; Dappe, Yannick J

    2015-05-13

    Achieving highly spin-polarized electric currents in atomic-scale junctions is of great importance in the field of nanoelectronics and spintronics. Based on robust symmetry considerations, we propose a mechanism to block completely one of spin conduction channels for a broad class of atomic and molecular junctions bridging two ferromagnetic electrodes. This particular behavior is due to the wave function orthogonality between spin up s-like states in ferromagnetic electrode and available π channels in the junction. As a consequence, the system would ideally yield 100% spin-polarized current, with a junction acting thus as a "half-metallic" conductor. Using ab initio electron transport calculations, we demonstrate this principle on two examples: (i) a short carbon chain and (ii) a π-conjugated molecule (polythiophene) connected either to model semi-infinite Ni wires or to realistic Ni(111) electrodes. It is also predicted that such atomic-scale junctions should lead to very high (ideally, infinite) magneto-resistance ratios since the electric current gets fully blocked if two electrodes have antiparallel magnetic alignment. PMID:25871804

  8. Atomic many-body effects and Lamb shifts in alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginges, J. S. M.; Berengut, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the radiative potential method [V. V. Flambaum and J. S. M. Ginges, Phys. Rev. A 72, 052115 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.052115], which enables the accurate inclusion of quantum electrodynamics (QED) radiative corrections in a simple manner in atoms and ions over the range 10 ≤Z ≤120 , where Z is the nuclear charge. Calculations are performed for binding energy shifts to the lowest valence s , p , and d waves over the series of alkali-metal atoms Na to E119. The high accuracy of the radiative potential method is demonstrated by comparison with rigorous QED calculations in frozen atomic potentials, with deviations on the level of 1%. The many-body effects of core relaxation and second- and higher-order perturbation theory on the interaction of the valence electron with the core are calculated. The inclusion of many-body effects tends to increase the size of the shifts, with the enhancement particularly significant for d waves; for K to E119, the self-energy shifts for d waves are only an order of magnitude smaller than the s -wave shifts. It is shown that taking into account many-body effects is essential for an accurate description of the Lamb shift.

  9. Atomic structures of a liquid-phase bonded metal/nitride heterointerface

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Akihito; Shibata, Naoya; Nayuki, Kei-ichiro; Tohei, Tetsuya; Terasaki, Nobuyuki; Nagatomo, Yoshiyuki; Nagase, Toshiyuki; Akiyama, Kazuhiro; Kuromitsu, Yoshirou; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-phase bonding is a technologically important method to fabricate high-performance metal/ceramic heterostructures used for power electronic devices. However, the atomic-scale mechanisms of how these two dissimilar crystals specifically bond at the interfaces are still not well understood. Here we analyse the atomically-resolved structure of a liquid-phase bonded heterointerface between Al alloy and AlN single crystal using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). In addition, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, using dual silicon drift X-ray detectors in STEM, was performed to analyze the local chemistry of the interface. We find that a monolayer of MgO is spontaneously formed on the AlN substrate surface and that a polarity-inverted monolayer of AlN is grown on top of it. Thus, the Al alloy is bonded with the polarity-inverted AlN monolayer, creating a complex atomic-scale layered structure, facilitating the bonding between the two dissimilar crystals during liquid-phase bonding processes. Density-functional-theory calculations confirm that the bonding stability is strongly dependent on the polarity and stacking of AlN and MgO monolayers. Understanding the spontaneous formation of layered transition structures at the heterointerface will be key in fabricating very stable Al alloy/AlN heterointerface required for high reliability power electronic devices. PMID:26961157

  10. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, J. A.; Softley, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  11. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    PubMed

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness. PMID:27334186

  12. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, C.; Zhang, H.; Cao, Q. P.; Wang, X. D.; Zhang, D. X.; Ramamurty, U.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and “liquid-like” regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested. PMID:27480496

  13. Deformation behavior of metallic glasses with shear band like atomic structure: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, C; Zhang, H; Cao, Q P; Wang, X D; Zhang, D X; Ramamurty, U; Jiang, J Z

    2016-08-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the plastic deformation within the shear bands in three different metallic glasses (MGs). To mimic shear bands, MG specimens were first deformed until flow localization occurs, and then the volume of the material within the localized regions was extracted and replicated. Homogeneous deformation that is independent of the size of the specimen was observed in specimens with shear band like structure, even at a temperature that is far below the glass transition temperature. Structural relaxation and rapid cooling were employed to examine the effect of free volume content on the deformation behavior. This was followed by detailed atomic structure analyses, employing the concepts of Voronoi polyhedra and "liquid-like" regions that contain high fraction of sub-atomic size open volumes. Results suggest that the total fraction of atoms in liquid-like regions is a key parameter that controls the plastic deformation in MGs. These are discussed in the context of reported experimental results and possible strategies for synthesizing monolithic amorphous materials that can accommodate large tensile plasticity are suggested.

  14. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    PubMed

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  15. New chemistry for the growth of first-row transition metal films by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klesko, Joseph Peter

    redox non-innocent nature of a series of recently-reported 1,4-di-tert-butyl-1,3-diazabutadienyl complexes. Other metal complexes using the same ligand system are subsequently evaluated for use as ALD precursors. Finally, a novel approach is described for the stoichiometric control of first-row transition metal manganese and cobalt borate films, whereby the film composition is governed by the elements present in a single precursor. Computational techniques such as density functional theory (DFT) using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) are used to determine the electronic structure and predict the relative reducing power of organic coreagents. Potential ALD precursors are analyzed by 1H and 13C NMR, IR, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TGA/DTA), melting point and solid state decomposition measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, preparative sublimation studies, and solution-screening reactions. Deposition parameters are optimized for successful ALD processes. The composition and surface morphology of the resultant films are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and four-point probe resistivity measurements.

  16. Atomic-level elucidation of the initial stages of self-assembled monolayer metallization and nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Keith, John A; Jacob, Timo

    2010-11-01

    The development of high-performance molecular electronics and nanotech applications requires deep understanding of atomic level structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of electrode/molecular interfaces. Recent electrochemical experiments on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have identified highly practical means to generate nanoparticles and metal monolayers suspended above substrate surfaces through SAM metallizations. A rational basis why this process is even possible is not yet well-understood. To clarify the initial stages of interface formation during SAM metallization, we used first-principles spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study Pd diffusion on top of 4-mercaptopyridine (4MP) SAMs on Au(111). After distinguishing potential-energy surfaces (PESs) for different spin configurations for transition metal atoms on the SAM, we find adatom diffusion is not possible over the clean 4MP-SAM surface. Pre-adsorption of transition-metal atoms, however, facilitates atomic diffusion that appears to explain multiple reports on experimentally observed island and monolayer formation on top of SAMs. Furthermore, these diffusions most likely occur by moving across low-lying and intersecting PESs of different spin states, opening the possibility of magnetic control over these systems. Vertical diffusion processes were also investigated, and the electrolyte was found to play a key role in preventing metal permeation through the SAM to the substrate.

  17. Electronic and magnetic properties of 1T-HfS2 by doping transition-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xu; Wang, Tianxing; Wang, Guangtao; Dai, Xianqi; Xia, Congxin; Yang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    We explored the electronic and magnetic properties of 1T-HfS2 doped by transition metal (TM) atom using the first-principles calculation. We doped the transition metal atoms from the IIIB to VIB groups in nonmagnetic 1T-HfS2. Numerical results show that the pristine 1T-HfS2 is a semiconductor with indirect gaps of 1.250 eV. Magnetism can be observed for V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Cu doping. The polarized charges mainly arise from the localized 3d electrons of the TM atom. The strong p-d hybridization was found between the 3d orbitals of TM and 3p orbitals of S. The substituted 1T-HfS2 can be a metal, semiconductor or half-metal. Analysis of the band structure and magnetic properties indicates that TM-doped HfS2 (TM = V, Fe, Cu) are promising systems to explore two-dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors. The formation energy calculations also indicate that it is energetically favorable and relatively easier to incorporate transition metal atom into the HfS2 under S-rich experimental conditions. In contrast, V-doped HfS2 has relatively wide half-metallic gap and low formation energy. So V-doped 1T-HfS2 is ideal for spin injection, which is important for application in semiconductor spintronics.

  18. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications.

  19. Fabrication of a polymer-metal combined atomic force microscopy probe for coarse food surface imaging.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyen-Wook; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2013-05-01

    We fabricated a polymer-metal combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe by two steps; a polymeric resin was used at first step, and a metal-ion was used at second step which needs more fabricating time than the resin. At first step, we fabricated a cylindrical base on to a commercial cantilever. At second step, we fabricated a conical probe on to the fabricated cylindrical base. To make the conical probe composed with silver, a 0.2 M aqueous solution of silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used. A 50 microm length polymeric-metallic hybrid tip has been fabricated to observe large bio and food samples. Generally, the AFM images of bio/food samples show cliff-like sharp patters in vertical. However, the AFM image by fabricated long tip shows clear structure of each brown rice flours. As most of commercial tips have three-angular pyramidal, the scanned results should be influenced by the lateral face of the three-angular pyramid, which results in cliff-like images. Because the sample size is large, the side area of the sample was adversely affected by the pyramidal structure during imaging. This problem may be resolved by designing conical structure tips. As the conical structure has no edge, the AFM image becomes clear. The fabricated tip has conical structure, and a clear AFM image was achieved. PMID:23858900

  20. Nonlocal response of metallic nanospheres probed by light, electrons, and atoms.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie-Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For selected metals, we predict hydrodynamic multipolar plasmons to be measurable on single nanospheres.

  1. Limits to metallic conduction in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional silicon wires.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bent; Ryu, Hoon; Tan, Y-H Matthias; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2014-12-12

    The recent observation of ultralow resistivity in highly doped, atomic-scale silicon wires has sparked interest in what limits conduction in these quasi-1D systems. Here we present electron transport measurements of gated Si:P wires of widths 4.6 and 1.5 nm. At 4.6 nm we find an electron mobility, μ(el)≃60  cm²/V s, in excellent agreement with that of macroscopic Hall bars. Metallic conduction persists to millikelvin temperatures where we observe Gaussian conductance fluctuations of order δG∼e²/h. In thinner wires (1.5 nm), metallic conduction breaks down at G≲e²/h, where localization of carriers leads to Coulomb blockade. Metallic behavior is explained by the large carrier densities in Si:P δ-doped systems, allowing the occupation of all six valleys of the silicon conduction band, enhancing the number of 1D channels and hence the localization length.

  2. Influence of transition metal atoms doping on structural, electronic and nonlinear optical properties of Mg12O12 nanoclusters: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamlouei, Hamid Reza; Nouri, Amin; Mohammadi, Asghar; Tehrani, Abbas Dadkhah

    2016-03-01

    Using density functional theory, we investigated the effect of transition metal doping on structural, electronic, energetic, linear and nonlinear optical properties of Mg12O12 nanocluster. The result revealed that transition metal atoms doping lead to reduce the Eg and increase the dipole moment. The doping of transition metal atom on Mg12O12 nanocluster enhances its polarizability value. Also polarizability values for doped nanoclusters decrease as the atomic number of transition metal increase. The first hyperpolarizability value dramatically increases as substitute a magnesium atom with a transition metal atom. Among the transition metal atom doped nanocage, scandium has the largest first hyperpolarizability value (β◦≈47,872 au). The stability and remarkable values of β◦ (for Sc, Ti and V doped of nanocage) suggest that these compounds may be applicable as NLO material in industrial.

  3. In situ atom scale visualization of domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition.

    PubMed

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-10-08

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application.

  4. In Situ Atom Scale Visualization of Domain Wall Dynamics in VO2 Insulator-Metal Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-01-01

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application. PMID:25292447

  5. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  6. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  7. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  8. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-01

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed. PMID:25393218

  9. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-01

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed.

  10. Ultrafast and ultraslow oxygen atom transfer reactions between late metal centers.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Kevin C; Laitar, David S; Muldoon, John; Pu, Lihung; Braun-Sand, Sonja B; Wiest, Olaf; Brown, Seth N

    2007-01-24

    Oxotrimesityliridium(V), (mes)3Ir=O (mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl), and trimesityliridium(III), (mes)3Ir, undergo extremely rapid degenerate intermetal oxygen atom transfer at room temperature. At low temperatures, the two complexes conproportionate to form (mes)3Ir-O-Ir(mes)3, the 2,6-dimethylphenyl analogue of which has been characterized crystallographically. Variable-temperature NMR measurements of the rate of dissociation of the mu-oxo dimer combined with measurements of the conproportionation equilibrium by low-temperature optical spectroscopy indicate that oxygen atom exchange between iridium(V) and iridium(III) occurs with a rate constant, extrapolated to 20 degrees C, of 5 x 107 M-1 s-1. The oxotris(imido)osmium(VIII) complex (ArN)3Os=O (Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) also undergoes degenerate intermetal atom transfer to its deoxy partner, (ArN)3Os. However, despite the fact that its metal-oxygen bond strength and reactivity toward triphenylphosphine are nearly identical to those of (mes)3Ir=O, the osmium complex (ArN)3Os=O transfers its oxygen atom 12 orders of magnitude more slowly to (ArN)3Os than (mes)3Ir=O does to (mes)3Ir (kOsOs = 1.8 x 10-5 M-1 s-1 at 20 degrees C). Iridium-osmium cross-exchange takes place at an intermediate rate, in quantitative agreement with a Marcus-type cross relation. The enormous difference between the iridium-iridium and osmium-osmium exchange rates can be rationalized by an analogue of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. Both Ir(III) and Ir(V) are pyramidal and can form pyramidal iridium(IV) with little energetic cost in an orbitally allowed linear approach. Conversely, pyramidalization of the planar tris(imido)osmium(VI) fragment requires placing a pair of electrons in an antibonding orbital. The unique propensity of (mes)3Ir=O to undergo intermetal oxygen atom transfer allows it to serve as an activator of dioxygen in cocatalyzed oxidations, for example, acting with osmium tetroxide to catalyze the aerobic

  11. Reactions of group 14 metal atoms with acetylene: a matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun-Lei; Xu, Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Laser-ablated group 14 metal atoms have been codeposited at 4 K with acetylene in excess argon. Products, Ge(C2H2), HGeCCH, Sn(C2H2), Sn2CCH2, HSnCCH, and HPbCCH, have been formed in the present experiments and characterized using infrared spectroscopy on the basis of the results of the isotopic shifts, mixed isotopic splitting patterns, stepwise annealing, the change of reagent concentration and laser energy, and the comparison with theoretical predictions. Density functional theory calculations have been performed on these molecules. The agreement between the experimental and the calculated vibrational frequencies, relative absorption intensities, and isotopic shifts supports the identification of these molecules from the matrix infrared spectra. Plausible reaction mechanisms have been proposed to account for the formation of these molecules.

  12. Electric Field Dependent Photoluminescence in Atomically Thin Transition Metal Dichalcogenides van der Waals Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis A.; High, Alex A.; Dibos, Alan; Joe, Andrew; Gulpinar, Elgin; Park, Hongkun; Kim, Philip

    uregui, Alex A. High, Alan Dibos, Andrew Joe, Elgin Gulpinar, Hongkun Park, Philip Kim Harvard University, Physics Department -abstract- Single layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) are 2-dimensional (2D) semiconductors characterized by a direct optical bandgap and large exciton binding energies (>100 meV). We fabricate CQW heterostructures made of 2D TMDCs with hexagonal Boron nitride (BN) as atomically thin barrier and gate dielectric, with top and bottom gate electrodes. We study the evolution of photoluminescence (PL) spectrum with varying BN barrier thickness, electric field, temperature and polarization. Our measured low-temperature (T = 3K) PL peaks show full width at half maxima on the order of ~3meV. We identify the photoluminescence peaks, corresponding to the charged exciton emission, which red shifts and its brightness increases while the neutral exciton emission becomes darker for increasing electric field.

  13. Energy shifts of Rydberg atoms due to patch fields near metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J. D.; Martin, J. D. D.

    2011-03-15

    The statistical properties of patch electric fields due to a polycrystalline metal surface are calculated. The fluctuations in the electric field scale like 1/z{sup 2} when z>>w, where z is the distance to the surface and w is the characteristic length scale of the surface patches. For typical thermally evaporated gold surfaces these field fluctuations are comparable to the image field of an elementary charge, and scale in the same way with distance to the surface. Expressions for calculating the statistics of the inhomogeneous broadening of Rydberg-atom energies due to patch electric fields are presented. Spatial variations in the patch fields over the Rydberg orbit are found to be insignificant.

  14. [Study on determination of eight metal elements in Hainan arecanut leaf by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-yun; Wang, Ping; Feng, Mei-li; Dong, Zhi-guo; Li, Jie

    2008-12-01

    Arecanut is a sort of palm that is important economic crop for the farmers in Hainan province of China, wherein there are many kinds of metal elements such as K, Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn etc. These elements are important nutrition for the growth of arecanut. It is very valuable to study on the content of these metal elements in arecanut leaf in terms of plant nutriology of arecanut. The arecanut leaf in Wangling county, Hainan province of China was sampled by diagonal-field-sampling method. Refering to other plant sample determination by FAAS, the detailed studies are done with different digestion and determination methods. In the present paper the effects of mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 digestion method on determining the amount of metal elements in the arecanut leaf by FAAS is reported, and another one is incineration digestion method. FAAS method was established for the determination of K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn The samples were incinerated or heated with HNO3-HClO4 (4:1). In the meantime, the optimum parameters of FAAS and effects of different digestion methods on the results were discussed. The recovery rate of standard addition is 98.36%-102.38% in the first method; RSD is 0.42%-2.328% (n=6); The recovery rate of standard addition is 99.22%-103.72% in the second method; RSD is 0.58%-1.283 (n=6). The metal amount determined by the first method is lower than the second method, the ratio is 0.9703-0.9934. The two methods are satisfied, but the latter is better. It is precise enough to common experiment to use flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry with digestion by incineration If the especially precise experiment is required, the digestion methods with mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 may be introduced. The paper introduced methods dependable for determination of some metal elements in order to study on some nutrient effects of these metal elements in arecanut. PMID:19248529

  15. Quantitative Z-Contrast Imaging of Supported Metal Complexes and Clusters - A Gateway to Understanding Catalysis on the Atomic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Nigel D.; Aydin, C.; Lu, Jing; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Ortalan, V.; Reed, Bryan W.; Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2013-09-01

    Z-contrast imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to observe and quantify the sizes, shapes, and compositions of the metal frames in supported mono-, bi-, and multimetallic metal clusters and can even detect the metal atoms in single-metal-atom complexes, as well as providing direct structural information characterizing the metal-support interface. Herein, we assess the major experimental challenges associated with obtaining atomic resolution Z-contrast images of the materials that are highly beam-sensitive, that is, the clusters readily migrate and sinter on support surfaces, and the support itself can drastically change in structure if the experiment is not properly controlled. Calibrated and quantified Z-contrast images are used in conjunction with exsitu analytical measurements and larger-scale characterization methods such as extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to generate an atomic-scale understanding of supported catalysts and their function. Examples of the application of these methods include the characterization of a wide range of sizes and compositions of supported clusters, primarily those incorporating Ir, Os, and Au, on highly crystalline supports (zeolites and MgO).

  16. Changes in the shape of atomic lines of alkali metals in sonoluminescence spectra of solutions of surfactants and halogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachek, M. V.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2013-11-01

    The multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate, of the mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate with lithium and potassium chlorides, and of sodium and potassium halogenides were measured near the lines of metals at an ultrasonic frequency of 20 kHz. The Na, Li, and K lines in spectra of surfactant solutions are noticeably narrower than those obtained in solutions of metal chlorides. The width of Na lines in spectra of metal fluorides, chlorides, and iodides remains constant, while that of the K line increases with increasing atomic weight of a halogen. The results are discussed in the context of the effect that the bonding strength of an atom possibly has on the formation of metal lines in sonoluminescence spectra.

  17. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  18. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  19. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  20. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in themore » total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. In conclusion, these multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.« less

  1. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments. PMID:26902901

  2. Accurate nonrelativistic ground-state energies of 3d transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Scemama, A.; Applencourt, T.; Giner, E.; Caffarel, M.

    2014-12-28

    We present accurate nonrelativistic ground-state energies of the transition metal atoms of the 3d series calculated with Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC). Selected multi-determinantal expansions obtained with the CIPSI (Configuration Interaction using a Perturbative Selection made Iteratively) method and including the most prominent determinants of the full configuration interaction expansion are used as trial wavefunctions. Using a maximum of a few tens of thousands determinants, fixed-node errors on total DMC energies are found to be greatly reduced for some atoms with respect to those obtained with Hartree-Fock nodes. To the best of our knowledge, the FN-DMC/(CIPSI nodes) ground-state energies presented here are the lowest variational total energies reported so far. They differ from the recently recommended non-variational values of McCarthy and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 054107 (2012)] only by a few percents of the correlation energy. Thanks to the variational property of FN-DMC total energies, our results provide exact lower bounds for the absolute value of all-electron correlation energies, |E{sub c}|.

  3. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  4. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M.; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J.

    2016-02-01

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  5. Assessment of toxic metals in raw and processed milk samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2009-09-01

    Milk and dairy products have been recognized all over the world for their beneficial influence on human health. The levels of toxic metals (TMs) are an important component of safety and quality of milk. A simple and efficient microwave assisted extraction (MAE) method has been developed for the determination of TMs (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb), in raw and processed milk samples. A Plackett-Burman experimental design and 2(3)+star central composite design, were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for MAE. Concentrations of TMs were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by standard addition method and conventional wet acid digestion method (CDM), for comparative purpose. No significant differences were observed (P>0.05), when comparing the values obtained by the proposed MAE method and CDM (paired t-test). The average relative standard deviation of the MAE method varied between 4.3% and 7.6% based on analyte (n=6). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of understudy TMs in milk samples. The results of raw and processed milk indicated that environmental conditions and manufacturing processes play a key role in the distribution of toxic metals in raw and processed milk.

  6. Atom-efficient metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of indium organometallics with organic electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Pérez, I; Sestelo, J P; Sarandeses, L A

    2001-05-01

    The novel metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of indium organometallics with organic electrophiles is described. Triorganoindium compounds (R(3)In) containing alkyl, vinyl, aryl, and alkynyl groups are efficiently prepared from the corresponding lithium or magnesium organometallics by reaction with indium trichloride. The cross-coupling reaction of R(3)In with aryl halides and pseudohalides (iodide 2, bromide 5, and triflate 4), vinyl triflates, benzyl bromides, and acid chlorides proceeds under palladium catalysis in excellent yields and with high chemoselectivity. Indium organometallics also react with aryl chlorides as under nickel catalysis. In the cross-coupling reaction the triorganoindium compounds transfer, in a clear example of atom economy, all three of the organic groups attached to the metal, as shown by the necessity of using only 34 mol % of indium. The feasibility of using R(3)In in reactions with different electrophiles, along with the high yields and chemoselectivities obtained, reveals indium organometallics to be useful alternatives to other organometallics in cross-coupling reactions.

  7. Mechanism of Photoinduced Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiangcheng; Fang, Cheng; Fantin, Marco; Malhotra, Nikhil; So, Woong Young; Peteanu, Linda A; Isse, Abdirisak A; Gennaro, Armando; Liu, Peng; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2016-02-24

    Photoinduced metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate was investigated using several phenothiazine derivatives and other related compounds as photoredox catalysts. The experiments show that all selected catalysts can be involved in the activation step, but not all of them participated efficiently in the deactivation step. The redox properties and the stability of radical cations derived from the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Laser flash photolysis (LFP) was used to determine the lifetime and activity of photoexcited catalysts. Kinetic analysis of the activation reaction according to dissociative electron-transfer (DET) theory suggests that the activation occurs only with an excited state of catalyst. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed the structures and stabilities of the radical cation intermediates as well as the reaction energy profiles of deactivation pathways with different photoredox catalysts. Both experiments and calculations suggest that the activation process undergoes a DET mechanism, while an associative electron transfer involving a termolecular encounter (the exact reverse of DET pathway) is favored in the deactivation process. This detailed study provides a deeper understanding of the chemical processes of metal-free ATRP that can aid the design of better catalytic systems. Additionally, this work elucidates several important common pathways involved in synthetically useful organic reactions catalyzed by photoredox catalysts. PMID:26820243

  8. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  9. The halogen atom/metal trimer CW laser-engineering concept overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, G.; Jacobs, T. A.

    1992-07-01

    A halogen atom/metal vapor laser is discussed in terms of CW power and performance. Fluorine and sodium represent surrogates for the halogen and metal species; other combinations are possible. Since lasing may occur from a variety of excited electronic states, operation is expected to be broadly dispersed over the visible and near UV wavelength regions. The device is a low pressure, supersonic mixing laser that resembles the HF/DF CW laser, e.g., separate plenums are utilized for the fluorine and sodium vapors, and each plenum feeds a nozzle array. Sodium trimer formation begins in the nozzle and continues inside the laser cavity. The design of this nozzle is particularly important; the concept of controlled condensation is introduced. Downstream of the nozzle bank, the two vapor streams mix and the F-Na3 reaction pumps several electronically excited states that have gain in the blue-green region. Estimates are given for power per unit mass flow rate and power per unit nozzle bank cross-sectional area.

  10. Antibiotic resistance gene abundances associated with antibiotics and heavy metals in animal manures and agricultural soils adjacent to feedlots in Shanghai; China.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiuling; Shen, Qunhui; Liu, Fang; Ma, Jing; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yuanlong; Wu, Minghong

    2012-10-15

    Eight antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), 7 heavy metals, and 6 antibiotics were quantified in manures and soils collected from multiple feedlots in Shanghai. The samples were analyzed to determine if ARG abundances were associated with heavy metal concentration and independent of antibiotics. The results revealed the presence of chloramphenicol, sulfonamides and tetracyclines at concentration ranges of 3.27-17.85, 5.85-33.37 and 4.54-24.66 mg kg(-1), respectively. Typical heavy metals, such as Cu, Zn, and As, were detected at concentration ranges of 32.3-730.1, 75.9-4333.8, and 2.6-617.2 mg kg(-1). All ARGs tested were detected in the collected samples except tetB(P), which was absent in animal manures. Overall, sulfonamide ARGs were more abundant than tetracycline ARGs. Except for sulII, only a weak positive correlation was found between ARGs and their corresponding antibiotics. On the contrary, significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were found between some ARGs and typical heavy metals. For example, sulA and sulIII were strongly correlated with levels of Cu, Zn and Hg. The data demonstrated that the presence of ARGs was relatively independent of their respective antibiotic inducer. In addition to antibiotics, toxic heavy metals, such as Hg, Cu, and Zn, exerted a strong selection pressure and acted as complementary factors for ARG abundance.

  11. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  12. Comparisons between adsorption and diffusion of alkali, alkaline earth metal atoms on silicene and those on silicane: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Xu; Huan-Sheng, Lu; Bo, Liu; Gang, Liu; Mu-Sheng, Wu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on silicane and silicene are both investigated by using a first-principles method within the frame of density functional theory. Silicane is staler against the metal adatoms than silicene. Hydrogenation makes the adsorption energies of various metal atoms considered in our calculations on silicane significantly lower than those on silicene. Similar diffusion energy barriers of alkali metal atoms on silicane and silicene could be observed. However, the diffusion energy barriers of alkali-earth metal atoms on silicane are essentially lower than those on silicene due to the small structural distortion and weak interaction between metal atoms and silicane substrate. Combining the adsorption energy with the diffusion energy barriers, it is found that the clustering would occur when depositing metal atoms on perfect hydrogenated silicene with relative high coverage. In order to avoid forming a metal cluster, we need to remove the hydrogen atoms from the silicane substrate to achieve the defective silicane. Our results are helpful for understanding the interaction between metal atoms and silicene-based two-dimensional materials. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20152ACB21014, 20151BAB202006, and 20142BAB212002) and the Fund from the Jiangxi Provincial Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14254). Bo Xu is also supported by the Oversea Returned Project from the Ministry of Education, China.

  13. Angular-dependent embedded atom method potential for atomistic simulations of metal-covalent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongare, Avinash M.; Neurock, Matthew; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2009-11-01

    A computationally efficient interatomic potential is developed for the description of interatomic interactions in multicomponent systems composed of metals, Si and Ge. The potential is based on reformulation of the embedded atom method (EAM) potential for metals and Stillinger-Weber (SW) potential commonly used for Si and Ge in a compatible functional form. The potential incorporates a description of the angular dependence of interatomic interactions into the framework of the EAM potential and, therefore, is dubbed angular-dependent EAM (A-EAM) potential. The A-EAM potential retains the properties of the pure components predicted by the original EAM and SW potentials, thus limiting the scope of potential parameterization to only the cross interactions among the components. The ability of the potential to provide an adequate description of binary systems with mixed type of bonding is illustrated for Au-Si/Ge system, with the parameters for Au-Si and Au-Ge interactions determined based on the results of density-functional theory calculations performed for several representative bulk structures and small clusters. To test the performance of the A-EAM potential at finite temperatures, the values of the enthalpy of mixing of liquid Au-Si and Au-Ge alloys, as well as the equilibrium lines on the Au-Si phase diagram are evaluated and compared with experimental data. The calculation of the phase diagram is based on the values of the excess chemical potential difference between Au and Si, evaluated in a series of semi-grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations performed for different temperatures and alloy compositions. The potential is shown to provide an adequate semiquantitative description of the thermodynamic properties of the alloy at different temperatures and in the whole range of compositions, thus showing a considerable promise for large-scale atomistic simulations of metal-Si/Ge systems.

  14. The effect of spherical inclusions in metallic glass nanowires under tensile test and its relation to atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, Matias; Gutierrez, Gonzalo; Amigo, Nicolas

    The plastic behavior of crystalline metals is well understood. It is know that this regime is mainly mediated by nucleation and propagation of dislocations as well as by grain boundary sliding. In metallic glasses (MGs) the plastic behavior is quite different from their crystalline counterparts and a relationship between atomic-micro structure and properties remains one of the barriers that has hampered the progress to wide applications of MGs. In particular it would be desirable to have studies which directly relate the evolution of the shear bands (SBs) and glass matrix structure to each step of the applied strain, which would allow us to easily connect the evolution of the atomic structure to the stress-strain curve. Here we present a computational tensile test which shows the evolution of the atomic structure according to the strain is applied for a Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire at 300 K with a Cu-Zr b2 inclusion in the center of the system with three different radius from 20 to 60 Å. The system consists of a million atoms and the local structure is analyzed by means of the Voronoi polyhedral technique and the nucleation and propagation of SBs by monitoring the local atomic shear strain. CONICyT PhD Fellowship No. 21140904.

  15. In situ dissolution or deposition of Ytterbium (Yb) metal in microhotplate wells for a miniaturized atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Anderson, John M; Burns, George R; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Wheeler, David R; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2012-10-22

    Current atomic clocks are burdened by size, weight, power and portability limitations to satisfy a broad range of potential applications. One critical need in the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock is small, low-power metallic sources. Exploiting the relatively high vapor pressure of ytterbium (Yb) and its dissolution in anhydrous ammonia, we report two independent techniques for depositing Yb inside a well micromachined into a microhotplate. Subsequent in situ evaporation of Yb from the microhotplate well serves as a low-power metallic source suitable for atomic clocks. The deposition and evaporation of Yb were confirmed using a variety of physicochemical techniques including quartz crystal microbalance, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and laser fluorescence. We also describe the fabrication of the microhotplate device, an integral component of our Yb-based miniature atomic clock. The Yb deposition/evaporation on a microhotplate well is thus useful as a low power Yb source during the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock, and this technique could be used for other applications requiring a vapor of a metal that has a moderate vapor pressure.

  16. In situ dissolution or deposition of Ytterbium (Yb) metal in microhotplate wells for a miniaturized atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Anderson, John M; Burns, George R; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Wheeler, David R; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2012-10-22

    Current atomic clocks are burdened by size, weight, power and portability limitations to satisfy a broad range of potential applications. One critical need in the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock is small, low-power metallic sources. Exploiting the relatively high vapor pressure of ytterbium (Yb) and its dissolution in anhydrous ammonia, we report two independent techniques for depositing Yb inside a well micromachined into a microhotplate. Subsequent in situ evaporation of Yb from the microhotplate well serves as a low-power metallic source suitable for atomic clocks. The deposition and evaporation of Yb were confirmed using a variety of physicochemical techniques including quartz crystal microbalance, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and laser fluorescence. We also describe the fabrication of the microhotplate device, an integral component of our Yb-based miniature atomic clock. The Yb deposition/evaporation on a microhotplate well is thus useful as a low power Yb source during the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock, and this technique could be used for other applications requiring a vapor of a metal that has a moderate vapor pressure. PMID:23187228

  17. Metallic influence on the atomic structure and optical activity of ligand-protected nanoparticles: a comparison between Ag and Au.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco; Noguez, Cecilia; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2014-03-21

    Using time-perturbed density functional theory the optical activity of metal-thiolate compounds formed by highly symmetric Ag and Au nanoparticles (NPs) and a methyl-thiol molecule is studied after performing atomic optimizations and electronic calculations upon adsorption. Many different sites and orientations of the adsorbed molecule on icosahedral Ag and Au NPs of 55 atoms are considered. Upon molecular adsorption atomic distortions on Au NPs are induced while not on Ag, which causes higher molecular adsorption energies in Au than in Ag. Structural distortions and the specific molecular adsorption site and orientation result in chiral metal-thiolate NPs. Ag and Au compounds with similar chirality, according to Hausdorff chirality measurements, show different optical activity signatures, where circular dichroism spectra of Au NPs are more intense. These dissimilarities are attributed in part to the differences in the electronic density of states, which are a consequence of relativistic effects and the atomic distortion. It is concluded that the optical activity of Ag and Au compounds is due to different mechanisms, while in Au it is mainly due to the atomic distortion of the metallic NPs induced after molecular adsorption, in Ag it is defined by the adsorption site and molecular orientation with respect to the NP symmetry.

  18. Sample preparation of solid samples for metal determination by atomic spectroscopy - An overview and selected recent applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, J.; Hardaway, C.; Bobbadi, K.; Reddy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Classical methods involving dry dissolution, wet decomposition, and microwave methods for digestion/dissolution of solid samples for metal determination by various atomic spectroscopic techniques are discussed. Recent applications of solid sample preparation are presented including soils, sediments, food, cosmetics, oils, and coal.

  19. Distribution, risk assessment, and statistical source identification of heavy metals in aqueous system from three adjacent regions of the Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zuo, Hang; Liu, Jingjun; Liu, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Distribution of five heavy metals (Cr, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn) and some physicochemical variables were studied from ten sites (S1-S10) in filtered water, suspended particles, and sediment samples from Gansu Province, Ningxia, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions of the Yellow River in Northern China. The results showed that heavy metal concentrations in filtered water were relatively lower, while they were higher and approximated in suspended particles and sediment samples. Metal chemical fractions showed that high proportions of Cd were found in the exchangeable fractions, while others likely to be existed in lithology. Heavy metal pollution index (HPI) indicated that the quality of filtered water was relatively better, and the potential ecological risk index (PERI) revealed that only Cd has the higher ecological risk in suspended particles and sediment samples, which is accordance with the results obtained by the chemical fractions analysis; at the same time, the higher ecological risks existed in S3, S6, S9, and S10 in suspended particles and sediment samples due to the waste emission of a variety of industries. Results of cluster analysis (CA) indicated that contamination sources in the sediment samples were from both natural processes and anthropogenic activities. PMID:26822214

  20. Size-confined growth of atom-precise nanoclusters in metal-organic frameworks and their catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingli; Song, Yongbo; Chong, Hanbao; Yang, Sha; Xiang, Ji; Jin, Shan; Kang, Xi; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2016-01-01

    Using MOFs as size-selection templates, we have for the first time synthesized atom-precise Au11:PPh3 nanoclusters (NCs) and Au13Ag12:PPh3 NCs with high purity by a one-step, in situ reduction method. Specifically, we found that the product released from the frameworks of ZIF-8 is exclusively the Au11:PPh3 NCs rather than polydispersed NCs, and inside MIL-101(Cr) the Au13Ag12:PPh3 NCs constitute the exclusive product. The metal NC@MOF composites are also demonstrated for catalytic application. The high catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol indicates that atom-precise noble metal NCs@MOFs may act as a promising class of heterogeneous catalysts. The atom-precise NCs obtained in the MOF templated synthesis imply the future possibility of using MOFs of various pore sizes for the size-selective synthesis of atomically precise NCs. Meanwhile, metal NCs@MOFs will contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of nanocatalyst surface reactions and hence opens up enormous opportunities in heterogeneous catalysis.Using MOFs as size-selection templates, we have for the first time synthesized atom-precise Au11:PPh3 nanoclusters (NCs) and Au13Ag12:PPh3 NCs with high purity by a one-step, in situ reduction method. Specifically, we found that the product released from the frameworks of ZIF-8 is exclusively the Au11:PPh3 NCs rather than polydispersed NCs, and inside MIL-101(Cr) the Au13Ag12:PPh3 NCs constitute the exclusive product. The metal NC@MOF composites are also demonstrated for catalytic application. The high catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol indicates that atom-precise noble metal NCs@MOFs may act as a promising class of heterogeneous catalysts. The atom-precise NCs obtained in the MOF templated synthesis imply the future possibility of using MOFs of various pore sizes for the size-selective synthesis of atomically precise NCs. Meanwhile, metal NCs@MOFs will contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of nanocatalyst

  1. Correlations between dynamics and atomic structures in Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F.; Mendelev, M. I.; Kramer, M. J.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    The atomic structure of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs) has been widely accepted to be heterogeneous and dominated by icosahedral short range order (ISRO). However, the correlations between dynamics and atomic structures in Cu-Zr MGs remain an enigma. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigated the correlations between dynamics and atomic structures in Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG. The atomic structures are characterized using ISRO and the Bergman-type medium range order (BMRO). The simulation and analysis results show that the majority of the mobile atoms are not involved in ISRO or BMRO, indicating that the dynamical heterogeneity has a strong correlation to structural heterogeneity. Moreover, we found that the localized soft vibration modes below 1.0 THz are mostly concentrated on the mobile atoms. The diffusion was studied using the atomic trajectory collected in an extended time interval of 1.2 μs at 700 K in MD simulations. It was found that the long range diffusion in MGs is highly heterogeneous, which is confined to the liquid-like regions and strongly avoids the ISRO and the Bergman-type MRO. All These results clearly demonstrate strong correlations between dynamics (in terms of dynamical heterogeneity and diffusion) and atomic structures in Cu64.5Zr35.5 MGs. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering under the Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  2. Tunable electronic structures of germanium monochalcogenide nanosheets via light non-metallic atom functionalization: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2016-08-17

    Germanium monochalcogenides, i.e. GeS and GeSe sheets, are isoelectronic analogues of phosphorene, which have been synthesized in recent experiments (P. Ramasamy et al., J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 479). Utilizing first-principles calculations, we have investigated their tunable electronic and magnetic properties via light non-metallic atom (B, C, N, O, Si, P, S) functionalization. We find that on these GeS and GeSe sheets O and S adatoms prefer to locate at the top site above the Ge atom, while the other ones like to occupy the anion site, which push the original S/Se atom to the hollow site instead. O and S adatoms slightly affect the semiconducting behaviour of the doped systems, while B, C, N, Si, P ones will drastically modify their band structures and induce versatile spintronic properties. Through the supercell calculations, B and C adatoms are found to induce a bipolar semiconducting behaviour in the decorated systems, while the N/P adatom will cause a spin-gapless-semiconducting/nearly-half-metallic feature in them. The B/C/N/Si/P-substituted GeS/GeSe sheet can be formed by removing the hollow-site S/Se atom from the adatom-decorated structures, which exhibit an opposite semiconducting/metallic behaviour to their phosphorene counterparts. A general odd-even rule is proposed for this phenomenon, which shows that an odd (even) number of valence electron difference between the substitution and host atoms would cause a metallic (semiconducting) feature in the substituted systems. Our study demonstrates that atom functionalization is an efficient way to tailor the properties of GeS and GeSe nanosheets, which have adaptable electronic properties for potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics. PMID:27491896

  3. Tunable electronic structures of germanium monochalcogenide nanosheets via light non-metallic atom functionalization: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2016-08-17

    Germanium monochalcogenides, i.e. GeS and GeSe sheets, are isoelectronic analogues of phosphorene, which have been synthesized in recent experiments (P. Ramasamy et al., J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 479). Utilizing first-principles calculations, we have investigated their tunable electronic and magnetic properties via light non-metallic atom (B, C, N, O, Si, P, S) functionalization. We find that on these GeS and GeSe sheets O and S adatoms prefer to locate at the top site above the Ge atom, while the other ones like to occupy the anion site, which push the original S/Se atom to the hollow site instead. O and S adatoms slightly affect the semiconducting behaviour of the doped systems, while B, C, N, Si, P ones will drastically modify their band structures and induce versatile spintronic properties. Through the supercell calculations, B and C adatoms are found to induce a bipolar semiconducting behaviour in the decorated systems, while the N/P adatom will cause a spin-gapless-semiconducting/nearly-half-metallic feature in them. The B/C/N/Si/P-substituted GeS/GeSe sheet can be formed by removing the hollow-site S/Se atom from the adatom-decorated structures, which exhibit an opposite semiconducting/metallic behaviour to their phosphorene counterparts. A general odd-even rule is proposed for this phenomenon, which shows that an odd (even) number of valence electron difference between the substitution and host atoms would cause a metallic (semiconducting) feature in the substituted systems. Our study demonstrates that atom functionalization is an efficient way to tailor the properties of GeS and GeSe nanosheets, which have adaptable electronic properties for potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  4. A difference in using atomic layer deposition or physical vapour deposition TiN as electrode material in metal-insulator-metal and metal-insulator-silicon capacitors.

    PubMed

    Groenland, A W; Wolters, R A M; Kovalgin, A Y; Schmitz, J

    2011-09-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the MIM capacitors the bottom electrode is a patterned 100 nm TiN layer (called BE type 1), deposited via sputtering, while MIS capacitors have a flat bottom electrode (called BE type 2-silicon substrate). A high quality 50-100 nm thick SiO2 layer, made by inductively-coupled plasma CVD at 150 degrees C, is deposited as a dielectric on top of both types of bottom electrodes. BE type 1 (MIM) capacitors have a varying from low to high concentration of structural defects in the SiO2 layer. BE type 2 (MIS) capacitors have a low concentration of structural defects and are used as a reference. Two sets of each capacitor design are fabricated with the TiN top electrode deposited either via physical vapour deposition (PVD, i.e., sputtering) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). The MIM and MIS capacitors are electrically characterized in terms of the leakage current at an electric field of 0.1 MV/cm (I leak) and for different structural defect concentrations. It is shown that the structural defects only show up in the electrical characteristics of BE type 1 capacitors with an ALD TiN-based top electrode. This is due to the excellent step coverage of the ALD process. This work clearly demonstrates the sensitivity to process-induced structural defects, when ALD is used as a step in process integration of conductors on insulation materials.

  5. Probing interlayer interactions between graphene and metal substrates by supersonic rare-gas atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichibe, H.; Satake, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Kinjyo, A.; Kunihara, A.; Yamada, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Hayes, W. W.; Manson, J. R.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that highly surface-sensitive supersonic rare-gas (He, Ar, and Xe) atom scattering, in both the quantum and classical regimes, can probe and quantify the interlayer interactions between graphene monolayers and metal substrates in terms of the Debye temperature corresponding to the surface normal vibration, and the surface effective mass. As models of the strongly and weakly interacting graphene, we investigated two systems, graphene on Ru(0001) and Pt(111), respectively. The experimental data for Ar and Xe are compared with the results from theoretical simulations based on the classical smooth surface model. For gr/Pt(111) we find that the scattering pattern of the rare-gas beam, including the Debye-Waller attenuation of the He beam, are quite similar to that from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG); this suggests that the graphene-Pt(111) interaction is much like a van der Waals interaction. On the contrary, for the gr/Ru(0001) system, we find a smaller Debye-Waller attenuation and a larger surface effective mass, indicating that graphene on Ru(0001) is tightly bonded to the substrate. Furthermore, asymmetrical spectral shapes in the Ar and Xe scattering spectra from gr/Ru(0001) are interpreted as a result of the lateral distribution of the interlayer interaction corresponding to the moiré pattern. It is found that the "valley" region of the moiré pattern has high effective mass reflecting stronger bonding to the substrate, contributing to the high reflectivity of the He beam reported for this system. On the other hand, the effective mass of the "hill" region is found to be similar to that of HOPG, indicating that this region is well decoupled from the substrate. These results demonstrate a unique capability of atom scattering to probe and evaluate the molecule-substrate interaction and its spatial distributions.

  6. Monitoring of Metallic-atom-density in Plasma Processes by Light Source for Absorption Spectroscopy using Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi

    It is important to monitor the density of species in plasma or sputtering processes for controlling the process precisely because both composition and property of films are affected by the density of species such as radicals and ions. Absorption spectroscopy is a powerful method to monitor the density of species in the plasma. We have developed a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp (multi-MHCL) for monitoring densities of multi-metallic-atoms in the plasma or sputtering processes. The multi-MHCL is a compact light source in compared with the conventional light sources, and can emit multi-atomic lines simultaneously. The multi-MHCL was applied to an absorption spectroscopy for measuring densities of Zn and In atoms in a radio frequency magnetron sputtering process using IZO (Indium Zinc Oxide) target. The densities of Zn and In atoms were successfully measured in the range of 109 to 1010cm-3.

  7. Photoinduced Charge Transfer at Metal Oxide/Oxide Interfaces Prepared with Plasma Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpuneet

    LiNbO3 and ZnO have shown great potential for photochemical surface reactions and specific photocatalytic processes. However, the efficiency of LiNbO3 is limited due to recombination or back reactions and ZnO exhibits a chemical instability in a liquid cell. In this dissertation, both materials were coated with precise thickness of metal oxide layers to passivate the surfaces and to enhance their photocatalytic efficiency. LiNbO 3 was coated with plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited (PEALD) ZnO and Al2O3, and molecular beam deposited TiO2 and VO2. On the other hand, PEALD ZnO and single crystal ZnO were passivated with PEALD SiO2 and Al2O3. Metal oxide/LiNbO3 heterostructures were immersed in aqueous AgNO3 solutions and illuminated with ultraviolet (UV) light to form Ag nanoparticle patterns. Alternatively, Al2O3 and SiO2/ZnO heterostructures were immersed in K3PO 4 buffer solutions and studied for photoelectrochemical reactions. A fundamental aspect of the heterostructures is the band alignment and band bending, which was deduced from in situ photoemission measurements. This research has provided insight to three aspects of the heterostructures. First, the band alignment at the interface of metal oxides/LiNbO 3, and Al2O3 or SiO2/ZnO were used to explain the possible charge transfer processes and the direction of carrier flow in the heterostructures. Second, the effect of metal oxide coatings on the LiNbO3 with different internal carrier concentrations was related to the surface photochemical reactions. Third is the surface passivation and degradation mechanism of Al2O 3 and SiO2 on ZnO was established. The heterostructures were characterized after stability tests using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that limited thicknesses of ZnO or TiO2 on polarity patterned LiNbO3 (PPLN) enhances the Ag+ photoinduced reduction process. ZnO seems more efficient

  8. Catalytic oxidation of H2 by N2O in the gas phase: O-atom transport with atomic metal cations.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Bozović, Andrea; Orlova, Galina; Bohme, Diethard K

    2008-10-16

    Twenty-five atomic cations, M (+), that lie within the thermodynamic window for O-atom transport catalysis of the oxidation of hydrogen by nitrous oxide, have been checked for catalytic activity at room temperature with kinetic measurements using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Only 4 of these 25 atomic cations were seen to be catalytic: Fe (+), Os (+), Ir (+), and Pt (+). Two of these, Ir (+) and Pt (+), are efficient catalysts, while Fe (+) and Os (+) are not. Eighteen atomic cations (Cr (+), Mn (+), Co (+), Ni (+), Cu (+), Ge (+), Se (+), Mo (+), Ru (+), Rh (+), Sn (+), Te (+), Re (+), Pb (+), Bi (+), Eu (+), Tm (+), and Yb (+)) react too slowly at room temperature either in their oxidation with N 2O to form MO (+) or in the reduction of MO (+) by H 2. Many of these reactions are known to be spin forbidden and a few actually may lie outside the thermodynamic window. Three alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations, CaO (+), SrO (+), and BaO (+), were observed to favor MOH (+) formation in their reactions with H 2. A potential-energy landscape is computed for the oxidation of H 2 with N 2O catalyzed by Fe (+)( (6)D) that vividly illustrates the operation of an ionic catalyst and qualitatively accounts for the relative inefficiency of this catalyst. PMID:18808088

  9. Cross sections of collisional excitation transfer in collisions of rare-earth metal atoms in screened excited states with atoms of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present and apply a method to determine the collisional excitation transfer (CET) cross sections in collisions of rare-earth metal (REM) atoms in the screened excited states 4fN - 15d6s2 with ground-state atoms of inert gases. The method is based on the fact that the upper laser levels are collisionally populated from the close-lying resonant levels, which are excited by electron impact, in REM vapour lasers. An experimental measurement of only one laser parameter (average lasing power) is required to determine the cross sections. The CET cross sections from the screened level 4f12(3H5)5d3/26s2, with energy E = 22 791.176 cm-1, to the unscreened 4f12(3H6)6s26p1/2 (E = 22 468.046 cm-1) and screened 4f13(2F07/2)5d6s(3D) (E = 22 559.502 cm-1) levels of thulium atoms in the collisions with helium atoms are estimated as an example.

  10. Atomic/molecular depth profiling of nanometric-metallized polymer thin films by secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Helena; Vadillo, José Miguel; Laserna, José Javier

    2010-02-01

    The capability of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to perform atomic and molecular in-depth analysis in complex nanometric-metallized thin polymer films used to manufacture capacitors is demonstrated through three different case studies related to failure analysis. The excellent repeatability and sensitivity of the technique allow us to study the degradation process of the nanometric-metallized layer in the capacitor films and the accurate location of the metal-polymer interface. The analysis of the sample is challenging due to the extreme difference in conductivity between layers, and the reduced thickness of the metallization grown on top of a rough polymeric base. However, SIMS has provided reliable and reproducible results with relative standard deviation (RSD) values better than 1.5% in the metallic layer thickness estimation. The detailed information of atomic and molecular ion in-depth distributions provided by SIMS depth profiling has allowed the identification of different factors (demetallization, generation of interstitial oxide regions, and diffusion processes or modification in the metallization thickness) that can be directly related to the origin of the lack of performance of the mounted devices.

  11. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition-metal atom adsorbed two-dimensional GaAs nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jia; Xiang, Gang; Yu, Tian; Lan, Mu; Zhang, Xi

    2016-09-01

    By using first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, the electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transitional metal (TM) atoms (from Sc to Zn) adsorbed monolayer GaAs nanosheets (GaAsNSs) are systematically investigated. Upon TM atom adsorption, GaAsNS, which is a nonmagnetic semiconductor, can be tuned into a magnetic semiconductor (Sc, V, and Fe adsorption), a half-metal (Mn adsorption), or a metal (Co and Cu adsorption). Our calculations show that the strong p–d hybridization between the 3d orbit of TM atoms and the 4p orbit of neighboring As atoms is responsible for the formation of chemical bonds and the origin of magnetism in the GaAsNSs with Sc, V, and Fe adsorption. However, the Mn 3d orbit with more unpaired electrons hybridizes not only with the As 4p orbit but also with the Ga 4p orbit, resulting in a stronger exchange interaction. Our results may be useful for electronic and magnetic applications of GaAsNS-based materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174212).

  12. Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition-metal atom adsorbed two-dimensional GaAs nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jia; Xiang, Gang; Yu, Tian; Lan, Mu; Zhang, Xi

    2016-09-01

    By using first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, the electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transitional metal (TM) atoms (from Sc to Zn) adsorbed monolayer GaAs nanosheets (GaAsNSs) are systematically investigated. Upon TM atom adsorption, GaAsNS, which is a nonmagnetic semiconductor, can be tuned into a magnetic semiconductor (Sc, V, and Fe adsorption), a half-metal (Mn adsorption), or a metal (Co and Cu adsorption). Our calculations show that the strong p-d hybridization between the 3d orbit of TM atoms and the 4p orbit of neighboring As atoms is responsible for the formation of chemical bonds and the origin of magnetism in the GaAsNSs with Sc, V, and Fe adsorption. However, the Mn 3d orbit with more unpaired electrons hybridizes not only with the As 4p orbit but also with the Ga 4p orbit, resulting in a stronger exchange interaction. Our results may be useful for electronic and magnetic applications of GaAsNS-based materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174212).

  13. High Throughput Atomic Layer Deposition Processes: High Pressure Operations, New Reactor Designs, and Novel Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, MoatazBellah Mahmoud

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase nano-coating process that deposits very uniform and conformal thin film materials with sub-angstrom level thickness control on various substrates. These unique properties made ALD a platform technology for numerous products and applications. However, most of these applications are limited to the lab scale due to the low process throughput relative to the other deposition techniques, which hinders its industrial adoption. In addition to the low throughput, the process development for certain applications usually faces other obstacles, such as: a required new processing mode (e.g., batch vs continuous) or process conditions (e.g., low temperature), absence of an appropriate reactor design for a specific substrate and sometimes the lack of a suitable chemistry. This dissertation studies different aspects of ALD process development for prospect applications in the semiconductor, textiles, and battery industries, as well as novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The investigation of a high pressure, low temperature ALD process for metal oxides deposition using multiple process chemistry revealed the vital importance of the gas velocity over the substrate to achieve fast depositions at these challenging processing conditions. Also in this work, two unique high throughput ALD reactor designs are reported. The first is a continuous roll-to-roll ALD reactor for ultra-fast coatings on porous, flexible substrates with very high surface area. While the second reactor is an ALD delivery head that allows for in loco ALD coatings that can be executed under ambient conditions (even outdoors) on large surfaces while still maintaining very high deposition rates. As a proof of concept, part of a parked automobile window was coated using the ALD delivery head. Another process development shown herein is the improvement achieved in the selective synthesis of organic-inorganic materials using an ALD based process called sequential vapor

  14. High aspect ratio iridescent three-dimensional metal–insulator–metal capacitors using atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Micheal Blake, Alan; Djara, Vladimir; O'Connell, Dan; Povey, Ian M.; Cherkaoui, Karim; Monaghan, Scott; Scully, Jim; Murphy, Richard; Hurley, Paul K.; Pemble, Martyn E.; Quinn, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report on the structural and electrical properties of TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiN metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitor structures in submicron three-dimensional (3D) trench geometries with an aspect ratio of ∼30. A simplified process route was employed where the three layers for the MIM stack were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a single run at a process temperature of 250 °C. The TiN top and bottom electrodes were deposited via plasma-enhanced ALD using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor. 3D trench devices yielded capacitance densities of 36 fF/μm{sup 2} and quality factors >65 at low frequency (200 Hz), with low leakage current densities (<3 nA/cm{sup 2} at 1 V). These devices also show strong optical iridescence which, when combined with the covert embedded capacitance, show potential for system in package (SiP) anticounterfeiting applications.

  15. Evaluation of metal contents of household detergent samples from Turkey by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, copper, chromium, cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc in detergent samples from Kayseri, Turkey were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. HClO₄ (10 mL)/HNO₃ (10 mL) mixture was used for the digestion of household detergent samples. The correctness of the analytical procedures was checked with standard addition-recovery tests in different detergent samples for the investigated metal ions. The concentration ranges of the elements in the detergent samples were found as 17.2-60.1, 11.1-40.1, 2.5-32.3, 8.1-10.5, 7.2-21.6, 9.8-17.9, 1.7-3.8, 12.5-22.5, and 2.0-5.8 μg/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, and chromium, respectively. The values found in this work were compared with some other studies around the world conducted on detergent samples. PMID:23722641

  16. Construction of 2D atomic crystals on transition metal surfaces: graphene, silicene, and hafnene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Zhang, Lizhi; Huang, Li; Li, Linfei; Meng, Lei; Gao, Min; Huan, Qing; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2014-06-12

    The synthesis and structures of graphene on Ru(0001) and Pt(111), silicene on Ag(111) and Ir(111) and the honeycomb hafnium lattice on Ir(111) are reviewed. Epitaxy on a transition metal (TM) substrate is a pro-mising method to produce a variety of two dimensional (2D) atomic crystals which potentially can be used in next generation electronic devices. This method is particularly valuable in the case of producing 2D materials that do not exist in 3D forms, for instance, silicene. Based on the intensive investigations of epitaxial graphene on TM in recent years, it is known that the quality of graphene is affected by many factors, including the interaction between the 2D material overlayer and the substrate, the lattice mismatch, the nucleation density at the early stage of growth. It is found that these factors also apply to many other epitaxial 2D crystals on TM. The knowledge from the reviewed systems will shine light on the design and synthesis of new 2D crystals with novel properties.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and biological approach of metal chelates of some first row transition metal ions with halogenated bidentate coumarin Schiff bases containing N and O donor atoms.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Chetan T; Patil, Sangamesh A; Toragalmath, Shivakumar S; Kinnal, Shivashankar M; Badami, Prema S

    2016-04-01

    The impregnation of halogen atoms in a molecule is an emerging trend in pharmaceutical chemistry. The presence of halogens (Cl, Br, I and F) increases the lipophilic nature of molecule and improves the penetration of lipid membrane. The presence of electronegative halogen atoms increases the bio- activity of core moiety. In the present study, Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are synthesised using Schiff bases (HL(I) and HL(II)), derived from 8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin/3-chloro-8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin with 2,4-difluoroaniline/o-toluidine respectively. The synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral (IR, NMR, UV-visible, Mass, ESI-MS, ESR), thermal, fluorescence and molar conductivity studies. All the synthesized metal complexes are completely soluble in DMF and DMSO. The non-electrolytic nature of the metal complexes was confirmed by molar conductance studies. Elemental analysis study suggest [ML2(H2O)2] stoichiometry, here M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=deprotonated ligand. The obtained IR data supports the binding of metal ion to Schiff base. Thermal study suggests the presence of coordinated water molecules. Electronic spectral results reveal six coordinated geometry for the synthesized metal complexes. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes were evaluated for antibacterial (Pseudomonas aureginosa and Proteus mirabilis), antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae), anthelmintic (Pheretima posthuma) and DNA cleavage (Calf Thymus DNA) activities. PMID:26874303

  18. Synthesis, characterization and biological approach of metal chelates of some first row transition metal ions with halogenated bidentate coumarin Schiff bases containing N and O donor atoms.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Chetan T; Patil, Sangamesh A; Toragalmath, Shivakumar S; Kinnal, Shivashankar M; Badami, Prema S

    2016-04-01

    The impregnation of halogen atoms in a molecule is an emerging trend in pharmaceutical chemistry. The presence of halogens (Cl, Br, I and F) increases the lipophilic nature of molecule and improves the penetration of lipid membrane. The presence of electronegative halogen atoms increases the bio- activity of core moiety. In the present study, Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes are synthesised using Schiff bases (HL(I) and HL(II)), derived from 8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin/3-chloro-8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin with 2,4-difluoroaniline/o-toluidine respectively. The synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral (IR, NMR, UV-visible, Mass, ESI-MS, ESR), thermal, fluorescence and molar conductivity studies. All the synthesized metal complexes are completely soluble in DMF and DMSO. The non-electrolytic nature of the metal complexes was confirmed by molar conductance studies. Elemental analysis study suggest [ML2(H2O)2] stoichiometry, here M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), L=deprotonated ligand. The obtained IR data supports the binding of metal ion to Schiff base. Thermal study suggests the presence of coordinated water molecules. Electronic spectral results reveal six coordinated geometry for the synthesized metal complexes. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes were evaluated for antibacterial (Pseudomonas aureginosa and Proteus mirabilis), antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae), anthelmintic (Pheretima posthuma) and DNA cleavage (Calf Thymus DNA) activities.

  19. Optical response of metal nanojunctions driven by single atom motion: influence of quantized electron transport on nanoplasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Marchesin, Federico; Koval, Peter; Barbry, Marc; Aizpurua, Javier

    The correlation between transport properties across sub-nanometric metallic gaps and the optical response of the system is a complex effect that, similarly to the near-field enhancement, is determined by fine atomic-scale details in the junction structure. Using ab initio calculations, we present here a study of the simultaneous evolution of the structure and the optical response of a plasmonic junction as the two Na380 clusters forming the cavity approach and retract. Atomic reorganizations are responsible for a large hysteresis of the optical response. The system exhibits a jump-to-contact instability during the approach, and the formation of an atom-sized neck across the junction during retraction. Due to the quantization of the conductance in metal nanocontacts, atomic-scale reconfigurations play a crucial role in determining the optical response. We observe abrupt changes in the intensities and spectral positions of the dominating plasmon resonances, and find a one-to-one correspondence between these jumps and those of the quantized transport across the neck. These results point out to an unforeseen connection between transport and optics at the atomic scale, which is at the frontier of current optoelectronics We acknowledge support from MINECO (Grants FIS2013-14481-P and MAT2013-46593-C6-2-P), UPV/EHU and Gipuzkuako Foru Aldundia.

  20. Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, J.

    1999-02-12

    Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable

  1. Fabrication of metallic single electron transistors featuring plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbasian, Golnaz

    The continuing increase of the device density in integrated circuits (ICs) gives rise to the high level of power that is dissipated per unit area and consequently a high temperature in the circuits. Since temperature affects the performance and reliability of the circuits, minimization of the energy consumption in logic devices is now the center of attention. According to the International Technology Roadmaps for Semiconductors (ITRS), single electron transistors (SETs) hold the promise of achieving the lowest power of any known logic device, as low as 1x10-18 J per switching event. Moreover, SETs are the most sensitive electrometers to date, and are capable of detecting a fraction of an electron charge. Despite their low power consumption and high sensitivity for charge detection, room temperature operation of these devices is quite challenging mainly due to lithographical constraints in fabricating structures with the required dimensions of less than 10 nm. Silicon based SETs have been reported to operate at room temperature. However, they all suffer from significant variation in batch-to-batch performance, low fabrication yield, and temperature-dependent tunnel barrier height. In this project, we explored the fabrication of SETs featuring metal-insulator-metal (MIM) tunnel junctions. While Si-based SETs suffer from undesirable effect of dopants that result in irregularities in the device behavior, in metal-based SETs the device components (tunnel barrier, island, and the leads) are well-defined. Therefore, metal SETs are potentially more predictable in behavior, making them easier to incorporate into circuits, and easier to check against theoretical models. Here, the proposed fabrication method takes advantage of unique properties of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). Chemical mechanical polishing provides a path for tuning the dimensions of the tunnel junctions, surpassing the limits imposed by electron beam

  2. Application of atomic-orbital projections to the study of the electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapito, Luis; Calzolari, Arrigo; Ferretti, Andrea; Nardelli, Marco

    2013-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOF) are a new class of artificial crystalline materials. Because of their flexibility for synthesis and instrinsic ultrahigh surface area and porosity, MOFs show superior performance in gas storage, catalysis, and sensing applications. We use an efficient projection of plane-wave wavefunctions onto atomic orbitals for studying the electronic properties of these intriguing materials. The present scheme harnesses the robust periodic algorithms and systematic convergence of the plane-wave method for an atomistic electronic (Landauer conductance) and chemical (charge transfer, bond and atomic charge) analysis that provides guidelines for the design of MOF electronic materials.

  3. Effect of interface atomic structure on the electronic properties of nano-sized metal-oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Hou, Jiechang; Bonnell, Dawn A

    2015-01-14

    We report that the size dependence of electronic properties at nanosized metal-semiconducting oxide interfaces is significantly affected by the interface atomic structure. The properties of interfaces with two orientations are compared over size range of 20-200 nm. The difference in interface atomic structure leads to electronic structure differences that alter electron transfer paths. Specifically, interfaces with a higher concentration of undercoordinated Ti result in enhanced tunneling due to the presence of defect states or locally reduced tunnel barrier widths. This effect is superimposed on the mechanisms of size dependent properties at such small scales.

  4. Electronic and magnetic behaviors of graphene with 5d series transition metal atom substitutions: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Tang, Wencheng; Ren, Qingqiang; Zhao, Yiming; Wang, Sake; Yu, Jin; Du, Yanhui; Hao, Yitong

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures and magnetic behaviors of graphene with 5d series transition metal atom substitutions are investigated by performing first-principles calculations. All the impurities are tightly bonded to single vacancy in a graphene sheet. The substitutions of La and Ta lead to Fermi level shifting to valence and conduction band, respectively. Both the two substitutions result in metallic properties. Moreover, the Hf, Os and Pt-substituted systems exhibit semiconductor properties, while the Re and Ir-substituted ones exhibit robust half-metallic properties. Interestingly, W-substituted system shows dilute magnetic semiconductor property. On the other hand, the substitution of Ta, W, Re and Ir induce 0.86 μB, 2 μB, 1 μB and 0.99 μB magnetic moment, respectively. Our studies demonstrate that the 5d series transition metal substituted graphene have potential applications in nanoelectronics, spintronics and magnetic storage devices.

  5. Simulation studies of the structural and dynamic properties of atomic and molecular clusters: Transition metals and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayoso, Juan Garcia-Rodeja

    1997-12-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the binding energies and melting behaviour of clusters NiN PdN, PtN, CuN, AgN, AuN with N2 23 were obtained on the basis of several models of metallic cohesion widely used in the study of bulk and surface systems. The results show that the use of dimer molecule properties in fitting the model parameters reduces the predicted cluster binding energies. The Voter and Chen version of the embedded atom method (V-EAM) predict icosahedral cluster grown sequences for every metal. The appearance of a premelting state in clusters with icosahedral magic sizes plus a few atoms was observed whenever such magic sizes were obtained. V-EAM has also been employed in obtaining the ground- state atomic configurations of Ni-Al clusters with 13, 19 and 55 atoms for all the range of concentrations. All cluster structures are found to be based on icosahedral packing. The interplay between the tendencies to surface segregation of Al atoms and heterocoordination was analysed in detail. The ground-state structures of (C60)N clusters with N2 20 were calculated using a pairwise additive atom-atom intermolecular potential, and the Girifalco's spherical potential. Both potentials agree in predicting a change from icosahedral to decahedral structures, but at slightly different sizes. The structures and thermal behaviour of(C60)N clusters supported on a graphite substrate were studied by means of MD and Monte Carlo simulations, using Girifalco's and Ruof-Hickman's potentials to model the C60-C60 and C60-graphite interactions, respectively. The ground-state structures of the supported clusters consists in monolayer-like hexagonal arrangements. The short range of the interactions causes the absence of a liquidlike state prior to cluster fragmentation.

  6. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  7. Preparation of Supported Metal Catalysts by Atomic and Molecular Layer Deposition for Improved Catalytic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Troy D.

    Creating catalysts with enhanced selectivity and activity requires precise control over particle shape, composition, and size. Here we report the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) to synthesize supported Ni, Pt, and Ni-Pt catalysts in the size regime (< 3 nm) where nanoscale properties can have a dramatic effect on reaction activity and selectivity. This thesis presents the first ALD synthesis of non-noble metal nanoparticles by depositing Ni on Al2O3 with two half-reactions of Ni(Cp)2 and H2. By changing the number of ALD cycles, Ni weight loadings were varied from 4.7 wt% to 16.7 wt% and the average particle sizes ranged from 2.5 to 3.3 nm, which increased the selectivity for C 3H6 hydrogenolysis by an order of magnitude over a much larger Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Pt particles were deposited by varying the number of ALD cycles and the reaction chemistry (H2 or O 2) to control the particle size from approximately 1 to 2 nm, which allowed lower-coordinated surface atoms to populate the particle surface. These Pt ALD catalysts demonstrated some of the highest oxidative dehydrogenation of propane selectivities (37%) of a Pt catalyst synthesized by a scalable technique. Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a reaction of interest due to the recent increased recovery of natural gas, but this reaction is hindered from industrial implementation because the Ni catalysts are plagued by deactivation from sintering and coking. This work utilized Ni ALD and NiPt ALD catalysts for the DRM reaction. These catalysts did not form destructive carbon whiskers and had enhanced reaction rates due to increased bimetallic interaction. To further limit sintering, the Ni and NiPt ALD catalysts were coated with a porous alumina matrix by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The catalysts were evaluated for DRM at 973 K, and the MLD-coated Ni catalysts outperformed the uncoated Ni catalysts in either activity (with 5 MLD cycles) or stability (with 10 MLD cycles). In summary, this thesis developed a

  8. Barrier-free subsurface incorporation of 3d metal atoms into Bi(111) films

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, C.; Vollmers, N. J.; Gerstmann, U.; Zahl, P.; Lukermann, D.; Jnawali, G.; Pfnur, H.; Sutter, P.; Tegenkamp, C.; Schmidt, W. G.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-05-27

    By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with density functional theory it is shown that the Bi(111) surface provides a well-defined incorporation site in the first bilayer that traps highly coordinating atoms such as transition metals (TMs) or noble metals. All deposited atoms assume exactly the same specific sevenfold coordinated subsurface interstitial site while the surface topography remains nearly unchanged. Notably, 3d TMs show a barrier-free incorporation. The observed surface modification by barrier-free subsorption helps to suppress aggregation in clusters. Thus, it allows a tuning of the electronic properties not only for the pure Bi(111) surface, but may also be observed for topological insulators formed by substrate-stabilized Bi bilayers.

  9. Ground state of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Guerout, R.; Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.

    2010-10-15

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the polar alkali-metal-atom-strontium diatomic molecules as possible candidates for the realization of samples of ultracold polar molecular species not yet investigated experimentally. Using a quantum chemistry approach based on effective core potentials and core polarization potentials, we model these systems as effective three-valence-electron systems, allowing for calculation of electronic properties with full configuration interaction. The potential curve and the permanent dipole moment of the {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} ground state are determined as functions of the internuclear distance for LiSr, NaSr, KSr, RbSr, and CsSr molecules. These molecules are found to exhibit a significant permanent dipole moment, though smaller than those of the alkali-metal-atom-Rb molecules.

  10. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of the atomic structure of nanoparticles in different metallic matrices.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Gurman, S J; Binns, C

    2009-05-01

    It has been appreciated for some time that the novel properties of particles in the size range 1-10 nm are potentially exploitable in a range of applications. In order to ultimately produce commercial devices containing nanosized particles, it is necessary to develop controllable means of incorporating them into macroscopic samples. One way of doing this is to embed the nanoparticles in a matrix of a different material, by co-deposition for example, to form a nanocomposite film. The atomic structure of the embedded particles can be strongly influenced by the matrix. Since some of the key properties of materials, including magnetism, strongly depend on atomic structure, the ability to determine atomic structure in embedded nanoparticles is very important. This review focuses on nanoparticles, in particular magnetic nanoparticles, embedded in different metal matrices. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provides an excellent means of probing atomic structure in nanocomposite materials, and an overview of this technique is given. Its application in probing catalytic metal clusters is described briefly, before giving an account of the use of EXAFS in determining atomic structure in magnetic nanocomposite films. In particular, we focus on cluster-assembled films comprised of Fe and Co nanosized particles embedded in various metal matrices, and show how the crystal structure of the particles can be changed by appropriate choice of the matrix material. The work discussed here demonstrates that combining the results of structural and magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical calculations, can play a significant part in tailoring the properties of new magnetic cluster-assembled materials.

  11. Antiferromagnetic half metallicity in codoped chalcopyrite semiconductors Cu(Al 1 - 2 xAxBx)Se2 (A and B are 3d transition-metal atoms)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahjahan, M.; Oguchi, T.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic properties of group I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite-type compounds Cu(Al 1 - 2 xAxBx)Se2 are calculated using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's function method, where A (Ti, V, Cr, Mn) and B (Fe, Co, Ni) are 3d transition metal atoms, and x is atomic concentration. We found that codoping of Cr-Co and V-Ni pairs at Al site of host CuAlSe2 exhibit antiferromagnetic (AF) half metallicity with low Curie temperature (TC). The AF half metallic property is supported by nullified net magnetic moment and compensated density of states in the minority spin direction. On the other hand, codoping of Cr-Ni, Mn-Co, V-Co, and Ti-Co pairs at Al site of host CuAlSe2 manifest ferrimagnetic half metallicity with a small net magnetization and keeping antiparallel local spin moments. In Mn-Co case TC is close to room temperature. Besides, Cr-Fe, V-Fe, and Ti-Ni codoping cases lead to an instable magnetic ordering and therefore obtain a disordered local moment (spin-glass like) state.

  12. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. II. Screening beyond the single-site and atomic-sphere approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, A. V.; Simak, S. I.; Korzhavyi, P. A.; Skriver, H. L.

    2002-06-01

    A quantitative description of the configurational part of the total energy of metallic alloys with substantial atomic size difference cannot be achieved in the atomic-sphere approximation: It needs to be corrected at least for the multipole-moment interactions in the Madelung part of the one-electron potential and energy. In the case of a random alloy such interactions can be accounted for only by lifting the atomic-sphere and single-site approximations, in order to include the polarization due to local environment effects. Nevertheless, a simple parametrization of the screened Coulomb interactions for the ordinary single-site methods, including the generalized perturbation method, is still possible. We obtained such a parametrization for bulk and surface NiPt alloys, which allows one to obtain quantitatively accurate effective interactions in this system.

  13. Cyclotron dynamics of a Kondo singlet in a spin-orbit-coupled alkaline-earth-metal atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lv, Hao; Wang, Wen-Li; Du, Juan; Qian, Jun; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    We propose a scheme to investigate the interplay between the Kondo-exchange interaction and the quantum spin Hall effect with ultracold fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms trapped in two-dimensional optical lattices using ultracold collision and laser-assisted tunneling. In the strong Kondo-coupling regime, although the loop trajectory of the mobile atom disappears, collective dynamics of an atom pair in two clock states can exhibit an unexpected spin-dependent cyclotron orbit in a plaquette, realizing the quantum spin Hall effect of the Kondo singlet. We demonstrate that the collective cyclotron dynamics of the spin-zero Kondo singlet is governed by an effective Harper-Hofstadter model in addition to second-order diagonal tunneling.

  14. One- and two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of alkali-metal atoms on helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pifrader, Alexandra; Allard, Olivier; Auboeck, Gerald; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Huber, Robert; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2010-10-28

    Alkali-metal atoms captured on the surface of superfluid helium droplets are excited to high energies ({approx_equal}3 eV) by means of pulsed lasers, and their laser-induced-fluorescence spectra are recorded. We report on the one-photon excitation of the (n+1)p(leftarrow)ns transition of K, Rb, and Cs (n=4, 5, and 6, respectively) and on the two-photon one-color excitation of the 5d(leftarrow)5s transition of Rb. Gated-photon-counting measurements are consistent with the relaxation rates of the bare atoms, hence consistent with the reasonable expectation that atoms quickly desorb from the droplet and droplet-induced relaxation need not be invoked.

  15. Uptake of Fe, Na and K atoms on low-temperature ice: implications for metal atom scavenging in the vicinity of polar mesospheric clouds.

    PubMed

    Murray, Benjamin J; Plane, John M C

    2005-12-01

    Ice clouds form in the mesosphere between 80 and 90 km, at high latitudes during summer when the temperature falls below 150 K. There is strong evidence that the water-ice particles in these clouds scavenge metal atoms that are produced in the mesosphere by meteoric ablation. In the present study the uptake of Fe, Na and K on an ice film was studied in a fast flow tube over a temperature range of 80-150 K, covering the temperatures over which ice clouds form in the upper mesosphere. The uptake was found to be highly efficient and mostly in the diffusion-limited regime, requiring accurate measurements of the diffusion coefficients of the metal atoms in He: DFeHe = 366 (+/- 17) (T/296 K)(1.85 +/- 0.07), DNaHe 286 (+/- 13) (T/296 K)(1.68 +/- 0.04) and DKHe = 247 (+/- 15) (T/296 K)(1.69 +/- 0.07) Torr cm2 s(-1). Measured values of the diffusion coefficients in N2 are 112 (+/- 4), 125 (+/- 4) and 88 (+/- 4) Torr cm2 s(-1) at 293 K for Fe, Na and K, respectively. The uptake of Na and K was observed to be extremely efficient from 80-150 K, with lower limits of gamma Na > 0.09 and gamma K > 0.05, although it is likely that gamma is much closer to unity. The uptake of Fe on cubic ice is close to unity efficiency above 135 K, but gamma Fe decreases to only 3 x 10(-3) at 80 K. Uptake of Fe on amorphous ice films is much more efficient than on cubic ice films below 130 K. These results are interpreted using quantum calculations of the metal atoms adsorbed onto a 12-H2O model ice surface. Finally, it is shown that the uptake of Fe, Na and K on low-temperature ice is sufficiently fast to explain the substantial depletions in the mesospheric metal layers that are observed in the presence of mesospheric ice clouds.

  16. Atomic-layer electroless deposition: a scalable approach to surface-modified metal powders.

    PubMed

    Cappillino, Patrick J; Sugar, Joshua D; El Gabaly, Farid; Cai, Trevor Y; Liu, Zhi; Stickney, John L; Robinson, David B

    2014-04-29

    Palladium has a number of important applications in energy and catalysis in which there is evidence that surface modification leads to enhanced properties. A strategy for preparing such materials is needed that combines the properties of (i) scalability (especially on high-surface-area substrates, e.g. powders); (ii) uniform deposition, even on substrates with complex, three-dimensional features; and (iii) low-temperature processing conditions that preserve nanopores and other nanostructures. Presented herein is a method that exhibits these properties and makes use of benign reagents without the use of specialized equipment. By exposing Pd powder to dilute hydrogen in nitrogen gas, sacrificial surface PdH is formed along with a controlled amount of dilute interstitial hydride. The lattice expansion that occurs in Pd under higher H2 partial pressures is avoided. Once the flow of reagent gas is terminated, addition of metal salts facilitates controlled, electroless deposition of an overlayer of subnanometer thickness. This process can be cycled to create thicker layers. The approach is carried out under ambient processing conditions, which is an advantage over some forms of atomic layer deposition. The hydride-mediated reaction is electroless in that it has no need for connection to an external source of electrical current and is thus amenable to deposition on high-surface-area substrates having rich, nanoscale topography as well as on insulator-supported catalyst particles. STEM-EDS measurements show that conformal Rh and Pt surface layers can be formed on Pd powder with this method. A growth model based on energy-resolved XPS depth profiling of Rh-modified Pd powder is in general agreement. After two cycles, deposits are consistent with 70-80% coverage and a surface layer with a thickness from 4 to 8 Å.

  17. Nitric oxide as an electron donor, an atom donor, an atom acceptor, and a ligand in reactions with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Flaim, Eric; Jarvis, Michael J Y; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2005-12-15

    The room-temperature reactions of nitric oxide with 46 atomic cations have been surveyed systematically across and down the periodic table using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Rate coefficients and product distributions were measured for the reactions of first-row cations from K+ to Se+, of second-row cations from Rb+ to Te+ (excluding Tc+), and of third-row cations from Cs+ to Bi+. Reactions both first and second order in NO were identified. The observed bimolecular reactions were thermodynamically controlled. Efficient exothermic electron transfer was observed with Zn+, As+, Se+, Au+, and Hg+. Bimolecular O-atom transfer was observed with Sc+, Ti+, Y+, Zr+, Nb+, La+, Hf+, Ta+, and W+. Of the remaining 32 atomic ions, all but 8 react in novel termolecular reactions second order in NO to produce NO+ and the metal-nitrosyl molecule, the metal-monoxide cation and nitrous oxide, and/or the metal-nitrosyl cation. K+, Rb+, Cs+, Ga+, In+, Tl+, Pb+, and Bi+ are totally unreactive. Further reactions with NO produce the dioxide cations CaO2+, TiO2+, VO2+, CrO2+, SrO2+, ZrO2+, NbO2+, RuO2+, BaO2+, HfO2+, TaO2+, WO2+, ReO2+, and OsO2+ and the still higher order oxides WO3+, ReO3+, and ReO4+. NO ligation was observed in the formation of CaO+(NO), ScO+(NO), TiO+(NO), VO+(NO)(1-3), VO2+(NO)(1-3), SrO+(NO), SrO2+(NO)1,2, RuO+(NO)(1-3), RuO2+(NO)1,2, OsO+(NO)(1-3), and IrO+(NO). The reported reactivities for bare atomic ions provide a benchmark for reactivities of ligated atomic ions and point to possible second-order NO chemistry in biometallic and metal-surface environments leading to the conversion of NO to N2O and the production of metal-nitrosyl molecules.

  18. Nature of the interaction between rare gas atoms and transition metal doped silicon clusters: the role of shielding effects.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Vu Thi; Janssens, Ewald; Claes, Pieterjan; Fielicke, André; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Lievens, Peter

    2015-07-21

    Mass spectrometry experiments show an exceptionally weak bonding between Si7Mn(+) and rare gas atoms as compared to other exohedrally transition metal (TM) doped silicon clusters and other SinMn(+) (n = 5-10) sizes. The Si7Mn(+) cluster does not form Ar complexes and the observed fraction of Xe complexes is low. The interaction of two cluster series, SinMn(+) (n = 6-10) and Si7TM(+) (TM = Cr, Mn, Cu, and Zn), with Ar and Xe is investigated by density functional theory calculations. The cluster-rare gas binding is for all clusters, except Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+), predominantly driven by short-range interaction between the TM dopant and the rare gas atoms. A high s-character electron density on the metal atoms in Si7Mn(+) and Si7Zn(+) shields the polarization toward the rare gas atoms and thereby hinders formation of short-range complexes. Overall, both Ar and Xe complexes are similar except that the larger polarizability of Xe leads to larger binding energies.

  19. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  20. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert; Vurpillot, François; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-04-17

    Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis. The increasingly detailed design of such catalysts necessitates three-dimensional characterization with high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is uniquely suited to the task but faces challenges with the evaporation of metal/insulator systems. Correlation of APT with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO, reveals preferential evaporation of the MgO and an inaccurate assessment of nanoparticle composition. Finite element field evaporation modeling is used to illustrate the evolution of the evaporation front. Nanoparticle composition is most accurately predicted when the MgO is treated as having a locally variable evaporation field, indicating the importance of considering laser-oxide interactions and the evaporation of various molecular oxide ions. These results demonstrate the viability of APT for analysis of oxide-supported metal nanoparticles, highlighting the need for developing a theoretical framework for the evaporation of heterogeneous materials.

  1. Properties of alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth-metal ions for an accurate estimate of their long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Nandy, D. K.; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of interaction potentials among the alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth ions is very useful in the studies of cold atom physics. Here we carry out theoretical studies of the long-range interactions among the Li, Na, K, and Rb alkali-metal atoms with the Ca+, Ba+, Sr+, and Ra+ alkaline-earth ions systematically, which are largely motivated by their importance in a number of applications. These interactions are expressed as a power series in the inverse of the internuclear separation R . Both the dispersion and induction components of these interactions are determined accurately from the algebraic coefficients corresponding to each power combination in the series. Ultimately, these coefficients are expressed in terms of the electric multipole polarizabilities of the above-mentioned systems, which are calculated using the matrix elements obtained from a relativistic coupled-cluster method and core contributions to these quantities from the random-phase approximation. We also compare our estimated polarizabilities with the other available theoretical and experimental results to verify accuracies in our calculations. In addition, we also evaluate the lifetimes of the first two low-lying states of the ions using the above matrix elements. Graphical representations of the dispersion coefficients versus R are given among all the alkaline ions with Rb.

  2. Investigating the atomic level influencing factors of glass forming ability in NiAl and CuZr metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Sina; Kirk, Donald Walter; Singh, Chandra Veer; Thorpe, Steven John

    2015-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are a relatively new class of amorphous metal alloy which possess unique mechanical and magnetic properties. The specific concentrations and combinations of alloy elements needed to prevent crystallization during melt quenching remains poorly understood. A correlation between atomic properties that can explain some of the previously identified glass forming ability (GFA) anomalies of the NiAl and CuZr systems has been identified, with these findings likely extensible to other transition metal-transition metal and transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) alloy classes as a whole. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation methods are utilized to study thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural properties of equiatomic CuZr and NiAl metallic glasses in an attempt to further understand the underlying connections between glass forming ability, nature of atomic level bonding, short and medium range ordering, and the evolution of structure and relaxation properties in the disordered phase. The anomalous breakdown of the fragility parameter as a useful GFA indicator in TM-M alloy systems is addressed through an in-depth investigation of bulk stiffness properties and the evolution of (pseudo)Gruneisen parameters over the quench domain, with the efficacy of other common glass forming ability indicators similarly being analyzed through direct computation in respective CuZr and NiAl systems. Comparison of fractional liquid-crystal density differences in the two systems revealed 2-3 times higher values for the NiAl system, providing further support for its efficacy as a general purpose GFA indicator.

  3. Investigating the atomic level influencing factors of glass forming ability in NiAl and CuZr metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Sina; Kirk, Donald Walter; Singh, Chandra Veer; Thorpe, Steven John

    2015-09-21

    Bulk metallic glasses are a relatively new class of amorphous metal alloy which possess unique mechanical and magnetic properties. The specific concentrations and combinations of alloy elements needed to prevent crystallization during melt quenching remains poorly understood. A correlation between atomic properties that can explain some of the previously identified glass forming ability (GFA) anomalies of the NiAl and CuZr systems has been identified, with these findings likely extensible to other transition metal-transition metal and transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) alloy classes as a whole. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation methods are utilized to study thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural properties of equiatomic CuZr and NiAl metallic glasses in an attempt to further understand the underlying connections between glass forming ability, nature of atomic level bonding, short and medium range ordering, and the evolution of structure and relaxation properties in the disordered phase. The anomalous breakdown of the fragility parameter as a useful GFA indicator in TM-M alloy systems is addressed through an in-depth investigation of bulk stiffness properties and the evolution of (pseudo)Gruneisen parameters over the quench domain, with the efficacy of other common glass forming ability indicators similarly being analyzed through direct computation in respective CuZr and NiAl systems. Comparison of fractional liquid-crystal density differences in the two systems revealed 2-3 times higher values for the NiAl system, providing further support for its efficacy as a general purpose GFA indicator.

  4. Controlling magnetism of MoS2 sheets by embedding transition-metal atoms and applying strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yungang; Su, Qiulei; Wang, Zhiguo; Deng, Huiqiu; Zu, Xiaotao

    2013-11-14

    Prompted by recent experimental achievement of transition metal (TM) atoms substituted in MoS2 nanostructures during growth or saturating existing vacancies (Sun et al., ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 3506; Deepak et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 12549), we explored, via density functional theory, the magnetic properties of a series of 3d TM atoms substituted in a MoS2 sheet, and found that Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn substitutions can induce magnetism in the MoS2 sheet. The localizing unpaired 3d electrons of TM atoms respond to the introduction of a magnetic moment. Depending on the species of TM atoms, the substituted MoS2 sheet can be a metal, semiconductor or half-metal. Remarkably, the applied elastic strain can be used to control the strength of the spin-splitting of TM-3d orbitals, leading to an effective manipulation of the magnetism of the TM-substituted MoS2 sheet. We found that the magnetic moment of the Mn- and Fe-substituted MoS2 sheets can monotonously increase with the increase of tensile strain, while the magnetic moment of Co-, Ni-, Cu- and Zn-substituted MoS2 sheets initially increases and then decreases with the increase of tensile strain. An instructive mechanism was proposed to qualitatively explain the variation of magnetism with elastic strain. The finding of the magnetoelastic effect here is technologically important for the fabrication of strain-driven spin devices on MoS2 nanostructures, which allows us to go beyond the current scope limited to the spin devices within graphene and BN-based nanostructures.

  5. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer involving Os-centered radicals: evidence for tunneling.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Grills, David C; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os(•) and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•) radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons are in the range 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.7 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.8 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 °C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies (E(D) - E(H)) and the pre-exponential factor ratio (A(H)/A(D)). For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (η(5)-(i)Pr4C5H)(CO)2Os(•), the (E(D) - E(H)) = 3.3 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) and A(H)/A(D) = 0.06 ± 0.02 values suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism.

  6. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal.

  7. Theoretical Analysis of the Adsorption of Late Transition Metal Atoms on the (001) Surface of Early Transition Metal Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gómez, T.; Florez, E.; Illas, F.

    2010-01-28

    The interaction of atoms of Groups 9, 10, and 11 with the (001) surface of TiC, ZrC, VC, and {delta}-MoC has been studied by means of periodic density functional calculations using slab models. The calculated values of the adsorption energy are rather large, especially for Groups 9 and 10 elements (E{sub ads} = 3-6 eV), but without clear trends along the series. Nevertheless, the analysis of the interaction at different sites indicates that the adsorbed atoms will be relatively mobile. Many of the admetals are electronically perturbed upon interaction with the carbide surfaces. Co, Ni, Cu, and Rh adatoms get positively or negatively charged, depending on the nature of the carbide substrate. Ir, Pd, Pt, and Au adatoms are always negatively charged. An analysis of the Bader charges for the most stable sites provides strong evidence that the most negative charge on the adatoms corresponds to the interaction with ZrC, followed by TiC. In the case of VC and {delta}-MoC, the charge on the adsorbed atoms may be slightly positive and of the same order for both carbides. The effect of the underlying carbide is large, with ZrC and TiC being predicted as the supports with the largest effect on the electronic structure of the adsorbed atoms with direct implications for the use of these systems in catalysis.

  8. Control of the charge state of metal atoms on thin MgO films.

    PubMed

    Sterrer, Martin; Risse, Thomas; Martinez Pozzoni, Umberto; Giordano, Livia; Heyde, Markus; Rust, Hans-Peter; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2007-03-01

    The arrangement of single gold and palladium atoms deposited on the surface of a 3 monolayer thin film of MgO was investigated using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. While Pd atoms are arranged in a random fashion, Au forms an ordered array on the surface. The long-range ordering as well as the scanning tunneling microscopy appearance of single Au atoms on a 3 monolayer thin MgO film can be explained by partial charge transfer from the substrate to Au atoms as predicted recently by density functional theory calculations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 226104 (2005)10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.226104]. In contrast with that, Au atoms on a thick film were found to be essentially neutral.

  9. Silica gel modified with N-(3-propyl)-O-phenylenediamine: functionalization, metal sorption equilibrium studies and application to metal enrichment prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akl, Magda Ali Abd-elAziz; Kenawy, Ibraheim Mohamed; Lasheen, Rabab Ramadan

    2005-08-01

    The use of the chemically modified silica gel N-(3-propyl)-O-phenylenediamine (SiG-NPPDA) adsorbent, for the preconcentration and separation of trace heavy metals, was described. SiG-NPPDA sorbs quantitatively (90-100% recovery) trace amounts of nine heavy metals, viz., Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Pb(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) at pH 7-8. The sorption capacity varies from 350 to 450 micromol g(-1). Desorption was found to be quantitative with 1-2 M HNO3 or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. The distribution coefficient, Kd and the percentage concentration of the investigated metal ions on the adsorbent at equilibrium, C(M,eqm)% (Recovery, R%), were studied as a function of experimental parameters. The logarithmic values of the distribution coefficient, log Kd, ranges between 4.0 and 6.4. Some foreign ions caused little interference in the preconcentration and determination of the investigated nine metals by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The adsorbent and its formed metal chelates were characterized by IR (absorbance and/or reflectance), potentiometric titrations and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG). The mode of chelation between the SiG-NPPDA adsorbent and the investigated metal ions is proposed to be due to the reaction of the investigated metal ions with the two nitrogen atoms of the SiG-NPPDA adsorbent. The present adsorbent coupled with flame AAS has been used to enrich and determine the nine metal ions in natural aqueous systems and in certified reference materials (RSD < or = 5%). The copper, iron, manganese and zinc present in some pharmaceutical vitamin samples were also preconcentrated on SiG-NPPDA adsorbent and determined by flame AAS (RSD < or = 4.2%). Nanogram concentrations (0.07-0.14 ng ml(-1)) of Cd(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Pb(II), Cr(III), Mn(II), Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) can be determined reliably with a preconcentration factor of 100.

  10. Correlating the Energetics and Atomic Motions of the Metal-Insulator Transition of M1 Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jamie M.; Drumm, Daniel W.; Casey, Phil S.; Smith, Jackson S.; Seeber, Aaron J.; Bhargava, Suresh K.; Russo, Salvy P.

    2016-05-01

    Materials that undergo reversible metal-insulator transitions are obvious candidates for new generations of devices. For such potential to be realised, the underlying microscopic mechanisms of such transitions must be fully determined. In this work we probe the correlation between the energy landscape and electronic structure of the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide and the atomic motions occurring using first principles calculations and high resolution X-ray diffraction. Calculations find an energy barrier between the high and low temperature phases corresponding to contraction followed by expansion of the distances between vanadium atoms on neighbouring sub-lattices. X-ray diffraction reveals anisotropic strain broadening in the low temperature structure’s crystal planes, however only for those with spacings affected by this compression/expansion. GW calculations reveal that traversing this barrier destabilises the bonding/anti-bonding splitting of the low temperature phase. This precise atomic description of the origin of the energy barrier separating the two structures will facilitate more precise control over the transition characteristics for new applications and devices.

  11. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE PAGES

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  12. Correlating the Energetics and Atomic Motions of the Metal-Insulator Transition of M1 Vanadium Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jamie M.; Drumm, Daniel W.; Casey, Phil S.; Smith, Jackson S.; Seeber, Aaron J.; Bhargava, Suresh K.; Russo, Salvy P.

    2016-01-01

    Materials that undergo reversible metal-insulator transitions are obvious candidates for new generations of devices. For such potential to be realised, the underlying microscopic mechanisms of such transitions must be fully determined. In this work we probe the correlation between the energy landscape and electronic structure of the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide and the atomic motions occurring using first principles calculations and high resolution X-ray diffraction. Calculations find an energy barrier between the high and low temperature phases corresponding to contraction followed by expansion of the distances between vanadium atoms on neighbouring sub-lattices. X-ray diffraction reveals anisotropic strain broadening in the low temperature structure’s crystal planes, however only for those with spacings affected by this compression/expansion. GW calculations reveal that traversing this barrier destabilises the bonding/anti-bonding splitting of the low temperature phase. This precise atomic description of the origin of the energy barrier separating the two structures will facilitate more precise control over the transition characteristics for new applications and devices. PMID:27211303

  13. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  14. Non-destructive functionalisation for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on carbon nanotubes: effect of linking agents and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemnade, N.; Shearer, C. J.; Dieterle, D. J.; Cherevan, A. S.; Gebhardt, P.; Wilde, G.; Eder, D.

    2015-02-01

    The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and sustainable energy applications. The performance of such hybrids can be further improved by rationally designing interfaces and morphologies. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is among the most powerful techniques for the controlled deposition of inorganic compounds, due to its ability to form conformal coatings on porous substrates at low temperatures with high surface sensitivity and atomic control of film thickness. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocarbon surface has so far limited the applicability of ALD on CNTs. Herein we investigate the role of structural defects in CNTs, both intrinsic and induced by acid treatment, on coverage, uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coatings. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of small aromatic molecules, including benzyl alcohol (BA), naphthalene carboxylic acid (NA) and pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA), as active nucleation sites and linking agents. Importantly, only PCA exhibits sufficiently strong interactions with the pristine CNT surface to withstand desorption under reaction conditions. Thus, PCA enables a versatile and non-destructive alternative route for the deposition of highly uniform metal oxide coatings onto pristine CNTs via ALD over a wide temperature range and without the typical surface corrosion induced by covalent functionalisation. Importantly, preliminary tests demonstrated that the improved morphology obtained with PCA has indeed considerably increased the hybrid's photocatalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution via sacrificial water splitting. The concept demonstrated in this work is transferable to a wide range of other inorganic compounds including metal oxides, metal (oxy)nitrides and metal chalcogenides on a variety of nanocarbons.The hybridisation of metal oxides and nanocarbons has created a promising new class of functional materials for environmental and

  15. Colloidal europium nanoparticles via a solvated metal atom dispersion approach and their surface enhanced Raman scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Urumese, Ancila; Jenjeti, Ramesh Naidu; Sampath, S; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2016-08-15

    Chemistry of lanthanide metals in their zerovalent state at the nanoscale remains unexplored due to the high chemical reactivity and difficulty in synthesizing nanoparticles by conventional reduction methods. In the present study, europium(0) nanoparticles, the most reactive of all the rare earth metals have been synthesized by solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) method using hexadecyl amine as the capping agent. The as-prepared europium nanoparticles show surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This lead to the investigation of its surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using visible light excitation source. The SERS activity of europium nanoparticles has been followed using 4-aminothiophenol and biologically important molecules such as hemoglobin and Cyt-c as the analytes. This is the first example of lanthanide metal nanoparticles as SERS substrate which can possibly be extended to other rare-earth metals. Since hemoglobin absorbs in the visible region, the use of visible light excitation source leads to surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS). The interaction of biomolecules with Eu(0) has been followed using FT-IR and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques. The results indicate that there is no major irreversible change in the structure of biomolecules upon interaction with europium nanoparticles.

  16. Colloidal europium nanoparticles via a solvated metal atom dispersion approach and their surface enhanced Raman scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Urumese, Ancila; Jenjeti, Ramesh Naidu; Sampath, S; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2016-08-15

    Chemistry of lanthanide metals in their zerovalent state at the nanoscale remains unexplored due to the high chemical reactivity and difficulty in synthesizing nanoparticles by conventional reduction methods. In the present study, europium(0) nanoparticles, the most reactive of all the rare earth metals have been synthesized by solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) method using hexadecyl amine as the capping agent. The as-prepared europium nanoparticles show surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. This lead to the investigation of its surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using visible light excitation source. The SERS activity of europium nanoparticles has been followed using 4-aminothiophenol and biologically important molecules such as hemoglobin and Cyt-c as the analytes. This is the first example of lanthanide metal nanoparticles as SERS substrate which can possibly be extended to other rare-earth metals. Since hemoglobin absorbs in the visible region, the use of visible light excitation source leads to surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS). The interaction of biomolecules with Eu(0) has been followed using FT-IR and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques. The results indicate that there is no major irreversible change in the structure of biomolecules upon interaction with europium nanoparticles. PMID:27214148

  17. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals.

  18. Simple analytical embedded-atom-potential model including a long-range force for fcc metals and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J.; Ye, Y. Y.

    1996-09-01

    A simple analytical embedded-atom method (EAM) model is developed. The model includes a long-range force. In this model, the electron-density function is taken as a decreasing exponential function, the two-body potential is defined as a function like a form given by Rose et al. [Phys. Rev. B 33, 7983 (1986)], and the embedding energy is assumed to be an universal form recently suggested by Banerjea and Smith. The embedding energy has a positive curvature. The model is applied to seven fcc metals (Al, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt) and their binary alloys. All the considered properties, whether for pure metal systems or for alloy systems, are predicted to be satisfactory at least qualitatively. The model resolves the problems of Johnson's model for predicting the properties of the alloys involving metal Pd. However, more importantly, (i) by investigating the structure stability of seven fcc metals using the present model, we found that the stability energy is dominated by both the embedding energy and the pair potential for fcc-bcc stability while the pair potential dominates and is underestimated for fcc-hcp stability; and (ii) we find that the predicted total energy as a function of lattice parameter is in good agreement with the equation of state of Rose et al. for all seven fcc metals, and that this agreement is closely related to the electron density, i.e., the lower the contribution from atoms of the second-nearest neighbor to host density, the better the agreement becomes. We conclude the following: (i) for an EAM, where angle force is not considered, the long-range force is necessary for a prediction of the structure stability; or (ii) the dependence of the electron density on angle should be considered so as to improve the structure-stability energy. The conclusions are valid for all EAM models where an angle force is not considered.

  19. Atomized spraying of liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces as a generalized way for ubiquitous printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin; Gao, Yunxia; Liu, Jing

    2014-09-01

    A direct electronics printing technique through atomized spraying for patterning room-temperature liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. This method is highly flexible and capable of fabricating electronic components on various target objects, with either flat or rough surfaces, made of different materials, or having different orientations from 2D to 3D geometrical configurations. With a pre-designed mask, the liquid metal ink can be directly deposited on the substrate to form various specific patterns which lead to the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. Further, extended printing strategies were also suggested to illustrate the adaptability of the method. For example, it can be used for making transparent conductive film with an optical transmittance of 47 % and a sheet resistance of 5.167Ω/□ due to natural porous structure. Different from the former direct writing technology where large surface tension and poor adhesion between the liquid metal and the substrate often impede the flexible printing process, the liquid metal here no longer needs to be pre-oxidized to guarantee its applicability on target substrates. One critical mechanism was that the atomized liquid metal microdroplets can be quickly oxidized in the air due to its large specific surface area, resulting in a significant increase of the adhesion capacity and thus firm deposition of the ink to the substrate. This study paved a generalized way for pervasively and directly printing electronics on various substrates which are expected to be significant in a wide spectrum of electrical engineering areas.

  20. The Determination of Trace Metals in Saline Waters and Biological Tissues Using the Heated Graphite Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segar, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    A selective, volatalization technique utilizing the heated graphite atomizer atomic absorption technique has been developed for the analysis of iron in sea water. A similar technique may be used to determine vanadium, copper, nickel and cobalt in saline waters when their concentrations are higher than those normally encountered'in unpolluted sea waters. A preliminary solvent extraction using ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate and methyl iso-butyl ketone permits the determination of a number of elements including iron, copper, zinc, nickel, cobalt and lead in sea water. The heated graphite atomized technique has also been applied to the determination of a range of trace transition elements in marine plant and animal tissues.

  1. Controlled synthesis of racemic indenyl rare-earth metal complexes via the cooperation between the intramolecular coordination of donor atoms and a bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangliu; Wu, Zhangshuan; Zhou, Lingmin; Wang, Shaowu; Zhang, Lijun; Zhu, Xiancui; Wei, Yun; Zhai, Jinhua; Wu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    The reactions of Me2Si(C9H6CH2CH2-DG)2 (DG = NMe2 (1), CH2NMe2 (2), OMe (3), and N(CH2CH2)2O (4)) with [(Me3Si)2N]3RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 in toluene afforded a series of racemic divalent rare-earth metal complexes: {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2-DG)2}RE (DG = NMe2, RE = Yb (6) and Eu (7); DG = CH2NMe2, RE = Yb (8), Eu (9), and Sm (10); DG = OMe, RE = Yb (11) and Eu (12); DG = N(CH2CH2)2O, RE = Yb (13) and Eu (14)). Similarly, the racemic divalent rare-earth metal complexes {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2CH2NMe2)(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)}RE (RE = Yb (15) and Eu (16)) were also obtained. The reaction of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)2Li2 with NdCl3 gave a racemic dimeric neodymium chloride {η(5):η(1):η(5)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2OMe)2NdCl}2 (17), whereas the reaction of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2Li2 with SmCl3 afforded a racemic dinuclear samarium chloride bridged by lithium chloride {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1)-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2SmCl}2(μ-LiCl) (18). Further reaction of complex 18 with LiCH2SiMe3 provided an unexpected rare-earth metal alkyl complex {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1):σ-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)[(C9H5CH2CH2N(CH2)Me]}Sm (19) through the activation of an sp(3) C-H bond α-adjacent to the nitrogen atom. Complexes 19 and {η(5):η(1):η(5):η(1):σ-Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)[(C9H5CH2CH2N(CH2)Me]}Y (20) were also obtained by one-pot reactions of Me2Si(C9H5CH2CH2NMe2)2Li2 with RECl3 followed by treatment with LiCH2SiMe3. All compounds were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods and elemental analysis. Complexes 6-10 and 14-20 were further characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All of the prepared rare-earth metal complexes were racemic, suggesting that racemic organo rare-earth metal complexes could be controllably synthesized by the cooperation between a bridge and the intramolecular coordination of donor atoms.

  2. Ab initio study of neutral (TiO2)n clusters and their interactions with water and transition metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Cakır, D; Gülseren, O

    2012-08-01

    We have systematically investigated the growth behavior and stability of small stoichiometric (TiO(2))(n) (n = 1-10) clusters as well as their structural, electronic and magnetic properties by using the first-principles plane wave pseudopotential method within density functional theory. In order to find out the ground state geometries, a large number of initial cluster structures for each n has been searched via total energy calculations. Generally, the ground state structures for the case of n = 1-9 clusters have at least one monovalent O atom, which only binds to a single Ti atom. However, the most stable structure of the n = 10 cluster does not have any monovalent O atom. On the other hand, Ti atoms are at least fourfold coordinated for the ground state structures for n ≥ 4 clusters. Our calculations have revealed that clusters prefer to form three-dimensional structures. Furthermore, all these stoichiometric clusters have nonmagnetic ground state. The formation energy and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap for the most stable structure of (TiO(2))(n) clusters for each n have also been calculated. The formation energy and hence the stability increases as the cluster size grows. In addition, the interactions between the ground state structure of the (TiO(2))(n) cluster and a single water molecule have been studied. The binding energy (E(b)) of the H(2)O molecule exhibits an oscillatory behavior with the size of the clusters. A single water molecule preferably binds to the cluster Ti atom through its oxygen atom, resulting an average binding energy of 1.1 eV. We have also reported the interaction of the selected clusters (n = 3, 4, 10) with multiple water molecules. We have found that additional water molecules lead to a decrease in the binding energy of these molecules to the (TiO(2))(n) clusters. Finally, the adsorption of transition metal (TM) atoms (V, Co and Pt) on the n = 10 cluster has been

  3. Inhomogeneous thermal expansion of metallic glasses in atomic-scale studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein; Shakur Shahabi, Hamed; Bednarčik, Jozef; Eckert, Jürgen

    2015-01-28

    Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the elastic strain in metallic glasses subjected to mechanical loading could be inhomogeneous in the atomic-scale and it increases with distance from an average atom and eventually reaches the macroscopic strain at larger inter-atomic distances. We have observed a similar behavior for the thermal strain imposed by heating of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles below the glass transition temperature by analysis of the scattering data obtained by in-situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results imply that the volumetric thermal strains calculated from the shift in position of the principal diffraction maximum and reduced pair correlation function (PDF) peaks are in good agreement for the length scales beyond 0.6 nm, corresponding to the atoms located over the third near-neighbor shell. However, smaller and even negative volumetric thermal strains have been calculated based on the shifts in the positions of the second and first PDF peaks, respectively. The structural changes of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy particles are accompanied by decreasing the average coordination number of the first near-neighbor shell, which manifests the occurrence of local changes in the short-range order upon heating. It is believed that the detected length-scale dependence of the volumetric thermal strain is correlated with the local atomic rearrangements taking place in the topologically unstable regions of the glass governed by variations in the atomic-level stresses.

  4. Investigation of atomic anti-site disorder and ferrimagnetic order in the half-metallic Heusler alloy Mn2VGa.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Kumar, K; Harish Kumar, N; Babu, P D; Venkatesh, S; Ramakrishnan, S

    2012-08-22

    The band structure calculation for the compound Mn(2)VGa carried out using the plane wave self-consistent field package with generalized gradient approximation shows that the compound is nearly half-metallic at the equilibrium lattice parameter. However, theoretical investigations have shown that a certain percentage of atomic anti-site disorder can destroy the half-metallic nature of the sample. Hence it is important to quantify the site disorder in these systems. We have deduced the percentage of atomic anti-site disorder from the refinement of the higher angle room temperature (300 K) neutron diffraction (ND) pattern and it was observed to be roughly 8% in our sample. The field variation of resistance recorded at different temperatures shows a positive slope at low temperatures and a negative slope at higher temperatures, indicating the half-metallic character at low temperatures. The ab initio calculations predict a ferrimagnetic ground state for this system. The analysis of the magnetic structure from ND data measured at 6 K yields magnetic moment values of 1.28 μ(B) and -0.7 μ(B) for Mn and V, respectively, confirming the ferrimagnetic ordering.

  5. Estimation of Enthalpy of Formation of Liquid Transition Metal Alloys: A Modified Prescription Based on Macroscopic Atom Model of Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Subramanian; Saibaba, Saroja

    2016-09-01

    The enthalpy of formation Δo H f is an important thermodynamic quantity, which sheds significant light on fundamental cohesive and structural characteristics of an alloy. However, being a difficult one to determine accurately through experiments, simple estimation procedures are often desirable. In the present study, a modified prescription for estimating Δo H f L of liquid transition metal alloys is outlined, based on the Macroscopic Atom Model of cohesion. This prescription relies on self-consistent estimation of liquid-specific model parameters, namely electronegativity ( ϕ L) and bonding electron density ( n b L ). Such unique identification is made through the use of well-established relationships connecting surface tension, compressibility, and molar volume of a metallic liquid with bonding charge density. The electronegativity is obtained through a consistent linear scaling procedure. The preliminary set of values for ϕ L and n b L , together with other auxiliary model parameters, is subsequently optimized to obtain a good numerical agreement between calculated and experimental values of Δo H f L for sixty liquid transition metal alloys. It is found that, with few exceptions, the use of liquid-specific model parameters in Macroscopic Atom Model yields a physically consistent methodology for reliable estimation of mixing enthalpies of liquid alloys.

  6. Atomically precise arrays of fluorescent silver clusters: a modular approach for metal cluster photonics on DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Copp, Stacy M; Schultz, Danielle E; Swasey, Steven; Gwinn, Elisabeth G

    2015-03-24

    The remarkable precision that DNA scaffolds provide for arraying nanoscale optical elements enables optical phenomena that arise from interactions of metal nanoparticles, dye molecules, and quantum dots placed at nanoscale separations. However, control of ensemble optical properties has been limited by the difficulty of achieving uniform particle sizes and shapes. Ligand-stabilized metal clusters offer a route to atomically precise arrays that combine desirable attributes of both metals and molecules. Exploiting the unique advantages of the cluster regime requires techniques to realize controlled nanoscale placement of select cluster structures. Here we show that atomically monodisperse arrays of fluorescent, DNA-stabilized silver clusters can be realized on a prototypical scaffold, a DNA nanotube, with attachment sites separated by <10 nm. Cluster attachment is mediated by designed DNA linkers that enable isolation of specific clusters prior to assembly on nanotubes and preserve cluster structure and spectral purity after assembly. The modularity of this approach generalizes to silver clusters of diverse sizes and DNA scaffolds of many types. Thus, these silver cluster nano-optical elements, which themselves have colors selected by their particular DNA templating oligomer, bring unique dimensions of control and flexibility to the rapidly expanding field of nano-optics.

  7. The Direct Calculation of Solid and Liquid Free Energies of Metals and Alloys Using the Embedded Atom Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xueyu; Morris, James

    2003-03-01

    We present a method of directly and accurately calculating the free energy of metals and alloys, directly from models such as the Embedded Atom Method (EAM). An effective pair potential is defined, and used in an extended Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) approach. An effective hard-sphere density is defined, and perturbations from the hard-sphere limit are calculated using the pair correlation functions calculated from density functional theory. Calculations using the Mei and Davenport EAM potential for Al, with the modifications of Sturgeon and Laird, demonstrate the accuracy of the approach for both the liquid and solid phases by comparison with simulations. These results are the first step toward the direct calculation of the solid-liquid interfacial free energy for metallic systems, an important parameter for classical nucleation theory and for solidification dynamics. Our recent simulation results for the interfacial free energy provides an important test of the inhomogeneous theory. We also present preliminary results for binary systems, where the direct calculation of phase diagrams based upon the inter-atomic potentials will be compared with simulations. The approach will also allow for the direct calculation of the properties of under-cooled liquid metals and alloys.

  8. Atomically Thin B doped g-C3N4 Nanosheets: High-Temperature Ferromagnetism and calculated Half-Metallicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Daqiang; Liu, Yonggang; Liu, Peitao; Si, Mingsu; Xue, Desheng

    2016-01-01

    Since the graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3), which can be seen as C-doped graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4), was reported to display ferromagnetic ground state and intrinsic half-metallicity (Du et al., PRL,108,197207,2012), it has attracted numerous research interest to tune the electronic structure and magnetic properties of g-C3N4 due to their potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, we reported the experimentally achieving of high temperature ferromagnetism in metal-free ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets by introducing of B atoms. Further, first-principles calculation results revealed that the current flow in such a system was fully spin-polarized and the magnetic moment was mainly attributed to the p orbital of N atoms in B doped g-C3N4 monolayer, giving the theoretic evidence of the ferromagnetism and half-metallicity. Our finding provided a new perspective for B doped g-C3N4 spintronic devices in future. PMID:27762348

  9. Impact of deformation on the atomic structures and dynamics of a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M. F.; Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-11-03

    Despite numerous studies on the atomic structures of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs), their inherent structural ordering, e.g., medium-range order (MRO), remains difficult to describe. Specifically lacking is an understanding of how the MRO responds to deformation and the associated changes in atomic mobility. In this paper, we focus on the impact of deformation on MRO and associated effect on diffusion in a well-relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG by molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu-Zr MG exhibits a larger elastic limit of 0.035 and a yield stress of 3.5 GPa. The cluster alignment method was employed to characterize the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) andmore » Bergman-type medium-range order (BMRO) in the models upon loading and unloading. From this analysis, we find the disruption of both ISRO and BMRO occurs as the strain reaches about 0.02, well below the elastic limit. Within the elastic limit, the total fractions of ISRO or BMRO can be fully recovered upon unloading. The diffusivity increases six to eight times in regions undergoing plastic deformation, which is due to the dramatic disruption of the ISRO and BMRO. As a result, by mapping the spatial distributions of the mobile atoms, we demonstrate the increase in atomic mobility is due to the extended regions of disrupted ISRO and more importantly BMRO.« less

  10. Impact of deformation on the atomic structures and dynamics of a Cu-Zr metallic glass: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Wang, C. Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M. F.; Ho, K. M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-11-03

    Despite numerous studies on the atomic structures of Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs), their inherent structural ordering, e.g., medium-range order (MRO), remains difficult to describe. Specifically lacking is an understanding of how the MRO responds to deformation and the associated changes in atomic mobility. In this paper, we focus on the impact of deformation on MRO and associated effect on diffusion in a well-relaxed Cu64.5Zr35.5 MG by molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu-Zr MG exhibits a larger elastic limit of 0.035 and a yield stress of 3.5 GPa. The cluster alignment method was employed to characterize the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) and Bergman-type medium-range order (BMRO) in the models upon loading and unloading. From this analysis, we find the disruption of both ISRO and BMRO occurs as the strain reaches about 0.02, well below the elastic limit. Within the elastic limit, the total fractions of ISRO or BMRO can be fully recovered upon unloading. The diffusivity increases six to eight times in regions undergoing plastic deformation, which is due to the dramatic disruption of the ISRO and BMRO. As a result, by mapping the spatial distributions of the mobile atoms, we demonstrate the increase in atomic mobility is due to the extended regions of disrupted ISRO and more importantly BMRO.

  11. Atomically Precise Growth of Catalytically Active Cobalt Sulfide on Flat Surfaces and within a Metal-Organic Framework via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Peters, Aaron W; Li, Zhanyong; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-08-25

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been employed as a new synthetic route to thin films of cobalt sulfide on silicon and fluorine-doped tin oxide platforms. The self-limiting nature of the stepwise synthesis is established through growth rate studies at different pulse times and temperatures. Additionally, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the crystalline phase of these films has the composition Co9S8. The nodes of the metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 were then selectively functionalized with cobalt sulfide via ALD in MOFs (AIM). Spectroscopic techniques confirm uniform deposition of cobalt sulfide throughout the crystallites, with no loss in crystallinity or porosity. The resulting material, CoS-AIM, is catalytically active for selective hydrogenation of m-nitrophenol to m-aminophenol, and outperforms the analogous oxide AIM material (CoO-AIM) as well as an amorphous CoSx reference material. These results reveal AIM to be an effective method of incorporating high surface area and catalytically active cobalt sulfide in metal-organic frameworks.

  12. Atomically Precise Growth of Catalytically Active Cobalt Sulfide on Flat Surfaces and within a Metal-Organic Framework via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Peters, Aaron W; Li, Zhanyong; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-08-25

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been employed as a new synthetic route to thin films of cobalt sulfide on silicon and fluorine-doped tin oxide platforms. The self-limiting nature of the stepwise synthesis is established through growth rate studies at different pulse times and temperatures. Additionally, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the crystalline phase of these films has the composition Co9S8. The nodes of the metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 were then selectively functionalized with cobalt sulfide via ALD in MOFs (AIM). Spectroscopic techniques confirm uniform deposition of cobalt sulfide throughout the crystallites, with no loss in crystallinity or porosity. The resulting material, CoS-AIM, is catalytically active for selective hydrogenation of m-nitrophenol to m-aminophenol, and outperforms the analogous oxide AIM material (CoO-AIM) as well as an amorphous CoSx reference material. These results reveal AIM to be an effective method of incorporating high surface area and catalytically active cobalt sulfide in metal-organic frameworks. PMID:26241521

  13. TRANSITION METAL CATALYSIS IN CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION: ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel and diversified macromolecular structures, which include polymers with designed topologies (top), compostions (middle), and functionalities (bottom), can be prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization processes. These polymers can be synthesized from a large variety of...

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pressure Broadened Alkali-Metal Atom Resonance Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindo, F.; Zhu, C.; Kirby, K.; Babb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    We are carrying out a joint theoretical and experimental research program to study the broadening of alkali atom resonance lines due to collisions with helium and molecular hydrogen for applications to spectroscopic studies of brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.

  15. Visualization and quantification of transition metal atomic mixing in Mo1-xWxS2 single layers.

    PubMed

    Dumcenco, Dumitru O; Kobayashi, Haruka; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Suenaga, Kazu

    2013-01-01

    The alloying behaviour of materials is a well-known problem in all kinds of compounds. Revealing the heteroatomic distributions in two-dimensional crystals is particularly critical for their practical use as nano-devices. Here we obtain statistics of the homo- and heteroatomic coordinates in single-layered Mo(1-x)W(x)S(2) from the atomically resolved scanning transmission electron microscope images and successfully quantify the degree of alloying for the transition metal elements (Mo or W). The results reveal the random alloying of this mixed dichalcogenide system throughout the chemical compositions (x=0 to 1). Such a direct route to gain an insight into the alloying degree on individual atom basis will find broad applications in characterizing low-dimensional heterocompounds and become an important complement to the existing theoretical methods.

  16. A fully coherent electron beam from a noble-metal covered W(111) single-atom emitter.

    PubMed

    Chang, Che-Cheng; Kuo, Hong-Shi; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Tsong, Tien T

    2009-03-18

    In quantum mechanics, a wavefunction contains two factors: the amplitude and the phase. Only when the probing beam is fully phase coherent, can complete information be retrieved from a particle beam based experiment. Here we use the electron beam field emitted from a noble-metal covered W(111) single-atom tip to image single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in an electron point projection microscope (PPM). The interference fringes of an SWNT bundle exhibit a very high contrast and the fringe pattern extends throughout the entire beam width. This indicates good phase correlation at all points transverse to the propagation direction. Application of these sources can significantly improve the performance and expand the capabilities of current electron beam based techniques. New instrumentation based on the full spatial coherence may allow determination of the three-dimensional atomic structures of nonperiodic nanostructures and make many advanced experiments possible.

  17. Determining the quantum-coherent to semiclassical transition in atomic-scale quasi-one-dimensional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bent; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic-scale silicon wires, patterned by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and degenerately doped with phosphorus (P), have attracted significant interest owing to their exceptionally low resistivity and semiclassical Ohmic conduction at temperatures as low as T =4.2 K . Here, we investigate the transition from semiclassical diffusive to quantum-coherent conduction in a 4.6 nm wide wire as we decrease the measurement temperature. By analyzing the temperature dependence of universal conductance fluctuations (UCFs) and one-dimensional (1D) weak localization (WL)—fundamental manifestations of quantum-coherent transport in quasi-1D metals—we show that transport evolves from quantum coherent to semiclassical at T ˜4 K . Remarkably, our study confirms that universal concepts of mesoscopic physics such as UCF and 1D WL retain their validity in quasi-1D metallic conductors down to the atomic scale.

  18. Atomic-Scale Structural Evolution and Stability of Supercooled Liquid of a Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.; Dong, Y. D.; Lu, J.

    2011-05-27

    In this Letter, direct experimental evidence is provided for understanding the thermal stability with respect to crystallization in the Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} glass-forming liquid. Through high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the atomic-structure evolution in the glass-forming liquid during the isothermal annealing process is clearly revealed. In contrast with the existing theoretical models, our results reveal that, prior to nanocrystallization, there exists a metastable state prone to forming icosahedralike atomic clusters, which impede the subsequent crystallization and hence stabilize the supercooled liquid. The outcome of the current research underpins the topological origin for the excellent thermal stability displayed by the Zr-based bulk metallic glass.

  19. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Luo, H.; Qu, T. L. Yang, K. Y.; Ding, Z. C.

    2015-10-15

    We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of {sup 87}Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the {sup 87}Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the {sup 87}Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  20. Structural properties of Al and TiAl3 metallic glasses — An embedded atom method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahiri, M.; Trady, S.; Hasnaoui, A.; Mazroui, M.; Saadouni, K.; Sbiaai, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the structural properties of metallic glasses (MGs). We emphasized our study on monatomic Al and binary TiAl3 systems. The calculations are performed by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on semi-empirical many-body potentials derived from the embedded atom method. The structure is analyzed using the radial distribution function (RDF), the common neighbor analysis (CNA) and the coordination numbers (CNs). Our results demonstrated that it is possible to form MGs in both systems upon fast cooling from the liquid state. This is confirmed by the fact that the system energy and/or volume during the cooling stage decrease continuously with a slight change and by atomic scale analysis using the RDF, CNA and CN analyzing techniques. Furthermore, this specific study shows that under the same conditions, the icosahedral structures appeared in TiAl3 are more abundant than in pure Al. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Survival of hydrogen anions near atomically flat metal surfaces: Band gap confinement and image state recapture effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Andrew; Shaw, John; Chakraborty, Himadri; Thumm, Uwe

    2010-03-01

    Resonant charge transfer (RCT) between ions and surfaces is a key intermediate step in surface-chemical processes as well as in micro- and nano-fabrications on the surface. The RCT process in the collision of hydrogen anions with metal surfaces is described within a wave packet propagation methodology using Crank-Nicholson algorithm [1]. The ion-survival probability is found to strongly enhance at two different ion velocities perpendicular to the surface. The low velocity enhancement is induced from a dynamical confinement of the ion level inside the band gap, while the high velocity enhancement emerges owing to the recapture from transiently populated image states [2]. These structures are found to be somewhat sensitive to the ion's distance of closest approach to the surface and the choice of inter-atomic potentials between the ion and the surface atoms. [1] Chakraborty et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 052903 (2004); [2] Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. A (submitted).

  2. Valence state parameters of all transition metal atoms in metalloproteins--development of ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Zhi; Wang, Jian-Jiang; Zhao, Dong-Xia

    2014-09-01

    To promote accuracy of the atom-bond electronegativity equalization method (ABEEMσπ) fluctuating charge polarizable force fields, and extend it to include all transition metal atoms, a new parameter, the reference charge is set up in the expression of the total energy potential function. We select over 700 model molecules most of which model metalloprotein molecules that come from Protein Data Bank. We set reference charges for different apparent valence states of transition metals and calibrate the parameters of reference charges, valence state electronegativities, and valence state hardnesses for ABEEMσπ through linear regression and least square method. These parameters can be used to calculate charge distributions of metalloproteins containing transition metal atoms (Sc-Zn, Y-Cd, and Lu-Hg). Compared the results of ABEEMσπ charge distributions with those obtained by ab initio method, the quite good linear correlations of the two kinds of charge distributions are shown. The reason why the STO-3G basis set in Mulliken population analysis for the parameter calibration is specially explained in detail. Furthermore, ABEEMσπ method can also quickly and quite accurately calculate dipole moments of molecules. Molecular dynamics optimizations of five metalloproteins as the examples show that their structures obtained by ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge polarizable force field are very close to the structures optimized by the ab initio MP2/6–311G method. This means that the ABEEMσπ/MM can now be applied to molecular dynamics simulations of systems that contain metalloproteins with good accuracy.

  3. Transition rates for lithium-like ions, sodium-like ions, and neutral alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Liu, Z.W.; Sapirstein, J.

    1996-11-01

    Third-order many-body perturbation theory is used to obtain E1 transition amplitudes for ions of the lithium and sodium isoelectronic sequences and for the neutral alkali-metal atoms potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium. Complete angular reductions of the first, second, and third-order amplitudes are given. Tables of transition energies and rates are given for the 2p{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 2s{sub {1/2}}, 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub {1/2}}, and 3s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} transitions in the lithium isoelectronic sequence and for the corresponding 3p{sub 1/2} {yields} 3s{sub 1/2}, 3p{sub 3/2} {yields} 3s{sub {1/2}}, 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 1/2}, and 4s{sub {1/2}} {yields} 3p{sub 3/2} transitions in the sodium sequence. For neutral alkali atoms, amplitudes of np{sub {1/2}} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, np{sub 3/2} {yields} ns{sub {1/2}}, (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub {1/2}}, and (n + 1)s{sub {1/2}} {yields} np{sub 3/2} transitions are evaluated, where n is the principal quantum number of the valence electron in the atomic ground state, Semi-empirical corrections for the omitted fourth- and higher-order terms in perturbation theory are given for the neutral alkali-metal atoms. Comparisons with previous high-precision calculations and with experiment are made. 42 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  4. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Platforms for Atomic Layer Deposition of Cobalt Ions To Enable Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kung, Chung-Wei; Mondloch, Joseph E; Wang, Timothy C; Bury, Wojciech; Hoffeditz, William; Klahr, Benjamin M; Klet, Rachel C; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-12-30

    Thin films of the metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 were grown on conducting glass substrates. The films uniformly cover the conducting glass substrates and are composed of free-standing sub-micrometer rods. Subsequently, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized to deposit Co(2+) ions throughout the entire MOF film via self-limiting surface-mediated reaction chemistry. The Co ions bind at aqua and hydroxo sites lining the channels of NU-1000, resulting in three-dimensional arrays of separated Co ions in the MOF thin film. The Co-modified MOF thin films demonstrate promising electrocatalytic activity for water oxidation.

  5. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  6. Metal-Organic Framework Thin Films as Platforms for Atomic Layer Deposition of Cobalt Ions To Enable Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kung, Chung-Wei; Mondloch, Joseph E; Wang, Timothy C; Bury, Wojciech; Hoffeditz, William; Klahr, Benjamin M; Klet, Rachel C; Pellin, Michael J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-12-30

    Thin films of the metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000 were grown on conducting glass substrates. The films uniformly cover the conducting glass substrates and are composed of free-standing sub-micrometer rods. Subsequently, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized to deposit Co(2+) ions throughout the entire MOF film via self-limiting surface-mediated reaction chemistry. The Co ions bind at aqua and hydroxo sites lining the channels of NU-1000, resulting in three-dimensional arrays of separated Co ions in the MOF thin film. The Co-modified MOF thin films demonstrate promising electrocatalytic activity for water oxidation. PMID:26636174

  7. [Use of solubilization for the preparation of samples for determination of heavy metals in biological materials using atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Pfüller, U; Fuchs, V; Golbs, S; Ebert, E; Pfeifer, D

    1980-01-01

    Solubilisation was tested for its suitability to prepare organic samples for metal determination. Flameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry was used as test method. Copper, manganese, zinc, and chromium levels were determined from various organ systems of Wistar rat, in response to "normal" feeding of pelletised standard feed. A comparison between experimentally established concentrations, on the one hand, and literature data, on the other, suggested that solubilisation was applicable with good success to the preparation of samples from which to determine reliable values, in ppm and ppb, of the above elements. PMID:7436671

  8. Improvement of metal gate/high-k dielectric CMOSFETs characteristics by atomic layer etching of high-k gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K. S.; Park, C.; Kang, C. Y.; Park, C. S.; Park, B. J.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, B. H.; Lee, Jack C.; Bersuker, G.; Kirsch, P.; Jammy, R.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) has been applied to the high-k dielectric patterning in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (CMOSFETs), and its electrical characteristics were compared with those etched by conventional etching such as wet etching (WE) or reactive ion etching (RIE). The CMOSFET etched by the ALE showed the improvement of the off-state leakage current (Ioff), which was mainly attributed to the decreased perimeter component of the gate leakage current (IG) particularly, at the low field region. The better electrical characteristics are due to the low trap density at the edge of gate oxides in the S/D region of CMOSFETs.

  9. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach. PMID:27595707

  10. One-dimensional metallic surface states of Pt-induced atomic nanowires on Ge(0 0 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Kim, Sunghun; Mochizuki, Izumi; Takeichi, Yasuo; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Shin, Shik; Komori, Fumio

    2016-07-01

    Surface states of platinum-induced atomic nanowires on a germanium (0 0 1) surface, which shows a structural phase transition at 80 K, were studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). We observed four one-dimensional metallic surface states, among which, two bands were reported in our previous study (Yaji et al 2013 Phys. Rev. B 87 241413). One of the newly-found two bands is a quasi-one-dimensional state and is split into two due to the Rashba effect. Photoelectron intensity from one of the spin-polarized branches is reduced at a boundary of the surface Brillouin zone below the phase transition temperature. The reduction of the photoelectron intensity in the low temperature phase is interpreted as the interference of photoelectrons, not as the Peierls instability. We also discuss the low energy properties of the metallic surface states and their spin splitting using high-resolution ARPES with a vacuum ultraviolet laser.

  11. Pre-concentration of trace metals from sea-water for determination by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, R E; Berman, S S; Desaulniers, A; Russell, D S

    1980-02-01

    Determination of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr and Ni in coastal sea-water by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by solvent extraction and use of a chelating ion-exchange resin is described. Following the extraction of the pyrrolidine-N-carbodithioate and oxinate complexes into methyl isobutyl ketone, the trace metals are further preconcentrated by back-extraction into 1.5M nitric acid. Preconcentration on the chelating resin is effected by a combined column and batch technique, allowing greater preconcentration factors to be obtained. Provided samples are appropriately treated to release non-labile metal species prior to preconcentration, both methods yield comparable analytical results with respect to the mean concentrations determined as well as to mean relative standard deviations. Control and treatment of the analytical blank is also described. PMID:18962623

  12. Investigating the atomic level influencing factors of glass forming ability in NiAl and CuZr metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sedighi, Sina; Kirk, Donald Walter; Singh, Chandra Veer Thorpe, Steven John

    2015-09-21

    Bulk metallic glasses are a relatively new class of amorphous metal alloy which possess unique mechanical and magnetic properties. The specific concentrations and combinations of alloy elements needed to prevent crystallization during melt quenching remains poorly understood. A correlation between atomic properties that can explain some of the previously identified glass forming ability (GFA) anomalies of the NiAl and CuZr systems has been identified, with these findings likely extensible to other transition metal–transition metal and transition metal–metalloid (TM–M) alloy classes as a whole. In this work, molecular dynamics simulation methods are utilized to study thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural properties of equiatomic CuZr and NiAl metallic glasses in an attempt to further understand the underlying connections between glass forming ability, nature of atomic level bonding, short and medium range ordering, and the evolution of structure and relaxation properties in the disordered phase. The anomalous breakdown of the fragility parameter as a useful GFA indicator in TM–M alloy systems is addressed through an in-depth investigation of bulk stiffness properties and the evolution of (pseudo)Gruneisen parameters over the quench domain, with the efficacy of other common glass forming ability indicators similarly being analyzed through direct computation in respective CuZr and NiAl systems. Comparison of fractional liquid-crystal density differences in the two systems revealed 2-3 times higher values for the NiAl system, providing further support for its efficacy as a general purpose GFA indicator.

  13. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Materer, N.F.

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C{sub 2}H{sub 3} and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  14. Metal atom dynamics in superbulky metallocenes: a comparison of (Cp(BIG))2Sn and (Cp(BIG))2Eu.

    PubMed

    Harder, Sjoerd; Naglav, Dominik; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Nowik, Israel; Herber, Rolfe H

    2014-02-17

    Cp(BIG)2Sn (Cp(BIG) = (4-n-Bu-C6H4)5cyclopentadienyl), prepared by reaction of 2 equiv of Cp(BIG)Na with SnCl2, crystallized isomorphous to other known metallocenes with this ligand (Ca, Sr, Ba, Sm, Eu, Yb). Similarly, it shows perfect linearity, C-H···C(π) bonding between the Cp(BIG) rings and out-of-plane bending of the aryl substituents toward the metal. Whereas all other Cp(BIG)2M complexes show large disorder in the metal position, the Sn atom in Cp(BIG)2Sn is perfectly ordered. In contrast, (119)Sn and (151)Eu Mößbauer investigations on the corresponding Cp(BIG)2M metallocenes show that Sn(II) is more dynamic and loosely bound than Eu(II). The large displacement factors in the group 2 and especially in the lanthanide(II) metallocenes Cp(BIG)2M can be explained by static metal disorder in a plane parallel to the Cp(BIG) rings. Despite parallel Cp(BIG) rings, these metallocenes have a nonlinear Cpcenter-M-Cpcenter geometry. This is explained by an ionic model in which metal atoms are polarized by the negatively charged Cp rings. The extent of nonlinearity is in line with trends found in M(2+) ion polarizabilities. The range of known calculated dipole polarizabilities at the Douglas-Kroll CCSD(T) level was extended with values (atomic units) for Sn(2+) 15.35, Sm(2+)(4f(6) (7)F) 9.82, Eu(2+)(4f(7) (8)S) 8.99, and Yb(2+)(4f(14) (1)S) 6.55. This polarizability model cannot be applied to predominantly covalently bound Cp(BIG)2Sn, which shows a perfectly ordered structure. The bent geometry of Cp*2Sn should therefore not be explained by metal polarizability but is due to van der Waals Cp*···Cp* attraction and (to some extent) to a small p-character component in the Sn lone pair.

  15. Enhanced binding strength between metal nanoclusters and carbon nanotubes with an atomic nickel defect.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dongchul; Park, Noejung; Kim, Gunn; Hong, Suklyun

    2012-05-25

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we study binding properties of small metal nanoclusters (Cu(13) and Al(13)) onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs). On defect-free CNTs, the binding affinity with the Cu or Al cluster is very weak. When various defects such as vacancies, substitutional nickel defects, and nickel adatoms are introduced in CNTs to increase the binding strength, the binding energies of the metal nanoclusters increase substantially irrespective of types of defects. The effect of the Ni adatom is especially noticeable. Our results propose a method for improving the wettability of metal-CNT complex composites.

  16. Linear free energy relationships for metal-ligand complexation: Bidentate binding to negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-05-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO( αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand p Ka values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for five and six membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems.

  17. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  18. Modelling the atomic structure of Al92U8 metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Michalik, S; Bednarcik, J; Jóvári, P; Honkimäki, V; Webb, A; Franz, H; Fazakas, E; Varga, L K

    2010-10-13

    The local atomic structure of the glassy Al(92)U(8) alloy was modelled by the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method, fitting x-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) signals. The final structural model was analysed by means of partial pair correlation functions, coordination number distributions and Voronoi tessellation. In our study we found that the most probable atomic separations between Al-Al and U-Al pairs in the glassy Al(92)U(8) alloy are 2.7 Å and 3.1 Å with coordination numbers 11.7 and 17.1, respectively. The Voronoi analysis did not support evidence of the existence of well-defined building blocks directly embedded in the amorphous matrix. The dense-random-packing model seems to be adequate for describing the connection between solvent and solute atoms. PMID:21386570

  19. Ultrafast emission of ions during laser ablation of metal for 3D atom probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, A.; Houard, J.; Vurpillot, F.; Deconihout, B.

    2009-03-01

    The 3D atom probe(3DAP) is an imaging instrument based on the controlled field evaporation of single atoms from a sample having a tip shape with an end radius of 50 nm. In the fs laser assisted 3DAP the evaporation is induced by the laser pulses so that the physical process involved in this 3DAP analysis might correspond to the very early stages of the ablation process. In this paper we present the principle of the 3DAP and we discuss the existing models of the fs assisted evaporation. At last, we test the relevance of these models with pump-probe experiments on tungsten tips in the tomographic atom probe.

  20. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    A decomposition of the molecular energy is presented that is motivated by the atom superposition and electron delocalization physical model of chemical binding. The energy appears in physically transparent form consisting of a classical electrostatic interaction, a zero order two electron exchange interaction, a relaxation energy, and the atomic energies. Detailed formulae are derived in zero and first order of approximation. The formulation extends beyond first order to any chosen level of approximation leading, in principle, to the exact energy. The structure of this energy decomposition lends itself to the fullest utilization of the solutions to the atomic sub problems to simplify the calculation of the molecular energy. If nonlinear relaxation effects remain minor, the molecular energy calculation requires at most the calculation of two center, two electron integrals. This scheme thus affords the prospects of substantially reducing the computational effort required for the calculation of molecular energies.

  1. Electronic, Mechanical, and Dielectric Properties of Two-Dimensional Atomic Layers of Noble Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Pooja; Kumar, Jagdish; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    We present density functional theory-based electronic, mechanical, and dielectric properties of monolayers and bilayers of noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt) taken with graphene-like hexagonal structure. The Au, Ag, and Pt bilayers stabilize in AA-stacked configuration, while the Cu bilayer favors the AB stacking pattern. The quantum ballistic conductance of the noble-metal mono- and bilayers is remarkably increased compared with their bulk counterparts. Among the studied systems, the tensile strength is found to be highest for the Pt monolayer and bilayer. The noble metals in mono- and bilayer form show distinctly different electron energy loss spectra and reflectance spectra due to the quantum confinement effect on going from bulk to the monolayer limit. Such tunability of the electronic and dielectric properties of noble metals by reducing the degrees of freedom of electrons offers promise for their use in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics applications.

  2. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser-trapped alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Sprouse, G. D.; Orozco, L. A.; DeMille, D. P.

    2007-03-15

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent, parity-violating electromagnetic moment, the anapole moment. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the antinode of a standing wave Fabry-Perot cavity driving the anapole-induced microwave E1 transition. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  3. [Atomic beam studies of the interaction of hydrogen with transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed two experimental facilities during the term of this grant. In the first three years we constructed a helium atom scattering (HAS) facility with both elastic (EHAS) and inelastic (IHAS) scattering measurement capabilities to investigate the structural and dynamical aspects of solid surfaces and thin films. A pioneering surface metastable atom magnetic diffraction (SMAMD) facility was constructed and developed over the past four years, which makes possible the investigation of long-range electron spin-ordering on the surfaces of insulating magnetic crystals. The following were studied: H overlayers and Ag, Cu on Pd(111), reconstructed Au(111), and NiO(100).

  4. Emergence of metallicity in silver clusters in the 150 atom regime: a study of differently sized silver clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Erusappan, Jayanthi; Govindarajan, Anuradha; Sugi, K. S.; Udayabhaskararao, Thumu; Ghosh, Atanu; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-06-01

    We report the systematic appearance of a plasmon-like optical absorption feature in silver clusters protected with 2-phenylethanethiol (PET), 4-flurothiophenol (4-FTP) and (4-(t-butyl)benzenethiol (BBS) as a function of cluster size. A wide range of clusters, namely, Ag44(4-FTP)30, Ag55(PET)31, ~Ag75(PET)40, ~Ag114(PET)46, Ag152(PET)60, ~Ag202(BBS)70, ~Ag423(PET)105, and ~Ag530(PET)100 were prepared. The UV/Vis spectra show multiple features up to ~Ag114 and thereafter, from Ag152 onwards, the plasmonic feature corresponding to a single peak at ~460 nm evolves, which points to the emergence of metallicity in clusters composed of ~150 metal atoms. A minor blue shift in the plasmonic peak was observed as cluster sizes increased and merged with the spectrum of plasmonic nanoparticles of 4.8 nm diameter protected with PET. Clusters with different ligands, such as 4-FTP and BBS, also show this behavior, which suggests that the `emergence of metallicity' is independent of the functionality of the thiol ligand.We report the systematic appearance of a plasmon-like optical absorption feature in silver clusters protected with 2-phenylethanethiol (PET), 4-flurothiophenol (4-FTP) and (4-(t-butyl)benzenethiol (BBS) as a function of cluster size. A wide range of clusters, namely, Ag44(4-FTP)30, Ag55(PET)31, ~Ag75(PET)40, ~Ag114(PET)46, Ag152(PET)60, ~Ag202(BBS)70, ~Ag423(PET)105, and ~Ag530(PET)100 were prepared. The UV/Vis spectra show multiple features up to ~Ag114 and thereafter, from Ag152 onwards, the plasmonic feature corresponding to a single peak at ~460 nm evolves, which points to the emergence of metallicity in clusters composed of ~150 metal atoms. A minor blue shift in the plasmonic peak was observed as cluster sizes increased and merged with the spectrum of plasmonic nanoparticles of 4.8 nm diameter protected with PET. Clusters with different ligands, such as 4-FTP and BBS, also show this behavior, which suggests that the `emergence of metallicity' is independent of

  5. Investigation of thermal atomic layer deposited TiAlX (X = N or C) film as metal gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jinjuan; Zhang, Yanbo; Li, Tingting; Wang, Xiaolei; Gao, Jianfeng; Yin, Huaxiang; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Wenwu; Ding, Yuqiang; Xu, Chongying; Zhao, Chao

    2016-08-01

    TiAlX (X = N or C) films are developed by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique as metal gate. The TiAlX films are deposited by using four different combinations of precursors: A: TiCl4-NH3-TMA-NH3, B: TiCl4-TMA-NH3, C: TiCl4-NH3-TMA and D: TiCl4-TMA. The physical characteristics of the TiAlX films such as chemical composition, growth rate, resistivity and surface roughness are estimated by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, four point probe method and atomic force microscopy respectively. Additionally, the electrical characteristics of the TiAlX films are investigated by using metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure. It is shown that NH3 presence in the reaction makes the film more like TiAlN(C) while NH3 absence makes the film more like TiAlC. The TiAlC film deposited by TiCl4-TMA has effective work function close to mid-gap of Si, which is rather potential for low power FinFET device application.

  6. Chemisorption of Transition-Metal Atoms on Boron- and Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes: Energetics and Geometric and Electronic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    An, Wei; Turner, C. H.

    2009-04-30

    The well-defined binding between transition-metals (TM) and the sidewall of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) plays a key role in the performance of CNT-based anoelectronics, as well as the stability of catalysts used in either heterogeneous catalysis or fuel-cell electrocatalysis. Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations demonstrate that either boron or nitrogen doping can increase the binding strength of TM atoms with singlewall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and comparatively, boron doping is more effective. The binding nature can be identified as chemisorption, based on the magnitude of the binding energy and the formation of multiple bonds. The chemisorbed TM atoms can modify the electronic structure of the doped nanotubes in various ways, depending upon the TM and helicity of the CNT, rendering the TM/doped-SWCNT composite viable for a wide range of applications. A total of 11 technologically relevant TMs adsorbed on two distinct and stable doped-SWCNT models have been investigated in this study. The doping sites are arranged in either a locally concentrated or uniform fashion within semiconducting SWCNT(8,0) and metallic SWCNT(6,6). The results serve as a starting point for studying larger, more complex TM nanostructures anchored on the sidewall of boron- or nitrogen-doped CNTs.

  7. Structures of mannose-6-phosphate isomerase from Salmonella typhimurium bound to metal atoms and substrate: implications for catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sagurthi, S R; Gowda, Giri; Savithri, H S; Murthy, M R N

    2009-07-01

    Mannose-6-phosphate isomerase (MPI) catalyzes the interconversion of mannose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. X-ray crystal structures of MPI from Salmonella typhimurium in the apo form (with no metal bound) and in the holo form (with bound Zn2+) and two other structures with yttrium bound at an inhibitory site and complexed with Zn2+ and fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) were determined in order to gain insights into the structure and the isomerization mechanism. Isomerization involves acid/base catalysis with proton transfer between the C1 and C2 atoms of the substrate. His99, Lys132, His131 and Asp270 are close to the substrate and are likely to be the residues involved in proton transfer. The interactions observed at the active site suggest that the ring-opening step is probably catalyzed by His99 and Asp270. An active-site loop consisting of residues 130-133 undergoes conformational changes upon substrate binding. Zn2+ binding induces structural order in the loop consisting of residues 50-54. The metal atom appears to play a role in substrate binding and is probably also important for maintaining the architecture of the active site. Isomerization probably follows the previously suggested cis-enediol mechanism.

  8. Electronic properties of transition metal atoms on Cu2 N/Cu(100): a DFT comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferron, Alejandro; Lado, José; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquín

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic and magnetic properties of individual transition metal atoms (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) deposited on a Cu2N /Cu(100) surface by means of spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We focus our work on a comparative study of the various quantities, such as magnetic moment, orbital occupation, structural properties, hybridization with the substrate and spin polarization of the substrate, paying attention to the trends as the transition metal is changed. In this work we try to go beyond existing theoretical works by providing a comprehensive and comparative study of the electronic, magnetic and structural properties of these seven atoms including also Ni, for which there are no published calculations to the best of our knowledge. In the case of Mn, Fe and Co, we connect our results with the existing scanning tunneling microscope experiments. A.F. acknowledges funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration, under the PEOPLE programme, Marie Curie COFUND Actions, grant agreement number 600375 and CONICET.

  9. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os• and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os• radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 × 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 × 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 °C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 ± 1.0 and 16.6 ± 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os•, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 ± 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 ± 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Atomic-scale structural evolution from disorder to order in an amorphous metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Liu, X. J.; Hou, H. Y.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to study the atomic-scale structural evolution from disorder to order during the isothermal annealing of an amorphous Ni. Three plateaus in the time dependent potential energy and mean square displacement (MSD) curves were observed, indicating that the atomic ordering process from amorphous to nanocrystalline Ni undergoes three distinct stages. The structural analyses reveal that the atomic structural evolution is associated with these three stages: Disordered atoms adjust their relative positions to form a one-dimensional (1D) periodic structure at the first stage, then form a 2D periodic structure at the second stage, and finally form a 3D periodic nanocrystal. Further analyses of potential energy and MSD difference and dynamics demonstrate that the structural change from the 2D to 3D structure is more difficult than that from the 1D to 2D structure, because both the 1D and 2D quasi-ordered structures belong to transition states and have similar structural features in nature. Our findings may provide new insights into the nanocrystallization of amorphous alloys and implications for producing nanostructured materials.

  11. Determination of the Relative Atomic Masses of Metals by Liberation of Molecular Hydrogen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waghorne, W. Earle; Rous, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Students determine the relative atomic masses of calcium, magnesium, and aluminum by reaction with hydrochloric acid and measurement of the volume of hydrogen gas liberated. The experiment demonstrates stoichiometry and illustrates clearly that mass of the reagent is not the determinant of the amounts in chemical reactions. The experiment is…

  12. Accelerating solidification process simulation for large-sized system of liquid metal atoms using GPU with CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Liang; Li, KenLi; Shi, Lin; Liu, RangSu; Mei, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is a powerful tool to simulate and analyze complex physical processes and phenomena at atomic characteristic for predicting the natural time-evolution of a system of atoms. Precise simulation of physical processes has strong requirements both in the simulation size and computing timescale. Therefore, finding available computing resources is crucial to accelerate computation. However, a tremendous computational resource (GPGPU) are recently being utilized for general purpose computing due to its high performance of floating-point arithmetic operation, wide memory bandwidth and enhanced programmability. As for the most time-consuming component in MD simulation calculation during the case of studying liquid metal solidification processes, this paper presents a fine-grained spatial decomposition method to accelerate the computation of update of neighbor lists and interaction force calculation by take advantage of modern graphics processors units (GPU), enlarging the scale of the simulation system to a simulation system involving 10 000 000 atoms. In addition, a number of evaluations and tests, ranging from executions on different precision enabled-CUDA versions, over various types of GPU (NVIDIA 480GTX, 580GTX and M2050) to CPU clusters with different number of CPU cores are discussed. The experimental results demonstrate that GPU-based calculations are typically 9∼11 times faster than the corresponding sequential execution and approximately 1.5∼2 times faster than 16 CPU cores clusters implementations. On the basis of the simulated results, the comparisons between the theoretical results and the experimental ones are executed, and the good agreement between the two and more complete and larger cluster structures in the actual macroscopic materials are observed. Moreover, different nucleation and evolution mechanism of nano-clusters and nano-crystals formed in the processes of metal solidification is observed with large-sized system.

  13. Accelerating solidification process simulation for large-sized system of liquid metal atoms using GPU with CUDA

    SciTech Connect

    Jie, Liang; Li, KenLi; Shi, Lin; Liu, RangSu; Mei, Jing

    2014-01-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation is a powerful tool to simulate and analyze complex physical processes and phenomena at atomic characteristic for predicting the natural time-evolution of a system of atoms. Precise simulation of physical processes has strong requirements both in the simulation size and computing timescale. Therefore, finding available computing resources is crucial to accelerate computation. However, a tremendous computational resource (GPGPU) are recently being utilized for general purpose computing due to its high performance of floating-point arithmetic operation, wide memory bandwidth and enhanced programmability. As for the most time-consuming component in MD simulation calculation during the case of studying liquid metal solidification processes, this paper presents a fine-grained spatial decomposition method to accelerate the computation of update of neighbor lists and interaction force calculation by take advantage of modern graphics processors units (GPU), enlarging the scale of the simulation system to a simulation system involving 10 000 000 atoms. In addition, a number of evaluations and tests, ranging from executions on different precision enabled-CUDA versions, over various types of GPU (NVIDIA 480GTX, 580GTX and M2050) to CPU clusters with different number of CPU cores are discussed. The experimental results demonstrate that GPU-based calculations are typically 9∼11 times faster than the corresponding sequential execution and approximately 1.5∼2 times faster than 16 CPU cores clusters implementations. On the basis of the simulated results, the comparisons between the theoretical results and the experimental ones are executed, and the good agreement between the two and more complete and larger cluster structures in the actual macroscopic materials are observed. Moreover, different nucleation and evolution mechanism of nano-clusters and nano-crystals formed in the processes of metal solidification is observed with large

  14. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  15. Comparative study of metal atom adsorption on free-standing h-BN and h-BN/Ni (1 1 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yubin; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a comparative study of the adsorption behavior of single metal atoms (Li, Sc, Ti, Co, Ni, and Cu) on two systems, a free-standing hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheet and an h-BN/Ni (1 1 1) surface, was performed using density functional theory calculations. It was found that the Ni (1 1 1) supporting layer under the h-BN sheet could significantly improves the adsorption energies for single metal adatoms with h-BN. In particular, in the case of Li and Sc, the improved adsorption energies were higher than the cohesive energies of their atoms. The mechanism for these strong adsorptions was primarily due to the charge transfer increases from the adsorbed metal atoms to the h-BN, except for the case of Ni. On the other hand, the adsorption behavior was greatly affected by the interface interaction between the h-BN and Ni (1 1 1) for the adsorption of a single Ni atom. These results may provide fundamental information on the interaction between the adsorbed metal atoms between the h-BN based systems, and suggest that the use of a metal-adsorbed h-BN/Ni (1 1 1) system has good potential for nanosensors and nanocatalysts.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy study: From clean surface to surfaces adsorbed with atom/cluster or metallic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xieqiu

    2007-12-01

    Nanostructures, namely materials in the nanometer or sub-nanometer scales, can possess completely diRTMerent properties from their bulk counterparts. Due to the potential applications in different disciplines, the study of nanostructures has attracted extensive attention worldwide in recent years. Metal nanostructures grown on semiconductor substrates are a special group of nanostructures. Since these nanostructures can be prepared in ultrahigh vacuum with high controllability, one can use low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to obtain information in situ on both the structural and electronic properties of these nanostructures simultaneously. In this thesis, I will present the growth behavior of metal or semiconductor nanostructures at the initial stage and the novel electronic properties of some of these nanostructures. The study of single Ge atoms adsorbed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface shows that different deposition temperatures result in diRTMerent adsorption structures. We find Ge substitution for the Si adatoms during high temperature growth and simple Ge adsorption above the Si atoms during low temperature growth. Small Ag clusters, formed on the Si(111)-7x7 surface at controlled coverages, show a strong rectification effect, which is an indication of the initial stage of Schottky barrier formation and possibly the smallest Schottky diode. On the surfaces of heavily n-doped and p-doped Si substrates, although the 7x7 is metallic at room temperature, an energy gap opens at low temperatures. This energy gap is correlated well with the electronic localization induced by the doping impurities. For Pb nanoislands, a pseudogap was discovered at temperatures higher than the superconducting transition temperature. The strength of the pseudogap depends on the lateral size and temperature, which is speculated to originate from the weak electronic localization induced by structural disorder.

  17. Observing single-atom diffusion at a molecule-metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Johannes; Martínez-Blanco, Jesús; Peters, Maike V.; Hecht, Stefan; Grill, Leonhard

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics at the interface between a close-packed porphyrin monolayer and Au(111) is investigated by time-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy, detecting the motion of single-interface adatoms in real space. Imaging sequences reveal predominant switching of the molecular appearance in adjacent molecules, pointing to a spatial correlation that is consistent with adatom diffusion from one molecule to the next. In some cases, the number of switching molecules is drastically increased, indicating collective switching events. In addition to the thermally induced motion of adatoms at the interface, also voltage pulses from the microscope tip can induce the process—revealing different yields in agreement with the model of adatom hopping.

  18. Interactions between fluorescence of atomically layered graphene oxide and metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shao-Sian; Yeh, Yun-Chieh; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp2- and sp3-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the interactions between the fluorescence of two-dimensional layered materials and the LSPR effect.Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp2- and sp3-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the

  19. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  20. Determination of metal content in valerian root phytopharmaceutical derivatives by atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arce, Silvia; Cerutti, Soledad; Olsina, Roberto; Gomez, María R; Martínez, Luis D

    2005-01-01

    Phytopharmaceuticals containing Valerian are used as mild sleep-inducing agents. The elemental composition of 3 different marks of Valeriana officinalis roots commercially available in the Argentinian market, their teas, and a commercial tincture have been studied. The content of Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn was determined in phytopharmaceuticals by flame atomic emission/absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, and ultrasonic nebulization coupled to inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Prior to analyses of the samples, a digestion procedure was optimized. The analytical results obtained for Fe, Al, Ca, and V in the solid sample study were within the range 100-1000 mg/kg, and for Mn, Zn, and Pb within the range 10-100 mg/kg. Cadmium was found at levels up to 0.0125 mg/kg. PMID:15759744

  1. Atomic origin of high-temperature electron trapping in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xiao; Dhar, Sarit; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-04-06

    MOSFETs based on wide-band-gap semiconductors are suitable for operation at high temperature, at which additional atomic-scale processes that are benign at lower temperatures can get activated, resulting in device degradation. Recently, significant enhancement of electron trapping was observed under positive bias in SiC MOSFETs at temperatures higher than 150 °C. Here, we report first-principles calculations showing that the enhanced electron trapping is associated with thermally activated capturing of a second electron by an oxygen vacancy in SiO{sub 2} by which the vacancy transforms into a structure that comprises one Si dangling bond and a bond between a five-fold and a four-fold Si atoms. The results suggest a key role of oxygen vacancies and their structural reconfigurations in the reliability of high-temperature MOS devices.

  2. Measurement of Trace Metals in Tobacco and Cigarette Ash by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    The ICP AES experiment reported here is suitable for use in a junior- or senior-level undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory. The objective of this experiment is to analyze trace metals present in cigarette tobacco, the cigarette filter, and the ash obtained when the cigarette is burned. Two different brands of cigarettes, one with and one without a filter, were used. The filter was analyzed before and after smoke was drawn through it. The trace metals were extracted using concentrated nitric acid at room temperature and at 100 °C respectively, to test the extraction efficiency. Some tobacco samples were spiked with ZnCl2 and FeCl3 to assess the efficiency of the recovery. Zinc and iron are shown to be present in tobacco, filter, and ash, while chromium was above the detection limit only in the ash. These metals are concentrated in the ash compared to the tobacco by factors of ˜4 (Zn), 12 17 (Fe), and ≥ 2 (Cr). If sufficient laboratory time is available, this experiment could be paired with one using atomic absorption (AA) to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of ICP when compared to AA.

  3. Reconciling simulated melting and ground-state properties of metals with a modified embedded-atom method potential.

    PubMed

    Sushko, G B; Verkhovtsev, A V; Kexel, Ch; Korol, A V; Schramm, S; Solov'yov, A V

    2016-04-13

    We propose a modification of the embedded-atom method-type potential aiming at reconciling simulated melting and ground-state properties of metals by means of classical molecular dynamics. Considering titanium, magnesium, gold, and platinum as case studies, we demonstrate that simulations performed with the modified force field yield quantitatively correctly both the melting temperature of the metals and their ground-state properties. It is shown that the accounting for the long-range interatomic interactions noticeably affects the melting point assessment. The introduced modification weakens the interaction at interatomic distances exceeding the equilibrium one by a characteristic vibration amplitude defined by the Lindemann criterion, thus allowing for the correct simulation of melting, while keeping its behavior in the vicinity of the ground state minimum. The modification of the many-body potential has a general nature and can be applicable to metals with different characteristics of the electron structure as well as for many different molecular and solid state systems experiencing phase transitions. PMID:26977922

  4. Ph(i-PrO)SiH2: An Exceptional Reductant for Metal-Catalyzed Hydrogen Atom Transfers.

    PubMed

    Obradors, Carla; Martinez, Ruben M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2016-04-13

    We report the discovery of an outstanding reductant for metal-catalyzed radical hydrofunctionalization reactions. Observations of unexpected silane solvolysis distributions in the HAT-initiated hydrogenation of alkenes reveal that phenylsilane is not the kinetically preferred reductant in many of these transformations. Instead, isopropoxy(phenyl)silane forms under the reaction conditions, suggesting that alcohols function as important silane ligands to promote the formation of metal hydrides. Study of its reactivity showed that isopropoxy(phenyl)silane is an exceptionally efficient stoichiometric reductant, and it is now possible to significantly decrease catalyst loadings, lower reaction temperatures, broaden functional group tolerance, and use diverse, aprotic solvents in iron- and manganese-catalyzed hydrofunctionalizations. As representative examples, we have improved the yields and rates of alkene reduction, hydration, hydroamination, and conjugate addition. Discovery of this broadly applicable, chemoselective, and solvent-versatile reagent should allow an easier interface with existing radical reactions. Finally, isotope-labeling experiments rule out the alternative hypothesis of hydrogen atom transfer from a redox-active β-diketonate ligand in the HAT step. Instead, initial HAT from a metal hydride to directly generate a carbon-centered radical appears to be the most reasonable hypothesis. PMID:26984323

  5. Reconciling simulated melting and ground-state properties of metals with a modified embedded-atom method potential.

    PubMed

    Sushko, G B; Verkhovtsev, A V; Kexel, Ch; Korol, A V; Schramm, S; Solov'yov, A V

    2016-04-13

    We propose a modification of the embedded-atom method-type potential aiming at reconciling simulated melting and ground-state properties of metals by means of classical molecular dynamics. Considering titanium, magnesium, gold, and platinum as case studies, we demonstrate that simulations performed with the modified force field yield quantitatively correctly both the melting temperature of the metals and their ground-state properties. It is shown that the accounting for the long-range interatomic interactions noticeably affects the melting point assessment. The introduced modification weakens the interaction at interatomic distances exceeding the equilibrium one by a characteristic vibration amplitude defined by the Lindemann criterion, thus allowing for the correct simulation of melting, while keeping its behavior in the vicinity of the ground state minimum. The modification of the many-body potential has a general nature and can be applicable to metals with different characteristics of the electron structure as well as for many different molecular and solid state systems experiencing phase transitions.

  6. Interactions between fluorescence of atomically layered graphene oxide and metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Shao-Sian; Yeh, Yun-Chieh; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2013-02-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) demonstrates interesting photoluminescence (PL) because of its unique heterogeneous atomic structure, which consists of variable sp(2)- and sp(3)-bonded carbons. In this study, we report the interaction between the luminescence of GO ranging from a single atomic layer to few-layered thin films and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photoluminescence of GO in the vicinity of the Ag NPs is enhanced significantly due to the near-field plasmonic effect by coupling electron-hole pairs of GO with oscillating electrons in Ag NPs, leading to an increased PL intensity and a decreased PL decay lifetime. The maxima 30-fold enhancement in PL intensity is obtained with an optimized film thickness of GO, and the luminescence image from a single atomic layer GO sheet is successfully observed with the assistance of the LSPR effect. The results provide an ideal platform for exploring the interactions between the fluorescence of two-dimensional layered materials and the LSPR effect. PMID:23340692

  7. Characterization of the atomic emission in inconel 718 alloy metal vapor arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R.L.; Peebles, H.C.; Bertram, L.A.; Hareland, W.A.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Visible and uv emission spectroscopy was used to identify and study various atomic species in the plasma of a vacuum arc furnace during a remelt of Inconel 718. The studies were carried out at a base pressure of 10 mtorr, and with the furnace backfilled with CO to a total pressure of 100 mtorr. Various emitting species were identified, and the internal energy distributions of a number of these species were mapped out using Boltzmann plots. Internal temperatures of 6000 to 7000/sup 0/K were measured for the neutral atomic species in the low pressure arc, while a value of 11,600/sup 0/K was obtained for the ion temperature. In addition, the density of the highly volatile element Mn in the interelectrode region was found to be greatly enhanced compared to its relative abundance in the bulk alloy, indicating the importance of vaporization in determining the atomic composition of the arc plasma. Increasing the furnace pressure resulted in an increase in the temperature of the neutral species of 1500 to 4000/sup 0/K, and an apparent suppression of the Mn vaporization rate.

  8. On the road to metallic nanoparticles by rational design: bridging the gap between atomic-level theoretical modeling and reality by total scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Binay; Wilson, A. R.; Wiley, B. J.; Ren, Y.; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-10-01

    The extent to which current theoretical modeling alone can reveal real-world metallic nanoparticles (NPs) at the atomic level was scrutinized and demonstrated to be insufficient and how it can be improved by using a pragmatic approach involving straightforward experiments is shown. In particular, 4 to 6 nm in size silica supported Au100-xPdx (x = 30, 46 and 58) explored for catalytic applications is characterized structurally by total scattering experiments including high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Atomic-level models for the NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modeling Sutton-Chen (SC) method. Models are matched against independent experimental data and are demonstrated to be inaccurate unless their theoretical foundation, i.e. the SC method, is supplemented with basic yet crucial information on the length and strength of metal-to-metal bonds and, when necessary, structural disorder in the actual NPs studied. An atomic PDF-based approach for accessing such information and implementing it in theoretical modeling is put forward. For completeness, the approach is concisely demonstrated on 15 nm in size water-dispersed Au particles explored for bio-medical applications and 16 nm in size hexane-dispersed Fe48Pd52 particles explored for magnetic applications as well. It is argued that when ``tuned up'' against experiments relevant to metals and alloys confined to nanoscale dimensions, such as total scattering coupled to atomic PDF analysis, rather than by mere intuition and/or against data for the respective solids, atomic-level theoretical modeling can provide a sound understanding of the synthesis-structure-property relationships in real-world metallic NPs. Ultimately this can help advance nanoscience and technology a step closer to producing metallic NPs by rational design.The extent to which current theoretical modeling alone can

  9. On the road to metallic nanoparticles by rational design: bridging the gap between atomic-level theoretical modeling and reality by total scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Binay; Wilson, A R; Wiley, B J; Ren, Y; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-11-14

    The extent to which current theoretical modeling alone can reveal real-world metallic nanoparticles (NPs) at the atomic level was scrutinized and demonstrated to be insufficient and how it can be improved by using a pragmatic approach involving straightforward experiments is shown. In particular, 4 to 6 nm in size silica supported Au(100-x)Pd(x) (x = 30, 46 and 58) explored for catalytic applications is characterized structurally by total scattering experiments including high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Atomic-level models for the NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modeling Sutton-Chen (SC) method. Models are matched against independent experimental data and are demonstrated to be inaccurate unless their theoretical foundation, i.e. the SC method, is supplemented with basic yet crucial information on the length and strength of metal-to-metal bonds and, when necessary, structural disorder in the actual NPs studied. An atomic PDF-based approach for accessing such information and implementing it in theoretical modeling is put forward. For completeness, the approach is concisely demonstrated on 15 nm in size water-dispersed Au particles explored for bio-medical applications and 16 nm in size hexane-dispersed Fe48Pd52 particles explored for magnetic applications as well. It is argued that when "tuned up" against experiments relevant to metals and alloys confined to nanoscale dimensions, such as total scattering coupled to atomic PDF analysis, rather than by mere intuition and/or against data for the respective solids, atomic-level theoretical modeling can provide a sound understanding of the synthesis-structure-property relationships in real-world metallic NPs. Ultimately this can help advance nanoscience and technology a step closer to producing metallic NPs by rational design. PMID:26463562

  10. On the road to metallic nanoparticles by rational design: bridging the gap between atomic-level theoretical modeling and reality by total scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Binay; Wilson, A R; Wiley, B J; Ren, Y; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-11-14

    The extent to which current theoretical modeling alone can reveal real-world metallic nanoparticles (NPs) at the atomic level was scrutinized and demonstrated to be insufficient and how it can be improved by using a pragmatic approach involving straightforward experiments is shown. In particular, 4 to 6 nm in size silica supported Au(100-x)Pd(x) (x = 30, 46 and 58) explored for catalytic applications is characterized structurally by total scattering experiments including high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. Atomic-level models for the NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modeling Sutton-Chen (SC) method. Models are matched against independent experimental data and are demonstrated to be inaccurate unless their theoretical foundation, i.e. the SC method, is supplemented with basic yet crucial information on the length and strength of metal-to-metal bonds and, when necessary, structural disorder in the actual NPs studied. An atomic PDF-based approach for accessing such information and implementing it in theoretical modeling is put forward. For completeness, the approach is concisely demonstrated on 15 nm in size water-dispersed Au particles explored for bio-medical applications and 16 nm in size hexane-dispersed Fe48Pd52 particles explored for magnetic applications as well. It is argued that when "tuned up" against experiments relevant to metals and alloys confined to nanoscale dimensions, such as total scattering coupled to atomic PDF analysis, rather than by mere intuition and/or against data for the respective solids, atomic-level theoretical modeling can provide a sound understanding of the synthesis-structure-property relationships in real-world metallic NPs. Ultimately this can help advance nanoscience and technology a step closer to producing metallic NPs by rational design.

  11. Atomic and molecular spectra of vapors evolved in graphite furnace. Part 7: Alkaline metal sulfates and sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemme, M.; Katskov, D. A.; Tittarelli, P.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal behavior and vapor absorption spectra of Li, Na and K sulfates and Li, Na sulfides in graphite vaporizers for atomic absorption spectrometry are investigated using a UV spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Fifty spectra in the wavelength range 190-380 nm are collected during the vaporization of 1 μg and 10 μg of metal as sulfide and sulfate, respectively, simultaneously to the increase of vaporizer temperature from 700 to 2700 K during 10 s. The behavior of transient spectra is compared for the pyrocoated tube and filter furnace. It is found that Na and K sulfates in the pyrocoated tube evolve, first, metal bound sulfur-oxygen compounds, while Li sulfate emanates S 2 vapor. For all substances studied, the vaporization involves active interaction with graphite, suggestively with formation of graphite-metal and graphite-sulfur intercalation compounds. Those compounds retained metal and sulfur until above 2000 K. Both vapor dissociation and decomposition of intercalation compounds are accompanied by appearance in gas phase of CS molecules. In the filter furnace at high temperature the structured spectrum between 190 and 210 nm is characteristic for all sulfur containing compounds. It is suggestively attributed to C nS m ( n> m) molecule. The samples of Li and Na sulfides do not retain initial chemical composition after dissolving, sampling from solution, drying and pyrolysis at 700 K. Their vapor spectra show the presence of sodium sulfate (or sulfite) and lithium oxide in the respective dry residues. The diffuse absorption bands at 190-230 nm with maxima at 200-210 nm precede or appear together with molecular spectra. The phenomenon is suggestively assigned to the light scattering on specific molecular clusters.

  12. The use of ion chromatography-dc plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the speciation of trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Urasa, I.T.

    1991-09-20

    The original objects of this research program were: to interface d.c. plasma atomic emission spectrometer with an ion chromatograph; to characterize and optimize the combined systems for application in the speciation of metals in aqueous solutions; to use this system in the study of the solution chemistry of various metals; and to find ways in which the measurement sensitivity of the method can be enhanced, thereby allowing the detection of metal species at low ppb concentration levels. This approach has been used to study the chemistry of and speciate several elements in solution including: arsenic, chromium, iron, manganese, nickel phosphorus, platinum, selenium, and vanadium. During the course of this research, we have found that the solution chemistry of the elements studied and the speciation data obtained can vary considerably depending on the solution, and the chromatographic conditions employed. The speciation of chromium, iron, and vanadium was found to be highly influenced by the acidity of the sample. The element selective nature of the d.c. plasma detector allows these changes to be monitored, thereby providing quantitative information on the new moieties formed. New approaches are being developed including the use of chelating ligands as preconcentration agents for purposes of reducing further the detection limits of the elements of interest and to improve the overall element speciation scheme. New thrusts are being directed towards the employment of post-column derivatization method coupled with colorimetric measurements to detect and quantify metal species eluting from the chromatographic column. The influence of sample acidity on these investigations will be carefully evaluated. These new thrusts are described in the accompanying Project Renewal Proposal.

  13. Atomic scale characterization and surface chemistry of metal modified titanate nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukovecz, Ákos; Kordás, Krisztián; Kiss, János; Kónya, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    Titanates are salts of polytitanic acid that can be synthesized as nanostructures in a great variety concerning crystallinity, morphology, size, metal content and surface chemistry. Titanate nanotubes (open-ended hollow cylinders measuring up to 200 nm in length and 15 nm in outer diameter) and nanowires (solid, elongated rectangular blocks with length up to 1500 nm and 30-60 nm diameter) are the most widespread representatives of the titanate nanomaterial family. This review covers the properties and applications of these two materials from the surface science point of view. Dielectric, vibrational, electron and X-ray spectroscopic results are comprehensively discussed first, then surface modification methods including covalent functionalization, ion exchange and metal loading are covered. The versatile surface chemistry of one-dimensional titanates renders them excellent candidates for heterogeneous catalytic, photocatalytic, photovoltaic and energy storage applications, therefore, these fields are also reviewed.

  14. Universal Scaling Law for Atomic Diffusion and Viscosity in Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xu; Liu, Chang-Song; Zhu, Zhen-Gang

    2004-12-01

    The recently proposed scaling law relating the diffusion coefficient and the excess entropy of liquid [Samanta A et al. 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 145901; Dzugutov M 1996 Nature 381 137], and a quasi-universal relationship between the transport coefficients and excess entropy of dense fluids [Rosenfeld Y 1977 Phys. Rev. A 15 2545], are tested for diverse liquid metals using molecular dynamics simulations. Interatomic potentials derived from the glue potential and second-moment approximation of tight-binding scheme are used to study liquid metals. Our simulation results give sound support to the above-mentioned universal scaling laws. Following Dzugutov, we have also reached a new universal scaling relationship between the viscosity coefficient and excess entropy. The simulation results suggest that the reduced transport coefficients can be expressed approximately in terms of the corresponding packing density.

  15. Ring state for single transition metal atoms on boron nitride on Rh(111).

    PubMed

    Natterer, Fabian Donat; Patthey, François; Brune, Harald

    2012-08-10

    The low-temperature adsorption of isolated transition metal adatoms (Mn, Co, and Fe) onto hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on Rh(111) creates a bistable adsorption complex. The first state considerably weakens the hexagonal boron nitride- (h-BN-) substrate bond for 60 BN unit cells, leading to a highly symmetric ring in STM images, while the second state is imaged as a conventional adatom and leaves the BN-substrate interaction intact. We demonstrate reversible switching between the two states and, thus, controlled pinning and unpinning of the h-BN layer from the metal substrate. I(z) and d lnI/dz curves are used to reveal the BN deformation in the ring state. PMID:23006283

  16. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, F; Martínez, J I; García-Lastra, J M; Rossmeisl, J; Koper, M T M

    2012-03-16

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phenomenon between any set of adsorbates bound similarly to the surface. On the example of the near-surface alloys of Pt, we show that scalability is a result of identical variations of adsorption energies with respect to the valence configuration of both the surface components and the adsorbates. PMID:22540492

  17. Spintronic and transport properties of linear atomic strings of transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Neha; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, first-principles investigations have been performed to study the spintronic and transport properties of linear atomic strings of Fe, Co and Ni. The structural stabilities of the considered strings were compared on the basis of binding energies which revealed that all the strings are energetically feasible to be achieved. Further, all the considered strings are found to be ferromagnetic and the observed magnetic moment ranges from 1.38 to 1.71 μB. The observed transport properties and high spin polarization points towards their potential for nano interconnects and spintronic applications.

  18. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  19. The electronic and magnetic properties of B-doping Stone-Wales defected graphene decorated with transition-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qingxiao; Fu, Zhibing; Wang, Chaoyang; Tang, Yongjian; Zhang, Hong; Yuan, Lei; Yang, Xi

    2015-09-01

    The geometry, electronic, and magnetic properties of transition-metal (TM) atoms adsorbed on the Stone-Wales (SW) defected graphene with or without B-doped were investigated by the first-principles density functional theory (DFT), aiming to study the effect of a combination of B-dopant and SW-defect on the adsorption of TM-adatoms on graphene. It was found that the introducing of B-dopant enhanced the adsorption of TM-adatoms, while it hardly affected the electronic structure of defected graphene. Meanwhile, the magnetic properties of the adsorption systems were mainly contributed by the 3d orbitals of TM-adatoms. We hope our results will be useful for applications in the designing of devices based on graphene.

  20. ZrO2 on GaN metal oxide semiconductor capacitors via plasma assisted atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hauff, P.; Afshar, A.; Foroughi-Abari, A.; Bothe, K.; Cadien, K.; Barlage, D.

    2013-06-01

    ZrO2 has been deposited on GaN by Atomic Layer Deposition. Multiple Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitors with 4.4 nm, 5.4 nm, and 8.5 nm of ZrO2 oxide were fabricated with Cr electrodes. Capacitance measurements produce capacitance densities as high as 3.8 μF/cm2. Current densities of 0.88 A/cm2 at 1 V for the 4.4 nm oxides and hysteresis values of less than 6 mV were observed for the 5.8 nm oxide, indicating an interfacial Dit not greater than 6.4 × 1010 cm2. Temperature dependent current measurements revealed no signature Poole-Frankel component. Comprehensive assessment of these measurements indicates a low defect density oxide formed on GaN with a low number of interface states.

  1. Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-15

    The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

  2. [The Measuring Method of Atomic Polarization of Alkali Metal Vapor Based on Optical Rotation and the Analysis of the Influence Factors].

    PubMed

    Shang, Hui-ning; Quan, Wei; Chen, Yao; Li, Yang; Li, Hong

    2016-02-01

    High sensitivity measurements of inertia and magnetic field could be achieved by utilizing a category of devices, which manipulate the atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. The alkali cell which contains the alkali metal vapor is used to sense magnetic field and inertia. The atomic number density of alkali vapor and the polarization of alkali metal vapor are two of the most important parameters of the cell. They play an important role in the research on atomic spins in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free regime. Besides, optical polarization plays an important role in quantum computing and atomic physics. We propose a measurement of alkali vapor polarization and alkali number density by detecting the optical rotation in one system. This method simplifies existing experimental equipment and processes. A constant bias magnetic field is applied and the Faraday rotation angle is detected by a bunch of the probe beam to deduce alkali-metal density. Then the magnetic field is closed and a bunch of the pump laser is utilized to polarize alkali-metal. Again, the probe beam is utilized to obtain the polarization of alkali metal. The alkali density obtained at first is used to deduce the polarization. This paper applies a numerical method to analyze the Faraday rotation and the polarization rotation. According to the numerical method, the optimal wavelength for the experiment is given. Finally, the fluctuation of magnetic field and wavelength on signal analysis are analyzed. PMID:27209720

  3. Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified lanthum-nickel for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Jason

    Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB5 alloys for battery applications using conventional cast and crush alloy techniques. The previous works nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA) that could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. This work examined the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (<25 mum) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB5 alloy powder for further processing advantage. Miniature convergent-divergent jets based on rocket technology were used to design two new atomization nozzles, HPGA-II and HPGA-III. The HPGA-II nozzle was demonstrated to be more efficient in producing fine powders at half the operating pressures of the existing Ames HPGA (HPGA-I) nozzle that operated, at 7.57 MPa. A design concept advanced in this dissertation enabled the design of the HPGA-III that was 16.8% (comparing surface area) more efficient than HPGA-II. HPGA-III operated at 3.13 MPa produced a 40 wt.% yield of <25 mum powders of 316L stainless steel. This nozzle was demonstrated to produce a high yield of ultrafine powders that are essential for development of a direct production process for AB5 alloys for powders for battery applications. Rapid solidification by gas atomization of LaNi4.6Si 0.4 and LaNi4.85Sn0.15, LaNi4.75Sn 0.25 and LaNi5.5Sn0.3 alloys was studied. Small atomized particles (<25 mum) were resilient to hydrogen induced fracture in gas-phase hydrogen cycling. Rapid annealing of the gasatomized AB 5 alloys at 900°C for 5 minutes was sufficient to fully remove quenched-in nonequilibrium substitution-rich phases La-Ni-Si and La

  4. Calculations of rates for strong-field ionization of alkali-metal atoms in the quasistatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M. Z.; Simonović, N. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tunneling and over-the-barrier ionization of alkali-metal atoms in strong electromagnetic fields are studied using the single-electron model (valence electron plus atomic core) and the frozen-core approximation. The lowest-state energies and widths (ionization rates) at different values of applied field, obtained using the Stark shift expansion and the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov formula, respectively, are compared with the corresponding values determined numerically by the complex rotation method. Good agreement for the energies is obtained at the field strengths corresponding to the tunneling regime. In contrast, the rates obtained by the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov formula significantly overestimate numerical results. After introducing a correction in the formula that accounts for the dependence of the binding energy on the field strength, good agreement in the tunneling regime is obtained for the rates too. A disagreement that still remains in the over-the-barrier ionization regime indicates that at stronger fields further corrections of the rate formula, such as those related to the form of the bound-state wave function, are required. Finally, it is demonstrated that numerically determined ionization rates are not too sensitive to the choice of model for the effective core potential and good results can be obtained using a simple local pseudopotential.

  5. Identifying the Atomic-Level Effects of Metal Composition on the Structure and Catalytic Activity of Peptide-Templated Materials.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Nicholas A; McKee, Erik M; Merino, Kyle C; Drummy, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ren, Yang; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Naik, Rajesh R; Bedford, Nicholas M; Knecht, Marc R

    2015-12-22

    Bioinspired approaches for the formation of metallic nanomaterials have been extensively employed for a diverse range of applications including diagnostics and catalysis. These materials can often be used under sustainable conditions; however, it is challenging to control the material size, morphology, and composition simultaneously. Here we have employed the R5 peptide, which forms a 3D scaffold to direct the size and linear shape of bimetallic PdAu nanomaterials for catalysis. The materials were prepared at varying Pd:Au ratios to probe optimal compositions to achieve maximal catalytic efficiency. These materials were extensively characterized at the atomic level using transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and atomic pair distribution function analysis derived from high-energy X-ray diffraction patterns to provide highly resolved structural information. The results confirmed PdAu alloy formation, but also demonstrated that significant surface structural disorder was present. The catalytic activity of the materials was studied for olefin hydrogenation, which demonstrated enhanced reactivity from the bimetallic structures. These results present a pathway to the bioinspired production of multimetallic materials with enhanced properties, which can be assessed via a suite of characterization methods to fully ascertain structure/function relationships.

  6. Formation of a quasi-solid structure by intercalated noble gas atoms in pores of Cu(I)-MFU-4l metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Denysenko, Dmytro; Weinrauch, Ingrid; Volkmer, Dirk; Hirscher, Michael; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2015-01-14

    The primary adsorption sites for Kr and Xe within the large-pore metal-organic framework Cu(I)-MFU-4l have been investigated by high-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction, revealing an enormous number of adsorption sites: in total, 10 crystallographically different positions for Xe and 8 positions for Kr were localized, the first five of which are located near metal atoms and the organic linker, and the remaining sites form a second adsorption layer in the pores.

  7. Formation of a quasi-solid structure by intercalated noble gas atoms in pores of Cu(I)-MFU-4l metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Denysenko, Dmytro; Weinrauch, Ingrid; Volkmer, Dirk; Hirscher, Michael; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2015-01-14

    The primary adsorption sites for Kr and Xe within the large-pore metal-organic framework Cu(I)-MFU-4l have been investigated by high-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction, revealing an enormous number of adsorption sites: in total, 10 crystallographically different positions for Xe and 8 positions for Kr were localized, the first five of which are located near metal atoms and the organic linker, and the remaining sites form a second adsorption layer in the pores. PMID:25418446

  8. First-principles studies of BN sheets with absorbed transition metal single atoms or dimers: stabilities, electronic structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongwei; Lu, Zhansheng; Ju, Weiwei; Tang, Yanan

    2012-04-11

    BN sheets with absorbed transition metal (TM) single atoms, including Fe, Co, and Ni, and their dimers have been investigated by using a first-principles method within the generalized gradient approximation. All of the TM atoms studied are found to be chemically adsorbed on BN sheets. Upon adsorption, the binding energies of the Fe and Co single atoms are modest and almost independent of the adsorption sites, indicating the high mobility of the adatoms and isolated particles to be easily formed on the surface. However, Ni atoms are found to bind tightly to BN sheets and may adopt a layer-by-layer growth mode. The Fe, Co, and Ni dimers tend to lie (nearly) perpendicular to the BN plane. Due to the wide band gap of the pure BN sheet, the electronic structures of the BN sheets with TM adatoms are determined primarily by the distribution of TM electronic states around the Fermi level. Very interesting spin gapless semiconductors or half-metals can be obtained in the studied systems. The magnetism of the TM atoms is preserved well on the BN sheet, very close to that of the corresponding free atoms and often weakly dependent on the adsorption sites. The present results indicate that BN sheets with adsorbed TM atoms have potential applications in fields such as spintronics and magnetic data storage due to the special spin-polarized electronic structures and magnetic properties they possess.

  9. Effect of hydrogen atoms on the structures of trinuclear metal carbonyl clusters: trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-mei; Wang, Chao-yang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-05-18

    The structures of the trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 12, 11, 10, 9) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Optimization of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) gives the experimentally known structure in which all carbonyl groups are terminal and each edge of a central Mn(3) equilateral triangle is bridged by a single hydrogen atom. This structure establishes the canonical distance 3.11 A for the Mn-Mn single bond satisfying the 18-electron rule. The central triangular (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) unit is retained in the lowest energy structure of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(11), which may thus be derived from the H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) structure by removal of a carbonyl group with concurrent conversion of one of the remaining carbonyl groups into a semibridging carbonyl group to fill the resulting hole. The potential energy surface of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) is relatively complicated with six singlet and five triplet structures. One of the lower energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structures has one of the hydrogen atoms bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle and the other two hydrogen atoms bridging Mn-Mn edges. This H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure achieves the favored 18-electron configuration with a very short MnMn triple bond of 2.36 A. The other low energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure retains the (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) core of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) but has a unique six-electron donor eta(2)-mu(3) carbonyl group bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle similar to the unique carbonyl group in the known compound Cp(3)Nb(3)(CO)(6)(eta(2)-mu(3)-CO). For H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(9) a structure with a central (mu(3)-H)(2)Mn(3) trigonal bipyramid lies >20 kcal/mol below any of the other structures. Triplet structures were found for the unsaturated H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 11, 10, 9) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest lying singlet structures.

  10. Nonlinear absorption in ionic liquids with transition metallic atoms in the anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóvoa-López, José A.; López Lago, Elena; Seijas, Julio A.; Pilar Vázquez-Tato, M.; Troncoso, Jacobo; de la Fuente, Raúl; Salgueiro, José R.; Michinel, Humberto

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear absorption has been investigated by open aperture Z-scan in ionic liquids obtained by combination of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium cations with anions containing a transition metal (Co, Zn, Cu or Ni) and thiocyanate groups. The laser source was a Ti:Sapphire oscillator (80-fs pulses, λ = 810 nm, repetition rate of 80.75 MHz). All liquids present quite low heat capacities that favor the development of strong thermal effects. Thermal effects and nonlinear absorption make them potential materials for optical limiting purposes.

  11. Tunable plasmonic response of metallic nanoantennna heterodimer arrays modified by atomic-layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambold, Raymond A.; Borst, Benjamin D.; Qi, Jie; Weisel, Gary J.; Willis, Brian G.; Zimmerman, Darin T.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of tunable, plasmon extinction characteristics of arrays of nanoscale antennas that have potential use as sensors, energy-harvesting devices, catalytic converters, in near-field optical microscopy, and in surface-enhanced spectroscopy. Each device is composed of a palladium triangular-prism antenna and a flat counter-electrode. Arrays of devices are fabricated on silica using electron-beam lithography, followed by atomic-layer deposition of copper. Optical extinction is measured by employing a broadband light source in a confocal, transmission arrangement. We characterize the plasmon resonance behavior by examining the dependence on device length, the gap spacing between the electrodes, material properties, and the device array density, all of which contribute in varying degrees to the measured response. We employ finite-difference time-domain simulations to demonstrate good qualitative agreement between experimental trends and theory and use scanning electron microscopy to correlate plasmonic extinction characteristics with changes in morphology.

  12. Diffusion anisotropy of poor metal solute atoms in hcp-Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, Lucia Mottura, Alessandro

    2015-05-28

    Atom migration mechanisms influence a wide range of phenomena: solidification kinetics, phase equilibria, oxidation kinetics, precipitation of phases, and high-temperature deformation. In particular, solute diffusion mechanisms in α-Ti alloys can help explain their excellent high-temperature behaviour. The purpose of this work is to study self- and solute diffusion in hexagonal close-packed (hcp)-Ti, and its anisotropy, from first-principles using the 8-frequency model. The calculated diffusion coefficients show that diffusion energy barriers depend more on bonding characteristics of the solute rather than the size misfit with the host, while the extreme diffusion anisotropy of some solute elements in hcp-Ti is a result of the bond angle distortion.

  13. Atomic and molecular oxygen adsorbed on (111) transition metal surfaces: Cu and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    López-Moreno, S.; Romero, A. H.

    2015-04-21

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the reaction of oxygen with clean copper and nickel [111]-surfaces. We study several alternative adsorption sites for atomic and molecular oxygen on both surfaces. The minimal energy geometries and adsorption energies are in good agreement with previous theoretical studies and experimental data. From all considered adsorption sites, we found a new O{sub 2} molecular precursor with two possible dissociation paths on the Cu(111) surface. Cross barrier energies for the molecular oxygen dissociation have been calculated by using the climbing image nudge elastic band method, and direct comparison with experimental results is performed. Finally, the structural changes and adsorption energies of oxygen adsorbed on surface when there is a vacancy nearby the adsorption site are also considered.

  14. Ground state of Ho atoms on Pt(111) metal surfaces: Implications for magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbowiak, M.; Rudowicz, C.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the ground state of Ho atoms adsorbed on the Pt(111) surface, for which conflicting results exist. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations yielded the Ho ground state as | Jz=±8 > . Interpretation of x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra and the magnetization curves indicated the ground state as | Jz=±6 > . Superposition model is employed to predict the crystal-field (CF) parameters based on the structural data for the system Ho/Pt(111) obtained from the DFT modeling. Simultaneous diagonalization of the free-ion (HFI) and the trigonal CF Hamiltonian (HCF) within the whole configuration 4 f10 of H o3 + ion was performed. The role of the trigonal CF terms, neglected in the pure uniaxial CF model used previously for interpretation of experimental spectra, is found significant, whereas the sixth-rank CF terms may be neglected in agreement with the DFT predictions. The results provide substantial support for the experimental designation of the | Jz=±6 > ground state, albeit with subtle difference due to admixture of other | Jz> states, but run against the DFT-based designation of the | Jz=±8 > ground state. A subtle splitting of the ground energy level with the state (predominantly), | Jz=±6 > is predicted. This paper provides better insight into the single-ion magnetic behavior of the Ho/Pt(111) system by helping to resolve the controversy concerning the Ho ground state. Experimental techniques with greater resolution powers are suggested for direct confirmation of this splitting and C3 v symmetry experienced by the Ho atom.

  15. Role of the presence of transition-metal atoms at the antisites in CrAs, CrSe and VAs zinc-blende compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdog˜an, K.; Galanakis, I.; Şaşıog˜lu, E.; Aktaş, B.

    In a recent publication [I. Galanakis, K. Özdog˜an, E. Şaşıog˜lu, B. Aktaş, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 140408(R)] we have shown that in the case of CrAs and related transition-metal chalcogenides and pnictides, crystallizing in the zinc-blende structure, the excess of the transition-metal atoms leads to half-metallic ferrimagnetism. The latter property is crucial for spintronic applications with respect to ferromagnets due to the lower stray fields created by these materials. We extend this study to cover the case where the transition-metal atoms sitting at antisites are not identical to the ones in the perfect sites. In Cr-based compounds, the creation of Mn antisites keeps the half-metallic ferrimagnetic character produced also by the Cr antisites. In the case of VAs, Cr and Mn antisites keep the half-metallic character of VAs (contrary to V antisites) due to the larger exchange splitting exhibited by these atoms.

  16. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  17. Comparative study of pretreatment methods for the determination of metals in atmospheric aerosol by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Karanasiou, A A; Thomaidis, N S; Eleftheriadis, K; Siskos, P A

    2005-03-15

    A comparative study of pretreatment methods for the determination of 10 elements (As, Cd, Pb, V, Ni, Mn, Cr, Cu, Fe, Al) in atmospheric aerosols by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was conducted. For the digestion of the particulates collected in filters, six methods were compared using a mixture of HNO(3) and HF with or without the addition of various oxidative agents (HClO(4) or H(2)O(2)) or acids (HCl). The comparative study was performed using loaded cellulose filter samples, which were digested in Parr bombs and heated in a conventional oven at 170 degrees C for 5h. The extraction efficiency and blanks were compared and it was proved that the digestion method using only HNO(3)-HF extracted most of the metals and gave the lowest blanks. The HNO(3)-HF mixture was selected for the development of an improved microwave digestion method specific for aerosol-loaded filters. The operating parameters were optimized, so that quantitative recovery of the reference materials NIST 1649a urban dust and NIST 1648 urban particulate matter was achieved. The blank of cellulose and teflon filters were also determined and compared. Teflon filters present the lowest blanks for all the elements. The obtained limits of detection for each type of filters were adequate for environmental monitoring purposes. ETAAS instrumental operation was also optimized for the compensation and the elimination of interferences. The temperature optimization was performed for each metal in every type of filter and optimized parameters are proposed for 10 elements.

  18. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  19. Electrical-field-driven metal-insulator transition tuned with self-aligned atomic defects.

    PubMed

    Syrlybekov, Askar; Wu, Han-Chun; Mauit, Ozhet; Wu, Ye-Cun; Maguire, Pierce; Khalid, Abbas; Coileáin, Cormac Ó; Farrell, Leo; Heng, Cheng-Lin; Abid, Mohamed; Liu, Huajun; Yang, Li; Zhang, Hong-Zhou; Shvets, Igor V

    2015-09-01

    Recently, significant attention has been paid to the resistance switching (RS) behaviour in Fe3O4 and it was explained through the analogy of the electrically driven metal-insulator transition based on the quantum tunneling theory. Here, we propose a method to experimentally support this explanation and provide a way to tune the critical switching parameter by introducing self-aligned localized impurities through the growth of Fe3O4 thin films on stepped SrTiO3 substrates. Anisotropic behavior in the RS was observed, where a lower switching voltage in the range of 10(4) V cm(-1) is required to switch Fe3O4 from a high conducting state to a low conducting state when the electrical field is applied along the steps. The anisotropic RS behavior is attributed to a high density array of anti-phase boundaries (APBs) formed at the step edges and thus are aligned along the same direction in the film which act as a train of hotspot forming conduits for resonant tunneling. Our experimental studies open an interesting window to tune the electrical-field-driven metal-insulator transition in strongly correlated systems.

  20. Metal ions and flexibility in a viral RNA pseudoknot at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Minasov, George; Su, Li; Rich, Alexander

    2010-03-05

    Many pathogenic viruses use programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting to regulate translation of their structural and enzymatic proteins from polycistronic mRNAs. Frameshifting is commonly stimulated by a pseudoknot located downstream from a slippery sequence, the latter positioned at the ribosomal A and P sites. We report here the structures of two crystal forms of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from beet western yellow virus at resolutions of 1.25 and 2.85 {angstrom}. Because of the very high resolution of 1.25 {angstrom}, ten mono- and divalent metal ions per asymmetric unit could be identified, giving insight into potential roles of metal ions in stabilizing the pseudoknot. A magnesium ion located at the junction of the two pseudoknot stems appears to play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure. Because the two crystal forms exhibit mostly unrelated packing interactions and local crystallographic disorder in the high-resolution form was resolvable, the two structures offer the most detailed view yet of the conformational preference and flexibility of an RNA pseudoknot.

  1. Origin of the metal-insulator transition of indium atom wires on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Woo; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2016-06-01

    As a prototypical one-dimensional electron system, self-assembled indium (In) nanowires on the Si(111) surface have been believed to drive a metal-insulator transition by a charge-density-wave (CDW) formation due to Fermi surface nesting. Here, our first-principles calculations demonstrate that the structural phase transition from the high-temperature 4 ×1 phase to the low-temperature 8 ×2 phase occurs through an exothermic reaction with the consecutive bond-breaking and bond-making processes, giving rise to an energy barrier between the two phases as well as a gap opening. This atomistic picture for the phase transition not only identifies its first-order nature but also solves a long-standing puzzle of the origin of the metal-insulator transition in terms of the ×2 periodic lattice reconstruction of In hexagons via bond breakage and new bond formation, not by the Peierls-instability-driven CDW formation.

  2. Cage-Core Interactions in Fullerenes Enclosing Metal Clusters with Multiple Scandium and Yttrium Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Liu; Hagelberg, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Pronounced stability has been reported for metallofullerenes of the form NSc3@CN (N = 68, 78) /1/. In response of these and related findings, Density Functional Theory studies have been performed on the relation between cage-core interactions and the geometry as well as stability of endofullerenes with metal impurities containing Sc and Y. Substantial electron transfer from the metal core to the fullerene cage combines with electron backdonation, involving the interaction between the occupied orbitals of the negatively charged cage and the unoccupied d orbitals of the positively charged core. The Hueckel 4n+2 rule, well established in organic chemistry, is shown to provide a valuable heuristic tool for understanding the intramolecular electron transfer and the related stability gain /1/. The usefulness of the aromaticity concept for explaining and predicting the architecture of metallofullerenes is further exemplified by the units Sc2@C84 and Y2@C84 which were analyzed in spin triplet and singlet conditions. The Sc2 core turns out to be realized by two separated ions, while Y2 forms a bound subunit. These findings are in agreement with conclusions based on the 4n + 2 rule, assisted by Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) calculations. /1/ Stevenson, S.; Fowler, P.W.; Heine, T.; Duchamp, J.C.; Rice, G.; Glass, T.; Harich, K.; Hadju, F.; Bible, R.; Dorn, H.C. Nature, 2000, 408, 427, /2/ S. S. Park, D. Liu, F. Hagelberg, J. Phys. Chem. A 109, 8865 (2005).

  3. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  4. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  5. Comparative studies of metal air pollution by atomic spectrometry techniques and biomonitoring with moss and lichens.

    PubMed

    State, Gabriel; Popescu, Ion V; Radulescu, Cristiana; Macris, Cristina; Stihi, Claudia; Gheboianu, Anca; Dulama, Ioana; Niţescu, Ovidiu

    2012-09-01

    Our study was dedicated to the analysis of air pollution level with metals in Dambovita County, Romania; maps of the concentration distributions for air pollutants were drawn; statistical analysis includes calculation of the background concentrations and the contamination factors. The highest values of the contamination factor CF is 63.1 ± 6.63 for mosses samples and 33.12 ± 3.96 for lichens and it indicates extreme contaminations in the surroundings of steel works and an electric plant. The comparison of the distribution maps for Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations enables the identification of the pollution sources, the limits of areas with very high levels of pollution, the comparison of the concentration gradients in some areas and the influence of woodlands on the spread of pollutants through the air.

  6. Enhancement of the third-order nonlinear optical properties in open-shell singlet transition-metal dinuclear systems: effects of the group, of the period, and of the charge of the metal atom.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hitoshi; Inoue, Yudai; Yamada, Taishi; Ito, Soichi; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Kishi, Ryohei; Champagne, Benoît; Nakano, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Metal-metal multiply bonded complexes in their singlet state have been predicted to form a novel class of "σ-dominant" third-order nonlinear optical compounds based on the results of dichromium(II) and dimolybdenum(II) systems (H. Fukui et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett.2011, 2, 2063) whose second hyperpolarizabilities (γ) are enhanced by the contribution of the dσ electrons with an intermediate diradical character. In this study, using the spin-unrestricted coupled-cluster method with singles and doubles as well as with perturbative triples, we investigate the dependences of γ on the group and on the period of the transition metals as well as on their atomic charges in several open-shell singlet dimetallic systems. A significant enhancement of γ is observed in those dimetallic systems composed of (i) transition metals with a small group number, (ii) transition metals with a large periodic number, and (iii) transition metals with a small positive charge. From the decomposition of the γ values into the contributions of dσ, dπ, and dδ electrons, the γ enhancements are shown to originate from the dσ contribution, because it corresponds to the intermediate diradical character region. Furthermore, the amplitude of dσ contribution turns out to be related to the size of the d(z(2)) atomic orbital of the transition metal, which accounts for the dependence of γ on the group, on the period, and on the charge of the metal atoms. These dependences provide a guideline for an effective molecular design of highly efficient third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) systems based on the metal-metal bonded systems.

  7. Promotion of atomic hydrogen recombination as an alternative to electron trapping for the role of metals in the photocatalytic production of H2

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ji Bong; Dillon, Robert; Lee, Ilkeun; Yin, Yadong; Bardeen, Christopher J.; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The production of hydrogen from water with semiconductor photocatalysts can be promoted by adding small amounts of metals to their surfaces. The resulting enhancement in photocatalytic activity is commonly attributed to a fast transfer of the excited electrons generated by photon absorption from the semiconductor to the metal, a step that prevents deexcitation back to the ground electronic state. Here we provide experimental evidence that suggests an alternative pathway that does not involve electron transfer to the metal but requires it to act as a catalyst for the recombination of the hydrogen atoms made via the reduction of protons on the surface of the semiconductor instead. PMID:24843154

  8. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  9. Retraction: Atomic-scale simulation to study the dynamical properties and local structure of Cu-Zr and Ni-Zr metallic glass-forming alloys.

    PubMed

    Yang, M H; Li, Y; Li, J H; Liu, B X

    2016-07-20

    Retraction of 'Atomic-scale simulation to study the dynamical properties and local structure of Cu-Zr and Ni-Zr metallic glass-forming alloys' by M. H. Yang et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 7169-7183.

  10. Atom-efficient route for converting incineration ashes into heavy metal sorbents.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi Wai; Santos, Rafael M; Vanduyfhuys, Kenneth; Meesschaert, Boudewijn; Martens, Johan A

    2014-01-01

    Bottom ashes produced from municipal solid-waste incineration are suitable for sorbent synthesis because of their inherent composition, high alkalinity, metastable mineralogy, and residual heat. This work shows that bottom ashes can be atom-efficiently converted into valuable sorbents without the need for costly and hazardous chemicals. The ashes were hydrothermally treated in rotary autoclaves at autogenic pH conditions to promote the conversion of precursor mineral phases into zeolites and layered silicate hydrates. Two main mineral phases were formed: katoite and sodium aluminum phosphate silicate hydrate. These mineral alterations are accompanied by a tenfold increase in specific surface area and a twofold reduction in average particle size. Performance evaluation of the new sorbents for Cd(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) adsorption at pH5 indicates sorption capacities of 0.06, 0.08, and 0.22 mmol g(-1), respectively, which are similar to those of natural adsorbents and synthetic materials obtained from more demanding synthesis conditions.

  11. Atomic-scale simulations of material behaviors and tribology properties for BCC metal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, D. Aristizabal; P, A. Parra; P, López; E, Restrepo-Parra

    2016-01-01

    This work has two main purposes: (i) introducing the basic concepts of molecular dynamics analysis to material scientists and engineers, and (ii) providing a better understanding of instrumented indentation measurements, presenting an example of nanoindentation and scratch test simulations. To reach these purposes, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoindentation and scratch test technique were carried out for generic thin films that present BCC crystalline structures. Structures were oriented in the plane (100) and placed on FCC diamond substrates. A pair wise potential was employed to simulate the interaction between atoms of each layer and a repulsive radial potential was used to represent a spherical tip indenting the sample. Mechanical properties of this generic material were obtained by varying the indentation depth and dissociation energy. The load-unload curves and coefficient of friction were found for each test; on the other hand, dissociation energy was varied showing a better mechanical response for films that present grater dissociation energy. Structural change evolution was observed presenting vacancies and slips as the depth was varied. Project supported by la DirecciónNacional de Investigación of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, “the Theoretical Study of Physical Properties of Hard Materials for Technological Applications” (Grant No. 20101007903).

  12. Structures of 13-atom clusters of fcc transition metals by ab initio and semiempirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, R. C.; Gallego, L. J.

    2006-11-01

    We report the results of ab initio calculations of the structures and magnetic moments of Ni13 , Pd13 , Pt13 , Cu13 , Ag13 , and Au13 that were performed using a density-functional method that employs linear combinations of pseudoatomic orbitals as basis sets (SIESTA). Our structural results for Pt13 , Cu13 , Ag13 , and Au13 show that a buckled biplanar structure (BBP) is more stable than the icosahedral configuration, in keeping with results obtained recently by Chang and Chou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 133401 (2004)] using the Vienna ab initio simulation package with a plane-wave basis. However, for Ni13 and Pd13 we found that the icosahedral structure is more stable than BBP. For all these clusters, two semiempirical methods based on spherically symmetric potentials both found the icosahedral structure to be the more stable, while the modified embedded atom model method, which uses a direction-dependent potential, found BBP to be the more stable structure. When low-energy structures found in recent ab initio studies of Pt13 , Cu13 , and Au13 other than Chang and Chou were optimized with SIESTA, those reported for Pt13 and Cu13 were found to be less stable than BBP, but the two-dimensional planar configuration reported for Au13 proved to be more stable than BBP.

  13. Single d-metal atoms on F(s) and F(s+) defects of MgO(001): a theoretical study across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Konstantin M; Inntam, Chan; Matveev, Alexei V; Nasluzov, Vladimir A; Rösch, Notker

    2005-08-24

    Single d-metal atoms on oxygen defects F(s) and F(s+) of the MgO(001) surface were studied theoretically. We employed an accurate density functional method combined with cluster models, embedded in an elastic polarizable environment, and we applied two gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. In this way, we quantified how 17 metal atoms from groups 6-11 of the periodic table (Cu, Ag, Au; Ni, Pd, Pt; Co, Rh, Ir; Fe, Ru, Os; Mn, Re; and Cr, Mo, W) interact with terrace sites of MgO. We found bonding with F(s) and F(s+) defects to be in general stronger than that with O2- sites, except for Mn-, Re-, and Fe/F(s) complexes. In M/F(s) systems, electron density is accumulated on the metal center in a notable fashion. The binding energy on both kinds of O defects increases from 3d- to 4d- to 5d-atoms of a given group, at variance with the binding energy trend established earlier for the M/O2- complexes, 4d < 3d < 5d. Regarding the evolution of the binding energy along a period, group 7 atoms are slightly destabilized compared to their group 6 congeners in both the F(s) and F(s+) complexes; for later transition elements, the binding energy increases gradually up to group 10 and finally decreases again in group 11, most strongly on the F(s) site. This trend is governed by the negative charge on the adsorbed atoms. We discuss implications for an experimental detection of metal atoms on oxide supports based on computed core-level energies.

  14. Single d-metal atoms on F(s) and F(s+) defects of MgO(001): a theoretical study across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Konstantin M; Inntam, Chan; Matveev, Alexei V; Nasluzov, Vladimir A; Rösch, Notker

    2005-08-24

    Single d-metal atoms on oxygen defects F(s) and F(s+) of the MgO(001) surface were studied theoretically. We employed an accurate density functional method combined with cluster models, embedded in an elastic polarizable environment, and we applied two gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. In this way, we quantified how 17 metal atoms from groups 6-11 of the periodic table (Cu, Ag, Au; Ni, Pd, Pt; Co, Rh, Ir; Fe, Ru, Os; Mn, Re; and Cr, Mo, W) interact with terrace sites of MgO. We found bonding with F(s) and F(s+) defects to be in general stronger than that with O2- sites, except for Mn-, Re-, and Fe/F(s) complexes. In M/F(s) systems, electron density is accumulated on the metal center in a notable fashion. The binding energy on both kinds of O defects increases from 3d- to 4d- to 5d-atoms of a given group, at variance with the binding energy trend established earlier for the M/O2- complexes, 4d < 3d < 5d. Regarding the evolution of the binding energy along a period, group 7 atoms are slightly destabilized compared to their group 6 congeners in both the F(s) and F(s+) complexes; for later transition elements, the binding energy increases gradually up to group 10 and finally decreases again in group 11, most strongly on the F(s) site. This trend is governed by the negative charge on the adsorbed atoms. We discuss implications for an experimental detection of metal atoms on oxide supports based on computed core-level energies. PMID:16104741

  15. Metal Free Azide-Alkyne Click Reaction: Role of Substituents and Heavy Atom Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sharmistha; Datta, Ayan

    2015-09-01

    Metal free click reactions provide an excellent noninvasive tool to modify and understand the processes in biological systems. Release of ring strain in cyclooctynes on reaction with azides on the formation of triazoles results in small activation energies for various intermolecular Huisgen reactions (1-9). Substitution of difluoro groups at the α, α' position of the cyclooctyne ring enhances the rates of cycloadditions by 10 and 20 times for methyl azide and benzyl azide respectively at room temperature. The computed rate enhancement on difluoro substitution using direct dynamical calculations using the canonical variational transition state theory (CVT/CAG) with small curvature tunneling (SCT) corrections are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. For the intramolecular click reaction (10) notwithstanding its much higher activation energy, quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) enhances the rate of cycloaddition significantly and increases the N(14)/N(15) primary kinetic isotope effect at 298 K. QMT is shown to be rather efficient in 10 due to a thin barrier of ∼2.4 Å. The present study shows that tunneling effects can be significant for intramolecular click reactions.

  16. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y.

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  17. Metal Free Azide-Alkyne Click Reaction: Role of Substituents and Heavy Atom Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sharmistha; Datta, Ayan

    2015-09-01

    Metal free click reactions provide an excellent noninvasive tool to modify and understand the processes in biological systems. Release of ring strain in cyclooctynes on reaction with azides on the formation of triazoles results in small activation energies for various intermolecular Huisgen reactions (1-9). Substitution of difluoro groups at the α, α' position of the cyclooctyne ring enhances the rates of cycloadditions by 10 and 20 times for methyl azide and benzyl azide respectively at room temperature. The computed rate enhancement on difluoro substitution using direct dynamical calculations using the canonical variational transition state theory (CVT/CAG) with small curvature tunneling (SCT) corrections are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. For the intramolecular click reaction (10) notwithstanding its much higher activation energy, quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) enhances the rate of cycloaddition significantly and increases the N(14)/N(15) primary kinetic isotope effect at 298 K. QMT is shown to be rather efficient in 10 due to a thin barrier of ∼2.4 Å. The present study shows that tunneling effects can be significant for intramolecular click reactions. PMID:26264958

  18. [Determination of trace metals in biological materials by iodides extraction and atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, E; Yamamoto, K; Takano, K; Tutumi, M; Uehara, K; Ohno, T; Tasaka, S

    1983-09-01

    Extraction of arsenic, mercury, gold, silver, antimony, indium, bismuth, tellurium, cadmium, zinc and copper iodides with methylisobutylketone was examined in the sulfuric acid of concentrations from 0 to 15 normalities. Although, arsenic and zinc iodides were extracted from 6 to 12 normalities, extraction of other metal-iodides were carried out in more wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations almost from 2 to 12 normalities. Iron, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium iodides, these, being chief biological elements of inorganic substances, were not extracted in the least into methylisobutylketone layer from sulfuric acid solution. Copper and zinc were normal elements of biological materials and were extracted into methylisobutylketone layer by this procedures. The flame interferences of copper and zinc were not recognized in determinations of gold, silver, antimony, indium, bismuth, tellurium and cadmium. To investigate the influences of biological elements, mock solutions of human blood and urine were prepared. The addition of mock blood does not excessively interfere with determinations of arsenic, mercury, indium, bismuth, tellurium, cadmium, silver and antimony with the exception of gold. However, with addition of mock urine negative interferences were strongly seen in antimony determination, while in mercury, indium and silver determinations only slight interferences were observed. To examine the influences of sample preparation techniques, gold, silver, indium, cadmium and copper were treated both by wet ashing (nitric acid and sulfuric acid) and dry ashing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Heat capacity measurements of atoms and molecules adsorbed on evaporated metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, T.W.

    1989-05-01

    Investigations of the properties of absorbed monolayers have received great experimental and theoretical attention recently, both because of the importance of surface processes in practical applications such as catalysis, and the importance of such systems to the understanding of the fundamentals of thermodynamics in two dimensions. We have adapted the composite bolometer technology to the construction of microcalorimeters. For these calorimeters, the adsorption substrate is an evaporated film deposited on one surface of an optically polished sapphire wafer. This approach has allowed us to make the first measurements of the heat capacity of submonolayer films of /sup 4/He adsorbed on metallic films. In contrast to measurements of /sup 4/He adsorbed on all other insulating substrates, we have shown that /sup 4/He on silver films occupies a two-dimensional gas phase over a broad range of coverages and temperatures. Our apparatus has been used to study the heat capacity of Indium flakes. CO multilayers, /sup 4/He adsorbed on sapphire and on Ag films and H/sub 2/ adsorbed on Ag films. The results are compared with appropriate theories. 68 refs., 19 figs.

  20. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, George W

    2015-02-16

    Executive Summary of Final Report for Award DE-FG02-88ER13937 Project Title: Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and its Precursors on Metal Surfaces Applicant/Institution: Columbia University Principal Investigator: George W. Flynn Objectives: The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material. Project Description: Our work treated specifically the surface chemistry aspects of carbon reactions by using proximal probe (atomic scale imaging) techniques to study model systems of graphene that have many features in common with soot forming reactions of importance in combustion flames. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is the main probe technique that we used to study the interfacial structure and chemistry of graphene, mainly because of its ability to elucidate surface structure and dynamics with molecular or even atomic resolution. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), which measures the local density of quantum states over a single