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Sample records for adjacent normal colorectal

  1. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  2. Different expression of calgizzarin (S100A11) in normal colonic epithelium, adenoma and colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Mothes, Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Settmacher, Utz; Von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect proteomic markers usable to distinguish colorectal carcinoma from colon adenoma for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the process of tumourigenesis. Therefore, we microdissected colon carcinoma tissue, epithelial colon adenoma tissue as well as normal adjacent colon epithelium and determined protein profiles by SELDI-TOF MS. A multitude of significantly different signals was detected. For their identification colon biopsis were lysed and subjected to a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for separation. Subsequently, we identified nearly 100 proteins by tryptic digestion, peptide fingerprint mapping and database search. Calgizzarin (S100A11; S100C) identified by peptide fingerprint mapping correlated very well with a significantly differentially expressed signal found in prior protein profiling. Using an immunodepletion assay we confirmed the identity of this signal as calgizzarin. To localise calgizzarin in tissues we performed immunohistochemistry. For further confirmation of the identity of calgizzarin we re-analysed IHC-positive as well as IHC-negative tissue sections on ProteinChip arrays. This work demonstrates that biomarkers in colorectal cancer can be detected, identified and assessed by a proteomic approach comprising tissue-microdissection, protein profiling and immunological techniques. PMID:16327996

  3. Discrimination of serum Raman spectroscopy between normal and colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Yu, Ting; Li, Siqi

    2011-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy of tissues has been widely studied for the diagnosis of various cancers, but biofluids were seldom used as the analyte because of the low concentration. Herein, serum of 30 normal people, 46 colon cancer, and 44 rectum cancer patients were measured Raman spectra and analyzed. The information of Raman peaks (intensity and width) and that of the fluorescence background (baseline function coefficients) were selected as parameters for statistical analysis. Principal component regression (PCR) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were used on the selected parameters separately to see the performance of the parameters. PCR performed better than PLSR in our spectral data. Then linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used on the principal components (PCs) of the two regression method on the selected parameters, and a diagnostic accuracy of 88% and 83% were obtained. The conclusion is that the selected features can maintain the information of original spectra well and Raman spectroscopy of serum has the potential for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  4. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  5. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Tumor, Adjacent, and Normal Tissues of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhenzhu; Shen, Yanting; Lu, Jiafeng; Xie, Xueying; Ge, Qinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major type of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma (AC), one major subtype of NSCLC. In this study, the miRNAs were detected in normal, adjacent, and tumor tissues by next-generation sequencing. Then the expression levels of differential miRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In the results, 259, 401, and 389 miRNAs were detected in tumor, adjacent, and normal tissues of pooled AC samples, respectively. In addition, for the first time we have found that miR-21-5p and miR-196a-5p were gradually upregulated from normal to adjacent to tumor tissues; miR-218-5p was gradually downregulated with 2-fold or greater change in AC tissues. These 3 miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Lastly, we predicted target genes of these 3 miRNAs and enriched the potential functions and regulatory pathways. The aberrant miR-21-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-218-5p may become biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. This research may be useful for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and the study of pathology in lung cancer. PMID:27247934

  6. Cell Budding from Normal Appearing Epithelia: A Predictor of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Cho, William CS; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    . Our most recent studies of human CRC have detected nearly identical focal capsule disruptions, lymphocyte infiltration, budding cells, and the formation of TLCs. Our studies have further shown that age- and type-matched node-positive and -negative CRC have a significantly different morphological and immunohistochemical profile and that the majority of lymphatic ducts with disseminated cells are located within the mucosa adjacent to morphologically normal appearing epithelial structures that express a stem cell-related marker. New hypothesis: Based on these findings and the growth patterns of budding cells revealed by double immunohistochemistry, we further hypothesize that metastatic spread is an early event of carcinogenesis and that budding cells overlying focal capsule disruptions represent invasion- and metastasis-initiating cells that follow one of four pathways to progress: (1) to undergo extensive in situ proliferation leading to the formation of tumor nests that subsequently invade the submucosa, (2) to migrate with associated lymphocytes functioning as “seeds” to grow in new sites, (3) to migrate and intravasate into pre-existing vascular structures by forming TLCs, or (4) to intravasate into vascular structures that are generated by the budding cells themselves. We also propose that only node-positive cases harbor stem cells with the potential for multi-lineage differentiation and unique surface markers that permit intravasation. PMID:23355797

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Zan; Mo, Lin; Wu, Tong; Tan, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is one of the most important tasks of biomedical research and has become the main objective of medical investigations. The present paper proposed an analytical strategy for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues by combining the use of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with chemometrics. The successive projection algorithm-linear discriminant analysis (SPA-LDA) was used to seek a reduced subset of variables/wavenumbers and build a diagnostic model of LDA. For comparison, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based on full-spectrum classification was also used as the reference. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for a preliminary analysis. A total of 186 spectra from 20 patients with partial colorectal resection were collected and divided into three subsets for training, optimizing, and testing the model. The results showed that, compared to PLS-DA, SPA-LDA provided more parsimonious model using only three wavenumbers/variables (4065, 4173, and 5758 cm(-1)) to achieve the sensitivity of 84.6%, 92.3%, and 92.3% for the training, validation, and test sets, respectively, and the specificity of 100% for each subset. It indicated that the combination of NIR spectroscopy and SPA-LDA algorithm can serve as a potential tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues. PMID:25654106

  8. Filtrating colorectal cancer associated genes by integrated analyses of global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in cancer and normal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Gao, Fei; Xia, Yudong; Tang, Yi; Zhao, Wei; Jin, Congcong; Luo, Huijuan; Wang, Junwen; Li, Qingshu; Wang, Yalan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine patterning across the tumor genome was considered as a hallmark of cancer development and progression. However, locus-specific difference of hydroxymethylation between colorectal cancer and normal tissue is unknown. In this study, we performed a newly developed method, HMST-seq, to profile 726 aberrant methylated loci and 689 aberrant hydroxymethylated loci synchronously in genome wide of colorectal cancers, majority of which presented higher methylation or lower hydroxymethylationin than in normal group. Besides, abnormal hydroxymethylated modification was more frequently occur at proximal regions close to TSSs and TSSs regions than abnormal methylation. Subsequently, we screened four genes (ALOX15, GHRHR, TFPI2 and TKTL1) with aberrant methylation and aberrant hydroxymethylation at some genome position by functional enrichment analysis as candidate genes associated with colorectal cancer. Our results may allow us to select differentially epigenetically modified target genes implicated in colorectal cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:27546520

  9. Distinctive Glycerophospholipid Profiles of Human Seminoma and Adjacent Normal Tissues by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Mattarozzi, Monica; Cheng, Liang; Beck, Stephen D. W.; Bianchi, Federica; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-08-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been successfully used to discriminate between normal and cancerous human tissue from different anatomical sites. On the basis of this, DESI-MS imaging was used to characterize human seminoma and adjacent normal tissue. Seminoma and adjacent normal paired human tissue sections (40 tissues) from 15 patients undergoing radical orchiectomy were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen and sectioned to 15 μm thickness and thaw mounted to glass slides. The entire sample was two-dimensionally analyzed by the charged solvent spray to form a molecular image of the biological tissue. DESI-MS images were compared with formalin-fixed, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides of the same material. Increased signal intensity was detected for two seminolipids [seminolipid (16:0/16:0) and seminolipid (30:0)] in the normal tubule testis tissue; these compounds were undetectable in seminoma tissue, as well as from the surrounding fat, muscle, and blood vessels. A glycerophosphoinositol [PI(18:0/20:4)] was also found at increased intensity in the normal testes tubule tissue when compared with seminoma tissue. Ascorbic acid (i.e., vitamin C) was found at increased amounts in seminoma tissue when compared with normal tissue. DESI-MS analysis was successfully used to visualize the location of several types of molecules across human seminoma and normal tissues. Discrimination between seminoma and adjacent normal testes tubules was achieved on the basis of the spatial distributions and varying intensities of particular lipid species as well as ascorbic acid. The increased presence of ascorbic acid within seminoma compared with normal seminiferous tubules was previously unknown.

  10. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  11. Effects of supplemental vitamin D and calcium on normal colon tissue and circulating biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Roberd M

    2015-04-01

    This brief review, based on an invited presentation at the 17th Workshop on Vitamin D, is to summarize a line of the author's research that has been directed at the intertwined missions of clarifying and/or developing vitamin D and calcium as preventive agents against colorectal cancer in humans, understanding the mechanisms by which these agents may reduce risk for the disease, and developing 'treatable' biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. The biological plausibility and observational and clinical trial evidence for vitamin D and calcium in reducing risk for colorectal neoplasms, the development of pre-neoplastic biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms, and the clinical trial findings from the author's research group on the efficacy of vitamin D and calcium in modulating these biomarkers are summarized. Regarding the latter, we tested the efficacy of 800 IU (20μg) of vitamin D3 and 2.0g of calcium daily, alone and combined vs. placebo over 6 months on modulating normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial design clinical trial (n=92). The tissue-based biomarkers were measured in biopsies of normal-appearing rectal mucosa using immunohistochemistry with quantitative image analysis, and a panel of circulating inflammation markers was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA). Statistically significant proportional tissue increases in the vitamin D group relative to the placebo group were found in bax (51%), p21 (141%), APC (48%), E-cadherin (78%), MSH2 (179%), the CaSR (39%), and CYP27B1 (159%). In blood, there was a 77% statistically significant decrease in a summary inflammation z-score. The findings for calcium were similar to those for vitamin D. These findings indicate that supplemental vitamin D3 or calcium can favorably modulate multiple normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal

  12. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  13. Differential expression of the Na+/I− symporter protein in thyroid cancer and adjacent normal and nodular goiter tissues

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHASHA; LIANG, JUN; LIN, YANSONG; YAO, RUYONG

    2013-01-01

    The ability of differentiated thyroid cancer and adjacent thyroid cells to concentrate iodine is dependent on their expression of a functional NA+/I− symporter (NIS). Thyroid cancer is insensitive to 131I treatment if the thyroid cells lack the ability to concentrate iodide. Thus, in this study, we aimed to determine whether the NIS protein was differentially expressed in thyroid cancer and various surrounding tissues. We recruited 114 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and divided them into two groups: 60 patients of 9 males and 51 females with a mean age of 49.55 years who had PTC with surrounding nodular goiter tissue (simplified as GNG), and 54 patients of 8 males and 46 females with a mean age of 45.78 years who had PTC with surrounding normal tissue (Gnormal) after total or near total thyroidectomy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections were prepared for immunohistochemical staining of the NIS protein and semi-quantitative analysis. The NIS protein was expressed in the basolateral membrane of the normal epithelium, while PTC and nodular goiter cells expressed NIS in the cytoplasm and basolateral membrane. The expression levels of the NIS protein were higher in the adjacent normal tissues compared with those of the surrounding nodular goiter tissues (P=0.002) and expression levels of the NIS protein were higher in PTC tissues compared with the surrounding nodular goiter tissues (P=0.008). The data from this study indicate that cancer-surrounding tissues may play a significant role in mediating the sensitivity of PTC patients to radioactive iodine treatment. PMID:23255951

  14. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  15. A quantitative study of silver-stained NORs in different segments of the normal human colorectal crypt.

    PubMed Central

    Morais, M; Dockery, P; White, F H

    1996-01-01

    Quantification of silver-stained nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs) in paraffin sections may provide clues about the proliferation and differentiation in normal and neoplastic tissues. The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether AgNOR quantification could provide useful data about proliferation in the different segments of the normal human colorectal crypt. Samples of histologically 'normal' large intestine (n = 8) were obtained from colorectal cancer resections at a distance of > 5 cm from the tumour margins and were routinely processed for paraffin embedding using strictly standardised procedures. Sections were cut and stained with a one-stage silver colloid impregnation technique. The longitudinally sectioned crypts were divided into proliferative (P), intermediate (I) and surface (S) segments using strict criteria. Clearly defined AgNORs, which appeared as black dots within the nuclear profile, were quantified from each segment for volume density (Vv) and number per unit area (NA) estimates using traditional point-counting techniques. A 1-way analysis of variance followed by Scheffe's test indicated significant progressive reductions of AgNOR Vv and NA from P to S segments. Our data suggest that both volume and frequency of AgNORs may be related to cellular proliferation since both parameters are highest in the P segment. The further exploitation of stereological tools in conjunction with AgNOR staining may be valuable in assessing normal differentiation and proliferation patterns and in predicting the biological behaviour of neoplastic tissues in which increased proliferation is a feature. Images Fig PMID:8763469

  16. MnTnBuOE-2-PyP protects normal colorectal fibroblasts from radiation damage and simultaneously enhances radio/chemotherapeutic killing of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kosmacek, Elizabeth A.; Chatterjee, Arpita; Tong, Qiang; Lin, Chi; Oberley, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Manganese porphyrins have been shown to be potent radioprotectors in a variety of cancer models. However, the mechanism as to how these porphyrins protect normal tissues from radiation damage still remains largely unknown. In the current study, we determine the effects of the manganese porphyrin, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP, on primary colorectal fibroblasts exposed to irradiation. We found that 2 Gy of radiation enhances the fibroblasts' ability to contract a collagen matrix, increases cell size and promotes cellular senesence. Treating fibroblasts with MnTnBuOE-2-PyP significantly inhibited radiation-induced collagen contraction, preserved cell morphology and also inhibited cellular senescence. We further showed that MnTnBuOE-2-PyP enhanced the overall viability of the fibroblasts following exposure to radiation but did not protect colorectal cancer cell viability. Specifically, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP in combination with irradiation, caused a significant decrease in tumor clonogenicity. Since locally advanced rectal cancers are treated with chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery and non-metastatic anal cancers are treated with chemoradiation therapy, we also investigated the effects of MnTnBuOE-2-PyP in combination with radiation, 5-fluorouracil with and without Mitomycin C. We found that MnTnBuOE-2-PyP in combination with Mitomycin C or 5-fluorouracil further enhances those compounds' ability to suppress tumor cell growth. When MnTnBuOE-2-PyP was combined with the two chemotherapeutics and radiation, we observed the greatest reduction in tumor cell growth. Therefore, these studies indicate that MnTnBuOE-2-PyP could be used as a potent radioprotector for normal tissue, while at the same time enhancing radiation and chemotherapy treatment for rectal and anal cancers. PMID:27119354

  17. Comparison of human colorectal normal tissue with cancerous tissue autofluorescence image by optical sectioning with a confocal laser-scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Chia, Teck-Chee; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Diong, Cheong Hoong; Tang, Choong Leong; Choen, Francis S.; Krishnan, Shankar M.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated normal and cancerous human colorectal tissues (fresh thick biopsy specimens) using Olympus Confocal laser scanning biological microscope (FV300). The different layers of autofluorescence images of the specimen were captured by 488 nm laser scanning and sectioning. Optical sectioning can be performed in the vertical plane. Laser scanning can be performed in the horizontal plane. By comparing the autofluorescence image of the normal colorectal tissue with cancerous tissue, the structures of the optical sectioning image layer were found to be significantly different. We have also obtained fibrous autofluorescence image inside tissue specimen. Our investigation may help provide some useful insight to other autofluorescence research studies like laser induced autofluorescence spectra of human colorectal tissue study as a diagnosis technique for clinical application.

  18. Comparative study of trace elements in normal and cancerous colorectal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.C.; Apostolidis, N.S.; Romanos, A.N.; Paradellis, T.P.

    1983-08-01

    Quantitative study of the Zn, Cu, K, Rb, Mn, Pb and Ni trace elements by the x-ray fluorescence method in normal and cancerous tissue samples, obtained from 18 patients suffering from cancer of the colon and rectum, shows that cancerous tissues exhibit statistically higher K, Rb, and Cu concentration than corresponding normal tissues. There are evidences that also Ni and Pb are elevated in cancerous tissues. Finally Zn and Mn do not show any appreciable difference in normal and cancerous tissues.

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  20. Discrimination of normal and colorectal cancer using Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Deli; Wang, Yue

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) and Raman spectrum of serum for diagnosis of colon cancer and rectum cancer were investigated in this paper. The aim of this study was that using Raman spectrum and LIF analysis the serum of colon cancer and rectum cancer for found the difference compared to normal, the difference was found. For example: the intensity and red shift both different In this paper we investigated 82 colon cancers, 69 rectum cancers and obtained 80.7%, 82.5% accuracy to rectum cancer and colon cancer separately compared to clinical diagnostic. It is exploring that use Raman spectrum and LIF to detection of cancer.

  1. Assessment of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling in paired colorectal cancer and normal colon tissue samples using computer-aided immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Wells; Oppenheimer, Darin; Peralba, Josep; Sebastiani, Valeria; Amador, Maria; Jimeno, Antonio; Embuscado, Erlinda; Hidalgo, Manuel; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine

    2005-12-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) plays a role in multiple tumor cell processes and is targeted by several anticancer therapies. Although EGFR mutations may determine tumor susceptibility in a small proportion of patients, knowledge of the EGFR signaling pathway status in tumors may help guide further drug development and hypothesis-driven combination studies. We aimed to validate and apply a novel computer-aided immunohistochemical (IHC) technique to characterize the status of EGFR signaling in matched colorectal tumor and normal colon tissue samples. Tissue Microarrays (TMA)were made from both cancerous and normal colorectal tissue in 18 patients and stained with antibodies against EGFR, phospho-EGFR (pEGFR), Akt, pAkt, MAPK, and pMAPK. TMA's were quantitatively scored using the Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS II, Chromavision, Inc). ACIS was compared against cell line Western blotting, ELISA, and visual scoring (0-3+) by a pathologist. We found that ACIS analysis was highly reproducible and results were well correlated with other techniques. A post-scan "image microdissection" technique of analyzing heterogeneous human samples showed good correlation between paired human samples [Pearson correlation for tumors, 0.922 (p < .001)]. Cancer samples had markedly higher staining of pEGFR, Akt, pAkt, MAPK, and pMAPK. We conclude that ACIS IHC of human tissue samples is quantitative, reproducible, and correlates with Western blots and ELISA in cell line pellets as well as pathologist's scores of human samples. Colorectal tumors show higher staining of pEGFR and downstream effectors compared to matched normal colorectal tissues.

  2. Tumor-induced solid stress activates β-catenin signaling to drive malignant behavior in normal, tumor-adjacent cells

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guanqing; Weaver, Valerie Marie

    2016-01-01

    Recent work by Fernández-Sánchez and coworkers examining the impact of applied pressure on the malignant phenotype of murine colon tissue in vivo revealed that mechanical perturbations can drive malignant behavior in genetically normal cells. Their findings build upon an existing understanding of how the mechanical cues experienced by cells within a tissue become progressively modified as the tissue transforms. Using magnetically stimulated ultra-magnetic liposomes to mimic tumor growth -induced solid stress, Fernández-Sánchez and coworkers were able to stimulate β-catenin to promote the cancerous behavior of both a normal and genetically modified colon epithelium. In this perspective, we discuss their findings in the context of what is currently known regarding the role of the mechanical landscape in cancer progression and β-catenin as a mechanotransducer. We review data that suggest that mechanically regulated activation of β-catenin fosters development of a malignant phenotype in tissue and predict that mechanical cues may contribute to tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26439949

  3. Correlation of circular RNA abundance with proliferation – exemplified with colorectal and ovarian cancer, idiopathic lung fibrosis, and normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Reiner, Agnes T.; Auer, Katharina; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Bachleitner-Hofmann, Thomas; Mesteri, Ildiko; Grunt, Thomas W.; Zeillinger, Robert; Pils, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Circular RNAs are a recently (re-)discovered abundant RNA species with presumed function as miRNA sponges, thus part of the competing endogenous RNA network. We analysed the expression of circular and linear RNAs and proliferation in matched normal colon mucosa and tumour tissues. We predicted >1,800 circular RNAs and proved the existence of five randomly chosen examples using RT-qPCR. Interestingly, the ratio of circular to linear RNA isoforms was always lower in tumour compared to normal colon samples and even lower in colorectal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, this ratio correlated negatively with the proliferation index. The correlation of global circular RNA abundance (the circRNA index) and proliferation was validated in a non-cancerous proliferative disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, ovarian cancer cells compared to cultured normal ovarian epithelial cells, and 13 normal human tissues. We are the first to report a global reduction of circular RNA abundance in colorectal cancer cell lines and cancer compared to normal tissues and discovered a negative correlation of global circular RNA abundance and proliferation. This negative correlation seems to be a general principle in human tissues as validated with three different settings. Finally, we present a simple model how circular RNAs could accumulate in non-proliferating cells. PMID:25624062

  4. Lipid Profiles of Canine Invasive Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder and Adjacent Normal Tissue by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Allison L.; Ifa, Demian R.; Manicke, Nicholas E.; Costa, Anthony B.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Knapp, Deborah W.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2009-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used in an imaging mode to interrogate the lipid profiles of thin tissue sections of canine spontaneous invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder (a model of human invasive bladder cancer) as well as adjacent normal tissue from four different dogs. The glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids that appear as intense signals in both the negative ion and positive ion modes were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) product ion scans using collision-induced dissociation. Differences in the relative distributions of the lipid species were present between the tumor and adjacent normal tissue in both the negative and positive ion modes. DESI-MS images showing the spatial distributions of particular glycerophospholipids, sphinoglipids and free fatty acids in both the negative and positive ion modes were compared to serial tissue sections that were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Increased absolute and relative intensities for at least five different glycerophospholipids and three free fatty acids in the negative ion mode and at least four different lipid species in the positive ion mode were seen in the tumor region of the samples in all four dogs. In addition, one sphingolipid species exhibited increased signal intensity in the positive ion mode in normal tissue relative to the diseased tissue. Principal component analysis (PCA) was also used to generate unsupervised statistical images from the negative ion mode data and these images are in excellent agreement with the DESI images obtained from the selected ions and also the H&E stained tissue PMID:19810710

  5. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  6. Ki-67 Expression in Sclerosing Adenosis and Adjacent Normal Breast Terminal Ductal Lobular Units: A Nested Case-Control Study from the Mayo Benign Breast Disease Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Aziza; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Stallings-Mann, Melody L.; Degnim, Amy C.; Radisky, Derek C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Visscher, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sclerosing adenosis (SA) increases risk for invasive breast cancer (BC) 2.1 times relative to that in the general population. Here, we sought to evaluate whether the proliferation marker Ki-67 stratifies risk among women with SA. Methods A nested case-control sample of patients with SA was obtained from the Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort. Ki-67 expression was evaluated in SA lesions and in the adjacent normal terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) in women who did (cases, n =133) or did not (controls, n =239) develop BC. Ki67 was scored by intensity and number of positively stained cells per one high-power field (magnification, ×40) (40×HPF) for both SA and normal TDLU. Associations of Ki-67 expression with case-control status were assessed using conditional logistic regression. Results Higher Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with case-control status in both SA (P=.03) and normal background TDLU (P=.006). For the SA lesion, >2 average positively stained cells/40×HPF showed an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.1–3.4) compared to samples with an average of ≤2 positively stained cells. For background TDLU, lobules with >2 but ≤6 average positively stained cells showed an adjusted OR of 1.3 to 1.5, whereas those with an average of >6 positively stained cells had an OR of 2.4 (95% CI, 1.1–5.3) compared to those with an average of <2 positively stained cells. Conclusions Among women with SA, increased Ki-67 expression in either the SA lesion or the normal background TDLU carried an approximately 2-fold increased odds of subsequent BC as compared to lower Ki-67 expression. PMID:25863475

  7. DEK over expression as an independent biomarker for poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The DEK protein is related to chromatin reconstruction and gene transcription, and plays an important role in cell apoptosis. High expression levels of the human DEK gene have been correlated with numerous human malignancies. This study explores the roles of DEK in tumor progression and as a prognostic determinant of colorectal cancer. Methods Colorectal cancer specimens from 109 patients with strict follow-up, and colorectal adenomas from 52 patients were selected for analysis of DEK protein by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between DEK over expression and the clinicopathological features of colorectal cancers were evaluated by Chi-square test and Fisher’s exact tests. The survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the relationship between prognostic factors and patient survival was also analyzed by the Cox proportional hazard models. Results DEK protein showed a nuclear immunohistochemical staining pattern in colorectal cancers. The strongly positive rate of DEK protein was 48.62% (53/109) in colorectal cancers, which was significantly higher than that in either adjacent normal colon mucosa (9.17%, 10/109) or colorectal adenomas (13.46%, 7/52). DEK over expression in colorectal cancers was positively correlated with tumor size, grade, lymph node metastasis, serosal invasion, late stage, and disease-free survival- and 5-year survival rates. Further analysis showed that patients with late stage colorectal cancer and high DEK expression had worse survival rates than those with low DEK expression. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed high DEK expression, serosal invasion, and late stage are significant independent risk factors for mortality in colorectal cancer. Conclusions DEK plays an important role in the progression of colorectal cancers and it is an independent poor prognostic factor of colorectal cancers. PMID:23902796

  8. Expression and clinical significance of Sirt1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    YU, DENG-FENG; JIANG, SU-JUAN; PAN, ZHI-PENG; CHENG, WEI-DONG; ZHANG, WEN-JUN; YAO, XIAO-KUN; LI, YU-CHENG; LUN, YONG-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the expression of Silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) in colorectal cancer and peritumoral normal mucosa tissue, and therefore analyze the role and molecular mechanism of Sirt1 in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer tissue specimens were employed as the experimental group, and adjacent normal mucosa tissues >5 cm from tumor lesions were used as the control group. The expression of Sirt1 was detected by the immunohistochemical streptavidin peroxidase detection method in paraffin-embedded sections, whilst Sirt1 protein expression was examined by western blot analysis in the fresh tissues. Sirt1 protein was primarily expressed in the nuclei of the tumor cells, and positive staining was brownish-yellow in color. The relative expression quantities of Sirt1 in the peritumoral normal rectal mucosa and rectal carcinoma were 1.15 and 2.62, and the differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). The expression level of Sirt1 in colorectal carcinoma was significantly associated with the depth of tumor invasion, differentiation and tumor size (P<0.05). Sirt1 expression was also found to be associated with tumor tissue type, lymph node metastasis, Duke's stage and patient age. These characteristics combined may therefore be used as markers for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26893713

  9. Fusobacterium in colonic flora and molecular features of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromu; Maruyama, Reo; Chung, Woonbok; Garriga, Judith; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Yamano, Hiro-o; Sugai, Tamotsu; An, Byonggu; Shureiqi, Imad; Toyota, Minoru; Kondo, Yutaka; Estécio, Marcos R H; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2014-03-01

    Fusobacterium species are part of the gut microbiome in humans. Recent studies have identified overrepresentation of Fusobacterium in colorectal cancer tissues, but it is not yet clear whether this is pathogenic or simply an epiphenomenon. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between Fusobacterium status and molecular features in colorectal cancers through quantitative real-time PCR in 149 colorectal cancer tissues, 89 adjacent normal appearing mucosae and 72 colonic mucosae from cancer-free individuals. Results were correlated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status, microsatellite instability (MSI), and mutations in BRAF, KRAS, TP53, CHD7, and CHD8. Whole-exome capture sequencing data were also available in 11 cases. Fusobacterium was detectable in 111 of 149 (74%) colorectal cancer tissues and heavily enriched in 9% (14/149) of the cases. As expected, Fusobacterium was also detected in normal appearing mucosae from both cancer and cancer-free individuals, but the amount of bacteria was much lower compared with colorectal cancer tissues (a mean of 250-fold lower for Pan-fusobacterium). We found the Fusobacterium-high colorectal cancer group (FB-high) to be associated with CIMP positivity (P = 0.001), TP53 wild-type (P = 0.015), hMLH1 methylation positivity (P = 0.0028), MSI (P = 0.018), and CHD7/8 mutation positivity (P = 0.002). Among the 11 cases where whole-exome sequencing data were available, two that were FB-high cases also had the highest number of somatic mutations (a mean of 736 per case in FB-high vs. 225 per case in all others). Taken together, our findings show that Fusobacterium enrichment is associated with specific molecular subsets of colorectal cancers, offering support for a pathogenic role in colorectal cancer for this gut microbiome component.

  10. Mucosal adherent bacterial dysbiosis in patients with colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Chen, Jing; Zheng, Junyuan; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Jingjing; Huang, Chunlan; Lou, Lihong; Wang, Xingpeng; Zeng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the gut microbiota is involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). The composition of gut microbiota in CRC precursors has not been adequately described. To characterize the structure of adherent microbiota in this disease, we conducted pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes to determine the bacterial profile of normal colons (healthy controls) and colorectal adenomas (CRC precursors). Adenoma mucosal biopsy samples and adjacent normal colonic mucosa from 31 patients with adenomas and 20 healthy volunteers were profiled using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) showed structural segregation between colorectal adenomatous tissue and control tissue. Alpha diversity estimations revealed higher microbiota diversity in samples from patients with adenomas. Taxonomic analysis illustrated that abundance of eight phyla (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Candidate-division TM7, and Tenericutes) was significantly different. In addition, Lactococcus and Pseudomonas were enriched in preneoplastic tissue, whereas Enterococcus, Bacillus, and Solibacillus were reduced. However, both PCoA and cluster tree analyses showed similar microbiota structure between adenomatous and adjacent non-adenoma tissues. These present findings provide preliminary experimental evidence supporting that colorectal preneoplastic lesion may be the most important factor leading to alterations in bacterial community composition. PMID:27194068

  11. TNF-{alpha} similarly induces IL-6 and MCP-1 in fibroblasts from colorectal liver metastases and normal liver fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Lars; Seggern, Lena von; Schumacher, Jennifer; Goumas, Freya; Wilms, Christian; Braun, Felix; Broering, Dieter C.

    2010-07-02

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the predominant cell type of the neoplastic stroma of solid tumors, yet their biology and functional specificity for cancer pathogenesis remain unclear. We show here that primary CAFs from colorectal liver metastases express several inflammatory, tumor-enhancing factors, including interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Both molecules were intensely induced by TNF-{alpha} on the transcript and protein level, whereas PDGF-BB, TGF-{beta}1 and EGF showed no significant effects. To verify their potential specialization for metastasis progression, CAFs were compared to fibroblasts from non-tumor liver tissue. Interestingly, these liver fibroblasts (LFs) displayed similar functions. Further analyses revealed a comparable up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by TNF-{alpha}, and of alpha-smooth muscle actin, by TGF-{beta}1. Moreover, the proliferation of both cell types was induced by PDGF-BB, and CAFs and LFs displayed an equivalent migration towards HT29 colon cancer cells in Boyden chamber assays. In conclusion, colorectal liver metastasis may be supported by CAFs and resident fibroblastic cells competent to generate a prometastatic microenvironment through inflammatory activation of IL-6 and MCP-1.

  12. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  13. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC.

  14. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27590114

  15. Mutation of the nm23-H1 gene has a non-dominant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    JIN, YUELING; DAI, ZHENSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Nm23-H1 is a metastasis suppressor gene, which is has a reduced expression in patients with digestive system cancer. However, the mechanistic basis for the genetic instability remains unknown. To study the expression of the nm23-H1 gene in patients with colorectal cancer, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism was used to analyze any point mutation, and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of nm23-H1. Results revealed that all 63 specimens of Chinese human colorectal cancer tissues exhibit no point mutation. Among those 63 specimens, 19 (30%) exhibited positive immunostaining for the nm23-H1 protein and 44 (70%) exhibited negative immunostaining. These observations suggested that the protein and gene expression levels of nm23-H1 are reduced in colorectal cancer compared with the adjacent normal tissues, and the point mutation in the nm23-H1 gene is not the dominant cause of metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27330777

  16. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  17. Differential expression of mucins in Middle Eastern patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    AL-KHAYAL, KHAYAL; ABDULLA, MAHA; AL-OBAID, OMAR; ZUBAIDI, AHMAD; VAALI-MOHAMMED, MANSOOR-ALI; ALSHEIKH, ABDULMALIK; AHMAD, REHAN

    2016-01-01

    Mucin overexpression has been implicated in the tumorigenesis and progression of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, data obtained on the prognostic importance of mucin expression in CRC is inconsistent. Due to lack of data on mucin expression and the increase in CRC incidence in Saudi Arabia, the aim of the present study was to analyze the mucin expression profile in patients with CRC in this ethnic group. The present study consisted of 22 patients that underwent surgery for CRC. Histopathological and immunohistochemical staining was performed on CRC tumor and adjacent normal tissues. A tissue microarray was prepared from the tumor and normal adjacent samples to investigate the mucin expression profile using immunohistochemistry. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer tissues were immunostained with mucin 1 (MUC1), mucin 2 (MUC2) and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) antibodies. Associations between mucin expression and histopathological variables were evaluated. The present study indicated that MUC1 was highly expressed in early (stage I and II; P=0.0016) and late (stage III and IV; P<0.0001) stage CRC tissues compared to normal adjacent tissues. However, MUC2 expression was observed to be downregulated in early and late stage CRC tissues compared to normal and adjacent tissues. Furthermore, serum MUC1 levels were observed to be increased in early and late stage CRC. The present findings indicate that MUC1 expression was significantly higher in early and late stage CRC tissues and MUC2 was downregulated in CRC tissues compared with normal adjacent tissues, and serum MUC1 protein was significantly higher in CRC patients compared to control serum. In conclusion, during colorectal tumorigenesis the pattern of MUC1 and MUC2 expression is altered in Saudi Arabian patients with CRC compared with normal. A higher expression of MUC1 may be used as an independent biomarker in various stages of CRC tumors, which would aid in the early detection of CRC. PMID:27347157

  18. MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Ticha, Ivana; Haapaniemi, Staffan; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process encompassing genetic alterations. The oncoprotein AEG-1, encoded by the MTDH gene, was shown previously to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants in tumor tissue, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. The corresponding normal colorectal tissue was analyzed in the carriers of exonic variant to confirm germline or somatic origin. We detected 42 intronic variants, where 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found 8 exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C > G-germline) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA-somatic, c.1340dupA-unknown origin, c.1731delA-unknown origin), were novel. In silico prediction analyses suggested four deleterious variants (c.232G > T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA, and c.1731delA). There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. We described several novel exonic and intronic variants of the MTDH gene. The detection of likely pathogenic truncating mutations and alterations in functional protein domains indicate their clinical significance, although none of the variants had prognostic potential. PMID:26983693

  19. The expression and correlation of SIRT1 and Phospho-SIRT1 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianzhen; Chen, Suiqin; Cheng, Meili; Cao, Fangli; Cheng, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    SIRT1 is the homologue of sir2 in mammals, which is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) dependent histone deacetylase. SIRT1 is involved in many physiological processes, such as metabolism, senescence, inflammatory response, neuroprotection, and tumorigenesis by acetylating histones and multiple transcription factors. However, the exact role of SIRT1 in tumor is still under controversial. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were performed to investigate the expressions and subcellular localizations of SIRT1 and Phospho-SIRT1 in colorectal cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues. The relationship between SIRT1 or Phospho-SIRT1 and clinicopathological characteristics was also analyzed. Real-Time PCR was performed to investigate the transcriptional level of SIRT1 mRNA in colorectal cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues. SIRT1 and Phospho-SIRT1 were both localized in the nucleus. The expressions of SIRT1 and Phospho-SIRT1 were higher in colorectal cancer tissues than normal tissues. SIRT1 expression in cancer tissues was associated with patient age, TNM stage and mutant P53 loss. Phospho-SIRT1 expression in cancer tissues was associated with Ki67. SIRT1 and Phospho-SIRT1 were highly correlated in cancer tissues and normal tissues. The ratios of Phospho-SIRT1 and SIRT1 expression in cancer tissues were higher than normal tissues. SIRT1 mRNA level was no significant difference in cancer tissues and normal tissues. SIRT1 have a dual character in colorectal cancer, and Phospho-SIRT1 may determine the role of SIRT1 in colorectal cancer formation. PMID:25785061

  20. Aberrant gene expression in mucosa adjacent to tumor reveals a molecular crosstalk in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A colorectal tumor is not an isolated entity growing in a restricted location of the body. The patient’s gut environment constitutes the framework where the tumor evolves and this relationship promotes and includes a complex and tight correlation of the tumor with inflammation, blood vessels formation, nutrition, and gut microbiome composition. The tumor influence in the environment could both promote an anti-tumor or a pro-tumor response. Methods A set of 98 paired adjacent mucosa and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 50 colon mucosa from healthy donors (246 samples in total) were included in this work. RNA extracted from each sample was hybridized in Affymetrix chips Human Genome U219. Functional relationships between genes were inferred by means of systems biology using both transcriptional regulation networks (ARACNe algorithm) and protein-protein interaction networks (BIANA software). Results Here we report a transcriptomic analysis revealing a number of genes activated in adjacent mucosa from CRC patients, not activated in mucosa from healthy donors. A functional analysis of these genes suggested that this active reaction of the adjacent mucosa was related to the presence of the tumor. Transcriptional and protein-interaction networks were used to further elucidate this response of normal gut in front of the tumor, revealing a crosstalk between proteins secreted by the tumor and receptors activated in the adjacent colon tissue; and vice versa. Remarkably, Slit family of proteins activated ROBO receptors in tumor whereas tumor-secreted proteins transduced a cellular signal finally activating AP-1 in adjacent tissue. Conclusions The systems-level approach provides new insights into the micro-ecology of colorectal tumorogenesis. Disrupting this intricate molecular network of cell-cell communication and pro-inflammatory microenvironment could be a therapeutic target in CRC patients. PMID:24597571

  1. QuickView video preview software of colon capsule endoscopy: reliability in presenting colorectal polyps as compared to normal mode reading.

    PubMed

    Farnbacher, Michael J; Krause, Horst H; Hagel, Alexander F; Raithel, Martin; Neurath, Markus F; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) proved to be highly sensitive in detection of colorectal polyps (CP). Major limitation is the time-consuming video reading. The aim of this prospective, double-center study was to assess the theoretical time-saving potential and its possible impact on the reliability of "QuickView" (QV), in the presentation of CP as compared to normal mode (NM). METHODS. During NM reading of 65 CCE videos (mean patient´s age 56 years), all frames showing CPs were collected and compared to the number of frames presented by QV at increasing QV settings (10, 20, ... 80%). Reliability of QV in presenting polyps <6 mm and ≥6 mm (significant polyp), and identifying patients for subsequent therapeutic colonoscopy, capsule egestion rate, cleansing level, and estimated time-saving potential were assessed. RESULTS. At a 30% QV setting, the QV video presented 89% of the significant polyps and 86% of any polyps with ≥1 frame (per-polyp analysis) identified in NM before. At a 10% QV setting, 98% of the 52 patients with significant polyps could be identified (per-patient analysis) by QV video analysis. Capsule excretion rate was 74% and colon cleanliness was adequate in 85%. QV´s presentation rate correlates to the QV setting, the polyp size, and the number of frames per finding. CONCLUSIONS. Depending on its setting, the reliability of QV in presenting CP as compared to NM reading is notable. However, if no significant polyp is presented by QV, NM reading must be performed afterwards. The reduction of frames to be analyzed in QV might speed up identification of candidates for therapeutic colonoscopy. PMID:24325660

  2. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cianchi, Fabio; Cortesini, Camillo; Fantappiè, Ornella; Messerini, Luca; Schiavone, Nicola; Vannacci, Alfredo; Nistri, Silvia; Sardi, Iacopo; Baroni, Gianna; Marzocca, Cosimo; Perna, Federico; Mazzanti, Roberto; Bechi, Paolo; Masini, Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the potential involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, we correlated the expression and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with the degree of tumor angiogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa were obtained from 46 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemical expression of iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31 was analyzed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. iNOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were assessed by specific biochemical assays. iNOS protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. iNOS and VEGF mRNA levels were evaluated using Northern blot analysis. Both iNOS and VEGF expressions correlated significantly with intratumor microvessel density (rs = 0.31, P = 0.02 and rs = 0.67, P < 0.0001, respectively). A significant correlation was also found between iNOS and VEGF expression (P = 0.001). iNOS activity and cyclic GMP production were significantly higher in the cancer specimens than in the normal mucosa (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively), as well as in metastatic tumors than in nonmetastatic ones (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Western and Northern blot analyses confirmed the up-regulation of the iNOS protein and gene in the tumor specimens as compared with normal mucosa. NO seems to play a role in colorectal cancer growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:12598314

  3. PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Shi, Jian-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Rui; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Ya-Chao; Wei, Teng-Yao; Gao, Ying; Li, Wei; Tang, Hong-Ying; Tang, Mei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the PAQR3 gene expression and its methylation level in colorectal cancer tissues, as well as the association with colorectal cancer clinical data. In total, 54 cases of colorectal cancer tissue samples and normal adjacent tissue samples were collected between June, 2013 and July, 2014. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to detect the mRNA and protein levels of PAQR3 in colorectal samples, respectively. MSP was used to detect the methylation level of PAQR3 gene in colorectal samples, which was compared with colorectal data. The results showed that a decreased expression level of PAQR3 mRNA in colorectal cancer tissues and the expression reduction rate was 57.4% (31/54). Similarly, the expression level of PAQR3 protein was reduced in cancer tissues, and the reduction rate was 46.3% (25/54), while the protein expression reduction rate in cancer adjacent tissue was 5.6% (3/54), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Furthermore, the methylation rates of PAQR3 in cancer tissues and cancer adjacent tissues were 33.3% (18/54) and 5.6% (3/54), respectively. In addition, PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels in colorectal cancer tissues were associated with the differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. The methylation level of PAQR3 was associated with age, differentiated degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In conclusion, the expression of PAQR3 mRNA and protein in colorectal cancer was reduced and methylation of PAQR3 occurred. Although the PAQR3 mRNA and protein levels were not associated with gender, age or the location of tumor, there was an association with differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. In addition, the methylation level of PAQR3 was not correlated with gender or tumor location, but was correlated with age, differentiation degree, lymphatic metastasis and tumor infiltration depth. PMID:27588124

  4. Distribution of Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in primary colorectal cancer and secondary colorectal liver metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ebraheem, A.; Mersov, A.; Gurusamy, K.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    A microbeam synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) technique has been used to determine the localization and the relative concentrations of Zn, Cu, Fe and Ca in primary colorectal cancer and secondary colorectal liver metastases. 24 colon and 23 liver samples were examined, all of which were formalin fixed tissues arranged as microarrays of 1.0 mm diameter and 10 μm thickness. The distribution of these metals was compared with light transmission images of adjacent sections that were H and E stained to reveal the location of the cancer cells. Histological details were provided for each sample which enable concentrations of all elements in different tissue types to be compared. In the case of liver, significant differences have been found for all elements when comparing tumour, normal, necrotic, fibrotic, and blood vessel tissues (Kruskal Wallis Test, P<0.0001). The concentrations of all elements have also been found to be significantly different among tumour, necrotic, fibrotic, and mucin tissues in the colon samples (Kruskal Wallis Test, P<0.0001). The concentrations of all elements have been compared between primary colorectal samples and colorectal liver metastases. Concentration of Zn, Cu, Fe and Ca are higher in all types of liver tissues compared to those in the colon tissues. Comparing liver tumour and colon tumour samples, significant differences have been found for all elements (Mann Whitney, P<0.0001). For necrotic tissues, significant increase has been found for Zn, Ca, Cu and Fe (Mann Whitney, P<0.0001 for Fe and Zn, 0.014 for Ca, and 0.001 for Cu). The liver fibrotic levels of Zn, Ca, Cu and Fe were higher than the fibrotic colon areas (independent T test, P=0.007 for Zn and Mann Whitney test P<0.0001 for Cu, Fe and Ca). For the blood vessel tissue, the analysis revealed that the difference was only significant for Fe ( P=0.009) from independent T test.

  5. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Deland, F.H.; Casper, S.; Corgan, R.L.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with /sup 131/I at a total dose of at least 1.0 ..mu..Ci. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the /sup 131/I-labeled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with /sup 131/I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the apparent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  6. Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, E E; Deland, F H; Casper, S; Corgan, R L; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D M

    1980-03-15

    This study examines the accuracy of colorectal cancer radioimmunodetection. Twenty-seven patients with a history of histologically-confirmed colonic or rectal carcinoma received a high-titer, purified goat anti-CEA IgG labelled with 131-I at a total dose of at least 1.0 muCi. Various body views were scanned at 24 and 48 hours after administration of the radioantibody. Three additional cases were evaluated; one had a villous adenoma in the rectum and received the 131-I-labelled anti-CEA IgG, while two colonic carcinoma patients received normal goat IgG labelled with 131-I. All of the 7 cases with primary colorectal cancer showed true-positive tumor localization, while 20 of 25 sites of metastatic colorectal cancer detected by immune scintigraphy were corroborated by other detection measures. The sensitivity of the radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancers (primary and metastatic) was found to be 90% (true-positive rate), the putative specificity (true-negative rate) was 94%, and the appraent overall accuracy of the technique was 93%. Neither the case of a villous adenoma receiving the anti-CEA IgG nor the two cases of colonic cancer receiving normal goat IgG showed tumor radiolocalization. Very high circulating CEA titers did not appear to hinder successful tumor radiolocalization. These findings suggest that in colorectal cancers the method of CEA radioimmunodetection may be of value in preoperatively determining the location and extent of disease, in assessing possible recurrence or spread postoperatively, and in localizing the source of CEA production in patients with rising or elevated CEA titers. An ancilliary benefit could be a more tumor-specific detection test for confirming the findings of other, more conventional diagnostic measures.

  7. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data.

    PubMed

    Kok-Sin, Teow; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Sagap, Ismail; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2015-07-01

    Apart from genetic mutations, epigenetic alteration is a common phenomenon that contributes to neoplastic transformation in colorectal cancer. Transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes without changes in the DNA sequence is explained by the existence of promoter hypermethylation. To test this hypothesis, we integrated the epigenome and transcriptome data from a similar set of colorectal tissue samples. Methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina InfiniumHumanMethylation27 BeadChip on 55 paired cancer and adjacent normal epithelial cells. Fifteen of the 55 paired tissues were used for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Validation was carried out on 150 colorectal tissues using the methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) technique. PCA and supervised hierarchical clustering in the two microarray datasets showed good separation between cancer and normal samples. Significant genes from the two analyses were obtained based on a ≥2-fold change and a false discovery rate (FDR) p-value of <0.05. We identified 1,081 differentially hypermethylated CpG sites and 36 hypomethylated CpG sites. We also found 709 upregulated and 699 downregulated genes from the gene expression profiling. A comparison of the two datasets revealed 32 overlapping genes with 27 being hypermethylated with downregulated expression and 4 hypermethylated with upregulated expression. One gene was found to be hypomethylated and downregulated. The most enriched molecular pathway identified was cell adhesion molecules that involved 4 overlapped genes, JAM2, NCAM1, ITGA8 and CNTN1. In the present study, we successfully identified a group of genes that showed methylation and gene expression changes in well-defined colorectal cancer tissues with high purity. The integrated analysis gives additional insight regarding the regulation of colorectal cancer-associated genes and their underlying mechanisms that

  8. Identification of diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer via integrative epigenomics and genomics data

    PubMed Central

    KOK-SIN, TEOW; MOKHTAR, NORFILZA MOHD; HASSAN, NUR ZARINA ALI; SAGAP, ISMAIL; ROSE, ISA MOHAMED; HARUN, ROSLAN; JAMAL, RAHMAN

    2015-01-01

    Apart from genetic mutations, epigenetic alteration is a common phenomenon that contributes to neoplastic transformation in colorectal cancer. Transcriptional silencing of tumor-suppressor genes without changes in the DNA sequence is explained by the existence of promoter hypermethylation. To test this hypothesis, we integrated the epigenome and transcriptome data from a similar set of colorectal tissue samples. Methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina InfiniumHumanMethylation27 BeadChip on 55 paired cancer and adjacent normal epithelial cells. Fifteen of the 55 paired tissues were used for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Validation was carried out on 150 colorectal tissues using the methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) technique. PCA and supervised hierarchical clustering in the two microarray datasets showed good separation between cancer and normal samples. Significant genes from the two analyses were obtained based on a ≥2-fold change and a false discovery rate (FDR) P-value of <0.05. We identified 1,081 differentially hypermethylated CpG sites and 36 hypomethylated CpG sites. We also found 709 upregulated and 699 downregulated genes from the gene expression profiling. A comparison of the two datasets revealed 32 overlapping genes with 27 being hypermethylated with downregulated expression and 4 hypermethylated with upregulated expression. One gene was found to be hypomethylated and downregulated. The most enriched molecular pathway identified was cell adhesion molecules that involved 4 overlapped genes, JAM2, NCAM1, ITGA8 and CNTN1. In the present study, we successfully identified a group of genes that showed methylation and gene expression changes in well-defined colorectal cancer tissues with high purity. The integrated analysis gives additional insight regarding the regulation of colorectal cancer-associated genes and their underlying mechanisms that

  9. Lack of mucin MUC5AC field change expression associated with tubulovillous and villous colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Longman, R; Douthwaite, J; Sylvester, P; O'Leary, D; Warren, B; Corfield, A; Thomas, M

    2000-01-01

    Background—MUC5AC is a secreted mucin aberrantly expressed by polypoid colorectal adenomas. It has been hypothesised that the "normal" surrounding colorectal mucosa expresses MUC5AC as a field change phenomenon that can be used to predict adenoma recurrence following resection. Aim—To determine if there is a field change of de novo MUC5AC expression in histologically normal rectal mucosa adjacent to villous and tubulovillous adenomas, and thus whether MUC5AC expression can be used as a marker of early tumour recurrence. Methods—In a prospective cohort study paired mucosal biopsies of adenomatous and macroscopically "normal" mucosa were obtained from 11 patients with villous and 11 patients with tubulovillous adenomas who underwent primary resection for purpose of cure. The tissues were studied to determine MUC5AC gene expression by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. Patients were followed up by flexible sigmoidoscopy to detect the presence of early local recurrence. Results—10 villous adenomas showed mature MUC5AC glycoprotein and all 11 expressed MUC5AC mRNA. Five tubulovillous adenomas showed mature MUC5AC glycoprotein and 10 expressed MUC5AC mRNA. Neoexpression of the MUC5AC mucin gene was not detected in any of the mucosal biopsies taken adjacent to either villous or tubulovillous adenomas, even in three patients with early, locally recurrent disease. Conclusions—Aberrant MUC5AC gene expression is not a "field change" in the colorectal mucosa in patients with rectal adenomas and therefore cannot be used to predict local recurrence of villous and tubulovillous adenomas. Key Words: mucin • colorectal adenoma • gene expression • field change PMID:10767823

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase A negatively regulated by miRNAs promotes aerobic glycolysis and is increased in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Hui; Liu, Aifen; Fang, Changge; Hao, Jianguo; Wang, Zhenghui

    2015-08-14

    Reprogramming metabolism of tumor cells is a hallmark of cancer. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is frequently overexpressed in tumor cells. Previous studies has shown higher levels of LDHA is related with colorectal cancer (CRC), but its role in tumor maintenance and underlying molecular mechanisms has not been established. Here, we investigated miRNAs-induced changes in LDHA expression. We reported that colorectal cancer express higher levels of LDHA compared with adjacent normal tissue. Knockdown of LDHA resulted in decreased lactate and ATP production, and glucose uptake. Colorectal cancer cells with knockdown of LDHA had much slower growth rate than control cells. Furthermore, we found that miR-34a, miR-34c, miR-369-3p, miR-374a, and miR-4524a/b target LDHA and regulate glycolysis in cancer cells. There is a negative correlation between these miRNAs and LDHA expression in colorectal cancer tissues. More importantly, we identified a genetic loci newly associated with increased colorectal cancer progression, rs18407893 at 11p15.4 (in 3'-UTR of LDHA), which maps to the seed sequence recognized by miR-374a. Cancer cells overexpressed miR-374a has decreased levels of LDHA compared with miR-374a-MUT (rs18407893 at 11p15.4). Taken together, these novel findings provide more therapeutic approaches to the Warburg effect and therapeutic targets of cancer energy metabolism. PMID:26062441

  11. Chemokine CXCL14 is associated with prognosis in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chemokine CXCL14 has been reported to play an important role in the progression of many malignancies such as breast cancer and papillary thyroid carcinoma, but the role of CXCL14 in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) remains to be established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression pattern and significance of CXCL14 in CRC progression. Method 265 colorectal carcinoma specimens and 129 matched adjacent normal colorectal mucosa specimens were collected. Expression of CXCL14 in clinical samples was examined by immunostaining. The effect of CXCL14 on colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, BrdU incorporation assay and colony formation assay. The impact of CXCL14 on migration and invasion of colorectal carcinoma cells was determined by transwell assay and Matrigel invasion assay, respectively. Results CXCL14 expression was significantly up-regulated in tumor tissues compared with adjacent nontumorous mucosa tissues (P < 0.001). Tumoral CXCL14 expression levels were significantly correlated with TNM (Tumor-node-metastasis) stage, histodifferentiation, and tumor size. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, high CXCL14 expression in tumor specimens (n = 91) from stage I/II patients was associated with increased risk for disease recurrence (risk ratio, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.15-7.40; P = 0.024). Elevated CXCL14 expression in tumor specimens (n = 135) from stage III/IV patients correlated with worse overall survival (risk ratio, 3.087; 95% CI, 1.866-5.107; P < 0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that enforced expression of CXCL14 in SW620 colorectal carcinoma cells resulted in more aggressive phenotypes. In contrast, knockdown of CXCL14 expression could mitigate the proliferative, migratory and invasive potential of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. Conclusion Taken together, CXCL14 might be a potential novel prognostic factor to predict the disease recurrence and overall survival and could be a

  12. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  13. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  14. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer In many cases, colorectal cancer ... screening tests you need, when you need them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal ...

  15. Plasma cytokines as potential response indicators to dietary freeze-dried black raspberries in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn A; Bobe, Gerd; Sardo, Christine; Wang, Li-Shu; Kuo, Chieh-Ti; Stoner, Gary; Colburn, Nancy H

    2012-08-01

    Oral consumption of freeze-dried black raspberries attenuated neoplastic changes in colorectal tissue markers of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. To determine whether plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were associated with berry treatment and changes in colorectal tissue markers of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis, plasma and biopsy samples of adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal-appearing colorectal tissue were collected before and during berry treatment from 24 CRC patients who had not received prior therapy and drank a slurry of black raspberry powder (20 g in 100 ml drinking water) 3 times a day for 1 to 9 wk. Plasma concentrations of GM-CSF (+0.12 ± 0.04 pg/mL; P = 0.01) and IL-8 (-1.61 ± 0.71 pg/mL; P = 0.04) changed in patients receiving berries for more than 10 days. These changes were correlated with beneficial changes in markers of proliferation (r(ΔGM-CSF, ΔKi67 carcinoma - normal) = -0.51) and apoptosis (r(ΔIL-8, ΔTUNEL carcinoma - normal) = -0.52) observed in colorectal tissue taken within the same week. Plasma concentrations of GM-CSF and IL-8 may serve as noninvasive indicators to monitor tissue response to berry-based interventions for CRC. PMID:22823889

  16. Thymosin β4 induces invasion and migration of human colorectal cancer cells through the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, Zhengri; Hong, Chang-Soo; Jung, Mi-Ran; Choi, Chan; Park, Young-Kyu

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Tβ4 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer cells. • The overexpression of Tβ4 is correlated with stage of colorectal cancer. • Tβ4 stimulates cell adhesion, invasion, migration and EMT. • Tβ4 activates the ILK/AKT/β-catenin signaling pathway. - Abstract: Thymosin β4 (Tβ4) is a 43-amino-acid peptide involved in many biological processes. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanism(s) of Tβ4 in cell invasion and migration remain unclear. In this study, we show that Tβ4 was significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and high levels of Tβ4 were correlated with stage of colorectal cancer, and that Tβ4 expression was associated with morphogenesis and EMT. Tβ4-upregulated cancer cells showed increased adhesion, invasion and migration activity, whereas Tβ4-downregulated cells showed decreased activities. We also demonstrated that Tβ4 interacts with ILK, which promoted the phosphorylation and activation of AKT, the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3β, the expression and nuclear localization of β-catenin, and integrin receptor activation. These results suggest that Tβ4 is an important regulator of the ILK/AKT/β-catenin/Integrin signaling cascade to induce cell invasion and migration in colorectal cancer cells, and is a potential target for cancer treatment.

  17. Attenuated expression of HRH4 in colorectal carcinomas: a potential influence on tumor growth and progression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Earlier studies have reported the production of histamine in colorectal cancers (CRCs). The effect of histamine is largely determined locally by the histamine receptor expression pattern. Recent evidence suggests that the expression level of histamine receptor H4 (HRH4) is abnormal in colorectal cancer tissues. However, the role of HRH4 in CRC progression and its clinical relevance is not well understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and molecular phenotypes of colorectal tumors with abnormal HRH4 expression. Methods Immunoblotting, real-time PCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays were adopted to examine HRH4 expression in case-matched CRC samples (n = 107) and adjacent normal tissues (ANTs). To assess the functions of HRH4 in CRC cells, we established stable HRH4-transfected colorectal cells and examined cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle and apoptosis in these cells. Results The protein levels of HRH4 were reduced in most of the human CRC samples regardless of grade or Dukes classification. mRNA levels of HRH4 were also reduced in both early-stage and advanced CRC samples. In vitro studies showed that HRH4 over-expression caused growth arrest and induced expression of cell cycle proteins in CRC cells upon exposure to histamine through a cAMP -dependent pathway. Furthermore, HRH4 stimulation promoted the 5-Fu-induced cell apoptosis in HRH4-positive colorectal cells. Conclusion The results from the current study supported previous findings of HRH4 abnormalities in CRCs. Expression levels of HRH4 could influence the histamine-mediated growth regulation in CRC cells. These findings suggested a potential role of abnormal HRH4 expression in the progression of CRCs and provided some new clues for the application of HRH4-specific agonist or antagonist in the molecular therapy of CRCs. PMID:21609450

  18. Quantitative Image Analysis of Epithelial and Stromal Area in Histological Sections of Colorectal Cancer: An Emerging Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Rogojanu, R.; Thalhammer, T.; Thiem, U.; Heindl, A.; Mesteri, I.; Seewald, A.; Jäger, W.; Smochina, C.; Ellinger, I.; Bises, G.

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), an increase in the stromal (S) area with the reduction of the epithelial (E) parts has been suggested as an indication of tumor progression. Therefore, an automated image method capable of discriminating E and S areas would allow an improved diagnosis. Immunofluorescence staining was performed on paraffin-embedded sections from colorectal tumors (16 samples from patients with liver metastasis and 18 without). Noncancerous tumor adjacent mucosa (n = 5) and normal mucosa (n = 4) were taken as controls. Epithelial cells were identified by an anti-keratin 8 (K8) antibody. Large tissue areas (5–63 mm2/slide) including tumor center, tumor front, and adjacent mucosa were scanned using an automated microscopy system (TissueFAXS). With our newly developed algorithms, we showed that there is more K8-immunoreactive E in the tumor center than in tumor adjacent and normal mucosa. Comparing patients with and without metastasis, the E/S ratio decreased by 20% in the tumor center and by 40% at tumor front in metastatic samples. The reduction of E might be due to a more aggressive phenotype in metastasis patients. The novel software allowed a detailed morphometric analysis of cancer tissue compartments as tools for objective quantitative measurements, reduced analysis time, and increased reproducibility of the data. PMID:26579535

  19. Immunohistochemical Expression of Ornithine Decarboxylase, Diamine Oxidase, Putrescine, and Spermine in Normal Canine Enterocolic Mucosa, in Chronic Colitis, and in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giacomo; Cerquetella, Matteo; Pengo, Graziano; Mari, Subeide; Balint, Emilia; Bassotti, Gabrio; Manolescu, Nicolae

    2015-01-01

    We compared the immunohistochemical expression of putrescine (PUT), spermine (SPM), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and diamine oxidase (DAO) in bioptic samples of canine colonic mucosa with chronic inflammation (i.e., granulomatous colitis and lymphoplasmacytic colitis) or neoplasia. Single and total polyamines levels were significantly higher in neoplastic tissue than in normal samples. Samples with different degrees of inflammation showed a general decrease expression of ODC if compared to controls; SPM was practically not expressed in control samples and very low in samples with chronic-granulomatous inflammation. In carcinomatous samples, the ODC activity was higher with respect to controls and samples with inflammation. This is the first description of polyamines expression in dog colonic mucosa in normal and in different pathological conditions, suggesting that the balance between polyamine degradation and biosynthesis is evidently disengaged during neoplasia. PMID:26550563

  20. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  1. The immune microenvironment of the colorectal tumor: Involvement of immunity genes and microRNAs belonging to the TH17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Omrane, Inés; Benammar-Elgaaied, Amel

    2015-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is a complex and multifactorial disease. Various factors such as genetic, immunological, epigenetic and environmental constitute minor risk factors with their additive effects contributing to the advent of colorectal cancer. In order to evaluate the role of innate and adaptive immunity in the susceptibility, the presentation and the development of colorectal cancer, we considered an immunogenetic approach on polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene and NOD2/CARD15 gene (receptors of innate immunity) as well as in cytokine genes of the TH17 pathway IL17A, IL17F and cytokine receptor IL23R. Then, we evaluated the expression of microRNAs regulated by TLR4 and NOD2/CARD15 or targeting TLR4, IL17 and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF) induced by IL17. Through a case-control study, we showed that the polymorphism of IL17A is associated with its susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Considering the tumor location, we found that the mutated alleles of IL17A, IL17F and IL23R are rather associated with colon cancer and not with rectum cancer. This result confirms that the colon and rectum are two different physiological entities. This study shows that TLR4, IL17A/F and IL23R polymorphisms are involved in the presentation of the disease with regard to tumor architecture, histology, and differentiation, advanced stage of the disease and lymph node and metastasis. Overall, these polymorphisms are associated with a poor prognosis of the disease. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the occurrence of colorectal cancer, we aimed at analyzing the tumor compared to a normal adjacent tissue and the expression of miRNAs (miR21, miR146a, miR135a, miR147b and miR155) that regulate immunity genes especially the cytokines of the TH17 pathway. This research has shown that microRNAs 21, 135a and 146a are associated with colorectal cancer. Indeed, these three miRs are overexpressed in cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. These results

  2. S-phase fractions of colorectal carcinomas related to pathologic and clinical features

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Prioleau, P.G.

    1981-09-01

    The S-phase fractions (SPFs) of epithelial cells in 100 resected colorectal carcinomas were measured by in vitro exposure to tritiated thymidine and autoradiography. The frequency distribution of SPFs was gaussian with a median of 17.8 per hundred in 90 unirradiated carcinomas, whereas in ten carcinomas given radiation therapy preoperatively, it was positively skewed with a median of 6.9. Analysis of the unirradiated carcinomas showed no relationship between SPF and various clinical and morphologic features that included age, race, sex, site, size, Dukes' stage, histologic grade of the tumor, number of metastasis-bearing regional lymph nodes, presence of adenomas of the large bowel, survival or relapse-free survival of the patient, or SPF or adjacent normal colorectal crypts. The results show no evidence that colorectal carcinomas can be divided into kinetic subsets. The spatial orientation of labeled cells in autoradiographs indicated presence of a nonproliferative fraction of cells in many tumors that may modulate response to radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  3. Reciprocal regulation of BMF and BIRC5 (Survivin) linked to Eomes overexpression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Kang, Yuki; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay A; Bradford, C Samuel; Johnson, Gavin; Dashwood, Wan Mohaiza; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2016-10-28

    Eomesodermin (Eomes) is a T-box transcription factor that has been implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer and other human malignancies. We screened a panel of human primary colon cancers and patient-matched controls (n = 30) and detected Eomes overexpression at the mRNA and protein level. Similar results were obtained in a panel of rat colon tumors and adjacent normal-looking colonic mucosa (n = 24). In human colon cancer cells, forced overexpression of Eomes enhanced cell viability and protected against staurosporine-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, knocking down Eomes resulted in reduced cell viability, G2/M cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis induction. The apoptotic mechanism centered on the reciprocal downregulation of anti-apoptotic BIRC5 (Survivin) and upregulation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 modifying factor (BMF). In patients with colorectal cancer, high EOMES expression (n = 95) was associated with poor overall survival compared with individuals exhibiting low EOMES levels (n = 80). We conclude from the current investigation, and prior literature, that Eomes has a divergent role in cancer development, with evidence for tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions, depending on stage and tissue context. Further studies are warranted on the apoptotic mechanisms linked to the reciprocal regulation of BMF and BIRC5 in human colorectal cancers characterized by Eomes overexpression. PMID:27539959

  4. Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyl Transferase 2: A Promising Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chunhui; Qi, Jia; Deng, Quanwen; Chen, Rihong; Zhai, Duanyang; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers all over the world. It is essential to search for more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods for CRC. Abnormal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has been considered as a characteristic of cancer cells. In this study, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) as well as p53-mediated cancer signaling pathways were investigated in patients with colorectal cancer. The CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from 95 untreated colorectal cancer patients and were stained for expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2) and p53. The survival rate was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted as well. Our data demonstrated that expression of NMNAT2 and p53 was significantly higher in CRC tissues, while NMNAT2 expression is in correlation with the invasive depth of tumors and TNM stage. Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of NMNAT2 and the expression of p53. However, NMNAT2 expression was not a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, our results indicated that NMNAT2 might participate in tumorigenesis of CRC in a p53-dependent manner and NMNAT2 expression might be a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27218101

  5. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  6. Detection and identification of heat shock protein 10 as a biomarker in colorectal cancer by protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Bogumil, Ralf; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-04-01

    Although colorectal cancer is one of the best-characterized tumors with regard to the multistep progression, it remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasms. For a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind the process of tumorigenesis and tumor progression, changes in protein expression between microdissected normal and tumorous colonic epithelium were analyzed. Cryostat sections from colorectal tumors, adenoma tissue, and adjacent normal mucosa were laser-microdissected and analyzed using ProteinChip Arrays. The derived MS profiles exhibited numerous statistical differences. One peak showing significantly high expression in the tumor was purified by reverse-phase chromatography and SDS-PAGE. The protein band of interest was passively eluted from the gel and identified as heat shock protein 10 (HSP 10) by tryptic digestion, peptide mapping, and MS/MS analysis. This tumor marker was further characterized by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of HSP 10-positive tissue by ProteinChip technology confirmed the identity of this protein. This work demonstrates that biomarker in colorectal cancer can be detected, identified, and assessed by a proteomic approach comprising tissue microdissection, protein profiling, and immunological techniques. In our experience, histological defined microdissected tissue areas should be used to identify proteins that might be responsible for tumorigenesis. PMID:16502466

  7. Low Expression of DYRK2 (Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulated Kinase 2) Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haiyan; Hu, Kaishun; Wu, Wenjing; Li, Yu; Tian, Huan; Chu, Zhonghua; Koeffler, H Phillip; Yin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) is a member of dual-specificity kinase family, which could phosphorylate both Ser/Thr and Tyr substrates. The role of DYRK2 in human cancer remains controversial. For example, overexpression of DYRK2 predicts a better survival in human non-small cell lung cancer. In contrast, amplification of DYRK2 gene occurs in esophageal/lung adenocarcinoma, implying the role of DYRK2 as a potential oncogene. However, its clinical role in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been explored. In this study, we analyzed the expression of DYRK2 from Oncomine database and found that DYRK2 level is lower in primary or metastatic CRC compared to adjacent normal colon tissue or non-metastatic CRC, respectively, in 6 colorectal carcinoma data sets. The correlation between DYRK2 expression and clinical outcome in 181 CRC patients was also investigated by real-time PCR and IHC. DYRK2 expression was significantly down-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Functional studies confirmed that DYRK2 inhibited cell invasion and migration in both HCT116 and SW480 cells and functioned as a tumor suppressor in CRC cells. Furthermore, the lower DYRK2 levels were correlated with tumor sites (P = 0.023), advanced clinical stages (P = 0.006) and shorter survival in the advanced clinical stages. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that DYRK2 expression was an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.001). Taking all, we concluded that DYRK2 a novel prognostic biomarker of human colorectal cancer. PMID:27532268

  8. Low Expression of DYRK2 (Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulated Kinase 2) Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenjing; Li, Yu; Tian, Huan; Chu, Zhonghua; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Yin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) is a member of dual-specificity kinase family, which could phosphorylate both Ser/Thr and Tyr substrates. The role of DYRK2 in human cancer remains controversial. For example, overexpression of DYRK2 predicts a better survival in human non-small cell lung cancer. In contrast, amplification of DYRK2 gene occurs in esophageal/lung adenocarcinoma, implying the role of DYRK2 as a potential oncogene. However, its clinical role in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been explored. In this study, we analyzed the expression of DYRK2 from Oncomine database and found that DYRK2 level is lower in primary or metastatic CRC compared to adjacent normal colon tissue or non-metastatic CRC, respectively, in 6 colorectal carcinoma data sets. The correlation between DYRK2 expression and clinical outcome in 181 CRC patients was also investigated by real-time PCR and IHC. DYRK2 expression was significantly down-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Functional studies confirmed that DYRK2 inhibited cell invasion and migration in both HCT116 and SW480 cells and functioned as a tumor suppressor in CRC cells. Furthermore, the lower DYRK2 levels were correlated with tumor sites (P = 0.023), advanced clinical stages (P = 0.006) and shorter survival in the advanced clinical stages. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that DYRK2 expression was an independent prognostic factor (P < 0.001). Taking all, we concluded that DYRK2 a novel prognostic biomarker of human colorectal cancer. PMID:27532268

  9. Expression of prokineticin-receptor2(PK-R2) is a new prognostic factor in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Goi, Takanori; Kurebayashi, Hidetaka; Ueda, Yuki; Naruse, Takayuki; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Koneri, Kenji; Hirono, Yasuo; Katayama, Kanji; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2015-10-13

    The increased invasiveness of colorectal cancer cells is important for progression and metastasis to the surrounding organs. According to recent molecular biological studies, signaling through transmembrane Prokineticin-Receptor2(PK-R2) is likely involved in the ability of tumor cell to invade. However, no studies have evaluated the relationship between PK-R2 expression, ability of cancer to invade/metastasize, and patient prognosis in cases of resected colorectal cancer. Accordingly, we have examined these factors in the present study.Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect PK-R2 in the primary lesion and adjacent normal large intestine mucosa of 324 colorectal cancer patients who underwent resection surgery at our department. Additionally, we conducted clinicopathologic examinations and analyzed patient prognoses with the Kaplan-Meier method. Further, multivariate analysis was conducted using a cox-proportional hazard model.PK-R2 expression was observed on the cellular membrane of the primary lesion in 147 of 324 cases (45.3%) of human colorectal cancer. PK-R2 expression was associated with a higher incidence of vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, hepatic metastasis, and hematogenous metastasis. Further, prevalence of PK-R2 expression increased as tumor stage increased. In stage III curative resection cases, where recurrence is the most serious problem, cases that expressed PK-R2 had a significantly lower 5-year survival rate (82.1% versus 66.8%) and higher recurrence compared to those cases with no PK-R2 expression. In the multivariate analysis for prognosis, PK-R2 expression was found to be an independent factor(ratio2.621).PK-R2 expression could be one of the new prognostic factors in human colorectal cancer.

  10. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in human colorectal cancer: correlation with tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cianchi, Fabio; Cortesini, Camillo; Fantappiè, Ornella; Messerini, Luca; Schiavone, Nicola; Vannacci, Alfredo; Nistri, Silvia; Sardi, Iacopo; Baroni, Gianna; Marzocca, Cosimo; Perna, Federico; Mazzanti, Roberto; Bechi, Paolo; Masini, Emanuela

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the potential involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, we correlated the expression and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with the degree of tumor angiogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa were obtained from 46 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemical expression of iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31 was analyzed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. iNOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were assessed by specific biochemical assays. iNOS protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. iNOS and VEGF mRNA levels were evaluated using Northern blot analysis. Both iNOS and VEGF expressions correlated significantly with intratumor microvessel density (r(s) = 0.31, P = 0.02 and r(s) = 0.67, P < 0.0001, respectively). A significant correlation was also found between iNOS and VEGF expression (P = 0.001). iNOS activity and cyclic GMP production were significantly higher in the cancer specimens than in the normal mucosa (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively), as well as in metastatic tumors than in nonmetastatic ones (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Western and Northern blot analyses confirmed the up-regulation of the iNOS protein and gene in the tumor specimens as compared with normal mucosa. NO seems to play a role in colorectal cancer growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:12598314

  11. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery. PMID:27695171

  12. Colorectal neoplasm and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Bhat, Mohammad Hayat; Sinha, S K; Kochar, R; Vaiphi, K

    2006-01-01

    The risk for colorectal carcinoma in acromegaly remains controversial. In our earlier study, we have demonstrated that the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Asian Indians with acromegaly is not increased and after this report, routine colonoscopy in our patients with acromegaly was abandoned. Subsequently, two consecutive young men aged 30 and 35, one 6 years after and other at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly had colorectal carcinoma respectively. None of them had family history of colonic neoplasm. These two younger patients with no other predisposition for colorectal neoplasm suggests that colonoscopy should be done in all patients with acromegaly at diagnosis and they should remain under surveillance.

  13. Synchronous trifocal colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charalampoudis, Petros; Kykalos, Stylianos; Stamopoulos, Paraskevas; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (SCRCs) have been increasingly diagnosed due to emerging diagnostic modalities. The presence of three or more synchronous colorectal cancers has, however, only rarely been reported. A 76-year-old white man presented for management of two concurrent colorectal adenocarcinomas in the left colon evidenced on total colonoscopy. Preoperative abdominal ultrasonography and thoracoabdominal computed tomography were negative for metastatic disease. The patient underwent an elective left hemicolectomy. The pathology report ultimately showed the presence of three moderately differentiated, distinct colorectal cancers. The patient experienced an uneventful recovery.

  14. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  15. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:25737434

  16. In situ detection of Epstein-Barr virus in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yuen, S T; Chung, L P; Leung, S Y; Luk, I S; Chan, S Y; Ho, J

    1994-11-01

    The association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma in the nasopharynx, which is common in Chinese from the southern region, is well established. Recently, EBV has also been found to be associated with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas (LELCs) and carcinomas with prominent lymphoid infiltrates in the stomach. We investigated for the presence of EBV in 74 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 36 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma from Chinese patients by in situ hybridization (ISH) using an antisense EBER probe. In seven cases (9.5%) of gastric carcinoma, EBER was highly expressed in the adenocarcinoma cells and metastatic tumor cells in regional lymph nodes. In all these cases, the normal gastric epithelium was EBV negative. None of the colorectal carcinomas showed a positive signal. Isolated positive lymphoid cells were frequently found in both tumors. Of the seven positive cases, only one was LELC, and the others were conventional adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type. Five showed expression of the viral RNA in all tumor cells as well as the surrounding dysplastic epithelium. Interestingly, the sixth case showed distinct negative islands of dysplastic glands adjacent to strongly positive dysplastic glands and invasive carcinoma cells. This pattern of positivity, together with negative normal gastric epithelium and positive metastatic tumor, suggested that EBV infection occurred in the dysplastic phase and that an apparent growth advantage was conferred by the EBV infection.

  17. Registered report: Fusobacterium nucleatum infection is prevalent in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Repass, John; Maherali, Nimet; Owen, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'Fusobacterium nucleatum infection is prevalent in human colorectal carcinoma' by Castellarin and colleagues published in Genome Research in 2012 (Castellarin et al., 2012). The experiment to be replicated is reported in Figure 2. Here, Castellarin and colleagues performed a metagenomic analysis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) to identify potential associations between inflammatory microorganisms and gastrointestinal cancers. They conducted quantitative real-time PCR on genomic DNA isolated from tumor and matched normal biopsies from a patient cohort and found that the overall abundance of Fusobacterium was 415 times greater in CRC versus adjacent normal tissue. These results confirmed earlier studies and provide evidence for a link between tissue-associated bacteria and tumorigenesis. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  18. Fusobacterium nucleatum: an emerging bug in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Y; Bhat, Ashaqullah; Fazili, Khalid M; Ganai, Bashir A

    2015-09-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a plethora of diverse microbial species, wherein certain bacteria considered as driver bacteria with procarcinogenic features contribute directly toward colonic epithelium cell damage to initiate colorectal carcinogenesis. However, some bacteria, in particular Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is otherwise a normal resident of the oral microflora and a relatively poor colonizer of the healthy gut, have also been considered to play a role in the development of colorectal cancer. Many studies have reported that F. nucleatum is associated with colorectal adenomas and advanced-stage colorectal cancer, but its precise role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we review some of the important features of F. nucleatum, its association with inflammatory bowel disease, modulation of the tumor-immune microenvironment, and E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling.

  19. Gut mucosal microbiome across stages of colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Geicho; Li, Xiangchun; Zhou, Haokui; Sheng, Jianqiu; Wong, Sunny Hei; Wu, William Ka Kai; Ng, Siew Chien; Tsoi, Ho; Dong, Yujuan; Zhang, Ning; He, Yuqi; Kang, Qian; Cao, Lei; Wang, Kunning; Zhang, Jingwan; Liang, Qiaoyi; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial dysbiosis contributes to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we catalogue the microbial communities in human gut mucosae at different stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. We analyse the gut mucosal microbiome of 47 paired samples of adenoma and adenoma-adjacent mucosae, 52 paired samples of carcinoma and carcinoma-adjacent mucosae and 61 healthy controls. Probabilistic partitioning of relative abundance profiles reveals that a metacommunity predominated by members of the oral microbiome is primarily associated with CRC. Analysis of paired samples shows differences in community configurations between lesions and the adjacent mucosae. Correlations of bacterial taxa indicate early signs of dysbiosis in adenoma, and co-exclusive relationships are subsequently more common in cancer. We validate these alterations in CRC-associated microbiome by comparison with two previously published data sets. Our results suggest that a taxonomically defined microbial consortium is implicated in the development of CRC. PMID:26515465

  20. CAHM, a long non-coding RNA gene hypermethylated in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Susanne K; Mitchell, Susan M; Graham, Lloyd D; McEvoy, Aidan; Thomas, Melissa L; Baker, Rohan T; Ross, Jason P; Xu, Zheng-Zhou; Ho, Thu; LaPointe, Lawrence C; Young, Graeme P; Molloy, Peter L

    2014-08-01

    The CAHM gene (Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HyperMethylated), previously LOC100526820, is located on chromosome 6, hg19 chr6:163 834 097-163 834 982. It lacks introns, encodes a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and is located adjacent to the gene QKI, which encodes an RNA binding protein. Deep bisulphite sequencing of ten colorectal cancer (CRC) and matched normal tissues demonstrated frequent hypermethylation within the CAHM gene in cancer. A quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to characterize additional tissue samples. With a threshold of 5% methylation, the CAHM assay was positive in 2/26 normal colorectal tissues (8%), 17/21 adenomas (81%), and 56/79 CRC samples (71%). A reverse transcriptase-qPCR assay showed that CAHM RNA levels correlated negatively with CAHM % methylation, and therefore CAHM gene expression is typically decreased in CRC. The CAHM qMSP assay was applied to DNA isolated from plasma specimens from 220 colonoscopy-examined patients. Using a threshold of 3 pg methylated genomic DNA per mL plasma, methylated CAHM sequences were detected in the plasma DNA of 40/73 (55%) of CRC patients compared with 3/73 (4%) from subjects with adenomas and 5/74 (7%) from subjects without neoplasia. Both the frequency of detection and the amount of methylated CAHM DNA released into plasma increased with increasing cancer stage. Methylated CAHM DNA shows promise as a plasma biomarker for use in screening for CRC.

  1. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  2. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  3. Overexpression of DHX32 contributes to the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huayue; Liu, Wenjuan; Fang, Zanxi; Liang, Xianming; Li, Juan; Bai, Yongying; Lin, Lingqing; You, Hanyu; Pei, Yihua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Zhong-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work demonstrates that DHX32 is upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to its adjacent normal tissues. However, how overexpressed DHX32 contributes to CRC remains largely unknown. In this study, we reported that DHX32 was overexpressed in human colon cancer cells. Overexpressed DHX32 promoted SW480 cancer cells proliferation, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased the susceptibility to chemotherapy agent 5-Fluorouracil. Furthermore, PCR array analyses revealed that depleting DHX32 in SW480 colon cancer cells suppressed expression of WISP1, MMP7 and VEGFA in the Wnt pathway, and anti-apoptotic gene BCL2 and CA9, however, elevated expression of pro-apoptotic gene ACSL5. The findings suggested that overexpressed DHX32 played an important role in CRC progression and metastasis and that DHX32 has the potential to serve as a biomarker and a novel therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:25782664

  4. Thymine DNA Glycosylase Is a Positive Regulator of Wnt Signaling in Colorectal Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehe; Yu, Tianxin; Shi, Jiandang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Ting; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Yadong; Zeng, Zheng; Wang, Chi; Li, Mingsong; Liu, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Although the mechanisms of β-catenin degradation have been well studied, the mechanism by which β-catenin activates transcription is still not fully understood. While screening a panel of DNA demethylases, we found that thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) up-regulated Wnt signaling. TDG interacts with the transcription factor TCF4 and coactivator CREB-binding protein/p300 in the Wnt pathway. Knocking down TDG by shRNAs inhibited the proliferation of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. In CRC patients, TDG levels were significantly higher in tumor tissues than in the adjacent normal tissues. These results suggest that TDG warrants consideration as a potential biomarker for CRC and as a target for CRC treatment. PMID:24532795

  5. Evaluation of FTIR spectroscopy as diagnostic tool for colorectal cancer using spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liu; Sun, Xuejun; Chao, Zhang; Zhang, Shiyun; Zheng, Jianbao; Gurung, Rajendra; Du, Junkai; Shi, Jingsen; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhang, Yuanfu; Wu, Jinguang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to confirm FTIR spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for colorectal cancer. 180 freshly removed colorectal samples were collected from 90 patients for spectrum analysis. The ratios of spectral intensity and relative intensity (/I1460) were calculated. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Fisher's discriminant analysis (FDA) were applied to distinguish the malignant from normal. The FTIR parameters of colorectal cancer and normal tissues were distinguished due to the contents or configurations of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Related to nitrogen containing, water, protein and nucleic acid were increased significantly in the malignant group. Six parameters were selected as independent factors to perform discriminant functions. The sensitivity for FTIR in diagnosing colorectal cancer was 96.6% by discriminant analysis. Our study demonstrates that FTIR can be a useful technique for detection of colorectal cancer and may be applied in clinical colorectal cancer diagnosis.

  6. PTBP1-associated microRNA-1 and -133b suppress the Warburg effect in colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kohei; Sakai, Miku; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kumazaki, Minami; Shinohara, Haruka; Yamada, Nami; Nakayama, Tatsushi; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ito, Yuko; Futamura, Manabu; Uno, Bunji; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Akao, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    It is known that pyruvate kinase in muscle (PKM), which is a rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme, has essential roles in the Warburg effect and that expression of cancer-dominant PKM2 is increased by polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1), which is a splicer of the PKM gene. In other words, PKM2 acts as a promoter of the Warburg effect. Previously, we demonstrated that the Warburg effect was partially established by down-regulation of several microRNAs (miRs) that bind to PTBP1 and that ectopic expression of these miRs suppressed the Warburg effect. In this study, we investigated the functions of miR-1 and -133b, which are well known as muscle-specific miRs, from the viewpoint of the Warburg effect in colorectal tumors. The expression levels of miR-1 and -133b were relatively high in colon tissue except muscle and very frequently down-regulated in 75 clinical colorectal tumors samples, even in adenomas, compared with those of the adjacent normal tissue samples. The ectopic expression of these miRs induced growth suppression and autophagic cell death through the switching of PKM isoform expression from PKM2 to PKM1 by silencing PTBP1 expression both in vitro and in vivo. Also, we showed that the resultant increase in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was involved in this mechanism. Furthermore, PTBP1 was highly expressed in most of the 30 clinical colorectal tumor samples examined, even in adenomas. Our results suggested that PTBP1 and PTBP1-associated miR-1 and -133b are crucial molecules for the maintenance of the Warburg effect in colorectal tumors. PMID:26980745

  7. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  8. Colorectal Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports Press Room Contact Us Sign Up We fight for Moms Dads Uncles Aunts Friends Brothers Sisters ... on Congress. Take Action Your Guide in the Fight Free resource for stage III & stage IV colorectal ...

  9. Tests for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to look for colorectal cancer Imaging tests use sound waves, x-rays, magnetic fields, or radioactive substances to ... has spread to the liver. Ultrasound Ultrasound uses sound waves and their echoes to create images of the ...

  10. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  11. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  12. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  13. Label-free visualization of collagen in submucosa as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jingting; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    The collagen signature in colorectal submucosa is changed due to remodeling of the extracellular matrix during the malignant process and plays an important role in noninvasive early detection of human colorectal cancer. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in normal colorectal submucosa (NCS) and cancerous colorectal submucosa (CCS). What's more, the collagen content was quantitatively measured. It was found that in CCS the morphology of collagen becomes much looser and the collagen content is significantly reduced compared to NCS. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to provide collagen signature as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  14. Silencing homeobox C6 inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wentao; Lao, Xinyuan; Zhu, Dexiang; Lin, Qi; Xu, Pingping; Wei, Ye; Xu, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox C6 (HOXC6), a member of the homeobox family that encodes highly conserved transcription factors, plays a vital role in various carcinomas. In this study, we used a tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of 462 CRC samples to demonstrate that HOXC6 is more abundantly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues than adjacent normal mucosa. Clinicopathological data indicated that higher HOXC6 expression correlated with poor overall survival and was associated with primary tumor location in the right colon, primary tumor (pT) stage 3/4 and primary node (pN) stage 1/2. Multivariate analysis showed that high HOXC6 expression was an independent risk factor for poor CRC patient prognosis. HOXC6 downregulation via lentivirus-mediated expression of HOXC6-targeting shRNA reduced HCT116 cell viability and colony formation in vitro, and reduced growth of subcutaneous xenografts in nude mouse. HOXC6 thus appears to promote CRC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through autophagy inhibition and mTOR pathway activation. PMID:27081081

  15. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  16. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  17. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  18. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  19. [Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernardeau-Mozer, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2004-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) is an inductible isoenzyme of cyclooxygenase undetectable in normal colonic mucosa and overexpressed in 80% colonic tumor. Several works in vitro and in vivo showed that Cox2 plays a key role in the multistep process of colorectal tumorigenesis such apoptosis inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis induction. So that Cox2 represent a potential molecular target in colorectal management and specific Cox2 inhibitors may be useful as chemopreventive as well as therapeutic agent in humans. In animals study Cox2 inhibitors was shown to be effective and in humans Cox2 inhibitors are approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to endoscopic surveillance and surgery in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between Cox2/Cox2 inhibitors and differents signaling pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis and to precise their possible molecular mechanisms of action. This work although review clinicals data of their efficacy as chemopreventive agent as well as therapeutic in the differents group at risk for colorectal cancer. PMID:15239336

  20. Teaching normal birth, normally.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Teaching normal-birth Lamaze classes normally involves considering the qualities that make birth normal and structuring classes to embrace those qualities. In this column, teaching strategies are suggested for classes that unfold naturally, free from unnecessary interventions. PMID:19436595

  1. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana; Kollárová, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle - a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer.

  2. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle – a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer. PMID:27110303

  3. Increased expression of S100A4, a metastasis-associated gene, in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, K; Nakanishi, H; Wada, K; Suzuki, M; Matsuzaki, O; Matsuura, A; Endo, H

    1997-12-01

    The S100A4 gene (also known as pEL98/mts1/p9Ka/18A2/42A/calvasculin /FSP1/CAPL) encoding an S100-related calcium-binding protein is implied to be involved in the invasion and metastasis of murine tumor cells. In the present study, the expression of S100A4 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines (SW837, LoVo, DLD-1, HT-29, SW480, SW620, WiDr, and Colo201) and surgically resected neoplastic tissues was examined to investigate whether S100A4 plays a role in the invasion and metastasis of human tumor cells. Northern blot analysis using total RNA isolated from the adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed that five of the eight cell lines expressed substantial amounts of S100A4 mRNA. Normal colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) expressed little of the RNA. Using surgically resected specimens, it seemed that the amount of S100A4 mRNA in adenomas was nearly equal to that in normal colonic mucosa, whereas adenocarcinomas expressed a significantly higher amount of the RNA than did the adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded surgical specimens and monoclonal anti-S100A4 antibody demonstrated that none of 12 adenoma specimens were immunopositive, whereas 8 of 18 (44%) focal carcinomas in carcinoma in adenoma specimens and 50 of 53 (94%) adenocarcinoma specimens were immunopositive. Interestingly, the incidence of immunopositive cells increased according to the depth of invasion, and nearly all of the carcinoma cells in 14 metastases in the liver were positive. These results suggest that S100A4 may be involved in the progression and the metastatic process of human colorectal neoplastic cells. PMID:9815629

  4. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  5. [Nutrition and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Maike, Wolters; Hahn, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Current prospective cohort studies and metaanalysis enable a reevaluation of how food or nutrients such as fiber and fat influence cancer risk. Based on the evidence criteria of the WHO/FAD, risk reduction by a high intake of fruit is assessed as possible, while a lowered risk by a high vegetable intake is probable. Especially raw vegetables and fruits seem to exert anticancer properties. The evidence of a risk reducing effect of whole grain relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as probable whereas the evidence of an increased risk by high consumption of refined white flour products and sweets is (still) insufficient despite some evidences. There is a probable risk reducing effect of milk and dairy products. e available data on eggs and red meat indicate a possible risk increasing influence. Stronger clues for a risk increasing effect have been shown for meat products leading to an evidence assessed as probable. Owing to varied interpretations of the data on fiber, the evidence of a risk reducing effect relating to colorectal cancer is assessed as possible or insufficient. The available data on alcohol consumption indicate a possible risk increasing effect. In contrast to former evaluations, diets rich in fat seem to increase colorectal cancer risk only indirectly as part of a hypercaloric diet by advancing the obesity risk. Thus, the evidence of obesity, especially visceral obesity, as a risk of colorectal cancer is judged as convincing today. Prospective cohort studies suggest that people who get higher than average amounts of folic acid from multivitamin supplements have lower risks of colorectal cancer. The evidence for a risk reducing effect of calcium, selenium, vitamin D and vitamin E on colorectal cancer is insufficient. As primary prevention, a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, and legumes added by low-fat dairy products, fish, and poultry can be recommended. In

  6. Cancer stem cells CD133 and CD24 in colorectal cancers in Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Anahita; Naghshvar, Farshad; Maleki, Iradj; Salehi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to study the expression of CD24 and CD133 in colorectal cancer and normal adjacent tissues to assess a relationship between these markers and clinic-pathological characteristics and patient’s survival. Background: Cancer stem cells are a group of tumor cells that have regeneration and multi-order differentiation capabilities. Patients and methods: Expression of CD24 and CD133 was studied in a paraffin block of colorectal cancer and normal tissues near tumors with the immuneohistochemical method in patients who were referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital in Sari. Results: A total of 50 samples (25 males and 25 females) with a mean age of 67.57±13.9 years old with range 28-93 years, included 3 mucinous carcinoma and 47 adenocarcinoma. Expression of CD133 marker was negative in 29 cases and positive in 21 cases. Expression of CD24 in tissue near tumor cells was found in 30% of available samples. The relationship between expressing CD24 with treatment (surgery and chemotherapy) was significant and its relationship with patient’s survival was insignificant statistically. However, there was a clear difference as mean survival age of patients based on CD24 expression was 26.64±18.15 for negative cases and 41.75±28.76 months for positive cases. CD24 and CD133 expressions and their co-expression with other clinic-pathological factors were not significant. Conclusion: During this study, the relationship between CD24 and treatment type was significant. To confirm this result, various studies with high sample numbers and other stem cell markers are recommended. PMID:27099673

  7. MiRNA-203 suppresses cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colorectal cancer via targeting of EIF5A2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Biao; Wang, Bin; Fang, Jiaqing; Zhu, Xuchao; Cao, Zhongwei; Lin, Qi; Zhou, Lisheng; Sun, Xing

    2016-07-04

    While it is known that miR-203 is frequently downregulated in many types of human cancer, little is known regarding its expression and functional role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and the potential mechanisms of miR-203 in colorectal cancer. MiR-203 was significantly downregulated in CRC tissues compared with matched normal adjacent tissues. Our clinical data show that decreased miR-203 was associated with an advanced clinical tumor-node-metastasis stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor survival in CRC patients. Furthermore, externally induced expression of miR-203 significantly inhibited CRC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we identified EIF5A2 as a direct and functional target of miR-203. The levels of miR-203 were inversely correlated with levels of the EIF5A2 in the CRC tissues. Restoration of EIF5A2 in the miR-203-overexpressing CRC cells reversed the suppressive effects of miR-203. Our results demonstrate that miR-203 serves as a tumor suppressor gene and may be useful as a new potential therapeutic target in CRC.

  8. MiRNA-203 suppresses cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colorectal cancer via targeting of EIF5A2

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Biao; Wang, Bin; Fang, Jiaqing; Zhu, Xuchao; Cao, Zhongwei; Lin, Qi; Zhou, Lisheng; Sun, Xing

    2016-01-01

    While it is known that miR-203 is frequently downregulated in many types of human cancer, little is known regarding its expression and functional role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and the potential mechanisms of miR-203 in colorectal cancer. MiR-203 was significantly downregulated in CRC tissues compared with matched normal adjacent tissues. Our clinical data show that decreased miR-203 was associated with an advanced clinical tumor-node-metastasis stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor survival in CRC patients. Furthermore, externally induced expression of miR-203 significantly inhibited CRC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we identified EIF5A2 as a direct and functional target of miR-203. The levels of miR-203 were inversely correlated with levels of the EIF5A2 in the CRC tissues. Restoration of EIF5A2 in the miR-203-overexpressing CRC cells reversed the suppressive effects of miR-203. Our results demonstrate that miR-203 serves as a tumor suppressor gene and may be useful as a new potential therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:27376958

  9. Expression of young HERV-H loci in the course of colorectal carcinoma and correlation with molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Bressan, Cédric; Hühns, Maja; Gock, Michael; Kühn, Florian; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Trillet-Lenoir, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-H family has been associated with colorectal carcinomas (CRC), yet no individual HERV-H locus expression has been thoroughly correlated with clinical data. Here, we characterized HERV-H reactivations in clinical CRC samples by integrating expression profiles, molecular patterns and clinical data. Expression of relevant HERV-H sequences was analyzed by qRT-PCR on two well-defined clinical cohorts (n = 139 pairs of tumor and adjacent normal colon tissue) including samples from adenomas (n = 21) and liver metastases (n = 16). Correlations with clinical and molecular data were assessed. Results CRC specific HERV-H sequences were validated and found expressed throughout CRC disease progression. Correlations between HERV-H expression and lymph node invasion of tumor cells (p = 0.0006) as well as microsatellite instable tumors (p < 0.0001) were established. No association with regard to age, tumor localization, grading or common mutations became apparent. Interestingly, CRC expressed elements belonged to specific young HERV-H subfamilies and their 5′ LTR often presented active histone marks. Conclusion These results suggest a functional role of HERV-H sequences in colorectal carcinogenesis. The pronounced connection with microsatellite instability warrants a more detailed investigation. Thus, HERV-H sequences in addition to tumor specific mutations may represent clinically relevant, truly CRC specific markers for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26517682

  10. Colorectal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Giovanni; Messerini, Luca; Gafà, Roberta; Risio, Mauro

    2011-03-01

    Epithelial colorectal tumors are common pathologic entities. Their histology report should be comprehensive of a series of pathologic parameters essential for the correct clinical management of the patients. Diagnostic histologic criteria of adenomatous, serrated, inflammatory, and hamartomatous polyps and of polyposis syndromes are discussed. In addition, the pathologic features of early and advanced colorectal cancer are described and a checklist is given. Finally, molecular prognostic and predictive factors currently employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer are discussed.

  11. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum infection with colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Yuan; Ge, Quan-Xing; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Yong-Jian; Du, Yan-Lei; Shen, Bo; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) abundance in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and its association with CRC invasiveness in Chinese patients. METHODS: The resected cancer and adjacent normal tissues (10 cm beyond cancer margins) from 101 consecutive patients with CRC were collected. Fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was applied to detect F. nucleatum in CRC and normal tissues. The difference of F. nucleatum abundance between cancer and normal tissues and the relationship of F. nucleatum abundance with clinical variables were evaluated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed on 22 CRC tissues with the highest F. nucleatum abundance by FQ-PCR testing to confirm FQ-PCR results. RESULTS: The median abundance of F. nucleatum in CRC tissues [0.242 (0.178-0.276)] was significantly higher than that in normal controls [0.050 (0.023-0.067)] (P < 0.001). F. nucleatum was over-represented in 88/101 (87.1%) CRC samples. The abundance of F. nucleatum determined by 2-ΔCT was significantly greater in tumor samples [0.242 (0.178, 0.276)] than in normal controls [0.050 (0.023, 0.067)] (P < 0.001). The frequency of patients with lymph node metastases was higher in the over-abundance group [52/88 (59.1%)] than in the under-abundance group [0/13 (0%)] (P < 0.005). No significant association of F. nucleatum with other clinico-pathological variables was observed (P > 0.05). FISH analysis also found more F. nucleatum in CRC than in normal tissues (median number 6, 25th 3, 75th 10 vs 2, 25th 1, 75th 5) (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: F. nucleatum was enriched in CRC tissues and associated with CRC development and metastasis. PMID:27004000

  12. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-12-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  13. Genetic pathways in colorectal and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, M; Straub, J; Tomlinson, I P; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Cells from cancers show aberrant behaviour such as unrestrained growth, invasion into adjacent tissue and metastasis. All these features of cancer cell behaviour can be explained in terms of genetic changes and the functional impact of these changes. In this review, colorectal cancer (CRC) is examined as a classical example of multistep carcinogenesis. First there is an overview which shows that cancers develop by a process of somatic evolution. This gives rise to preferred genetic pathways of tumorigenesis. The factors which may influence the development and ultimate choice of genetic pathways are then examined. Next, CRC is studied as a specific disease and the putative genetic pathways are described. The mutations that comprise these pathways and the possible functional sequelae of these are explored. The review concludes with a look at those avenues which may further elucidate the natural history of CRC and lead to improved therapy.

  14. Biology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a serious health problem, a challenge for research, and a model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in its development. According to its incidence, this pathology manifests itself in three forms: family, hereditary, and most commonly sporadic, apparently not associated with any hereditary or familial factor. For the types having inheritance patterns and a family predisposition, the tumours develop through defined stages ranging from adenomatous lesions to the manifestation of a malignant tumour. It has been established that environmental and hereditary factors contribute to the development of colorectal cancer, as indicated by the accumulation of mutations in oncogenes, genes which suppress and repair DNA, signaling the existence of various pathways through which the appearance of tumours may occur. In the case of the suppressive and mutating tracks, these are characterised by genetic disorders related to the phenotypical changes of the morphological progression sequence in the adenoma/carcinoma. Moreover, alternate pathways through mutation in BRAF and KRAS genes are associated with the progression of polyps to cancer. This review surveys the research done at the cellular and molecular level aimed at finding specific alternative therapeutic targets for fighting colorectal cancer. PMID:25932044

  15. Modelling multiscale aspects of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Ingeborg M. M.; Byrne, Helen M.; Johnston, Matthew D.; Edwards, Carina M.; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Bodmer, Walter F.; Maini, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is responsible for nearly half a million deaths annually world-wide [11]. We present a series of mathematical models describing the dynamics of the intestinal epithelium and the kinetics of the molecular pathway most commonly mutated in CRC, the Wnt signalling network. We also discuss how we are coupling such models to build a multiscale model of normal and aberrant guts. This will enable us to combine disparate experimental and clinical data, to investigate interactions between phenomena taking place at different levels of organisation and, eventually, to test the efficacy of new drugs on the system as a whole.

  16. MicroRNA 196B regulates FAS-mediated apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, In-Hong; Park, Won Cheol; Seo, Geom-Seog; Choi, Suck-Chei; Kim, Hun-Soo; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Yun, Ki-Jung; Chae, Soo-Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Using miRNA microarray analysis, we identified 31 miRNAs that were significantly up-regulated or down-regulated in colon cancer tissues. We chose MIR196B, which was specifically up-regulated in colon cancer, for further study. We identified 18 putative MIR196B target genes by comparing between the mRNAs down-regulated in MIR196B-overexpressed cells and the assumed MIR196B target genes predicted by public bioinformatics tools. The association between MIR196B and FAS was verified in this study. FAS expression was constitutively elevated in normal human colorectal tissues. However, its expression was often reduced in human colorectal cancer. The decrease in FAS expression could be responsible for the reduction of apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. In colorectal cancer tissue, we showed that MIR196B up-regulation was mutually followed by down regulation of FAS expression. We also showed that MIR196B directly repressed FAS expression in colorectal cells. Furthermore, anti-MIR196B up-regulated FAS expression and increased apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of MIR196B modulates apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells by partially repressing FAS expression and that anti-MIR196B could be a potential candidate as an anti-cancer drug in colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:25605245

  17. Folic acid and sodium butyrate prevent tumorigenesis in a mouse model of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rong; Wang, Xia; Sun, Dan-Feng; Tian, Xiao-Qing; Zhao, Shu-Liang; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2008-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. The role of epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, has only recently been investigated. In this study, the effects of epigenetic agents such as folic acid (FA) and sodium butyrate (NaBu) on the development of colorectal cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) using ICR mice was examined. Of the mice treated in a chemopreventive manner with epigenetic agents, FA and NaBu, 15-50% developed colorectal cancer at 24 weeks compared with a 95% incidence of colorectal cancer in DMH-treated control mice. Folate deficiency can alter cytosine methylation in DNA leading to inappropriate activation of the proto-oncogene c-myc. We detected lower levels of p21(WAF1) gene expression in colorectal cancer samples, as well as significantly lower levels of acetylated histone H3, compared with samples from corresponding normal colorectal mucosa. In contrast, administration of NaBu increased levels of p21(WAF1) mRNA and p21(WAF1) protein, and was associated with an accumulation of histone acetylation. In summary, our results show that FA and NaBu reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer induced by DMH-induced in ICR mice, and therefore we hypothesize that targeting epigenetic targets should be further investigated for the prevention of colorectal cancer in humans.

  18. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  19. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  20. Glycoprotein screening in colorectal cancer based on differentially expressed Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyun; Cheng, Zongyong; Ouyang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yanyan; Chen, Shuijiao; Wang, Chunlian; Lu, Fanggen; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the identification of new biomarkers for CRC is valuable for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to screen differentially expressed glycoproteins (especially O-glycoproteins) and to identify diagnostic or therapeutic candidates for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on different Tn antigen expression levels. Fresh cancer tissues and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from CRC patients and classified into three groups based on their Tn antigen expression: CRC with negative Tn expression (CRC Tn‑), CRC with positive Tn expression (CRC Tn+) and normal control without Tn expression (NC). Protein extractions were separated and identified by iTRAQ technology. Glycoproteins and O-glycoproteins were selected using UniProt and DAVID. Deep bioinformatic analysis, including Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KO), was used to annotate this O-glycoprotein interaction network. Subsequently, two O‑glycoproteins were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in either LS174T cells or CRC tissues. We found that 330 differentially expressed proteins were identified by iTRAQ between CRC Tn‑ and NC tissues, 317 between CRC Tn+ and NC tissues, and 316 between CRC Tn‑ and Tn+ tissues. Of the 316 proteins, 55 glycoproteins and 19 O‑glycoproteins were identified and analyzed via deep informatics. Namely, different Tn antigen expression levels in CRC led to differential protein expression patterns, especially for glycoproteins and O‑glycoproteins. Decorin and SORBS1, two representative functional O-glycoproteins, were significantly downregulated in the CRC Tn+ tissues compared with the level in the CRC Tn‑ or NC tissues. Based on this deep bioinformatic analysis, Decorin and SORBS1 are hypothesized to be involved in the TGF‑β and PPAR‑γ signaling pathways, respectively. PMID:27432485

  1. Vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure is linked to morphogenesis of colorectal polypoid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hirofumi; Enzan, Hideaki; Yasui, Wataru

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the difference of surrounding stromal structure between the polypoid and flat adenomas in the colorectum, we performed microscopic study including immunohistochemistry in a total of 32 colorectal adenomas (typical 24 polypoid and eight flat adenomas), especially focusing on vessels around muscularis mucosa. All 24 polypoid adenomas accompanied vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure in association with muscularis mucosa and submucosal vessels, whereas none of eight flat adenomas had vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure; surrounding muscularis mucosa and submucosa of the flat adenomas are identical to those of normal colorectal tissue. Vasculo-smooth muscle hamartomatous structure is linked to the morphogenesis of colorectal polypoid adenomas.

  2. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  3. Exploiting a novel miR-519c-HuR-ABCG2 regulatory pathway to overcome chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    To, Kenneth K W; Leung, W W; Ng, Simon S M

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. While surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for early stage CRC, adjuvant chemotherapy is usually given to reduce the risk of recurrence after colectomy. Overexpression of a multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter ABCG2 in vitro has been shown to cause resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and irinotecan, components of the most commonly adopted regimens for treating CRC. Both anticancer drugs are known ABCG2 substrates. An effective way to predict drug response may provide guidance for better cancer treatment. We investigated the effect of ABCG2 dysregulation on cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy using pairs of snap-frozen paraffin-embedded archival blocks of human colorectal cancer tissues and their matched non-cancerous colon tissues from CRC patients. In CRC patients responding to chemotherapy, the tumors were found to have remarkable lower ABCG2 expression than the adjacent normal colon tissues. On the contrary, the tumors from patients not responding to 5-FU-based chemotherapy have higher ABCG2 level than the adjacent normal tissues. The high ABCG2 expression in the tumor is associated with the concomitant overexpression of the mRNA binding protein HuR but a low expression of miR-519c because miR-519c is known to target both ABCG2 and HuR. Further investigation in CRC cell lines revealed that the ABCG2 overexpression was caused by an interplay between miR-519c, HuR and the length of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of ABCG2. These parameters may be further developed as useful biomarkers to predict patient response to adjuvant chemotherapy. Besides being predictive biomarkers, the microRNAs and mRNA binding protein identified may also be potential drug targets for modulating ABCG2 to combat resistance in CRC chemotherapy.

  4. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hance, J; Rockall, T; Darzi, A

    2004-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been shown to offer many advantages to general surgical patients but has not been widely adopted for colorectal disease. Initial fears surrounding the oncological safety of laparoscopic colectomies have largely subsided but the technical challenges still remain. Surgical robots or telemanipulators present the laparoscopic surgeon with unrivaled dexterity and vision, which may allow colonic resections to be completed with greater ease. Although initial studies suggest promising results using currently available systems, it will take further time for patient benefits to be proven, therefore justifying the greater expense of operating with this new technology.

  5. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent neoplasms in developed countries and up to 5% of all cases occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high index of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has major consequences not only for the patient--for whom there are highly effective preventive measures--but also for the patient's relatives, who may carry the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of Lynch's syndrome and serrated polyposis syndrome.

  6. [Genetics of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-10-01

    Up to 5% of all cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) are due to a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary forms often require a high degree of suspicion for their diagnosis and specific and specialized management. Moreover, a diagnosis of hereditary CRC has important consequences, not only for patients-for whom highly effective preventive measures are available-, but also for their relatives, who may be carriers of the same condition. The most significant advances in the field of hereditary CRC have been produced in the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes and in the discovery of new causative genes.

  7. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Jason D; Lee, Monica D; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  8. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  9. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  10. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  11. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes.

  12. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fiber . Talk with your doctor about taking aspirin every day. Taking aspirin every day can lower your risk of colorectal ... 50 to 59, ask your doctor if daily aspirin is right for you . Previous section Get Tested ...

  13. Population screening for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    Each year in the UK, around 16,000 people die from colorectal cancer. At disease presentation, around 55% of people have advanced cancer that has spread to lymph nodes, metastasised to other organs or is so locally advanced that surgery is unlikely to be curative (Dukes' stage C or D). Overall 5-year survival for colorectal cancer in the UK is around 47-51% (compared to 64% in the USA), but only 7% at most in those presenting with metastatic disease. These facts underlie the current introduction of national bowel screening programmes in the UK. Here we assess the role of screening of the general population in reducing mortality from colorectal cancer. We do not consider the screening arrangements needed for high-risk populations, including those with inflammatory bowel disease or a strong family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:17009566

  14. Fusobacterium nucleatum associates with stages of colorectal neoplasia development, colorectal cancer and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, L; Schmid, J; Ebert, M; Soucek, P; Kunicka, T; Liska, V; Bruha, J; Neary, P; Dezeeuw, N; Tommasino, M; Jenab, M; Prehn, J H M; Hughes, D J

    2014-08-01

    Commensal bacteria in the colon may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Recent studies from North America showed that Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) infection is over-represented in disease tissue versus matched normal tissue in CRC patients. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of DNA extracted from colorectal tissue biopsies and surgical resections of three European cohorts totalling 122 CRC patients, we found an over-abundance of Fn in cancerous compared to matched normal tissue (p < 0.0001). To determine whether Fn infection is an early event in CRC development, we assayed Fn in colorectal adenoma (CRA) tissue from 52 Irish patients. While for all CRAs the Fn level was not statistically significantly higher in disease versus normal tissue (p = 0.06), it was significantly higher for high-grade dysplasia (p = 0.015). As a secondary objective, we determined that CRC patients with low Fn levels had a significantly longer overall survival time than patients with moderate and high levels of the bacterium (p = 0.008). The investigation of Fn as a potential non-invasive biomarker for CRC screening showed that, while Fn was more abundant in stool samples from CRC patients compared to adenomas or controls, the levels in stool did not correlate with cancer or adenoma tissue levels from the same individuals. This is the first study examining Fn in the colonic tissue and stool of European CRC and CRA patients, and suggests Fn as a novel risk factor for disease progression from adenoma to cancer, possibly affecting patient survival outcomes. Our results highlight the potential of Fn detection as a diagnostic and prognostic determinant in CRC patients.

  15. Management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Aytac, Erman; Ozuner, Gokhan; Isik, Ozgen; Gorgun, Emre; Stocchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience on management of colorectal neoplasia during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period (< 6 mo), between 8/1997 and 4/2013, in our department were reviewed. Patient characteristics, operations, fetal health and follow-up during pregnancy, type of delivery and oncologic outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: Eight patients met our study criteria. Median age at the time of diagnosis of colorectal cancer was 31 years. Median follow-up after surgery was 36 mo. Median duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 wk. Three patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer during pregnancy and underwent surgery prior to delivery. None of the patients received adjuvant treatment during pregnancy. Five patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer within a median of 2.1 mo after delivery and underwent surgery. No adverse neonatal outcomes were noted. All deliveries were at term (2 cesarean sections) except for one preterm delivery following low anterior resection on the 34th week of pregnancy. CONCLUSION: There has been a significant delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer which is probably due to overlap of symptoms and signs between these tumors and a normal pregnancy. Surgery for colorectal cancer during pregnancy can be performed safely without compromising maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:27559434

  16. Decreasing CNPY2 Expression Diminishes Colorectal Tumor Growth and Development through Activation of p53 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Gong, Hui; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jun; He, Sheng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guo, Rui; Xie, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke

    2016-04-01

    Neovascularization drives tumor development, and angiogenic factors are important neovascularization initiators. We recently identified the secreted angiogenic factor CNPY2, but its involvement in cancer has not been explored. Herein, we investigate CNPY2's role in human colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Tumor samples were obtained from CRC patients undergoing surgery. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) expression was analyzed in tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Stable lines of human HCT116 cells expressing CNPY2 shRNA or control shRNA were established. To determine CNPY2's effects on tumor xenografts in vivo, human CNPY2 shRNA HCT116 cells and controls were injected into nude mice, separately. Cellular apoptosis, growth, and angiogenesis in the xenografts were evaluated. CNPY2 expression was significantly higher in CRC tissues. CNPY2 knockdown in HCT116 cells inhibited growth and migration and promoted apoptosis. In xenografts, CNPY2 knockdown prevented tumor growth and angiogenesis and promoted apoptosis. Knockdown of CNPY2 in the HCT116 CRC cell line reversibly increased p53 activity. The p53 activation increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and decreased cyclin-dependent kinase 2, thereby inhibiting tumor cell growth, inducing cell apoptosis, and reducing angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. CNPY2 may play a critical role in CRC development by enhancing cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis through negative regulation of the p53 pathway. Therefore, CNPY2 may represent a novel CRC therapeutic target and prognostic indicator. PMID:26835537

  17. Abnormal expression of calcyphosine is associated with poor prognosis and cell biology function in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Weiwei; Wang, Quhui; Wang, Feiran; Jiang, Yasu; Xu, Meirong; Xu, Junfei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the calcyphosine (CAPS) expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and to explore its clinical and prognostic significances. CAPS expression was measured by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, and immunohistochemistry. The relationships between the CAPS expression levels and the clinicopathological factors were investigated. The Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test were used to investigate the overall survival of the patients. Moreover, the effects of CAPS on biological roles of CRC cells were also evaluated by MTT assay, colony formation assay, and transwell assay. CAPS was significantly overexpressed in cancerous tissue and CRC cell lines compared with adjacent nontumor tissue and a normal human intestinal epithelial cell line. Overexpression of CAPS was significantly associated with histological grade (P=0.004), invasive depth (P<0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.003), tumor node metastasis stage (P=0.017), and distant metastasis (P=0.042). Furthermore, silencing of CAPS expression in CRC cells inhibited their proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that high CAPS expression might demonstrate poor prognosis in CRC patients. Cox regression analysis revealed that CAPS expression was an independent prognostic factor of CRC. Our data suggested that the upregulation of CAPS might play a role in the carcinogenesis and progression of CRC. CAPS could be used as a potential diagnostic factor and be an independent good prognostic indicator for CRC patients. PMID:26889086

  18. SERPINA4 is a novel independent prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-Min; Mi, Yu-Shuai; Yu, Fu-Dong; Han, Yang; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Lu, Su; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Sen-Lin; Ye, Ling; Liu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Dao-Hua; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Xue-Bin; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Tang, Hua-Mei; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serpina family A member 4 (SERPINA4), also known as kallistatin, exerts important effects in inhibiting tumor growth and angiogenesis in many malignancies. However, the precise role of SERPINA4 in CRC has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of SERPINA4 and its clinical significance in CRC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of SERPINA4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens was significantly decreased than that in adjacent normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of SERPINA4 by using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 327 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that decreased SERPINA4 expression was significantly associated with invasion depth, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and tumor differentiation. SERPINA4 was also an independent prognostic indicator of disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with CRC. Furthermore, the impact of altered SERPINA4 expression on CRC cells was analyzed with a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. The results demonstrated that SERPINA4 significantly inhibits malignant tumor progression and serves as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27648355

  19. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA.

  20. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  1. SERPINA4 is a novel independent prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui-Min; Mi, Yu-Shuai; Yu, Fu-Dong; Han, Yang; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Lu, Su; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Sen-Lin; Ye, Ling; Liu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Dao-Hua; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Xue-Bin; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Tang, Hua-Mei; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serpina family A member 4 (SERPINA4), also known as kallistatin, exerts important effects in inhibiting tumor growth and angiogenesis in many malignancies. However, the precise role of SERPINA4 in CRC has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of SERPINA4 and its clinical significance in CRC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of SERPINA4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens was significantly decreased than that in adjacent normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of SERPINA4 by using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 327 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that decreased SERPINA4 expression was significantly associated with invasion depth, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and tumor differentiation. SERPINA4 was also an independent prognostic indicator of disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with CRC. Furthermore, the impact of altered SERPINA4 expression on CRC cells was analyzed with a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. The results demonstrated that SERPINA4 significantly inhibits malignant tumor progression and serves as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27648355

  2. SERPINA4 is a novel independent prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-Min; Mi, Yu-Shuai; Yu, Fu-Dong; Han, Yang; Liu, Xi-Sheng; Lu, Su; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Sen-Lin; Ye, Ling; Liu, Ting-Ting; Yang, Dao-Hua; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Xue-Bin; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Tang, Hua-Mei; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serpina family A member 4 (SERPINA4), also known as kallistatin, exerts important effects in inhibiting tumor growth and angiogenesis in many malignancies. However, the precise role of SERPINA4 in CRC has not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of SERPINA4 and its clinical significance in CRC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of SERPINA4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens was significantly decreased than that in adjacent normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of SERPINA4 by using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 327 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that decreased SERPINA4 expression was significantly associated with invasion depth, nodal involvement, distant metastasis, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and tumor differentiation. SERPINA4 was also an independent prognostic indicator of disease-free survival and overall survival in patients with CRC. Furthermore, the impact of altered SERPINA4 expression on CRC cells was analyzed with a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. The results demonstrated that SERPINA4 significantly inhibits malignant tumor progression and serves as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target for CRC.

  3. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-12-14

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  4. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  5. Bio-Imaging of Colorectal Cancer Models Using Near Infrared Labeled Epidermal Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gadi; Lecht, Shimon; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Ettinger, Keren; Amsalem, Orit; Oron-Herman, Mor; Yavin, Eylon; Prus, Diana; Benita, Simon; Nissan, Aviram; Lazarovici, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Novel strategies that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have led to the clinical development of monoclonal antibodies, which treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) but only subgroups of patients with increased wild type KRAS and EGFR gene copy, respond to these agents. Furthermore, resistance to EGFR blockade inevitably occurred, making future therapy difficult. Novel bio-imaging (BOI) methods may assist in quantization of EGFR in mCRC tissue thus complementing the immunohistochemistry methodology, in guiding the future treatment of these patients. The aim of the present study was to explore the usefulness of near infrared-labeled EGF (EGF-NIR) for bio-imaging of CRC using in vitro and in vivo orthotopic tumor CRC models and ex vivo human CRC tissues. We describe the preparation and characterization of EGF-NIR and investigate binding, using BOI of a panel of CRC cell culture models resembling heterogeneity of human CRC tissues. EGF-NIR was specifically and selectively bound by EGFR expressing CRC cells, the intensity of EGF-NIR signal to background ratio (SBR) reflected EGFR levels, dose-response and time course imaging experiments provided optimal conditions for quantization of EGFR levels by BOI. EGF-NIR imaging of mice with HT-29 orthotopic CRC tumor indicated that EGF-NIR is more slowly cleared from the tumor and the highest SBR between tumor and normal adjacent tissue was achieved two days post-injection. Furthermore, images of dissected tissues demonstrated accumulation of EGF-NIR in the tumor and liver. EGF-NIR specifically and strongly labeled EGFR positive human CRC tissues while adjacent CRC tissue and EGFR negative tissues expressed weak NIR signals. This study emphasizes the use of EGF-NIR for preclinical studies. Combined with other methods, EGF-NIR could provide an additional bio-imaging specific tool in the standardization of measurements of EGFR expression in CRC tissues. PMID:23144978

  6. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Methods Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student’s t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. Results In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. Conclusions These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. PMID:27462886

  7. Colorectal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts are Genotypically Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Carmical, Joseph R.; Wood, Thomas G.; Hellmich, Mark R.; Eltorky, Mahmoud; Bohanon, Frederick J.; Chao, Celia

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the stromal microenvironment facilitate colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and “co-evolve” with the epithelial cancer cells. Genetic and epigenetic differences between normal colorectal mucosa fibroblasts (NF) and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are not known. The aim of this study is to identify differentially expressed genes and promoter methylation between NF and CAF in human CRC. RNA and DNA were extracted from cultured NF and CAF from CRC resections. Genome-wide gene expression and methylation analyses were performed using the Illumina Human HT-12 v4.0 Expression and Illumina Human Methylation 27 BeadChips. Gene expression values between NF and CAF were compared and correlated with methylation patterns. Data was analyzed using Partek Genomics Suite using one-way ANOVA and p<0.05 as significant. Ingenuity iReport™ was performed to identify potential differences in biological functions and pathways between the NF and CAF. Paired methylation and gene expression analyses from 11 NF and 10 CAF colorectal samples are reported. Unsupervised analysis of differentially expressed genes using iReport™ identified “Top Diseases” as “Cancer” and “Colorectal Cancer”. Previous genome wide studies have focused on the cancer cells. We have identified differentially expressed genes and differentially methylated promoter regions that are CAF-specific in CRC. PMID:25530743

  8. Lack of association between human papillomavirus infection and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Hanieh; Fard, Zahra Tahmasebi; Abdirad, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with nearly one million new cases identified annually. Different factors might cause colorectal cancer, one of the most prevalent cancers among both men and women. Viral aetiology in cancerous malignancies is a very important issue and so far a number of viral strains have been identified as tumour oncogene viruses. Viral infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), have recently been suggested as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unknown. Aim To assessed the association between HPV infection and colorectal cancer. Material and methods In this study, 50 cancer tissue samples and 50 samples without colon cancer were studied in order to identify HPV through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 42 adenocarcinomas, 10 were well differentiated, 30 moderated differentiated, and 2 were poorly differentiated. DNA extraction was verified by beta globin gene amplification; specific PCR was carried out based on HPV L1 consensus primers MY09/MY11. Results HPV DNA was not identified in any of the normal, adenocarcinoma, or adenoma samples. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies, the current research failed to establish a relationship between HPV infection and the incidence of colon cancer. Considering the existing inconsistencies, it is recommended that further studies be conducted with larger sample size. PMID:25396002

  9. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  10. Fusobacterium is associated with colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Amber N; Araújo-Pérez, Félix; Azcárate-Peril, Andrea; Yeh, Jen Jen; Sandler, Robert S; Keku, Temitope O

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a player in colorectal cancer (CRC). While particular imbalances in the gut microbiota have been linked to colorectal adenomas and cancer, no specific bacterium has been identified as a risk factor. Recent studies have reported a high abundance of Fusobacterium in CRC subjects compared to normal subjects, but this observation has not been reported for adenomas, CRC precursors. We assessed the abundance of Fusobacterium species in the normal rectal mucosa of subjects with (n = 48) and without adenomas (n = 67). We also confirmed previous reports on Fusobacterium and CRC in 10 CRC tumor tissues and 9 matching normal tissues by pyrosequencing. We extracted DNA from rectal mucosal biopsies and measured bacterial levels by quantitative PCR of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Local cytokine gene expression was also determined in mucosal biopsies from adenoma cases and controls by quantitative PCR. The mean log abundance of Fusobacterium or cytokine gene expression between cases and controls was compared by t-test. Logistic regression was used to compare tertiles of Fusobacterium abundance. Adenoma subjects had a significantly higher abundance of Fusobacterium species compared to controls (p = 0.01). Compared to the lowest tertile, subjects with high abundance of Fusobacterium were significantly more likely to have adenomas (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.37-9.74, p-trend 0.005). Cases but not controls had a significant positive correlation between local cytokine gene expression and Fusobacterium abundance. Among cases, the correlation for local TNF-α and Fusobacterium was r = 0.33, p = 0.06 while it was 0.44, p = 0.01 for Fusobacterium and IL-10. These results support a link between the abundance of Fusobacterium in colonic mucosa and adenomas and suggest a possible role for mucosal inflammation in this process.

  11. A Comprehensive MicroRNA Expression Profile of Liver and Lung Metastases of Colorectal Cancer with Their Corresponding Host Tissue and Its Prognostic Impact on Survival

    PubMed Central

    Pecqueux, Mathieu; Liebetrau, Isabell; Werft, Wiebke; Dienemann, Hendrik; Muley, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Joachim; Müssle, Benjamin; Rahbari, Nuh; Schölch, Sebastian; Büchler, Markus W.; Weitz, Jürgen; Reissfelder, Christoph; Kahlert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with a length of 18–25 nucleotides. They can regulate tumor invasion and metastasis by changing the expression and translation of their target mRNAs. Their expression is substantially altered in colorectal cancer cells as well as in the adjacent tumor-associated stroma. Both of these compartments have a mutual influence on tumor progression. In the development of metastases, cancer cells initially interact with the host tissue. Therefore, compartment-specific expression signatures of these three locations—tumor, associated stroma, and host tissue—can provide new insights into the complex tumor biology of colorectal cancer. Frozen tissue samples of colorectal liver (n = 25) and lung metastases (n = 24) were laser microdissected to separate tumor cells and the adjacent tumor-associated stroma cells. Additionally, normal lung and liver tissue was collected from the same patients. We performed a microarray analysis in four randomly selected liver metastases and four randomly selected lung metastases, analyzing a total of 939 human miRNAs. miRNAs with a significant change >2-fold between the tumor, tumor stroma, and host tissue were analyzed in all samples using RT-qPCR (11 miRNAs) and correlated with the clinical data. We found a differential expression of several miRNAs between the tumor, the tumor-associated stroma, and the host tissue compartment. When comparing liver and lung metastases, miR-194 showed a 1.5-fold; miR-125, miR-127, and miR-192 showed a 2.5-fold; miR-19 and miR-215 a 3-fold; miR-145, miR-199-3, and miR-429 a 5-fold; miR-21 a 7-fold; and, finally, miR-199-5 a 12.5-fold downregulation in liver metastases compared to lung metastases. Furthermore miR-19, miR-125, miR-127, miR-192, miR-194, miR-199-5, and miR-215 showed a significant upregulation in the normal liver tissue compared to the normal lung tissue. Univariate analysis identified an association of poor survival with the expression of miR-125 (p = 0

  12. Laparoscopic Colorectal Training Gap in Colorectal and Surgical Residents

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mark; Williamson, Paul; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is an established safe procedure with demonstrated benefits. Proficiency in this specialty correlates with the volume of cases. We examined training in this surgical field for both general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents to determine whether the number of cases needed for proficiency is being realized. Methods: We examined the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Board of Colorectal Surgeons (ABCRS) operative statistics for graduating general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residents. Results: Although the number of advanced laparoscopy cases had increased for general surgery residents, there was still a significant gap in case volume between the average number of laparoscopic colorectal operations performed by graduating general surgery residents (21.6) and those performed by graduating colon and rectal surgery residents (81.9) in 2014. Conclusion: There is a gap between general surgery and colon and rectal surgery residency training for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. General surgery residents are not meeting the volume of cases necessary for proficiency in colorectal surgery. This deficit represents a structural difference in training. PMID:27493468

  13. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yan; Lv, Liyang; Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao; Cao, Lili

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  14. Quantitative Profiling of Colorectal Cancer-Associated Bacteria Reveals Associations between Fusobacterium spp., Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and Clinicopathological Features of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Katie S.; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  15. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  16. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  17. LRIG1, a 3p tumor suppressor, represses EGFR signaling and is a novel epigenetic silenced gene in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Changhua; Zhou, Tian; Han, Xilin; Zhuang, Huijie; Qian, Haixin

    2015-08-21

    Downregulation of LRIG1 was found in many types of cancer. However, data concerning the possible mechanism of LRIG1 reduction in cancers were not reported yet. To analyze the regulation and function of LRIG1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), 6 cell lines, 46 paired tissues from primary CRC cases were employed in this study. In CRC cell lines, under-expression of LRIG1 was correlated with promoter region hypermethylation, and restoration of LRIG1 was induced by 5-Aza-2'-deoxyazacytidine treatment. Subsequently, we ectopically expressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 low-expressing HCT-116 cells and suppressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 high-expressing LoVo cells. We found that over-expression of LRIG1 inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation and tumor growth, while knockdown of LRIG1 promotes cell proliferation and colony formation. Decreased and increased EGFR/AKT signaling pathway may partially explain the lower and higher rates of proliferation in CRC cells transfected with LRIG1 cDNA or shRNA. In clinical samples, we compared the methylation, mRNA and protein expression of LRIG1 in samples of CRC tissues. A significant increase in LRIG1 methylation was identified in CRC specimens compared to adjacent normal tissues and that it was negatively correlated with its mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, LRIG1 is frequently methylated in human CRC and consequent mRNA and protein downregulation may contribute to tumor growth by activating EGFR/AKT signaling. - Highlights: • Promoter methylation of LRIG1 occurred in colorectal cancer cells and tumors. • Restoration of LRIG1 inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. • Overexpression or knockdown of LRIG1 regulates EGFR/AKT and downstream apoptosis. • Methylation of LRIG1 correlates with its mRNA and protein downregulation. • LRIG1 was firstly identified as an epigenetic target in cancer.

  18. miR-448 suppresses proliferation and invasion by regulating IGF1R in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bai; Ge, Liang; Li, Minghe; Wang, Lei; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that miR-448 expression was downregulated, and exerted tumor suppressor roles in several types of cancer. However, the biological function and underlying mechanism of miR-448 in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been elucidated. In this study, we detected the miR-448 expression in CRC tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues (ANT) and five colorectal cancer cell lines by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion were investigated in CRC cells transfected miR-448 mimic or negative control mimic by MTT, colony forming, wound healing and transwell invasion assays, respectively. Target gene was identified by bioinformatic prediction, dual-luciferase reporter assay, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Our data proved that miR-448 expression was downregulated in CRC tissues and cell lines, and was inversely associated with advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P < 0.01), and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01). Overexpression of miR-448 suppressed CRC cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. Moreover, we identified insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) as a direct target gene of miR-448 in CRC cell. IGF1R expression was upregulated in CRC tissues and cell lines, and its expression was negatively correlated with the expression level of miR-448 in CRC tissues(r = -0.569, P = 0.002). In addition, IGF1R overexpression rescued the suppressive effect of miR-448-mediated CRC on cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. These results suggested that miR-448 might serve as a tumor suppressor in CRC partly through targeting IGF1R. PMID:27508021

  19. Colorectal cancer in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Carlos Gouveia; Paquete, Ana Teresa; Pissarra, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diagnosis and deaths caused by colorectal cancer (CRC) warrant closer examination of affected patients and focus on management of CRC in Portugal. In order to assess the extent and quality of the information available in Portugal, we first analyse Portuguese cancer registries and then the management of CRC by discussing the diagnostic process and medical care provided, especially pharmaceuticals. Other cancer indications are mentioned in order to illustrate current approaches of cancer in Portugal. Current national data on cancer patients are scarce and there are divergencies in methods of data collection and treatment amongst regional cancer registries. However, the available data is sufficient enough to understand the dimension of CRC, with age-standardised incidence of 37 per 100,000 and mortality of 31 per 100,000 annually. An ongoing project is restructuring health services to improve efficiency and quality, however, some problems exist. The regional inequity of access to health care facilities and long waiting times for diagnostic examinations and surgery are major examples. Despite the non-availability of clinical guidelines, a pilot screening programme started at the beginning of 2009 in the Centre Region of the country. It is hoped that this overview will provide the basis for discussion on improvements in CRC management in Portugal and lead to better outcomes.

  20. Immunotherapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels; Zörnig, Inka; Klug, Paula; Krauss, Jürgen; Haag, Georg-Martin

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the immune response, reflected by high T cell infiltrates in primary tumors and metastases, influences the clinical course of colorectal cancer (CRC). Therefore, immunotherapy concepts have been adapted from other tumor entities, which typically rely on the activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules PD-1 and CTLA-4). However, most of the strategies using the approved checkpoint inhibitors and/or combination strategies have more or less failed to produce impressive results in early phase trials in CRC. Therefore, a number of novel targets for checkpoint inhibition are currently in early phase clinical testing (TIM-3, Lag-3, OX40, GITR, 4-1BB, CD40, CD70). A simple activation of infiltrating T cells will not, however, lead to a meaningful anti-tumor response without modulating the environmental factors in CRC. Thus, it is absolutely necessary to improve our understanding of the complex regulation of the tumor microenvironment in CRC to design individual combination treatments leading to effective immune control. PMID:27259331

  1. Animal Models of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert L.; Fleet, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the United States. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist. PMID:23076650

  2. Animal models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Fleet, James C

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that afflicts a large number of people in the USA. The use of animal models has the potential to increase our understanding of carcinogenesis, tumor biology, and the impact of specific molecular events on colon biology. In addition, animal models with features of specific human colorectal cancers can be used to test strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms driving human cancer, we discuss the approaches one can take to model colon cancer in animals, and we describe a number of specific animal models that have been developed for the study of colon cancer. We believe that there are many valuable animal models to study various aspects of human colorectal cancer. However, opportunities for improving upon these models exist.

  3. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers. PMID:27096035

  4. Sphingosine kinase 1 is upregulated with lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Inoue, Satoru; Yoshida, Yuki; Kodaka, Atsushi; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Tsuiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of SphK1, an oncogenic kinase that produces sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and its correlation with the expression of LPAR2, a major lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor overexpressed in various cancers, in human colorectal cancer. METHODS: Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the mRNA expression of SphK1, LPAR2, and the three major S1P receptors in 27 colorectal cancer samples and corresponding normal tissue samples. We also examined the correlation between the expression of SphK1 and LPAR2. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer tissue in 22 of 27 patients had higher levels of SphK1 mRNA than in normal tissue. In two-thirds of the samples, SphK1 mRNA expression was more than two-fold higher than in normal tissue. Consistent with previous reports, LPAR2 mRNA expression in 20 of 27 colorectal cancer tissue samples was higher compared to normal tissue samples. Expression profiles of all three major S1P receptors, S1PR1, S1PR2, and S1PR3, varied without any trend, with no significant difference in expression between cancer and normal tissues. A highly significant positive correlation was found between SphK1 and LPAR2 expression [Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) = 0.784 and P < 0.01]. The mRNA levels of SphK1 and LPAR2 did not correlate with TNM stage. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that S1P and LPA may play important roles in the development of colorectal cancer via the upregulation of SphK1 and LPAR2, both of which could serve as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26937138

  5. Chromogranin positive cells in colorectal carcinoma and transitional mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, M; Mimori, K; Kamakura, T; Adachi, Y; Ikeda, Y; Sugimachi, K

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--Immunostaining of chromogranin identifies gastrointestinal mucosal endocrine cells. The detailed distribution and significance of chromogranin positive cells in colorectal carcinomas and in transitional mucosa remain unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify these aspects. METHODS--The distribution of chromogranin positive cells was studied by immunohistochemical methods in normal epithelium remote from carcinoma, in transitional mucosa, and in carcinomas of the colorectum. In selected cases northern or western blot analyses were performed. RESULTS--Chromogranin positive cells were seen in the lower third of the normal crypts and less frequently in transitional mucosa. Thirty five per cent (n = 38) of colorectal carcinomas showed immunohistochemically positive carcinoma cells in the tumour tissue. Northern and western blot analyses showed similar results. There was no difference in clinicopathological factors, including prognosis, between chromogranin positive cases of colorectal carcinoma (n = 38) and chromogranin negative cases (n = 70). CONCLUSIONS--Neuroendocrine cell differentiation is controlled in transitional mucosa and the presence of chromogranin positive cells in carcinoma tissue does not influence the patient's prognosis. Images PMID:7560204

  6. Common genetic variation in ETV6 is associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meilin; Gu, Dongying; Du, Mulong; Xu, Zhi; Zhang, Suzhan; Zhu, Lingjun; Lu, Jiachun; Zhang, Rui; Xing, Jinliang; Miao, Xiaoping; Chu, Haiyan; Hu, Zhibin; Yang, Lei; Tang, Cuiju; Pan, Lei; Du, Haina; Zhao, Jian; Du, Jiangbo; Tong, Na; Sun, Jielin; Shen, Hongbing; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhengdong; Chen, Jinfei

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer, but much of heritability remains unexplained. To identify additional susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer, here we perform a GWAS in 1,023 cases and 1,306 controls and replicate the findings in seven independent samples from China, comprising 5,317 cases and 6,887 controls. We find a variant at 12p13.2 associated with colorectal cancer risk (rs2238126 in ETV6, P=2.67 × 10−10). We replicate this association in an additional 1,046 cases and 1,076 controls of European ancestry (P=0.034). The G allele of rs2238126 confers earlier age at onset of colorectal cancer (P=1.98 × 10−6) and reduces the binding affinity of transcriptional enhancer MAX. The mRNA level of ETV6 is significantly lower in colorectal tumours than in paired normal tissues. Our findings highlight the potential importance of genetic variation in ETV6 conferring susceptibility to colorectal cancer. PMID:27145994

  7. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D.; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E.; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  8. Effects of octreotide on responses to colorectal distension in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Su, X; Burton, M; Gebhart, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—It has been suggested that the analgesic effect of the somatostatin analogue octreotide in visceral pain involves peripheral mechanisms. We evaluated the effect of octreotide on responses to noxious colorectal distension in rats.
METHODS—In a behavioural study, pressor and electromyographic responses to colorectal distension were evaluated before and after intravenous or intrathecal administration of octreotide. In pelvic nerve afferent fibre recordings, responses of mechanosensitive fibres innervating the colon to noxious colorectal distension (80 mm Hg, 30 seconds) were tested before and after octreotide.
RESULTS—Octreotide was ineffective in attenuating responses to colorectal distension in either normal or acetic acid inflamed colon when administered intravenously but attenuated responses when given intrathecally. Administration of octreotide over a broad dose range (0.5 µg/kg to 2.4 mg/kg) did not alter responses of afferent fibres to noxious colorectal distension in untreated, or acetic acid or zymosan treated colons.
CONCLUSIONS—In the rat, octreotide has no peripheral (pelvic nerve) modulatory action in visceral nociception. The antinociceptive effect of octreotide in this model of visceral nociception is mediated by an action at central sites.


Keywords: octreotide; colorectal distension; electromyographic responses; afferent fibres; visceral pain; analgesic effect; rat PMID:11302968

  9. Significant overexpression of DVL1 in Taiwanese colorectal cancer patients with liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Yii; Yen, Li-Chen; Liu, Hsueh-Chiao; Liu, Po-Ping; Chung, Fu-Yen; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2013-10-14

    Undetected micrometastasis plays a key role in the metastasis of cancer in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The aim of this study is to identify a biomarker of CRC patients with liver metastasis through the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Microarray and bioinformatics analysis of 10 CRC cancer tissue specimens compared with normal adjacent tissues revealed that 31 genes were up-regulated (gene expression ratio of cancer tissue to paired normal tissue > 2) in the cancer patients. We used a weighted enzymatic chip array (WEnCA) including 31 prognosis-related genes to investigate CTCs in 214 postoperative stage I-III CRC patients and to analyze the correlation between gene expression and clinico-pathological parameters. We employed the immunohistochemistry (IHC) method with polyclonal mouse antibody against DVL1 to detect DVL1 expression in 60 CRC patients. CRC liver metastasis occurred in 19.16% (41/214) of the patients. Using univariate analysis and multivariate proportional hazards regression analysis, we found that DVL1 mRNA overexpression had a significant, independent predictive value for liver metastasis in CRC patients (OR: 5.764; 95% CI: 2.588-12.837; p < 0.0001 on univariate analysis; OR: 3.768; 95% CI: 1.469-9.665; p = 0.006 on multivariate analysis). IHC staining of the immunoreactivity of DVL1 showed that DVL1 was localized in the cytoplasm of CRC cells. High expression of DVL1 was observed in 55% (33/60) of CRC tumor specimens and was associated significantly with tumor depth, perineural invasion and liver metastasis status (all p < 0.05). Our experimental results demonstrated that DVL1 is significantly overexpressed in CRC patients with liver metastasis, leading us to conclude that DVL1 could be a potential prognostic and predictive marker for CRC patients.

  10. Aspirin and the risk of colorectal cancer in relation to the expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD).

    PubMed

    Fink, Stephen P; Yamauchi, Mai; Nishihara, Reiko; Jung, Seungyoun; Kuchiba, Aya; Wu, Kana; Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Markowitz, Sanford D; Chan, Andrew T

    2014-04-23

    Aspirin use reduces the risk of colorectal neoplasia, at least in part, through inhibition of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2, cyclooxygenase 2)-related pathways. Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15-(nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) (15-PGDH, HPGD) is down-regulated in colorectal cancers and functions as a metabolic antagonist of PTGS2. We hypothesized that the effect of aspirin may be antagonized by low 15-PGDH expression in the normal colon. In the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, we collected data on aspirin use every 2 years and followed up participants for diagnoses of colorectal cancer. Duplication-method Cox proportional, multivariable-adjusted, cause-specific hazards regression for competing risks data was used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) for incident colorectal cancer according to 15-PGDH mRNA expression level measured in normal mucosa from colorectal cancer resections. Among 127,865 participants, we documented 270 colorectal cancer cases from which we could assess 15-PGDH expression. Compared with nonuse, regular aspirin use was associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer that developed within a background of colonic mucosa with high 15-PGDH expression [multivariable HR, 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.71], but not with low 15-PGDH expression (multivariable HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.27) (P for heterogeneity = 0.018). Regular aspirin use was associated with lower incidence of colorectal cancers arising in association with high 15-PGDH expression, but not with low 15-PGDH expression in normal colon mucosa. This suggests that 15-PGDH expression level in normal colon mucosa may serve as a biomarker that may predict stronger benefit from aspirin chemoprevention. PMID:24760190

  11. Dipeptidase 1: a candidate tumor-specific molecular marker in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McIver, C M; Lloyd, J M; Hewett, P J; Hardingham, J E

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify tumor-specific markers for the detection of rare disseminated colorectal tumor cells in peripheral venous blood and in intra-peritoneal saline lavage samples collected before and after resection of colorectal tumors. Using cDNA micro-array screening, we found dipeptidase 1 (DPEP1) to be highly expressed in colon tumors compared to matched normal mucosa. Relative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed that DPEP1 was over-expressed by >/=2 fold in colon tumor compared to normal colonic mucosal tissue in 56/68 (82%) patients. Using immunobead RT-PCR, a technique that first enriches for epithelial cells, we found DPEP1 positive cells in intra-peritoneal lavage and venous blood samples from 15/38 (39%) colorectal cancer cases. This is the first report of DPEP1 as a marker for disseminated colon tumor cells.

  12. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. The Mendelian colorectal cancer syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A small minority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) (≤5%) are caused by a single, inherited faulty gene. These diseases, the Mendelian colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes, have been central to our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in general. Most of the approximately 13 high-penetrance genes that predispose to CRC primarily predispose to colorectal polyps, and each gene is associated with a specific type of polyp, whether conventional adenomas (APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1), juvenile polyps (SMAD4, BMPR1A), Peutz-Jeghers hamartomas (LKB1/STK11) and mixed polyps of serrated and juvenile types (GREM1). Lynch syndrome (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2), by contrast, is associated primarily with cancer risk. Major functional pathways are consistently inactivated in the Mendelian CRC syndromes: certain types of DNA repair (proofreading of DNA replication errors, mismatch repair and base excision repair) and signalling (bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Wnt signalling and mTOR). The inheritance of the CRC syndromes also varies: most are dominant but some of the DNA repair deficiencies are recessive. Some of the Mendelian CRC genes are especially important because they play a role through somatic inactivation in sporadic CRC (APC, MLH1, SMAD4, POLE). Additional Mendelian CRC genes may remain to be discovered and searches for these genes are ongoing, especially in patients with multiple adenomas and hyperplastic polyps. PMID:26169059

  14. What's New in Colorectal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for colorectal cancer What’s new in colorectal cancer research? Research is always going ... ways to find colorectal cancer early by studying new types of screening tests and improving the ones ...

  15. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  16. Colorectal adenocarcinoma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, M B; Greenstein, A J; Sachar, D B; Barth, J; Balasubramanian, S; Harpaz, N; Heimann, T M; Aufses, A H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to review the clinical features and estimate the long-term survival of patients with colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Recent studies have demonstrated a significantly increased risk of colorectal carcinoma in patients with Crohns disease. METHODS: The authors reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 30 patients with Crohn's disease admitted to The Mount Sinai Hospital between 1960 and 1989 in whom colorectal adenocarcinoma developed. All patients were operated on and follow-up was complete for all patients to 10 years after operation, to the time of death, or to the closing date of the study in December 1989. RESULTS: The 30 patients in the series had 33 colorectal adenocarcinomas; three patients (10%) presented with two synchronous cancers. The patients were relatively young (mean age, 53 years) and had long-standing Crohn's disease (duration >20 years in 87%). The 5-year actuarial survival was 44% for the overall series: 100% for stage A, 86% for stage B, 60% for stage C. All five patients with excluded bowel tumor died of large bowel cancer within 2.4 years; by contrast, the actuarial 5-year survival for patients with in-continuity tumors was 56%. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence, characteristics, and prognosis of colorectal carcinoma complicating Crohn's disease are similar to the features of cancer in ulcerative colitis, including young age, multiple neoplasms, long duration of disease, and greater than a 50% 5-year survival rate (without excluded loops). These observations suggest the advisability of surveillance programs for Crohn's disease of the colon similar to those for ulcerative colitis of comparable duration and extent. PMID:8597513

  17. Epigenetic silencing of monoallelically methylated miRNA loci in precancerous colorectal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Menigatti, M; Staiano, T; Manser, C N; Bauerfeind, P; Komljenovic, A; Robinson, M; Jiricny, J; Buffoli, F; Marra, G

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of protein-encoding genes is common in early-stage colorectal tumorigenesis. Less is known about the methylation-mediated silencing of genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs), which are also important epigenetic modulators of gene expression. Using quantitative PCR, we identified 56 miRNAs that were expressed in normal colorectal mucosa and in HT29 colorectal cancer cells treated with demethylating agents but not in untreated HT29 cells, suggesting that they probably undergo methylation-induced silencing during colorectal tumorigenesis. One of these, miR-195, had recently been reported to be underexpressed in colorectal cancers and to exert tumor-suppressor effects in colorectal cancer cells. We identified the transcription start site (TSS) for primary miRNA (pri-miR)-497/195, the primary precursor that yields miR-195 and another candidate on our list, miR-497, and a single CpG island upstream to the TSS, which controls expression of both miRNAs. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite genomic sequencing studies revealed monoallelic methylation of this island in normal colorectal mucosa (50/50 samples) and full methylation in most colorectal adenomas (38/50; 76%). The hypermethylated precancerous lesions displayed significantly downregulated expression of both miRNAs. Similar methylation patterns were observed at two known imprinted genes, MEG3 and GNAS-AS1, which encode several of the 56 miRNAs on our list. Imprinting at these loci was lost in over half the adenomas (62% at MEG3 and 52% at GNAS-AS1). Copy-number alterations at MEG3, GNAS-AS1 and pri-miR-497/195, which are frequent in colorectal cancers, were less common in adenomas and confined to tumors displaying differential methylation at the involved locus. Our data show that somatically acquired, epigenetic changes at monoallelically methylated regions encoding miRNAs are relatively frequent in sporadic colorectal adenomas and might contribute to the onset and progression of

  18. Epigenetic silencing of monoallelically methylated miRNA loci in precancerous colorectal lesions.

    PubMed

    Menigatti, M; Staiano, T; Manser, C N; Bauerfeind, P; Komljenovic, A; Robinson, M; Jiricny, J; Buffoli, F; Marra, G

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of protein-encoding genes is common in early-stage colorectal tumorigenesis. Less is known about the methylation-mediated silencing of genes encoding microRNAs (miRNAs), which are also important epigenetic modulators of gene expression. Using quantitative PCR, we identified 56 miRNAs that were expressed in normal colorectal mucosa and in HT29 colorectal cancer cells treated with demethylating agents but not in untreated HT29 cells, suggesting that they probably undergo methylation-induced silencing during colorectal tumorigenesis. One of these, miR-195, had recently been reported to be underexpressed in colorectal cancers and to exert tumor-suppressor effects in colorectal cancer cells. We identified the transcription start site (TSS) for primary miRNA (pri-miR)-497/195, the primary precursor that yields miR-195 and another candidate on our list, miR-497, and a single CpG island upstream to the TSS, which controls expression of both miRNAs. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite genomic sequencing studies revealed monoallelic methylation of this island in normal colorectal mucosa (50/50 samples) and full methylation in most colorectal adenomas (38/50; 76%). The hypermethylated precancerous lesions displayed significantly downregulated expression of both miRNAs. Similar methylation patterns were observed at two known imprinted genes, MEG3 and GNAS-AS1, which encode several of the 56 miRNAs on our list. Imprinting at these loci was lost in over half the adenomas (62% at MEG3 and 52% at GNAS-AS1). Copy-number alterations at MEG3, GNAS-AS1 and pri-miR-497/195, which are frequent in colorectal cancers, were less common in adenomas and confined to tumors displaying differential methylation at the involved locus. Our data show that somatically acquired, epigenetic changes at monoallelically methylated regions encoding miRNAs are relatively frequent in sporadic colorectal adenomas and might contribute to the onset and progression of

  19. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  20. Preoperative staging of colorectal cancer: CT vs. integrated FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Chung, Tae Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2008-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging is essential in determining the optimal therapeutic planning for individual patients. The computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer, even if controversial, may be useful for planning surgery and/or neoadjuvant therapy, particularly when local tumor extension into adjacent organs or distant metastases are detected. There have been significant changes in the CT technology with the advent of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner. Advances in CT technology have raised interest in the potential role of CT for detection and staging of colorectal cancer. In recent studies, MDCT with MPR images has shown promising accuracy in the evaluation of local extent and nodal involvement of colorectal cancer. Combined PET/CT images have significant advantages over either alone because it provides both functional and anatomical data. Therefore, it is natural to expect that PET/CT would improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of colorectal cancer. The most significant additional information provided by PET/CT relates to the accurate detection of distant metastases. For the evaluation of patients with colorectal cancer, CT has relative advantages over PET/CT in regard to the depth of tumor invasion through the wall, extramural extension, and regional lymph node metastases. PET/CT should be performed on selected patients with suggestive but inconclusive metastatic lesions with CT. In addition, PET/CT with dedicated CT protocols, such as contrast-enhanced PET/CT and PET/CT colonography, may replace the diagnostic CT for the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer.

  1. Current concepts in colorectal cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Patricia A; Gerner, Eugene W

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer chemoprevention, or chemoprophylaxis, is a drug-based approach to prevent colorectal cancer. Preventing colorectal adenomas with currently available agents demonstrates the promise of pharmacologic strategies directed at critical regulatory pathways. However, agent toxicity, lesion breakthrough and competing efficacy from endoscopy procedures challenge population-based implementation. This article reviews the role of colorectal cancer chemoprevention in the context of existing screening and surveillance guidelines and practice. Emphasis is placed on the role of the colorectal adenoma as a cancer precursor and its surrogacy in assessing individual risk and for evaluating chemoprevention efficacy. We discuss the importance of risk stratification for identifying subjects at moderate-to-high risk for colorectal cancer who are most likely to benefit from chemoprevention at an acceptable level of risk. PMID:19673624

  2. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. hcrcn81 promotes cell proliferation through Wnt signaling pathway in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Tingting; Shi, Lihong; He, Kunyan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the role of hcrcn81 gene in Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway related to human colorectal cancer. A total of 30 pairs of human colorectal cancer tissues with control normal tissues were analyzed by qRT-PCR. The proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, cell colony and metastasis of LS174T(-hcrcn81), HCT116(-hcrcn81), LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) cells were tested, of which hcrcn81 was knockdown in LS174T, HCT116 cells and hcrcn81 was overexpressed in LoVo, SMMC-7721 cells. Besides, the mRNA and protein levels of hcrcn81, β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclinD1, GSK-3β and survivin in colon cancer cell lines were evaluated by qRT-PCR and western blot. The mRNA levels of β-catenin and Survivin were up-regulated in 76.7 % (23/30) and 63.3 % (19/30) of the tumor samples, respectively. hcrcn81 and GSK-3β mRNA expression levels were down-regulated in 20/30 (66.7 %) and 21/30 (70.0 %) of the tumor samples as compared to the adjacent normal tissues, respectively. Furthermore, in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) cells, the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclinD1 and Survivin were up-regulated, whereas those of GSK-3 were down-regulated. In LS174T(-hcrcn81) and HCT116(-hcrcn81) cells, the mRNA levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclinD1 and Survivin were down-regulated, whereas GSK-3βmRNA was up-regulated. Cell proliferation in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) groups was significantly enhanced (P < 0.05). Proliferation index in both LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) groups was significantly higher than that in the control groups (P < 0.05). The number of colony in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) cells were significantly higher than that in the control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) groups were significantly lower than that in the control groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Finally, the number of migrating cells was

  4. Concentration of folate in colorectal tissue biopsies predicts prevalence of adenomatous polyps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Folate has been implicated as a potential aetiological factor for colorectal cancer. Previous research has not adequately exploited concentrations of folate in normal colonic mucosal biopsies to examine the issue. Methods: Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs ...

  5. [Signet ring cell colorectal carcinom - case report].

    PubMed

    Matkovčík, Z; Hlad, J

    2015-08-01

    Signet ring cell colorectal carcinoma is a rare aggressive tumor. The incidence of this desease is very low in young patients and accounts up to 1% of all surgical patients with colorectal cancer. The infrequency of the disease among young patients makes the diagnosis more difficult and the prognosis less favourable. Biopsy results are crucial for verification of signet ring cell carcinoma. Treatment is similar as in other types of colorectal cancer. We report a case of signet ring cell colon cancer in a 22 years old female patient.The aim of this paper is to point out this rare case of infrequent colorectal cancer in a young female patient. PMID:26395957

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  7. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  8. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  9. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  10. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  11. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  12. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  14. Top-down morphogenesis of colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Tian-Li; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Kathy; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Ben-Sasson, Shmuel; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2001-01-01

    One of the fundamental tenets of oncology is that tumors arise from stem cells. In the colon, stem cells are thought to reside at the base of crypts. In the early stages of tumorigenesis, however, dysplastic cells are routinely found at the luminal surface of the crypts whereas the cells at the bases of these same crypts appear morphologically normal. To understand this discrepancy, we evaluated the molecular characteristics of cells isolated from the bases and orifices of the same crypts in small colorectal adenomas. We found that the dysplastic cells at the tops of the crypts often exhibited genetic alterations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and neoplasia-associated patterns of gene expression. In contrast, cells located at the base of these same crypts did not contain such alterations and were not clonally related to the contiguous transformed cells above them. These results imply that development of adenomatous polyps proceeds through a top-down mechanism. Genetically altered cells in the superficial portions of the mucosae spread laterally and downward to form new crypts that first connect to preexisting normal crypts and eventually replace them. PMID:11226292

  15. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  16. Allelic loss in colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, S.E.; Fearon, E.R.; Tersmette, K.W.F.; Enterline, J.P.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Leppert, M.; Nakamura, Yusuke; White, R. )

    1989-06-02

    Clinical and pathological associations with molecular genetic alterations were studied in colorectal carcinomas from 83 patients. Fractional allelic loss, a measure of allelic deletions throughout the genome, and allelic deletions of specific chromosomal arms (the short arm of 17 and long arm of 18) each provided independent prognostic information by multivariate analysis when considered individually with Dukes' classification. Distant metastasis was significantly associated with high fractional allelic loss and with deletions of 17p and 18q. Mutations of ras proto-oncogenes and deletions of 5q had no prognostic importance. Statistically significant associations were also found between allelic losses and a family history of cancer, left-sided tumor location, and absence of extracellular tumor mucin. Allelic deletion analysis thus identified subsets of colorectal carcinoma with increased predilection for distant metastasis and cancer-related death. Further studies may define a subset of genetic alterations that can be used clinically to help assess prognosis.

  17. General aspects of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Centelles, Josep J

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the main causes of death. Cancer is initiated by several DNA damages, affecting proto-oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, and DNA repairing genes. The molecular origins of CRC are chromosome instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI), and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). A brief description of types of CRC cancer is presented, including sporadic CRC, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndromes, familiar adenomatous polyposis (FAP), MYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS). Some signalling systems for CRC are also described, including Wnt-β-catenin pathway, tyrosine kinase receptors pathway, TGF-β pathway, and Hedgehog pathway. Finally, this paper describes also some CRC treatments.

  18. The diagnostics of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Swiderska, Magdalena; Choromańska, Barbara; Dąbrowska, Ewelina; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Choromańska, Katarzyna; Szczurko, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Piotr; Dadan, Jacek; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent human malignant neoplasms. CRC has an estimated incidence of more than 1,000,000 new cases annually worldwide. Approximately one out of three people who develop CRC dies from the disease. Furthermore, CRC often affects inhabitants of industrialized countries in comparison to less developed countries. Several markers of colon cancer, including CEA, CA-19-9, TPS, TAG-72 and lysosomal hydrolases, have been identified and are now being adopted in routine clinical practice. Increased values of these markers are often the first signal of recurrence or metastases, which is useful in prediction and prognosis of clinical outcome of patients with CRC. Determination of the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in body fluids may bring some hope of improving diagnosis of colorectal cancer. However, it has to be remembered that currently the most effective diagnostic method of CRC is endoscopy. PMID:24876814

  19. Fascin expression in colorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ozerhan, Ismail Hakki; Ersoz, Nail; Onguru, Onder; Ozturk, Mustafa; Kurt, Bulent; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the significance of fascin expression in colorectal carcinoma. METHODS This is a retrospective study of 167 consecutive, well-documented cases of primary colorectal adenocarcinoma for which archival material of surgical specimens from primary tumor resections were available. We chose a representative tissue sample block and examined fascin expression by immunohistochemistry using a primary antibody against “fascin”. We calculated the “immunohistochemical score (IHS)” of fascin for each case, which was calculated from the multiplication of scores for the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity. RESULTS Fascin immunoreactivity was observed in 59 (35.3%) of all cases with strong reactivity in 24 (14.4%), moderate reactivity in 25 (14.9%) and weak reactivity in 10 (6.0%) cases. Strong/moderate immunoreactivities were mostly observed in invasive fronts of the tumors or in both invasive and other areas. Fascin immunoreactivity scores were significantly higher in tumors with lymph node metastasis (p:0.002) and advanced stage presentation (p:0.007). There was no relation between fascin expression and age, gender, depth of invasion, distant metastasis or histological grade (p>0.05). There was a higher and statistically significant correlation between fascin immunoreactivity in the invasive borders of tumors and lymph node metastasis (r:0.747, p:0.005). In stage III/IV tumors, two-year survival was 92.2% in tumors without fascin immunoreactivity, and only 60.0% in tumors with a fascin IHS>10 (p:0.003). CONCLUSION These findings suggest that fascin is heterogeneously expressed in approximately one third of colorectal carcinomas with a significant association with lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and location. Moreover, these results indicate that fascin may have a role in the lymph node metastasis of colorectal carcinomas. PMID:20186299

  20. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  1. [Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers of Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Umemura, Tsukuru; Kuroki, Chieri

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common tumor in Japan, causing almost 50,000 deaths per year. The development of new biomarkers is strongly desired, in order to detect the early stage of colorectal cancer with high sensitivity and specificity, using less invasive and high through-put methods. miRNA is a small non-coding RNA which regulates gene expression by digesting mRNA or suppressing translation. miRNAs are stable and present in blood, urine, stool, and other body fluids. The profiles of miRNAs in body fluid are specific to pathological states. There is accumulating data showing the usefulness of miRNAs as new biomarkers for colorectal cancer. We summarize the current knowledge in the previous literature (10 plasma analyses: sensitivity: 83.3 to 89%, specificity: 41 to 84.7%, AUC: 0.606 to 0.896; 13 serum analyses: sensitivity: 66.7 to 96.4%, specificity: 63.9 to 88.1%, AUC: 0.679 to 0.918; and 8 fecal analyses: sensitivity: 70.9 to 81.8%, specificity: 68.4 to 96.3%, AUC: 0.64 to 0.829). We focus on the standardization of miRNA analysis, namely: 1) preanalytical processes: difference of miRNA levels between plasma and serum, sampling methods, preparation of plasma or serum, and preservation of samples; 2) analytical processes: mRNA extraction methods, amplification, normalizer, and cut-off values. In conclusion, miRNAs are expected to become new biomarkers for colorectal cancer screening. PMID:26524857

  2. miR-153 supports colorectal cancer progression via pleiotropic effects that enhance invasion and chemotherapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Pickard, Karen; Jenei, Veronika; Bullock, Marc D; Bruce, Amanda; Mitter, Richard; Kelly, Gavin; Paraskeva, Christos; Strefford, John; Primrose, John; Thomas, Gareth J; Packham, Graham; Mirnezami, Alex H

    2013-11-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNA) have been broadly studied in cancer, comparatively less is understood about their role in progression. Here we report that miR-153 has a dual role during progression of colorectal cancer by enhancing cellular invasiveness and platinum-based chemotherapy resistance. miRNA profiling revealed that miR-153 was highly expressed in a cellular model of advanced stage colorectal cancer. Its upregulation was also noted in primary human colorectal cancer compared with normal colonic epithelium and in more advanced colorectal cancer stages compared with early stage disease. In colorectal cancer patients followed for 50 months, 21 of 30 patients with high levels of miR-153 had disease progression compared with others in this group with low levels of miR-153. Functional studies revealed that miR-153 upregulation increased colorectal cancer invasiveness and resistance to oxaliplatin and cisplatin both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations indicated that miR-153 promoted invasiveness indirectly by inducing matrix metalloprotease enzyme 9 production, whereas drug resistance was mediated directly by inhibiting the Forkhead transcription factor Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a). In support of the latter finding, we found that levels of miR-153 and FOXO3a were inversely correlated in matched human colorectal cancer specimens. Our findings establish key roles for miR-153 overexpression in colorectal cancer progression, rationalizing therapeutic strategies to target expression of this miRNA for colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:23950211

  3. Systemic Treatment of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolpin, Brian M.; Mayer, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common non-cutaneous malignancy in the United States and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death. Over the past 12 years, significant progress has been made in the systemic treatment of this malignant condition. Six new chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced, increasing median overall survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from less than 9 months with no treatment to approximately 24 months. For patients with stage III (lymph node positive) colon cancer, an overall survival benefit for fluorouracil-based chemotherapy has been firmly established, and recent data have shown further efficacy for the inclusion of oxaliplatin in such adjuvant treatment programs. For patients with stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at higher risk for disease recurrence. Ongoing randomized clinical trials are evaluating how best to combine currently available therapies, while smaller studies are evaluating new agents, with the goal of continued progress in prolonging life among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and increasing cure rates among those with resectable disease. PMID:18471507

  4. Epidemiology and molecular genetics of colorectal cancer in iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Malekzadeh, Reza; Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Ansari, Reza

    2009-03-01

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer in Iranian older age subjects is currently very low compared to Western population, the younger generation is experiencing an accelerated rate approaching the Western rates and the burden of disease will increase dramatically in near future. The high frequency of positive family history of colorectal cancer in Iranian patients indicates that a significant number of colorectal cancers in Iran arise in family members and relatives of colorectal cancer patients. It is clear that the familial clustering of colorectal cancer is more often seen in younger probands and cancer located in the right side of the colon. These epidemiologic findings call for a broader attempt to promote public awareness and screening strategies in those families with a member affected by colorectal cancer, especially at younger age or with proximal tumors. Based on our present understanding, the possibility of preventing or curing most colon and rectal cancers is now plausible. The molecular biology of colon cancer has been the subject of many researches and is better understood than those for any other solid cancer and have established an important example for cancer research. It is now clear that colorectal cancer develops as the result of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to malignant transformation of normal mucosa. In spite of these scientific progresses and the fact that screening can reduce the rate of death by detecting early cancer or premalignant polyps, the rate of screening is very low globally and negligible in Iran and many other developing countries which is due to cost, resistance by physicians, patients, and the healthcare system. In Iran screening should at least be started in family members at earlier age with colonoscopy as the preferred modality of screening method. PMID:19249887

  5. Frequent PIK3CA Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer with Double Somatic Mismatch Repair Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stacey A.; Turner, Emily H.; Beightol, Mallory B.; Jacobson, Angela; Gooley, Ted A.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Smith, Christina; Scroggins, Sheena; Tait, Jonathan F.; Grady, William M.; Lin, Edward H.; Cohn, David E.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Arnold, Mark W.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pearlman, Rachel; Hampel, Heather; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Double somatic mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have recently been described in colorectal and endometrial cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI) not attributable to MLH1 hypermethylation or germline mutation. We sought to define the molecular phenotype of this newly recognized tumor subtype. Methods From two prospective Lynch syndrome screening studies, we identified patients with colorectal and endometrial tumors harboring ≥2 somatic MMR mutations, but normal germline MMR testing (“double somatic”). We determined the frequencies of tumor PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, and PTEN mutations by targeted next-generation sequencing and used logistic-regression models to compare them to: Lynch syndrome, MLH1 hypermethylated, and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. We validated our findings using independent datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Results Among colorectal cancer cases, we found that 14/21 (67%) of double somatic cases had PIK3CA mutations vs. 4/18 (22%) Lynch syndrome, 2/10 (20%) MLH1 hypermethylated, and 12/78 (15%) MSS tumors; p<0.0001. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 100% of 13 double somatic endometrial cancers (p=0.04). BRAF mutations were absent in double somatic and Lynch syndrome colorectal tumors. We found highly similar results in a validation cohort from TCGA (113 colorectal, 178 endometrial cancer), with 100% of double somatic cases harboring a PIK3CA mutation (p<0.0001). Conclusions PIK3CA mutations are present in double somatic mutated colorectal and endometrial cancers at substantially higher frequencies than other MSI subgroups. PIK3CA mutation status may better define an emerging molecular entity in colorectal and endometrial cancers, with the potential to inform screening and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27302833

  6. Alternative splicing of spleen tyrosine kinase differentially regulates colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Beibei; Hu, Jun; Chen, Dianke; Li, Li; Chen, Daici; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been reported as a potential tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of alternative splicing of SYK in carcinogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, SYK isoforms were overexpressed in the human CRC HCT 116 cell line using lentiviral expression vectors to investigate the biological functions of full length SYK [SYK(L)] and short form SYK [SYK(S)] in CRC. Real-time cellular analysis and the 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine assay were used to detect the effects of SYK(L) and SYK(S) on cell proliferation. Cell cycle progression and migration were assessed via flow cytometry and Transwell assays, respectively. The results revealed that the recombinant lentivirus with SYK(L) overexpression significantly suppressed the proliferation and metastasis of CRC cells, while SYK(S) overexpression did not. In addition, MTS assays demonstrated that SYK(L) and SYK(S) increased the cellular sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), suggesting that SYK(L) and 5-FU produce a significant synergistic effect on CRC cell proliferation, while SYK(S) has an effect on modulating CRC 5-FU sensitivity. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction results revealed that SYK(L) was downregulated in 69% of 26 pairs of CRC and adjacent non-cancerous tissues, whereas SYK(S) exhibited no significant differences between tumor and normal tissues. Overall, the present data provides evidence that SYK(L) is a tumor suppressor in CRC, and both SYK(L) and SYK(S) may serve as important predictors in the chemotherapeutic treatment of CRC.

  7. Identification of candidate susceptibility genes for colorectal cancer through eQTL analysis

    PubMed Central

    Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Solé, Xavier; Crous-Bou, Marta; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Berenguer, Antoni; Guino, Elisabet; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Guardiola, Jordi; Biondo, Sebastiano; Salazar, Ramon; Moreno, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aim to identify the genes responsible for colorectal cancer risk behind the loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These genes may be candidate targets for developing new strategies for prevention or therapy. We analyzed the association of genotypes for 26 GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the expression of genes within a 2 Mb region (cis-eQTLs). Affymetrix Human Genome U219 expression arrays were used to assess gene expression in two series of samples, one of healthy colonic mucosa (n = 47) and other of normal mucosa adjacent to colon cancer (n = 97, total 144). Paired tumor tissues (n = 97) were also analyzed but did not provide additional findings. Partial Pearson correlation (r), adjusted for sample type, was used for the analysis. We have found Bonferroni-significant cis-eQTLs in three loci: rs3802842 in 11q23.1 associated to C11orf53, COLCA1 (C11orf92) and COLCA2 (C11orf93; r = 0.60); rs7136702 in 12q13.12 associated to DIP2B (r = 0.63) and rs5934683 in Xp22.3 associated to SHROOM2 and GPR143 (r = 0.47). For loci in chromosomes 11 and 12, we have found other SNPs in linkage disequilibrium that are more strongly associated with the expression of the identified genes and are better functional candidates: rs7130173 for 11q23.1 (r = 0.66) and rs61927768 for 12q13.12 (r = 0.86). These SNPs are located in DNA regions that may harbor enhancers or transcription factor binding sites. The analysis of trans-eQTLs has identified additional genes in these loci that may have common regulatory mechanisms as shown by the analysis of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:24760461

  8. Alternative splicing of spleen tyrosine kinase differentially regulates colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Beibei; Hu, Jun; Chen, Dianke; Li, Li; Chen, Daici; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been reported as a potential tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of alternative splicing of SYK in carcinogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, SYK isoforms were overexpressed in the human CRC HCT 116 cell line using lentiviral expression vectors to investigate the biological functions of full length SYK [SYK(L)] and short form SYK [SYK(S)] in CRC. Real-time cellular analysis and the 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine assay were used to detect the effects of SYK(L) and SYK(S) on cell proliferation. Cell cycle progression and migration were assessed via flow cytometry and Transwell assays, respectively. The results revealed that the recombinant lentivirus with SYK(L) overexpression significantly suppressed the proliferation and metastasis of CRC cells, while SYK(S) overexpression did not. In addition, MTS assays demonstrated that SYK(L) and SYK(S) increased the cellular sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), suggesting that SYK(L) and 5-FU produce a significant synergistic effect on CRC cell proliferation, while SYK(S) has an effect on modulating CRC 5-FU sensitivity. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction results revealed that SYK(L) was downregulated in 69% of 26 pairs of CRC and adjacent non-cancerous tissues, whereas SYK(S) exhibited no significant differences between tumor and normal tissues. Overall, the present data provides evidence that SYK(L) is a tumor suppressor in CRC, and both SYK(L) and SYK(S) may serve as important predictors in the chemotherapeutic treatment of CRC. PMID:27602108

  9. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  10. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals.

  11. Tailored Telephone Counseling Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawl, Susan M.; Christy, Shannon M.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ding, Yan; Krier, Connie; Champion, Victoria L.; Rex, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of two interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening participation and forward stage movement of colorectal cancer screening adoption among first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps. One hundred fifty-eight first-degree relatives of individuals diagnosed with adenomatous polyps were…

  12. Immunoscintigraphy of colorectal cancer with an antibody to epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, C.Y.; Baker, L.A.; Davidson, B.R.; Ward, M.; Roberts, K.; Clarke, G.; Ward, C.; Westwood, J.; Boulos, P.B.; Clark, C.G. )

    1990-02-01

    Immunoperoxidase staining of LICR-LON M8, a mouse monoclonal antibody reactive with epithelial membrane antigen, showed a strong reaction with colorectal cancer. This finding prompted an immunoscintigraphic study of colorectal cancer patients using this antibody. Sixteen patients had external gamma scintigraphy after intravenous injection of indium 111-labeled M8. Positive scans were obtained in 11 of the 13 patients with primary colorectal cancers, and 2 of the 3 patients with recurrent tumors. The high indium 111 background in the liver prevented the detection of hepatic metastases in 5 patients. Twelve patients had samples taken of tumor, normal colon, and venous blood at the time of surgery. The ratio of labeled antibody uptake in tumor to that of blood was 5.1 (+/- 3.6 S.D.), which was significantly different (P = 0.001) to that of the similar ratio for normal colon (2.0 +/- 1.6 S.D.). The tumor to normal colon uptake ratio was 2.6 (+/- 1.3 S.D.). These results suggest a specific uptake of indium 111-labeled M8 by colorectal cancer.

  13. A proposed classification system for liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, N J; Bonnheim, D C; Herrera, L O; Mittelman, A

    1984-04-01

    A proposed classification system for liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is presented. This proposed system utilizes the prognostic factors of the extent of hepatic involvement by metastasis at the time of laparotomy, performance status, preoperative serum alkaline phosphatase level, and the presence or absence of extrahepatic intraabdominal disease at the time of laparotomy. Because of the several different modes of treatment for liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma, it is necessary that a liver classification system be adopted so that different treatment groups will be comparable. The proposed system utilizes the extent of hepatic involvement by metastasis at laparotomy with a division into three subsets of patients described by a Roman numeral. Roman numeral I represents less than or equal to 25 per cent involvement of the liver by metastasis; Roman numeral II represents greater than 25 per cent but less than or equal to 50 per cent involvement by liver metastasis, and Roman numeral III represents greater than 50 per cent involvement by liver metastasis. An Arabic subscript number is used to describe the patients' performance status. Alkaline phosphatase levels are described by a subscript letter with a representing less than two times normal alkaline phosphatase, b representing greater than two times, but less than four times normal levels, and c representing greater than four times normal levels. At the time of laparotomy extrahepatic intra-abdominal disease is represented by the superscript letter E. PMID:6714032

  14. Laparoscopic-Assisted Versus Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: Short- and Long-Term Outcomes Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Mistretta, Antonio; Marventano, Stefano; Toscano, Chiara; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Basile, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite the theoretical advantages of laparoscopic surgery, it is still not considered the standard treatment for colorectal cancer patients because of criticism concerning oncologic stability. This study aimed at examining the short- and long-term follow-up results of laparoscopic surgery versus open surgery for colorectal cancer and at investigating clinical outcomes, oncologic safety, and any potential advantages of laparoscopic colorectal cancer resection. Subjects and Methods We retrospectively analyzed a database containing the information about patients who underwent surgery for stage I–III colorectal cancer from January 2004 to January 2012 at our institution. Results The patients who underwent the laparoscopic-assisted procedure showed a significantly faster recovery than those who underwent open surgery, namely, less time to first passing flatus (P=.041), time of first bowel motion (P=.04), time to resume normal diet (P=.043), and time to walk independently (P=.031). Laparoscopic colorectal surgery caused less pain for patients, leading to lower need of analgesic (P=.002) and less hospital recovery time (P=.034), compared with patients who underwent open surgery. No differences were found in 3- and 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates. Conclusions Our results suggested that the laparoscopic approach was as safe as the open alternative. Laparoscopic-assisted surgery has been shown to be a favorable surgical option with better short-term outcomes and similar long-term oncological control compared with open resection. PMID:23004676

  15. The EF-hand calcium-binding protein tescalcin is a potential oncotarget in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hee Kang, Yun; Ro Han, Seung; Kim, Jong-Tae; Lee, Seon-Jin; Il Yeom, Young; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Wha; Yoon, Suk Ran; Yoon, Do-Young; Hong, Kwan Soo; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Young-Ha; Lee, Hee Gu

    2014-01-01

    Tescalcin (TESC) is an EF-hand calcium binding protein that is differentially expressed in several tissues, however it is not reported that the expression and functional roles of TESC in colorectal cancer. Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of TESC in colorectal cancer tissues were assessed using RT-PCR, real time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathologic analyses. Quantitative analysis of TESC levels in serum specimens was performed using sandwich ELISA. Colorectal cancer cells transfected with TESC small interfering RNA and short hairpin RNA were examined in cell proliferation assays, phospho-MAPK array, and mouse xenograft models. Here we demonstrated that TESC is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC), but was not expressed in normal mucosa and premalignant dysplastic lesions. Furthermore, serum TESC levels were elevated in patients with CRC. Knockdown of TESC inhibited the Akt-dependent NF-κB pathway and decreased cell survival in vitro. Depletion of TESC reduced tumor growth in a CRC xenograft model. Thus, TESC is a potential diagnostic marker and oncotarget in colorectal cancer. PMID:24811141

  16. Identification of novel tumor suppressor proteases by degradome profiling of colorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, Julia M.; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Quirós, Pedro M.; Astudillo, Aurora; Galván, José A.; Colomer, Dolors; López-Otín, Carlos; Freije, José M.P.; Puente, Xose S.

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play important roles during tumor development and progression through their ability to promote cell growth or by facilitating the invasion of surrounding tissues. The human genome contains more than 570 protease-coding genes, many of them forming functional networks, which has forced the use of global strategies for the analysis of this group of enzymes. In this study, we have designed a new quantitative PCR-based device for profiling the entire degradome in human malignancies. We have used this method to evaluate protease expression levels in colorectal carcinomas with the finding that most proteases with altered expression in these tumors exert their function in the extracellular compartment. In addition, we have found that among genes encoding repressed proteases there was a higher proportion with somatic mutations in colorectal cancer when compared to genes coding for upregulated proteases (14% vs. 4%, p<0.05). One of these genes, MASP3, is consistently repressed in colorectal carcinomas as well as in colorectal cancer cell lines when compared to normal colonic mucosa. Functional analysis of this gene revealed that ectopic expression of MASP3 reduces cell proliferation in vitro and restrains subcutaneous tumor growth, whereas its downregulation induces an increase in the tumorigenic potential of colorectal cancer cells. These results provide new insights into the diversity of proteases associated with cancer and support the utility of degradome profiling to identify novel proteases with tumor-defying functions.

  17. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  18. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  19. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Laura; Jäkel, Jörg; Dahl, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients. Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC). Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53) as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  20. The Role of MicroRNA-200 in Progression of Human Colorectal and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bojmar, Linda; Karlsson, Elin; Ellegård, Sander; Olsson, Hans; Björnsson, Bergthor; Hallböök, Olof; Larsson, Marie; Stål, Olle; Sandström, Per

    2013-01-01

    The role of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer has been studied extensively in vitro, but involvement of the EMT in tumorigenesis in vivo is largely unknown. We investigated the potential of microRNAs as clinical markers and analyzed participation of the EMT-associated microRNA-200–ZEB–E-cadherin pathway in cancer progression. Expression of the microRNA-200 family was quantified by real-time RT-PCR analysis of fresh-frozen and microdissected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary colorectal tumors, normal colon mucosa, and matched liver metastases. MicroRNA expression was validated by in situ hybridization and after in vitro culture of the malignant cells. To assess EMT as a predictive marker, factors considered relevant in colorectal cancer were investigated in 98 primary breast tumors from a treatment-randomized study. Associations between the studied EMT-markers were found in primary breast tumors and in colorectal liver metastases. MicroRNA-200 expression in epithelial cells was lower in malignant mucosa than in normal mucosa, and was also decreased in metastatic compared to non-metastatic colorectal cancer. Low microRNA-200 expression in colorectal liver metastases was associated with bad prognosis. In breast cancer, low levels of microRNA-200 were related to reduced survival and high expression of microRNA-200 was predictive of benefit from radiotheraphy. MicroRNA-200 was associated with ER positive status, and inversely correlated to HER2 and overactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, that was associated with high ZEB1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that the stability of microRNAs makes them suitable as clinical markers and that the EMT-related microRNA-200 – ZEB – E-cadherin signaling pathway is connected to established clinical characteristics and can give useful prognostic and treatment-predictive information in progressive breast and colorectal cancers. PMID:24376848

  1. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  2. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  3. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for detecting colorectal cancer: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Wheeler, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the theoretical potential to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. To date, these techniques have not been able to be effectively translated to endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents a new technology that may be well-suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of resected specimen pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa. Patients being treated for colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Representative adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa specimens were collected from each case. Specimens were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of H&E permanent sections. Hyperspectral image data of the fluorescence excitation of adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal tissue were acquired using a custom microscope configuration previously developed in our lab. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation spectral range of 390-450 nm. We conclude that fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for differentiating adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal mucosa of the colon. Future work will focus on expanding the number of specimen pairs analyzed and will utilize fresh tissues where possible, as flash freezing and reconstituting tissues may have altered the autofluorescence properties.

  4. HPP1: A transmembrane protein-encoding gene commonly methylated in colorectal polyps and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanne; Biden, Kelli G.; Simms, Lisa A.; Huggard, Phillip; Karamatic, Rozemary; Eyre, Helen J.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Herath, Nirmitha; Barker, Melissa; Anderson, Gregory J.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Ramm, Grant A.; Jass, Jeremy R.; Leggett, Barbara A.

    2001-01-01

    Adenomas are the precursors of most colorectal cancers. Hyperplastic polyps have been linked to the subset of colorectal cancers showing DNA microsatellite instability, but little is known of their underlying genetic etiology. Using a strategy that isolates differentially methylated sequences from hyperplastic polyps and normal mucosa, we identified a 370-bp sequence containing the 5′ untranslated region and the first exon of a gene that we have called HPP1. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to isolate HPP1 from normal mucosa. Using reverse transcription–PCR, HPP1 was expressed in 28 of 30 (93%) normal colonic samples but in only seven of 30 (23%) colorectal cancers (P < 0.001). The 5′ region of HPP1 included a CpG island containing 49 CpG sites, of which 96% were found to be methylated by bisulfite sequencing of DNA from colonic tumor samples. By COBRA analysis, methylation was detected in six of nine (66%) adenomas, 17 of 27 (63%) hyperplastic polyps, and 46 of 55 (84%) colorectal cancers. There was an inverse relationship between methylation level and mRNA expression in cancers (r = −0.67; P < 0.001), and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment restored HPP1 expression in two colorectal cancer cell lines. In situ hybridization of HPP1 indicated that expression occurs in epithelial and stromal elements in normal mucosa but is silenced in both cell types in early colonic neoplasia. HPP1 is predicted to encode a transmembrane protein containing follistatin and epidermal growth factor-like domains. Silencing of HPP1 by methylation may increase the probability of neoplastic transformation. PMID:11120884

  5. Gelsolin Induces Colorectal Tumor Cell Invasion via Modulation of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jingli; Tan, Ee Hong; Yan, Benedict; Tochhawng, Lalchhandami; Jayapal, Manikandan; Koh, Shiuan; Tay, Hwee Kee; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Hooi, Shing Chuan; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Kumar, Alan Prem; Goh, Yaw Chong; Lim, Yaw Chyn; Yap, Celestial T.

    2012-01-01

    Gelsolin is a cytoskeletal protein which participates in actin filament dynamics and promotes cell motility and plasticity. Although initially regarded as a tumor suppressor, gelsolin expression in certain tumors correlates with poor prognosis and therapy-resistance. In vitro, gelsolin has anti-apoptotic and pro-migratory functions and is critical for invasion of some types of tumor cells. We found that gelsolin was highly expressed at tumor borders infiltrating into adjacent liver tissues, as examined by immunohistochemistry. Although gelsolin contributes to lamellipodia formation in migrating cells, the mechanisms by which it induces tumor invasion are unclear. Gelsolin’s influence on the invasive activity of colorectal cancer cells was investigated using overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown. We show that gelsolin is required for invasion of colorectal cancer cells through matrigel. Microarray analysis and quantitative PCR indicate that gelsolin overexpression induces the upregulation of invasion-promoting genes in colorectal cancer cells, including the matrix-degrading urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Conversely, gelsolin knockdown reduces uPA levels, as well as uPA secretion. The enhanced invasiveness of gelsolin-overexpressing cells was attenuated by treatment with function-blocking antibodies to either uPA or its receptor uPAR, indicating that uPA/uPAR activity is crucial for gelsolin-dependent invasion. In summary, our data reveals novel functions of gelsolin in colorectal tumor cell invasion through its modulation of the uPA/uPAR cascade, with potentially important roles in colorectal tumor dissemination to metastatic sites. PMID:22927998

  6. T-cell factor-4 frameshift mutations occur frequently in human microsatellite instability-high colorectal carcinomas but do not contribute to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruckert, Stefan; Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Brueckl, Wolfgang M; Oswald, Ursula; Beyser, Kurt; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Haynl, Angela; Koch, Claudia; Rüschoff, Josef; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2002-06-01

    Colorectal carcinomas with microsatellite instability accumulate errors in short repetitive DNA repeats, especially mono and dinucleotide repeats. One such error-prone A(9) monorepeat is found in exon 17 of the TCF-4 gene. TCF-4 and beta-catenin form a transcription complex, which is important for both maintenance of normal epithelium and development of colorectal tumors. To elucidate the relevance of frameshift mutations in the TCF-4 in colorectal carcinogenesis, a variety of investigations in human tumors and cell lines was performed. It was found that mutations in the TCF-4 A(9) repeat do not contribute to tumorigenesis and seem to be passenger mutations.

  7. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  8. Chromosome 5 allele loss in human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Voss, R; Hall, V; Bodmer, W F; Jass, J R; Jeffreys, A J; Lucibello, F C; Patel, I; Rider, S H

    That the sporadic and inherited forms of a particular cancer could both result from mutations in the same gene was first proposed by Knudson. He further proposed that these mutations act recessively at the cellular level, and that both copies of the gene must be lost for the cancer to develop. In sporadic cases both events occur somatically whereas in dominant familial cases susceptibility is inherited through a germline mutation and the cancer develops after a somatic change in the homologous allele. This model has since been substantiated in the case of retinoblastoma, Wilms tumour, acoustic neuroma and several other tumours, in which loss of heterozygosity was shown in tumour material compared to normal tissue from the same patient. The dominantly inherited disorder, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, also called familial polyposis coli), which gives rise to multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon that have a relatively high probability of progressing to a malignant adenocarcinoma, provides a basis for studying recessive genes in the far more common colorectal carcinomas using this approach. Following a clue as to the location of the FAP gene given by a case report of an individual with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q, who had FAP and multiple developmental abnormalities, we have examined sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas for loss of alleles on chromosome 5. Using a highly polymorphic 'minisatellite' probe which maps to chromosome 5q we have shown that at least 20% of this highly heterogeneous set of tumours lose one of the alleles present in matched normal tissue. This parallels the assignment of the FAP gene to chromosome 5 (see accompanying paper) and suggests that becoming recessive for this gene may be a critical step in the progression of a relatively high proportion of colorectal cancers. PMID:2886919

  9. Red Meat and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton) is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented. PMID:26779313

  10. Endoluminal Therapy in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Katherine A; Tsikitis, V Liana

    2016-09-01

    Appropriate endoscopic resection for colorectal polyps can present a challenge to endoscopists, as these lesions may harbor malignancy. With recent advances in endoscopy, however, we are now entering an exciting frontier of endoscopic therapy for gastrointestinal lesions. These techniques include endoluminal mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, which may be utilized on several colonic lesions. This article will discuss these principle endoscopic techniques, their outcomes, and briefly highlight their influence on endoscopic interventions, including transanal endoscopic microsurgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. PMID:27582646

  11. Inflammatory networks underlying colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Audrey; Zinger, Adar; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation is emerging as one of the hallmarks of cancer, yet its role in most tumors remains unclear. Whereas a minority of solid tumors are associated with overt inflammation, long-term treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is remarkably effective in reducing cancer rate and death. This indicates that inflammation might have many as-yet-unrecognized facets, among which an indolent course might be far more prevalent than previously appreciated. In this Review, we explore the various inflammatory processes underlying the development and progression of colorectal cancer and discuss anti-inflammatory means for its prevention and treatment.

  12. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  13. miR-422a is an independent prognostic factor and functions as a potential tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gui-Xi; Qu, Ai-Lin; Yang, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Shou-Cai; Wang, Chuan-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of miR-422a in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and to further explore the prognostic value and function of miR-422a in CRC carcinogenesis. METHODS: miR-422a expression was analyzed in 102 CRC tissues and paired normal mucosa adjacent to carcinoma by quantitative real-time PCR. The relationship of miR-422a expression with clinicopathological parameters was also analyzed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate analysis were performed to estimate the potential role of miR-422a. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were used for in vitro functional analysis of miR-422a. RESULTS: The levels of miR-422a were dramatically reduced in CRC tissues compared with normal mucosa (P < 0.05), and significantly correlated with local invasion (P = 0.004) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression multivariate analyses revealed that miR-422a expression (HR = 0.568, P = 0.015) and clinical TNM stage (HR = 2.942, P = 0.003) were independent prognostic factors for overall survival in CRC patients. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that overexpression of miR-422a inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of SW480 and HT-29 cells. CONCLUSION: Down-regulation of miR-422a may serve as an independent prognosis factor in CRC. MiR-422a functions as a tumor suppressor and regulates progression of CRC. PMID:27350737

  14. Colorectal cancer: from prevention to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Alex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-06-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  15. Colorectal cancer: From prevention to personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Binefa, Gemma; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Teule, Àlex; Medina-Hayas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a very heterogeneous disease that is caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. CRC develops through a gradual accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes, leading to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa into invasive cancer. CRC is one of the most prevalent and incident cancers worldwide, as well as one of the most deadly. Approximately 1235108 people are diagnosed annually with CRC, and 609051 die from CRC annually. The World Health Organization estimates an increase of 77% in the number of newly diagnosed cases of CRC and an increase of 80% in deaths from CRC by 2030. The incidence of CRC can benefit from different strategies depending on its stage: health promotion through health education campaigns (when the disease is not yet present), the implementation of screening programs (for detection of the disease in its early stages), and the development of nearly personalized treatments according to both patient characteristics (age, sex) and the cancer itself (gene expression). Although there are different strategies for screening and although the number of such strategies is increasing due to the potential of emerging technologies in molecular marker application, not all strategies meet the criteria required for screening tests in population programs; the three most accepted tests are the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. FOBT is the most used method for CRC screening worldwide and is also the primary choice in most population-based screening programs in Europe. Due to its non-invasive nature and low cost, it is one of the most accepted techniques by population. CRC is a very heterogeneous disease, and with a few exceptions (APC, p53, KRAS), most of the genes involved in CRC are observed in a small percentage of cases. The design of genetic and epigenetic marker panels that are able to provide maximum coverage in the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia seems a reasonable strategy

  16. Differential expression of a new tumor-associated antigen, TLP, during human colorectal cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, F; Graziano, P; Roselli, M; Mariotti, S; Bernard, P; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Rasi, G; Garaci, E

    1999-04-01

    Tumour liberated particles (TLP) have been proposed as a potential new serum tumor marker. In particular, a high percentage of patients with early stages of lung cancer scored positive for serum TLP, suggesting its possible role as a marker for early diagnosis of disease. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of TLP in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in order to determine whether its expression correlates with the various stages of cancer transformation. TLP distribution was assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal, premalignant, and malignant colorectal lesions. Normal colonic mucosa and hyperplastic polyps showed no positive staining, whereas adenomas and adenocarcinomas reacted to anti-TLP serum. The percentage of positive tumor cells increased from adenomas with mild dysplasia to adenomas with severe dysplasia. Moreover, a supranuclear staining pattern was observed mainly in adenomas with mild dysplasia, whereas adenomas with severe dysplasia as well as adenocarcinomas showed a characteristic diffuse staining pattern and a strong staining intensity. Only a few cases of adenocarcinoma were found to be TLP-negative and all were poorly differentiated. Our results suggest that TLP antigen expression may be considered as a marker of epithelial atypia in the colorectal tract and as a potential target for new diagnostic and/or therapeutic approaches to human colorectal cancer.

  17. GUCY2C lysosomotropic endocytosis delivers immunotoxin therapy to metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marszalowicz, Glen P.; Snook, Adam E.; Magee, Michael S.; Merlino, Dante; Lisa, D. Berman-Booty; Waldman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of targeted cancer therapy has been limited by the paucity of determinants which are tumor-specific and generally associated with disease, and have cell dynamics which effectively deploy cytotoxic payloads. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C) may be ideal for targeting because it is normally expressed only in insulated barrier compartments, including intestine and brain, but over-expressed by systemic metastatic colorectal tumors. Here, we reveal that GUCY2C rapidly internalizes from the cell surface to lysosomes in intestinal and colorectal cancer cells. Endocytosis is independent of ligand binding and receptor activation, and is mediated by clathrin. This mechanism suggests a design for immunotoxins comprising a GUCY2C-directed monoclonal antibody conjugated through a reducible disulfide linkage to ricin A chain, which is activated to a potent cytotoxin in lysosomes. Indeed, this immunotoxin specifically killed GUCY2C-expressing colorectal cancer cells in a lysosomal- and clathrin-dependent fashion. Moreover, this immunotoxin reduced pulmonary tumors >80% (p<0.001), and improved survival 25% (p<0.001), in mice with established colorectal cancer metastases. Further, therapeutic efficacy was achieved without histologic evidence of toxicity in normal tissues. These observations support GUCY2C-targeted immunotoxins as novel therapeutics for metastatic tumors originating in the GI tract, including colorectum, stomach, esophagus, and pancreas. PMID:25294806

  18. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  19. Identifying and quantifying the stromal fibrosis in muscularis propria of colorectal carcinoma by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijia; Yang, Yinghong; Jiang, Weizhong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    The examination of stromal fibrosis within colorectal cancer is overlooked, not only because the routine pathological examinations seem to focus more on tumour staging and precise surgical margins, but also because of the lack of efficient diagnostic methods. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to study the muscularis stroma of normal and colorectal carcinoma tissue at the molecular level. In this work, we attempt to show the feasibility of MPM for discerning the microstructure of the normal human rectal muscle layer and fibrosis colorectal carcinoma tissue practicably. Three types of muscularis propria stromal fibrosis beneath the colorectal cancer infiltration were first observed through the MPM imaging system by providing intercellular microstructural details in fresh, unstained tissue samples. Our approach also presents the capability of quantifying the extent of stromal fibrosis from both amount and orientation of collagen, which may further characterize the severity of fibrosis. By comparing with the pathology analysis, these results show that the MPM has potential advantages in becoming a histological tool for detecting the stromal fibrosis and collecting prognosis evidence, which may guide subsequent therapy procedures for patients into good prognosis.

  20. Decreased MALL expression negatively impacts colorectal cancer patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Feifei; Sun, Xing; Zhong, Lin; Yan, Dongwang; Zhou, Chongzhi; Deng, Guilong; Wang, Bin; Qi, Xiaosheng; Wang, Shuyun; Qu, Lei; Deng, Biao; Pan, Ming; Chen, Jian; Wang, Yupeng; Song, Guohe; Tang, Huamei; Zhou, Zongguang; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether MALL expression is associated with colon cancer progression and patient survival. MALL mRNA expression was reduced in the tumor tissues of 70% of the colon cancer patients and 75% of the rectal cancer patients as compared to their normal tissues. MALL protein was also significantly reduced in the tumor tissues of colon cancer patients (P < 0.001). Increased LOH and methylation of MALL was observed in tumor tissues as compared to normal tissues. Reduced MALL expression was associated with vessin invasion, disease recurrence and metastasis or death (P ≤ 0.027). Furthermore, patients with MALL-negative tumors had significantly decreased overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.008 and P < 0.011, respectively). Univariate analysis indicated that MALL expression was significantly associated with OS and DFS. Finally, overexpression of MALL suppressed HCT116 and SW480 cell proliferation and inhibited HCT116 migration. MALL may play a role in colorectal cancer progression as suppression of its expression in tumor tissues negatively impacts colorectal cancer patient survival. Further analyses are required to determine if reduced MALL expression is due to LOH and/or methylation. PMID:26992238

  1. Detection of colorectal dysplasia using fluorescently labelled lectins

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Joe Chin-Hun; Ibrahim, Ashraf E. K.; Dawson, Sarah; Parashar, Deepak; Howat, William J.; Guttula, Kiran; Miller, Richard; Fearnhead, Nicola S.; Winton, Douglas J.; Neves, André A.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening using conventional colonoscopy lacks molecular information and can miss dysplastic lesions. We tested here the ability of fluorescently labelled lectins to distinguish dysplasia from normal tissue when sprayed on to the luminal surface epithelium of freshly resected colon tissue from the Apcmin mouse and when applied to fixed human colorectal tissue sections. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) showed significantly decreased binding to adenomas in the mouse tissue and in sections of human colon from 47 patients. Changes in WGA binding to the human surface epithelium allowed regions containing normal epithelium (NE) or hyperplastic polyps (HP) to be distinguished from regions containing low-grade dysplasia (LGD), high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or carcinoma (C), with 81% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 93% positive predictive value (PPV). Helix pomatia agglutinin (HGA) distinguished epithelial regions containing NE from regions containing HP, LGD, HGD or C, with 89% sensitivity, 87% specificity and 97% PPV. The decreased binding of WGA and HPA to the luminal surface epithelium in human dysplasia suggests that these lectins may enable more sensitive detection of disease in the clinic using fluorescence colonoscopy. PMID:27071814

  2. The classification of secondary colorectal liver cancer in human biopsy samples using angular dispersive x-ray diffraction and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Farquharson, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    The motivation behind this study is to assess whether angular dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) data, processed using multivariate analysis techniques, can be used for classifying secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue and normal surrounding liver tissue in human liver biopsy samples. The ADXRD profiles from a total of 60 samples of normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases were measured using a synchrotron radiation source. The data were analysed for 56 samples using nonlinear peak-fitting software. Four peaks were fitted to all of the ADXRD profiles, and the amplitude, area, amplitude and area ratios for three of the four peaks were calculated and used for the statistical and multivariate analysis. The statistical analysis showed that there are significant differences between all the peak-fitting parameters and ratios between the normal and the diseased tissue groups. The technique of soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to classify normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases resulting in 67% of the normal tissue samples and 60% of the secondary colorectal liver tissue samples being classified correctly. This study has shown that the ADXRD data of normal and secondary colorectal liver cancer are statistically different and x-ray diffraction data analysed using multivariate analysis have the potential to be used as a method of tissue classification.

  3. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in colorectal cancer liver metastases is associated with vascular structures.

    PubMed

    Illemann, Martin; Eefsen, Rikke Helene Løvendahl; Bird, Nigel Charles; Majeed, Ali; Osterlind, Kell; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; Lund, Ida Katrine; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2016-02-01

    Metastatic growth by colorectal cancer cells in the liver requires the ability of the cancer cells to interact with the new microenvironment. This interaction results in three histological growth patterns of liver metastases: desmoplastic, pushing, and replacement. In primary colorectal cancer several proteases, involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix components, are up-regulated. In liver metastases, their expression is growth pattern dependent. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is a strong prognostic marker in plasma from colorectal cancer patients, with significant higher levels in patients with metastatic disease. We therefore wanted to determine the expression pattern of TIMP-1 in primary colorectal cancers and their matching liver metastases. TIMP-1 mRNA was primarily seen in α-smooth-muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells. In all primary tumors and liver metastases with desmoplastic growth pattern, TIMP-1 mRNA was primarily found in α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts located at the invasive front. Some α-SMA-positive cells with TIMP-1 mRNA were located adjacent to CD34-positive endothelial cells, identifying them as pericytes. This indicates that TIMP-1 in primary tumors and liver metastases with desmoplastic growth pattern has dual functions; being an MMP-inhibitor at the cancer periphery and involved in tumor-induced angiogenesis in the pericytes. In the liver metastases with pushing or replacement growth patterns, TIMP-1 was primarily expressed by activated hepatic stellate cells at the metastasis/liver parenchyma interface. These cells were located adjacent to CD34-positive endothelial cells, suggesting a function in tumor-induced angiogenesis. We therefore conclude that TIMP-1 expression is growth pattern dependent in colorectal cancer liver metastases.

  4. Dependence receptors and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehlen, Patrick; Tauszig-Delamasure, Servane

    2014-11-01

    The research on colorectal cancer (CRC) biology has been leading the oncology field since the early 1990s. The search for genetic alterations has allowed the identification of the main tumour suppressors or oncogenes. Recent work obtained in CRC has unexpectedly proposed the existence of novel category of tumour suppressors, the so-called 'dependence receptors'. These transmembrane receptors behave as Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde with two opposite sides: they induce a positive signalling (survival, proliferation, differentiation) in presence of their ligand, but are not inactive in the absence of their ligand and rather trigger apoptosis when unbound. This trait confers them a conditional tumour suppressor activity: they eliminate cells that grow abnormally in an environment offering a limited quantity of ligand. This review will describe how receptors such as deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), uncoordinated 5 (UNC5), rearranged during transfection (RET) or TrkC constrain CRC progression and how this dependence receptor paradigm may open up therapeutical perspectives. PMID:25163468

  5. Update on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    DA Silva, Felipe Carneiro; Wernhoff, Patrik; Dominguez-Barrera, Constantino; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2016-09-01

    In the past two decades, significant advances have been made in our understanding of colorectal (CRC) tumors with DNA mismatch (MMR) repair deficiency. The knowledge from molecular and genetic alterations in a variety of clinical conditions has refined the disease terminology and classification. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) encompasses a spectrum of conditions that have significant phenotypic overlapping that makes clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Distinguishing among the HNPCC disorders is clinically important, as the approach to surveillance for patients and their at-risk family members differs according to risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Prospective and next-generation studies will provide valuable clinical information regarding the natural history of disease that will help differentiate the Lynch syndrome mimics and guide diagnosis and management for heterogeneous conditions currently grouped under the category of familial CRC. The review is intended to present and discuss the molecular nature of various conditions related to MMR deficiency and discusses the tools and strategies that have been used in detecting these conditions. PMID:27630275

  6. Genetic architecture of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ulrike; Bien, Stephanie; Zubair, Niha

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors. A small proportion (3-5%) of cases arise from hereditary syndromes predisposing to early onset CRC as a result of mutations in over a dozen well defined genes. In contrast, CRC is predominantly a late onset 'sporadic' disease, developing in individuals with no obvious hereditary syndrome. In recent years, genome wide association studies have discovered that over 40 genetic regions are associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC, and it has been estimated that increasingly large genome wide scans will identify many additional novel genetic regions. Subsequent experimental validations have identified the causally related variant(s) in a limited number of these genetic regions. Further biological insight could be obtained through ethnically diverse study populations, larger genetic sequencing studies and development of higher throughput functional experiments. Along with inherited variation, integration of the tumour genome may shed light on the carcinogenic processes in CRC. In addition to summarising the genetic architecture of CRC, this review discusses genetic factors that modify environmental predictors of CRC, as well as examples of how genetic insight has improved clinical surveillance, prevention and treatment strategies. In summary, substantial progress has been made in uncovering the genetic architecture of CRC, and continued research efforts are expected to identify additional genetic risk factors that further our biological understanding of this disease. Subsequently these new insights will lead to improved treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:26187503

  7. Evolving management of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Zijp, Jochem van der Voort; Hoekstra, Harald J; Basson, Marc D

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer, including total mesorectal excision, the resection of liver and lung metastasis and advances in chemoradiation and foreshadows some interventions that may lie just beyond the frontier. In particular, little is known about the intracellular and extracellular cascades that may influence colorectal cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. Although the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinases and focal adhesion associated proteins in response to integrin-mediated cell matrix binding (”outside in integrin signaling”) is well described, the stimulation of cell adhesion by intracellular signals activated by pressure prior to adhesion represents a different signal paradigm. However, several studies have suggested that increased pressure and shear stress activate cancer cell adhesion. Further studies of the pathways that regulate integrin-driven cancer cell adhesion may identify ways to disrupt these signals or block integrin-mediated adhesion so that adhesion and eventual metastasis can be prevented in the future. PMID:18609678

  8. Computational Identification of Novel Stage-Specific Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Ashok; Ramar, Karthick; Ramalingam, Satish

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that the conversion of normal colon epithelium to adenoma and then to carcinoma stems from acquired molecular changes in the genome. The genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to a certain extent, and much remains to be known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with the advancement of colorectal cancer from one stage to the next. Here in this study we attempted to identify novel cancer genes that could underlie the stage-specific progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer. We conducted a stage-based meta-analysis of the voluminous tumor genome-sequencing data and mined using multiple approaches for novel genes driving the progression to stage-II, stage-III and stage-IV colorectal cancer. The consensus of these driver genes seeded the construction of stage-specific networks, which were then analyzed for the centrality of genes, clustering of subnetworks, and enrichment of gene-ontology processes. Our study identified three novel driver genes as hubs for stage-II progression: DYNC1H1, GRIN2A, GRM1. Four novel driver genes were identified as hubs for stage-III progression: IGF1R, CPS1, SPTA1, DSP. Three novel driver genes were identified as hubs for stage-IV progression: GSK3B, GGT1, EIF2B5. We also identified several non-driver genes that appeared to underscore the progression of colorectal cancer. Our study yielded potential diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer as well as novel stage-specific drug targets for rational intervention. Our methodology is extendable to the analysis of other types of cancer to fill the gaps in our knowledge. PMID:27243824

  9. Increased Pulse Wave Velocity Reflecting Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Kwack, Won Gun; Lee, Youg-Sup; Hahm, Ki Baik; Kim, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    The obese patients with diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer as well as adenomas under the shared pathogenesis related to atherosclerosis. Here we determined the association between increased arterial stiffness and colorectal adenomas incorporating parameters including age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profiles, fasting glucose, and blood pressure. Subjects who simultaneously underwent colonoscopies and pulse wave velocity (PWV) determinations between July 2005 and September 2006 were analyzed, based on which the subjects were classified into two groups as patients group with colorectal adenomas (n = 49) and control group (n = 200) with normal, non-polypoid benign lesions or hyperplastic polyps. Uni- and multi-variate analyses were performed to calculate the odd ratio for colon adenomas. Based on uni-variate analysis, age, waist circumference, body mass index, heart-femoral PWV (hfPWV), and brachial-ankle PWV were significantly associated with adenomas (p<0.05) and multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the heart-femoral PWV, waist circumference, and the levels of LDL-C were significant risk factor for colorectal adenoma. However, arterial stiffness did not affect the progression of colon adenoma. The finding that hfPWV, reflecting aortic stiffness, was increased in patients with colorectal adenomas lead to conclusion that patients who have prominently increased arterial stiffness can be recommended to undergo colonoscopic examinations and at the same time we also recommend counseling about the risk for atherosclerosis in those who have colorectal adenomas. PMID:21103036

  10. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  11. Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... be acceptable screening tests for colorectal cancer: High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT). Both polyps and ... higher than that of gFOBT or FIT. Test sensitivity for adenomas is low. False-positive test results ...

  12. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  13. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  14. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    PubMed

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  15. Abdominal metastases from colorectal cancer: intraperitoneal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guend, Hamza; Patel, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Patients with peritoneal metastasis from colorectal cancer represent a distinct subset with regional disease rather than systemic disease. They often have poorer survival outcomes with systemic chemotherapy. Optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) offers such patients a more directed therapy with improved survival. In this review, we discuss the diagnosis, evaluation and classification, as well as rational for treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) secondary to colorectal cancer. PMID:26697203

  16. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA PRNCR1 in colorectal cancer promotes cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Qiu, Mantang; Xu, Youtao; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Yanyan; Li, Ming; Xu, Lin; Yin, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been confirmed to play a critical regulatory role in various biological processes including carcinogenesis, which indicates that lncRNAs are valuable biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The novel lncRNA prostate cancer non-coding RNA 1 (PRNCR1) is located in the susceptible genomic area of CRC, however the functional role of PRNCR1 remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the clinical significance and biological function of PRNCR1 in CRC. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to assess the expression profile of PRNCR1 in CRC tissues and cell lines. An antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) was designed to knock down PRNCR1. In a cohort of 63 patients, PRNCR1 was significantly overexpressed in CRC tissues compared with the expression in adjacent tissues, with an average fold increase of 10.55 (P=0.006). Additionally, a high level of PRNCR1 was associated with large tumor volume (P<0.05). Based on receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC), we found that the area under the curve (AUC) of PRNCR1 was 0.799 while the AUC of conventional biomarker CEA-CA199 was 0.651, indicating that PRNCR1 could be a sensitive diagnostic biomarker of CRC. Compared with the normal human colorectal epithelial cell line (FHC), PRNCR1 was upregulated in most CRC cell lines (HCT116, SW480, LoVo and HT-29). After knockdown of PRNCR1 by ASO, CRC cell proliferation ability was significantly inhibited. We further found that PRNCR1 knockdown induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in the S phases. In contrast, PRNCR1 knockdown did not affect cell apoptosis or invasive ability. Hence, these data indicate that PRNCR1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells and is a potential oncogene of CRC.

  17. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  18. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  19. Intra-colonic administration of a polymer-bound NIRF probe for improved colorectal cancer detection during colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kogan-Zviagin, Inga; Shamay, Yosi; Nissan, Aviram; Sella-Tavor, Osnat; Golan, Moran; David, Ayelet

    2014-10-28

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticle imaging probes for cancer diagnosis. However, various biological barriers limit the efficient delivery of nanoparticles to tumors following parenteral administration. We have investigated the applicability of a water-soluble polymeric imaging probe for improving the detection of gastrointestinal (GI) tumors after intra-luminal (colonic) administration. N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers bearing either fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC) or near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye (IR-783) were conjugated with EPPT1 peptide, derived from the CDR3 Vh region of a monoclonal antibody (ASM2) raised against human epithelial cancer cells, for targeting under-glycosylated mucin-1 (uMUC-1) expressed in neoplastic tissues. The targeted FITC-labeled copolymer, P-(EPPT1)-FITC, was investigated for its ability to bind human CRC cells and tissue specimens in vitro. The uMUC-1-targeted NIRF-labeled copolymer, P-(EPPT1)-IR783, was assessed for its ability to detect colonic lesions in vivo. P-(EPPT1)-FITC demonstrated superior binding to colorectal cancer (CRC) cells that over-express the uMUC-1 antigen and exhibited selectivity towards human CRC tissue specimens, as compared to adjacent normal tissues from the same patient. When applied intra-colonically, P-(EPPT1)-IR783 significantly accumulated in cancerous tissue, relative to the adjacent normal mucosa of HT29 and LS174T tumor-bearing mice, and demonstrated higher signal intensities in colonic tumors, as compared to the non-targeted P-(GG-OH)-IR783 probe (i.e., without EPPT1). We found that P-(GG-OH)-IR783 can also accumulate specifically at tumor sites. The cancer-specific uptake and retention of P-(GG-OH)-IR783 was not mediated by organic anion transporting peptides (OATPs). Our findings indicate that the polymer-bound NIRF probe can successfully detect solid tumors in the GI tract following intra-colonic administration, and could be used in conjunction with

  20. Intra-colonic administration of a polymer-bound NIRF probe for improved colorectal cancer detection during colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kogan-Zviagin, Inga; Shamay, Yosi; Nissan, Aviram; Sella-Tavor, Osnat; Golan, Moran; David, Ayelet

    2014-10-28

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticle imaging probes for cancer diagnosis. However, various biological barriers limit the efficient delivery of nanoparticles to tumors following parenteral administration. We have investigated the applicability of a water-soluble polymeric imaging probe for improving the detection of gastrointestinal (GI) tumors after intra-luminal (colonic) administration. N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers bearing either fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC) or near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye (IR-783) were conjugated with EPPT1 peptide, derived from the CDR3 Vh region of a monoclonal antibody (ASM2) raised against human epithelial cancer cells, for targeting under-glycosylated mucin-1 (uMUC-1) expressed in neoplastic tissues. The targeted FITC-labeled copolymer, P-(EPPT1)-FITC, was investigated for its ability to bind human CRC cells and tissue specimens in vitro. The uMUC-1-targeted NIRF-labeled copolymer, P-(EPPT1)-IR783, was assessed for its ability to detect colonic lesions in vivo. P-(EPPT1)-FITC demonstrated superior binding to colorectal cancer (CRC) cells that over-express the uMUC-1 antigen and exhibited selectivity towards human CRC tissue specimens, as compared to adjacent normal tissues from the same patient. When applied intra-colonically, P-(EPPT1)-IR783 significantly accumulated in cancerous tissue, relative to the adjacent normal mucosa of HT29 and LS174T tumor-bearing mice, and demonstrated higher signal intensities in colonic tumors, as compared to the non-targeted P-(GG-OH)-IR783 probe (i.e., without EPPT1). We found that P-(GG-OH)-IR783 can also accumulate specifically at tumor sites. The cancer-specific uptake and retention of P-(GG-OH)-IR783 was not mediated by organic anion transporting peptides (OATPs). Our findings indicate that the polymer-bound NIRF probe can successfully detect solid tumors in the GI tract following intra-colonic administration, and could be used in conjunction with

  1. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  6. Industrial risk factors for colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lashner, B.A.; Epstein, S.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in the United States, and its incidence rates have sharply increased recently, especially in males. Industrial exposures, both occupational and environmental, are important colorectal cancer risk factors that are generally unrecognized by clinicians. Migration studies have documented that colorectal cancer is strongly associated with environmental risk factors. The causal role of occupational exposures is evidenced by a substantial literature associating specific work practices with increased colorectal cancer risks. Industrially related environmental exposures, including polluted drinking water and ionizing radiation, have also been associated with excess risks. Currently, there is a tendency to attribute colorectal cancer, largely or exclusively, to dietary and other lifestyle factors, thus neglecting these industrially related effects. Concerted efforts are needed to recognize the causal role of industrial risk factors and to encourage government and industry to reduce carcinogenic exposures. Furthermore, cost-effective screening programs for high-risk population groups are critically needed to further reduce deaths from colorectal cancer. 143 references.

  7. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  8. The Immune Landscapes of Polypoid and Nonpolypoid Precancerous Colorectal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, Teresa; Bertoni, Ramona; Ancona, Nicola; Marra, Giancarlo; Resta, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the immunoediting process in precancerous lesions. We explored this aspect of benign colorectal adenomas with a descriptive analysis of the immune pathways and immune cells whose regulation is linked to the morphology and size of these lesions. Two series of polypoid and nonpolypoid colorectal adenomas were used in this study: 1) 84 samples (42 lesions, each with matched samples of normal mucosa) whose gene expression data were used to quantify the tumor morphology- and size-related dysregulation of immune pathways collected in the Molecular Signature Database, using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis; 2) 40 other lesions examined with immunohistochemistry to quantify the presence of immune cells in the stromal compartment. In the analysis of transcriptomic data, 429 immune pathways displayed significant differential regulation in neoplasms of different morphology and size. Most pathways were significantly upregulated or downregulated in polypoid lesions versus nonpolypoid lesions (regardless of size). Differential pathway regulation associated with lesion size was observed only in polypoid neoplasms. These findings were mirrored by tissue immunostaining with CD4, CD8, FOXP3, MHC-I, CD68, and CD163 antibodies: stromal immune cell counts (mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages) were significantly higher in polypoid lesions. Certain markers displayed significant size-related differences regardless of lesion morphology. Multivariate analysis of variance showed that the marker panel clearly discriminated between precancerous lesions of different morphologies and sizes. Statistical analysis of immunostained cell counts fully support the results of the transcriptomic data analysis: the density of infiltration of most immune cells in the stroma of polypoid precancerous lesions was significantly higher than that observed in nonpolypoid lesions. Large neoplasms also have more immune cells in their stroma than small lesions. Immunoediting in precancerous

  9. The Immune Landscapes of Polypoid and Nonpolypoid Precancerous Colorectal Lesions.

    PubMed

    Maglietta, Antonella; Maglietta, Rosalia; Staiano, Teresa; Bertoni, Ramona; Ancona, Nicola; Marra, Giancarlo; Resta, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the immunoediting process in precancerous lesions. We explored this aspect of benign colorectal adenomas with a descriptive analysis of the immune pathways and immune cells whose regulation is linked to the morphology and size of these lesions. Two series of polypoid and nonpolypoid colorectal adenomas were used in this study: 1) 84 samples (42 lesions, each with matched samples of normal mucosa) whose gene expression data were used to quantify the tumor morphology- and size-related dysregulation of immune pathways collected in the Molecular Signature Database, using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis; 2) 40 other lesions examined with immunohistochemistry to quantify the presence of immune cells in the stromal compartment. In the analysis of transcriptomic data, 429 immune pathways displayed significant differential regulation in neoplasms of different morphology and size. Most pathways were significantly upregulated or downregulated in polypoid lesions versus nonpolypoid lesions (regardless of size). Differential pathway regulation associated with lesion size was observed only in polypoid neoplasms. These findings were mirrored by tissue immunostaining with CD4, CD8, FOXP3, MHC-I, CD68, and CD163 antibodies: stromal immune cell counts (mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages) were significantly higher in polypoid lesions. Certain markers displayed significant size-related differences regardless of lesion morphology. Multivariate analysis of variance showed that the marker panel clearly discriminated between precancerous lesions of different morphologies and sizes. Statistical analysis of immunostained cell counts fully support the results of the transcriptomic data analysis: the density of infiltration of most immune cells in the stroma of polypoid precancerous lesions was significantly higher than that observed in nonpolypoid lesions. Large neoplasms also have more immune cells in their stroma than small lesions. Immunoediting in precancerous

  10. Fas/Fas Ligand Interaction in Human Colorectal Hepatic Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Yoong, Khong F.; Afford, Simon C.; Randhawa, Satinder; Hubscher, Stefan G.; Adams, David H.

    1999-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel role for the Fas pathway in the promotion of local tumor growth by inducing apoptotic cell death in normal hepatocytes at the tumor margin in colorectal hepatic metastases. Our results show that >85% of lymphocytes infiltrating colorectal liver cancer express high levels of Fas-ligand (Fas-L) by flow cytometry. Using immunohistochemistry of tumor tissue we showed strong Fas expression in noninvolved hepatocytes, whereas Fas-L expression was restricted to tumor cells and infiltrating lymphocytes at the tumor margin. Apoptosis was observed in 45 ± 13% of the Fashigh hepatocytes at the tumor margin whereas only 7 ± 3% tumor cells were apoptotic (n = 10). In vitro, primary human hepatocytes expressed Fas receptor and crosslinking with anti-Fas antibody induced apoptosis in 44 ± 5% of the cells compared with 4.6 ± 1.0% in untreated controls (P = 0.004). Both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and human metastatic colon cancer cells cells are able to induce Fas-mediated apoptosis of primary human hepatocytes in coculture cytotoxic assays. TIL induced apoptosis in 47 ± 9% hepatocytes compared with control 4.3 ± 1.0% (P = 0.009) and this effect was reduced by anti-human Fas-L mAb (18.7 ± 1.3%, P = 0.009). SW620 cells induced apoptosis in 26 ± 2% hepatocytes compared with control 5.6 ± 1.7% (P = 0.004) and this was reduced to 11.2 ± 1.8% (P = 0.004) in the presence of anti-human Fas-L mAb. These data suggest that the inflammatory response at the margin of colorectal liver metastases induces Fas expression in surrounding hepatocytes, allowing them to be killed by Fas-L-bearing TIL or tumor cells and facilitating the invasion of the tumor into surrounding liver tissue. PMID:10079247

  11. Cathepsin B promotes colorectal tumorigenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Benjamin; Mongrain, Sébastien; Cagnol, Sébastien; Langlois, Marie‐Josée; Boulanger, Jim; Bernatchez, Gérald; Carrier, Julie C.; Boudreau, François

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a cysteine proteinase that primarily functions as an endopeptidase within endolysosomal compartments in normal cells. However, during tumoral expansion, the regulation of cathepsin B can be altered at multiple levels, thereby resulting in its overexpression and export outside of the cell. This may suggest a possible role of cathepsin B in alterations leading to cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intracellular and extracellular cathepsin B in growth, tumorigenesis, and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Results show that mRNA and activated levels of cathepsin B were both increased in human adenomas and in CRCs of all stages. Treatment of CRC cells with the highly selective and non‐permeant cathepsin B inhibitor Ca074 revealed that extracellular cathepsin B actively contributed to the invasiveness of human CRC cells while not essential for their growth in soft agar. Cathepsin B silencing by RNAi in human CRC cells inhibited their growth in soft agar, as well as their invasion capacity, tumoral expansion, and metastatic spread in immunodeficient mice. Higher levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 were observed in cathepsin B‐deficient tumors as well as an increase in cyclin B1. Finally, cathepsin B colocalized with p27Kip1 within the lysosomes and efficiently degraded the inhibitor. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that cathepsin B is a significant factor in colorectal tumor development, invasion, and metastatic spreading and may, therefore, represent a potential pharmacological target for colorectal tumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808857

  12. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  13. Diet and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Baseline Dietary Knowledge of Colorectal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, K. J.; Fearon, K. C. H.; Buckner, K.; Richardson, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the dietary knowledge, attitudes and potential barriers to change of patients attending a colorectal outpatient clinic. Design: Use of a semistructured interview to generate qualitative and quantitative data. Setting: A regional colorectal outpatient clinic within Edinburgh. Method: Patients attending clinic with colorectal…

  14. Variation in the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility loci and colorectal polyps by polyp type.

    PubMed

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N; Newcomb, Polly A; Hutter, Carolyn M; Peters, Ulrike; Passarelli, Michael N; Schwartz, Malaika R; Upton, Melissa P; Zhu, Lee-Ching; Potter, John D; Makar, Karen W

    2014-07-15

    We conducted a case-control study of the association between subsets of colorectal polyps, including adenomas and serrated polyps, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to colorectal cancer through prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Participants were enrollees in the Group Health Cooperative (Seattle, Washington) aged 24-79 years who received a colonoscopy from 1998 to 2007, donated a buccal or blood sample, and completed a structured questionnaire. We performed genotyping of 13 colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs. Polytomous logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between polyps and the colorectal cancer risk allele for each SNP under a log-additive model. Analyses included 781 controls, 489 cases with adenoma, 401 cases with serrated polyps, and 188 cases with both polyp types. The following SNPs were associated with advanced adenomas: rs10936599, rs10795668, rs16892766, and rs9929218 (P < 0.05). For nonadvanced adenomas and for serrated polyps overall, only rs961253 was statistically significant (P < 0.05). These associations were in the same directions as those in prior colorectal cancer GWAS. No SNP was significantly associated with hyperplastic polyps, and only rs6983267 was significantly associated with sessile serrated polyps, but this association was opposite of that found in colorectal cancer GWAS. Our results suggest that the association between colorectal cancer susceptibility SNPs and colorectal polyps varies by polyp type.

  15. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il; Tavakkoli, Ali; Farokhzad, Omid C; Vilos, Cristian

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs. PMID:27529192

  16. Identification of reference genes for circulating microRNA analysis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yanqin; Wu, Yike; Huang, Jinyong; Li, Qing; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Li, Furong; Gou, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the most frequently used method for measuring expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs), which is based on normalization to endogenous references. Although circulating miRNAs have been regarded as potential non-invasive biomarker of disease, no study has been performed so far on reference miRNAs for normalization in colorectal cancer. In this study we tried to identify optimal reference miRNAs for qPCR analysis across colorectal cancer patients and healthy individuals. 485 blood-derived miRNAs were profiled in serum sample pools of both colorectal cancer and healthy control. Seven candidate miRNAs chosen from profiling results as well as three previous reported reference miRNAs were validated using qPCR in 30 colorectal cancer patients and 30 healthy individuals, and thereafter analyzed by statistical algorithms BestKeeper, geNorm and NormFinder. Taken together, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-25-3p and hsa-miR-106b-5p were recommended as a set of suitable reference genes. More interestingly, the three miRNAs validated from 485 miRNAs are derived from a single primary transcript, indicting the cluster may be highly conserved in colorectal cancer. However, all three miRNAs differed significantly between healthy individuals and non-small cell lung cancer or breast cancer patients and could not be used as reference genes in the two types of cancer. PMID:27759076

  17. Chemotherapy is linked to severe vitamin D deficiency in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fakih, Marwan G.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Tian, Lili; Muindi, Josephia; Sunga, Annette Y.

    2009-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical evidence support an association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Normal vitamin D status has been linked to favorable health outcomes ranging from decreased risk of osteoporosis to improved cancer mortality. We performed a retrospective study to assess the impact of metastatic disease and chemotherapy treatment on vitamin D status in patients with colorectal cancer residing in Western New York. Materials and methods Patients, 315, with colorectal cancer treated in a single institute were assayed for 25-OH vitamin D. The association of age, gender, primary disease site and stage, body mass index, and chemotherapy with vitamin D status was investigated. Results Vitamin D deficiency was common among participants with a median 25-OH vitamin D level of 21.3 ng/ml (optimal range 32–100 ng/ml). Primary site of disease and chemotherapy status were associated with very low 25-OH vitamin D levels (≤15 ng/ml) on multivariate analysis. Patients receiving chemotherapy and patients with a rectal primary were fourfold and 2.6-fold more likely to have severe vitamin D deficiency on multivariate analysis than nonchemotherapy patients and colon cancer primary patients, respectively. Conclusions Chemotherapy is associated with a significant increase in the risk of severe vitamin D deficiency. Patients with colorectal cancer, especially those receiving chemotherapy, should be considered for aggressive vitamin D replacement strategies. PMID:18830610

  18. Loss of CSMD1 or 2 may contribute to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Song, Chun

    2014-05-01

    CUB and sushi multiple domain protein 1 (CSMD1) is a candidate tumor suppressor gene. The three members of CSMD family have very similar structures, each consisting of 14 CUB domains separated from one another by a sushi domain, an additional uninterrupted array of sushi domains, a single transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmic tail. In this work, we aimed to study the protein and mRNA levels of the CSMD1, CSMD2, and CSMD3 and evaluate their prognostic importance in colorectal cancer. Reduced expressions of these three proteins were detected in colorectal cancer tissues by comparing matched normal tissues. Low CSMD2 expression was significantly associated with differentiation, lymphatic invasion, and tumor size. CSMD3 was associated with differentiation and lymphatic invasion. CSMD1 and CSMD2 expressions were associated with overall survival. This study offers convincing evidence for the first time that the three genes of CSMD family were downregulated in the patients with colorectal cancer and may be used as predictors of colorectal cancer.

  19. Loss of CSMD1 or 2 may contribute to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Song, Chun

    2014-05-01

    CUB and sushi multiple domain protein 1 (CSMD1) is a candidate tumor suppressor gene. The three members of CSMD family have very similar structures, each consisting of 14 CUB domains separated from one another by a sushi domain, an additional uninterrupted array of sushi domains, a single transmembrane domain, and a short cytoplasmic tail. In this work, we aimed to study the protein and mRNA levels of the CSMD1, CSMD2, and CSMD3 and evaluate their prognostic importance in colorectal cancer. Reduced expressions of these three proteins were detected in colorectal cancer tissues by comparing matched normal tissues. Low CSMD2 expression was significantly associated with differentiation, lymphatic invasion, and tumor size. CSMD3 was associated with differentiation and lymphatic invasion. CSMD1 and CSMD2 expressions were associated with overall survival. This study offers convincing evidence for the first time that the three genes of CSMD family were downregulated in the patients with colorectal cancer and may be used as predictors of colorectal cancer. PMID:24408017

  20. Loss of heterozygosity and mutational analyses of the ACTRII gene locus in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Olaru, Andreea; Mori, Yuriko; Yin, Jing; Wang, Suna; Kimos, Martha C; Perry, Kellie; Xu, Yan; Sato, Fumiaki; Selaru, Florin M; Deacu, Elena; Sterian, Anca; Shibata, David; Abraham, John M; Meltzer, Stephen J

    2003-12-01

    The activin type II receptorgene (ACTRII) is mutated in 58.1% of microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) colorectal cancers and is a close relative of the TGFbeta-1 type II receptor, which is known to be involved in both MSI-H and non-MSI-H colorectal carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine whether ACTRII was involved in non-MSI-H colorectal cancers. We evaluated ACTRII inactivation by allelic deletion, loss of mRNA expression, or somatic mutation in 51 non-MSI-H colon cancers. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the ACTRII locus (2q23.1) was found in 9 (17.6%) of 51 primary tumors. Loss of ACTRII mRNA expression was seen in one (14.3%) of the seven LOH-positive primary tumors from which total RNA was available. We also performed DNA sequencing analysis of tumors showing LOH. One LOH-positive primary tumor exhibited a novel germline missense sequence alteration (amino acid substitution, 117 Ile to Phe) that was not found in 23 additional normal individuals, implying that this alteration is not a frequent polymorphism. We conclude that ACTRII is probably involved in both non-MSI-H and MSI-H colorectal carcinogenesis, but more frequently in the latter subgroup.

  1. Pathophysiological mechanisms of death resistance in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Ying; Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancers develop adaptive mechanisms to survive under extreme conditions and display hallmarks of unlimited proliferation and resistance to cell death. The deregulation of cell death is a key factor that contributes to chemoresistance in tumors. In a physiological context, balance between cell proliferation and death, and protection against cell damage are fundamental processes for maintaining gut epithelial homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying anti-death cytoprotection and tumor resistance often bear common pathways, and although distinguishing them would be a challenge, it would also provide an opportunity to develop advanced anti-cancer therapeutics. This review will outline cell death pathways (i.e., apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis), and discuss cytoprotective strategies in normal intestinal epithelium and death resistance mechanisms of colon tumor. In colorectal cancers, the intracellular mechanisms of death resistance include the direct alteration of apoptotic and necroptotic machinery and the upstream events modulating death effectors such as tumor suppressor gene inactivation and pro-survival signaling pathways. The autocrine, paracrine and exogenous factors within a tumor microenvironment can also instigate resistance against apoptotic and necroptotic cell death in colon cancers through changes in receptor signaling or transporter uptake. The roles of cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2, growth factors, glucose, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides in colorectal cancer will be highlighted. Targeting anti-death pathways in the colon cancer tissue might be a promising approach outside of anti-proliferation and anti-angiogenesis strategies for developing novel drugs to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26557002

  2. Estrogen Receptors and Their Implications in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Francesco; Ryan, Elizabeth J.; Doherty, Glen; Winter, Desmond C.; Sheahan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding their cognate receptors, ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2), estrogens activate intracellular signaling cascades that have important consequences for cellular behavior. Historically linked to carcinogenesis in reproductive organs, estrogens have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of different cancer types of non-reproductive tissues including the colon. ERβ is the predominant estrogen receptor expressed in both normal and malignant colonic epithelium. However, during colon cancer progression, ERβ expression is lost, suggesting that estrogen signaling may play a role in disease progression. Estrogens may in fact exert an anti-tumor effect through selective activation of pro-apoptotic signaling mediated by ERβ, inhibition of inflammatory signals and modulation of the tumor microenvironment. In this review, we analyze the estrogen pathway as a possible therapeutic avenue in colorectal cancer, we report the most recent experimental evidence to explain the cellular and molecular mechanisms of estrogen-mediated protection against colorectal tumorigenesis, and we discuss future challenges and potential avenues for targeted therapy. PMID:25699240

  3. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  4. Distinguishing epigenetic features of preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to seminomas and nonseminomas

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Yulia V.; Zinovyeva, Marina V.; Stukacheva, Elena A.; Klimov, Alexey; Tryakin, Alexey A.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.

    2016-01-01

    PIWI pathway proteins are expressed during spermatogenesis where they play a key role in germ cell development. Epigenetic loss of PIWI proteins expression was previously demonstrated in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), implying their involvement in TGCT development. In this work, apart from studying only normal testis and TGCT samples, we also analyzed an intermediate stage, i.e. preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to TGCTs. Importantly, in this study, we minimized the contribution of patient-to-patient heterogeneity by using matched preneoplastic/TGCT samples. Surprisingly, expression of germ cell marker DDX4 suggests that spermatogenesis is retained in premalignant testis tissues adjacent to nonseminoma, but not those adjacent to seminoma. Moreover, this pattern is followed by expression of PIWI pathway genes, which impacts one of their functions: DNA methylation level over LINE-1 promoters is higher in preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to nonseminomas than those adjacent to seminomas. This finding might imply distinct routes for development of the two types of TGCTs and could be used as a novel diagnostic marker, possibly, noninvasively. Finally, we studied the role of CpG island methylation in expression of PIWI genes in patient samples and using in vitro experiments in cell line models: a more complex interrelation between DNA methylation and expression of the corresponding genes was revealed. PMID:26843623

  5. HMGA1 drives metabolic reprogramming of intestinal epithelium during hyperproliferation, polyposis, and colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Belton, Amy S; Xian, Lingling; Huso, Tait; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-03-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC), it remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Early identification and removal of polyps that may progress to overt CRC is the cornerstone of CRC prevention. Expression of the High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) gene is significantly elevated in CRCs as compared with adjacent, nonmalignant tissues. We investigated metabolic aberrations induced by HMGA1 overexpression in small intestinal and colonic epithelium using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMMS) in a transgenic model in which murine Hmga1 was misexpressed in colonic epithelium. To determine if these Hmga1-induced metabolic alterations in mice were relevant to human colorectal carcinogenesis, we also investigated tumors from patients with CRC and matched, adjacent, nonmalignant tissues. Multivariate statistical methods and manual comparisons were used to identify metabolites specific to Hmga1 and CRC. Statistical modeling of data revealed distinct metabolic patterns in Hmga1 transgenics and human CRC samples as compared with the control tissues. We discovered that 13 metabolites were specific for Hmga1 in murine intestinal epithelium and also found in human CRC. Several of these metabolites function in fatty acid metabolism and membrane composition. Although further validation is needed, our results suggest that high levels of HMGA1 protein drive metabolic alterations that contribute to CRC pathogenesis through fatty acid synthesis. These metabolites could serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets.

  6. Remodeling in myocardium adjacent to an infarction in the pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Scott D; Criscione, John; Covell, James W

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the structure of the "normal" ventricular wall adjacent to an infarcted area involve all components of the myocardium (myocytes, fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and the coronary vasculature) and their three-dimensional structural relationship. Assessing changes in these components requires tracking material markers in the remodeling tissue over long periods of time with a three-dimensional approach as well as a detailed histological evaluation of the remodeled structure. The purpose of the present study was to examine the hypotheses that changes in the tissue adjacent to an infarct are related to myocyte elongation, myofiber rearrangement, and changes in the laminar architecture of the adjacent tissue. Three weeks after myocardial infarction, noninfarcted tissue adjacent to the infarct remodeled by expansion along the direction of the fibers and in the cross fiber direction. These changes are consistent with myocyte elongation and myofiber rearrangement (slippage), as well as a change in cell shape to a more elliptical cross section with the major axis in the epicardial tangent plane, and indicate that reorientation of fibers either via "cell slippage" or changes in orientation of the laminar structure of the ventricular wall are quantitatively important aspects of the remodeling of the normally perfused myocardium.

  7. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  8. SNHG16 is regulated by the Wnt pathway in colorectal cancer and affects genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; True, Kirsten; Hamilton, Mark P; Nielsen, Morten M; Damas, Nkerorema D; Damgaard, Christian K; Ongen, Halit; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Bramsen, Jesper B; Pedersen, Jakob S; Lund, Anders H; Vang, Søren; Stribolt, Katrine; Madsen, Mogens R; Laurberg, Søren; McGuire, Sean E; Ørntoft, Torben F; Andersen, Claus L

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer where they have been shown to act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. RNA profiling of 314 colorectal adenomas/adenocarcinomas and 292 adjacent normal colon mucosa samples using RNA-sequencing demonstrated that the snoRNA host gene 16 (SNHG16) is significantly up-regulated in adenomas and all stages of CRC. SNHG16 expression was positively correlated to the expression of Wnt-regulated transcription factors, including ASCL2, ETS2, and c-Myc. In vitro abrogation of Wnt signaling in CRC cells reduced the expression of SNHG16 indicating that SNHG16 is regulated by the Wnt pathway. Silencing of SNHG16 resulted in reduced viability, increased apoptotic cell death and impaired cell migration. The SNHG16 silencing particularly affected expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. A connection between SNHG16 and genes involved in lipid metabolism was also observed in clinical tumors. Argonaute CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (AGO-CLIP) demonstrated that SNHG16 heavily binds AGO and has 27 AGO/miRNA target sites along its length, indicating that SNHG16 may act as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) "sponging" miRNAs off their cognate targets. Most interestingly, half of the miRNA families with high confidence targets on SNHG16 also target the 3'UTR of Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase (SCD). SCD is involved in lipid metabolism and is down-regulated upon SNHG16 silencing. In conclusion, up-regulation of SNHG16 is a frequent event in CRC, likely caused by deregulated Wnt signaling. In vitro analyses demonstrate that SNHG16 may play an oncogenic role in CRC and that it affects genes involved in lipid metabolism, possible through ceRNA related mechanisms.

  9. Bisulfite-Based DNA Methylation Analysis from Recent and Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin Embedded Colorectal Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Hollósi, Péter; Wichmann, Barnabás; Bodor, András; Patai, Árpád V; Schöller, Andrea; Krenács, Tibor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to test the applicability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for gene specific DNA methylation analysis after using two commercially available DNA isolation kits. Genomic DNA was isolated from 5 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal adjacent tissues from "recent", collected within 6 months, and "archived", collected more than 5 years ago, FFPE tissues using either High Pure FFPET DNA Isolation kit or QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit. DNA methylation analysis of MAL, SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes, known to be hypermethylated in CRC, was performed using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and sequencing. QIAamp (Q) method resulted in slightly higher recovery in archived (HP: 1.22 ± 3.18 μg DNA; Q: 3.00 ± 4.04 μg DNA) and significantly (p < 0.05) higher recovery in recent samples compared to High Pure method (HP) (HP: 4.10 ± 2.91 μg DNA; Q: 11.51 ± 7.50 μg DNA). Both OD260/280 and OD260/230 ratios were lower, but still high in the High Pure isolated archived and recent samples compared to those isolated with QIAamp. Identical DNA methylation patterns were detected for all 3 genes tested by MS-HRM with both isolation kits in the recent group. However, despite of higher DNA recovery in QIAamp slightly more reproducible methylation results were obtained from High Pure isolated archived samples. Sequencing confirmed DNA hypermethylation in CRCs. In conclusion, reproducible DNA methylation patterns were obtained from recent samples using both isolation kits. However, long term storage may affect the reliability of the results leading to moderate differences between the efficiency of isolation kits.

  10. MiR-378 is an independent prognostic factor and inhibits cell growth and invasion in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs(miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that participate in a variety of biologic processes, and dysregulation of miRNA is always associated with cancer development and progression. Aberrant expression of miR-378 has been found in some types of cancer. However, effects and potential mechanisms of miR-378 in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been explored. Methods Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to evaluate miR-378 levels in CRC cell lines and 84 pairs of CRC cancer and normal adjacent mucosa. Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional regression analyses were utilized to determine the association of miR-378 expression with survival of patients. MTT and invasion assays were used to determine the role of miR-378 in regulation of CRC cancer cell growth and invasion, respectively. Tumor growth was assessed by subcutaneous inoculation of cells into BALB/c nude mice. Luciferase assay was performed to assess miR-378 binding to vimentin gene. Results In this study, we confirmed that miR-378 significantly down-regulated in CRC cancer tissues and cell lines. Moreover, patients with low miR-378 expression had significantly poorer overall survival, and miR-378 expression was an independent prognostic factor in CRC. Over-expression of miR-378 inhibited SW620 cell growth and invasion, and resulted in down-regulation of vimentin expression. However, miR-378 knock-down promoted these processes and enhanced the expression of vimentin. In addition, we further identified vimentin as the functional downstream target of miR-378 by directly targeting the 3′-UTR of vimentin. Conclusions In conclusion, miR-378 may function as a tumor suppressor and plays an important role in inhibiting tumor growth and invasion. Our present results implicate the potential effects of miR-378 on prognosis and treatment of CRC cancer. PMID:24555885

  11. The Clinical Significance of MiR-429 as a Predictive Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving 5-Fluorouracil Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Sheng-jian; Cai, Xiao-jun; Li, Shu-jin

    2016-01-01

    Background 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) based treatment is the standard therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), but the development of chemoresistance is inevitable. Increasing evidence shows that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in malignant transformation. Thus, it is imperative that we find new diagnostic and prognostic marker for chemotherapy in CRC. Material/Methods For clinical parameter analysis, 78 CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues and 45 serum specimens from CRC patients were included in this study. For chemo-response analysis, 116 primary tissues were collected from the patients receiving first-line 5-FU treatment. Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to detect microRNAs expression. Results The expression of miR-429 was significantly increased in both serum and primary tissues from CRC patients, and enhanced miR-429 level was associated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. The diagnostic and prognostic values were also confirmed in CRC by using primary tissues. For patients receiving 5-FU-based treatment, miR-429 levels were significantly lower in responding group. The proportions of patients that did not experience response to therapy were higher in primary tumors with high miR-429 expression levels as compared with primary tumors with low miR-429 expression levels. Finally, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that miR-429 is an independent prognostic indicator for chemo-response to 5-FU therapy among CRC patients. Conclusions High level of miR-429 expression was correlated with enhanced malignant potential and poor prognosis of CRC patients. Furthermore, miR-429 could affect the chemo-sensitivity of CRC patients to 5-FU therapy and was associated with poor response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with CRC. PMID:27654003

  12. Bisulfite-Based DNA Methylation Analysis from Recent and Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin Embedded Colorectal Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Hollósi, Péter; Wichmann, Barnabás; Bodor, András; Patai, Árpád V; Schöller, Andrea; Krenács, Tibor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to test the applicability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for gene specific DNA methylation analysis after using two commercially available DNA isolation kits. Genomic DNA was isolated from 5 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal adjacent tissues from "recent", collected within 6 months, and "archived", collected more than 5 years ago, FFPE tissues using either High Pure FFPET DNA Isolation kit or QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit. DNA methylation analysis of MAL, SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes, known to be hypermethylated in CRC, was performed using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and sequencing. QIAamp (Q) method resulted in slightly higher recovery in archived (HP: 1.22 ± 3.18 μg DNA; Q: 3.00 ± 4.04 μg DNA) and significantly (p < 0.05) higher recovery in recent samples compared to High Pure method (HP) (HP: 4.10 ± 2.91 μg DNA; Q: 11.51 ± 7.50 μg DNA). Both OD260/280 and OD260/230 ratios were lower, but still high in the High Pure isolated archived and recent samples compared to those isolated with QIAamp. Identical DNA methylation patterns were detected for all 3 genes tested by MS-HRM with both isolation kits in the recent group. However, despite of higher DNA recovery in QIAamp slightly more reproducible methylation results were obtained from High Pure isolated archived samples. Sequencing confirmed DNA hypermethylation in CRCs. In conclusion, reproducible DNA methylation patterns were obtained from recent samples using both isolation kits. However, long term storage may affect the reliability of the results leading to moderate differences between the efficiency of isolation kits. PMID:25991403

  13. Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Impacts MSI-Driven Carcinogenesis and Anti-Tumor Immunity in Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    El-Bchiri, Jamila; Guilloux, Agathe; Dartigues, Peggy; Loire, Etienne; Mercier, Dominique; Buhard, Olivier; Sobhani, Iradj; de la Grange, Pierre; Auboeuf, Didier; Praz, Françoise; Fléjou, Jean-François; Duval, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) degrades mutant mRNAs containing premature termination codon (PTC-mRNAs). Here we evaluate the consequence of NMD activity in colorectal cancers (CRCs) showing microsatellite instability (MSI) whose progression is associated with the accumulation of PTC-mRNAs encoding immunogenic proteins due to frameshift mutations in coding repeat sequences. Inhibition of UPF1, one of the major NMD factors, was achieved by siRNA in the HCT116 MSI CRC cell line and the resulting changes in gene expression were studied using expression microarrays. The impact of NMD activity was also investigated in primary MSI CRCs by quantifying the expression of several mRNAs relative to their mutational status and to endogenous UPF1 and UPF2 expression. Host immunity developed against MSI cancer cells was appreciated by quantifying the number of CD3ε-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). UPF1 silencing led to the up-regulation of 1251 genes in HCT116, among which a proportion of them (i.e. 38%) significantly higher than expected by chance contained a coding microsatellite (P<2×10−16). In MSI primary CRCs, UPF1 was significantly over-expressed compared to normal adjacent mucosa (P<0.002). Our data provided evidence for differential decay of PTC-mRNAs compared to wild-type that was positively correlated to UPF1 endogenous expression level (P = 0.02). A negative effect of UPF1 and UPF2 expression on the host's anti-tumor response was observed (P<0.01). Overall, our results show that NMD deeply influences MSI-driven tumorigenesis at the molecular level and indicate a functional negative impact of this system on anti-tumor immunity whose intensity has been recurrently shown to be an independent factor of favorable outcome in CRCs. PMID:18612427

  14. Microsatellite instability in tumor and nonneoplastic colorectal cells from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and sporadic high microsatellite-instable tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Dietmaier, W; Gänsbauer, S; Beyser, K; Renke, B; Hartmann, A; Rümmele, P; Jauch, K W; Hofstädter, F; Rüschoff, J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic alterations such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) have been frequently studied in various tumor types. Genetic heterogeneity of nonneoplastic cells has not yet been sufficiently investigated. However, genomic instability in normal cells could be a potentially important issue, in particular when these cells are used as reference in LOH and MSI analyses of tumor samples. In order to investigate possible genetic abnormalities in normal colorectal cells of tumor patients, MSI analyses of normal colonic mucosa were performed. Up to 15 different laser-microdissected normal regions containing 50-150 cells were investigated in each of 15 individual microsatellite-stable, sporadic high microsatellite-instable (MSI-H) and hereditary non-polyposis coli cancer (HNPCC) colorectal cancer patients. Frequent MSI and heterogeneity in the MSI pattern were found both in normal and tumor cells from 10 HNPCC and sporadic MSI-H tumor patients whose tumors had defect mismatch repair protein expressions. This observation shows that MSI can also occur in nonneoplastic cells which has to be considered in MSI analyses for molecular HNPCC screening. In addition, considerable genetic heterogeneity was detected in all MSI-H (sporadic and HNPCC) tumors when analyzing five different regions with less than 150 cells, respectively. These differences were not detectable in larger tumor regions containing about 10,000 cells. Thus, heterogeneity of the MSI pattern (e.g. intratumoral MSI) is an important feature of tumors with the MSI-H phenotype.

  15. Attenuation by spinal cord stimulation of a nociceptive reflex generated by colorectal distention in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C; Foreman, Robert D; Linderoth, Bengt

    2003-02-28

    The mechanisms underlying the cause and treatment of visceral pain of gastrointestinal origin are poorly understood. Previous clinical studies have shown that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) attenuates neuropathic and ischemic pain, and animal experiments have provided knowledge about probable physiological mechanisms. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether SCS influences colonic sensitivity in a conscious rat. A visceromotor behavioral response (VMR), induced by colorectal distention, was used to quantify the level of colonic sensitivity. Under anesthesia, an electrode (cathode) was placed on the dorsal surface of the spinal cord at L1. One week after implantation of the SCS electrode, the effects of stimulation delivered with different intensities (50 Hz, 0.2 ms for 30 min) on colonic sensitivity were determined. Nociceptive levels of colorectal distention (60 mm Hg for 10 min) induced an enhanced VMR quantified as an increased number of abdominal muscle contractions compared to controls in which the balloon catheter was inserted into the colorectal region but not distended. Colonic sensitization with acetic acid increased the VMR to innocuous levels of colorectal distention (30 mm Hg for 10 min). We found that SCS induced a significant depression of the VMR produced by colorectal distention in both normal rats and those with sensitized colons. The suppressive effect of SCS on colonic sensitivity suggests that SCS may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of visceral pain of gastrointestinal origin associated with abdominal cramping and painful abdominal spasms. PMID:12559199

  16. NDRG4, a novel candidate tumor suppressor, is a predictor of overall survival of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunming; Zhu, Shaojun; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Qingchuan; Ji, Gang; Wang, Weizhong; Zheng, Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    The role of NDRG4 in human malignancies is largely unknown. We investigated the role of NDRG4 protein in colorectal cancer and its prognostic value in a hospital-based retrospective training cohort of 272 patients and a prospective validation cohort of 708 patients were. Cell line was transfected with an NDRG4 expression construct to confirm the suppression of PI3K-AKT activity by NDRG4. Appropriate statistical methods were utilized for analysis. Results showed that NDRG4 protein expression was significantly decreased from normal mucosa, chronic colitis, ulcerative colitis, atypical hyperplasia to colorectal cancer. Significant negative correlations were found between NDRG4 staining and p-AKT. Patients with positive NDRG4 staining had favorable survival in both study cohorts. In multivariate analysis, NDRG4 staining proved to be an independent predictor of overall survival. Moreover, the prognostic role of NDRG4 was stratified by p-AKT. Overexpression of NDRG4 in colorectal cancer cell can significantly suppress PI3K-AKT activity, even after EGF stimulation. These results indicated NDRG4 protein expression was decreased in colorectal cancer. It may play its tumor suppressive role in carcinogenesis and progression through attenuation of PI3K-AKT activity. Therefore, high risk colorectal cancer patients could be better identified based on the combination of NDRG4 and PI3K-AKT activity. PMID:25749388

  17. Clinicopathologic Features of Colorectal Carcinoma in HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Carlie; Cavalcanti, Marcela S.; Daniel, Tanisha; Vakiani, Efsevia; Shia, Jinru; Sigel, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests differences in colo-rectal cancer in HIV-infected patients (HIV+) compared with HIV− patients. Microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in a subset of colorectal cancer, is present at a higher rate in certain cancers in HIV+ patients. Colorectal cancer with MSI share some characteristics with those reported for HIV+ colorectal cancer. On this premise, we studied clinical and pathologic features of HIV+ colorectal cancer and evaluated for MSI using matched HIV− colorectal cancer controls. Methods Two nested, matched cohorts were identified from a hospital-based cohort of colorectal cancer patients. HIV+ colo-rectal cancers were identified and random control patients were matched for selected characteristics. Mismatch repair protein (MMR) IHC was performed as the detection method for MSI. Variables were compared between cases and controls using fixed-effects logit modeling to account for matching. Results We included 184 colorectal cancer samples (38 HIV+, 146 HIV− control). Median patient age at colorectal cancer onset was 55. When compared with HIV− colorectal cancer, HIV+patients were more likely to have smoked (P = 0.001), have right-sided colorectal cancer (37% vs. 14%; P = 0.003), and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) above 50/10 high-power fields (21% vs. 7%). There was no difference in MMR protein expression (P = 0.6). HIV+ colorectal cancer patients had reduced overall survival (P = 0.02) but no difference in progression-free survival. Conclusions HIV+ patients developed colorectal cancer at a lower median age than population estimates, had a higher frequency of right-sided disease, and increased TILs, suggesting potential biologic differences compared with uninfected patients. Impact Clinicopathologic differences in colorectal cancer of HIV+ persons may have implications for tumor pathogenesis. PMID:27197294

  18. Immune Response Gene Expression in Colorectal Cancer Carries Distinct Prognostic Implications According to Tissue, Stage and Site: A Prospective Retrospective Translational Study in the Context of a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pentheroudakis, George; Raptou, Georgia; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Wirtz, Ralph M.; Vrettou, Eleni; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Gourgioti, Georgia; Gakou, Chryssa; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.; Bournakis, Evangelos; Rallis, Grigorios; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Galani, Eleni; Lazaridis, Georgios; Papaxoinis, George; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Makatsoris, Thomas; Kalogeras, Konstantine T.; Fountzilas, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Although host immune response is an emerging prognostic factor for colorectal cancer, there is no consensus on the optimal methodology, surrogate markers or tissue for study. Patients and Methods Tumour blocks were prospectively collected from 344 patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Whole section lymphocytic infiltration was studied along with mRNA expression of CD3Z, CD8, CD4, CXCL9, CXCL13, IGHM, FOXP3, SNAI2 and ESR1 by qRT-qPCR in tissue microarray (TMA) cores from the centre of tumour, invasive margin and adjacent normal mucosa. Results Lymphocytic infiltration, deficient MMR (10.9%), KRAS (40.7%) and BRAF (4.9%) mutations or single mRNA gene expression were not prognostic. Tumour ESR1 gene expression (Hazard Ratio [HR] for relapse 2.33, 95% CI 1.35-4.02; HR for death 1.74, 95% CI 1.02-2.97) and absence of necrosis (HR for relapse 1.71, 95% CI 1.05-2.71; HR for death 1.98, 95% CI 1.14-3.43) were adverse prognostic features. We used CD3Z and CD8 expression in order to devise the mRNA-based Immune Score (mIS) and proceeded to partitioning analysis in 267 patients, with age, stage, tumour site (Right vs Left CRC), KRAS mutation and tumour mIS as input factors. Only in patients with stage III right-sided colon cancer, a low immune response was associated with inferior disease-free survival (mIS-low, HR for relapse 2.28, 95% CI 1.05-8.02). No prognostic significance was seen for tumour mIS in any other stage or site of CRC, or for a similar mIS score derived from adjacent normal mucosa. Independent adverse prognostic significance was retained in multivariable analysis for absence of necrosis, tumour ESR1 expression in all patients and low tumour mIS in stage III right-sided CRC. Conclusions In localised CRC, mRNA-based CD3Z/CD8 profiling of tumour immune response may have stage, site and tissue-specific prognostic significance, along with ESR1 expression. Trial Registration ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN

  19. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  20. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  1. Cytotoxic T-cell immunity against telomerase reverse transcriptase in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Titu, Liviu V; Loveday, Ruth L; Madden, Leigh A; Cawkwell, Lynn; Monson, John R; Greenman, John

    2004-10-01

    The catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) has recently been proposed as a potential tumour-associated antigen capable of inducing T-cell mediated immunity in cancer patients. Before any attempts at vaccination with hTERT antigens can be made, one should establish if cancer patients possess cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) that can recognise hTERT epitopes. The T-cell response against two HLA-A2-specific epitopes of hTERT in 37 colorectal cancer patients and 12 normal controls was analysed using an interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) ELISPOT assay. For comparison the response to HLA-A2-restricted epitopes of CEA and influenza A matrix protein was also measured. CTL that recognised either of the two hTERT epitopes studied were found in 7 (19%) of colorectal cancer patients, with 2 (5%) possessing T-cells that recognised both these peptides. Four (11%) colorectal cancer patients had CTL that reacted to the CEA epitope. No relationship between cancer stage and the presence of specific CTL against hTERT or CEA was observed. None of the normal controls possessed T-cells capable of recognising either the hTERT or the CEA epitopes. However, a similar proportion of patients and normal controls had CTL reactive with the influenza A peptide. The results of this study demonstrate that CTL active against hTERT are present in approximately 20% of colorectal cancer patients irrespective of disease stage. Moreover, these cells are functional, able to secrete IFN-gamma when stimulated with the relevant peptide. PMID:15375515

  2. Exploring Different Strategies for Efficient Delivery of Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Congcong; Ng, Huei Leng Helena; Pan, Weisan; Chen, Hubiao; Zhang, Ge; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Lu, Aiping; Yang, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the world. Currently available chemotherapy of CRC usually delivers the drug to both normal as well as cancerous tissues, thus leading to numerous undesirable effects. Much emphasis is being laid on the development of effective drug delivery systems for achieving selective delivery of the active moiety at the anticipated site of action with minimized unwanted side effects. Researchers have employed various techniques (dependent on pH, time, pressure and/or bacteria) for targeting drugs directly to the colonic region. On the other hand, systemic drug delivery strategies to specific molecular targets (such as FGFR, EGFR, CD44, EpCAM, CA IX, PPARγ and COX-2) overexpressed by cancerous cells have also been shown to be effective. This review aims to put forth an overview of drug delivery technologies that have been, and may be developed, for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26569228

  3. Applications of nanoparticles to diagnostics and therapeutics in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortina, Paolo; Kricka, Larry J; Graves, David J; Park, Jason; Hyslop, Terry; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi; Surrey, Saul; Waldman, Scott A

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has considerable promise for the detection, staging and treatment of cancer. Here, we outline one such promising application: the use of nanostructures with surface-bound ligands for the targeted delivery and ablation of colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the US. Normal colonic epithelial cells as well as primary CRC and metastatic tumors all express a unique surface-bound guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), which binds the diarrheagenic bacterial heat-stable peptide enterotoxin ST. This makes GCC a potential target for metastatic tumor ablation using ST-bound nanoparticles in combination with thermal ablation with near-infrared or radiofrequency energy absorption. Furthermore, the incorporation of iron or iron oxide into such structures would provide advantages for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although the scenarios outlined in this article are hypothetical, they might stimulate ideas about how other cancers could be attacked using nanotechnology.

  4. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Raminder Kaur; Khangura, Charanpreet Kaur; Desai, Anagha; Goyert, Gregory; Sangha, Roopina

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity. PMID:26770850

  5. Novel insights into Notum and glypicans regulation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Mariangela; Arigoni, Maddalena; Loiacono, Luisa; Riccardo, Federica; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Feodorova, Yana; Tashkova, Dessislava; Belovejdov, Vesselin; Sarafian, Victoria; Cavallo, Federica; Signori, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    The connection between colorectal cancer (CRC) and Wnt signaling pathway activation is well known, but full elucidation of the underlying regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its biological functions in CRC pathogenesis is still needed. Here, the azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium salt (AOM/DSS) murine model has been used as an experimental platform able to mimic human sporadic CRC development with predictable timing. We performed genome-wide expression profiling of AOM/DSS-induced tumors and normal colon mucosa to identify potential novel CRC biomarkers. Remarkably, the enhanced expression of Notum, a conserved feedback antagonist of Wnt, was observed in tumors along with alterations in Glypican-1 and Glypican-3 levels. These findings were confirmed in a set of human CRC samples. Here, we provide the first demonstration of significant changes in Notum and glypicans gene expression during CRC development and present evidence to suggest them as potential new biomarkers of CRC pathogenesis. PMID:26517809

  6. Differentially expressed microRNAs in colorectal cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Mohammed; Benner, Axel; Patil, Nitin; Heil, Oliver; Allgayer, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis continues to be the most significant contributor to cancer related mortality, and although several studies have examined expression profiles emanating from patients with metastatic disease, very little information is available about signatures that differentiate metastatic lesions from primary tumors and associated normal tissues, largely because such matched tissue sample series are rare. This study was specifically designed to identify the metastasis relevant microRNAs in colorectal cancer and characterize microRNAs that modulate the metastatic phenotype. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) with the accession number GSE54088, was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in Cancer Research with the PMID 26069251. PMID:26697326

  7. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy. PMID:24216997

  8. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Fayez; Al Jerf, Feras; Al-Halabi, M. H. D. Bassel

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR) and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE) and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families. PMID:23737765

  9. Ablative Therapies for Colorectal Polyps and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.; Nurkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques are gaining popularity in the management of colorectal polyps and occasionally superficial cancers. While their use is in many times palliative, they have proven to be curative in carefully selected patients with polyps or malignancies, with less morbidity than radical resection. However, one should note that data supporting local and ablative therapies for colorectal cancer is scarce and may be subject to publication bias. Therefore, for curative intent, these techniques should only be considered in highly select cases as higher rates of local recurrences have also been reported. The aim of this review is to explain the different modalities of local and ablative therapies specific to colorectal neoplasia and explain the indications and circumstances where they have been most successful. PMID:25089281

  10. The stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairudin, Nur Izzati; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. To better understand about the kinetics of cancer growth, mathematical models are used to provide insight into the progression of this natural process which enables physicians and oncologists to determine optimal radiation and chemotherapy schedules and develop a prognosis, both of which are indispensable for treating cancer. This thesis investigates the stability of colorectal cancer mathematical models. We found that continuous saturating feedback is the best available model of colorectal cancer growth. We also performed stability analysis. The result shows that cancer progress in sequence of genetic mutations or epigenetic which lead to a very large number of cells population until become unbounded. The cell population growth initiate and its saturating feedback is overcome when mutation changes causing the net per-capita growth rate of stem or transit cells exceed critical threshold.

  11. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  12. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cipe, Gokhan; Idiz, Ufuk Oguz; Firat, Deniz; Bektasoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complex and vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26483877

  13. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts.

  14. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J.; Abud, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts. PMID:26367378

  15. ERBB3 Positively Correlates with Intestinal Stem Cell Markers but Marks a Distinct Non Proliferative Cell Population in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardé, Thierry; Kass, Lisa; Staples, Margaret; Lescesen, Helen; Carne, Peter; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Abud, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested ERBB3/HER3 may be a useful prognostic marker for colorectal cancer. Tumours with an intestinal stem cell signature have also been shown to be more aggressive. Here, we investigate whether ERBB3 is associated with intestinal stem cell markers in colorectal cancer and if cancer stem cells within tumours are marked by expression of ERBB3. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers (LGR5, EPHB2, CD44s and CD44v6) was assessed by qRT-PCR in primary colorectal tumours (stages 0 to IV) and matched normal tissues from 53 patients. The localisation of ERBB3, EPHB2 and KI-67 within tumours was investigated using co-immunofluorescence. Expression of ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers were significantly elevated in adenomas and colorectal tumours compared to normal tissue. Positive correlations were found between ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers. However, co-immunofluorescence analysis showed that ERBB3 and EPHB2 marked specific cell populations that were mutually exclusive within tumours with distinct proliferative potentials, the majority of ERBB3+ve cells being non-proliferative. This pattern resembles cellular organisation within normal colonic epithelium where EPHB2 labelled proliferative cells reside at the crypt base and ERBB3+ve cells mark differentiated cells at the top of crypts. Our results show that ERBB3 and intestinal stem cell markers correlate in colorectal cancers. ERBB3 localises to differentiated cell populations within tumours that are non-proliferative and distinct from cancer stem cells. These data support the concept that tumours contain discrete stem, proliferative and differentiation compartments similar to that present in normal crypts. PMID:26367378

  16. MicroRNA-375 inhibits colorectal cancer growth by targeting PIK3CA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yihui; Tang, Qingchao; Li, Mingqi; Jiang, Shixiong; Wang, Xishan

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-375 is downregulated in colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth by targeting PIK3CA. • miR-375 inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth in xenograft nude mice model. - Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of death from cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by triggering RNA degradation or interfering with translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is involved in human disease including cancer. Herein, we showed that miR-375 was frequently down-regulated in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues when compared to normal human colon tissues. PIK3CA was identified as a potential miR-375 target by bioinformatics. Overexpression of miR-375 in SW480 and HCT15 cells reduced PIK3CA protein expression. Subsequently, using reporter constructs, we showed that the PIK3CA untranslated region (3′-UTR) carries the directly binding site of miR-375. Additionally, miR-375 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and colony formation and led to cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-375 overexpression resulted in inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. SiRNA-mediated silencing of PIK3CA blocked the inhibitory effect of miR-375 on CRC cell growth. Lastly, we found overexpressed miR-375 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, we propose that overexpression of miR-375 may provide a selective growth inhibition for CRC cells by targeting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism array profiling identifies distinct chromosomal aberration patterns across colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zarzour, Peter; Boelen, Lies; Luciani, Fabio; Beck, Dominik; Sakthianandeswaren, Anuratha; Mouradov, Dmitri; Sieber, Oliver M; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Hesson, Luke B; Ward, Robyn L; Wong, Jason W H

    2015-05-01

    The progression of benign colorectal adenomas into cancer is associated with the accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. Even though patterns and frequencies of chromosomal aberrations have been well established in colorectal carcinomas, corresponding patterns of aberrations in adenomas are less well documented. The aim of this study was to profile chromosomal aberrations across colorectal adenomas and carcinomas to provide a better insight into key changes during tumor initiation and progression. Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis was performed on 216 colorectal tumor/normal matched pairs, comprising 60 adenomas and 156 carcinomas. While many chromosomal aberrations were specific to carcinomas, those with the highest frequency in carcinomas (amplification of chromosome 7, 13q, and 20q; deletion of 17p and chromosome 18; LOH of 1p, chromosome 4, 5q, 8p, 17p, chromosome 18, and 20p) were also identified in adenomas. Hierarchical clustering using chromosomal aberrations revealed three distinct subtypes. Interestingly, these subtypes were only partially dependent on tumor staging. A cluster of colorectal cancer patients with frequent chromosomal deletions had the least favorable prognosis, and a number of adenomas (n = 9) were also present in the cluster suggesting that, at least in some tumors, the chromosomal aberration pattern is determined at a very early stage of tumor formation. Finally, analysis of LOH events revealed that copy-neutral/gain LOH (CN/G-LOH) is frequent (>10%) in carcinomas at 5q, 11q, 15q, 17p, chromosome 18, 20p, and 22q. Deletion of the corresponding region is sometimes present in adenomas, suggesting that LOH at these loci may play an important role in tumor initiation.

  18. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  19. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association.

  20. Xc- inhibitor sulfasalazine sensitizes colorectal cancer to cisplatin by a GSH-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-zhe; Chen, Gang; Wang, Peng; Lu, Wen-hua; Zhu, Chao-feng; Song, Ming; Yang, Jing; Wen, Shijun; Xu, Rui-hua; Hu, Yumin; Huang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis and tumor regression through inhibition of plasma membrane cystine transporter xc(-). Cysteine is a rate-limiting precursor for intracellular glutathione (GSH) synthesis, which is vital for compound detoxification and maintaining redox balance. Platinum-based chemotherapy is an important regimen used in clinics for various cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). We hypothesized that targeting xc(-) transporter by SSZ may annihilate cellular detoxification through interruption of GSH synthesis and may enhance the anti-cancer activity of cisplatin (CDDP) by increasing drug transport. In the present study, we revealed that xCT, the active subunit of xc(-), is highly expressed in CRC cell lines and human colorectal carcinoma tissues compared with their normal counterparts. SSZ effectively depleted cellular GSH, leading to significant accumulation of reactive oxygen species and growth inhibition in CRC cells. In contrast, the normal epithelial cells of colon origin were less sensitive to SSZ, showing a moderate ROS elevation. Importantly, SSZ effectively enhanced the intracellular platinum level and cytotoxicity of CDDP in CRC cells. The synergistic effect of SSZ and CDDP was reversed by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Together, these results suggest that SSZ, a relatively non-toxic drug that targets cystine transporter, may, in combination with CDDP, have effective therapy for colorectal cancer.

  1. Plasminogen activators in experimental colorectal neoplasia: a role in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence?

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Lewin, M R; Driver, H E; Savage, F; Mahmoud, M; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1987-01-01

    An important step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive carcinoma is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. By the generation of plasmin, plasminogen activators may play an important role in regulating the extracellular protease activity required for this event to occur. The production of biofunctional urokinase and of tissue plasminogen activator was therefore investigated in the dimethylhydrazine induced rat model of colorectal neoplasia. Both adenomatous polyps (p values less than 0.001) and colorectal carcinomas (p values less than 0.001) were demonstrated to produce a significant excess of both urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator when compared with macroscopically normal colon. There was, however, no increased production of either enzyme by macroscopically normal preneoplastic colon when compared with control colon. This enhanced capacity of colorectal tumours to produce plasminogen activators and generate plasmin is thus a feature of both the premalignant as well as the malignant phenotype. These enzymes may contribute to the malignant potential of adenomatous polyps and to the invasive capacity of established carcinomas. PMID:3115868

  2. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  3. Expression pattern, ethanol-metabolizing activities, and cellular localization of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in human large bowel: association of the functional polymorphisms of ADH and ALDH genes with hemorrhoids and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chien-Ping; Jao, Shu-Wen; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Chen, Pei-Chi; Chung, Chia-Chi; Lee, Shou-Lun; Nieh, Shin; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2012-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol. Functional polymorphisms of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes occur among racial populations. The goal of this study was to systematically determine the functional expressions and cellular localization of ADHs and ALDHs in human rectal mucosa, the lesions of adenocarcinoma and hemorrhoid, and the genetic association of allelic variations of ADH and ALDH with large bowel disorders. Twenty-one surgical specimens of rectal adenocarcinoma and the adjacent normal mucosa, including 16 paired tissues of rectal tumor, normal mucosae of rectum and sigmoid colon from the same individuals, and 18 surgical mixed hemorrhoid specimens and leukocyte DNA samples from 103 colorectal cancer patients, 67 hemorrhoid patients, and 545 control subjects recruited in previous study, were investigated. The isozyme/allozyme expression patterns of ADH and ALDH were identified by isoelectric focusing and the activities were assayed spectrophotometrically. The protein contents of ADH/ALDH isozymes were determined by immunoblotting using the corresponding purified class-specific antibodies; the cellular activity and protein localizations were detected by immunohistochemistry and histochemistry, respectively. Genotypes of ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. At 33mM ethanol, pH 7.5, the activity of ADH1C*1/1 phenotypes exhibited 87% higher than that of the ADH1C*1/*2 phenotypes in normal rectal mucosa. The activity of ALDH2-active phenotypes of rectal mucosa was 33% greater than ALDH2-inactive phenotypes at 200μM acetaldehyde. The protein contents in normal rectal mucosa were in the following order: ADH1>ALDH2>ADH3≈ALDH1A1, whereas those of ADH2, ADH4, and ALDH3A1 were fairly low. Both activity and content of ADH1 were significantly decreased in rectal tumors, whereas the ALDH activity remained

  4. Diet, microbiota, and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akin, Hakan; Tözün, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world causing nearly 500,000 deaths every year. In addition to genetic background, environmental factors including diet and lifestyle are accepted as major contributors to adenoma and CRC development. Lifestyle factors include high BMI, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Growing interest and accumulating data on human microbiota implicate that host-microbe interplay has an important role in the development of metabolic, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases. Findings from recent studies suggest that colon cancer risk is determined by the interaction between diet and gut microbiota. Dietary changes affect gut microbiota and conversely microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. Identification of the microbial communities associated with carcinogenesis is of crucial importance. Nowadays, with the evolvement of culture-independent molecular techniques, it has become possible to identify main bacterial species in healthy individuals, inflammatory conditions, and CRC. Some recent studies have shown the differences in intestinal microbiota between colon cancer patients and healthy individuals. Animal studies have provided a better understanding of interaction between pathobionts and symbionts in the development of colon cancer. There is no single causative organism identified in CRC; however, there is strong evidence that reduction of protective bacteria, increase in some bacteria (ie, fusobacterium members; Bacteroides/Prevotella), and age-related changes in microbiota have an impact on adenoma or cancer development. Future studies will enable us to understand procarcinogenic and anticarcinogenic mechanisms and give insights to rational manipulation of the microbiota with prebiotics, probiotics, or dietary modifications. PMID:25291132

  5. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  6. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  8. Mechanisms Underlying Cancer Growth and Apoptosis by DEK Overexpression in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibing; Jin, Tiefeng; Quan, Chengshi; Kong, Jienan; Li, Yulin; Lin, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that DEK protein was overexpressed in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) compared with the normal colorectal mucosa. DEK was also significantly correlated with the prognostic characteristics of patients with CRC, demonstrating that DEK played an important role in CRC progression. In this work, we evaluate the effects of DEK on biological behaviors in CRC and explore the related molecular mechanisms. The results showed that DEK was overexpressed in human CRC tissues, and was correlated with the Ki-67 index and the apoptotic index. DEK depletion by RNAi in SW-620 and HCT116 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation, but increased cell apoptosis. Upregulation of DEK was involved in the p53/MDM, Bcl-2 family, and caspase pathways. Our study demonstrates that DEK promotes the growth of CRC, and could be a therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:25340858

  9. In silico Identification of SFRP1 as a Hypermethylated Gene in Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongbum

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation, as an epigenetic marker of cancer, influences tumor development and progression. We downloaded publicly available DNA methylation and gene expression datasets of matched cancer and normal pairs from the Cancer Genome Atlas Data Portal and performed a systematic computational analysis. This study has three aims to screen genes that show hypermethylation and downregulated patterns in colorectal cancers, to identify differentially methylated regions in one of these genes, SFRP1, and to test whether the SFRP genes affect survival or not. Our results show that 31 hypermethylated genes had a negative correlation with gene expression. Among them, SFRP1 had a differentially methylated pattern at each methylation site. We also show that SFRP1 may be a potential biomarker for colorectal cancer survival. PMID:25705155

  10. Preanalytical considerations in detection of colorectal cancer in blood serum using Raman molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treado, Patrick J.; Stewart, Shona D.; Smith, Aaron; Kirschner, Heather; Post, Christopher; Overholt, Bergein F.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Raman Molecular Imaging (RMI) is an effective technique to evaluate human tissue, cells and bodily fluids, including blood serum for disease diagnosis. ChemImage Corporation, in collaboration with clinicians, has been engaged in development of an in vitro diagnostic Raman assay focused on CRC detection. The Raman Assay for Colorectal Cancer (RACC) exploits the high specificity of Raman imaging to distinguish diseased from normal dried blood serum droplets without additional reagents. Pilot Study results from testing of hundreds of biobank patient samples have demonstrated that RACC detects CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. However, expanded clinical trials, which are ongoing, are revealing a host of important preanalytical considerations associated with sample collection, sample storage and stability, sample shipping, sample preparation and sample interferents, which impact detection performance. Results from recent clinical studies will be presented.

  11. Systematic Identification of Core Transcription Factors Mediating Dysregulated Links Bridging Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Wenjing; Ping, Yanyan; Zhao, Hongying; Xu, Chaohan; Li, Yiqun; Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Hu, Jing; Huang, Teng; Lv, Yanling; Ren, Huan; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows a tight link between inflammation and cancer. However, comprehensive identification of pivotal transcription factors (i.e., core TFs) mediating the dysregulated links remains challenging, mainly due to a lack of samples that can effectively reflect the connections between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Here, we constructed a series of TF-mediated regulatory networks from a large compendium of expression profiling of normal colonic tissues, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and colorectal cancer (CRC), which contains 1201 samples in total, and then proposed a network-based approach to characterize potential links bridging inflammation and cancer. For this purpose, we computed significantly dysregulated relationships between inflammation and their linked cancer networks, and then 24 core TFs with their dysregulated genes were identified. Collectively, our approach provides us with quite important insight into inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer, which could also be applied to identify functionally dysregulated relationships mediating the links between other different disease phenotypes. PMID:24386215

  12. Immunohistochemical Expression of PCNA and CD34 in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas Using Specified Automated Cellular Image Analysis System: A Clinicopathologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Ban J.; Ali, Hussam H.; Hussein, Alaa G.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim: To evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD34 in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, and to correlate this expression with different clinicopathologic parameters. Materials and Methods: The study was retrospectively designed. A total of 86 tissue samples, including 33 paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenomas, 33 paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, and a control group of 20 samples of nontumerous colonic tissue, were included in the study. From each block, 3 sections of 5 ΅m thickness were taken, 1 section was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the other 2 sections were stained immunohistochemically for PCNA and CD34. Scoring of the immunohistochemical staining was performed using a specified automated cellular image analysis system (Digimizer). Results: PCNA expression was significantly increased in a sequence of normal mucosa–adenoma–carcinoma. It was significantly higher in adenomas ≥ 1 cm and those with severe dysplasia, and it showed a significant positive correlation with grade and lymph node involvement in colorectal carcinoma. CD34 showed significantly higher expression in carcinoma than adenoma and in adenoma than in the control group. CD34 expression showed a significant correlation with adenomas carrying severe dysplasia and large-sized adenomas (≥1cm). It was significantly correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node involvement in colorectal carcinoma. Conclusion: PCNA plays an important role in colorectal neoplastic progression and can be utilized as ancillary marker for the risk of malignant transformation in colorectal adenomas as it correlates with high grade dysplasia and size. Intratumoral quantification of the mean (A and N) of CD34 in colorectal carcinoma reflects the grade of tumors and can predict lymph node involvement and lymphovascular invasion, to make a useful additional prognostic

  13. Label-free serum ribonucleic acid analysis for colorectal cancer detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Chen, Gang; Feng, Shangyuan; Pan, Jianji; Zheng, Xiongwei; Su, Ying; Chen, Yan; Huang, Zufang; Lin, Xiaoqian; Lan, Fenghua; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-06-01

    Studies with circulating ribonucleic acid (RNA) not only provide new targets for cancer detection, but also open up the possibility of noninvasive gene expression profiling for cancer. In this paper, we developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), platform for detection and differentiation of serum RNAs of colorectal cancer. A novel three-dimensional (3-D), Ag nanofilm formed by dry MgSO4 aggregated silver nanoparticles, Ag NP, as the SERS-active substrate was presented to effectively enhance the RNA Raman signals. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of serum RNA samples. One group from patients, n=55 with pathologically diagnosed colorectal cancer and the other group from healthy controls, n=45. Tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the normalized SERS spectra demonstrated that there are differential expressions of cancer-related RNAs between the two groups. Linear discriminate analysis, based on principal component analysis, generated features can differentiate the colorectal cancer SERS spectra from normal SERS spectra with sensitivity of 89.1 percent and specificity of 95.6 percent. This exploratory study demonstrated great potential for developing serum RNA SERS analysis into a useful clinical tool for label-free, noninvasive screening and detection of colorectal cancers.

  14. In vivo use of hyperspectral imaging to develop a noncontact endoscopic diagnosis support system for malignant colorectal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhimin; Zhang, Aoyu; Wang, Xiguang; Sun, Zongxiao; Wang, May D.; Xie, Tianyu

    2016-01-01

    The early detection and diagnosis of malignant colorectal tumors enables the initiation of early-stage therapy and can significantly increase the survival rate and post-treatment quality of life among cancer patients. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is recognized as a powerful tool for noninvasive cancer detection. In the gastrointestinal field, most of the studies on HSI have involved ex vivo biopsies or resected tissues. In the present study, we aimed to assess the difference in the in vivo spectral reflectance of malignant colorectal tumors and normal mucosa. A total of 21 colorectal tumors or adenomatous polyps from 12 patients at Shanghai Zhongshan Hospital were examined using a flexible hyperspectral (HS) colonoscopy system that can obtain in vivo HS images of the colorectal mucosa. We determined the optimal wavelengths for differentiating tumors from normal tissue based on these recorded images. The application of the determined wavelengths in spectral imaging in clinical trials indicated that such a clinical support system comprising a flexible HS colonoscopy unit and band selection unit is useful for outlining the tumor region and enhancing the display of the mucosa microvascular pattern in vivo.

  15. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  16. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting colorectal cancer, followed by white, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI), and American Indian/Alaska Native ( ... white, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander women. Sources: CDC’s National Program of Cancer ...

  17. Local inflammatory response in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Łaskowski, P; Klim, B; Ostrowski, K; Szkudlarek, M; Litwiejko-Pietryńczak, E; Kitlas, K; Nienartowicz, S; Dzięcioł, J

    2016-06-01

    Type and intensity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in close proximity to the primary tumor are prognostically significant in postoperative patients. High intensity of TILs is considered to be a prognostically beneficial factor. The research included 66 postoperative colorectal cancer patients. The control group comprised 20 colon segments. Monoclonal antibodies LCA, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD20, CD23 and CD138 were used to differentiate between T and B lymphocytes. Types of cells in the infiltrate were defined. We found greater numbers of T and B lymphocytes located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue when compared to the control group. T lymphocyte intensity in the inflammatory infiltrations was directly correlated with the size of resected tumors, presence of regional lymphatic node metastases and histological grade of malignancy. Lymphocytic infiltrations of greater intensity located in close proximity to the primary tumor were found in subjects with less advanced colorectal cancer. The research presented here proves direct dependence between the immune system and colorectal cancer. The presence of lymphocytes in the inflammatory infiltrations located in close proximity to the cancerous tissue has been proved to be prognostically beneficial. The obtained results support the application of immunotherapy in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27543872

  18. Diagnostics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Main risk factors include advanced age, family history, male sex, and lifestyle factors. Screening can reduce incidence and death from colorectal cancer. Therefore, prevention and early detection are crucial in order to detect and remove pre-neoplastic adenomas and to detect cancers at early stages. Colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood tests are established tools for screening. Newer fecal immunochemical tests reveal higher sensitivities for advanced adenoma and cancer than guaiac-based hemoccult tests. Molecular stool and blood tests as well as virtual colonoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy are promising new developments so far not established as routine instruments for the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is the method of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and for adenoma removal. Prognosis is essentially dependent on the tumor stage at the time of the initial diagnosis. Proper staging based on imaging prior to therapy is a prerequisite. In rectal cancer, local staging is an essential requirement for the identification of appropriate candidates for neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27493942

  19. URINARY MUTAGENICITY AND COLORECTAL ADENOMA RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We investigated urinary mutagenicity and colorectal adenoma risk in a clinic-based, case-control study of currently nonsmoking cases (n = 143) and controls (n = 156). Urinary organics were extracted by C18/methanol from 12-h overnight urine samples, and mutagenici...

  20. Characteristics of colorectal cancer diagnosed with screening abdominal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; HASEGAWA, RUMIKO; FUGO, KAZUNORI; SHIRAI, YOSHINORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; KISHIMOTO, TAKASHI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Patient records were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the characteristics of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosed with screening abdominal ultrasound (US). Patients diagnosed with CRC using abdominal US [localized irregular wall thickening (W) or a hypoechoic mass with a hyperechoic mass (M)] were enrolled. The patients were subjected to colonoscopy and treated surgically between March, 2010 and January, 2015. A total of 5 men (aged 74.0±0.8 years) and 10 women (aged 73.0±12.0 years) were analyzed. Stratification was analyzed with abdominal US. The threshold value of wall thickness to diagnose CRC was investigated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The average wall thickness was 2.8±0.4 mm in the surrounding normal tissue and 12.7±5.2 mm in CRC (one-way analysis of variance, P<0.0001). The wall was significantly thicker in CRC compared with the normal colonic wall. The calculated threshold value was 4.3 mm for the diagnosis of CRC. Stratification was preserved in W, while it was lost in M (Chi-squared test, P=0.0196). The hemoglobin concentration was lower, while the C-reactive protein, carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were elevated above normal values. The threshold value was 4.3 mm for the diagnosis of CRC with abdominal US. PMID:27330768

  1. Diet and supplements and their impact on colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pericleous, Marinos; Mandair, Dalvinder

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death among men and women. It has been proposed that dietary factors are responsible for 70-90% of colorectal cancer and diet optimization may prevent most cases. Aim To evaluate the role of dietary components and supplements in colorectal cancer. Methods Bibliographical searches were performed in Pubmed for the terms “diet and colorectal cancer”, “diet and colon cancer”, “diet and rectal cancer”, “nutrition and colorectal cancer”, “probiotics and colorectal cancer”, “prebiotics and colorectal cancer”, “alcohol and cancer” and “colorectal cancer epidemiology”. Results Consumption of processed or red meat, especially when cooked at high temperatures may be associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. The evidence for dietary fibre is unclear but foods that contain high amounts of fibre are usually rich in polyphenols which have been shown to alter molecular processes that can encourage colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses provide evidence on the benefits of circulating, diet-derived and supplemented, vitamin D and Calcium. We also found that diets rich in Folate may prevent colorectal carcinoma. The evidence on dietary micronutrients such as Zinc and Selenium in association with colorectal cancer is not conclusive. It has been suggested that there may be a direct association between alcohol intake and colorectal cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted a possible protective role of prebiotics and probiotics. Conclusions The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity and diabetes may often yield inconclusive results. Carefully designed randomized trials are recommended. PMID:24294513

  2. Colorectal cancer: response to sunitinib in a heavily pretreated colorectal cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Blesa, Joan Manel Gasent; Pulido, Enrique Grande

    2010-01-01

    A 64-year-old man was admitted to the emergency room in May 2000 due to pelvic pain, functional disability of the lower limb, and bleeding from a rectal fistula. The patient was diagnosed with a rectum-sigma adenocarcinoma (pT1N0M0 stage). After surgery by left hemicolectomy, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur for 6 months. Due to the development of subsequent recurrences (infravesical relapse, bone and lung progression) associated with CEA progression and pain worsening, the patient received treatment by every available agent for the metastatic colorectal cancer, including oxaliplatin and radiotherapy; irinotecan; FOLFOX schema; oral capecitabine; raltitrexed; irinotecan and cetuximab; cetuximab as a single agent; always in combination with zolendronic acid-based treatment for pain control. Once the patient had progressed to all the approved drugs available in the market, sunitinib (50mg/day given for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks of rest) was proposed as compassionate use. The patient received sunitinib for a total of 6 months (four cycles). On account of the nonmeasurable disease nature of the metastatic presentation in the present case, the clinical benefit was measured in terms of reduction of painkiller intake, improvement in performance status of the patient, and CEA serum levels. In addition to all of these clinical and biological data, CT images showed an increase in necrotic area of the bone lesion without any decrease in tumor size by classical RECIST criteria. The patient is still under sunitinib treatment and has recovered his normal daily activity.

  3. Implementation Intentions and Colorectal Screening

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.; Epp, Aaron; James, Aimee; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Geana, Mugur; Born, Wendi; Engelman, Kimberly K.; Shellhorn, Jeremy; Hester, Christina M.; LeMaster, Joseph; Buckles, Daniel; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations experience disproportionate colorectal cancer (CRC) burden and poorer survival. Novel behavioral strategies are needed to improve screening rates in these groups. Purpose To test a theoretically based “implementation intentions” intervention for improving CRC screening among unscreened adults in urban safety-net clinics. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting/participants Adults (N=470) aged ≥50 years, due for CRC screening, from urban safety-net clinics were recruited. Intervention The intervention (conducted in 2009–2011) was delivered via touchscreen computers that tailored informational messages to decisional stage and screening barriers. The computer then randomized participants to generic health information on diet and exercise (Comparison group) or “implementation intentions” questions and planning (Experimental group) specific to the CRC screening test chosen (fecal immunochemical test or colonoscopy). Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was completion of CRC screening at 26 weeks based on test reports (analysis conducted in 2012–2013). Results The study population had a mean age of 57 years, and was 42% non-Hispanic African American, 28% non-Hispanic white, and 27% Hispanic. Those receiving the implementation intentions–based intervention had higher odds (AOR=1.83, 95% CI=1.23, 2.73) of completing CRC screening than the Comparison group. Those with higher self-efficacy for screening (AOR=1.57, 95% CI=1.03, 2.39), history of asthma (AOR=2.20, 95% CI=1.26, 3.84), no history of diabetes (AOR=1.86, 95% CI=1.21, 2.86), and reporting they had never heard that “cutting on cancer” makes it spread (AOR=1.78, 95% CI=1.16, 2.72) were more likely to complete CRC screening. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that programs incorporating an implementation intentions approach can contribute to successful completion of CRC screening even among very low-income and

  4. Surgical quality in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Joseph M.; Williams, Nadia; Leake, Pierre-Anthony; Ferron-Boothe, Doreen; Meeks-Aitken, Nicola; Mitchell, Derek I.; McFarlane, Michael E.; East, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the quality of surgical management offered to patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as measured by adequacy of nodal resections and compare variations across the major hospitals in Jamaica. Method Data was obtained from the CRC Registry of patients diagnosed and treated surgically for CRC during the 3-year period commencing January 1, 2011. Variables analyzed included tumor site, stage and number of lymph nodes resected across hospitals. Results During the period under review 60% (349) of 586 patients had resections and formed the basis of this study. Of these 49% were treated at the UHWI, 27% from the KPH and STH, 15% from CRH and MRH and 8% from a private laboratory (DPS). Patient distribution was similar at UHWI compared to the others with mean age (61 vs 62) and with slightly more women having surgery (53% Vs 54%) (UHWI vs Others). For tumor grade, margin status, lymphovascular and depth of invasion (majority T3) there was no difference between UHWI and the other sites, although a smaller percentage of tumors treated at UHWI had Crohn's like reaction (p = 0.01). There was a larger proportion of sigmoid cancer at UHWI while the reverse trend was seen in cancers of the rectum (p = 0.027). The tumors treated at UHWI have a larger median number of regional nodes when compared to the other facilities (14 vs 10; p < 0.001) and also more likely to have positive nodes, as were women and younger patients. Comparison across facilities revealed that the proportion of tumors classed as well differentiated, circumferential margin involvement, and having lymphovascular invasion were higher for specimens processed at the private facility (p = 0.021, 0.035, 0.01 respectively). Histopathology reports of tumors treated at UHWI and DPS had median 14 and 18 nodes respectively while at NPH laboratory and CRH they were 9 and 10 respectively (p < 0.001), whilst those of the ascending, descending, sigmoid colon and rectum had median 15, 11, 13, 11

  5. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  6. Endometrial metastasis of colorectal cancer with coincident endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Richard; Lopes, Tito; Das, Nagiindra; Mathew, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis to the uterine corpus is uncommon and secondary colorectal tumours of the endometrium are rare. We describe a uterine tumour with components of both primary endometrial and metastatic colorectal carcinomata. In this case, a 72-year-old obese woman presented with a 2-week history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum and weight loss. She had an abdominoperineal resection 3 years previously for a Dukes stage B rectal carcinoma. A transvaginal ultrasonography showed a thickened endometrium. Histology immunophenotyping showed a CK7+, CK20+, CA125− and CEA+ colorectal metastasis (a profile consistent with her previous cancer) associated with a primary CK7+, CK20−, CA125+ and CEA− endometroid endometrial adenocarcinoma. We conclude this represents endometrial metastasis of colorectal carcinoma with coincident primary endometrial adenocarcinoma. We speculate as to whether the endometrial carcinoma arose de novo or was induced by the colorectal metastasis, or whether the primary endometrial tumour provided a fertile site for the colorectal metastasis. PMID:22791861

  7. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  8. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Schoen, Robert E; Whelan, Richard L; Steele, Robert J; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Robertson, John F R; Sewell, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  9. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Schoen, Robert E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Steele, Robert J.; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.; Robertson, John F. R.; Sewell, Herbert F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  10. Gut microbiome compositional and functional differences between tumor and non-tumor adjacent tissues from cohorts from the US and Spain

    PubMed Central

    Allali, Imane; Delgado, Susana; Marron, Pablo Isidro; Astudillo, Aurora; Yeh, Jen Jen; Ghazal, Hassan; Amzazi, Saaïd; Keku, Temitope; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and Spain. The molecular mechanisms involved in the etiology of CRC are not yet elucidated due in part to the complexity of the human gut microbiota. In this study, we compared the microbiome composition of 90 tumor and matching adjacent tissue (adjacent) from cohorts from the US and Spain by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing in order to determine the impact of the geographic origin on the CRC microbiome. Data showed a significantly (P < 0.05) higher Phylogenetic Diversity (PD) for the US (PD Adjacent = 26.3 ± 5.3, PD Tumor = 23.3 ± 6.2) compared to the Spanish cohort (PD Adjacent = 18.9 ± 5.9, PD Tumor = 18.7 ± 6.6) while no significant differences in bacterial diversity were observed between tumor and adjacent tissues for individuals from the same country. Adjacent tissues from the Spanish cohort were enriched in Firmicutes (SP = 43.9% and US = 22.2%, P = 0.0001) and Actinobacteria (SP = 1.6% and US = 0.5%, P = 0.0018) compared to US adjacent tissues, while adjacent tissues from the US had significantly higher abundances of Fusobacteria (US = 8.1% and SP = 1.5%, P = 0.0023) and Sinergistetes (US = 0.3% and SP = 0.1%, P = 0.0097). Comparisons between tumor and adjacent tissues in each cohort identified the genus Eikenella significantly over represented in US tumors (T = 0.024% and A = 0%, P = 0.03), and the genera Fusobacterium (T = 10.4% and A = 1.5%, P = <0.0001), Bulleida (T = 0.36% and A = 0.09%, P = 0.02), Gemella (T = 1.46% and A = 0.19%, P = 0.03), Parvimonas (T = 3.14% and A = 0.86%, P = 0.03), Campylobacter (T = 0.15% and A = 0.008%, P = 0.047), and Streptococcus (T = 2.84% and A = 2.19%, P = 0.05) significantly over represented in Spanish tumors. Predicted metagenome functional content from 16S rRNA surveys showed that bacterial motility proteins and proteins involved in flagellar assembly were over represented in adjacent tissues

  11. microRNA-221 and microRNA-18a identification in stool as potential biomarkers for the non-invasive diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yau, T O; Wu, C W; Dong, Y; Tang, C-M; Ng, S S M; Chan, F K L; Sung, J J Y; Yu, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: The detection of microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation in stool is a novel approach for the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The aim of this study is to investigate the use of miR-221 and miR-18a in stool samples as non-invasive biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Methods: A miRNA expression array containing 667 miRNAs was performed to identify miRNA dysregulation in CRC tissues. We focused on miR-221 and miR-18a, two significantly upregulated miRNAs which were subsequently verified in 40 pairs of CRC tissues and 595 stool samples (198 CRCs, 199 polyps and 198 normal controls). Results: miR-221 and miR-18a were upregulated in the miRNA expression array. miR-221 and miR-18a levels were also significantly higher in 40 CRC tumours compared with their respective adjacent normal tissues. In stool samples, miR-221 and miR-18a showed a significant increasing trend from normal controls to late stages of CRC (P<0.0001). The levels of stool miR-221 and miR-18a were both significantly higher in subjects with stages I+II (miR-221: P<0.0001, miR-18a: P<0.0001) and stages III+IV of CRC (miR-221: P=0.0004, miR-18a: P<0.0001) compared with normal controls. The AUC of stool miR-221 and miR-18a were 0.73 and 0.67 for CRC patients as compared with normal controls, respectively. No significant differences in stool miR-221 and miR-18a levels were found between patients with proximal and distal CRCs. The use of antibiotics did not influence stool miRNA-221 and miRNA-18a levels. Conclusions: Stool-based miR-221 can be used as a non-invasive biomarker for the detection of CRC. PMID:25233396

  12. High expression of substance P and its receptor neurokinin-1 receptor in colorectal cancer is associated with tumor progression and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yi; Ru, Guo-Qing; Ma, Ying-Yu; Xie, Jun; Chen, Wan-Yuan; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Li, Li; Jin, Ke-Tao; He, Xiang-Lei; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests that chronic inflammation and/or chronic infection is associated with cancer development, and the inflammatory process may play a crucial role in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Substance P (SP) belongs to the family of tachykinins and acts as an immunomodulator, binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) to initiate tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and migration, steps that are critical for tumor cell invasion and metastasis. It is suggested that SP/NK1R signaling may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis. However, the exact involvement and significance of SP and NK1R in CRC pathologies remain to be adequately deciphered. Patients and methods We performed immunohistochemistry staining on tissue microarrays containing 267 pairs of CRC and adjacent normal tissues to evaluate the clinical significance of SP or NK1R in the progression and prognosis of CRC. We also explored the potential correlation between SP and NK1R in CRC development. Results Expression levels of SP and NK1R were upregulated in CRC compared with their expressions in adjacent normal tissues (P<0.001). High expression of SP in CRC was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). We also found that high expression of NK1R in CRC was significantly related to TNM (tumor node metastasis) stage (P=0.010) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.019). A high correlation between SP and NK1R expression was also observed (r=0.419, P<0.001). Survival analysis showed that CRC patients with high expression of SP or NK1R have a poor prognosis when compared to patients with low SP or NK1R expression (log rank test, P<0.05). Multivariate analysis using Cox regression model showed that survival was independently correlated with lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and SP expression (P<0.05). Conclusion Upregulation of SP-NK1R may play a crucial role in CRC progression. Moreover, SP-NK1R expression may

  13. Circulating Non-coding RNA as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, Manuela; Lupini, Laura; Mangolini, Alessandra; Negrini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that colorectal cancer influences the types and quantity of nucleic acids - especially microRNAs - detected in the bloodstream. Concentration of circulating (cell-free) microRNAs, and possibly of other non-coding RNAs, could therefore serve as valuable colorectal cancer biomarker and could deliver insight into the disease process. This chapter addresses the recent discoveries on circulating microRNA and long non-coding RNA as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer. PMID:27573900

  14. RNF43 is frequently mutated in colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Yamauchi, Mai; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Cibulskis, Kristian; Saksena, Gordon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Qian, ZhiRong; Nishihara, Reiko; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Hahn, William C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2014-01-01

    We report somatic mutations of RNF43 in over 18% of colorectal adenocarcinomas and endometrial carcinomas. RNF43 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively regulates Wnt signaling. Truncating mutations of RNF43 are more prevalent in microsatellite-unstable tumors and show mutual exclusivity with inactivating APC mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas. These results indicate that RNF43 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in colorectal and endometrial cancers. PMID:25344691

  15. Activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K Pathway is Involved in S100A4-induced Viability and Migration in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyan; Duan, Liang; Zou, Zhengyu; Li, Huan; Yuan, Shimei; Chen, Xian; Zhang, Yunyuan; Li, Xueru; Sun, Hui; Zha, He; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Lan

    2014-01-01

    The S100 protein family member S100A4 regulates various cellular functions. Previous studies have shown that elevated expression of S100A4 is associated with progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, little is known about whether and how S100A4 contributes to CRC development. In our present study, the elevated expression of S100A4 in CRC tissues compared to matched adjacent normal tissues was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Adenovirus-mediated S100A4 overexpression obviously enhanced viability and migration of CRC cells, which was detected by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Additionally, S100A4 overexpression increased the phosphorylation levels of Akt, mTOR and p70S6K. These effects of S100A4 were abolished by treatment with either the specific PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002, or the specific mTOR/p70S6K inhibitor rapamycin. Furthermore, overexpression of S100A4 resulted in upregulation of VEGF and downregulation of E-cadherin, which were strongly reversed by either LY294002 or rapamycin. Altogether, our results demonstrate that activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway is involved in S100A4-induced viability, migration, upregulation of VEGF and downregulation of E-cadherin in CRC cells. PMID:24936148

  16. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA–RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA–miRNA and miRNA–miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA–RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:27067546

  17. The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Sikes, Michael; Bruno-Bárcena, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and, even though 5–15% of the total CRC cases can be attributed to individual genetic predisposition, environmental factors could be considered major factors in susceptibility to CRC. Lifestyle factors increasing the risks of CRC include elevated body mass index, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Additionally, a number of dietary elements have been associated with higher or lower incidence of CRC. In this context, it has been suggested that diets high in fruit and low in meat might have a protective effect, reducing the incidence of colorectal adenomas by modulating the composition of the normal nonpathogenic commensal microbiota. In addition, it has been demonstrated that changes in abundance of taxonomic groups have a profound impact on the gastrointestinal physiology, and an increasing number of studies are proposing that the microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. High-throughput sequencing and molecular taxonomic technologies are rapidly filling the knowledge gaps left by conventional microbiology techniques to obtain a comprehensive catalog of the human intestinal microbiota and their associated metabolic repertoire. The information provided by these studies will be essential to identify agents capable of modulating the massive amount of gut bacteria in safe noninvasive manners to prevent CRC. Probiotics, defined as “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host” (219), are capable of transient modulation of the microbiota, and their beneficial effects include reinforcement of the natural defense mechanisms and protection against gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics have been successfully used to manage infant diarrhea, food allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease; hence, the purpose of this review was to examine probiotic metabolic activities that may have an

  18. The intestinal microbiota, gastrointestinal environment and colorectal cancer: a putative role for probiotics in prevention of colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Azcárate-Peril, M Andrea; Sikes, Michael; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2011-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and, even though 5-15% of the total CRC cases can be attributed to individual genetic predisposition, environmental factors could be considered major factors in susceptibility to CRC. Lifestyle factors increasing the risks of CRC include elevated body mass index, obesity, and reduced physical activity. Additionally, a number of dietary elements have been associated with higher or lower incidence of CRC. In this context, it has been suggested that diets high in fruit and low in meat might have a protective effect, reducing the incidence of colorectal adenomas by modulating the composition of the normal nonpathogenic commensal microbiota. In addition, it has been demonstrated that changes in abundance of taxonomic groups have a profound impact on the gastrointestinal physiology, and an increasing number of studies are proposing that the microbiota mediates the generation of dietary factors triggering colon cancer. High-throughput sequencing and molecular taxonomic technologies are rapidly filling the knowledge gaps left by conventional microbiology techniques to obtain a comprehensive catalog of the human intestinal microbiota and their associated metabolic repertoire. The information provided by these studies will be essential to identify agents capable of modulating the massive amount of gut bacteria in safe noninvasive manners to prevent CRC. Probiotics, defined as "live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host" (219), are capable of transient modulation of the microbiota, and their beneficial effects include reinforcement of the natural defense mechanisms and protection against gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics have been successfully used to manage infant diarrhea, food allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease; hence, the purpose of this review was to examine probiotic metabolic activities that may have an effect

  19. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  20. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  1. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  2. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  5. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  6. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature. PMID:27437018

  7. 2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CONTROL GATE ADJACENT TO LIFT LOCK NO. 7; THIS CONTROL GATE IS A 1980s RECONSTRUCTION. - Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lift Lock No. 7 & Control Gate, East side of DuPage River, Channahon, Will County, IL

  8. 33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. HISTORIC PLAQUE MARKING WHERE JOHNSTON DIED, ADJACENT TO PATHWAY WITH CONCRETE CULVERT LEADING NORTH OUT OF RAVINE TOWARD JOHNSTON MEMORIAL SITE. VIEW NW. - Shiloh National Military Park Tour Roads, Shiloh, Hardin County, TN

  9. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. TOP VIEW OF CIRCUIT BREAKER ADJACENT TO BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  13. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  14. GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF WAREHOUSE ADJACENT TO BATCH PLANT, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM DREY STREET PLANT, INSIDE WELCOME WALL - Chambers Window Glass Company, Warehouse & Shipping, North of Drey (Nineteenth) Street, West of Constitution Boulevard, Arnold, Westmoreland County, PA

  15. 10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLATE PATIO ADJACENT TO SOUTH PORCH OF HOUSE, FROM SOUTHEAST CORNER OF REAR PORCH. SHED IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Butt Valley Dam, Gate Tender's House, Butt Valley Reservoir Road, Caribou, Plumas County, CA

  16. Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of fire alarm boxes located adjacent to the entrance of the northwest wing - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  17. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  18. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 2. THREEQUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. THREE-QUARTER VIEW FROM ADJACENT ACCESS ROAD SHOWING THREE SPANS AND NORTHWEST APPROACH SPANS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Red River Bridge, Spanning Red River at U.S. Highway 82, Garland, Miller County, AR

  20. 31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VAL, DETAIL OF LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  2. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  3. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  4. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Adjacent Segment Disease Perspective and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Pozo, Fanor M.; Deusdara, Renato A. M.; Benzel, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjacent segment disease has become a common topic in spine surgery circles because of the significant increase in fusion surgery in recent years and the development of motion preservation technologies that theoretically should lead to a decrease in this pathology. The purpose of this review is to organize the evidence available in the current literature on this subject. Methods For this literature review, a search was conducted in PubMed with the following keywords: adjacent segment degeneration and disease. Selection, review, and analysis of the literature were completed according to level of evidence. Results The PubMed search identified 850 articles, from which 41 articles were selected and reviewed. The incidence of adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine is close to 3% without a significant statistical difference between surgical techniques (fusion vs arthroplasty). Authors report the incidence of adjacent segment disease in the lumbar spine to range from 2% to 14%. Damage to the posterior ligamentous complex and sagittal imbalances are important risk factors for both degeneration and disease. Conclusion Insufficient evidence exists at this point to support the idea that total disc arthroplasty is superior to fusion procedures in minimizing the incidence of adjacent segment disease. The etiology is most likely multifactorial but it is becoming abundantly clear that adjacent segment disease is not caused by motion segment fusion alone. Fusion plus the presence of abnormal end-fusion alignment appears to be a major factor in creating end-fusion stresses that result in adjacent segment degeneration and subsequent disease. The data presented cast further doubt on previously established rationales for total disc arthroplasty, at least with regard to the effect of total disc arthroplasty on adjacent segment degeneration pathology. PMID:24688337

  6. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal endocrine cells and neuroendocrine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Mashima, Hirosato; Ohno, Hideki; Yamada, Yumi; Sakai, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells along the colorectum. ► INSL5 is expressed increasingly from proximal colon to rectum. ► INSL5 co-localizes rarely with chromogranin A. ► All rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined expressed INSL5. -- Abstract: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a member of the insulin superfamily, and is a potent agonist for RXFP4. We have shown that INSL5 is expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) along the colorectum with a gradient increase toward the rectum. RXFP4 is ubiquitously expressed along the digestive tract. INSL5-positive EECs have little immunoreactivity to chromogranin A (CgA) and might be a unique marker of colorectal EECs. CgA-positive EECs were distributed normally along the colorectum in INSL5 null mice, suggesting that INSL5 is not required for the development of CgA-positive EECs. Exogenous INSL5 did not affect the proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines, and chemically-induced colitis in INSL5 null mice did not show any significant changes in inflammation or mucosal healing compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, all of the rectal neuroendocrine tumors examined co-expressed INSL5 and RXFP4. INSL5 may be a unique marker of colorectal EECs, and INSL5–RXFP4 signaling might play a role in an autocrine/paracrine fashion in the colorectal epithelium and rectal neuroendocrine tumors.

  7. Glutamate dependent NMDA receptor 2D is a novel angiogenic tumour endothelial marker in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Stephen; Heath, Victoria L.; Ismail, Tariq; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Current vascular-targeted therapies in colorectal cancer (CRC) have shown limited benefit. The lack of novel, specific treatment in CRC has been hampered by a dearth of specific endothelial markers. Microarray comparison of endothelial gene expression in patient-matched CRC and normal colon identified a panel of putative colorectal tumour endothelial markers. Of these the glutamate dependent NMDA receptor GRIN2D emerged as the most interesting target. GRIN2D expression was shown to be specific to colorectal cancer vessels by RTqPCR and IHC analysis. Its expression was additionally shown be predictive of improved survival in CRC. Targeted knockdown studies in vitro demonstrated a role for GRIN2D in endothelial function and angiogenesis. This effect was also shown in vivo as vaccination against the extracellular region of GRIN2D resulted in reduced vascularisation in the subcutaneous sponge angiogenesis assay. The utility of immunologically targeting GRIN2D in CRC was demonstrated by the vaccination approach inhibiting murine CRC tumour growth and vascularisation. GRIN2D represents a promising target for the future treatment of CRC. PMID:26943033

  8. Relationship of prediagnostic body mass index with survival after colorectal cancer: Stage-specific associations.

    PubMed

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Chan, Andrew T; Slattery, Martha L; Potter, John D; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey; Phipps, Amanda; Nan, Hongmei; Harrison, Tabitha; Rohan, Thomas E; Qi, Lihong; Hou, Lifang; Caan, Bette; Kroenke, Candyce H; Strickler, Howard; Hayes, Richard B; Schoen, Robert E; Chong, Dawn Q; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I; Peters, Ulrike; Newcomb, Polly A

    2016-09-01

    Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but is inconsistently associated with CRC survival. In 6 prospective studies participating in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), 2,249 non-Hispanic white CRC cases were followed for a median 4.5 years after diagnosis, during which 777 died, 554 from CRC-related causes. Associations between prediagnosis BMI and survival (overall and CRC-specific) were evaluated using Cox regression models adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, study and smoking status (current/former/never). The association between BMI category and CRC survival varied by cancer stage at diagnosis (I-IV) for both all-cause (p-interaction = 0.03) and CRC-specific mortality (p-interaction = 0.04). Compared to normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) ), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stage I disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages II-IV disease. Similarly, obesity (BMI ≥30) was associated with increased mortality among those with Stages I-II disease, and decreased mortality among those with Stages III-IV disease. These results suggest the relationship between BMI and survival after CRC diagnosis differs by stage at diagnosis, and may emphasize the importance of adequate metabolic reserves for colorectal cancer survival in patients with late-stage disease.

  9. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility. PMID:15042511

  10. Quantitative Diagnosis of Colorectal Polyps by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Qinqin; Wu, Xiaojing; Tang, Tao; Liu, Hong; Zhu, S. W.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The principal aim of this study is to investigate the scattering coefficient of colorectal polyp tissues using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. It combines the existing scattering coefficient model and spectral domain OCT to achieve method of early diagnosis of colorectal polyp in hospitals. Seventeen patients were studied, and a total of 1456 data points were extracted by curve-fitting the OCT signals into a confocal single-backscattering model. The results show that the mean scattering coefficient value for colorectal polyps is 1.91 mm−1 (std: ±0.54 mm−1), which is between the values for normal and malignant tissues. In addition, we studied the difference between adenomatous polyps (n = 15) and inflammatory polyps (n = 2) quantitatively and found that the adenomatous tissues had lower scattering coefficients than the inflammatory ones. The quantitative measurements confirmed that OCT can be used in primary diagnosis to compensate for the deficiencies in methods of pathological diagnosis, with a great potential for early diagnosis of tissues. PMID:24818145

  11. Prognostic Factors for Survival after Resection of Pulmonary Metastases from Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Osoegawa, Atsushi; Kometani, Takuro; Fukuyama, Seiichi; Hirai, Fumihiko; Seto, Takashi; Ichinose, Yukito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: As chemotherapy has improved, the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma has reached up to 2.5 years. Many of these patients experience pulmonary metastases; however, the prognosis after pulmonary metastasectomy is not satisfying. In this study, we analyzed the prognostic factors for survival in patients who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy. Methods: Eighty-seven patients with colorectal carcinoma received pulmonary metastasectomy. The pathological status of the primary tumor, outcome of the pulmonary metastasectomy, disease-free interval, perioperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level and history of liver metastases were assessed. Results: The five-year survival was 42.5% after pulmonary metastasectomy. A univariate analyses revealed that the CEA level (p = 0.043) and the number of pulmonary metastases (p = 0.047) were prognostic factors for survival. The CEA level was an independent prognostic factor in a multivariate analysis (relative risk = 2.01, p = 0.037). Among cases with elevated preoperative CEA levels, those whose CEA level normalized after metastasectomy had a better prognosis compared with those whose CEA level decreased but was still high, or whose level increased after metastasectomy (median survival time of 41.8 months compared with 28.1 or 15.7 months, respectively p = 0.021). Conclusion: The CEA level can be a predictive marker for the prognosis in patients with pulmonary metastases from colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26289631

  12. Immunohistochemical expression pattern of MMR protein can specifically identify patients with colorectal cancer microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Amira, Arfaoui Toumi; Mouna, Trabelsi; Ahlem, Blel; Raoudha, Aloui; Majid, Ben Hmida; Amel, Hamza; Rachida, Zermani; Nadia, Kourdaa

    2014-07-01

    The microsatellite instability (MSI) pathway is found in most cases of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and in 12 % of sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). It involves inactivation of deoxyribonucleic acid mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6. MMR germline mutation detections are an important supplement to HNPCC clinical diagnosis. It enables at-risk and mutation-positive relatives to be informed about their cancer risks and to benefit from intensive surveillance programs that have been proven to reduce the incidence of CRC. In this study, we analyzed for the first time in Tunisia the potential value of immunohistochemical assessment of MMR protein to identify microsatellite instability in CRC. We evaluate by immunohistochemistry MMR protein expression loss in tumoral tissue compared to positive expression in normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry revealed loss of expression for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 in 15, 21, 13, and 15 % of cases, respectively. Here, we report a more elevated frequency of MSI compared to data of the literature. In fact, by immunohistochemistry, 70 % of cases were shown to be MSS phenotype, whereas 30 % of cases, in our set, were instable. Moreover, according to molecular investigation, 71 % of cases were instable (MSI-H) and remaining cases were stable (29 %). Thus, we found a perfect association between MMR immunohistochemical analyses and MSI molecular investigation. Immunohistochemical analysis of MMR gene product expression may allow one to specifically identify MSI phenotype of patients with colorectal carcinomas.

  13. New Insights into the Mechanism of Action of Aspirin in the Prevention of Colorectal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Luigia; López Contreras, Luilli Antonio; Sacco, Angela; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical studies have shown that the chronic administration of aspirin, even at the lowdoses (75-100 mg daily) recommended for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a reduction of cancer incidence and mortality, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanism of action of aspirin as an antineoplastic agent remains controversial. However, data of clinical pharmacology and several features of the chemopreventive effect of aspirin, emerged from clinical trials, suggest that the antiplatelet effect of aspirin plays a central role in its anticancer effects. In addition to their contribution to tumor metastasis, platelets may play a role in the early phases of tumorigenesis. In response to lifestyle and environment factors, intestinal epithelial damage/ dysfunction may be associated with platelet activation, initially as a mechanism to repair the damage. However, if the platelet response is unconstrained, it may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation. Altogether these events lead to alter the normal functions of intestinal epithelial cells and may translate into cellular transformation through several mechanisms, including the overexpression of cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which are considered early events in colorectal tumorigenesis. Thus, antiplatelet agents may play a role in the prevention of CRC by modifying epigenetic events involved in early phases of colorectal tumorigenesis. Finally, we carried out a critical review of the literature on off-target mechanisms of aspirin action as anticancer drug. PMID:26369679

  14. Various Acylglycerols from Common Oils Exert Different Antitumor Activities on Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Bueno, Rebeca P; González-Fernández, María J; Guil-Guerrero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Western countries; therefore, the implementation of healthy dietary habits in order to prevent its occurrence is a desirable action. We show here that both free fatty acids (FFAs) and some acylglycerols induce antitumoral actions in the colorectal cancer cell line HT-29. We tested several C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched oils (e.g., sunflower and Echium) as well as other oils, such as arachidonic acid-enriched (Arasco®) and docosahexaenoic acid-enriched (Marinol® and cod liver oil), in addition to coconut and olive oils. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test indicated inhibitory effects on HT-29 cells viability for FFAs, and monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol (DAG) species, while the lactate dehydrogenase test proved that FFAs were the more effective species to induce membrane injury. Conversely, all species did not exhibit actions on CCD-18 normal human colon cells viability. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of necrosis and apoptosis, while the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibition test demonstrated high activity for 2-monoacylglycerols derived from Arasco and sunflower oils. However, different monoacylglycerols and DAGs have also the potential for MAGL inhibition. Therefore, checking for activity on colon cancer cells of specifically designed acylglycerol-derivative species would be a suitable way to design functional foods destined to avoid colorectal cancer initiation. PMID:27007804

  15. Role of apoptosis resistance in immune evasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kebin

    2010-01-01

    The host immune system functions as a guardian against tumor development. It has been demonstrated that cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated cytotoxic pathways function to inhibit or delay human colorectal cancer development. However, the host anti-tumor immune responses also 'edit' the tumor and select for more aggressive variants, resulting in immune evasion and tumor escape. Fas is a death receptor that mediates one of the major cytotoxic effector mechanisms of the CTLs. Fas is highly expressed in normal human colon epithelial cells but is frequently silenced in colorectal carcinoma, especially in metastatic colorectal carcinoma, suggesting that loss of Fas expression and function may be an immune evasion and tumor escape mechanism. In addition, recent studies indicated that Fas also mediates cellular proliferation signaling pathways to promote tumor development. Therefore, the death receptor Fas may not only transduce death signals to suppress tumor development but also activate cellular proliferation and the migration process to promote tumor growth and progression. Thus, understanding the mechanisms by which the Fas receptor and its associated protein complex transduces the death and survival signals may identify molecular targets for the development of therapeutic strategy to enhance the Fas-mediated death signals to increase the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21160903

  16. Mutations in AXIN2 cause familial tooth agenesis and predispose to colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Arte, Sirpa; Somer, Mirja; Jarvinen, Heikki; Lahermo, Paivi; Thesleff, Irma; Pirinen, Sinikka; Nieminen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Wnt signaling regulates embryonic pattern formation and morphogenesis of most organs. Aberrations of regulation of Wnt signaling may lead to cancer. Here, we have used positional cloning to identify the causative mutation in a Finnish family in which severe permanent tooth agenesis (oligodontia) and colorectal neoplasia segregate with dominant inheritance. Eleven members of the family lacked at least eight permanent teeth, two of whom developed only three permanent teeth. Colorectal cancer or precancerous lesions of variable types were found in eight of the patients with oligodontia. We show that oligodontia and predisposition to cancer are caused by a nonsense mutation, Arg656Stop, in the Wnt-signaling regulator AXIN2. In addition, we identified a de novo frameshift mutation 1994-1995insG in AXIN2 in an unrelated young patient with severe tooth agenesis. Both mutations are expected to activate Wnt signaling. The results provide the first evidence of the importance of Wnt signaling for the development of dentition in humans and suggest that an intricate control of Wnt-signal activity is necessary for normal tooth development, since both inhibition and stimulation of Wnt signaling may lead to tooth agenesis. Our findings introduce a new gene for hereditary colorectal cancer and suggest that tooth agenesis may be an indicator of cancer susceptibility.

  17. Silencing of stat4 gene inhibits cell proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J M; Yao, M R; Zhu, Q; Wu, X Y; Zhou, J; Tan, W L; Zhan, S H

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) play critical roles in development, proliferation, and immune defense. However the consequences of STAT hyperactivity can predispose to diseases, including colorectal cancer. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the function of STAT4 in human colorectal cancer (CRC). The expression of STAT4 was examined by immunohistochemical assay using a tissue microarray procedure. A loss-of-function experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of lentivirus-mediated STAT4 shRNA (Lv-shSTAT4) on cell proliferation and invasive potential indicated by MTT and Transwell assays in CRC cell lines (SW480 and Caco2). As a consequence, it was found that the expression of STAT4 protein was significantly increased in CRC tissues compared with that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues (ANCT) (71.1% vs 44.4%, P=0.015), and was related with the Duke’s staging and depth of invasion in CRC patients (P=0.022; P=0.001). Silencing of STAT4 gene suppressed cell proliferation and invasion of CRC cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that increased expression of STAT4 is positively correlated with the depth of invasion in CRC patients, and inhibition of STAT4 expression represses the growth and invasion of CRC cells, suggesting that STAT4 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of CRC.

  18. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  19. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiufeng; Li, Guodong; Dang, Shuwei; Zhou, Yuhui; Zeng, Kai; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  20. Discovery and Validation of Hypermethylated Markers for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most prevalent malignant tumors worldwide. Screening and early diagnosis are critical for the clinical management of this disease. DNA methylation changes have been regarded as promising biomarkers for CRC diagnosis. Here, we map DNA methylation profiling on CRC in six CRCs and paired normal samples using a 450 K bead array. Further analysis confirms the methylation status of candidates in two data sets from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are calculated to determine the diagnostic performances. We identify 1549 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) showing differences in methylation between CRC and normal tissue. Two genes (ADD2 and AKR1B1), related to the DMRs, are selected for further validation. ROC curves show that the areas under the curves of ADD2 and AKR1B1 are higher than that of SEPT9, which has been clinically used as a screening biomarker of CRC. Our data suggests that aberrant DNA methylation of ADD2 and AKR1B1 could be potential screening markers of CRC. PMID:27493446

  1. Surgeons' Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer Resections Against Standard HPE Protocol-Auditing the Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Sagap, Ismail; Elnaim, Abdel Latif K; Hamid, Imtiaz; Rose, Isa M

    2011-06-01

    The survival of Colorectal Cancer patients is very much dependent on complete tumor resection and multimodality adjuvant treatment. However, the main determinants for management plan of these patients rely heavily on accurate staging through histopathological examination (HPE). A reliable standard HPE protocol will be a significant impact in determining best surgical outcome. We evaluate surgeons' intra-operative judgment and the quality of resected specimens in the treatment of colorectal cancers. To quantify the quality of surgery by applying standard HPE protocol in colorectal cancer specimens and to assess the use of new format for pathological reporting in Colorectal Cancer using a formulated standard proforma. We perform a prospective observation of all colorectal cancer patients who underwent surgical resection over 8 month duration. Surgeons are required to make self-assessment about completion of tumor excision and possible lymph nodes or adjacent organ involvement while all pathologists followed standard reporting protocol for examination of the specimens. We evaluate the accuracy of surgeons judgment against HPE. The study involved 44 colorectal cancers comprising of 23 male and 21 female patients. The majority of these patients were Malay (50%) followed by Chinese (43%) and Indian (7%). The main presenting symptoms were bleeding (32%), intestinal obstruction (29%) and perforation (7%). Sixteen (36%) patients underwent emergency surgery.Rectal tumor was the commonest (53%) followed by sigmoid colon (22.7%). Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation were given to 8 patients and complete pathological response was observed in 1 (12.5%) of these. The final TNM classification for staging were; stage I (22.7%), stage IIa (18.2%), stage IIb (11.4%), stage IIIa (2.3%), stage IIIb (25%), stage IIIc (13.6%) and stage IV (6.8%).The commonest surgery performed was anterior resection with mesorectal excision (43.2%). Ten patients (22.7%) had laparoscopic surgery with 3 (30

  2. Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cancer is largely considered to be a disease of genetic and environmental factors, increasing evidence has demonstrated a role for the microbiota (the microorganisms associated with the human body) in shaping inflammatory environments and promoting tumor growth and spread. Herein, we discuss both human data from meta'omics analyses and data from mechanistic studies in cell culture and animal models that support specific bacterial agents as potentiators of tumorigenesis-including Fusobacterium nucleatum, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, and colibactin-producing Escherichia coli. Further, we consider how microbes can be used in diagnosing colorectal cancer and manipulating the tumor environment to encourage better patient outcomes in response to immunotherapy treatments. PMID:27607555

  3. BRAF Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the deadliest cancer-related diseases. About 10% of CRC patients are characterized by a mutation in the B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene resulting in a valine-to-glutamate change at the residue 600 (V600E). This mutation is also present in more than 60% of melanoma patients. BRAF inhibitors were developed and found to improve patient survival; however, most patients at the end of the track ultimately develop resistance to these inhibitors. Melanoma patients benefit from the combination of BRAF inhibitors with mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, among others. Unfortunately, colorectal patients do not respond much efficiently, which suggests different resistance mechanisms between the two cancer types. This review aims at shedding light on recent discoveries that improve our understanding of the BRAF mutation biology in CRC. PMID:26396549

  4. Colorectal Cancer and Basement Membranes: Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Charalampos C.; Lazaris, Andreas C.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in males and the second in females. In 2008, an estimated 1.2 million people were diagnosed with and 608,700 people died of CRC. Besides diagnosis and treatment, prognosis is an important matter for cancer patients. Today, clinicopathological correlations have many applications in cancer prognostication. Examples include the prediction of the medium patient survival and the screening for patients suitable for specific therapeutic approaches. Apart from traditional prognostic factors, such as tumor stage and grade, new markers may be useful in clinical practice. Possible markers may result from the study of basement membranes (BMs). BM seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, so BM alterations may have prognostic significance as well. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe BMs and their relationship with CRC, in the aspect of clinicopathological correlations. PMID:25614736

  5. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Mori, Genki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kinjo, Yuzuru; So, Eriko; Abe, Seiichiro; Otake, Yosuke; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an established therapeutic technique for the treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. Because it is typically completed as en bloc resection, this technique provides a complete specimen for precise pathological evaluation. On the other hand, ESD is not as widely applied in treating colorectal neoplasms as with gastric cancers, due to its technical difficulty, longer procedure time, and increased risk of perforation. However, some devices that facilitate ESD and improve the safety of the procedure have been recently reported, and the use of the technique has gradually spread worldwide. Endoscopists who begin to perform ESD need to recognize the indications of ESD, the technical issue involved in this procedure, and its associated complications. This review outlines the methods and certain types of devices used for colorectal ESD. PMID:25333002

  6. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-09-21

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  7. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27672285

  8. Biomarkers for colitis-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Lai, Lisa A; Brentnall, Teresa A; Pan, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with extensive ulcerative colitis (UC) of more than eight years duration have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Molecular biomarkers for dysplasia and cancer could have a great clinical value in managing cancer risk in these UC patients. Using a wide range of molecular techniques - including cutting-edge OMICS technologies - recent studies have identified clinically relevant biomarker candidates from a variety of biosamples, including colonic biopsies, blood, stool, and urine. While the challenge remains to validate these candidate biomarkers in multi-center studies and with larger patient cohorts, it is certain that accurate biomarkers of colitis-associated neoplasia would improve clinical management of neoplastic risk in UC patients. This review highlights the ongoing avenues of research in biomarker development for colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

  9. What's new in hereditary colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Jass, Jeremy R

    2005-11-01

    Precancerous polyposes other than classic familial adenomatous polyposis and the condition hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, or Lynch syndrome, continue to present major diagnostic challenges for the anatomic pathologist. This editorial highlights the practical significance of novel insights and clinical guidelines in the recent literature, as well as in 4 contributions to this edition of the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine. The first section will address attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and a newly recognized type of autosomal-recessive adenomatous polyposis associated with the DNA repair gene MYH. The remainder of the editorial discusses the role of the revised Bethesda guidelines in the diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and concludes with the recently identified serrated pathway syndrome.

  10. Application of laser-induced autofluorescence spectra detection system in human colorectal cancer in-vivo screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Teck Chee; Fu, Sheng; Chia, Yee Hong; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Tang, Choong Leong

    2005-09-01

    This study aimed at applying Laser induced-autofluorescence (LIAF) diagnostics method as an in-vivo screening of colorectal polyplcancer. The spectrum algorithm based on the ratio of autofluorescence intensity was used to identify the diseased tissues from the normal tissues as it was generally performed better than an algorithm based only simply on the intensity of the spectrum. Histopathological biopsy results were compared with the detected AF spectra characteristics for different kinds of polyps. 73 patients had been examined via the LIAF spectroscopy detection system during their colonoscopy screening in Endoscopy Center, Singapore General Hospital. The autofluorescence from the surface of the colorectal tissues under 405 nm laser light excitation was detected using our detecting system. In the experimental investigation two groups of patients were involved. One group was "abnormal" group. There were 25 patients belonging to this group since polyps or carcinoma was found in their colorectal tract during colonoscopy. The histopathology reports confirm the group classification. Total 36 polyps' AF spectra and 9 carcinoma' AF spectra were detected from 25 patients of the abnormal group during their regular endoscopy examination. The intensity ratios RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 of polyps/cancerous AF spectra and intensity ratios of corresponding normal colorectal AF spectra were calculated. Two critical intensity ratios for separating the AF intensity ratios RI-680/I-500 and RI-630/I-500 of normal and abnormal colorectal tissues were defined as 0.5 and 0.6 respectively. Using the critical intensity ratio values, 48 "normal" group patients' rectums were checked via the LIAF detection system. There were 20 patients (41.7%) whose AF spectra of colorectal tract mucosa belonging to abnormal spectra. However, these 20 patients had not been found under white light via traditional endoscopy. For small diseased area like small plat polyp disease and carcinoma, it was

  11. Television watching and risk of colorectal adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y; Keum, N N; Chan, A T; Fuchs, C S; Wu, K; Giovannucci, E L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged TV watching, a major sedentary behaviour, is associated with increased risk of obesity and diabetes and may involve in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 31 065 men with ⩾1 endoscopy in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1988–2008) to evaluate sitting while watching TV and its joint influence with leisure-time physical activity on risk of colorectal adenoma. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Prolonged sitting while watching TV was significantly associated with increased risk of colorectal adenoma (n=4280), and adjusting for physical activity or a potential mediator body mass index did not change the estimates. The ORs (95% CIs) across categories of TV watching (0–6, 7–13, 14–20, and 21+ h per week) were 1.00 (referent), 1.09 (1.01–1.17), 1.16 (1.06–1.27), and 1.10 (0.97–1.25) (OR per 14-h per week increment=1.11; 95% CI: 1.04–1.18; Ptrend=0.001). Compared with the least sedentary (0–6 h per week of TV) and most physically active (highest quintile) men, the most sedentary (14+ h per week) and least active (lowest quintile) men had a significant increased risk of adenoma (OR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.05–1.49), particularly for high-risk adenoma. Conclusions: Prolonged TV viewing is associated with modest increased risk of colorectal adenoma independent of leisure-time physical activity and minimally mediated by obesity. PMID:25590667

  12. N-glycosylation of Colorectal Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Crina I. A.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Fung, Wesley L. J.; Koeleman, Carolien A.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Verhoeven, Aswin; Mesker, Wilma E.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide with an annual incidence of ∼1 million cases and an annual mortality rate of ∼655,000 individuals. There is an urgent need for identifying novel targets to develop more sensitive, reliable, and specific tests for early stage detection of colon cancer. Post-translational modifications are known to play an important role in cancer progression and immune surveillance of tumors. In the present study, we compared the N-glycan profiles from 13 colorectal cancer tumor tissues and corresponding control colon tissues. The N-glycans were enzymatically released, purified, and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid. Aliquots were profiled by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) with fluorescence detection and by negative mode MALDI-TOF-MS. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis to investigate the N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer, an excellent separation and prediction ability were observed for both HILIC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS data. For structure elucidation, information from positive mode ESI-ion trap-MS/MS and negative mode MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was combined. Among the features with a high separation power, structures containing a bisecting GlcNAc were found to be decreased in the tumor, whereas sulfated glycans, paucimannosidic glycans, and glycans containing a sialylated Lewis type epitope were shown to be increased in tumor tissues. In addition, core-fucosylated high mannose N-glycans were detected in tumor samples. In conclusion, the combination of HILIC and MALDI-TOF-MS profiling of N-glycans with multivariate statistical analysis demonstrated its potential for identifying N-glycosylation changes in colorectal cancer tissues and provided new leads that might be used as candidate biomarkers. PMID:22573871

  13. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots

    PubMed Central

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. METHODS: Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. RESULTS: There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ2 test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSION: There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population. PMID:25083084

  14. Colorectal Cancer with Uncommon Metastatic Spread

    PubMed Central

    Dellavedova, Luca; Calcagno, Anna; Roncoroni, Lucia; Maffioli, Lorenzo Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of bone metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) is quite low and the presence of isolated osseous metastases at the time of diagnosis or the onset of bone metastases without other organ involvement during follow-up is even lower. Here, we present an interesting case of diffuse skeletal metastases from CRC in which both the atypical presentation of the metastatic spread and the presence of infective comorbidities created some troubles in getting the final diagnosis. PMID:26420997

  15. Future of Minimally Invasive Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Whealon, Matthew; Vinci, Alessio; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is slowly taking over as the preferred operative approach for colorectal diseases. However, many of the procedures remain technically difficult. This article will give an overview of the state of minimally invasive surgery and the many advances that have been made over the last two decades. Specifically, we discuss the introduction of the robotic platform and some of its benefits and limitations. We also describe some newer techniques related to robotics. PMID:27582647

  16. Exome Sequencing Identifies Biallelic MSH3 Germline Mutations as a Recessive Subtype of Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ronja; Spier, Isabel; Zhao, Bixiao; Kloth, Michael; Marquez, Jonathan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kirfel, Jutta; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Stienen, Dietlinde; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Kayser, Katrin; Thiele, Holger; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Marra, Giancarlo; Kristiansen, Glen; Nöthen, Markus M; Büttner, Reinhard; Möslein, Gabriela; Betz, Regina C; Brieger, Angela; Lifton, Richard P; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    In ∼30% of families affected by colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutations have been identified in the previously implicated genes APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, and NTHL1, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover further genes with high-penetrance causative mutations, we performed exome sequencing of leukocyte DNA from 102 unrelated individuals with unexplained adenomatous polyposis. We identified two unrelated individuals with differing compound-heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) germline mutations in the mismatch-repair gene MSH3. The impact of the MSH3 mutations (c.1148delA, c.2319-1G>A, c.2760delC, and c.3001-2A>C) was indicated at the RNA and protein levels. Analysis of the diseased individuals' tumor tissue demonstrated high microsatellite instability of di- and tetranucleotides (EMAST), and immunohistochemical staining illustrated a complete loss of nuclear MSH3 in normal and tumor tissue, confirming the LoF effect and causal relevance of the mutations. The pedigrees, genotypes, and frequency of MSH3 mutations in the general population are consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Both index persons have an affected sibling carrying the same mutations. The tumor spectrum in these four persons comprised colorectal and duodenal adenomas, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and an early-onset astrocytoma. Additionally, we detected one unrelated individual with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations, representing constitutional mismatch-repair deficiency. Potentially causative variants in 14 more candidate genes identified in 26 other individuals require further workup. In the present study, we identified biallelic germline MSH3 mutations in individuals with a suspected hereditary tumor syndrome. Our data suggest that MSH3 mutations represent an additional recessive subtype of colorectal adenomatous polyposis. PMID:27476653

  17. Inositol Hexaphosphate and Inositol Inhibit Colorectal Cancer Metastasis to the Liver in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Min; Song, Yang; Wen, Zhaoxia; Lu, Xingyi; Cui, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) and inositol (Ins), naturally occurring carbohydrates present in most mammals and plants, inhibit the growth of numerous cancers both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we first examined the anti-metastatic effects of IP6 and Ins using a liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer (CRC) in BALB/c mice. CT-26 cells were injected into the splenic capsule of 48 BALB/c mice. The mice were then randomly divided into four groups: IP6, Ins, IP6 + Ins and normal saline control (n = 12 per group). IP6 and/or Ins (80 mg/kg each, 0.2 mL/day) were injected into the gastrointestinal tracts of the mice on the second day after surgery. All mice were sacrificed after 20 days, and the tumor inhibition rates were determined. The results demonstrated that the tumor weights of liver metastases and the tumor inhibition rates were reduced in the experimental groups compared to the control group and that treatment with the combination of IP6 and Ins resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth than treatment with either compound alone. These findings suggest that IP6 and Ins prevent the development and metastatic progression of colorectal cancer to the liver in mice by altering expression of the extracellular matrix proteins collagen IV, fibronectin and laminin; the adhesion factor receptor integrin-β1; the proteolytic enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 9; and the angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor beta in the tumor metastasis microenvironment. In conclusion, IP6 and Ins inhibited the development and metastatic progression of colorectal cancer to the liver in BALB/c mice, and the effect of their combined application was significantly greater than the effect of either compound alone. This evidence supports further testing of the combined application of IP6 and Ins for the prevention of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver in clinical studies. PMID:27187454

  18. A Gnotobiotic Mouse Model Demonstrates that Dietary Fiber Protects Against Colorectal Tumorigenesis in a Microbiota- and Butyrate–Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Holley, Darcy; Collins, Leonard B.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Hillhouse, Andrew; Curry, Kaitlin P.; Renner, Sarah W.; Greenwalt, Alicia; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Godfrey, Virginia; Heise, Mark T.; Threadgill, Deborah S.; Han, Anna; Swenberg, James A.; Threadgill, David W.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    It is controversial whether dietary fiber protects against colorectal cancer because of conflicting results from human epidemiologic studies. However, these studies and mouse models of colorectal cancer have not controlled the composition of gut microbiota, which ferment fiber into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. Butyrate is noteworthy because it has energetic and epigenetic functions in colonocytes and tumorsuppressive properties in colorectal-cancer cell lines. We utilized gnotobiotic mouse models colonized with wild-type or mutant strains of a butyrate-producing bacterium to demonstrate that fiber does have a potent tumor-suppressive effect but in a microbiota- and butyrate-dependent manner. Furthermore, due to the Warburg effect, butyrate was metabolized less in tumors where it accumulated and functioned as an HDAC inhibitor to stimulate histone acetylation and affect apoptosis and cell proliferation. To support the relevance of this mechanism in human cancer, we demonstrate that butyrate and histone-acetylation levels are elevated in colorectal adenocarcinomas compared to normal colonic tissues. PMID:25266735

  19. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  20. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-03-27

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as "hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jeghers syndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenile polyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome" (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  1. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  2. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  3. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Adam; Hanna, Mark H; Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient’s nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient’s chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery. PMID:27231513

  4. Implications of preoperative hypoalbuminemia in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Truong, Adam; Hanna, Mark H; Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Stamos, Michael J

    2016-05-27

    Serum albumin has traditionally been used as a quantitative measure of a patient's nutritional status because of its availability and low cost. While malnutrition has a clear definition within both the American and European Societies for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines, individual surgeons often determine nutritional status anecdotally. Preoperative albumin level has been shown to be the best predictor of mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Specifically in colorectal surgical patients, hypoalbuminemia significantly increases the length of hospital stay, rates of surgical site infections, enterocutaneous fistula risk, and deep vein thrombosis formation. The delay of surgical procedures to allow for preoperative correction of albumin levels in hypoalbuminemic patients has been shown to improve the morbidity and mortality in patients with severe nutritional risk. The importance of preoperative albumin levels and the patient's chronic inflammatory state on the postoperative morbidity and mortality has led to the development of a variety of surgical scoring systems to predict outcomes efficiently. This review attempts to provide a systematic overview of albumin and its role and implications in colorectal surgery. PMID:27231513

  5. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik−/−/Apcmin/+ mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apcmin/+ mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  6. TNIK inhibition abrogates colorectal cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mari; Uno, Yuko; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Ohata, Hirokazu; Mimata, Ayako; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Moriyama, Hideki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Inoue, Tomoko; Goto, Naoko; Okamoto, Koji; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling is essential for maintaining intestinal stem cells, and its constitutive activation has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. We and others have previously identified Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) as an essential regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex. Consistent with this, Tnik-deficient mice are resistant to azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis, and Tnik(-/-)/Apc(min/+) mutant mice develop significantly fewer intestinal tumours. Here we report the first orally available small-molecule TNIK inhibitor, NCB-0846, having anti-Wnt activity. X-ray co-crystal structure analysis reveals that NCB-0846 binds to TNIK in an inactive conformation, and this binding mode seems to be essential for Wnt inhibition. NCB-0846 suppresses Wnt-driven intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice and the sphere- and tumour-forming activities of colorectal cancer cells. TNIK is required for the tumour-initiating function of colorectal cancer stem cells. Its inhibition is a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:27562646

  7. Hyperplastic polyposis: association with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leggett, B A; Devereaux, B; Biden, K; Searle, J; Young, J; Jass, J

    2001-02-01

    Hyperplastic polyposis is a loosely defined syndrome initially thought not to confer a clinically important predisposition to colorectal cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the clinical, histologic, and molecular features of a prospective series of cases meeting a strict definition of the condition. Twelve patients were identified, seven of whom had developed colorectal cancer. Most polyps were hyperplastic, but 11 patients also had polyps containing dysplasia as either serrated adenomas. mixed polyps, or traditional adenomas. The mean percentage of dysplastic polyps in patients with cancer was 35%, and in patients without cancer, 11% (p < 0.05). Microsatellite instability (MSI) was present in 3 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. Kras was mutated in 8 of 47 hyperplastic polyps and two of eight serrated adenomas. No polyps showed loss of heterozygosity of chromosomes 5q, 1p, or 18q. Two of seven cancers showed a high level of MSI. It is concluded that hyperplastic polyposis is associated with a high risk of colorectal cancer. Hyperplastic polyps are the dominant type of polyp, but most cases have some dysplastic epithelium. A higher proportion of dysplastic polyps is associated with increased cancer risk. Clonal genetic changes are observed in some hyperplastic polyps and serrated adenomas.

  8. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Monica; Merino, Sandra; Caro, Aleidis; Feliu, Francesc; Escuder, Jordi; Francesch, Tani

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approximately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients (> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are under-represented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population. PMID:26483875

  9. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2012-01-01

    While surgery is the cornerstone treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer, chemotherapy is the first treatment option for metastatic disease when tumor lesions are frequently not fully resectable at presentation. Mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, but there is still a huge heterogeneity in survival rates that can be mainly explained by patient and tumor characteristics, host response factors, and treatment modalities. The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is a global treatment strategy, which applies several lines of therapy, salvage surgery, maintenance, and treatment-free intervals. The individualization of cancer treatment is based on the evaluation of prognostic factors for survival (serum lactate dehydrogenase level, performance status), and predictive factors for treatment efficacy [Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation status]. The available treatment modalities for metastatic colorectal cancer are chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab), and anti-epidermal growth factor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab). The increasing number of active compounds dictates the strategy of trials evaluating these treatments either in combination or sequentially. Alternative outcomes that can be measured earlier than overall survival are needed to shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of clinical trials. PMID:22423266

  10. Downregulation of microRNA-498 in colorectal cancers and its cellular effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A.; Lam, Alfred K.-Y.

    2015-01-15

    miR-498 is a non-coding RNA located intergenically in 19q13.41. Due to its predicted targeting of several genes involved in control of cellular growth, we examined the expression of miR-498 in colon cancer cell lines and a large cohort of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Two colon cancer cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW48) and one normal colonic epithelial cell line (FHC) were recruited. The expression of miR-498 was tested in these cell lines by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Tissues from 80 patients with surgical resection of colorectum (60 adenocarcinomas and 20 non-neoplastic tissues) were tested for miR-498 expression by qRT-PCR. In addition, an exogenous miR-498 (mimic) was used to detect the miRNA's effects on cell proliferation and cell cycle events in SW480 using MTT calorimetric assay and flow cytometry respectively. The colon cancer cell lines showed reduced expression of miR-498 compared to a normal colonic epithelial cell line. Mimic driven over expression of miR-498 in the SW480 cell line resulted in reduced cell proliferation and increased proportions of G2-M phase cells. In tissues, miR-498 expression was too low to be detected in all colorectal adenocarcinoma compared to non-neoplastic tissues. This suggests that the down regulation of miR-498 in colorectal cancer tissues and the direct suppressive cellular effect noted in cancer cell lines implies that miR-498 has some direct or indirect role in the pathogenesis of colorectal adenocarcinomas. - Highlights: • miR-498 is a non-coding RNA located in 19q13.41. • Colon cancer cell lines showed reduced expression of miR-498. • Mimic driven over expression of miR-498 in colon cancer cells resulted in lower cell proliferation. • miR-498 expression was down regulated in all colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues.

  11. Expression of four CEA family antigens (CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2) in normal and cancerous gastric epithelial cells: up-regulation of BGP and CGM2 in carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, T; Kuroki, M; Takeo, H; Matsuo, Y; Ohshima, K; Yamashita, Y; Shirakusa, T; Matsuoka, Y

    1998-03-30

    Four human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family members, CEA (CD66e), non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA, CD66c), biliary glycoprotein (BGP, CD66a) and CEA gene-family member 2 (CGM2), are expressed in normal mucosal epithelia of the colon. Expression of BGP and CGM2 has recently been demonstrated to be down-regulated in colorectal adenocarcinomas. We have now investigated the expression of the 4 CEA family antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma and carcinoma cell lines in comparison with adjacent normal gastric mucosa. The transcripts of the CEA, NCA and BGP genes evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were detectable at various levels in all the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines tested, while CGM2 mRNA was detectable in the cell lines of poorly differentiated but not of well-differentiated carcinomas. The levels of CEA mRNA in normal gastric mucosa were variable but mostly increased in adenocarcinomas. The sparse expression of NCA observed in the normal tissues was markedly up-regulated in the carcinomas. In contrast to previous findings on normal and cancerous colonic tissues, the transcripts of CGM2 were totally undetectable and those of BGP were recognized only marginally, if at all, in normal gastric mucosa, while both messages were detected at significant levels in most of the gastric adenocarcinomas. This was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our findings indicate that expression of the CEA family antigens, particularly that of BGP and CGM2, is differently regulated in epithelial cells of the colon and the stomach.

  12. Mortality of passerines adjacent to a North Carolina corn field treated with granular carbofuran.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, Tom; Smith, Milton R.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1996-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were collected during an epizootic in southeastern North Carolina (USA). Activity of brain cholinesterase (ChE) was inhibited by 14 to 48% in three of five specimens, and returned to normal levels after incubation. Gastrointestinal tracts were analyzed for 30 anti-ChE agents. Carbofuran, the only compound detected, was present in all specimens at levels from 5.44 to 72.7 μg/g wet weight. Application of granular carbofuran in an adjacent corn field, results of necropsy examinations, and chemical analyses are consistent with a diagnosis of carbofuran poisoning in these specimens.

  13. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  14. Diagnosis of colorectal cancer using Raman spectroscopy of laser-trapped single living epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Qin, Yejun; Zheng, Feng; Sun, Menghong; Shi, Daren

    2006-07-01

    A single-cell diagnostic technique for epithelial cancers is developed by utilizing laser trapping and Raman spectroscopy to differentiate cancerous and normal epithelial cells. Single-cell suspensions were prepared from surgically removed human colorectal tissues following standard primary culture protocols and examined in a near-infrared laser-trapping Raman spectroscopy system, where living epithelial cells were investigated one by one. A diagnostic model was built on the spectral data obtained from 8 patients and validated by the data from 2 new patients. Our technique has potential applications from epithelial cancer diagnosis to the study of cell dynamics of carcinogenesis.

  15. Gut Microbiota and Colorectal Surgery: Impact on Postoperative Complications.

    PubMed

    Russ, Andrew J; Casillas, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leakage is a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery and causes high morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of anastomotic healing remains unclear despite numerous studies. In this article, our aim is to provide different perspectives on what is known about the role of the gastrointestinal tract microbiome and its relation to anastomotic integrity. PMID:27582651

  16. Colorectal cancer screening: The role of the noninvasive options.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Lisa; Varcak, Susan Combs

    2016-09-01

    Recommended screening options for colorectal cancer are divided into noninvasive stool-based options, and invasive procedure-based options. Because multiple screening strategies are effective, efforts to reduce deaths from colorectal cancer should focus on maximizing the number of patients who are screened. This article reviews noninvasive stool-based screening options. PMID:27575898

  17. Is height a risk factor for colorectal adenoma?

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J.; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Although it is generally known that the risk for all types of cancer increases with adult height, combined and for several common site-specific cancers (including colon and rectal), evidence is limited for adenomas, which are precursors to colorectal cancer. We evaluated the association between height and risk of colorectal adenoma at various stages of the adenoma-carcinoma pathway. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study using data from patients who had undergone a complete colonoscopy as part of a health examination at the Health Promotion Center of Samsung Medical Center between October 13, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A total of 1,347 male subjects were included in our study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between height and colorectal adenoma. Results: Each 5-cm increase in height was associated with 1.6% and 5.3% higher risks of advanced colorectal adenoma and high-risk colorectal adenoma, respectively, but associations were not significant after adjusting for age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome, alcohol intake, smoking, family history of colorectal cancer, and regular aspirin use (p = 0.840 and p = 0.472, respectively). Conclusions: No clear association was found between colorectal adenoma risk and height. Unlike other site-specific tumors reported to have a consistent relationship with height, the association between colorectal tumor and height remains controversial. PMID:26701232

  18. Endoscopic management of acute colorectal anastomotic complications with temporary stent.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Maher A

    2009-01-01

    Acute postoperative anastomotic complications following colorectal resection include leak and obstruction. Often an operation is necessary to treat these complications. The role of endoluminal procedures to treat these complications has been limited. This article illustrates that such an approach is technically feasible and can be used to treat some colorectal anastomotic complications.

  19. NIH study finds sigmoidoscopy reduces colorectal cancer rates

    Cancer.gov

    Study finds that flexible sigmoidoscopy is effective in reducing the rates of new cases and deaths due to colorectal cancer. Researchers found that overall colorectal cancer mortality was reduced by 26 percent and incidence was reduced by 21 percent as a

  20. Alternatively spliced variants of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 and tumour progression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D. C.; Fawcett, J.; Walsh, M. D.; Reeder, J. A.; Simmons, D. L.; Antalis, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    Increased expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CD44 family of cell adhesion molecules has been associated with tumour metastasis. In the present study, expression of alternatively spliced variants of CD44 and their cellular distribution have been investigated in human colonic tumours and in the corresponding normal mucosa, in addition to benign adenomatous polyps. The expression of CD44 alternatively spliced variants has been correlated with tumour progression according to Dukes' histological stage. CD44 variant expression was determined by immunohistochemisty using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific CD44 variant domains together with RT-PCR analysis of CD44 variant mRNA expression in the same tissue specimens. We demonstrate that as well as being expressed in colonic tumour cells, the full range of CD44 variants, CD44v2-v10, are widely expressed in normal colonic crypt epithelium, predominantly in the crypt base. CD44v6, the epitope which is most commonly associated with tumour progression and metastasis, was not only expressed by many benign colonic tumours, but was expressed as frequently in normal basal crypt epithelium as in malignant colonic tumour cells, and surprisingly, was even absent from some metastatic colorectal tumours. Expression of none of the CD44 variant epitopes was found to be positively correlated with tumour progression or with colorectal tumour metastasis to the liver, results which are inconsistent with a role for CD44 variants as indicators of colonic cancer progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8695347

  1. Biomechanics of Artificial Disc Replacements Adjacent to a 2-Level Fusion in 4-Level Hybrid Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R.; Wei, Na; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The ideal procedure for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases remains controversial. Recent studies on hybrid surgery combining anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) for 2-level and 3-level constructs have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to estimate the biomechanics of 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs, which are more likely to be used clinically compared to 4-level arthrodesis. Material/Methods Eighteen human cadaveric spines (C2–T1) were evaluated in different testing conditions: intact, with 3 kinds of 4-level hybrid constructs (hybrid C3–4 ACDR+C4–6 ACDF+C6–7ACDR; hybrid C3–5ACDF+C5–6ACDR+C6–7ACDR; hybrid C3–4ACDR+C4–5ACDR+C5–7ACDF); and 4-level fusion. Results Four-level fusion resulted in significant decrease in the C3–C7 ROM compared with the intact spine. The 3 different 4-level hybrid treatment groups caused only slight change at the instrumented levels compared to intact except for flexion. At the adjacent levels, 4-level fusion resulted in significant increase of contribution of both upper and lower adjacent levels. However, for the 3 hybrid constructs, significant changes of motion increase far lower than 4P at adjacent levels were only noted in partial loading conditions. No destabilizing effect or hypermobility were observed in any 4-level hybrid construct. Conclusions Four-level fusion significantly eliminated motion within the construct and increased motion at the adjacent segments. For all 3 different 4-level hybrid constructs, ACDR normalized motion of the index segment and adjacent segments with no significant hypermobility. Compared with the 4-level ACDF condition, the artificial discs in 4-level hybrid constructs had biomechanical advantages compared to fusion in normalizing adjacent level motion. PMID:26694835

  2. MicroRNA-224 is associated with colorectal cancer progression and response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy by KRAS-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Amankwatia, E B; Chakravarty, P; Carey, F A; Weidlich, S; Steele, R J C; Munro, A J; Wolf, C R; Smith, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancers arise from benign adenomas, although not all adenomas progress to cancer and there are marked interpatient differences in disease progression. We have previously associated KRAS mutations with disease progression and reduced survival in colorectal cancer patients. Methods: We used TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) qRT–PCR analysis to identify miRNAs differentially expressed in normal colorectal mucosa, adenomas and cancers and in isogeneic KRAS WT and mutant HCT116 cells, and used a variety of phenotypic assays to assess the influence of miRNA expression on KRAS activity, chemosensitivity, proliferation and invasion. Results: MicroRNA-224 was differentially expressed in dysplastic colorectal disease and in isogeneic KRAS WT and mutant HCT116 cells. Antagomir-mediated miR-224 silencing in HCT116 KRAS WT cells phenocopied KRAS mutation, increased KRAS activity and ERK and AKT phosphorylation. 5-FU chemosensitivity was significantly increased in miR-224 knockdown cells, and in NIH3T3 cells expressing KRAS and BRAF mutant proteins. Bioinformatics analysis of predicted miR-224 target genes predicted altered cell proliferation, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypes that were experimentally confirmed in miR-224 knockdown cells. Conclusions: We describe a novel mechanism of KRAS regulation, and highlight the clinical utility of colorectal cancer-specific miRNAs as disease progression or clinical response biomarkers. PMID:25919696

  3. The Effect of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 Gene 3′Untranslated Region Polymorphism in Colorectal Cancer Risk among Saudi Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Alhadheq, Abdullah M.; Purusottapatnam Shaik, Jilani; Alamri, Abdullah; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alharbi, Othman; Almadi, Majid A.; Alhadeq, Faten; Azzam, Nahla A.; Alanazi, Mohammad; Bazzi, Mohammad D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. DNA repair systems are essential for each cell to repair and maintain the genome integrity. Base excision repair pathway is one of the crucial pathways to maintain genome integrity and PARP-1 plays a key role in BER pathway. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between polymorphisms in PARP-1 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) SNP rs8679 and its expression in colorectal cancer. Methods. Genotyping and gene expression were performed using TaqMan assays. The effects of age, gender, and tumor location were evaluated in cases and controls regarding the genotyping results. Resulting data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results and Conclusions. Genotyping analysis for SNP rs8679 showed decreased susceptibility to colorectal cancer at heterozygous TC allele and at minor allele C. Further this protective association was also observed in younger age patients (≤57), in female patients, and also in patients with tumors located at colon and rectum. PARP-1 expression levels are significantly different in colorectal cancer compared to matched normal tissue. Our findings proved that the upregulation of PARP-1 is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in Saudi patients with colorectal cancer, suggesting that PARP-1 can be novel and valuable signatures for predicting the clinical outcome of patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:27746584

  4. Aflibercept in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Fei; Lockhart, Albert Craig

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US. In recent decades, an improved understanding of the role of the angiogenesis pathway in colorectal cancer has led to advancements in treatment. Bevacizumab has been shown to improve the progression-free survival and overall survival when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and at present is the only antiangiogenesis agent approved for the treatment of this cancer. Aflibercept is a novel angiogenesis-targeting agent, and has demonstrated efficacy in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in a recent randomized Phase III trial. Here we review the role of angiogenesis in the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, strategies for targeting angiogenesis, and the clinical development of aflibercept. PMID:22253552

  5. Best Merge Region Growing Segmentation with Integrated Non-Adjacent Region Object Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Tarabalka, Yuliya; Montesano, Paul M.; Gofman, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    Best merge region growing normally produces segmentations with closed connected region objects. Recognizing that spectrally similar objects often appear in spatially separate locations, we present an approach for tightly integrating best merge region growing with non-adjacent region object aggregation, which we call Hierarchical Segmentation or HSeg. However, the original implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg required excessive computing time even for moderately sized images because of the required intercomparison of each region with all other regions. This problem was previously addressed by a recursive approximation of HSeg, called RHSeg. In this paper we introduce a refined implementation of non-adjacent region object aggregation in HSeg that reduces the computational requirements of HSeg without resorting to the recursive approximation. In this refinement, HSeg s region inter-comparisons among non-adjacent regions are limited to regions of a dynamically determined minimum size. We show that this refined version of HSeg can process moderately sized images in about the same amount of time as RHSeg incorporating the original HSeg. Nonetheless, RHSeg is still required for processing very large images due to its lower computer memory requirements and amenability to parallel processing. We then note a limitation of RHSeg with the original HSeg for high spatial resolution images, and show how incorporating the refined HSeg into RHSeg overcomes this limitation. The quality of the image segmentations produced by the refined HSeg is then compared with other available best merge segmentation approaches. Finally, we comment on the unique nature of the hierarchical segmentations produced by HSeg.

  6. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-10-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  7. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-06-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  8. Glycomics expression analysis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans of human colorectal cancer tissues and non-neoplastic mucosa by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Marolla, Ana Paula Cleto; Waisberg, Jaques; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Margeotto, Fernando Beani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To determine the presence of glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues, since it has a central role in tumor development and progression. Methods Tissue samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissues were obtained from 64 operated patients who had colorectal carcinoma with no distant metastases. Expressions of heparan sulphate, chondroitin sulphate, dermatan sulphate and their fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, with the technique for extraction and quantification of glycosaminoglycans after proteolysis and electrophoresis. The statistical analysis included mean, standard deviation, and Student’s t test. Results The glycosaminoglycans extracted from colorectal tissue showed three electrophoretic bands in agarose gel. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed characteristic disaccharide fragments from glycosaminoglycans, indicating their structural characterization in the tissues analyzed. Some peaks in the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were not characterized as fragments of sugars, indicating the presence of fragments of the protein structure of proteoglycans generated during the glycosaminoglycan purification. The average amount of chondroitin and dermatan increased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p=0.01). On the other hand, the average amount of heparan decreased in the neoplastic tissue compared to normal tissue (p= 0.03). Conclusion The method allowed the determination of the glycosaminoglycans structural profile in colorectal tissue from neoplastic and non-neoplastic colorectal tissue. Neoplastic tissues showed greater amounts of chondroitin sulphate and dermatan sulphate compared to non-neoplastic tissues, while heparan sulphate was decreased in neoplastic tissues. PMID:26761548

  9. Perceived religiousness is protective for colorectal cancer: data from the Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study.

    PubMed Central

    Kune, G A; Kune, S; Watson, L F

    1993-01-01

    The perceived or self-reported degree of 'religiousness' was obtained by interview from 715 colorectal cancer patients and 727 age/sex matched community controls, as part of a large, comprehensive population-based study of colorectal cancer incidence, aetiology and survival (The Melbourne Colorectal Cancer Study) conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Self-reported or perceived 'religiousness', as defined in the study, was a statistically significant protective factor [relative risk (RR) = 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9, P = 0.002]. This statistically significant protection remained after the previously determined major risk factors found in the study, namely a family history of colorectal cancer, dietary risk factors, beer consumption, number of children and age at birth of the first child, were statistically corrected for (P = 0.004). There was no association between Dukes' staging of the cancer and perceived degree of 'religiousness' (P = 0.42). Although self-reported or perceived 'religiousness' was associated with a median survival time of 62 months compared with 52 months in those self-reporting as being 'non-religious', this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.64). PMID:8258800

  10. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  11. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  12. Pattern of cell kinetics in colorectal mucosa of patients with different types of adenomatous polyps of the large bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Roncucci, L.; Scalmati, A.; Ponz de Leon, M. )

    1991-08-15

    It is generally accepted that adenomatous polyps represent the natural precursor of many colorectal malignancies. The sequence, however, which leads from a normally appearing mucosa to cancer is complex and involves many steps, including a hyperproliferative mucosa with an upward expansion of the replicative compartment. The current study evaluates cell replication in normal colorectal mucosa of patients with adenomatous polyps of various types and relates the observed findings to the main clinical and morphologic features of adenomas. Forty-four patients with polyps and 27 controls entered the study. Samples of colorectal mucosa were taken at endoscopy and cell replication was evaluated with a standard autoradiographic procedure. Cell replication was expressed as labeling index (LI), in the whole crypt and in each of the five longitudinal compartments in which the crypts were divided. Total LI and LI per crypt compartment were significantly higher (P less than 0.02 and P less than 0.01, respectively) than in controls. There was no appreciable difference of LI values between patients with single or multiple, tubular or tubulovillous, small or large adenomas, but in all of these subgroups LI was significantly higher than in controls. In conclusion, in normally appearing colorectal mucosa of patients with adenomatous polyps there was a significant increase of cell replication and a marked upward expansion of the proliferative zone; these changes were more evident in the left colon and in the rectum. Finally, cell replication did not seem to be related to the number of polyps, to the most common histotypes, or to the pattern of recurrence.

  13. Comparison of T-cell receptor repertoire restriction in blood and tumor tissue of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several immunotherapeutic approaches rely on antigen-specific T-cells. Restrictions in the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire were reported as indicator of anti-tumor cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in various tumor entities. It is unclear yet whether a TCR restriction in peripheral blood mirrors the tumor compartment. We compared the expression of TCR Vβ-families for the quantification of TCR repertoire alterations in blood and tissue samples from patients with colorectal carcinoma. Blood samples from patients with colorectal carcinoma and healthy volunteers and tissue samples of normal colonic mucosa and colorectal carcinoma were analyzed. Relative Vβ-family quantification was performed based on quantitative reverse transcribed PCR. Standard deviation and average mean of the single families were determined. Two variables describing the degree of Vβ-repertoire restriction were defined. Forty-eight blood samples and 37 tissue samples were analyzed. TCR repertoire restriction was higher in blood of tumor patients than in blood of healthy controls (p < 0.05). No difference in the degree of TCR repertoire restriction was found between carcinoma and unaffected colon tissue. We found no corresponding elevated TCR families among the different compartments blood, normal colon, and carcinoma tissue of the same patient. In conclusion, we observed a repertoire restriction in peripheral blood as well as in tumor tissue of cancer patients. However, in tumor tissue, repertoire alterations were comparable to normal mucosa, suggesting compartment-specific TCR distribution rather than alterations due to tumor-T-cell interaction questioning the presence of highly restricted clonal T-cell expansions in colorectal cancer as they have been described in other, assumingly more immunogenic tumor entities. PMID:20385014

  14. On the Adjacent Eccentric Distance Sum Index of Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui; Cao, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    For a given graph G, ε(v) and deg(v) denote the eccentricity and the degree of the vertex v in G, respectively. The adjacent eccentric distance sum index of a graph G is defined as ξsv(G)=∑v∈V(G)ε(v)D(v)deg(v), where D(v)=∑u∈V(G)d(u,v) is the sum of all distances from the vertex v. In this paper we derive some bounds for the adjacent eccentric distance sum index in terms of some graph parameters, such as independence number, covering number, vertex connectivity, chromatic number, diameter and some other graph topological indices. PMID:26091095

  15. Nonlinear spin wave coupling in adjacent magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Morozova, M. A.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.; Grishin, S. V.; Sheshukova, S. E.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally studied the coupling of spin waves in the adjacent magnonic crystals. Space- and time-resolved Brillouin light-scattering spectroscopy is used to demonstrate the frequency and intensity dependent spin-wave energy exchange between the side-coupled magnonic crystals. The experiments and the numerical simulation of spin wave propagation in the coupled periodic structures show that the nonlinear phase shift of spin wave in the adjacent magnonic crystals leads to the nonlinear switching regime at the frequencies near the forbidden magnonic gap. The proposed side-coupled magnonic crystals represent a significant advance towards the all-magnonic signal processing in the integrated magnonic circuits.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers. PMID:14528320

  17. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  18. Alteration of O-GlcNAcylation affects serine phosphorylation and regulates gene expression and activity of pyruvate kinase M2 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiyawat, Parunya; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Svasti, Jisnuson; Champattanachai, Voraratt

    2015-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification that has extensive crosstalk with phosphorylation either at the same or adjacent sites of various proteins. We have previously reported that O-GlcNAcylation level was increased in primary breast and colorectal cancer, but the interplay of the two modifications remains unclear. Therefore, we explored crosstalk of the modifications by RNA interference against O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) in colorectal cancer cells. Two-dimensional immunoblotting and mass spectrometric analysis showed that the levels of O-GlcNAc and serine phosphorylation of many proteins including serine hydroxymethyltransferase, cytokeratin-8, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L, and lamin-B1, were reduced in siOGT cells compared to siScramble cells. In HT29 cells, immunoprecipitated PKM2 revealed decreased O-GlcNAc and serine phosphorylation levels after siOGT knockdown, but increased levels after treatment with Thiamet-G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). In addition, when global O-GlcNAcylation was enhanced by treating cells with Thiamet-G, PKM2 expression level was upregulated, but PKM2-specific activity was decreased. On the other hand, in OGT knockdown cells, PKM2 expression level was downregulated, but PKM2-specific activity was increased. Moreover, the metastatic colorectal cancer cells, SW620, had more O-GlcNAc-PKM2 and showed lower PKM2-specific activity compared to the non-metastatic colorectal cancer SW480 cells. These results suggested roles of O-GlcNAcylation in modulating serine phosphorylation, as well as in regulating PKM2 activity and expression. Interfering levels of O-GlcNAcylation of PKM2 may be a novel target in controlling cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer.

  19. 124I-huA33 Antibody PET of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L.; Zanzonico, Pat; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Ruan, Shutian; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Douglas; Jaggi, Jaspreet S.; Scheinberg, David A.; Gonen, Mithat; Panageas, Katherine S.; Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Old, Lloyd J.; Larson, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Humanized A33 (huA33) is a promising monoclonal antibody that recognizes A33 antigen, which is present in more than 95% of colorectal cancers and in normal bowel. In this study, we took advantage of quantitative PET to evaluate 124I huA33 targeting, biodistribution, and safety in patients with colorectal cancer. We also determined the biodistribution of 124I-huA33 when a large dose of human intravenous IgG (IVIG) was administered to manipulate the Fc receptor or when 124I-huA33 was given via hepatic arterial infusion (HAI). Methods We studied 25 patients with primary or metastatic colorectal cancer; 19 patients had surgical exploration or resection. Patients received a median of 343 MBq (44.4–396 MBq) and 10 mg of 124I-huA33. Nineteen patients received the antibody intravenously and 6 patients via HAI, and 5 patients also received IVIG. Results Ten of 12 primary tumors were visualized in 11 patients. The median concentration in primary colon tumors was 0.016% injected dose per gram, compared with 0.004% in normal colon. The PET-based median ratio of hepatic tumor uptake to normal-liver uptake was 3.9 (range, 1.8–22.2). Quantitation using PET, compared with well counting of serum and tissue, showed little difference. Prominent uptake in bowel hindered tumor identification in some patients. Pharmacokinetics showed that patients receiving IVIG had a significantly shorter serum half-time (41.6 ± 14.0 h) than those without (65.2 ± 9.8 h). There were no differences in clearance rates among the intravenous group, IVIG group, and HAI group, nor was there any difference in serum area under the curve, maximum serum concentration, or volume of distribution. Weak titers of human–anti-human antibodies were observed in 6 of 25 patients. No acute side effects or significant toxicities were associated with huA33. Conclusion Good localization of 124I-huA33 in colorectal cancer with no significant toxicity has been observed. PET-derived 124I concentrations agreed well with

  20. Evaluation of Colon Cancer – Specific Antigen 2 as a Potential Serum Marker for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Eddy S.; Schoen, Robert E.; Magheli, Ahmed; Sokoll, Lori J.; Chan, Daniel W.; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A blood test to detect colon cancer at a preventable stage would represent a major advancement. We have previously identified colon cancer – specific markers using focused proteomics analysis of nuclear structural proteins. Two of these markers, colon cancer – specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4, have been developed into blood-based markers that are able to distinguish individuals with colorectal cancer from those without. CCSA-2 is a distinct novel colon cancer marker identified using focused proteomics. Experimental Design Using an indirect ELISA on serum samples obtained from two institutions, we evaluated CCSA-2 as a serum-based colon cancer marker. A total of111serumsamples from individuals who underwent colonoscopy and were subsequently diagnosed as either being normal or having hyperplastic polyps, nonadvanced adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer were evaluated. A diverse control population that consisted of 125 serum samples was also included in this study. Results Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CCSA-2. CCSA-2 at a cutoff of 10.8 µg/mL has overall specificity of 78.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 67.3–87.1%] and sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI, 85.8–99.5%) in separating individuals with advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer from normal, hyperplastic, and nonadvanced adenoma populations. The receiver operating characteristic curve for CCSA-2 has an area under the curve of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.95). Conclusion Our initial study shows that CCSA-2 is a potential serum-based marker for colon cancer detection with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:18316554

  1. Aberrant Apoptotic Response of Colorectal Cancer Cells to Novel Nucleoside Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Harmse, Leonie; Dahan-Farkas, Nurit; Panayides, Jenny-Lee; van Otterlo, Willem; Penny, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased understanding of colorectal cancer and the introduction of targeted drug therapy, the metastatic phase of the disease remains refractory to treatment. Since the deregulation of normal apoptosis contributes to the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer, novel nucleoside analogues were synthesized here and evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis and cause cell death in two colorectal adeno-carcinoma cell lines, Caco-2 and HT-29. Three novel nucleoside analogues assessed here showed cytotoxic activity, as measured by the MTT assay against both cell lines: the IC50 values ranged between 3 and 37 μM, with Caco-2 cells being more sensitive than HT-29 cells. Compared to camptothecin, the positive control, the nucleoside analogues were significantly less toxic to normal unstimulated leukocytes (p>0.05). Moreover, the nucleosides were able to induce apoptosis as measured by an increase in caspase 8 and caspase 3 activity above that of the control. This was additionally supported by data derived from Annexin V-FITC assays. Despite marginal changes to the mitochondrial membrane potential, all three nucleosides caused a significant increase in cytosolic cytochrome c (p>0.05), with a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial cytochrome c. Morphological analysis of both cell lines showed the rapid appearance of vacuoles following exposure to two of the nucleosides, while a third caused cellular detachment, delayed cytoplasmic vacuolisation and nuclear abnormalities. Preliminary investigations, using the autophagic indicator monodansylcadaverine and chloroquine as positive control, showed that two of the nucleosides induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles. In summary, the novel nucleoside analogues showed selective cytotoxicity towards both cancer cell lines and are effective initiators of an unusual apoptotic response, demonstrating their potential to serve as structural scaffolds for more potent analogues. PMID:26390405

  2. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  3. PNAS-4 expression and its relationship to p53 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Yan, Hui; Li, Yuan; Wang, Rong; Chen, Keling; Zhou, Zongguang; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    PNAS-4 is a novel pro-apoptotic protein activated during the early response to DNA damage; however, the molecular mechanisms and pathways regulating PNAS-4 expression in tumors are not well understood. We hypothesized that PNAS-4 is a p53 down-stream target gene and designed this study. We searched online for putative p53-binding sites in the entire PNAS-4 gene and did not find any corresponding information. In HCT116 colon cancer cells, after being transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, the expressions of PNAS-4 and other known p53 target gene (Apaf1, Bax, Fas and Dr5) were determined by real-time PCR. We found that PNAS-4 was up-regulated while Apaf1, Bax, Fas and Dr5 were down-regulated. We then examined the expression of PNAS-4 and p53 mutation in colorectal cancer patients. PNAS-4 expressed both in colorectal cancers and normal tissues, but compared with paired control, PNAS-4 was up-regulated in cancers (P=0.018). PNAS-4 overexpression ratios were correlated to the p53 mutant status (P=0.001). The mean PNAS-4 expression levels of p53 mutant homozygote group and heterozygote group were higher than that of p53 wild type group (P=0.013). The expression ratios of PNAS-4 (every sample in relative to its paired normal mucosa) were different between negative lymph node metastasis (66% up-regulated, 34% down-regulated) and positive metastasis (42% up-regulated, 58% down-regulated). Taken together, these findings suggested that PNAS-4 was not a p53 target, but overexpression of PNAS-4 was correlated to p53 inactivity in colorectal cancer.

  4. Outcome of Colorectal Surgery in Elderly Populations

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Franceschilli, Luana; Perrone, Federico; Angelucci, Giulio P.; Quareisma, Silvia; Gaspari, Achille L.; Sileri, Pierpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of age on short-term outcomes after colorectal surgery in terms of the 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. Methods The subjects for the study were patients who had undergone colorectal surgery. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to age; groups A and B patients were ≥80 and <80 years old of age, respectively. Both groups were manually matched for body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Charlson Comorbidity Index and procedure performed. Results A total of 200 patients, 91 men (45.5%) and 109 women (54.5%), were included in this retrospective study. These patients were equally divided into 2 groups. The mean ages were 85 years in group A (range, 80 to 104 years) and 55.3 years in group B (range, 13 to 79 years). The overall 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 1% of total 200 patients; both of these 2 patients were in group A. However, this observation had no statistical significance. No intraoperative complications were encountered in either group. The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity rate was 27% (54 of 200) for both groups. The 30-day postoperative morbidity rates in groups A and B were 28% (28 of 100) and 26% (26 of 100), respectively. However, these differences between the groups had no statistical significance importance. Conclusion Age alone should not be considered to be more of a contraindication or a worse predictor than other factors for the outcome after colorectal surgery on elderly patients.

  5. Outcome of Colorectal Surgery in Elderly Populations

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Franceschilli, Luana; Perrone, Federico; Angelucci, Giulio P.; Quareisma, Silvia; Gaspari, Achille L.; Sileri, Pierpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of age on short-term outcomes after colorectal surgery in terms of the 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. Methods The subjects for the study were patients who had undergone colorectal surgery. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to age; groups A and B patients were ≥80 and <80 years old of age, respectively. Both groups were manually matched for body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, Charlson Comorbidity Index and procedure performed. Results A total of 200 patients, 91 men (45.5%) and 109 women (54.5%), were included in this retrospective study. These patients were equally divided into 2 groups. The mean ages were 85 years in group A (range, 80 to 104 years) and 55.3 years in group B (range, 13 to 79 years). The overall 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 1% of total 200 patients; both of these 2 patients were in group A. However, this observation had no statistical significance. No intraoperative complications were encountered in either group. The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity rate was 27% (54 of 200) for both groups. The 30-day postoperative morbidity rates in groups A and B were 28% (28 of 100) and 26% (26 of 100), respectively. However, these differences between the groups had no statistical significance importance. Conclusion Age alone should not be considered to be more of a contraindication or a worse predictor than other factors for the outcome after colorectal surgery on elderly patients. PMID:27626024

  6. Repeat hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, R; Bismuth, H; Castaing, D; Waechter, F; Navarro, F; Abascal, A; Majno, P; Engerran, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors assess the long-term results of repeat hepatectomies for recurrent metastases of colorectal cancer and determine the factors that can predict survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Safer techniques of hepatic resection have allowed surgeons to consider repeat hepatectomy for colorectal metastases in an increasing number of patients. However, higher operative bleeding and increased morbidity have been reported after repeat hepatectomies, and the long-term benefit of these procedures needs to be evaluated. STUDY POPULATION: Sixty-four patients from a group of 243 patients resected for colorectal liver metastases were submitted to 83 repeat hepatectomies (64 second, 15 third, and 4 fourth hepatectomies). Combined extrahepatic surgery was performed in 21 (25%) of these 83 repeat hepatectomies. RESULTS: There was no intraoperative or postoperative mortality. Operative bleeding was not significantly increased in repeat hepatectomies as compared to first resections. Morbidity and duration of hospital stay were comparable to first hepatectomies. Overall and disease-free survival after a second hepatectomy were 60% and 42%, respectively, at 3 years and 41% and 26%, respectively, at 5 years. Factors of prognostic value on univariate analysis included the curative nature of first and second hepatectomies (p = 0.04 and p = 0.002, respectively), an interval between the two procedures of more than 1 year (p = 0.003), the number of recurrent tumors (p = 0.002), serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (p = 0.03), and the presence of extrahepatic disease (p = 0.03). Only the curative nature of the second hepatectomy and an interval of more than 1 year between the two procedures were independently related to survival on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Repeat hepatectomies can provide long-term survival rates similar to those of first hepatectomies, with no mortality and comparable morbidity. Combined extrahepatic surgery can be required to achieve tumor

  7. Virtual colonoscopy in stenosing colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coccetta, Marco; Migliaccio, Carla; La Mura, Francesco; Farinella, Eriberto; Galanou, Ioanna; Delmonaco, Pamela; Spizzirri, Alessandro; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Cattorini, Lorenzo; Milani, Diego; Cirocchi, Roberto; Sciannameo, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Background Between 5 and 10% of the patients undergoing a colonoscopy cannot have a complete procedure mainly due to stenosing neoplastic lesion of rectum or distal colon. Nevertheless the elective surgical treatment concerning the stenosis is to be performed after the pre-operative assessment of the colonic segments upstream the cancer. The aim of this study is to illustrate our experience with the Computed Tomographic Colonography (CTC) for the pre-operative assessment of the entire colon in the patients with stenosing colorectal cancers. Methods From January 2005 till March 2009, we observed and treated surgically 43 patients with stenosing colorectal neoplastic lesions. All patients did not tolerate the pre-operative colonoscopy. For this reason they underwent a pre-operative CTC in order to have a complete assessment of the entire colon. All patients underwent a follow-up colonoscopy 3 months after the surgical treatment. The CTC results were compared with both macroscopic examination of the specimen and the follow-up coloscopy. Results The pre-operative CTC showed four synchronous lesions in four patients (9.3% of the cases). The macroscopic examination of the specimen revealed three small sessile polyps (3 - 4 mm in diameter) missed in the pre-operative assessment near the stenosing colorectal cancer. The follow-up colonoscopy showed four additional sessile polyps with a diameter between 3 - 11 mm in three patients. Our experience shows that CTC has a sensitivity of 83,7%. Conclusion In patients with stenosing colonic lesions, CTC allows to assess the entire colon pre-operatively avoiding the need of an intraoperative colonoscopy. More synchronous lesions are detected and treated at the time of the elective surgery for the stenosing cancer avoiding further surgery later on. PMID:19900286

  8. The aging prostate is never "normal": implications from the genomic characterization of multifocal prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Schlomm, Thorsten; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan; Sauter, Guido

    2015-09-01

    We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field.

  9. 4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Elevation looking southwest from adjacent hills on northeast side of bridge, taken from river level. Note entire east side and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  10. 12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM THE PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO THE STEEL PLANT OFFICES. BAR AND BILLET MILLS AND, IN THE DISTANCE, THE BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES MAY BE SEEN. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking south. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead setting. Note laced vertical compression members, latticed portal strut, decorative strut bracing, and lightness of diagonal and lateral tension members. View to southeast through southeast portal from truss mid-span. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  13. 11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior detail, Boiler Room, fire door to the adjacent Blacksmith Shop, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to southwest (90mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Roundhouse Machine Shop Extension, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  14. 1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN BUILDING (BASSIN'S RESTAURANT) (HABS No. DC-357), 501-511 14TH STREET (THE LOCKER ROOM) HABS No. DC-356) ON CORNER, AND MUNSEY BUILDING (HABS No. DC-358) - William J. Stone Building, 1345 E Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ENTRY TO NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON RIGHT, AND HOUSING AREA ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  1. 7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL CONVEYOR; IN THE DISTANCE IS THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SWITCH HOUSE NO. 1; LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  2. 4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. REAR ELEVATION, DETAIL OF CONSTRUCTION, ADJACENT CORNER POSTS BETWEEN BUILDING PERIODS 1 AND 3. NOTE REUSED WOOD STRIP NAILED TO BUILDING PERIOD 1 POST INSCRIBED 'ST. LEONARD'. THERE ARE NO NAIL HOLES IN THE PERIOD 3 POST, THE FARRING STRIPS ADJUST FOR CLADDING - Charles' Gift, State Routes 2 & 4, Lusby, Calvert County, MD

  3. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  4. 12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE CANAL, LOOKING EAST. BARREN AREA IN FOREGROUND IS DECOMPOSING SAWDUST. DIRT PILE IN BACKGROUND IS THE EDGE OF THE SUMMIT COUNTY LANDFILL. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  5. LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ROOM; THE PIPES AT THE BOTTOM ARE PART OF THE RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM USED FOR HEATING THE FACTORY DURING COLD WEATHER. - Westmoreland Glass Company, Seventh & Kier Streets, Grapeville, Westmoreland County, PA

  6. How subaerial salt extrusions influence water quality in adjacent aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Razieh; Zarei, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ezzat

    2015-12-01

    Brines supplied from salt extrusions cause significant groundwater salinization in arid and semi-arid regions where salt rock is exposed to dissolution by episodic rainfalls. Here we focus on 62 of the 122 diapirs of Hormuz salt emergent in the southern Iran. To consider managing the degradation effect that salt extrusions have on the quality of adjoining aquifers, it is first necessary to understand how they influence adjacent water resources. We evaluate here the impacts that these diapirs have on adjacent aquifers based on investigating their geomorphologies, geologies, hydrologies and hydrogeologies. The results indicate that 28/62 (45%) of our sample of salt diapirs have no significant impact on the quality of groundwater in adjoining aquifers (namely Type N), while the remaining 34/62 (55%) degrade nearby groundwater quality. We offer simple conceptual models that account for how brines flowing from each of these types of salt extrusions contaminate adjacent aquifers. We identify three main mechanisms that lead to contamination: surface impact (Type A), subsurface intrusion (Type B) and indirect infiltration (Type C). A combination of all these mechanisms degrades the water quality in nearby aquifers in 19/62 (31%) of the salt diapirs studied. Having characterized the mechanism(s) by which each diapir affects the adjacent aquifer, we suggest a few possible remediation strategies to be considered. For instance, engineering the surface runoff of diapirs Types A and C into nearby evaporation basins would improve groundwater quality.

  7. MicroRNAs: Novel immunotherapeutic targets in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Nie, Jing; Mei, Qian; Han, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide and the prognosis for CRC patients with recurrence or metastasis is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival, there are still numerous efforts to be performed. Immunotherapy is frequently used, either alone or in combination with other therapies, for the treatment of CRC and is a safe and feasible way to improve CRC treatment. Furthermore, the significance of the immune system in the biology of CRC has been demonstrated by retrospective assessments of immune infiltrates in resected CRC tumors. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that can regulate multiple target genes at the post-transcriptional level and play critical roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. MiRNAs are required for normal immune system development and function. Nevertheless, aberrant expression of miRNAs is often observed in various tumor types and leads to immune disorders or immune evasion. The immunomodulatory function of miRNAs indicates that miRNAs may ultimately be part of the portfolio of anti-cancer targets. Herein, we will review the potential roles of miRNAs in the regulation of the immune response in CRC and then move on to discuss how to utilize different miRNA targets to treat CRC. We also provide an overview of the major limitations and challenges of using miRNAs as immunotherapeutic targets. PMID:27340348

  8. Proteomic indicators of oxidation and hydration state in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    New integrative approaches are needed to harness the potential of rapidly growing datasets of protein expression and microbial community composition in colorectal cancer. Chemical and thermodynamic models offer theoretical tools to describe populations of biomacromolecules and their relative potential for formation in different microenvironmental conditions. The average oxidation state of carbon (Z C) can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formulas of proteins, and water demand per residue ([Formula: see text]) is computed by writing the overall formation reactions of proteins from basis species. Using results reported in proteomic studies of clinical samples, many datasets exhibit higher mean Z C or [Formula: see text] of proteins in carcinoma or adenoma compared to normal tissue. In contrast, average protein compositions in bacterial genomes often have lower Z C for bacteria enriched in fecal samples from cancer patients compared to healthy donors. In thermodynamic calculations, the potential for formation of the cancer-related proteins is energetically favored by changes in the chemical activity of H2O and fugacity of O2 that reflect the compositional differences. The compositional analysis suggests that a systematic change in chemical composition is an essential feature of cancer proteomes, and the thermodynamic descriptions show that the observed proteomic transformations in host tissue could be promoted by relatively high microenvironmental oxidation and hydration states. PMID:27547546

  9. Impact of the immune system and immunotherapy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markman, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer is a multi-step process involving the gradual loss of regulation over the growth and functional capabilities of normal cells. Much research has been focused on the numerous cell intrinsic factors that govern this process; however, recent attention has turned to understanding the cell extrinsic factors in the tumor microenvironment that appear equally critical to the progression and treatment of cancer. One critical component of the tumor microenvironment is the immune system and it has become increasingly evident that the immune system plays an integral role in preventing and promoting the development of cancer. Understanding the immune cell types and pathways involved in this process has enabled the development of novel biomarkers for prognosis and accelerated the development of immune-based therapeutics, both of which have the potential to forever change the treatment paradigms for colorectal cancer (CRC). In this review, we discuss the impact of the immune system on the initiation, progression and treatment of cancer, specifically focusing on CRC. PMID:25830040

  10. Biphasic activity of chloroquine in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Deokbae; Lee, Youngki

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation process that is involved in tumor development and normal development. Autophagy is induced in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced cancer cell death or survival. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial devrepug, is a lysosomotropic agent and is currently used as a potential anticancer agent as well as an autophagy inhibitor. Here, we evaluate the characteristics of these dual activities of CQ using human colorectal cancer cell line HCT15. The results show that CQ inhibited cell viability in dose-and time-dependent manner in the range between 20 to 80 uM, while CQ did not show any antiproliferative activity at 5 and 10 uM. Cotreatment of CQ with antitumor agent NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, rescued the cell viability at low concentrations meaning that CQ acted as an autophagy inhibitor, but CQ induced the lethal effect at high concentrations. Acridine orange staining revealed that CQ at high doses induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). High doses of CQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cotreatment of antioxidants, such as NAC and trolox, with high doses of CQ rescued the cell viability. These results suggest that CQ may exert its dual activities, as autophagy inhibitor or LMP inducer, in concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25949192

  11. Biphasic Activity of Chloroquine in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Deokbae; Lee, Youngki

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation process that is involved in tumor development and normal development. Autophagy is induced in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced cancer cell death or survival. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial devrepug, is a lysosomotropic agent and is currently used as a potential anticancer agent as well as an autophagy inhibitor. Here, we evaluate the characteristics of these dual activities of CQ using human colorectal cancer cell line HCT15. The results show that CQ inhibited cell viability in dose-and time-dependent manner in the range between 20 to 80 uM, while CQ did not show any antiproliferative activity at 5 and 10 uM. Cotreatment of CQ with antitumor agent NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, rescued the cell viability at low concentrations meaning that CQ acted as an autophagy inhibitor, but CQ induced the lethal effect at high concentrations. Acridine orange staining revealed that CQ at high doses induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). High doses of CQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cotreatment of antioxidants, such as NAC and trolox, with high doses of CQ rescued the cell viability. These results suggest that CQ may exert its dual activities, as autophagy inhibitor or LMP inducer, in concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25949192

  12. Proteomic indicators of oxidation and hydration state in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    New integrative approaches are needed to harness the potential of rapidly growing datasets of protein expression and microbial community composition in colorectal cancer. Chemical and thermodynamic models offer theoretical tools to describe populations of biomacromolecules and their relative potential for formation in different microenvironmental conditions. The average oxidation state of carbon (Z C) can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formulas of proteins, and water demand per residue ([Formula: see text]) is computed by writing the overall formation reactions of proteins from basis species. Using results reported in proteomic studies of clinical samples, many datasets exhibit higher mean Z C or [Formula: see text] of proteins in carcinoma or adenoma compared to normal tissue. In contrast, average protein compositions in bacterial genomes often have lower Z C for bacteria enriched in fecal samples from cancer patients compared to healthy donors. In thermodynamic calculations, the potential for formation of the cancer-related proteins is energetically favored by changes in the chemical activity of H2O and fugacity of O2 that reflect the compositional differences. The compositional analysis suggests that a systematic change in chemical composition is an essential feature of cancer proteomes, and the thermodynamic descriptions show that the observed proteomic transformations in host tissue could be promoted by relatively high microenvironmental oxidation and hydration states.

  13. Biomechanical investigation of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Lucchetti, Donatella; Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Ciasca, Gabriele; Svelto, Maria; De Spirito, Marco; Sgambato, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    The nanomechanical properties of SW480 colon cancer cells were investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy. SW480 cells are composed of two sub-populations with different shape and invasiveness. These two cells populations showed similar adhesion properties while appeared significantly different in term of cells stiffness. Since cell stiffness is related to invasiveness and growth, we suggest elasticity as a useful parameter to distinguish invasive cells inside the colorectal tumor bulk and the high-resolution mechanical mapping as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of malignant cells.

  14. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment.

  15. Pharmacogenomics of cetuximab in metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Silvestris, Nicola; Vincenzi, Bruno; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Loupakis, Fotious; Dell'Aquila, Emanuela; Russo, Antonio; Scartozzi, Mario; Giampieri, Riccardo; Cascinu, Stefano; Lorusso, Vito; Tonini, Giuseppe; Falcone, Alfredo; Santini, Daniele

    2014-09-01

    Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that has revolutionized the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Knowledge of the mechanisms that underlie its effectiveness, as well as the primary and secondary resistance mechanisms, have led to important developments in the understanding of cetuximab biology. In light of knowledge gained from recent trials, the efficacy of cetuximab has been clearly demonstrated to depend upon RAS mutational status, moreover cetuximab should only be used in a subset of patients who may benefit. In this article, we critically review clinical and pharmacogenetic issues of cetuximab, focusing on the cost-effectiveness involved with the use of the drug.

  16. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment. PMID:26483876

  17. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Genetics and Screening.

    PubMed

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Giardiello, Francis M

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of CRCs arise in the setting of a well-established mendelian inherited disorder. In addition, serrated polyposis is a clinically defined syndrome with multiple serrated polyps in the colorectum and an increased CRC risk for which the genetics are unknown. This article focuses on genetic and clinical aspects of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and MUTYH-associated polyposis.

  18. Primary and recurrent colorectal cancer masquerading as gynaecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Brand, A; Scurry, J; Planner, R; Leung, S

    1996-05-01

    To make clinicians more aware of the phenomenon of primary and recurrent colorectal and anal carcinoma masquerading as primary gynaecological malignancy, we reviewed the records of 8 women referred to our gynaecological oncology unit with primary colorectal cancer (1), recurrent colorectal cancer (6) and primary anal cancer (1). Seven of these patients presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge. All patients had Papanicolaou smears performed; 7 were abnormal and 1 unsuitable for cytological assessment. None of the 6 patients with recurrent carcinoma had been previously treated with more than standard anterior or abdominoperineal resection; no radiotherapy had been given, and only 1 patient had received chemotherapy. These patients were treated in our gynaecological oncology unit for their recurrence by surgery and/or chemotherapy and/or irradiation. All 6 had further recurrences in the pelvis despite this aggressive therapy. Follow-up of colorectal cancer in women should involve gynaecological history, pelvirectal examination and Pap smear at each visit. Correct diagnosis of the colorectal origin of a genital tract tumour is made on careful history, examination and biopsy. An abnormal Pap smear may be the first indication of recurrent colorectal cancer in the cervix and vagina, although most patients ultimately present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. The presence of a tumour invading both cervix and posterior vaginal wall is suggestive of spread from a colorectal tumour compared to the more common lateral spread of a cervical primary.

  19. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  20. Role of physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes the evidence regarding physical activity and diet after colorectal cancer diagnosis in relation to quality of life, disease recurrence, and survival. There have been extensive reports on adiposity, inactivity, and certain diets, particularly those high in red and processed meats, and increased risk of colorectal cancer. Only in the past decade have data emerged on how such lifestyle factors are associated with outcomes in colorectal cancer survivors. Prospective observational studies have consistently reported that physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis reduces mortality. A meta-analysis estimated that each 15 metabolic equivalent task-hour per week increase in physical activity after colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with a 38% lower risk of mortality. No randomized controlled trials have been completed to confirm that physical activity lowers risk of mortality among colorectal cancer survivors; however, trials have shown that physical activity, including structured exercise, is safe for colorectal cancer survivors (localized to metastatic stage, during and after treatment) and improves cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function. In addition, prospective observational studies have suggested that a Western dietary pattern, high carbohydrate intake, and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages after diagnosis may increase risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and mortality, but these data are limited to single analyses from one of two US cohorts. Additional data from prospective studies and randomized controlled trials are needed. Nonetheless, on the basis of the available evidence, it is reasonable to counsel colorectal cancer survivors to engage in regular physical activity and limit consumption of refined carbohydrates, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages.