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Sample records for adjacent normal gastric

  1. EXPRESSION MECHANISM AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF NOB1 IN GASTRIC CANCER TISSUE AND ADJACENT NORMAL TISSUE.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W-P; Liu, X; Yang, Y; Liu, Y-F

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effect and relationship of NOB1 in the development of gastric cancer, based on an analysis of NOB1expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent tissue. Thirty gastric cancer tissue samples taken during surgery with complete pathological data and their related adjacent normal tissue were examined in this study. NOB1 protein expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Real-time PCR was used to detect NOB1 mRNA expression, which provided a basis on which to explore the clinical pathological characteristics for patients with gastric cancer. Results show that NOB1 protein in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue were diffusely expressed both in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The positive expression rate in gastric cancer tissue was 73%, higher than that in adjacent normal tissue (47%). Both the reference NAPDH and NOB1 amplification are reflected in the amplification curve in standard S-shape and the unimodal solubility curve which was not altered by non-specific amplification and primer dimer. NOB1 mRNA relative expression in cancer tissue was 4.899∓1.412. NOB1 expression had no direct relationship with the patients’ age, gender, tumor differentiation or infiltration degree, lymphatic metastasis, distant metastasis nor pTNM periodization, but was directly related to the size of the tumor. All the findings in this paper suggest that NOB1 can be one of the focuses for diagnosing and treating gastric cancer and that its protein expression is likely to increase with the growth of tumor, thus playing a great role in the incidence and development of gastric cancer.

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of ras oncogene p21 product in human gastric carcinomas and their adjacent mucosas.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, F; David, L; Sunkel, C; Lopes, C; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    1992-04-01

    In an attempt to clarify the relationship between ras oncogene expression and the clinico-pathological features of malignant and pre-malignant lesions of the stomach we undertook the immunohistochemical study of the expression of ras gene p21 product in a series of eighty gastric carcinomas and their respective adjacent mucosas. In two cases the mRNA of Ha-ras was also studied by in situ hybridization. The majority of gastric carcinomas as well as their adjacent non-neoplastic mucosas expressed ras gene product. There was a significant relationship between the expression of ras gene p21 product and the morphologic pattern of the tumours. An enhanced ras expression was found in several conditions regarded as precursor lesions of intestinal and/or diffuse types of gastric carcinoma (dysplasia, foveolar hyperplasia and even the neck zone of normal-appearing gastric glands, namely in the mucosa adjacent to diffuse carcinomas). Ras expression was actually more prominent in most of these conditions than in their respective adjacent carcinomas. No significant relationship was found between ras expression and invasiveness of the wall, nodal metastases and venous invasion.

  3. PIXE analysis of elements in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qixin; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Lingnuo; Xu, Yongling; Ye, Simao

    1990-04-01

    The elemental regional distributions in 20 resected human stomach tissues were obtained using PIXE analysis. The samples were pathologically divided into four types: normal, adjacent mucosa A, adjacent mucosa B and cancer. The targets for PIXE analysis were prepared by wet digestion with a pressure bomb system. P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se were measured and statistically analysed. We found significantly higher concentrations of P, K, Cu, Zn and a higher ratio of Cu compared to Zn in cancer tissue as compared with normal tissue, but statistically no significant difference between adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue was found.

  4. Successful endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer adjacent to gastric cardia varix

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ko; Hikichi, Takuto; Nakamura, Jun; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Waragai, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Konno, Naoki; Asama, Hiroyuki; Takasumi, Mika; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 58-year-old man with liver cirrhosis and renal failure was diagnosed with esophageal varices (EVs) and a gastric cardia varix (GCV) by esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). The patient also exhibited early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper gastric body adjacent to the GCV. The EVs and GCV were treated using endoscopy before endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of the EGC to prevent variceal bleeding during ESD. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) was performed to treat the EVs. In addition, extra-variceal polidocanol injection and argon plasma coagulation (APC) were performed after EVL. Follow-up EGD two months after APC revealed that the GCV had diminished in size. Then, ESD was performed with polidocanol injection into the submucosa around the GCV to prevent bleeding. During ESD, the EGC was resected en bloc without severe bleeding. Complications were not observed after ESD. Histopathological examination of the ESD specimens indicated that the resection was curative. PMID:27477990

  5. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  6. The expression patterns of tight junction protein claudin-1, -3, and -4 in human gastric neoplasms and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiming; Yang, Xingwang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is growing evidence that tight junction proteins are often abnormally regulated in human tumors. The function of tight junction proteins in the maintenance of normal epithelial physiology has been well discussed, but their role in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer is less well defined. To explore the expression distinction of the tight junction proteins claudin-1, -3, and -4 expression in the gastric cancer, the expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4 in 92 gastric cancer tissues and the non-neoplastic tissues adjacent to the tumors were examined by immunohistochemistry. Compared with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, the expression of claudin-1 was down regulated. However, the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 were up-regulated in gastric cancer tissue. In addition, the expression of claudin-3 is correlated with claudin-4 expression in gastric cancer. Our present study reveals that claudin-1, -3, and -4 protein expression altered between human gastric cancers and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. PMID:25755790

  7. Comparison of Gene Expression Profile Between Tumor Tissue and Adjacent Non-tumor Tissue in Patients with Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

    PubMed

    Kou, Youwei; Zhao, Ying; Bao, Chenhui; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are defined as spindle cell and/or epithelioid tumors originated from interstitial Cajal cells or precursors in the digestive tract. This study was conducted to identify genes differing in expression between the gastric tumors and the adjacent non-cancerous mucosas in patients with primary gastric GIST. The gene expression profile was determined by using oligonucleotide-based DNA microarrays and further validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis was performed to predict signaling pathways involved in gastric GIST. Our data showed that the expression levels of 957 genes (RAB39B, member RAS oncogene family; VCAN, versican; etc.) were higher and that of 526 genes (CXCL14, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 14; MTUS1, microtubule-associated tumor suppressor 1; etc.) were lower in the gastric tumor tissues as compared with normal gastric tissues. Results from KEGG pathway analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched into 16 signaling transduction pathways, including Hedeghog and Wnt signaling pathways. Our study may provide basis for identification of novel biomarkers associated with primary gastric GIST pathogenesis and for exploration of underlying mechanisms involved in this gastric sarcoma.

  8. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of human gastric normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dibo; Li, Xian; Cai, Jinhui; Ma, Yehao; Kang, Xusheng; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2014-09-01

    Human dehydrated normal and cancerous gastric tissues were measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. Based on the obtained terahertz absorption spectra, the contrasts between the two kinds of tissue were investigated and techniques for automatic identification of cancerous tissue were studied. Distinctive differences were demonstrated in both the shape and amplitude of the absorption spectra between normal and tumor tissue. Additionally, some spectral features in the range of 0.2~0.5 THz and 1~1.5 THz were revealed for all cancerous gastric tissues. To systematically achieve the identification of gastric cancer, principal component analysis combined with t-test was used to extract valuable information indicating the best distinction between the two types. Two clustering approaches, K-means and support vector machine (SVM), were then performed to classify the processed terahertz data into normal and cancerous groups. SVM presented a satisfactory result with less false classification cases. The results of this study implicate the potential of the terahertz technique to detect gastric cancer. The applied data analysis methodology provides a suggestion for automatic discrimination of terahertz spectra in other applications.

  9. Quantification of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in colonic carcinoma and normal adjacent colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, H; Bohe, M; Jönsson, P; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To measure the content of immunoreactive human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (irPSTI) in colonic carcinoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa. METHODS: From a stable hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibodies specific for human PSTI, a specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human PSTI was developed. In a precipitation assay system these antibodies bound human PSTI in a dose-dependent manner. The specimens were obtained from resectional surgery. RESULTS: The content of irPSTI was 19.9 micrograms/g protein (0.55 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) in colonic carcinoma. In adjacent normal colonic mucosa 43.6 micrograms/g protein (1.12 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) was shown. CONCLUSIONS: The enzymatic degradation of surrounding tissue necessary for tumour cell invasion could be facilitated by this relative deficit of the inhibitor in infiltrative carcinoma. PMID:1479031

  10. Screening of the residual normal ovarian tissue adjacent to orthotopic epithelial ovarian carcinomas in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G H; Wang, S T; Yao, M Z; Cai, J H; Chen, C Y; Yang, Z X; Hong, L; Yang, S Y

    2014-04-16

    The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility and methods of screening the residual normal ovarian tissue adjacent to orthotopic ovarian carcinomas in nude mice. Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR3) were subcutaneously implanted for a tumor source and ovarian orthotopic transplantation. The cancer tissue, proximal paraneoplastic tissue, middle paraneoplastic tissue, remote paraneoplastic tissue, and normal ovarian tissue were removed. CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 expression was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We obtained 35 paraneoplastic residual ovarian tissues with normal biopsies from 40 cases of an orthotopic epithelial ovarian carcinoma model (87.5%). CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 expression was lower in proximal paraneoplastic tissue than in cancer tissue (P < 0.05) and higher than in middle and remote paraneoplastic tissue (P < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the expression of these genes in middle and proximal paraneoplastic tissue as well as among residual normal ovarian tissues with different severity (P > 0.05). In ovarian tissues of 20 normal nude mice, the expression of CK- 7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 was negative. Overall, the expression levels of CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, TIMP-2, and other molecular markers showed a decreasing trend in the non-cancer tissue direction. The expression levels can be used as standards to screen residual normal ovarian tissue. We can obtain relatively safe normal ovarian tissues adjacent to epithelial ovarian cancer.

  11. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  12. Characterization of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiazhao; Chen, G.; Liu, Y. C.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. The initial diagnosis of gastric cancer often is delayed because up to 80 percent of patients are asymptomatic during the early stages of stomach cancer. So the ability to perform real-time in vivo histological diagnosis for early gastric cancer at the cellular level during ongoing endoscopy is a long-standing goal of endoscopists. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), MPM images of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa were obtained at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. The features such as the appearance of abnormal cells and the large loss of collagen in cancerous gastric submucosa were extracted to be as significant indicators to distinguish cancerous submucosa from normal submucosa. With the implementation of multiphoton microscopy concept in endoscopy applications, multiphoton endoscopy might realize in vivo histological diagnosis goal of endoscopists.

  13. Characterization of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jiazhao; Chen, G.; Liu, Y. C.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world; almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. The initial diagnosis of gastric cancer often is delayed because up to 80 percent of patients are asymptomatic during the early stages of stomach cancer. So the ability to perform real-time in vivo histological diagnosis for early gastric cancer at the cellular level during ongoing endoscopy is a long-standing goal of endoscopists. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), MPM images of human normal and cancerous gastric submucosa were obtained at excitation wavelength of 800 nm. The features such as the appearance of abnormal cells and the large loss of collagen in cancerous gastric submucosa were extracted to be as significant indicators to distinguish cancerous submucosa from normal submucosa. With the implementation of multiphoton microscopy concept in endoscopy applications, multiphoton endoscopy might realize in vivo histological diagnosis goal of endoscopists.

  14. Alterations in vitamin D signaling pathway in gastric cancer progression: a study of vitamin D receptor expression in human normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yanghui; Da, Mingxu; Zhang, Yongbin; Peng, Lingzhi; Yao, Jibin; Duan, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Amount of studies in cells and animal models have proved vitamin D has multifarious antitumor effects. However, epidemiological studies showed inconsistent result on gastric cancer. The antitumor role is mainly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Our hypothesis is that VDR may be abnormally (poorly) expressed in gastric cancer tissue. Present study is aimed at discovering and analyzing VDR expression in a series of human gastric tissues, including normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue, and correlated VDR to the clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer patients. VDR expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ2 test was used to analyze the VDR expression as well as the relationship between VDR and the clinicopathological factors of gastric cancer patients. Compared with normal (82.61%) and premalignant tissues (73.64%), VDR was lower expressed in cancer tissues (57.61%), with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among cancer tissues, VDR was higher expressed in well and moderate differentiated tissues contrasted with tissues with poor differentiation, and higher expressed in small tumors (< 5 cm) compared with large tumors (≥ 5 cm), with a statistically significant difference respectively (P = 0.016, P = 0.009). A decline linear trend appeared when analyzing the statistical difference of VDR expression among normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissues. VDR expression has been on the decline from the premalignant stage, finally low expressed in gastric cancer tissues, especial in poorly differentiated tissues. VDR could be a potential prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26722516

  15. Alterations in vitamin D signaling pathway in gastric cancer progression: a study of vitamin D receptor expression in human normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanghui; Da, Mingxu; Zhang, Yongbin; Peng, Lingzhi; Yao, Jibin; Duan, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Amount of studies in cells and animal models have proved vitamin D has multifarious antitumor effects. However, epidemiological studies showed inconsistent result on gastric cancer. The antitumor role is mainly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Our hypothesis is that VDR may be abnormally (poorly) expressed in gastric cancer tissue. Present study is aimed at discovering and analyzing VDR expression in a series of human gastric tissues, including normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue, and correlated VDR to the clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer patients. VDR expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ(2) test was used to analyze the VDR expression as well as the relationship between VDR and the clinicopathological factors of gastric cancer patients. Compared with normal (82.61%) and premalignant tissues (73.64%), VDR was lower expressed in cancer tissues (57.61%), with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among cancer tissues, VDR was higher expressed in well and moderate differentiated tissues contrasted with tissues with poor differentiation, and higher expressed in small tumors (< 5 cm) compared with large tumors (≥ 5 cm), with a statistically significant difference respectively (P = 0.016, P = 0.009). A decline linear trend appeared when analyzing the statistical difference of VDR expression among normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissues. VDR expression has been on the decline from the premalignant stage, finally low expressed in gastric cancer tissues, especial in poorly differentiated tissues. VDR could be a potential prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer.

  16. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  17. Characteristics of Patients with Chronic Unexplained Nausea and Vomiting and Normal Gastric Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Colvin, Ryan; Yates, Katherine; Hasler, William L.; Abell, Thomas L.; Ünalp-Arida, Aynur; Nguyen, Linda; Farrugia, Gianrico; Koch, Kenneth L.; Parkman, Henry P.; Snape, William J.; Lee, Linda; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic nausea and vomiting with normal gastric emptying is a poorly understood syndrome; we analyzed its characteristics. Methods We collected and analyzed data from 425 patients with chronic nausea and vomiting, enrolled at 6 centers by the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Gastroparesis Registry. Results Among the patients, 319 (75%) had delayed emptying, defined by the results of a standardized, low-fat meal, and 106 had normal gastric emptying. Patients with or without delayed emptying did not differ in age, sex, or race, although those with normal gastric emptying were less likely to be diabetic. Symptom severity indices were similar between groups for nausea, retching, vomiting, stomach fullness, inability to complete a meal, feeling excessively full after meals, loss of appetite, bloating, and visibly larger stomach. There were no differences in health care utilization, quality of life indices, depression, or trait anxiety scores. However, state anxiety scores were slightly higher among patients with delayed gastric emptying. Total gastroparesis cardinal symptom index scores were not correlated with gastric retention after 2 or 4 hours in either group. Patients with the syndrome were not adequately captured by the stand-alone criteria for the Rome III diagnoses of chronic idiopathic nausea and functional vomiting. With rare exceptions, the diagnosis remained stable after a 48-weeks follow-up period. Conclusions Patients with nausea and vomiting with normal gastric emptying represent a significant medical problem and are, for the most part, indistinguishable from those with gastroparesis. This syndrome is not categorized in the medical literature—it might be a separate clinical entity. PMID:21397732

  18. Mist1 Expressing Gastric Stem Cells Maintain the Normal and Neoplastic Gastric Epithelium and Are Supported by a Perivascular Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Stancikova, Jitka; Sakitani, Kosuke; Asfaha, Samuel; Renz, Bernhard W; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida A; Shibata, Wataru; Wang, Hongshan; Westphalen, Christoph B; Chen, Xiaowei; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Kim, Woosook; Khurana, Shradha S; Tailor, Yagnesh; Nagar, Karan; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D; Saha, Subhrajit; Ding, Lei; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G; Friedman, Richard A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Worthley, Daniel L; Korinek, Vladimir; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-12-14

    The regulation and stem cell origin of normal and neoplastic gastric glands are uncertain. Here, we show that Mist1 expression marks quiescent stem cells in the gastric corpus isthmus. Mist1(+) stem cells serve as a cell-of-origin for intestinal-type cancer with the combination of Kras and Apc mutation and for diffuse-type cancer with the loss of E-cadherin. Diffuse-type cancer development is dependent on inflammation mediated by Cxcl12(+) endothelial cells and Cxcr4(+) gastric innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). These cells form the perivascular gastric stem cell niche, and Wnt5a produced from ILCs activates RhoA to inhibit anoikis in the E-cadherin-depleted cells. Targeting Cxcr4, ILCs, or Wnt5a inhibits diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis, providing targets within the neoplastic gastric stem cell niche.

  19. Delayed gastric emptying does not normalize after gluten withdrawal in adult celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Usai-Satta, Paolo; Oppia, Francesco; Scarpa, Mariella; Giannetti, Cristiana; Cabras, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Objective Delayed gastric emptying has been frequently detected in patients with untreated celiac disease. According to several studies, gluten withdrawal showed to be effective in normalizing the gastric emptying rate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastric emptying rate of solids in patients with celiac disease before and after a gluten-free diet. Methods Twelve adult patients with celiac disease (age range 20-57 years) and 30 healthy controls (age range 30-54 years) underwent a (13)C-octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying. Half emptying time (t1/2) and lag phase (tlag) were calculated. After at least 12 months of a gluten-free diet, celiac patients underwent a new (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. A symptom score was utilized to detect dyspeptic and malabsorption symptoms in all the patients. Results The gastric motility parameters, t1/2 and tlag, were significantly longer in patients than in controls. On a gluten-free diet, surprisingly, the gastric emptying did not normalize despite an improvement of symptom score. No significant correlation between abnormal gastric emptying and specific symptom patterns, anthropometric parameters or severity of histological damage was found. Conclusions This finding supports the hypothesis that gluten-driven mucosal inflammation might determine motor abnormalities by affecting smooth muscle contractility or impairing gut hormone function. The persistence of these abnormalities on a gluten free diet suggests the presence of a persistent low-grade mucosal inflammation with a permanent perturbation of the neuro-immunomodulatory regulation.

  20. Expression Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) in tumor adjacent normal breast tissue and breast tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Zárate, Alejandro; Harshfield, Benjamin J; Hu, Rong; Knoblauch, Nick; Beck, Andrew H; Hankinson, Susan E; Carey, Vincent; Tamimi, Rulla M; Hunter, David J; Quackenbush, John; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer, the majority of which are located in intergenic or intronic regions. To explore regulatory impacts of these variants we conducted expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analyses on tissue samples from 376 invasive postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) diagnosed from 1990-2004. Expression analysis was conducted on all formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (and on 264 adjacent normal samples) using the Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array. Significance and ranking of associations between tumor receptor status and expression variation was preserved between NHS FFPE and TCGA fresh-frozen sample sets (Spearman r = 0.85, p<10^-10 for 17 of the 21 Oncotype DX recurrence signature genes). At an FDR threshold of 10%, we identified 27 trans-eQTLs associated with expression variation in 217 distinct genes. SNP-gene associations can be explored using an open-source interactive browser distributed in a Bioconductor package. Using a new a procedure for testing hypotheses relating SNP content to expression patterns in gene sets, defined as molecular function pathways, we find that loci on 6q14 and 6q25 affect various gene sets and molecular pathways (FDR < 10%). Although the ultimate biological interpretation of the GWAS-identified variants remains to be uncovered, this study validates the utility of expression analysis of this FFPE expression set for more detailed integrative analyses.

  1. Expression Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) in tumor adjacent normal breast tissue and breast tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Zárate, Alejandro; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Hu, Rong; Knoblauch, Nick; Beck, Andrew H.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Carey, Vincent; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Hunter, David J.; Quackenbush, John; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer, the majority of which are located in intergenic or intronic regions. To explore regulatory impacts of these variants we conducted expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analyses on tissue samples from 376 invasive postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) diagnosed from 1990–2004. Expression analysis was conducted on all formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (and on 264 adjacent normal samples) using the Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array. Significance and ranking of associations between tumor receptor status and expression variation was preserved between NHS FFPE and TCGA fresh-frozen sample sets (Spearman r = 0.85, p<10^-10 for 17 of the 21 Oncotype DX recurrence signature genes). At an FDR threshold of 10%, we identified 27 trans-eQTLs associated with expression variation in 217 distinct genes. SNP-gene associations can be explored using an open-source interactive browser distributed in a Bioconductor package. Using a new a procedure for testing hypotheses relating SNP content to expression patterns in gene sets, defined as molecular function pathways, we find that loci on 6q14 and 6q25 affect various gene sets and molecular pathways (FDR < 10%). Although the ultimate biological interpretation of the GWAS-identified variants remains to be uncovered, this study validates the utility of expression analysis of this FFPE expression set for more detailed integrative analyses. PMID:28152060

  2. Role of fucosyltransferases in the association between apomucin and Lewis antigen expression in normal and malignant gastric epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ferrer, A; de Bolos, C; Barranco, C; Garrido, M; Isern, J; Carlstedt, I; Reis, C; Torrado, J; Real, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In normal gastric epithelium, MUC5AC is detected in superficial epithelium associated with Lewis type 1 antigens and MUC6 is detected in antral glands with Lewis type 2. Therefore, the stomach constitutes an excellent model to examine the role of glycosyltransferases in determining the specificity of apomucin glycosylation.
AIMS—To determine the molecular basis of this association and to examine changes in expression of gastric and intestinal apomucins and their association with Lewis antigens during the gastric carcinogenesis process.
METHODS—Fucosyltransferase (FUT1, FUT2, FUT3) and mucin (MUC5AC, MUC6) transcripts were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Apomucin (MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6) and Lewis antigen (types 1 and 2) expression were analysed using single and double immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation.
RESULTS—In the normal stomach, FUT1 is exclusively detected associated with MUC6; FUT2 is only detected when MUC5AC is present. This co-regulation is lost in gastric tumours, as is differential expression of MUC5AC and MUC6 in normal gastric epithelial cells. In gastric tumours, especially those with the intestinal phenotype, MUC2 and MUC4 genes are upregulated, and gastric-type and intestinal-type mucins are coexpressed. These changes are early events in the gastric carcinogenesis process, as they are detected in intestinal metaplasia.
CONCLUSIONS—The glycosylation pattern found in normal gastric epithelium is dictated by the specific set of fucosyltranferases expressed by the cells rather than by the apomucin sequence. The development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer is associated with the appearance of cellular phenotypes that are absent from normal epithelium.


Keywords: fucosyltransferases; gastric carcinogenesis; gastric mucins; Lewis antigens PMID:10940270

  3. Discrimination between normal and malignant gastric epithelial cells by computer image analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, M; Zajicek, G; Levij, I S

    1984-09-01

    The nuclei of 21 normal and 23 malignant epithelial cells from gastric smears obtained by brushing were analyzed by a black-and-white video camera under computer control. Each nucleus was digitized and its relief smoothed and displayed. A Sobel operator determined the nuclear boundaries and nuclear core area. Eighteen nuclear parameters (form descriptors and gray-value descriptors) were extracted for each nucleus and used as variables for discriminant analysis. Nine of these parameters proved useful for discrimination between normal and malignant gastric epithelial cells, with a correct classification rate of 100%. Of these, the best discriminating variables were the maximal gray value in the core, the maximal horizontal and vertical diameters, the core area and the mean derivative value in the core.

  4. Low-Molecular-Weight Hydrophilic and Lipophilic Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Carcinomas and Adjacent Normal-Looking Skin.

    PubMed

    Grammenandi, Konstantina; Kyriazi, Maria; Katsarou-Katsari, Alexandra; Papadopoulos, Othon; Anastassopoulou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Georgios T; Sagriotis, Alexandros; Rallis, Michail; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight antioxidants are some of the most efficient agents of the skin defense mechanism against environmental factors, such as cosmic rays, smoke, and pollutants. The total skin concentrations of hydrophilic ascorbic and uric acids, as well as lipophilic α-tocopherol, β-carotene, and ubiquinol-10 antioxidants were determined by an HPLC-EC detector from 18 biopsies of human nonmelanoma skin carcinomas and 18 biopsies from skin areas adjacent to carcinomas. No significant differences in the concentrations of lipophilic antioxidants in both carcinomas and normal-looking skin areas adjacent to carcinomas were observed. On the contrary, ascorbic and uric acid concentrations were found to be 18 and 36% lower in carcinomas than in normal-looking skin areas, respectively. No statistical significance was observed between antioxidant concentrations and age, sex, phototype, profession, site of tumor, frequency, and time of UV light exposure either. Accordingly the antioxidant concentrations in both cancerous skin and adjacent normal-looking areas were found to be much higher than in normal skin, in contrast to literature data.

  5. Assessment of gastric emptying in normal subjects with sucralfate (Carafate) and Amphojel

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; McCallum, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum-containing antacids (e.g Amphojel) and aluminum-containing compounds such as sucralfate (Carafate) have been shown in animal and human studies to delay gastric emptying, and are one proposed mechanism of action for healing of duodenal ulcers. Therefore, the authors designed a study to study the effects of Carafate and Amphojel on gastric emptying. Ten normal volunteers of mean age 27 years with no previous history of upper gastrointestinal diseases were studied. For each test the subject ingested a meal composed of 30gm of cooked chicken liver injected with lmCi of 99m-Tc-S-C, mixed with 7.5 oz. of beef stew, and eaten with 4 oz. of water labeled with 100..mu..Ci of 111-In-DTPA. Immediately after ingestion of the meal, the subject was placed supine under a gamma camera. Gastric emptying (GE) was expressed as percent emptied. On separate days the subject was given either lgm of Carafate (190mg Al/gm) or placebo in a double blind fashion one hour prior to the test meal. On the third day, each subject was given 30cc of Amphojel (105mg Al/5cc) followed 30 minutes later by the test meal. GE at 2 hours for the solid meal was 60%, 69%, and 54% and 79%, 86% and 68% at 3 hours for placebo, Carafate, and Amphojel respectively. A small but not significant difference in gastric emptying between Amphojel and placebo was seen from 2 to 3 hours. For the liquid meal approximately 90% emptying was present at 1 hour for all three studies. Further studies are needed to determine whether these medications administered in the standard doses given here may affect gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients.

  6. Near-infrared optical coefficients of tumors and adjacent normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan G.

    2001-06-01

    The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tumours of the human breast, liver and kidney and their normal surrounding tissue have been measured in vitro for the near-infrared wavelengths between 600 and 1000 nm as well as 1064 nm. The Monte Carlo inversion technique (Simpson et al) was used to determine the optical coefficients of tissue samples from measurements of the diffuse transmittance and reflectance. The measurements of the diffusely transmitted and reflected intensities were performed using a single integrating sphere 'comparison' method. Four post-mortem samples of both liver adenocarcinoma and normal liver tissue were obtained from one subject and four samples of both tumour and normal kidney tissue were obtained from another subject. Four samples of both breast tumour and normal tissue were obtained from two patients. The scattering coefficient of tumours was found in each case to be significantly higher than that of nondiseased tissue. The absorption coefficient of tumours was generally much smaller than those of normal tissue. The scattering coefficient of tumours was 20% to 200% higher depending on the type of cancer and the wavelength, while the absorption coefficient of tumours was as much as twenty times smaller compared to normal tissue.

  7. Normal Variations of Sphenoid Sinus and the Adjacent Structures Detected in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Azadeh; Ghafari, Roshanak; AnjomShoa, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The sphenoid sinus is a common target of paranasal surgery. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is likely to endanger the anatomic variations of vital structures adjacent to the sphenoid sinus. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the variations of sphenoid sinus and the related structures by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method In this descriptive-analytic study, CBCT images of 103 patients aged above 20-years were selected (206 sides). Degree of pneumatization of sphenoid sinus, pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process, pterygoid process, protrusion of optic canal, vidian canal, and foramen rotundum, as well as prevalence of sinus septa were recorded. Examinations were performed using On-Demand software (Version 1); data were analyzed by using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant correlation between the pterygoid pneumatization and vidian canal protrusion (p< 0.001), and foramen rotundum protrusion (p< 0.001). The optic canal protrusion was found to be significantly associated with the anterior clinoid pneumatization and pterygoid process (p< 0.001). Statistically significant relationship was also observed between the carotid canal protrusion and pterygoid process pneumatization (p< 0.001). Conclusion The anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus tend to give rise to a complexity of symptoms and potentially serious complications. This variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the regional sphenoid sinus anatomy by a detailed CBCT sinus examination. PMID:26966706

  8. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  9. Gastric lipase in alcoholic pancreatitis. Comparison of secretive profiles following pentagastrin stimulation in normal adults and patients with pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Moreau, J; Bouisson, M; Balas, D; Ravaud, A; Stupnik, S; Buscail, L; Vaysse, N; Ribet, A

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the amount of gastric lipase secreted by the stomach in normal adults and to elucidate a possible adaptative secretion of this enzyme in response to pancreatic insufficiency secondary to alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Forty-one subjects underwent a gastric intubation. Pentagastrin (6 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 IV) significantly increased gastric lipase concentration and output. Stimulated gastric lipase output in seven normal subjects was 12,598 +/- 2036 U/h (by using tributyrin as substrate). Outputs where higher (P less than 0.02) in 17 patients with pancreatic insufficiency who were not drinking alcohol, but were not significantly different in nine patients who continued to drink (20,413 +/- 1778 U/h and 21,953 +/- 4973 U/h, respectively). On the other hand, high gastric lipase outputs were found in eight patients with duodenal ulcers and no evidence of pancreatic dysfunction (23,180 +/- 262 U/h). The time required to reach maximal lipase output (peak output) following pentagastrin stimulation was the same in all groups (approximately 38 minutes) except for the group of patients with pancreatic insufficiency who did not drink alcohol, in whom it was significantly reduced (approximately 26.5 minutes). Secretory patterns of gastric lipase and pepsin were closely comparable. Gastric lipase secretion could be increased in several clinical conditions and particularly in patients with pancreatic insufficiency caused by alcoholic chronic pancreatitis who have been abstinent for a long time.

  10. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  11. Comparative proteome analysis of human esophageal cancer and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yazdian–Robati, Rezvan; Ahmadi, Homa; Riahi, Maryam Matbou; Lari, Parisa; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ranking as the sixth commonest cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) represents one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. One of the main reasons for the low survival of patients with esophageal cancer is its late diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We used proteomics approach to analyze ESCC tissues with the aim of a better understanding of the malignant mechanism and searching candidate protein biomarkers for early diagnosis of esophageal cancer. The differential protein expression between cancerous and normal esophageal tissues was investigated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). Then proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) and MASCOT web based search engine. Results: We reported 4 differentially expressed proteins involved in the pathological process of esophageal cancer, such as annexinA1 (ANXA1), peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2), transgelin (TAGLN) andactin-aortic smooth muscle (ACTA2). Conclusion: In this report we have introduced new potential biomarker (ACTA2). Moreover, our data confirmed some already known markers for EC in our region. PMID:28392898

  12. In vitro synthesis of immunoglobulins, secretory component and complement in normal and pathological skin and the adjacent mucous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai A Fat, R. F. M.; Suurmond, D.; Van Furth, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study on the synthesis of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, and IgE), secretory component and complement in normal and pathological skin and in the adjacent mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal, oral and vaginal mucosa) is reported. The results are based on the culture of tissue samples in a medium with two radioactive amino acids and the detection of synthesized proteins by autoradiography of the immunoelectrophoretic pattern of the culture fluid, except in the case of IgE for which the Ouchterlony technique was used. The results indicate that the normal skin does not synthesize immunoglobulins, whereas normal mucous membranes produce IgG and IgA. In the lesions of various skin diseases immunoglobulins are synthesized, mainly IgG but sometimes also IgA and IgE. The cells responsible for the production of immunoglobulins are plasma cells and lymphoid cells present in the skin lesions and mucous membranes. Synthesis of the free secretory component could be demonstrated only in certain mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal mucosa, and oral mucosa). Complement (C3) synthesis was found in normal skin, mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal and oral mucosa), and in the lesions of such skin diseases as discoid lupus erythematosus, (bullous) pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis, malignant reticulosis, eczema and lichen planus. Complement production was also demonstrated in allergic skin reactions (i.e. tissue from allergic-positive patch tests, positive Mantoux tests and drug eruptions), but no immunoglobulin synthesis was detected in these lesions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4199092

  13. Viscoelastic properties of normal and cancerous human breast cells are affected differently by contact to adjacent cells.

    PubMed

    Schierbaum, Nicolas; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2017-04-07

    Malignant transformation drastically alters the mechanical properties of the cell and its response to the surrounding cellular environment. We studied the influence of the physical contact between adjacent cells in an epithelial monolayer on the viscoelastic behavior of normal MCF10A, non-invasive cancerous MCF7, and invasive cancerous MDA-MB-231 human breast cells. Using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging technique termed force clamp force mapping (FCFM) to record images of the viscoelastic material properties of sparse and confluent cells, we found that normal MCF10A cells are stiffer and have a lower fluidity when at confluent than at sparse density. Contrarily, cancerous MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells do not stiffen and do not decrease their fluidity when progressing from sparse to confluent density. The behavior of normal MCF10A cells appears to be governed by the formation of stable cell-cell contacts, because their disruption with a calcium-chelator (EGTA) causes the stiffness and fluidity values to return to those at sparse density. In contrast, EGTA-treatment of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells does not change their viscoelastic properties. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the change of the viscoelastic behavior in MCF10A cells when going from sparse to confluent density is accompanied by a remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton into thick stress fiber bundles, while in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells the actin cytoskeleton is only composed of thin and short fibers, regardless of cell density. While the observed behavior of normal MCF10A cells might be crucial for providing mechanical stability and thus in turn integrity of the epithelial monolayer, the dysregulation of this behavior in cancerous MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is possibly a central aspect of cancer progression in the epithelium.

  14. Markers of fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Mai, Minh; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Vo, Phung; Butler, Kimberly S.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a field of genetically altered but histologically normal tissue extends 1 cm or more from the margins of human breast tumors. The extent, composition and biological significance of this field are only partially understood, but the molecular alterations in affected cells could provide mechanisms for limitless replicative capacity, genomic instability and a microenvironment that supports tumor initiation and progression. We demonstrate by microarray, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry a signature of differential gene expression that discriminates between patient-matched, tumor-adjacent histologically normal breast tissues located 1 cm and 5 cm from the margins of breast adenocarcinomas (TAHN-1 and TAHN-5, respectively). The signature includes genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, wound healing, fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts, which are mediators of wound healing and fibrosis, and intra-lobular fibroblasts expressing MMP2, SPARC, TGF-β3, which are inducers of EMT, were both prevalent in TAHN-1 tissues, sparse in TAHN-5 tissues, and absent in normal tissues from reduction mammoplasty. Accordingly, EMT markers S100A4 and vimentin were elevated in both luminal and myoepithelial cells, and EMT markers α-smooth muscle actin and SNAIL were elevated in luminal epithelial cells of TAHN-1 tissues. These results identify cellular processes that are differentially activated between TAHN-1 and TAHN-5 breast tissues, implicate myofibroblasts as likely mediators of these processes, provide evidence that EMT is occurring in histologically normal tissues within the affected field and identify candidate biomarkers to investigate whether or how field cancerization contributes to the development of primary or recurrent breast tumors. PMID:21105047

  15. Decreased expression of TLR7 in gastric cancer tissues and the effects of TLR7 activation on gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, JIONG; DONG, LEI; QIN, BIN; SHI, HAITAO; GUO, XIAOYAN; WANG, YAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in gastric cancer tissues and investigate the effects of its activation on gastric cancer cells. Patients with gastric cancer (n=30) and patients without gastric cancer (control; n=14) who underwent gastroscopy were enrolled in the study. Gastric cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues were obtained from the patients with gastric cancer, and normal gastric epithelial tissues were obtained from the control patients. The TLR7 mRNA and protein expressions in different tissues were investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The present study also determined the effects of TLR7 activation by the agonist imiquimod on TLR7 protein expression, proinflammatory cytokine secretion and viability in SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR7 were significantly downregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with cancer-adjacent and normal gastric epithelial tissues (P<0.01). Imiquimod significantly increased TLR7 protein expression levels, and promoted the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in SGC-7901 cells. Furthermore, imiquimod inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Thus, the present study identified that the expression of TLR7 was decreased in gastric cancer tissues, and TLR7 activation enhanced TLR7 expression, promoted the production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibited the growth of gastric cancer cells. PMID:27347192

  16. Breast Field Cancerization: Isolation and Comparison of Telomerase-Expressing Cells in Tumor and Tumor Adjacent, Histologically Normal Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Hines, William C.; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase stabilizes chromosomes by maintaining telomere length, immortalizes mammalian cells, and is expressed in more than 90% of human tumors. However, the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is not restricted to tumor cells. We have previously shown that a subpopulation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in tumor-adjacent, histologically normal (TAHN) breast tissues expresses hTERT mRNA at levels comparable with levels in breast tumors. In the current study, we first validated a reporter for measuring levels of hTERT promoter activity in early-passage HMECs and then used this reporter to compare hTERT promoter activity in HMECs derived from tumor and paired TAHN tissues 1, 3, and 5 cm from the tumor (TAHN-1, TAHN-3, and TAHN-5, respectively). Cell sorting, quantitative real-time PCR, and microarray analyses showed that the 10% of HMECs with the highest hTERT promoter activity in both tumor and TAHN-1 tissues contain more than 95% of hTERT mRNA and overexpress many genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. The percentage of HMECs within this subpopulation showing high hTERT promoter activity was significantly reduced or absent in TAHN-3 and TAHN-5 tissues. We conclude that the field of normal tissue proximal to the breast tumors contains a population of HMECs similar in hTERT expression levels and in gene expression to the HMECs within the tumor mass and that this population is significantly reduced in tissues more distal to the tumor. PMID:21775421

  17. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  18. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  19. Identification of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in oral squamous cell carcinomas compared to adjacent normal tissues in the F344 rat model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L

    2016-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers and the model has been widely used for carcinogenesis and chemoprevention studies. Molecular characterization of this model needs reliable reference genes (RGs) to avoid false- positive and -negative results for proper interpretation of gene expression data between tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified 10 stably expressed genes in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p>0.5, CV<15%) that could serve as potential RGs in this model. The commonly used 27 RGs in the rat were also analyzed based on microarray data and most of them were found unsuitable for RGs in this model. Traditional RGs such as ACTB and GAPDH were significantly altered in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p<0.01, n=11); however, the Hsp90ab1 was ranked as the best RG candidate and the combination of Hsp90ab1 and HPRT1 was identified by NormFinder to be a superior reference for gene normalization among the commonly used RGs. This result was also validated by RT-PCR based on the selected top RG candidate pool. These data suggest that there are no common RGs suitable for different models and RG(s) should be identified before gene expression analysis. We successfully identified Hsp90ab1 as a stable RG in 4-NQO-induced OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues in F344 rats. The combination of two stably expressed genes may be a better option for gene normalization in tissue samples.

  20. Expression of TAK1/TAB1 expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma and adjacent normal tissues and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Li, Qiang; He, Jin-Tao; Liu, Guang-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its activation ligand, TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1), in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and adjacent normal tissues and to analyze the relevance between TAK1 and TAB1 protein expression and the pathological features of NSCLC patients. Surgical resection NSCLC specimens were collected from 74 patients undergoing surgery in our hospital from September 2003 to July 2008; tumor-adjacent normal tissue specimens were collected as controls. All cases were pathologically confirmed after surgery, and pathological data were complete for all patients. The expression of TAK1/TAB1 proteins in NSCLC and adjacent cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. The correlation between TAK1/TAB1 protein expression and the clinicopathological features and outcome of NSCLC was assessed. The positive expression ratio of TAK1 in NSCLC tissue was 63.5%, which was significantly higher than that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue (31.1%). The positive expression ratio of TAB1 in NSCLC tissue was 51.4%, which was significantly higher than that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue (24.3%). Further analysis showed that positive protein expression of TAK1 and TAB1 was unrelated to patient gender, age, tumor size, degree of differentiation, and history of smoking (P>0.05) but was significantly related to clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Additionally, the expression of TAK1 as well as TAB1 was negatively related to NSCLC patient prognosis, and patients with positive protein expression had a significantly lower 5-year survival rate than those with negative protein expression (P<0.05). TAK1/TAB1 expression in NSCLC tissue is significantly increased and closely associated with patient clinical prognosis. These two proteins are likely to become new therapeutic targets for the treatment of NSCLC.

  1. Effect of DA-9701 on the Normal Motility and Clonidine-induced Hypomotility of the Gastric Antrum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Je Wook; Han, Dae Kyeong; Kim, Ock Nyun; Lee, Kwang Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-9701 is a novel prokinetic agent. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DA-9701 on the motility of the gastric antrum in the normal and clonidine-induced hypomotility in an in vivo animal model. Methods A strain gauge force transducer was sutured on the gastric antrum to measure the contractile activity in rats. A total of 28 rats were subclassified into the 4 groups: (1) the placebo group, (2) the DA-9701 group, (3) the placebo group in the clonidine-pretreated rats, and (4) the DA-9701 group in the clonidine-pretreated rats. After the basal recording, either placebo (3% [w/v] hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose) or DA-9701 was administered. Contractile signals were measured after the administration and after a meal. In the clonidine-pretreated rats, either placebo or DA-9701 was administered. Contractile signals were measured after the administration and after a meal. Results Oral administration of DA-9701 did not significantly alter the motility index of the gastric antrum in the preprandial and postprandial periods, compared with the placebo group. The administration of clonidine decreased the motility index of the gastric antrum in the preprandial and postprandial periods, compared with the administration of placebo. This reduction of the antral motility by the administration of clonidine was not observed in the clonidine-pretreated DA-9701 group. The percentage of the motility index in the postprandial period was significantly greater in the clonidine-pretreated DA-9701 group, compared with the clonidine-pretreated placebo group. Conclusions DA-9701 improves the hypomotility of the gastric antrum induced by clonidine, suggesting its gastroprokinetic effect in the pathologic condition. PMID:26755679

  2. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  3. Alteration of normal gastric flora in critical care patients receiving antacid and cimetidine therapy.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, L G; Page, M C; Mileur, B L; Guenthner, S H

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifty-three critical care patients with documented cimetidine and antacid use were prospectively studied with serial gastric pH determinations and semiquantitative gastric fluid cultures. This study documents the abnormal gastric colonization of patients with therapeutically altered gastric acidity by hospital acquired gram negative rods (GNR). Three hundred twenty-four gastric fluid cultures from 153 patients revealed 152 (47%) positive cultures for GNR, 78 (24%) sterile specimens, and 94 (29%) positive for mixed oropharyngeal flora. One hundred forty (59%) of the 236 cultures at a pH of 4 or greater were positive for GNR. In contrast, only 12 (14%) of the 88 cultures at a pH of less than 4 were positive for GNR (p less than .001). Forty-six (52%) of 88 cultures at a pH of less than 4 were sterile as compared to only 32 (14%) of 236 sterile cultures at a pH of 4 or greater (p less than .001). At low pH, cultures are predominantly sterile and at a pH of 4 or greater the flora dramatically changes to hospital acquired GNR. This artificially maintained reservoir of gram negative rods in the critically ill patient is a potential reservoir of organisms causing nosocomial bacteremia or pneumonia in this high risk population.

  4. Magnetization transfer and T2 quantitation in normal appearing cortical gray matter and white matter adjacent to focal abnormality in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Rakesh K; Rao, Sajja B; Chawla, Sanjeev; Husain, Mazhar; Rathore, Ram K S

    2003-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the commonest causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries with posttraumatic epilepsy and functional disability being its major sequelae. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis whether the normal appearing adjacent gray and white matter regions on T2 and T1 weighted magnetization transfer (MT) weighted images show any abnormality on quantitative imaging in patients with TBI. A total of 51 patients with TBI and 10 normal subjects were included in this study. There were significant differences in T2 and MT ratio values of T2 weighted and T1 weighted MT normal appearing gray matter regions adjacent to focal image abnormality compared to normal gray matter regions in the normal individuals as corresponding contralateral regions of the TBI patient's group (p < 0.05). However the adjoining normal appearing white matter quantitative values did not show any significant change compared to the corresponding contralateral normal white matter values. We conclude that quantitative T2 and MT ratio values provide additional abnormality in patients with TBI that is not discernable on conventional T2 weighted and T1 weighted MT imaging especially in gray matter. This additional information may be of value in overall management of these patients with TBI.

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  6. The effect of short-term dietary supplementation with glucose on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose and oral glucose tolerance in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Cunningham, K M; Wishart, J M; Jones, K L; Read, N W

    1996-04-01

    Recent observations indicate that gastric emptying may be influenced by patterns of previous nutrient intake. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of a high glucose diet on gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, and the impact of any changes in gastric emptying on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide in response to glucose and fructose loads. Gastric emptying of glucose and fructose (both 75 g dissolved in 350 ml water) were measured in seven normal volunteers on separate days while each was on a "standard' diet and an identical diet supplemented with 440 g/day of glucose for 4-7 days. Venous blood samples for measurement of plasma glucose, insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels were taken immediately before and for 180 min after ingestion of glucose and fructose loads. Dietary glucose supplementation accelerated gastric emptying of glucose (50% emptying time 82 +/- 8 vs 106 +/- 10 min, p = 0.004) and fructose (73 +/- 9 vs 106 +/- 9 min, p = 0.001). After ingestion of glucose, plasma concentrations of insulin (p < 0.05) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (p < 0.05) were higher during the glucose-supplemented diet. In contrast, plasma glucose concentrations at 60 min and 75 min were lower (p < 0.05) on the glucose-supplemented diet. We conclude that short-term supplementation of the diet with glucose accelerates gastric emptying of glucose and fructose, presumably as a result of reduced feedback inhibition of gastric emptying from small intestinal luminal receptors. More rapid gastric emptying of glucose has a significant impact on glucose tolerance.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal Cadaveric Tissue.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Mahmoud; Elsobky, Emad; Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elhameed, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahim, Mona; Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir

    2016-12-01

    The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC) specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers. All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead, selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel, selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further work-up is needed to support this

  8. Immunohistochemical quantification of the cobalamin transport protein, cell surface receptor and Ki-67 in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors and in adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sysel, Annette M.; Valli, Victor E.; Bauer, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an obligate need for cobalamin (vitamin B12) to enable DNA synthesis necessary for cellular replication. This study quantified the immunohistochemical expression of the cobalamin transport protein (transcobalamin II; TCII), cell surface receptor (transcobalamin II-R; TCII-R) and proliferation protein (Ki-67) in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors, and compared these results to expression in corresponding adjacent normal tissues. All malignant tumor tissues stained positively for TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 proteins; expression varied both within and between tumor types. Expression of TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 was significantly higher in malignant tumor tissues than in corresponding adjacent normal tissues in both species. There was a strong correlation between TCII and TCII-R expression, and a modest correlation between TCII-R and Ki-67 expression in both species; a modest association between TCII and Ki-67 expression was present in canine tissues only. These results demonstrate a quantifiable, synchronous up-regulation of TCII and TCII-R expression by proliferating canine and feline malignant tumors. The potential to utilize these proteins as biomarkers to identify neoplastic tissues, streamline therapeutic options, evaluate response to anti-tumor therapy and monitor for recurrent disease has important implications in the advancement of cancer management for both human and companion animal patients. PMID:25633912

  9. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  10. Abnormal expression of paxillin correlates with tumor progression and poor survival in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paxillin (PXN) has been found to be aberrantly regulated in various malignancies and involved in tumor growth and invasion. The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of PXN in gastric cancer is still unclear. Methods The expression of PXN was determined in paired gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of PXN in 239 gastric cancer patients. Statistical analysis was applied to investigate the correlation between PXN expression and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in patients. Additionally, the effects of PXN on gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration were also evaluated. Results PXN was up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines as compared with adjacent normal tissues and normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. Overexpression of PXN was correlated with distant metastasis (P = 0.001) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.021) in gastric cancer patients. Patients with high PXN expression tended to have poor prognosis compared with patients with low PXN expression (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that PXN expression was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.020). Moreover, ectopic expression of PXN promotes cell proliferation and migration in AGS cells whereas knockdown of PXN inhibits cell proliferation and migration in SGC7901 cells. Conclusions PXN plays an important role in tumor progression and may be used as a potential prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. PMID:24180516

  11. Immunohistochemical Expression of CD105 and TGF-β1 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adjacent Apparently Normal Oral Mucosa and its Correlation With Clinicopathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sindhu; Nayak, Ramakant; Bhat, Kishore; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Babji, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) is essential for its growth, invasion, and metastasis. This entails a shift in the balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors. CD105 and TGF-β1 are 2 such proangiogenic factors wherein CD105 exerts its angiogenic effect by binding to and modulating the TGF-β1 pathway. A total of 50 resected specimens of OSCC were considered. One tissue specimen was taken from tumor proper and another specimen from adjacent apparently normal mucosa (AANM). Both tissues were immunohistochemically stained using CD105 and TGF-β1 antibodies. The expression of each antibody was individually assessed and then compared. Pearson χ test was used for statistical comparison of expression. CD105 was significantly expressed in OSCC as compared with AANM and also correlated with increasing TNM stage. The mean microvessel density was higher in OSCC. TGF-β1 was significantly expressed in epithelium of OSCC as compared with AANM. On comparing expression of TGF-β1 and CD105, 79.54% of endothelial cells expressed positivity for both molecules. Both CD105 and TGF-β1 were increased in OSCC, although based on our results CD105 alone can be used as a prognostic marker. On the basis of immunohistochemical expression of CD105 and TGF-β1 in endothelial cells, our results demonstrate that CD105 acts as one of the receptors of TGF-β1 on endothelial cells and induces the angiogenic pathway in OSCC.

  12. Differential gene expression profiling in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma compared to the adjacent microscopically normal urothelium by microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ma, F L; Ma, X B; Han, R F; Zhang, Y B; Chang, J W

    2006-01-01

    Identifying novel and known genes that are differentially expressed in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) has important implications in understanding the biology of bladder tumorigenesis and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study we identified the differential gene expression profiles comparing tumor to the adjacent microscopically normal mucosa by manual microdissection on frozen sections. The RNAs extracted from microdissected tissues were amplified by SMART cDNA PCR technology to generate forward subtractive cDNA library by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). We obtained 376 positive clones, one hundred clones of aggressive BTCC subtracted cDNA library were selected at random and inserts were reamplified by PCR. After differential screening by reverse dot blotting, 73 positive clones, that contend inserts putatively upregulated in aggressive BTCC, were further analysed by DNA sequencing, GenBank and EST database searching. Sequencing results showed that 66 clones stand for 23 known genes and 7 clones for three new EST (Genbank number: DN236875, DN236874 and DN236873). In conclusion, microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH allowed for an efficient way to identify aggressive BTCC-specific differential expressed genes that may potentially be involved in the carcinogenesis and/or progression of aggressive BTCC. These differentially expressed genes may be of potential utility as therapeutic and diagnostic targets for aggressive BTCC.

  13. Exploring the spatial dimension of estrogen and progesterone signaling: detection of nuclear labeling in lobular epithelial cells in normal mammary glands adjacent to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comprehensive spatial assessment of hormone receptor immunohistochemistry staining in digital whole slide images of breast cancer requires accurate detection of positive nuclei within biologically relevant regions of interest. Herein, we propose a combination of automated region labeling at low resolution and subsequent detailed tissue evaluation of subcellular structures in lobular structures adjacent to breast cancer, as a proof of concept for the approach to analyze estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the spatial context of surrounding tissue. Methods Routinely processed paraffin sections of hormone receptor-negative ductal invasive breast cancer were stained for estrogen and progesterone receptor by immunohistochemistry. Digital whole slides were analyzed using commercially available image analysis software for advanced object-based analysis, applying textural, relational, and geometrical features. Mammary gland lobules were targeted as regions of interest for analysis at subcellular level in relation to their distance from coherent tumor as neighboring relevant tissue compartment. Lobule detection quality was evaluated visually by a pathologist. Results After rule set optimization in an estrogen receptor-stained training set, independent test sets (progesterone and estrogen receptor) showed acceptable detection quality in 33% of cases. Presence of disrupted lobular structures, either by brisk inflammatory infiltrate, or diffuse tumor infiltration, was common in cases with lower detection accuracy. Hormone receptor detection tended towards higher percentage of positively stained nuclei in lobules distant from the tumor border as compared to areas adjacent to the tumor. After adaptations of image analysis, corresponding evaluations were also feasible in hormone receptor positive breast cancer, with some limitations of automated separation of mammary epithelial cells from hormone receptor-positive tumor cells. Conclusions As a proof of

  14. The impact of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on normal metabolism in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Andreas; Ekelund, Mikael; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Ståhlman, Marcus; Pierzynowski, Stefan; Gomez, Maria F.; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Groop, Leif; Hedenbro, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background A growing body of literature on Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) has generated inconclusive results on the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects on weight loss and glycaemia, partially due to the problems of designing clinical studies with the appropriate controls. Moreover, RYGB is only performed in obese individuals, in whom metabolism is perturbed and not completely understood. Methods In an attempt to isolate the effects of RYGB and its effects on normal metabolism, we investigated the effect of RYGB in lean pigs, using sham-operated pair-fed pigs as controls. Two weeks post-surgery, pigs were subjected to an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and circulating metabolites, hormones and lipids measured. Bile acid composition was profiled after extraction from blood, faeces and the gallbladder. Results A similar weight development in both groups of pigs validated our experimental model. Despite similar changes in fasting insulin, RYGB-pigs had lower fasting glucose levels. During an IVGTT RYGB-pigs had higher insulin and lower glucose levels. VLDL and IDL were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. RYGB-pigs had increased levels of most amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids, but these were more efficiently suppressed by glucose. Levels of bile acids in the gallbladder were higher, whereas plasma and faecal bile acid levels were lower in RYGB- than in sham-pigs. Conclusion In a lean model RYGB caused lower plasma lipid and bile acid levels, which were compensated for by increased plasma amino acids, suggesting a switch from lipid to protein metabolism during fasting in the immediate postoperative period. PMID:28257455

  15. Palliative Gastrectomy Prolongs Survival of Metastatic Gastric Cancer Patients with Normal Preoperative CEA or CA19-9 Values: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Yang, Horng-Ren; Yang, Mei-Due; Jeng, Long-Bin; Yang, Tse-Yen; Sargeant, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Palliative gastrectomy has been suggested to improve survival of patients with metastatic gastric cancer, but limitations in study design and availability of robust prognostic factors have cast doubt on the overall merit of this procedure. Methods. The characteristics and clinical outcomes of 173 patients diagnosed between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed to determine the value of palliative gastrectomy and to identify potential prognostic factors. Results. Median overall patient survival was 6.5 months. To attenuate potential selection bias, patients with adequate performance and survival time of ≥ 2 months since diagnosis were included for risk factor analysis (n = 137). The median overall survival was longer for patients who were younger than 60 years, had better performance status (8.7 versus 6.4 months, P = 0.015), received systemic chemotherapy, or had palliative gastrectomy in univariate analyses. Gastrectomy (P = 0.002) remained statistically significant in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analysis showed that patients aged < 60 years, CEA < 5 ng/mL or CA19-9 < 35 U/mL, obtained a survival advantage from palliative gastrectomy. In fact, palliative gastrectomy doubled overall survival for patients who had normal CEA and/or normal CA19-9. Conclusions. Palliative gastrectomy prolongs the survival of metastatic gastric cancer patients with normal CEA and/or CA19-9 level at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27990157

  16. Palliative Gastrectomy Prolongs Survival of Metastatic Gastric Cancer Patients with Normal Preoperative CEA or CA19-9 Values: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Yang, Horng-Ren; Yang, Mei-Due; Jeng, Long-Bin; Yang, Tse-Yen; Sargeant, Aaron M; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Palliative gastrectomy has been suggested to improve survival of patients with metastatic gastric cancer, but limitations in study design and availability of robust prognostic factors have cast doubt on the overall merit of this procedure. Methods. The characteristics and clinical outcomes of 173 patients diagnosed between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed to determine the value of palliative gastrectomy and to identify potential prognostic factors. Results. Median overall patient survival was 6.5 months. To attenuate potential selection bias, patients with adequate performance and survival time of ≥ 2 months since diagnosis were included for risk factor analysis (n = 137). The median overall survival was longer for patients who were younger than 60 years, had better performance status (8.7 versus 6.4 months, P = 0.015), received systemic chemotherapy, or had palliative gastrectomy in univariate analyses. Gastrectomy (P = 0.002) remained statistically significant in multivariate analyses. Subgroup analysis showed that patients aged < 60 years, CEA < 5 ng/mL or CA19-9 < 35 U/mL, obtained a survival advantage from palliative gastrectomy. In fact, palliative gastrectomy doubled overall survival for patients who had normal CEA and/or normal CA19-9. Conclusions. Palliative gastrectomy prolongs the survival of metastatic gastric cancer patients with normal CEA and/or CA19-9 level at the time of diagnosis.

  17. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  18. Differential expression of CCN family members CYR611, CTGF and NOV in gastric cancer and their association with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Gao, Xiangyu; Ji, Ke; Sanders, Andrew J.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Jiang, Wen G.; Ji, Jiafu; Ye, Lin

    2016-01-01

    CCN is an acronym for cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV). Aberrations of certain CCN members including CYR61, CTGF, Wnt1-inducible signalling pathway protein (WISP)-1 and -3 have been reported in gastric cancer. The present study aimed to examine the clinical relevance of NOV along with CYR61 and CTGF in gastric cancer by analysing their transcript levels. CYR61, CTGF and NOV transcript expression in 324 gastric cancer samples with paired adjacent normal gastric tissues were determined using real-time quantitative PCR and the results were statistically analysed against patient clinicopathological data using SPSS software. NOV mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly elevated when compared with levels in their paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Local advanced tumours with invasive expansion (T3 and T4) expressed higher levels of NOV (p=0.013) compared with the less invasive tumours (T1 and T2). CYR61 transcript levels were also significantly increased in gastric cancers compared with levels in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with CYR61-low transcript levels had longer overall survival (OS) (p=0.018) and disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.015). NOV overexpression promoted the in vitro proliferation of AGS cells while the knockdown resulted in a reduced proliferation of HGC27 cells. A similar effect was observed for the invasion of these two gastric cancer cell lines. NOV expression was increased in gastric cancer which was associated with local invasion and distant metastases. Taken together, the expression of NOV and CYR61 was increased in gastric cancer. The elevated expression of CYR61 was associated with poorer survival. NOV promoted proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Further investigations may highlight their predictive and therapeutic potential in gastric cancer. PMID:27633176

  19. Expression profiling of CEACAM6 associated with the tumorigenesis and progression in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Liu, P; Zhao, Y; Wang, Q

    2014-09-26

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily and has been recently reported to affect the neoplastic, metastatic, and invasive ability of malignant cells by regulating intracellular signaling pathways during tumorigenesis and progression. We investigated the expression and amplification of CEACAM6 in relation to the clinicopathological and biological significance of gastric adenocarcinoma. Expression of CEACAM6 mRNA in 75 primary gastric adenocarcinom and 20 adjacent tissues compared to normal gastric mucosas were explored using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical assays were conducted to evaluate the expression and tissue distribution of CEACAM6 protein. Overexpression of CEACAM6 mRNA in both gastric adenocarcinoma (2.513 ± 0.869) and adjacent tissues (1.171 ± 0.428) was significantly higher than the relative expressions in non-neoplastic specimens (0.594 ± 0.513) (P < 0.01). CEACAM6 protein was present in 52 (69.33%) gastric adenocarcinomas, but not in normal gastric tissues. Adenocarcinomas with elevated CEACAM6 expression were significantly associated with lymph node metastases and advanced stages. There were no relationships between CEACAM6 expression and tumor size, histological differentiation, or different subtypes, respectively. Moreover, higher expression of CEACAM6 was found to be correlated with short postoperative survival time of patients with gastric cancer. Amplification and upregulation of CEACAM6 expression was observed in human gastric adenocarcinomas, which may be correlated with the generation or transformation of malignant cells, tumor aggressive progression, and clinical outcome. CEACAM6 may be a valuable biomarker screening for gastric tumor and novel predictor for patients in advanced stages of gastric cancer.

  20. Galectin-1 mediates TGF-β-induced transformation from normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and promotes tumor progression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lingyan; Xu, Cong; Guan, Zhonghai; Su, Xingyun; Xu, Zhenzhen; Cao, Jiang; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Rcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells can induce the transformation from normal fibroblasts (NFs) into CAFs, reciprocally, CAFs promote tumor invasion and proliferation. TGF-β has been the mostly accepted factor to fuel NFs transformation into CAFs. Galectin-1 (Gal1) is highly upregulated in CAFs of multiple human cancers, and overexpression of Gal1 in CAFs promotes tumor progression. The effect of Gal1 on TGF-β-induced CAFs activation has not yet been established in gastric cancer (GC). In this study, we show that Gal1 expression in stroma is positively related to TGF-β in epithelial cells by retrospective analysis of GC patient samples. Meanwhile, conditioned media (CMs) from gastric cancer cells induce expression of both Gal1 and the CAFs marker alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in NFs via TGF-β secretion. Knockdown of Gal1 prevents TGF-β-induced the conversion of NFs to CAFs. CMs from fibroblasts overexpressing Gal1 inhibits cancer cells apoptosis, promotes migration and invasion in vitro. Thus, Gal1 is significantly involved in the development of tumor-promoting microenvironment by enhancing TGF-β signaling in a positive feedback loop. Targeting Gal1 in tumor stroma should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:27186290

  1. Expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone, gastric-inhibitory polypeptide, and vasopressin in normal adrenal glands and cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Galac, S; Kars, V J; Klarenbeek, S; Teerds, K J; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S

    2010-07-01

    Hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocortical tumor (AT) results from adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Studies in humans demonstrate that steroidogenesis in ATs may be stimulated by ectopic or overexpressed eutopic G protein-coupled receptors. We report on a screening of 23 surgically removed, cortisol-secreting ATs for the expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone (LH), gastric-inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and vasopressin (V(1a), V(1b), and V(2)). Normal adrenal glands served as control tissues. Abundance of mRNA for these receptors was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), and the presence and localization of these receptors were determined by immunohistochemistry. In both normal adrenal glands and ATs, mRNA encoding for all receptors was present, although the expression abundance of the V(1b) receptor was very low. The mRNA expression abundance for GIP and V(2) receptors in ATs were significantly lower (0.03 and 0.01, respectively) than in normal adrenal glands. The zona fasciculata of normal adrenal glands stained immunonegative for the GIP receptor. In contrast, islands of GIP receptor-immunopositive cells were detected in about half of the ATs. The zona fasciculata of both normal adrenal glands and AT tissue were immunopositive for LH receptor; in ATs in a homogenous or heterogenous pattern. In normal adrenal glands, no immunolabeling for V(1b)R and V(2) receptor was present, but in ATs, V(2) receptor-immunopositive cells were detected. In conclusion, QPCR analysis did not reveal overexpression of LH, GIP, V(1a), V(1b), or V(2) receptors in the ATs. However, the ectopic expression of GIP and V(2) receptor proteins in tumorous zona fasciculata tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine cortisol-secreting ATs.

  2. Expression of NUAK2 in gastric cancer tissue and its effects on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lin; Tong, Shu-Juan; Zhan, Zhen; Wang, Qian; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the expression and effects of NUAK2 in gastric cancer and adjacent normal gastric tissues. The protein expression levels of NUAK2 were detected by western blot analysis. The effects of NUAK2 expression on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells was detected using an MTT and BrdU incorporation assay. Furthermore, the effects of NUAK2 on proliferation and cancer stem cell markers, both protein and microRNA (miRNA), were investigated by western blot analysis and miRNA microarrays, respectively. The results demonstrated that NUAK2 was able to significantly promote the proliferation of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. In addition, NUAK2 overexpression decreased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase and increased the percentage of cells in the S phase. Western blot analysis and miRNA microarrays revealed that overexpression of NUAK2 resulted in increased expression levels of proliferation markers, including c-myc, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, miRNA 21, and gastric cancer stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, CD44 and CD133. In conclusion, NUAK2 expression differed between the tumor and normal gastric tissues. NUAK2 was able to promote the proliferation of gastric cancer cells and regulate their cell cycle. Proliferation and cancer stem cell markers were upregulated by NUAK2 expression. Therefore, the results from the present study suggest that NUAK2 may be a promising target for gastric cancer therapy in the future. PMID:28352350

  3. Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery on Bile Acid Metabolism in Normal and Obese Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Hina Y; Rajpal, Neetu; White, Wendy; Freudenberg, Johannes M.; Liu, Yaping; Way, James; Rajpal, Deepak; Cooper, David C.; Young, Andrew; Tavakkoli, Ali; Chen, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA) are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and Peptide YY (PYY), 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (P<0.001) in 24-hour fecal BA excretion on post-operative day 3 compared to ZDF-SHAM, which paralleled a significant increase in plasma PYY. Ratios of plasma and fecal cholic acid/chenodeoxycholic acid derived BAs were decreased in RYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans. PMID:25798945

  4. Effect of HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor on DNA synthesis and free radical oxidation in the gastric mucosa under normal conditions and during indometacin-induced ulcerative process in the stomach of albino mice.

    PubMed

    Timoshin, S S; Bragina, V V; Lebedko, O A; Sazonova, E N; Zhivotova, E Yu; Fleischman, M Yu

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of simvastatin (24 mg/kg per os for 30 days) on DNA synthesis ((3)H-thymidine autoradiography) and free radical oxidation (chemiluminescent method) in the gastric mucosa of albino mice under normal conditions and in ulcerative process induced by single indometacin administration. Simvastatin treatment activated free radical oxidation, which was seen from enhanced chemiluminescence in the mucosa homogenate (by 1.7-4.6 times). Administration of indometacin against the background of simvastatin treatment potentiated local oxidative stress and inhibited DNA synthesis. Under these conditions, the area of ulcerative lesion in the gastric mucosa increased by 3.0 times.

  5. Oxidative stress upregulates PDCD4 expression in patients with gastric cancer via miR-21.

    PubMed

    Tu, Honglei; Sun, Haibing; Lin, Yan; Ding, Jie; Nan, Kejun; Li, Zongfang; Shen, Qiang; Wei, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in carcinogenesis by aberrantly inducing signaling networks that initiatiate tumorigenesis and stimulate tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a novel class of endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate approximately 30% of the genes in a cell via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. However, the effects of ROS on miRNAs expression and the role of miRNAs in ROS-mediated injury on carcinogenesis are uncertain. Using UV spectrophotometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we examined tissues from human gastric cancers and tissues adjascent to gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues and found that total anti-oxidation competence (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) concentrations were lower in gastric cancer patients compared to the control subjects, while the concentrations of DNA oxidative damage product 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was higher. To determine the potential role of miRNA in gastric carcinogenesis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis was performed. We found that human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) mRNA and miR-21 expression were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues than in the adjacent normal gastric tissues. Furthermore, the expression of programmed cell death 4 protein (PDCD4) in gastric cancer tissues was significantly lower than in adjacent normal gastric tissues. The expression of miR-21 and PDCD4 was highly correlated with the degree of differentiation, tumor staging, local lymphatic node metastasis and remote metastasis. Expression of miR-21 was negatively correlated with T-AOC, SOD and CAT, but positively correlated with 8-OHdG and hOGG1mRNA. In addition, the relative expression of PDCD4 was negatively correlated with miR-21. These results suggest that the defensive balance of oxidation and antioxidant system in patients with GC was impaired, resulting in

  6. MicroRNA-29a inhibits cell migration and invasion via targeting Roundabout homolog 1 in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueting; Cai, Jun; Sun, Yanjun; Gong, Renhua; Sun, Dengqun; Zhong, Xingguo; Jiang, Shitao; He, Xinmiao; Bao, Enwu; Yang, Liusheng; Li, Yongxiang

    2015-09-01

    Deregulation of Roundabout homolog 1 (Robo1) has been demonstrated to be associated with several types of human cancer, including gastric cancer. However, the detailed role of Robo1 and its regulatory mechanism in gastric cancer remain largely unclear. In the current study, it was demonstrated that the expression of microRNA (miR)‑29a was frequently reduced in gastric cancer tissues, compared with their matched normal adjacent tissues. Similar results were additionally observed in AGS and SGC‑7901 human gastric cancer cells. Overexpression of miR‑29a led to reduced migration and invasion of AGS cells. To explore the targets of miR‑29a in gastric cancer, bioinformatics analysis was conducted and Robo1 was identified as a putative target of miR‑29a. Further western blotting and luciferase activity assay data confirmed that miR‑29a was able to negatively regulate the protein expression of Robo1, through directly binding to the 3'‑untranslated region of Robo1 mRNA in gastric cancer cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that Robo1 was frequently upregulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with their matched adjacent normal tissues, and a significant inverse correlation was identified between miR‑29a and Robo1 expression. In addition, knockdown of Robo1 by small interfering RNA markedly inhibited the migratory and invasive capabilities of AGS cells, which the results obtained with overexpression of miR‑29a. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge the current study suggested for the first time, that miR‑29a inhibits migration and invasion in part via direct inhibition of Robo1 in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, Robo1 and miR‑29a may serve as diagnostic or therapeutic targets for gastric cancer.

  7. DDX5 promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo through mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Du, Cheng; Li, Dan-qi; Li, Na; Chen, Li; Li, Shi-sen; Yang, Yang; Hou, Ming-xiao; Xie, Man-jiang; Zheng, Zhen-dong

    2017-01-01

    DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase 5 (DDX5) is an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that is overexpressed in various malignancies. Increasing evidence suggests that DDX5 participates in carcinogenesis and cancer progression via promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. However, the functional role of DDX5 in gastric cancer is largely unknown. In this study, we observed that DDX5 was significantly up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with the paired adjacent normal tissues. The expression of DDX5 correlated strongly with Ki67 index and pathological stage of gastric cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies suggested that knockdown of DDX5 inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and xenografts growth, whereas ectopic expression of DDX5 promoted these cellular functions. Mechanically, DDX5 induced gastric cancer cell growth by activating mTOR/S6K1. Treatment of everolimus, the specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly attenuated DDX5-mediated cell proliferation. Interestingly, the expression of DDX5 and p-mTOR in gastric cancer tissues demonstrated a positive correlation. Taken together, these results revealed a novel role of DDX5 in gastric cancer cell proliferation via the mTOR pathway. Therefore, DDX5 may serve as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:28216662

  8. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  9. Treatment of Patients with Obese Type 2 Diabetes with Tantalus-DIAMOND® Gastric Electrical Stimulation: Normal Triglycerides Predict Durable Effects for at Least 3 Years.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, H E; Ludvik, B; Yaniv, I; Schwartz, T; Zelewski, M; Gutterman, D D

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the present work are to evaluate long-term benefit of nonexcitatory gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by the DIAMOND(®) device on glycemic control and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral agents and to determine the magnitude of the modulating effects of fasting plasma triglyceride (FTG) levels on these effects of GES. Sixty one patients with type 2 diabetes [HbA1c > 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) to < 10.5% (91 mmol/mol)] were implanted with the DIAMOND(®) GES device and treated with meal-mediated antral electrical stimulation for up to 36 months. The effects of baseline HbA1c and FTG on glycemic control, body weight, and systolic blood pressure were measured. GES reduced mean HbA1c by 0.9% and body weight by 5.7%. The effects were greater in patients with normal fasting plasma triglycerides (NTG) as compared to those with hypertriglyceridemia. The mean decrease in HbA1c in patients with NTG averaged 1.1% and was durable over 3 years of follow-up. ANCOVA indicated that improvement in HbA1c was a function of both baseline FTG group (p = 0.02) and HbA1c (p = 0.001) and their interaction (p = 0.01). Marked weight loss (≥ 10%) was observed in a significant proportion of NTG patients by 12 months of treatment and persisted through the 3 years. GES improves glycemic control and reduces body weight by a triglyceride-dependent mechanism in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral agents. It is postulated that this is through a gut-brain interaction that modulates effects on the liver and pancreatic islets.

  10. The RNA-binding protein PCBP2 facilitates gastric carcinoma growth by targeting miR-34a

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Cheng-En; Liu, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Hui-Dong; Huang, Guang-Jian

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • PCBP2 is overexpressed in human gastric cancer. • PCBP2 high expression predicts poor survival. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer apoptosis by targeting miR-34a. - Abstract: Gastric carcinoma is the fourth most common cancer worldwide, with a high rate of death and low 5-year survival rate. However, the mechanism underling gastric cancer is still not fully understood. Here in the present study, we identify the RNA-binding protein PCBP2 as an oncogenic protein in human gastric carcinoma. Our results show that PCBP2 is up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues, and that high level of PCBP2 predicts poor overall and disease-free survival. Knockdown of PCBP2 in gastric cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro, whereas opposing results are obtained when PCBP2 is overexpressed. Our in vivo subcutaneous xenograft results also show that PCBP2 can critically regulate gastric cancer cell growth. In addition, we find that PCBP2-depletion induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via up-regulating expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins. Mechanically, we identify that miR-34a as a target of PCBP2, and that miR-34a is critically essential for the function of PCBP2. In summary, PCBP2 promotes gastric carcinoma development by regulating the level of miR-34a.

  11. Inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 promotes cancer cells migration in gastric cancer: Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang Y; Li, Lin; Wang, Xiao H; Wen, Xian Z; Ji, Ke; Ye, Lin; Cai, Jun; Jiang, Wen G; Ji, Jia F

    2015-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays an important role in regulating many biological processes. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) can dephosphorylate S1P into sphingosine and tip the balance of sphingosine-S1P. Increased levels of sphingosine leads to a decrease in the ability of cell invasion as well as an increase in the ability of cell apoptosis. However, little is known regarding the effects of SGPP1 in gastric cancer. The present study examined the function of SGPP1 on gastric cancer cell lines as well as its clinical relevance in gastric cancer progression. Using immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR techniques, the clinical significance of SGPP1 expression was analyzed in 288 paraffin-embedded gastric tissue specimens and 219 fresh gastric tissues, respectively. Transgenes encoding ribozymes to specifically target human SGPP1 (pEF-SGPP1) was constructed. Human gastric cancer cell lines (AGS and HGC27) were transfected with pEF-SGPP1 transgene and examined by functional analysis. SGPP1 was downregulated in gastric cancer tissues, compared with adjacent normal gastric tissues (p=0.034). SGPP1 mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly decreased when compared with their adjacent non-cancerous tissues (p<0.001). Weakly expressed SGPP1 was positively correlated with the lymph node metastasis (p=0.005) and distant metastasis (p=0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with SGPP1 positive expression had a significant increase in overall survival (OS) (p=0.034) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.041). Multivariate analysis indicated the expression of SGPP1 was an independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients (p=0.041). In vitro experiments showed that knockdown of SGPP1 resulted in an increase in the invasion (2-fold) and migration (5-fold) of AGS and HGC27. The two gastric cancer cells transfected with pEF-SGPP1 exhibited a slower rate of growth with less adhesion. Thus, our findings provided evidence that

  12. Gastric giardiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; De Boni, M.; Cielo, R.; Laurino, L.; Pelosio, P.; Braidotti, P.; Viale, G.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of gastric giardiasis in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and to define the clinicopathological correlates of gastric Giardia lamblia infection. METHODS: Consecutive gastric biopsy specimens (n = 15,023) from 11,085 patients, taken at Feltre City Hospital (north eastern Italy) from January 1986 to December 1991, were histologically and immunocytochemically examined for the occurrence of G lamblia trophozoites. Three gastric biopsy specimens from patients harbouring G lamblia infection, who repeated endoscopy before treatment, were also examined electron microscopically. RESULTS: Forty one patients (0.37% of the population study) harboured gastric giardiasis. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of dyspepsia, epigastric pain, or abdominal distension. Only two patients had diarrhoea at the time of investigation. Giardiasis was clinically unsuspected in all cases, although the nine patients who also had duodenal biopsies performed had concomitant intestinal giardiasis. Gastric giardiasis was invariably associated with chronic atrophic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa and Helicobacter pylori infection were found in 32 and 37 of the 41 patients with gastric giardiasis, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The invariable association of gastric giardiasis with chronic atrophic gastritis, most often showing intestinal metaplasia and H pylori infection, indicates that a decreased gastric acidity is a prerequisite for localisation of G lamblia to the gastric mucosa. Though its possible role as a gastric pathogen remains to be elucidated, these findings suggest that trophozoites should be carefully searched for when examining gastric biopsy specimens showing chronic atrophic gastritis. Images PMID:1452790

  13. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  14. Association between the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 and the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LING; YANG, XIGUI; YANG, XIANGSHAN; FAN, KAIXI; XIAO, PING; ZHANG, JING; WANG, XIUWEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) in gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 expression levels in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples (with and without lymph node metastasis), adjacent normal tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples were detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between TNFAIP8 expression levels and clinicopathological data and gastric adenocarcinoma prognosis was analyzed. The results demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples markedly increased at a rate of 47.2% (50/106) and 81.7% (49/60), respectively, as compared with the adjacent normal tissue samples in which no TNGFAIP8 expression was detected (0%). This increase in TNFAIP8 expression was statistically significant. TNFAIP8 expression rates in the primary tumors (60%, 36/60) of patients with lymph node metastasis were significantly higher compared with the primary tumors of patients without lymph node metastasis (30.4%, 14/46). TNFAIP8 expression was associated with an increase in the severity of TNM stage, tumor grade, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis and serum CA72-4 levels. The overall survival rate of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and high TNFAIP8 expression was poorer compared with patients with low TNFAIP8 expression, and TNFAIP8 expression was negatively correlated with patient prognosis. The results also demonstrated that TNFAIP8 was an independent prognostic marker in gastric adenocarcinoma (relative risk, 1.736; P=0.029). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression was associated with the occurrence, development and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma, and negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 may therefore serve as a prognostic factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27347043

  15. Gastric Microbiome and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, Kyle M.; Morrow, Casey D.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the stomach is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. The single strongest risk factor for gastric cancer is Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastric inflammation. Among persons with H. pylori infection, strain-specific components, host immune responses, and environmental factors influence the risk for gastric disease, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach, although only a small proportion of infected persons develop the malignancy. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have uncovered a complex community of non-cultivatable inhabitants of the human stomach. The interaction between these inhabitants, collectively referred to as the gastric microbiota, and H. pylori likely impacts gastric immunobiology and possibly the sequelae of H. pylori infection. Thus, characterization of the gastric microbiota in subjects with and without H. pylori infection could provide new insight into gastric homeostasis and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated disease, including gastric cancer. PMID:24855010

  16. Identification of specific biomarkers for gastric adenocarcinoma by ITRAQ proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhi, Qiaoming; Liu, Songbai; Xue, Sheng-Li; Shen, Congcong; Li, Yangxin; Wu, Chaofan; Tang, Zaixiang; Chen, Weichang; Song, Jenny Lee; Bao, Meiyu; Song, Yao-Hua; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers for gastric cancer (GC) by iTRAQ. Using proteins extracted from a panel of 4 pairs of gastric adenocarcinoma samples (stage III-IV, Her-2 negative), we identified 10 up regulated and 9 down regulated proteins in all four pairs of GC samples compared to adjacent normal gastric tissue. The up regulated proteins are mainly involved in cell motility, while the down regulated proteins are mitochondrial enzymes involved in energy metabolism. The expression of three up regulated proteins (ANXA1, NNMT, fibulin-5) and one of the down regulated proteins (UQCRC1) was validated by Western Blot in 97 GC samples. ANXA1 was up regulated in 61.36% of stage I/II GC samples compared to matched adjacent normal gastric tissue, and its expression increased further in stage III/IV samples. Knockdown of ANXA1 by siRNA significantly inhibited GC cell migration and invasion, whereas over expression of ANXA1 promoted migration and invasion. We found decreased expression of UQCRC1 in all stages of GC samples. Our data suggest that increased cell motility and decreased mitochondrial energy metabolism are important hallmarks during the development of GC. PMID:27941907

  17. The electrophoresis of human gastric juice

    PubMed Central

    Piper, D. W.; Stiel, Mirjam C.; Builder, Janet E.

    1962-01-01

    The electrophoretic pattern of normal human gastric juice is described. The effect of autodigestion of gastric juice and of the peptic digestion of albumin is described. The fallacies involved in the study of gastric juice proteins where peptic digestion of the protein constituent has not been prevented are emphasized. In this study the gastric juice was neutralized within the stomach to prevent changes due to autodigestion. PMID:13943717

  18. Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in the Distal Part of Esophagus in a Teenager: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuta; Paduraru, Gabriela; Mihaila, Doina; Burlea, Marin; Ciubara, Anamaria

    2015-10-01

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) of the esophagus is a congenital anomaly consisting of ectopic gastric mucosa. It may be connected with disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, exacerbated by Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis of HGM is confirmed via endoscopy with biopsy. Histopathology provides the definitive diagnosis by demonstrating gastric mucosa adjacent to normal esophageal mucosa. HGM located in the distal esophagus needs differentiation from Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant injury for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Malignant progression of HGM occurs in a stepwise pattern, following the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.We present a rare case of a teenage girl with HGM located in the distal esophagus, associated with chronic gastritis and biliary duodenogastric reflux. Endoscopy combined with biopsies is a mandatory method in clinical evaluation of metaplastic and nonmetaplastic changes within HGM of the esophagus.

  19. The extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinomas assessed by tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Thiago S; Oshima, Celina T F; Segreto, Helena R C; Barrazueta, Luis M; Costa, Henrique O; Lima, Flavio O; Forones, Nora M; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the immunoexpression of FasL, Fas, FADD, cleaved caspase 8, and cleaved caspase 3 in gastric cancer. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded gastric adenocarcinoma tissues from 87 patients, including adjacent normal tissues, were included on tissue microarray by immunohistochemistry. The tumor and the adjacent normal tissues were positive for FasL in 66.7% and 90.6%, for Fas in 52.8% and 52.4%, for FADD in 67.4% and 82.3%, for cleaved caspase 8 in 27.9% and 37.7%, and for cleaved caspase 3 in 33.7% and 8.3%, respectively. FasL and the FADD from tumor were statistically different in relation to the histological type. Cleaved caspase 8 was statistically different in relation to clinical stage (p=0.031). The FADD from normal tissue was statistically different in relation to age (p=0.039), sex (p=0.055), clinical stage (p=0.019), and Fas was different in relation to tumor size (p=0.012). In the tumor, we observed a correlation between FasL and Fas, FasL and FADD, and FasL and cleaved caspase 3. In the adjacent normal tissue, a correlation was observed between FasL and Fas, FasL and FADD. There was no association of another marker with sex, age, clinical stage, and survival. Our results suggest that these proteins mediate the early extrinsic apoptotic pathway in gastric cancer and adjacent normal mucosa. FasL protein binds to Fas protein and subsequently binds to death receptor FADD signaling activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In this phase, there was inhibition of caspase 8 and, consequently, decreased apoptosis.

  20. MicroRNA-181b targets cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 in gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Qian; Kong, Wei-Qing; Liu, Tao; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2012-07-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators. In our previous study, we found that miR-181b was significantly downregulated in human gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples compared to the adjacent normal gastric tissues. In this study, we confirm the down-regulation of miR-181b in human gastric cancer cell lines versus the gastric epithelial cells. Overexpression of miR-181b suppressed the proliferation and colony formation rate of gastric cancer cells. miR-181b downregulated the expression of cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) by binding its 3' untranslated region. Overexpression of CREB1 counteracted the suppression of growth in gastric cancer cells caused by ectopic expression of miR-181b. These results indicate that miR-181b may function as a tumor suppressor in gastric adenocarcinoma cells through negative regulation of CREB1.

  1. Double blind controlled study on the effect of sucralfate on gastric prostaglandin formation and microbleeding in normal and aspirin treated man.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtułowicz, W; Kopp, B; Oleksy, J

    1986-01-01

    Two groups A and B each comprising 12 healthy young male subjects were used in a double blind, placebo controlled trial to assess the effects of 1.0 g sucralfate qid on prostaglandin (PG) generation and mucosal integrity in the intact and aspirin-treated stomach. Mucosal formation and luminal release of PGE2, 6-keto-PGE1 alpha and thromboxane B2, gastric microbleeding and DNA loss (integrity indicators) and basal and pentagastrin induced acid secretion were measured after placebo and sucralfate treatment in subjects without (group A) and with administration of 2.5 g aspirin (group B). Sucralfate significantly reduced spontaneous gastric microbleeding and DNA loss in group A and prevented blood loss but not DNA loss caused by aspirin in group B. The protective effects of sucralfate on spontaneous gastric microbleeding were accompanied by increased mucosal biosynthesis and luminal release of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha with a reduction in release of thromboxane B2. In aspirin treated subjects both mucosal generation and luminal release of prostaglandins and thromboxane B2 were greatly suppressed although sucralfate treatment did not influence these prostaglandins in spite of the reduction in mucosal damage. It is concluded that sucralfate has a potent protective action on spontaneous and aspirin treated gastric microbleeding in man and that this protection may be partly because of the increased mucosal biosynthesis of prostaglandins. PMID:3492413

  2. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  3. Altered expression of PTCH and HHIP in gastric cancer through their gene promoter methylation: novel targets for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Tian, Ye; Zuo, Yun; Tu, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Yu-Fang; Qu, Chen-Jiang

    2013-04-01

    Human hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) and protein patched homolog (PTCH) are two negative regulators of the hedgehog signal, however, the mechanism of action in gastric cancer is unknown. Methylation of TSG promoters has been considered as a causative mechanism of tumorigenesis. In the present study, we first determined the expression of PTCH and HHIP mRNA and protein in gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues, and then detected methylation of the two genes to associate their expression and gene promoter methylation in gastric cancer. Expression in gastric cancer tissues and the cancer cells (AGS) were evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), qRT-PCR and IHC, while the methylation expression was valued by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP). Cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed by MTT assay and flow cytometry following treatment with 5-aza-dc. Results showed that PTCH and HHIP expression was reduced in gastric cancer tissues that were not associated with clinical features. Moreover, methylation of the promoters was reversely correlated with the expression. Following treatment with 5-aza-dc, AGS reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis, which is associated with upregulation of HHIP expression. The data demonstrated that loss of expression of HHIP and PTCH is associated with the methylation of gene promoters. In addition, 5-aza-dc-induced apoptosis correlated with the upregulation of HHIP expression in AGS. The findings demonstrated that the PTCH and HHIP genes may be novel targets for the control of gastric cancer.

  4. Gastric juice miR-129 as a potential biomarker for screening gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing; Luo, Lin; Wu, Yibo; Yu, Xiuchong; Liu, Yang; Yu, Xuelin; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xinjun; Cui, Long; Ye, Guoliang; Le, Yanping; Guo, Junming

    2013-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles during the occurrence and development of gastric cancer. Conventional serological tests for screening gastric cancer have limits on sensitivity and specificity. Several miRNAs in peripheral blood have been used as biomarkers of gastric cancer. However, most of these miRNAs are shared by several types of cancer. Thanks to the tissue specificity of gastric juice, here we examined the feasibility of using gastric juice miR-129-1/2, which are aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer, to screen gastric cancer. Total of 141 gastric juices samples from gastric cancer, gastric ulcer, atrophic gastritis, and minimal gastritis patients or subjects with normal mucosa were collected by gastroscopy. The gastric juice miR-129-1/2 levels were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for differentiating patients with gastric cancer from patients with benign gastric diseases. We showed that, compared with patients with benign gastric diseases, patients with gastric cancer had significantly lower levels of gastric juice miR-129-1-3p and miR-129-2-3p. The areas under ROC curve (AUC) were 0.639 and 0.651 for miR-129-1-3p and miR-129-2-3p, respectively. Using the parallel combination test, the AUC was up to 0.656. In summary, our results suggest that gastric juice miR-129-1-3p and miR-129-2-3p are potential biomarkers for the screening gastric cancer, and the detection of gastric juice miRNAs is a convenient non-invasion method for the diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  5. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  6. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, and that gastric tumors contain cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are believed to share a common microenvironment with normal niche, which play an important role in gastric cancer and tumor growth. This mini-review presents a brief overview of the recent developments in gastric cancer stem cell research. The knowledge gained by studying cancer stem cells in gastric mucosa will support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:23583679

  7. The impact of surgical excisions on human gastric slow wave conduction, defined by high-resolution electrical mapping and in-silico modeling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Hameed, Ahmer; Angeli, Timothy R.; Lahr, Christopher; Abell, Thomas L.; Cheng, Leo K.; O’Grady, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric contractions are coordinated by slow waves, generated by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Gastric surgery affects slow wave conduction, potentially contributing to post-operative gastric dysfunction. However, the impact of gastric cuts on slow waves has not been comprehensively evaluated. This study aimed to define consequences of surgical excisions on gastric slow waves by applying high-resolution (HR) electrical mapping and in-silico modeling. Methods Patients undergoing gastric stimulator implantation (n=10) underwent full-thickness stapled excisions (25×15 mm, distal corpus) for histological evaluation, enabling HR mapping (256 electrodes; 36cm2) over and adjacent to excisions. A biophysically-based in-silico model of bi-directionally coupled ICC networks was developed and applied to investigate the underlying conduction mechanisms and importance of excision orientation. Results Normal gastric slow waves propagated aborally (3.0±0.2 cycles/min). Excisions induced complete conduction block and wavelets that rotated around blocks, then propagated rapidly circumferentially distal to blocks (8.5±1.2 vs normal 3.6±0.4 mm s−1; p<0.01). This ‘conduction anisotropy’ homeostatically restored antegrade propagating gastric wavefronts distal to excisions. Excisions were associated with complex dysrhythmias in 5 patients: retrograde propagation (3/10), ectopics (3/10), functional blocks (2/10) and collisions (1/10). Simulations demonstrated conduction anisotropy emerged from bidirectional coupling within ICC layers and showed transverse incision length and orientation correlated to degree of conduction distortion. Conclusions Orienting incisions in the longitudinal gastric axis causes least disruption to electrical conduction and motility. However, if transverse incisions are made, a homeostatic mechanism of gastric conduction anisotropy compensates by restoring aborally-propagating wavefronts. Complex dysrhythmias accompanying excisions could

  8. Expression of FoxM1 and the EMT-associated protein E-cadherin in gastric cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Ke-Jian; Wu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Jun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) and E-cadherin in tissues of gastric cancer in order to reveal any correlation between FoxM1, E-cadherin and clinicopathological parameters. The association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin in the development and progression of gastric cancer was also investigated. The expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissue on tissue microarray was detected using immunohistochemistry. The clinicopathological significance of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer was explored, and the association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin was further examined using statistical techniques. In gastric cancer tissues, the expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin was strongly positive, but it was weak in normal gastric mucosa. Overexpression of FoxM1 was evident in gastric cancer, and was associated with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), advanced tumor state (P<0.05) and lymph node (or distant) metastasis (P<0.05), whereas E-cadherin had the opposite effects. Furthermore, the correlation between FoxM1 and E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue was negative. In conclusion, the high FoxM1 expression and low E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue suggests that these proteins play a critical role in the development and progression of gastric cancer. PMID:27698811

  9. Can transcutaneous recordings detect gastric electrical abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Familoni, B O; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J; Cote, K R

    1991-01-01

    The ability of transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity to detect gastric electrical abnormalities was determined by simultaneous measurements of gastric electrical activity with surgically implanted serosal electrodes and cutaneous electrodes in six patients undergoing abdominal operations. Transient abnormalities in gastric electrical activity were seen in five of the six patients during the postoperative period. Recognition of normal gastric electrical activity by visual analysis was possible 67% of the time and with computer analysis 95% of the time. Ninety four per cent of abnormalities in frequency were detected by visual analysis and 93.7% by computer analysis. Abnormalities involving a loss of coupling, however, were not recognised by transcutaneous recordings. Transcutaneous recordings of gastric electrical activity assessed by computer analysis can usually recognise normal gastric electrical activity and tachygastria. Current techniques, however, are unable to detect abnormalities in electrical coupling. PMID:1864531

  10. Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNA PVT1 and its diagnostic and prognostic significance in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C L; Li, H; Zhu, L; Liu, Z; Zhou, J; Shu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that dysregulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in cancer tumorigenesis and progression and might be used as diagnosis and prognosis biomarker, or potential therapeutic targets. LncRNA PVT1 has been reported to be upregulated in diverse human cancers; however, its clinical significance in gastric cancer (GC) remains elusive. This study was to evaluate the expression of PVT1 in GC and further explore its clinical significance.Previous microarray datasets were analyzed to conduct a preliminary screening for candidate lncRNAs of gastric cancer biomarkers in human gastric cancer tissues. Expression levels of PVT1 in 111pairs of gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues, gastric cancer cell lines and gastric cancer juices compared to their corresponding controls were detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Kaplan-Meier analysis were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic values. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using the Cox proportional hazard analysis.PVT1 expression was remarkably increased in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines compared with that in the normal control, and its up-regulation was significantly correlated to invasion depth (P < 0.001), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.002) and regional lymph nodes metastasis (P < 0.001) in gastric cancer. PVT1 levels were robust in differentiating gastric cancer tissues from controls [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.728; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.665-0.786, p<0.01]. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that increased PVT1 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P < 0.01) and disease-free survival (P < 0.01) of patients. A multivariate survival analysis also indicated that PVT1 could be an independent prognostic marker. The levels of PVT1 in gastric juice from gastric patients were significantly higher than those from normal subjects (P = 0.03). PVT1 might serve as a

  11. Dysregulation of MicroRNA-196b-5p and MicroRNA-375 in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Park, Ki Cheol; Kim, Jeong Goo; Moon, Sung Jin; Kang, Sang Bum; Lee, Dong Soo; Sul, Hae Joung; Ji, Jeong Seon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) can contribute to cancer development by leading to abnormal proliferation of cells, apoptosis, and differentiation. Although several miRNAs that are related to gastric cancer have been identified, the reported results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to determine miRNA expression profiles and validate miRNAs up- and down-regulated in gastric cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated 34 primary gastric cancer tissues and paired adjacent nontumorous gastric tissues. Total RNA was extracted, and low-molecular-weight RNAs (<200 nucleotides) were isolated for further analysis. Two pairs of tissues were processed for GeneChip microarray analysis, and the identified up- and down-regulated miRNAs were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results In the set of differentially expressed miRNAs, 5 were overexpressed by more than 2 fold, and 5 were reduced by 2 fold or less in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal gastric tissues. Four of these miRNAs (miR-196b-5p, miR-375, miR-483-5p, and miR-486-5p) were then validated by qPCR, and the relative expression levels of 2 miRNAs (miR-196b-5p and miR-375) were significantly different between cancer and normal tissues. Conclusions Our results revealed that the expression of miR-196b-5p and miR-375 significantly correlates with gastric cancer. These miRNAs could therefore serve as diagnostic biomarkers of gastric cancer. PMID:28053808

  12. Identification of the long non‑coding RNA LET as a novel tumor suppressor in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingjing; Hu, Xibao; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Xinrong; Ma, Junhong; Yuan, Hongxia

    2017-04-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged recently as important factors in regulating fundamental biological processes. Alterations in the expression and function of lncRNAs have been observed to promote tumor formation, progression and metastasis. Although downregulation of the expression levels of LET lncRNA in several tumors has been reported, its role in gastric cancer remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and function of LET in gastric cancer development. The expression levels of LET in 37 pairs of gastric cancer and adjacent non‑tumor tissues were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR). In addition, LET expression in gastric cancer cell lines was analyzed by RT‑qPCR assay analysis. Furthermore, the impact of LET on cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis were detected using the cell counting kit‑8, wound scratch and ELISA assays, respectively. The results demonstrated that the expression level of LET was downregulated in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines (SGC‑7901 and MGC‑803) compared with normal tissues and a normal human gastric epithelial cell line (GES‑1). Restoration of LET expression using a synthesized recombinant overexpression vector transfected into SGC‑7901 and MGC‑803 cells, significantly inhibited cell proliferation and migration, and promoted cell apoptosis in vitro. The present study is the first to demonstrate that LET may function as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. The results indicate that LET may be a promising biomarker and/or a therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  13. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  14. Urinary ADAM12 and MMP-9/NGAL complex detect the presence of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Takaya; Dagher, Adelle; Sachdev, Monisha; Ebi, Masahide; Yamada, Tamaki; Yamada, Tomonori; Joh, Takashi; Moses, Marsha A

    2015-03-01

    Although the early diagnosis of gastric cancer provides the opportunity for curative endoscopic resection, comprehensive screening endoscopy would be invasive and expensive. To date, there is a complete absence of clinically useful gastric cancer biomarkers. With the goal of discovering noninvasive biomarkers for the early diagnosis of gastric cancer, we have conducted a case-control study using urine samples from individuals with gastric cancer versus healthy control samples. Of the enrolled 106 patients from September, 2012 to April, 2013, a cohort of 70 patients composed of 35 patients with gastric cancer and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was analyzed. The gastric cancer group was composed of stage IA of 62.9% (22/35). The urinary levels of MMP-9/NGAL complex (uMMP-9/NGAL) and ADAM12 (uADAM12) were significantly higher in the gastric cancer group compared with the healthy control group as determined by monospecific ELISAs (uMMP-9/NGAL: median, 85 pg/mL vs. 0 pg/mL; P = 0.020; uADAM12: median, 3.35 ng/mL vs. 1.44 ng/mL; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that both uMMP-9/NGAL and uADAM12 were significant, independent diagnostic biomarkers for gastric cancer. Moreover, MMP-9/NGAL activity was significantly elevated as determined by gelatin zymography. The combination of uMMP-9/NGAL with uADAM12 distinguished between control samples and gastric cancer samples with an AUC of 0.825 (P < 0.001) in an ROC analysis. Significantly, immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a high coexpression of MMP-9 and NGAL (P < 0.001) and high expression of ADAM12 (P < 0.001) in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues (N = 35). In summary, uMMP-9/NGAL and uADAM12 are potential noninvasive biomarkers for gastric cancer, including early-stage disease.

  15. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction; Bowel obstruction - suction ... A tube is inserted through your nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Your ...

  16. Roles of linear and circular polarization properties and effect of wavelength choice on differentiation between ex vivo normal and cancerous gastric samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Lim, Lee Guan; Srivastava, Supriya; Yan, Jimmy So Bok; Shabbir, Asim; Liu, Quan

    2014-04-01

    Multispectral Mueller matrix imaging was performed over a spectral range from 470 to 632 nm on 4-μm unstained gastric tissue sections. A complete set of polarization parameters was derived. The combination of linear depolarization and linear retardance yields the highest accuracy in sample classification. When the depolarization of linearly polarized light due to scattering is independent of the orientation angle of the incident linear polarization vector, the derivation of linear polarization properties will require only 3×3 Mueller matrix, which would significantly reduce the complexity of the polarimetry imaging system. When additional parameters are needed to complement the two linear polarization parameters, retardance, circular depolarization, and depolarization can be included in classification in the order of preference. However, these additional parameters would require the measurement of 4×4 Mueller matrix. In addition, it appears that wavelength is not a critical factor in terms of classification accuracy for thin tissue sections in this study.

  17. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  18. Gastric sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemi, Emmanuel; Rohewal, Upinder; Tangorra, Matthew; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    A 58-year-old Jamaican male presented with acute-onset, right-sided facial droop and slurred speech. He had an episode of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed on the second day of admission and endoscopy with biopsy of antral ulcer revealed gastric sarcoidosis. This case demonstrates the rare entity of gastric sarcoidosis presenting acutely with an upper GI bleed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16775918

  19. Expression of group IIA phospholipase A2 is an independent predictor of favorable outcome for patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Huang, Chun-Jin; Yu, Guan-Zhen; Wang, Jie-Jun; Wang, Rui; Li, Yu-Mei; Wu, Qiong

    2013-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis in human gastrointestinal cancer. One of the well-studied isoforms of PLA2, group IIA PLA2 (PLA2G2A), appears to exert its protumorigenic or antitumorigenic effects in a tissue-specific manner. The present study was designed to determine the expression profile and prognostic value of PLA2G2A in gastric cancer in a large Chinese cohort. By using real-time polymerase chain reaction, the amount of PLA2G2A messenger RNA in 60 pairs of fresh gastric tumors and adjacent noncancerous mucosa was measured. The immunostaining of PLA2G2A in 866 gastric cancers with paired noncancerous tissues was assayed. No expression of PLA2G2A was found in normal gastric mucosa, and focal expression of PLA2G2A was noticed in intestinal metaplasia, whereas significantly increased expression of PLA2G2A was observed in the cytoplasm of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the extent of PLA2G2A expression was associated with tumor size (P < .001), tumor differentiation (P = .001), T class (P < .001), N class (P < .001), and TNM stage (P < .001) of gastric cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that PLA2G2A expression was an independent predictor of survival for patients with gastric cancer (P = .024). Expression of PLA2G2A seems to be protective for patients with gastric cancer (hazard ratio, 1.423; 95% confidence interval, 1.047-1.935), and it may be a target for achieving better treatment outcomes.

  20. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  1. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  2. [Gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, A

    1997-04-15

    The stomach is the most common site involved in primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originates from the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue so called MALT. It comprises a group of distinctive clinicopathological entities which are important to take in account for clinical behavior. In recent years, new diagnostic tools and modern modes of treatment have improved their overall prognosis. One of the most exciting recent discoveries is the hypothesis that an infection by a bacterium. Helicobacter pylori has a decisive role in gastric lymphoma.

  3. [Gastric volvulus].

    PubMed

    Solórzano, J; Acosta, D; Morales, H; Vásquez, F; Mora, G; Chávez, M; Andrade, D; Joutteaux, R; Sánchez, I; García, D; Valenzuela, E

    2006-10-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition in pediatric population in which there is an abnormal rotation of one part of the stomach around itself. It's a surgical emergency. We report a six year old female admitted in the emergency due to upper abdominal distention, nausea without vomiting, physical exam revealed upper abdominal distention and abdominal tenderness, no bowel sounds. Laparotomy was performed and a gastric volvulus with occlusive vascular involvement was found. In the post operative period she required a second laparotomy due to adhesions in small bowel.

  4. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  5. [Gastric cleansing].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann Serret, Alina; Alcaraz Bravo, Judit; Carballo Alvarez, Montse; Fernández Vargas, Carmen

    2006-10-01

    Numerous cases in emergency wards are due to the ingestion of potentially toxic substances. One of the most utilized procedures under these circumstances is gastric cleansing. This procedure is a technique habitually practiced by nursing personnel but is not without its risks. Therefore, the motive of this article is to make known the indications, contraindications, related complications of gastric cleansing and its integral patient care process in order to offer quality care methods which enable their being performed in an effective and efficient manner, under the maximum security conditions with the minimum inconveniences for the patient while at the same time describing the system most commonly used by our service.

  6. Association between the expression of T-cadherin and vascular endothelial growth factor and the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bin; Shi, Haitao; Lu, Xiaolan; Shi, Ameng; Cheng, Yan; Dong, Lei

    2015-08-01

    T-cadherin has been identified as a tumor-suppressor gene in several types of cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the association of the expression of T-cadherin with angiogenesis, and to evaluate its prognostic value for patients with primary gastric cancer. Gastric cancer tissues and matched adjacent tissues from 166 patients receiving surgical resection were included in the present study. The expression of T-cadherin was detected using immunohistochemistry, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) was detected using immunohistochemistry, and its association with the expression of T-cadherin was analyzed. In addition, the association between the expression of T-cadherin and clinicopathological features were analyzed. The mRNA and protein expression levels of T-cadherin were significantly lower in the gastric cancer tissue compared with the corresponding adjacent normal tissue (P<0.05). The expression of VEGF was not associated with the expression of T-cadherin in the gastric cancer tissue. The decreased protein expression of T-cadherin correlated with smoking, larger tumor size (diameter, >4 cm), lymph node metastasis and a higher tumor-lymph node-metastasis stage (P<0.05 or P<0.01). However, the expression of T-cadherin was not correlated with gender, age, alcohol intake, Helecobacter pylori infection or differentiation (P>0.05). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the expression of T-cadherin was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival rate of patients with gastric cancer. This data suggested that the downregulation of T-cadherin may contribute to gastric cancer progression, representing a useful biomarker for predicting the biological behavior and prognosis of gastric cancer. However, no significant association was observed between the expression of VEGF and T-cadherin.

  7. Analysis of the Distribution of Mucins in Adult Human Gastric Mucosa and Its Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mucins are complex composition of carbohydrates seen in the epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Normal distribution of such mucins in different part of the GIT and its alteration in various inflammatory, benign and malignant lesions of GIT has aroused interest in the field of histochemistry. Aim By applying variety of histochemical techniques an attempt has been made to draw a map of mucin secretion by the different epithelial cell types in different parts of the stomach. Materials and Methods Fifty samples were taken each from different parts of the stomach like fundus, body and pylorus, from dissected fresh specimens (total of 150 specimens). Tissue samples were subjected for routine process and studied for histological and different histochemical staining. Results Mucin pattern in adult predominantly secretes neutral mucosubstances. Surface epithelium shows predominant neutral mucin while cardiac and gastric glands with foveolar cells show moderate amount. Sialomucin is present in a few cells of the surface epithelium, foveolar cells and in most of the mucous neck cells. Small amount of sialomucin and sulphomucin are found in surface epithelial foveolar cells while traces of sulphomucin are found in deep foveolar cells. Mucous neck cells secrete both sulphomucin and sialomucin. Conclusion Normal gastric mucosa adjacent to gastric ulcers and malignant tumours of stomach secretes mucins which differ histochemically and biochemically from that of normal. Early recognition of such changes could be useful in recognizing the different type of carcinomas and their prognosis. PMID:27042436

  8. HOXA11 gene is hypermethylation and aberrant expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant DNA methylation is an acquired epigenetic alteration that serves as an alternative to genetic defects in the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and other genes in diverse human cancers. Gastric carcinoma is one of the tumors with a high frequency of aberrant methylation in promoter region. Hence we investigated the promoter methylation status and expression level of HOXA11 gene which may involve in GC development. Methods Thirty-two surgical excised gastric cancer specimens, twelve paired adjacent non-cancerous specimens and seven normal gastric mucosas were examined. The methylation status and expression level of HOXA11 gene were determined by bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP), real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) respectively. HOXA11 expression was knocked-down with siRNA to mimic HOXA11 gene hypermethylation and ability of cell proliferation and migration was determinate. In addition, we analyzed and correlated the findings with clinicopathological features. Results The methylation level of HOXA11 gene in gastric cancer tissues and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were higher than those in normal gastric mucosa (P < 0.05). The methylation level was higher in TNM III and IV patients of GC than those in TNM I and II patients (P < 0.05). The expression of HOXA11 mRNA and protein decreased in normal gastric mucosa, peri-cancer tissue and GC (P < 0.05). HOXA11 expression was inversely correlated with DNA methylation (P < 0.05). Knocked-down of HOXA11 expression with siRNA in BGC-823 cells enhanced cell proliferation compared with control, but no significant different was observed in migration ability. Conclusion Hypermethylation and decreased expression of HOXA11 gene may be involved in the carcinogenesis and development of GC and may provide useful information for the prediction of the malignant behaviors of GC. And the expression of HOXA11 is impaired by DNA methylation. However

  9. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field.

  10. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces CD14+HLA-DR‑/low myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wu, Ke; Tao, Kaixiong; Lu, Xiaoming; Ma, Jianhua; Mao, Zhengqiang; Li, Hang; Shi, Liang; Li, Jing; Niu, Yanfeng; Xiang, Fan; Wang, Guobin

    2015-07-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous group of cells, which have been revealed to inhibit T-cell responses in tumor-bearing mice. In addition, a number of immune suppressive mechanisms have linked MDSCs and the development of human cancer. However, the role of MDSCs in human gastric cancer tissue remains to be elucidated as specific markers are lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency and immune suppressive function of MDSCs denoted in the present study as cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14)+human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-/low in gastric cancer patients. In the present study, MDSCs were directly isolated and characterized from the tumor and adjacent normal tissue of gastric cancer patients. Functional analysis of the CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSCs co-cultured with allogeneic CD4+ T cells were performed and compared with controls. In addition, the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 production was compared in order to investigate the capacity of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to induce CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) MDSC-mediated CD4+ T-cell dysfunction and whether IL-10 secretion is involved in this mechanism. As a result, the quantity of CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) cells in tumor tissue from gastric cancer patients was significantly higher than that in the adjacent normal tissue. In addition, CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSCs isolated from tumor tissue were observed to inhibit the CD4+ T-cells' immune responses in comparison with those from the adjacent normal tissue. Furthermore, VIP was able to induce the differentiation of CD14+ mononuclear cells isolated from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells into activated MDSC cells. Of note, the immunosuppressive effect of VIP-induced CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) MDSCs on CD4+ T cells was mediated by IL-10 secretion, which was demonstrated in the subsequent decrease of IFN-γ and IL-2 production. In conclusion, CD14+HLA-DR(-/low) cells were significantly increased in gastric

  11. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass - discharge; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity ... Gloy VL, Briel M, Bhatt DL, et al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic ...

  12. Role of EZH2 protein expression in gastric carcinogenesis among Asians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lin; Yang, Teng-Fei; Liang, Shi-Chao; Guo, Ji-Xiang; Wang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    The present meta-analysis aggregated the results of relevant studies to identify the role of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) expression in gastric carcinogenesis among Asians. Related articles were found by searching the following electronic databases without language restrictions: PubMed, SpringerLink, Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Google Scholar. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA statistical software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) with their corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) were calculated. Ten relevant studies, which enrolled a total of 872 gastric cancer patients, were selected for statistical analysis. The most important findings of our meta-analysis was that cancer tissues exhibited higher expression levels of EZH2 protein than normal, adjacent and benign tissues (cancer tissues vs normal tissues: OR = 32.15, 95 % CI 22.58 ~ 45.79, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs adjacent tissues: OR = 16.10, 95 % CI 11.35 ~ 22.84, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs benign tissues: OR = 2.66, 95 % CI 1.89 ~ 3.75, P < 0.001; respectively). Furthermore, we observed positive correlations between EZH2 expression and the TNM stage (OR = 2.86, 95 % CI 1.72 ~ 4.75, P < 0.001) as well as lymph node metastasis (OR = 3.02, 95 % CI 2.01 ~ 4.53, P < 0.001) of patients with gastric carcinoma. The correlation between EZH2 expression and gastric cancer prognosis was also evaluated in the meta-analysis. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the overall survival (OS) of EZH2-negative patients was shorter than that of patients with positive expressions of EZH2 (HR = 0.54, 95 % CI = 0.05 ~ 1.03, P = 0.032). Our meta-analysis confirmed the view that EZH2 expression might participate in the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, EZH2 protein may be a valuable biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  13. Isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis presenting with severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Burzyantseva, Olga; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Gastric polyps exist in a wide variety of types, most of which are small and often benign. Discovery of gastric polyps during Endoscopy necessitates biopsies. Case presentation We present a case report of an isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis in a 26 years old Hispanic female when she was investigated for profound anemia. The Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous gastric polyps filling the entire stomach. She was treated with near-total gastrectomy and her anemia resolved Conclusion Isolated diffuse hyperplasic gastric polyposis with normal gastrin level is a rare entity and can present with severe anemia. PMID:18755016

  14. [Gastric epithelial polyps (part two)].

    PubMed

    Espejo Romero, Luis Hernán; Navarrete Siancas, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    The following is a statistical report regarding gastric polyps: Frequency determined through endoscopic examinations was 3.6%. The terms hyperplastic polyps and adenomas were used for the classification of epithelial polyps, considering the suprafoveal hyperplasias within the hyperplastic polyps, provided they were elevated lesions. Out of 2,283 polyps, 1,959 were hyperplastic (86%) and 324 were adenomas (14%). When analyzing 780 polyps, 86 (11%) were found to have the Nakamura III category. With regard to topography, in an examination of 2253 polyps, hyperplastic polyps were located as follows: 325 (17%) in the antrum, 1402 (73%) in the body and 202 (10%) in the fundus. Adenomas had a different distribution: 212 (65%) in the antrum, 100 (31%) in the body and 12 (4%) in the fundus. Out of 371 hyperplastic polyps examined, 49% were pediculate and 51% were sessile; on the contrary, 86 % of adenomas were sessile. The average age was 66.2 years in adenoma carriers, 58.5 in those having hyperplastic polyps, and 57.4 for suprafoveal hyperplasias. In 287 adenomas, 94.1% of carriers were over 40 years old. Out of 92 adenomas examined, 21.7% evidenced adenoma metaplasia and 72.8% evidenced metaplasia in adjacent areas. Only 5.5% had no metaplasia. In 105 hyperplastic polyps studied, intestinal metaplasia was found: 16.7% in the polyp and 60% in adjacent areas. No metaplasia was found in the remaining 23.3%. Average size of the adenomas was 14 mm and of hyperplastic polyps, 11 mm. A total of 195 adenomas were smaller than 10 mm. The percentage of malignization in 288 adenomas examined was closely related to their size: 214 (66%) smaller than 20 mm, had a malignization percentage of 7%; 74 (34%) larger than 20 mm, had 51% malignization, and 86.2% malignization was found in adenomas of over 40 mm. Global malignization percentage of adenomas was 18%. However, when adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the 4.1 category of the Viena classification (non-invasive high grade

  15. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  16. Using gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 as a novel type of biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunben; Shao, Yongfu; Zhu, Mengying; Li, Qier; Yang, Fang; Lu, Xuwen; Xu, Chunjing; Xiao, Bingxiu; Sun, Yanke; Guo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in tumorigenesis. However, the diagnostic values of most lncRNAs are largely unknown. To investigate whether gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 can be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer, 173 tissue samples and 130 gastric juice from benign lesion, gastric dysplasia, gastric premalignant lesions, and gastric cancer were collected. ABHD11-AS1 levels were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Then, the relationships between ABHD11-AS1 levels and clinicopathological factors of patients with gastric cancer were investigated. The results showed that ABHD11-AS1 levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in other tissues. Its levels in gastric juice from gastric cancer patients were not only significantly higher than those from cases of normal mucosa or minimal gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and gastric ulcers but also associated with gender, tumor size, tumor stage, Lauren type, and blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. More importantly, when using gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 as a marker, the positive detection rate of early gastric cancer patients was reached to 71.4 %. Thanks to the special origin of gastric juice, these results indicate that gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 may be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

  17. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-10-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis.

  18. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  19. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  20. [Effects of miR-382 on cell migration, invasion and proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Bu, P; Li, F; Liu, X L; Xu, J

    2017-02-28

    Objective: To investigate the effects of miR-382 on cell migration, invasion and proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803. Methods: The level of miR-382 expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 50 paired gastric cancer tissues and their adjacent normal tissues. miR-382 overexpression was achieved by transfection of construct pcDNA-miR-382 into MGC-803 cells. The migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells were detected by the scratch wound assay, Transwell and CCK-8, respectively. Results: miR-382 was decreased in 41 cases (82%) of gastric cancer tissues compared to their control. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-382 effectively inhibited the migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells(P<0.05). Conclusion: Down-regulation of miR-382 has a correlation with the progression of gastric cancer. Up-regulation of miR-382 can inhibit the migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells.

  1. Visualization of gastric bands on radionuclide gastric emptying studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; McIntyre, B.; Elgin, D.; Christian, P.; Moore, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of performing many gastric emptying studies with radionuclide labeled solid and liquid meals, the authors have noted the appearance of gastric ''bands'' on images. These bands do not appear to be peristaltic contractions because they persist in individual subjects for hours of imaging. Peristaltic contraction waves move and change appearance within a few seconds. Bands have been described in humans at autopsy and in dogs, pigs, and monkeys, typically in transverse and mid-gastric locations. However, because the bands have not been seen on radiographic studies with barium meals, the finding has been ignored in gastro-intestinal and radiologic textbooks. An anatomic basis or physiologic role in regulating gastric emptying is unknown. SPECT imaging of 5 normal subjects after ingestion of Tc-99m sulfur colloid labeled chicken liver meals on two separate study days was performed. Linear photon deficient regions (''bands'') were identified on gastric images in all subjects. Multiple bands were sometimes seen, including a transverse band across the mid lower body of the stomach and a vertical longitudinal band which appeared to bisect the fundus in three subjects. In one subject, multiple body positions including upright, upside-down, and supine, did not alter the appearance or location of the transverse gastric band. Conventional imaging did not always demonstrate presence of the band, since the optimal projection for imaging the band may not have been part of the planar imaging routine. Sixty-four acquisitions over 360/sup 0/ of SPECT imaging showed that bands were seen in some projections and not in others.

  2. Do calories or osmolality determine gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.B.; Levine, A.S.; Marlette, J.M.; Morley, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Recent animal studies suggest that gastric emptying is dependent on the caloric and osmotic content of the ingested food. These studies have involved intubation with infusion of liquid meals into the stomach. Scintigraphic methods, which are non-invasive and do not alter normal physiology, are now available for precise quantitation of gastric emptying. To study the role of calories and osmolality on gastric emptying, the authors employed a standardized /sup 99m/Tc-scrambled egg meal washed with 50 cc tap water in 10 normal human volunteers. A variety of simple and complex sugars, non-absorbable complex carbohydrate (polycose), medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) and gluten were dissolved in water and ingested with the test meal. Each subject acted as his own control. Coefficient of variation in control tests in each subject 12 weeks apart was 9.9%. Results showed that incremental glucose (25-66 gm) produced a linear increase in gastric emptying (T/2 control 50 +- 3, 25 gm 60 +- 3, 50 gm 79 +- 3 and 66 gm 102 +- 3 minutes). 25 gm fructose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) and 25 gm polycose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) had similar effects to glucose. 25 gm sucrose and 25 gm gluten did not significantly differ from controls. MCFA had an effect similar to 50 gm glucose - suggesting that calories are important in gastric emptying. However, 25 gm xylose markedly prolonged gastric emptying to 80 +- 5 minutes. The rank order for osmolality for substances tested MCFA = gluten < polycose < polycose < fructose < sucrose = glucose < xylose defined no relationship to gastric emptying. The authors' results suggest that neither calories nor osmolality alone determine gastric emptying. A specific food does not necessarily have the same effect on gastric emptying in different individuals.

  3. Intraoperative Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chan; Ravindranathan, Sharmila; Choksi, Vivek; Kattalan, Jestin Pudussery; Shankar, Uday; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Gastric intramural hematoma Symptoms: Bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accident Background: Intramural hematomas primarily present in the esophagus or duodenum. We report a case of intramural hematoma in the gastric wall (GIH) secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in a setting of platelet dysfunction. Case Report: This case study reviews the hospitalization of a 73-year-old male with a history of chronic kidney disease who was admitted for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and mitral valve repair. During his complicated hospital course, he inadvertently required the placement of a PEG tube. His coagulation profile prior to this procedure was within normal limits. The patient had no history of coagulopathy and was taking aspirin 81 mg per day. PEG tube placement was withheld due to an expanding hematoma that was noted at the site of needle insertion in the gastric wall. A single dose of intravenous desmopressin (0.3 microgram/kilogram) was administered under the suspicion of uremic bleeding. No further gastrointestinal bleeding events were observed. A platelet function assay (PFA) and collagen/epinephrine closure time indicated platelet dysfunction. Three days later, we again attempted a PEG tube placement. His PFA prior to this procedure had normalized due to aspirin discontinuation and improvement of renal function. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed an area of flat bluish gastric submucosal bruising at the site of the previous hematoma. The PEG tube was placed successfully at an adjacent site. Over the course of the following month, the patient underwent uneventful feeding through the PEG tube. Conclusions: To our knowledge, cases of GIH are rarely documented in literature. Multidisciplinary vigilance is required to maintain a high index of suspicion for this

  4. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  5. [Enzymes in gastric juice. An aid in the diagnosis of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Marino Alarcón, O; Concho Lugo, H; Silva Larralte, T; Tauil Bsereni, E; Solano Nava, P; Machado, D; Chacón Patiño, A

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we measured the activities of the following enzymes: LDH (lactic dehydrogenase), beta-glucuronidase, acid maltase, phosphohexoseisomerase (PHI) and acid proteases in the gastric juice of patients with gastric cancer (n = 50) (Case Group), in endoscopically normal subjects (n = 50) and in subjects with different non tumor-like digestive pathologies (n = 55) (Control Groups). In the patients with gastric carcinoma we found a significant increase in LDH, beta-glucuronidase, PHI and acid maltase activities and a decreased activity of acid proteases. The results agree with previous findings from other workers. The variations of enzyme activities in gastric juice can help to differentiate between malignant and benign processes of the gastric mucosa.

  6. Chronic Gastric Ischemia Leading to Gastric Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lundsmith, Emma; Zheng, Matthew; McCue, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension presented with 3 months of diffuse abdominal pain that worsened with meals, weight loss, and dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography revealed findings consistent with chronic gastric ischemia secondary to atherosclerosis. Gastric ischemia eventually led to perforation. We discuss causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of gastric ischemia, an underdiagnosed and potentially fatal condition that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28119945

  7. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  8. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  9. Gastric Schwannoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Romdhane, Hayfa; Cheikh, Myriam; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Slama, Sana Ben; Ennaifer, Rym; Belhadj, Najet

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are generally benign, slow growing tumors. They are rarely observed in the gastrointestinal tract with the most common site being the stomach. These tumors are usually asymptomatic. The preoperative diagnosis via endoscopy is a challenging issue due to the difficulty of differentiation from other submucosal tumors. A 54-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain persisting for the last 10 months. Upper endoscopy revealed an elevated submucosal mass of the gastric antrum. The overlying mucosa was normal. Biopsy specimens yielded only unspecific signs of mild inactive chronic inflammation. Endoscopic ultrasound examination noted a hypoechoic homogeneous mass lesion located in the gastric antrum. The mass appeared to arise from the muscularis propria, and there was no perigastric lymphadenopathy. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan identified a homogeneous round mass and arising from the antrum of the stomach. Submucosal tumor was suspected and surgical intervention was recommended. The patient underwent an elective laparoscopic partial gastrectomy. The histopathologic features and immunohistochemical-staining pattern were consistent with a benign gastric schwannoma. Our patient shows no recurrence with a follow-up of one year. The definitive diagnosis of gastric schwannomas requires immunohistochemical studies. Complete margin negative surgical resection, as in this case, is the curative treatment of choice. The clinical course is generally benign. PMID:28028429

  10. Effect of diazepam on unstimulated and on stimulated gastric secretion.

    PubMed

    Bennett, P N; Davies, P; Frigo, G M; Weerasinghe, W M; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1975-01-01

    The effect of intravenous diazepam on unstimulated and on pentagastrin-stimulated gastric secretion has been studied in normal subjects. No significant effect of diazapam was found on pentagastrin-stimulated gastric secretion. Unstimulated secretion was reduced by diazepam. This action of diazepam may be useful in peptic ulcer therapy.

  11. Repression of PES1 expression inhibits growth of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieping; Zhou, Xiaodong; Lan, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobin; Jiang, Xuping; Huang, Zongming

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. However, precise molecular mechanisms underlining its development are far from clear. We recently reported that PES1 promoted development of breast cancer and ovarian cancer as an oncogene. In this study, we reported that ablation of endogenous PES1 resulted in significant suppression of cell proliferation and growth and led to cell cycle arrest in G2 or G1 phase, respectively, in two gastric cancer cell lines (AGS and N87) in vitro. Meanwhile, silencing of PES1 obviously decreased expressions of cyclin D1, HIF-1α, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions and increased p21WAF1 expression. Re-expression of PES1 in these two kinds of PES1 knockdown cells rescued these effects. In vivo, repression of endogenous PES1 expression suppressed gastric tumor growth in nude mice. In addition, 40.7 % (24/59) of gastric cancer tissues showed PES1 expression via immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. However, there were not any positive PES1 stainings in matched adjacent tissues. Our results demonstrated that repression of PES1 changed expressions of some cell proliferation- and angiogenesis-related genes and inhibited gastric cancer growth, and PES1 expression increased in gastric cancer tissues. These results suggest that PES1 may play an important role in development of gastric cancer. PES1 may be a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  12. Gastric heterotopia in the rectum. A rare cause of ectopic gastric tissue.

    PubMed

    Salem, George A; Fazili, Javid; Ali, Tauseef

    2017-02-17

    Gastric heterotopia refers to the discovery of normal gastric tissue at foreign, unexpected sites. It has been described anywhere in the alimentary tract, even in the mediastinum, scrotum, and spinal cord. It is not uncommonly seen in the oesophagus or small intestine. However, large bowel lesions are rare, with the most common location of colonic lesions is the rectum. Although it is a rare entity, it may be the source for significant problems such as rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, deep rectal pain, and malignancy. Here, we report an additional case of gastric heterotopia in the rectum of a 56year old gentleman, and review the literature.

  13. Expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 in gastric adenocarcinoma and their clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shufang; Shi, Lifang; Zhang, Yi; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to detect the expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 in gastric adenocarcinoma, and to evaluate their roles in the carcinogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma, development, invasion and metastasis as well as their clinical significance. Methods: The expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 was detected by SP immunohistochemical method in 225 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 105 cases of nonneoplastic adjacent gastric tissue. The expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 mRNA was also detected by RT-PCR method in 50 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 30 cases of nonneoplastic adjacent gastric tissue. Results: The expression of SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the gastric adenocarcinoma was remarkably higher than those in the nonneoplastic adjacent gastric tissue (P < 0.01); The positive expression of SNCG and MAP2 was correlated with the depth of tumor invasion and the metastasis of lymph nodes (P < 0.05), and that of SDF-1 and CXCR4 was correlated with the metastasis of lymph nodes (P < 0.05). Conclusions: SNCG, MAP2, SDF-1 and CXCR4 may play an important role in the carcinogenesis, progression, invasion and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, it still needs more exploration whether they can serve as promising therapeutic targets of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:25400739

  14. [Gastric and intestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Larbi, Noureddine; Kaâbi, Samarra; Ben Salah, Khiareddine

    2003-12-01

    The authors report a retrospective study of 10 cases of gastric and small bowel bezoars. There was one gastric trichobezoar diagnosed by an abdominal mass and 9 small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoars. All patients underwent surgery: the gastric trichobezoar was removed through a gastrotomy; small bowel bezoars were treated either by enterotomy (n = 3), fragmentation (n = 5) or bowel resection (n = 1). Non operative treatment is efficient in gastric phytobezoars. Surgery is advisable for trichobezoars and small bowel bezoars. Prevention is main and patients who have gastric surgery must be alarmed from consumption of cactus in our country Tunisia.

  15. RABEX-5 overexpression in gastric cancer is correlated with elevated MMP-9 level

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lili; Hao, Xuwen; Tang, Yanping; Wei, Xiaodong; Gong, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate mRNA and protein expression levels of RABEX-5 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), their mutual correlation, and biological behavior in gastric cancer (GC) patients. Methods: The expression levels of RABEX-5 and MMP-9 were determined by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting in cell lines, GC tissues, and adjacent normal tissues. In addition, RABEX-5 and MMP-9 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed tissues from 113 GC patients. Results: The mRNA and protein expression levels of RABEX-5 and MMP-9 in GC cell lines and GC tissues were higher than those in normal gastric mucosa cell line and adjacent normal tissues. RABEX-5 expression and MMP-9 expression in GC tissues were significantly and positively correlated. In addition, the size of tumor (p<0.001), Lauren’s classification (p=0.009), and N stage (p<0.001) were identified as the relative factors of RABEX-5 expression, whereas the expression of MMP-9 was correlated with N stage (p=0.003). The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that the independent predictive factors of overall survival were T stage (hazard ratio (HR)=2.382; p=0.028), N stage (HR=1.755; p<0.001), RABEX-5 expression (HR=0.452; p=0.004), and MMP-9 expression (HR=0.561; p=0.032). Conclusions: RABEX-5 and MMP-9 expression levels were elevated in GC tissues and were associated with tumor invasion, metastasis, and prognosis. Therefore, they may be promising prognostic indicators of survival in GC patients. PMID:27347344

  16. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  17. Gastric carcinoma: monoclonal epithelial malignant cells expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent infection protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, S; Koizumi, S; Sugiura, M; Tokunaga, M; Uemura, Y; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, S; Sato, E; Osato, T

    1994-01-01

    In 1000 primary gastric carcinomas, 70 (7.0%) contained Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic sequences detected by PCR and Southern blots. The positive tumors comprised 8 of 9 (89%) undifferentiated lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas, 27 of 476 (5.7%) poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, and 35 of 515 (6.8%) moderately to well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In situ EBV-encoded small RNA 1 hybridization and hematoxylin/eosin staining in adjacent sections showed that the EBV was present in every carcinoma cell but was not significantly present in lymphoid stroma and in normal mucosa. Two-color immunofluorescence and hematoxylin/eosin staining in parallel sections revealed that every keratin-positive epithelial malignant cell expressed EBV-determined nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) but did not significantly express CD45+ infiltrating leukocytes. A single fused terminal fragment was detected in each of the EBNA1-expressing tumors, thereby suggesting that the EBV-carrying gastric carcinomas represent clonal proliferation of cells infected with EBV. The carcinoma cells had exclusively EBNA1 but not EBNA2, -3A, -3B, and -3C; leader protein; and latent membrane protein 1 because of methylation. The patients with EBV-carrying gastric carcinoma had elevated serum EBV-specific antibodies. The EBV-specific cellular immunity was not significantly reduced; however, the cytotoxic T-cell target antigens were not expressed. These findings strongly suggest a causal relation between a significant proportion of gastric carcinoma and EBV, and the virus-carrying carcinoma cells may evade immune surveillance. Images PMID:8090780

  18. Gastric Emptying and Vagus Nerve Function After Laparoscopic Partial Fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, Maud Y. A.; Ringers, Jan; van Rijn, Pieter J. J.; Neijenhuis, Peter; Stokkel, Marcel P. M.; Masclee, Ad A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the relation between vagus nerve dysfunction, gastric emptying, and antireflux surgery. Summary Background Data: Delayed gastric emptying occurs in up to 40% of reflux patients. After antireflux surgery, gastric emptying becomes normal or is even accelerated. Occasionally, severe gastric stasis is found and is associated with a negative outcome of the antireflux procedure. It has been suggested that injury to the vagus nerve could be the cause of this delayed emptying. Methods: We evaluated in a prospective study gastric emptying of solids and vagus nerve function (pancreatic polypeptide response to hypoglycemia) before and after surgery in 41 patients (22 women; age 43 ± 1.6 years) who underwent laparoscopic hemifundoplication. Results: All patients had relief of reflux symptoms varying from adequate (n = 8) to complete relief (n = 33). Gastric emptying of solids increased significantly (P < 0.001) after operation: lag phase from 19 ± 2 to 10 ± 1 minute, emptying rate (%/h) from 37 ± 2 to 48 ± 5 and half emptying time from 110 ± 8 to 81 ± 4 minutes. Gastric emptying improved to a similar extent in patients with delayed and normal preoperative gastric emptying. Postoperative signs of vagus nerve damage (PP peak < 47pmol/L) were present in 4 patients (10%). In these 4 patients gastric emptying both before and after operation did not differ from patients with normal vagus nerve function. In fact, none of the 41 patients had severely delayed emptying after laparoscopic hemifundoplication. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hemifundoplication affects vagus nerve integrity in 10% of patients, but this does not lead to a delay in gastric emptying. In fact, gastric emptying improved significantly after fundoplication. PMID:15492559

  19. Epstein-barr virus in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Jun; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Iizasa, Hisashi; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Nakamura, Munetaka; Nishimura, Junichi; Saito, Mari; Okamoto, Takeshi; Sakai, Kouhei; Suehiro, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Oga, Atsunori; Yanai, Hideo; Sakaida, Isao

    2014-11-07

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is detected in about 10% of gastric carcinoma cases throughout the world. In EBV-associated gastric carcinoma, all tumor cells harbor the clonal EBV genome. Gastric carcinoma associated with EBV has distinct clinicopathological features, occurs predominately in men and in younger-aged individuals, and presents a generally diffuse histological type. Most cases of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma exhibit a histology rich in lymphocyte infiltration. The immunological reactiveness in the host may represent a relatively preferable prognosis in EBV-positive cases. This fact highlights the important role of EBV in the development of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. We have clearly proved direct infection of human gastric epithelialcells by EBV. The infection was achieved by using a recombinant EBV. Promotion of growth by EBV infection was observed in the cells. Considerable data suggest that EBV may directly contribute to the development of EBV-associated GC. This tumor-promoting effect seems to involve multiple mechanisms, because EBV affects several host proteins and pathways that normally promote apoptosis and regulate cell proliferation.

  20. Expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Chen, Moye; Wang, Zeyang; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Claudins play an important role in regulating the permeability of epithelial and endothelial cells and in the maintenance of cell polarity. We aimed to investigate expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of gastric cancer. We compared their expression levels in the paired cancerous tissues versus those in the adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of claudin-11, -23 was greatly increased in paracancerous gastric tissue compared with cancerous tissue. We also compared their expression levels of tissues from gastric cancer, superficial gastritis, and atrophic gastritis by immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the expression of claudin-11 and 23 was significantly higher in superficial gastritis than that in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. The expression of claudin-23 was significantly lower in atrophic gastritis than that in gastric cancer, but no obviously difference was observed for claudin-11. As for analysis of clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer, logistic multiple regression indicated that claudin-11 was significantly associated with sex, smoking, alcohol, H. pylori infection and Borrmann classification while claudin-23 was significantly associated with vessel cancer embolus. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that gastric cancer patients with negative claudin-23 expression had significantly longer overall survival. In conclusion, the expression of claudin-11, -23 was remarkably downregulated in gastric cancer. Abnormal expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with some clinicopathologic parameters. In particular, claudin-23 positive expression was associated with poor prognostic outcomes of gastric cancer patients and may therefore serve as an independent prognosticator of patient survival. PMID:28350854

  1. Ataxin-3 expression correlates with the clinicopathologic features of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Xia; Tang, Yong; Ma, Yun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Ataxin-3 in human gastric cancer tissues and cell lines, and explore its clinical pathologic significance. Methods: The expression of Ataxin-3 in gastric cancer (n=536) and noncancerous gastric mucosa (n=312) was determined by immunohistochemistry and correlated to clinicopathologic features such as histologic differentiation and tumor size. The expression of Ataxin-3 protein in the human gastric cancer cell lines MKN45, SGC7901 and in normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) was also evaluated by Western blot analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine Ataxin-3 mRNA expression in human gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Results: The expression of Ataxin-3 protein was decreased in the gastric cancer compared to noncancerous gastric tissue, and correlated with tumor size, Lauren classification, histologic differentiation, and mutant p53 protein (P < 0.05). Similarly, Ataxin-3 mRNA expression was decreased in the gastric cancers compared to the noncancerous gastric tissue. Ataxin-3 protein and mRNA expression was lower in MKN45, SGC7901 cells than in the normal GES-1 cells. Conclusion: Decreased expression of Ataxin-3 may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis and development of gastric cancer. PMID:24955170

  2. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described. PMID:27828649

  3. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  4. Aberrant EphB/ephrin-B expression in experimental gastric lesions and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Shintaro; Saeki, Noritaka; Ogawa, Kazushige

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the expression profiles of EphB receptor and ephrin-B ligand can be used as markers for dysplastic/oncogenic transformation in gastric mucosa. METHODS: The protein expression and localization of EphB and ephrin-B in normal, ulcerated regenerating, and dysplastic gastric mucosa were examined in a rat experimental model by immunolabeling, and mRNA expression was assessed in four human gastric carcinoma cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Ephrin-B- and EphB-expressing regions were divided along the pit-gland axis in normal gastric units. EphB2 was transiently upregulated in the experimental ulcer, and its expression domain extended to gastric pits and/or the luminal surface where ephrin-B-expressing pit cells reside. EphB2, B3, and B4 and ephrin-B1 were coexpressed in the experimental gastric dysplasia, and more than one ligand-receptor pair was highly expressed in each of the gastric carcinoma cell lines. CONCLUSION: Robust and stable coexpression of EphB and ephrin-B is a feature common to experimentally induced gastric dysplasia and human gastric carcinoma cell lines as compared to normal gastric and ulcerated regenerating epithelia. Thus, EphB/ephrin-B may be a useful marker combination for dysplastic/oncogenic transformation in gastric cancer. PMID:25593460

  5. Intraoperative Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chan; Ravindranathan, Sharmila; Choksi, Vivek; Pudussery Kattalan, Jestin; Shankar, Uday; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-12-19

    BACKGROUND Intramural hematomas primarily present in the esophagus or duodenum. We report a case of intramural hematoma in the gastric wall (GIH) secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in a setting of platelet dysfunction. CASE REPORT This case study reviews the hospitalization of a 73-year-old male with a history of chronic kidney disease who was admitted for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and mitral valve repair. During his complicated hospital course, he inadvertently required the placement of a PEG tube. His coagulation profile prior to this procedure was within normal limits. The patient had no history of coagulopathy and was taking aspirin 81 mg per day. PEG tube placement was withheld due to an expanding hematoma that was noted at the site of needle insertion in the gastric wall. A single dose of intravenous desmopressin (0.3 microgram/kilogram) was administered under the suspicion of uremic bleeding. No further gastrointestinal bleeding events were observed. A platelet function assay (PFA) and collagen/epinephrine closure time indicated platelet dysfunction. Three days later, we again attempted a PEG tube placement. His PFA prior to this procedure had normalized due to aspirin discontinuation and improvement of renal function. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed an area of flat bluish gastric submucosal bruising at the site of the previous hematoma. The PEG tube was placed successfully at an adjacent site. Over the course of the following month, the patient underwent uneventful feeding through the PEG tube. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, cases of GIH are rarely documented in literature. Multidisciplinary vigilance is required to maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in patients with uremia or other coagulopathies to aid in prompt diagnosis.

  6. Changes in gastric myoelectric activity during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Sandoz, Gwenn R.; Stern, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine postprandial myoelectric activity of the stomach and gastric activity associated with space motion sickness using electrogastrography. Three crewmembers participated in this investigation. Preflight, subjects exhibited normal postprandial responses to the ingestion of a meal. Inflight, crewmembers exhibited an abnormal decrease in the power of the normal gastric slow wave after eating on flight day 1, but had a normal postprandial response by flight day 3. Prior to and during episodes of nausea and vomiting, the electrical activity of the stomach became dysrhythmic with 60-80% of the spectral power in the bradygastric and tachygastric frequency ranges. These findings indicate that gastric motility may be decreased during the first few days of space flight. In addition, changes in the frequency of the gastric slow wave associated with space motion sickness symptoms are consistent with those reported for laboratory-induced motion sickness.

  7. Molecular classifiers for gastric cancer and nonmalignant diseases of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Sibele I; Cristo, Elier B; Carvalho, Alex F; Hirata, Roberto; Pelosof, Adriane; Gomes, Luciana I; Martins, Waleska K; Begnami, Maria D; Zitron, Cláudia; Montagnini, André L; Soares, Fernando A; Neves, E Jordão; Reis, Luiz F L

    2004-02-15

    High incidence of gastric cancer-related death is mainly due to diagnosis at an advanced stage in addition to the lack of adequate neoadjuvant therapy. Hence, new tools aimed at early diagnosis would have a positive impact in the outcome of the disease. Using cDNA arrays having 376 genes either identified previously as altered in gastric tumors or known to be altered in human cancer, we determined expression signature of 99 tissue fragments representing normal gastric mucosa, gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and adenocarcinomas. We first validated the array by identifying molecular markers that are associated with intestinal metaplasia, considered as a transition stage of gastric adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type as well as markers that are associated with diffuse type of gastric adenocarcinomas. Next, we applied Fisher's linear discriminant analysis in an exhaustive search of trios of genes that could be used to build classifiers for class distinction. Many classifiers could distinguish between normal and tumor samples, whereas, for the distinction of gastritis from tumor and for metaplasia from tumor, fewer classifiers were identified. Statistical validations showed that trios that discriminate between normal and tumor samples are powerful classifiers to distinguish between tumor and nontumor samples. More relevant, it was possible to identify samples of intestinal metaplasia that have expression signature resembling that of an adenocarcinoma and can now be used for follow-up of patients to determine their potential as a prognostic test for malignant transformation.

  8. Association of adenocarcinomas of the distal esophagus, "gastroesophageal junction," and "gastric cardia" with gastric pathology.

    PubMed

    Wijetunge, Sulochana; Ma, Yanling; DeMeester, Steve; Hagen, Jeffrey; DeMeester, Tom; Chandrasoma, Parakrama

    2010-10-01

    Controversy exists as to whether adenocarcinomas occurring in the gastroesophageal junctional region and gastric cardia originate in the esophagus or the stomach. Esophageal adenocarcinoma is known to be strongly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease; gastric adenocarcinoma with Helicobacter pylori gastritis, and gastric intestinal metaplasia. This study evaluates the association of these tumors with pathologic findings in the biopsies of the gastric body and the antrum. It is hypothesized that if these malignancies are esophageal, they should have little or no significant association with gastric pathology; if they are gastric, these patients should have a high prevalence of gastric pathology. Between 2004 and 2008, 234 patients were diagnosed with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and/or adenocarcinoma; 107 were distal esophageal, 79 straddled the distal end of the tubular esophagus, and 48 were in the "gastric cardia." Simultaneous biopsies of the distal body and antrum were present in 185 patients; 49 had biopsy of either antrum or body. Gastric biopsies were assessed for inflammation, H. pylori infection, and intestinal metaplasia. During this period, 2146 patients had nonmalignant columnar epithelia in the esophagus with similar assessment of the stomach; these acted as a control group. The gastric biopsy was normal in 201/234 (85.9%) patients and showed significant inflammation, H. pylori infection, and/or gastric intestinal metaplasia in 33/234 (14.1%) patients. There was no gastritis, H. pylori infection, or intestinal metaplasia in 88/107 (82.2%) of the patients with distal esophageal HGD and/or adenocarcinoma, 70/79 (88.6%) with junctional HGD and/or adenocarcinoma, and 43/48 (85.9%) with "gastric cardiac" HGD and/or adenocarcinoma. The incidence of gastritis was significantly higher in the patients with HGD and/or adenocarcinoma (33/234 or 14.1%) than in the control population (146/2146 or 9.0%; P=0.01). This difference was largely the result of a

  9. Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) associated with gastric cancer in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, Anna Margrét; Sigurdardóttrir, Margrét; Jónasson, Jón Gunnlaugur; Oddsdóttir, Margrét; Magnússon, Jónas; Lee, Jeffrey R; Goldenring, James R

    2003-03-01

    Recent studies have described a spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplastic cell lineage (SPEM) in the gastric fundic mucosa associated with both chronic H. pylori infection and gastric adenocarcinoma. We investigated the association of SPEM both with early gastric adenocarcinoma and in biopsies taken from patients prior to diagnosis of cancer. Two cohorts were examined. First, gastric resections from 29 patients with early gastric cancer were examined. Second, biopsies taken from 18 patients prior to the diagnosis of gastric cancer were compared with their respective resection specimens as well as with control biopsies from a cohort of 19 patients diagnosed with gastritis without subsequent development of cancer. The presence of SPEM and intestinal metaplasia (IM) adjacent to and distant from the cancer was compared and spasmolytic polypeptide (SP) immunostaining within dysplastic/cancerous cells was identified. SPEM was present adjacent to cancer in all early cancer cases where the tumor was located in the body or at the body/antrum junction, and was present in the body mucosa distant from the cancer in 76% of cases. Intestinal metaplasia was found adjacent to the tumor in 76% of cases and in body sections in 52% of resections. SP immunostaining was noted within cancer cells in 62% of tumors, and within dysplastic cells in 76% of resections where dysplasia was present. SPEM was present in 82% of the biopsies obtained prior to the diagnosis of cancer, compared with only 37% in the gastritis cohort. IM was present in only 57% of biopsies. In conclusion, SPEM is strongly associated with early gastric cancers and is observed in gastric biopsies prior to the development of cancer. In addition, early gastric cancers demonstrated a high incidence of SP expression. These results suggest that SPEM merits consideration as an important pre-neoplastic gastric lesion.

  10. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  11. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  12. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  13. Upregulation of plasma C9 protein in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Poh-Kuan; Lee, Huiyin; Loh, Marie Chiew Shia; Choong, Lee-Yee; Lin, Qingsong; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Lim, Khong Hee; Soo, Ross Andrew; Yong, Wei Peng; Chan, Siew Pang; Smoot, Duane T.; Ashktorab, Hassan; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Current biomarkers used in the clinic do not have sufficient sensitivity for gastric cancer detection. To discover new and better biomarkers, protein profiling on plasma samples from 25 normal, 15 early-stage and 21 late-stage cancer was performed using an iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS approach. The level of C9 protein was found to be significantly higher in gastric cancer compared with normal subjects. Immunoblotting data revealed a congruent trend with iTRAQ results. The discriminatory power of C9 between normal and cancer states was not due to inter-patient variations and was independent from gastritis and Helicobacter pylori status of the patients. C9 overexpression could also be detected in a panel of gastric cancer cell lines and their conditioned media compared with normal cells, implying that higher C9 levels in plasma of cancer patients could be attributed to the presence of gastric tumor. A subsequent blind test study on a total of 119 plasma samples showed that the sensitivity of C9 could be as high as 90% at a specificity of 74%. Hence, C9 is a potentially useful biomarker for gastric cancer detection. PMID:20707004

  14. Selective coating of gastric ulcer by tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate in the rat.

    PubMed

    Koo, J; Ho, J; Lam, S K; Wong, J; Ong, G B

    1982-05-01

    Controlled clinical trials have shown that tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate healed duodenal and gastric ulcers significantly better than placebo. One mechanism suggested is that it forms a protective coat at the ulcer base. We studied this coating action in rats with chronic gastric ulcers produced by a standardized technique for mucosal wounding at the fundoantral junction. Bismuth was identified by histochemical staining using Castel's reagent, the specificity of which was verified in vitro against 13 other metallic compounds and chemicals. Our results showed that tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate had a coating affinity for the ulcer base, but not for the adjacent normal mucosa. All rats treated with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate 1, 2, 4, and 6 h previously, but not the control rats treated with water or those treated with four other bismuth compounds, manifested a layer of bismuth that coated the ulcer base. Light and electron microscopy of the tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate-treated ulcers--but not their controls-revealed an abundance of macrophages, which had ingested the bismuth. This unique bismuth coat may insulate the ulcer base from acid-pepsin digestion, while the influx of macrophages may expedite reparative processes.

  15. CCN1 induces a reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jianyuan; Norng, Manith; Modak, Cristina; Reavis, Kevin M; Mouazzen, Wasim; Pham, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein that activates many genes related to wound healing and tissue remodeling in fibroblasts, but its effect on epithelial cells remains unclear. This study examined the role of CCN1 in epithelial wound healing using rat gastric epithelial cells and rat stomach ulcer as in vitro and in vivo models, respectively. We found that CCN1 expression is highly upregulated in the epithelial cells adjacent to a wound and remains high until the wound is healed. Upregulation of CCN1 activates a transient epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the epithelial cells at the migrating front and drives wound closure. Once the wound is healed, these epithelial cells and their progeny can resume their original epithelial phenotype. We also found that CCN1-induced E-cadherin loss is not due to transcriptional regulation but rather protein degradation due to the collapse of adherens junctions, which is contributed by beta-catenin translocation. CCN1-activated integrin-linked kinase mediates this process. Finally, our in vivo study showed that locally neutralizing CCN1 drastically impairs wound closure, whereas local injection of recombinant CCN1 protein induces expression of vimentin and smooth muscle alpha-actin in normal gastric mucosal epithelial cells and accelerates re-epithelialization during ulcer healing. In conclusion, our study indicates that CCN1 can induce reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and this feature may have great value for clinical wound healing.

  16. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  17. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  18. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  19. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  20. Genetics of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Strand, Matthew S; Lockhart, Albert Craig; Fields, Ryan C

    2017-04-01

    Gastric cancer represents a major cause of cancer mortality worldwide despite a declining incidence. New molecular classification schemes developed from genomic and molecular analyses of gastric cancer have provided a framework for understanding this heterogenous disease, and early findings suggest these classifications will be relevant for designing and implementing new targeted therapies. The success of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in breast cancer and melanoma, respectively, has not been duplicated in gastric cancer, but trastuzumab and ramucirumab have demonstrated efficacy in select populations. New markers that predict therapeutic response are needed to improve patient selection for both targeted and immunotherapies.

  1. In vivo gastric mucosal histopathology using endocytoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Chiaki; Phlanusittepha, Chainarong; Hayee, Bu’Hussain; Santi, Esperanza Grace R; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Kudo, Shin-ei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the ability of endocytoscopy to identify normal gastric mucosa and to exclude Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: Endocytoscopic examination of the gastric corpus and antrum was performed in 70 consecutive patients. Target biopsy specimens were also obtained from the assessed region and multiple H. pylori tests were performed. The normal endocytoscopy patterns of the corpus and antrum were divided into the normal pit-dominant type (n-Pit) or the normal papilla-dominant type (n-Pap), respectively characterized as either regular pits with capillary networks or round, smooth papillary structures with spiral capillaries. On the other hand, normal mucosa was defined as mucosa not demonstrating histological abnormalities, including inflammation and atrophy. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of n-Pit for normal mucosa in the gastric corpus were 94.4% and 97.1%, respectively, whereas those of n-Pap for normal mucosa in the antrum were 92.0% and 86.7%, respectively. The positive predictive values of n-Pit and n-Pap for H. pylori-negative tissue were 88.6% and 93.1%, respectively, and their negative predictive values for H. pylori-negative tissues were 42.9% and 41.5%, respectively. The inter-observer agreement for determining n-Pit and n-Pap for normal mucosa were 0.857 and 0.769, respectively, which is considered reliable. CONCLUSION: N-Pit and n-Pap, seen using EC, are considered useful predictors of normal mucosa and the absence of H. pylori infection. PMID:25945015

  2. VEGF promotes gastric cancer development by upregulating CRMP4

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianjun; Zhai, Ertao; He, Yulong; Wu, Hui; Chen, Chuangqi; Ma, Jinping; Wang, Zhao; Cai, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the precise role of CRMP4 in gastric tumor growth and patient survival. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CRMP4, VEGF and VEGFR2 were validated by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. We investigated the effects on tumor growth of overexpression and knockdown of CRMP4 both in vitro and in vivo by constructing stable gastric cell lines using lentiviral-mediated transduction and shRNA interference-mediated knockdown of CRMP4 expression. We further validated the role of the ERK/AKT signaling pathways in VEGF and CRMP4 expression using ERK and PI3K inhibitors. Increased expression of VEGF and CRMP4 were observed in gastric cancer tissues compared with tumor-adjacent tissue. We found that higher CRPM4 expression was associated with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, tumor differentiation and poorer prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In HGC27 and SGC7901 gastric cancer cells, VEGF upregulated CRMP4 in time and dose-dependent manners. Overexpression of CRMP4 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of CRMP4 expression had opposite effects. VEGF activated CRMP4 expression in gastric cancer cells, and this effect was significantly inhibited by MAPK and PI3K inhibitors (PD98059 and LY294002). In mice, CRMP4 overexpression also resulted in increased tumor growth. These results suggest that increased CRMP4 expression mediated by the activation of VEGF signaling facilitates gastric tumor growth and metastasis, which may have clinical implications associated with a reduced survival rate in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26934554

  3. ANGPTL2 expression in gastric cancer tissues and cells and its biological behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Tu, Chuan-Tao; He, Juan; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) and its effect on biological behavior such as proliferation and invasiveness in gastric cancer. METHODS Western blotting was used to detect expression of ANGPTL2 in 60 human normal gastric tissues, 60 human gastric cancer tissues and gastric cell lines including GES-1, N87, SGC7901, BGC823 and PAMC82. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Transwell assay were used to detect the proliferation and invasive ability of gastric cancer cells. RESULTS Compared to normal tissues, ANGPTL2 protein levels were significantly upregulated in gastric tissues, and this level was closely correlated with gastric tumor grade, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis. Compared to GES-1 cells, ANGPTL2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in gastric cancer cells including N87, SGC7901, BGC823 and PAMC82. The expression of ANGPTL2 in highly malignant gastric cancer cell lines BGC823 and PAMC82 was significantly higher than in low malignancy gastric cancer cell lines N87 and SGC7901. MTT and Transwell experiments indicated that the proliferation rate and invasive ability of stable overexpressed gastric cancer cells was faster than in cells transfected with Lv-NC and blank control cells, and the invasive ability of stable overexpressed gastric cancer cells was higher than that of cells transfected with Lv-NC and blank control cells. CONCLUSION ANGPTL2 contributed to proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. In clinical treatment, ANGPTL2 may become a new target for treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:28058016

  4. Inhibitory neurotransmission regulates vagal efferent activity and gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Caitlin A; Travagli, R Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract receives extrinsic innervation from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which regulate and modulate the function of the intrinsic (enteric) nervous system. The stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract in particular are heavily influenced by the parasympathetic nervous system, supplied by the vagus nerve, and disruption of vagal sensory or motor functions results in disorganized motility patterns, disrupted receptive relaxation and accommodation, and delayed gastric emptying, amongst others. Studies from several laboratories have shown that the activity of vagal efferent motoneurons innervating the upper GI tract is inhibited tonically by GABAergic synaptic inputs from the adjacent nucleus tractus solitarius. Disruption of this influential central GABA input impacts vagal efferent output, hence gastric functions, significantly. The purpose of this review is to describe the development, physiology, and pathophysiology of this functionally dominant inhibitory synapse and its role in regulating vagally determined gastric functions. PMID:27302177

  5. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  6. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  7. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  8. Zn concentration in plasma and gastric fluid in patients with upper gastrointestinal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, S.C.; Wong, R.H.K.; Maydonovitch, C.; Johnson, L.F.; Nelson, N.; Henkin, R.I.

    1986-03-05

    Very few data are available about Zn in gastrointestinal fluids in humans. To obtain data in one such fluid Zn was measured in plasma and gastric fluid, obtained by direct visual aspiration through an endoscope placed into the gastric fundus, in 36 subjects with normal gastrointestinal mucosa (N) and in 36 patients with the following upper gastrointestinal pathology confirmed by endoscopy: 13 with esophagitis (E), 9 with gastritis (G) and 14 with duodenal ulcer disease (DU). Plasma and gastric fluid Zn were estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mean plasma Zn was significantly lower than normal in patients with E (N, 87 +/- 2 ..mu..g/dl, M +/- SEM; E, 75 +/- 4, p < 0.01) but plasma values were similar to normal in the other patient groups (G, 89 +/- 4; DU, 87 +/- 2). Mean gastric fluid zinc in G was significantly higher than in normal subjects (G, 664 +/- 159 ..mu..g/L; N, 360 +/- 43, p < 0.02) but not significantly different from normal in patients with DU or E (DU, 402 +/- 76; E, 307 +/- 55). Mean gastric fluid Zn in women with DU was approximately 45% higher than in men with DU, although it was 17% lower in normal women than in normal men. Compared to other normal tissues gastric fluid Zn is about 1/3 that in serum and about 3 times that in saliva. These results indicate that Zn in plasma and gastric fluid is altered in some upper gastrointestinal diseases.

  9. Gastrin and gastric surgery.

    PubMed

    Fabri, P J; McGuigan, J E

    1976-01-01

    data are present. These differential tests are of value in identifying the Zollinger-Ellison patient who has borderline serum gastrin levels and in differentiation from the syndrome of the retained antrum. 6. In a patient with a recurrent ulcer following surgery in whom a drug-induced ulcer can be excluded and gastric outlet obstruction cannot be demonstrated, a serum gastrin level may be indicated. A serum gastrin value greater than 300 pg. per ml. (normal less than 200 pg. per ml.) in a fasting morning serum sample is significantly elevated, even after vagotomy, and warrants further investigation. Provocative testing of the gastrin response to calcium and secretin should elucidate the etiology of the recurrent ulceration in this type of patient.

  10. Telomere length in the gastric mucosa after Helicobacter pylori eradication and its potential role in the gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Tahara, Sayumi; Tuskamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2017-02-14

    The molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis after Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication remain unclear. We examined the telomere length of gastric mucosa samples after successful H. pylori eradication in patients without and those with gastric cancer. Telomere length was measured by the real-time PCR among four different groups of biopsies: gastric body from subjects without history of H. pylori infection (Hp-: n = 23), gastric body from cancer-free subjects after H. pylori eradication (cancer-free body: n = 24), gastric body from early gastric cancer patients diagnosed after H. pylori eradication (EGC body: n = 35) and its paired samples from adjacent mucosa of cancerous area (EGC ADJ: n = 35). The Hp-group presented the longest telomeres among the all groups (Hp- vs. all others, all P < 0.05). Samples from EGC body group showed shorter telomere length than the samples from cancer-free body groups (P < 0.05). Conversely, samples from EGC ADJ group showed rather longer telomere length compared to the EGC body group (P < 0.05), which was also confirmed by the comparison of 35 matched samples (P = 0.0007). Among the samples after H. pylori eradication, shorter telomere length was associated with higher expression of IL-1B and NF-kB (P < 0.0001, 0.0006, respectively). Longer telomere length was also associated with higher expression of TNF-A (P = 0.01). Telomere shortening seems to be important initial steps in gastric cancer predisposition after H. pylori eradication, while it might shift to lengthening to acquire more aggressive pathway to develop cancer.

  11. Origin of Microsatellite Instability in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halling, Kevin C.; Harper, Jeffrey; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Petroni, Gina R.; Yustein, Aron S.; Tosi, Piero; Minacci, Chiara; Roviello, Franco; Piva, Paolo; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Jackson, Charles E.; Powell, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is observed in 13–44% of gastric carcinoma. The etiology of MSI in gastric carcinoma has not been clearly defined. To assess the role of mismatch repair in the development of MSI in gastric cancer, expression of hMSH2 and hMLH1 was explored. We examined 117 gastric carcinomas for MSI and observed instability at one or more loci in 19 (16%) of these tumors. Of the 19 tumors with MSI, nine exhibited low-rate MSI (MSI-L) with instability at <17% of loci, whereas the remaining 10 exhibited high-rate MSI (MSI-H) with instability at >33% of loci examined. Immunohistochemical staining for hMLH1 and hMSH2 was performed on eight of the tumors with MSI-H, five with MSI-L, and 15 tumors without MSI. All eight tumors with MSI-H showed loss of staining for either hMLH1 (n = 5) or hMSH2 (n = 3). In contrast, tumors with MSI-L or without MSI all showed normal hMSH2 and hMLH1 protein expression patterns. Moreover, all eight of the tumors with MSI-H also showed instability at BAT-26, whereas none of the MSI-L tumors or tumors without instability showed instability at BAT-26. These findings suggest that the majority of high-level MSI in gastric cancer is associated with defects of the mismatch repair pathway. Although larger studies are needed, BAT-26 appears to be a sensitive and specific marker for the MSI-H phenotype in gastric carcinoma. PMID:10393852

  12. Gastric tonometry: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M A; Mythen, M G

    2001-04-01

    Gastric tonometry has proved to be a sensitive but not specific predictor of outcome in the critically ill. The data accumulated to date indicate that those patients able to achieve or maintain a normal gastric mucosal pH do better than those who do not. In addition, therapy aimed at improving an abnormal gastric mucosal pH has proved to be less successful. These findings may simply indicate that tonometry identifies those "responders" and "nonresponders," as becomes increasingly apparent in populations of critical care patients receiving interventional therapy. Gastric tonometry has undergone a number of methodologic changes over the last decade, seeing a switch from saline to automated gas tonometry. Along with this switch of methodology has come a deeper scrutiny of the indices used to assess gut perfusion. Most studies (including all the interventional ones) have used gastric mucosal pH. The newer indices of gut luminal PCO2 (PgCO2) referenced to arterial CO2 (PgCO2-PaCO2) or end tidal CO2 (PgCO2-PeCO2), although relatively well validated, remain to be proven as predictors of outcome or guides to interventional therapy. If we take a fresh look at the interventional trials in intensive care patients, there is a very definite trend toward benefit in the protocol groups, although they are generally reported as negative studies. There is much to be accomplished, however, before we accept the gastric tonometer as a routine tool with which to guide therapy based on gastrointestinal perfusion, including a greater understanding of gastrointestinal physiology and, as ever, the call for an adequately powered prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate the clinical utility of gas tonometry.

  13. Role of the CacyBP/SIP protein in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Huihong; Meng, Juan; Jin, Haifeng; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Jinbo

    2015-05-01

    Various reports indicate that calcyclin binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP) is an important protein in tumorigenesis, but whether CacyBP/SIP promotes or suppresses cancer may depend on the cell type. In order to investigate whether CacyBP/SIP is significant in gastric cancerous tumorigenesis, the present study used immunohistochemistry to analyze 181 gastric cancer tissue samples, as well as 181 healthy tissue samples from the same gastric cancer patients. The immunohistochemical results were compared against patient data and pathological analysis of the tissue slices, including gender, age, degree of tumor differentiation and tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage. In addition, the level of CacyBP/SIP expression was detected in three frozen tissue samples of gastric adenocarcinoma using western blot analysis. Of the 181 cases analyzed in the present study, 80 cases were identified as non-metastatic gastric cancer and 101 cases were identified as gastric cancer that had metastasized to the lymph nodes. Tissue biopsies from the two sets of patients were examined using immunohistochemistry to identify the level of CacyBP/SIP expression in metastatic and primary gastric cancer tissues. Statistical analyses were performed on all data. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in 31% (56/181) of gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and 7% (12/181) of adjacent non-cancerous gastric tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the expression levels of CacyBP/SIP were higher in cancerous tissue compared with the adjacent non-cancerous gastric tissue using western blotting. No association was identified between CacyBP/SIP expression and patient age (P=0.975), gender (P=0.185), degree of tumor differentiation (P=0.076) or TNM stage (P=0.979). Among the 101 patients with metastatic gastric cancer, CacyBP/SIP was expressed at primary sites in 31% (31/101) of cases and at metastatic sites in 26% (26/101) of cases (P=0.434). However, among the

  14. Familial Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Duda, Dan G.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Mullen, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Implications for Practice: Although the majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are sporadic with many of those related to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, approximately 10% of the cases show familial aggregation, and a specific hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. This review describes the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Ultimately, a better understanding of the biology of these conditions should allow early identification and intervention as part of a multidisciplinary approach involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, and pathologists. PMID:26424758

  15. Lnc-ATB contributes to gastric cancer growth through a MiR-141-3p/TGFβ2 feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kecheng; Liang, Xin; Gao, Yuwei; Xu, Baixue; Xu, Yichun; Li, Yueqi; Tao, Yiwen; Shi, Weibin; Liu, Jianwen

    2017-03-11

    The long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) ATB is an important regulator in human tumors. Here, we aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms of lnc-ATB in gastric cancer (GC) tumorigenesis. RT-qPCR analysis was used to detect lnc-ATB expression level in 20 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal gastric mucosa tissues (ANTs). Moreover, the biological role of lnc-ATB was determined in vitro. We found that lnc-ATB was significantly upregulated in GC tissues compared to lnc-ATB expression in ANTs. These high lnc-ATB expression levels predicted poor prognosis in GC patients. Low levels of lnc-ATB inhibited GC cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest in vitro. Lnc-ATB was found to directly bind miR-141-3p. Moreover, TGF-β actives lnc-ATB and TGF-β2 directly binds mir-141-3p. Finally, we demonstrated that lnc-ATB fulfilled its oncogenic roles in a ceRNA-mediated manner. Our study suggests that lnc-ATB promotes tumor progression by interacting with miR-141-3p and that Lnc-ATB may be a valuable prognostic predictor for GC. In conclusion, the positive feedback loop of lnc-ATB/miR-141-3p/TGF-β2 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of GC.

  16. Loss of Lrig1 leads to expansion of Brunner glands followed by duodenal adenomas with gastric metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Shi, Chanjuan; Lu, Yuanyuan; Poulin, Emily J; Franklin, Jeffery L; Coffey, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a pan-ErbB negative regulator and intestinal stem cell marker down-regulated in many malignancies. We previously reported that 14 of 16 Lrig1-CreERT2/CreERT2 (Lrig1(-/-)) mice developed duodenal adenomas, providing the first in vivo evidence that Lrig1 acts as a tumor suppressor. We extended this study to a larger cohort and found that 49 of 54 Lrig1(-/-) mice develop duodenal adenomas beginning at 3 months. Most adenomas were histologically low grade and overlaid expanded Brunner glands. There was morphologic and biochemical blurring of the boundary between the epithelium and Brunner glands with glandular coexpression of ErbB2, which is normally restricted to the epithelium, and the Brunner gland marker Mucin6. Some adenomas were high grade with reduced Brunner glands. At age 4 to 5 weeks, before adenoma formation, we observed enhanced proliferation in Brunner glands and, at 2 months, an increase in the size of the Brunner gland compartment. Elevated expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) ligands amphiregulin and β-cellulin, as well as Egfr and phosphorylated Egfr, was detected in adenomas compared with adjacent normal tissue. These adenomas expressed the gastric-specific genes gastrokine1 and mucin5ac, indicating gastric metaplasia. Moreover, we found that a subset of human duodenal tumors exhibited features of LRIG1(-/-) adenomas, including loss of LRIG1, gastric metaplasia (MUCIN5AC and MUCIN6), and increased amphiregulin and Egfr activity.

  17. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  18. Asymptomatic Gastric Band Erosion Detected during Routine Gastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Gee Young; Kim, Woo Sub; Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gastric band erosion has decreased to 1%. Gastric band erosion can manifest with various clinical symptoms, although some patients remain asymptomatic. We present a case of a mostly asymptomatic patient who was diagnosed with gastric band erosion during a routine health check-up. A 32-year-old man without any underlying diseases except for non-alcoholic fatty liver underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery in 2010. He had no significant complications postoperatively. He underwent routine health check-ups with near-normal gastroduodenoscopic findings through 2014. However, in 2015, routine gastroduodenoscopy showed that the gastric band had eroded into the stomach. His gastric band was removed laparoscopically, and the remaining gastric ulcer perforation was repaired using an omental patch. Due to the early diagnosis, the infection was not serious. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 with oral antibiotics. This patient was fortunately diagnosed early by virtue of a routine health check-up; thus, eliminating the possibility of serious complications. PMID:26867553

  19. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R; Murugesan, Senthil V; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2015-07-15

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling.

  20. Expression of Leucine-rich Repeat-containing G-protein Coupled Receptor 5 and CD44: Potential Implications for Gastric Cancer Stem Cell Marker

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Hye Seung; Park, Seon Mee; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The human leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor (LGR) 5 and CD44 are one of the candidates for the marker of gastric cancer stem cells. We compared the expressions of two genes among control, dysplasia and cancer groups. Methods We compared the mRNA expression of LGR5, CD44 and CD44v8–10 and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of LGR5 and CD44 in gastric antral mucosa of 45 controls, 36 patients with gastric dysplasia, and 39 patients with early gastric cancer. Additionally, IHC of LGR5 in gastric body mucosa was analyzed. Normal mucosa adjacent to dysplastic or cancer lesions was used for the quantitative real-time–PCR and IHC. Results Immunoreactivity of LGR5 in base of antral mucosa was higher in non-cancerous tissues of cancer than those of control (P = 0.006), whereas the expression of LGR5 mRNA was not different among the three groups. Immunostaining of LGR5 was much stronger in the antrum than in the body of stomach (P < 0.001). Although there was no difference in antral immunointensity of LGR5 according to the severity of intestinal metaplasia, stronger immunostaining was found in the body with an aggravation of intestinal metaplasia (P trend < 0.001). The expression of CD44v8–10 mRNA was higher in cancer patients than control subjects and patients with dysplasia (P = 0.018 and 0.009) while the expression of CD44 mRNA was higher in the control groups than the others. Conclusions IHC of LGR5 in crypt base and CD44 may be used for gastric CSC markers. LGR5 expression may be associated with the developing of corporal intestinal metaplasia. The expression of CD44v8–10 mRNA would be more suitable for gastric cancer stem cell marker than CD44 or LGR5 mRNA. PMID:28053963

  1. A review on gastric diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The gastric fundal diverticulae are rare. They can present with variable symptoms. We are enclosing a literature review on gastric fundal diverticulum. Lessons have emerged which may help in the management of this rare condition in future. PMID:22257431

  2. Diabetic gastroparesis: an abnormality of gastric emptying of solids.

    PubMed

    Wright, R A; Clemente, R; Wathen, R

    1985-06-01

    Gastric emptying is delayed in subjects with gastroparesis diabeticorum. To ascertain whether solid or fluid gastric emptying is affected by visceral autonomic neuropathy, ten severe diabetics with gastroparesis and ten nondiabetic disease matched controls were studied. Subjects were screened to identify the presence or absence of autonomic neuropathy. The gastric emptying of fluids and solids was assessed by standard methodology utilizing a simultaneous dual radionuclide technique. If delayed gastric emptying was present on the initial study, metoclopramide (10mg IV bolus) was administered in a repeat study on a separate day. Screening modalities for autonomic neuropathy were markedly positive for the diabetic group, and were negative in the control group. The gastric emptying rate of fluids was normal in both groups and was not statistically different from previous standards developed using the same methodology (p = 0.53, analysis of covariance). The gastric emptying of solids was markedly delayed in the diabetic group in relation to the control group (p = .0035, analysis of covariance). Metoclopramide normalized delayed solid emptying rates without affecting fluid emptying rates.

  3. Sulglycotide displays cytoprotective activity in rat gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Niada, R; Mantovani, M; Prino, G; Omini, C; Berti, F

    1983-01-01

    Sulglycotide, a well known antisecretory and antiulcer compound, has been further investigated for its ability to protect rat gastric mucosa against extensive necrosis induced by absolute ethanol, NaOH (0.2N) and NaCl (30%). Sulglycotide, which has been compared with cimetidine, displays a dose-dependent cytoprotective activity against the above necrotizing agents. The results obtained indicate that Sulglycotide requires a normal prostaglandin biosynthetic process in order to manifest its antiulcer activity. In fact gastric mucosa from animals treated with Sulglycotide releases in vitro a greater amount of PGl2-like activity; and furthermore no protection was observed against gastric lesions induced by indomethacin. As far as the mode of action of Sulglycotide is concerned it is tempting to speculate that the compound may interfere with prostaglandin degradation or it may trigger an adaptive cytoprotection which is important in maintaining the cellular integrity of rat gastric mucosa.

  4. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  5. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  6. Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio for in vitro detection of human gastric pre-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Q.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, X. Y.; Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, X.

    2010-07-01

    Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance (DR) ratio (R540/R575) method based on DR spectral signatures is used for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of human gastric epithelial tissues in vitro. The DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues were measured using a spectrometer with an integrating sphere detector in the spectral range from 400 to 650 nm. The results of measurement showed that the average DR spectral intensity for the epithelial tissues of normal stomach is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of chronic and malignant stomach and that for the epithelial tissues of chronic gastric ulcer is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of malignant stomach. The average DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues show dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2). The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands are 6.84% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and chronic gastric ulcer, 14.7% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma and 22.6% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and undifferentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. It is evident from results that there were significant differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues in vitro ( P < 0.01).

  7. Intramural hemorrhage simulating gastric neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sheward, S E; Davis, M; Amparo, E G; Gogel, H K

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of benign gastric ulcer with secondary extensive intramural hemorrhage causing a radiographic appearance consistent with a large ulcerated gastric neoplasm. This is the second such case reported and the first studied with sonography and computed tomographic scan. A brief review of the literature on intramural gastric hematoma is presented.

  8. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  9. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  10. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  11. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  12. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  13. Human cytomegalovirus detection in gastric cancer and its possible association with lymphatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Guo, Gangqiang; Xu, Jianfeng; Sun, Xiangwei; Chen, Wenjing; Jin, Jinji; Hu, Changyuan; Zhang, Peichen; Shen, Xian; Xue, Xiangyang

    2017-02-08

    Increasing evidence suggests that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is associated with many human malignancies. However, its prevalence in gastric cancer (GC) and clinical association remain unknown. HCMV IgG and IgM antibodies in the sera of 80 GC patients and 80 healthy controls were detected using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The prevalence of HCMV UL47, UL55, UL56, and UL77 genes among 102 GC tumor tissues and adjacent normal specimens was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or nested PCR. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) was used to determine viral load. Virus localization in neoplastic tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. No significant difference of HCMV IgG and IgM seropositivity was found between GC patients and the healthy group. However, the overall HCMV DNA positivity rate was significantly higher in GC cancerous tissue compared with in paired normal tissue (P<0.01). HCMV infection was mainly localized in the tumorous epithelium. Q-PCR in HCMV-positive specimens indicated that the viral copy number was notably higher in GC tissues than in adjacent normal specimens (P<0.001). Clinical statistical analysis indicated that HCMV load in GC tumor tissue was positively associated with lymphatic metastasis (P=0.043), the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.6638. Our data clearly provide the prevalence of HCMV in GC patients. We conclude that HCMV infection in malignant tissues might be associated with carcinogenesis or progression of GC and possibly relates to lymphatic metastasis.

  14. Gastric acid secretion and mucosal appearances in Addison's disease and hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Delamore, I W; Williams, A W

    1961-06-01

    Studies of gastric acid secretion and mucosal appearances have been made in a group of 14 patients suffering from hypopituitarism. Achlorhydria was found in six of the patients suffering from Addison's disease but in only one patient suffering from hypopituitarism. In both groups the mean gastric secretion of hydrochloric acid was considerably lower than in a group of control subjects and replacement therapy with cortisone and DOCA in Addison's disease and cortisone and thyroid extract in hypopituitarism failed to restore gastric function to normal. A constant correlation was not found between gastric acid secretion and mucosal appearances.

  15. Ganoderma lucidum Pharmacopuncture for the Treatment of Acute Gastric Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Heung; Jang, Kyung-Jun; kim, Cheol-Hong; Lee, Yoo-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Jung; kim, Bum-Hoi; Yoon, Hyun-Min

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The gastric ulcer is a common disorder of the stomach and duodenum. The basic physiopathology of a gastric ulcer results from an imbalance between some endogenous aggressive and cytoprotective factors. This study examined whether Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP) would provide protection against acute gastric ulcers in rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into 4 groups of 8 rats each: normal, control, normal saline (NP) and GLP groups. The experimental acute gastric ulcer was induced by using an EtOH/HCl solution and the normal group received the same amount of normal saline instead of ethanol. The NP and the GLP groups were treated once with injections of saline and GLP, respectively. Two local acupoints were used: CV12 (中脘) which is the alarm point of the Stomach Meridian, and ST36 (足三里), which is the sea point of the Stomach Meridian. The stomachs from the rats in each group were collected and analyzed for gross appearance and histology. Also, immunohistochemistry staining for BAX, Bcl-2 and TGF-β1 was performed. Results: Histological observations of the gastric lesions in the control group showed comparatively extensive damage of the gastric mucosa and necrotic lesions had penetrated deeply into the mucosa. The lesions were long, hemorrhagic, and confined to the glandular portions. The lesions were measured microscopically by using the clear depth of penetration into the gastric mucosal surface. The length and the width of the ulcer were measured and the inhibition percentage was calculated. Wound healing of the acute gastric ulcer was promoted by using GLP, and significant alterations of indices in gastric mucosa were observed. Such protection was shown by gross appearance, histology and immunohistochemistry staining for BAX, Bcl-2 and TGF-β1. Conclusion: These results suggest that GLP administered at CV12 and ST36 can provide significant protection to the gastric mucosa against an ethanol-induced acute

  16. Assessment of gastric motility using meal labeled with technetium-99m sulfur colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.

    1983-12-01

    During a 2 year period, 83 patients with gastric motility problems were evaluated using radionuclide imaging. The patients presented with epigastric distress, postprandial fullness, pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; signs and symptoms suggestive of either gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy, or both, demonstrated no mechanical obstruction. After oral administration of a 300 g meal labeled with 600 muCi of technetium-99m sulfur colloid, a gastric emptying study consisting of serial images and data acquisition was performed. Of the patients studied, 52 had had peptic ulcer surgery, 17 were suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux, 8 were diabetic and suspected of having visceral enteropathy, and 6 had a history of irritable bowel syndrome. The normal mean gastric half emptying time was 77 +/- 16 minutes. Of the patients who had had gastric surgery, 90.4 percent had abnormal emptying: 69.2 percent had delayed gastric emptying and 21.2 percent had rapid gastric emptying time; 9.6 percent had normal emptying time. Of the gastroesophageal reflux group, all but two had normal gastric emptying time; 65 percent demonstrated gastroesophageal reflux within 15 minutes. Two of the patients with irritable bowel syndrome had prolonged emptying; the rest had normal emptying. All diabetic patients with gastroparesis had prolonged gastric emptying time, and all responded favorably to metoclopramide. Of the patients who previously had peptic ulcer surgery and had prolonged emptying time, 72 percent also responded favorably to metoclopramide. We conclude that radionuclide gastric imaging is a useful diagnostic test for the measurement of gastric emptying in patients with a variety of gastrointestinal motility disorders and may be helpful in assessing medical therapy and selecting those who may be candidates for surgery.

  17. Gastric emptying abnormalities in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, K.; Magyar, L.; Lange, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    The authors studied gastric emptying (GE) in patients with peripheral manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) using a radionuclide method. 18 patients underwent esophageal manometry and a GE study using chicken liver labeled in vivo with Tc-99m sulfur colloid as a marker of solid emptying. GE was also measured in 13 normal volunteers. 4 PSS patients with normal esophageal motility also had normal GE. The GE of 14 PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility was significantly (p < 0.05) delayed; with 67.4% retention of isotope after 2 hours compared to 49.8 in normals. The authors conclude that GE of solids is slow in approximately 2/3 of PSS patients with abnormal esophageal motility but is normal if the esophagus is uninvolved; Delayed GE may contribute to the severity of gastroesophageal reflux in PSS patients and the degree of dysphasgia; and Metoclopramide accelerates GE in PSS patients and should have a valuable therapeutic role.

  18. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  19. Microbiological profiles of sputum and gastric juice aspirates in Cystic Fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-momani, H.; Perry, A.; Stewart, C. J.; Jones, R.; Krishnan, A.; Robertson, A. G.; Bourke, S.; Doe, S.; Cummings, S. P.; Anderson, A.; Forrest, T.; Griffin, S. M.; Brodlie, M.; Pearson, J.; Ward, C.

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux (GOR) is a key problem in Cystic Fibrosis (CF), but the relationship between lung and gastric microbiomes is not well understood. We hypothesised that CF gastric and lung microbiomes are related. Gastric and sputum cultures were obtained from fifteen CF patients receiving percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. Non-CF gastric juice data was obtained through endoscopy from 14 patients without lung disease. Bacterial and fungal isolates were identified by culture. Molecular bacterial profiling used next generation sequencing (NGS) of the 16S rRNA gene. Cultures grew bacteria and/or fungi in all CF gastric juice and sputa and in 9/14 non-CF gastric juices. Pseudomonas aeruginosa(Pa) was present in CF sputum in 11 patients, 4 had identical Pa strains in the stomach. NGS data from non-CF gastric juice samples were significantly more diverse compared to CF samples. NGS showed CF gastric juice had markedly lower abundance of normal gut bacteria; Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium, but increased Pseudomonas compared with non-CF. Multivariate partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated similar bacterial profiles of CF sputum and gastric juice samples, which were distinct from non-CF gastric juice. We provide novel evidence suggesting the existence of an aerodigestive microbiome in CF, which may have clinical relevance. PMID:27245316

  20. Decreased Sp1 Expression Mediates Downregulation of SHIP2 in Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yan; Qian, Xue Yi; Xiao, Miao Miao; Shao, Yu Ling; Guo, Li Mei; Liao, Dong Ping; Da, Jie; Zhang, Lin Jie; Xu, Jiegou

    2017-01-01

    Past studies have shown that the Src homology 2-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) is commonly downregulated in gastric cancer, which contributes to elevated activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, proliferation and tumorigenesis of gastric cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the reduced expression of SHIP2 in gastric cancer remain unclear. While gene copy number variation analysis and exon sequencing indicated the absence of genomic alterations of SHIP2, bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS) showed promoter hypomethylation of SHIP2 in gastric cancer cells. Analysis of transcriptional activity of SHIP2 promoter revealed Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) was responsible for the regulation of SHIP2 expression in gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, Sp1 expression, but not Sp3, was frequently downregulated in gastric cancer compared with normal gastric mucosa, which was associated with a paralleled reduction in SHIP2 levels in gastric cancer. Moreover, overexpression of Sp1 inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed cell motility and invasion in gastric cancer cells in vitro, which was, at least in part, due to transcriptional activation of SHIP2 mediated by Sp1, thereby inactivating Akt. Collectively, these results indicate that decreased expression of transcription factor Sp1 contributes to suppression of SHIP2 in gastric cancer cells. PMID:28117748

  1. Microbiological profiles of sputum and gastric juice aspirates in Cystic Fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, H; Perry, A; Stewart, C J; Jones, R; Krishnan, A; Robertson, A G; Bourke, S; Doe, S; Cummings, S P; Anderson, A; Forrest, T; Griffin, S M; Brodlie, M; Pearson, J; Ward, C

    2016-06-01

    Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux (GOR) is a key problem in Cystic Fibrosis (CF), but the relationship between lung and gastric microbiomes is not well understood. We hypothesised that CF gastric and lung microbiomes are related. Gastric and sputum cultures were obtained from fifteen CF patients receiving percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. Non-CF gastric juice data was obtained through endoscopy from 14 patients without lung disease. Bacterial and fungal isolates were identified by culture. Molecular bacterial profiling used next generation sequencing (NGS) of the 16S rRNA gene. Cultures grew bacteria and/or fungi in all CF gastric juice and sputa and in 9/14 non-CF gastric juices. Pseudomonas aeruginosa(Pa) was present in CF sputum in 11 patients, 4 had identical Pa strains in the stomach. NGS data from non-CF gastric juice samples were significantly more diverse compared to CF samples. NGS showed CF gastric juice had markedly lower abundance of normal gut bacteria; Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium, but increased Pseudomonas compared with non-CF. Multivariate partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated similar bacterial profiles of CF sputum and gastric juice samples, which were distinct from non-CF gastric juice. We provide novel evidence suggesting the existence of an aerodigestive microbiome in CF, which may have clinical relevance.

  2. Association between serum vitamin D levels and gastric cancer: A retrospective chart analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neil; Companioni, Rafael Ching; Tiba, Melik; Alkhawam, Hassan; Catalano, Carmine; Sogomonian, Robert; Baum, Joel; Walfish, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether there is an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma associated with vitamin D deficiency (VDd). METHODS A retrospective case control study was performed of all patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma between 2005 and 2015. After we excluded the patients without a documented vitamin D level, 49 patients were included in our study. RESULTS The average age of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and documented vitamin D level was 64 years old (95%CI: 27-86) and average vitamin D level was 20.8 mg/dL (95%CI: 4-44). Compared to a matched control group, the prevalence of VDd/insufficiency in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than normal vitamin D levels (83.7% vs 16.3%). Forty-one patients (83.7%) with adenocarcinoma showed VDd/insufficiency compared to 18 (37%) patients with normal vitamin D level without gastric cancer (OR: 8.8, 95%CI: 5-22, P value < 0.0001). The average age of males with gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosis was 60 years old vs 68 years old for females (P = 0.01). Stage II gastric adenocarcinoma was the most prevalent in our study (37%). CONCLUSION We reported a positive relationship between VDd and gastric adenocarcinoma, that is to say, patients with decreased VDd levels have an increased propensity for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27672427

  3. Effects of gastric pH on oral drug absorption: In vitro assessment using a dissolution/permeation system reflecting the gastric dissolution process.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Makoto; Fukahori, Miho; Ikemura, Atsumi; Kubota, Ayaka; Higashino, Haruki; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gastric pH on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs using an in vitro system. A dissolution/permeation system (D/P system) equipped with a Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as the in vitro system to evaluate oral drug absorption, while a small vessel filled with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was used to reflect the gastric dissolution phase. After applying drugs in their solid forms to SGF, SGF solution containing a 1/100 clinical dose of each drug was mixed with the apical solution of the D/P system, which was changed to fasted state-simulated intestinal fluid. Dissolved and permeated amounts on applied amount of drugs were then monitored for 2h. Similar experiments were performed using the same drugs, but without the gastric phase. Oral absorption with or without the gastric phase was predicted in humans based on the amount of the drug that permeated in the D/P system, assuming that the system without the gastric phase reflected human absorption with an elevated gastric pH. The dissolved amounts of basic drugs with poor water solubility, namely albendazole, dipyridamole, and ketoconazole, in the apical solution and their permeation across a Caco-2 cell monolayer were significantly enhanced when the gastric dissolution process was reflected due to the physicochemical properties of basic drugs. These amounts resulted in the prediction of higher oral absorption with normal gastric pH than with high gastric pH. On the other hand, when diclofenac sodium, the salt form of an acidic drug, was applied to the D/P system with the gastric phase, its dissolved and permeated amounts were significantly lower than those without the gastric phase. However, the oral absorption of diclofenac was predicted to be complete (96-98%) irrespective of gastric pH because the permeated amounts of diclofenac under both conditions were sufficiently high to achieve complete absorption. These estimations of the effects of

  4. Enhanced gastric nitric oxide synthase activity in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Karmeli, F; Eliakim, R; Stalnikowicz, R; Ackerman, Z; Amir, G; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide, the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may have a role in tissue injury through its oxidative metabolism. Nitric oxide may have a role in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the association between gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and peptic disease. In this study, calcium independent nitric oxide synthase activity was detected in human gastric mucosa suggesting expression of the inducible isoform. In 17 duodenal ulcer patients gastric antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity was found to be two and 1.5-fold respectively higher than its activity in the antrum and fundus of 14 normal subjects (p < 0.05). H pylori was detected in the antrum of 15 of 17 duodenal ulcer patients and only in 7 of 14 of the control subjects. Antral nitric oxide synthase activity in H pylori positive duodenal ulcer patients was twofold higher than in H pylori positive normal subjects (p < 0.05). In duodenal ulcer patients antral and fundic nitric oxide synthase activity resumed normal values after induction of ulcer healing with ranitidine. Eradication of H pylori did not further affect gastric nitric oxide synthase activity. These findings suggest that in duodenal ulcer patients stimulated gastric mucosal nitric oxide synthase activity, though independent of the H pylori state, may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:7525417

  5. H19 serves as a diagnostic biomarker and up-regulation of H19 expression contributes to poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Wang, Y F; Zhang, X Q; Lv, J M; Li, Y; Liu, X X; Xu, T P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that dysregulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in cancer tumorigenesis and progression and might be used as diagnosis and prognosis biomarker, or potential therapeutic targets. LncRNA H19 has been reported to be upregulated in diverse human cancers; however, its clinical significance in gastric cancer (GC) remains elusive. Expression levels of H19 in 128 pairs of GC and adjacent normal tissues, GC cell lines and GC juices compared to their corresponding controls were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Kaplan-Meier analysis were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic values. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using the Cox proportional hazard analysis. H19 expression was remarkably increased in GC tissues and cell lines compared with that in the normal control, and its up-regulation was significantly correlated to invasion depth (P < 0.001), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.002) and regional lymph nodes metastasis (P < 0.001) in GC. H19 levels were robust in differentiating GC tissues from controls [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.697; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.636-0.752, p<0.01]. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that increased H19 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P = 0.017) and disease-free survival (P = 0.024) of patients. A multivariate survival analysis also indicated that H19 could be an independent prognostic marker. The levels of H19 in gastric juice from gastric patients were significantly higher than those from normal subjects (P = 0.034). Furthermore, knockdown of H19 expression by siRNA could inhibit cell migration and invasion in GC cells partly via regulating E-cadherin protein expression. H19 might serve as a promising biomarker for early detection and prognosis prediction of GC.

  6. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  7. Expression and clinical significance of matrix metalloproteinase-17 and -25 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; YU, SHI-JIE; LI, YAN-XIA; LUO, HE-SHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and clinicopathological features of matrix metalloproteinase 17 (MMP17; also known as MT4-MMP) and MMP25 (also known as MT6-MMP) in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the expression of MMP17 and MMP25 in 42 cases of gastric carcinoma and normal tissues, and 40 cases of atrophic gastritis. The expression of MMP17 in the normal gastric and atrophic gastritis tissues was significantly lower than that in the gastric cancer tissues (P<0.05). The expression of MMP25 in the gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis tissues was markedly higher compared with the normal gastric tissues (P<0.05). The expression of MMP17 and MMP25 was significantly associated with the depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis and serous membrane involvement (P<0.05), but not with patient age and gender, or lesion length, site and histological grade (P>0.05). Therefore, this indicates that the expression of MMP17 and MMP25 is increased with the degree of progress of gastric carcinoma. The detection of MMP17 and MMP25 expression may have clinical value in predicting the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:25621036

  8. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  9. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  10. Melanoma with gastric metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W.; Bhatia, Abhijit S.; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  11. Influence of SDZ RAD vs. MMF on gastric emptying in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Maes, Bart D; Evenepoel, Pieter; Kuypers, Dirk; Geypens, Benny; Ghoos, Yvo; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2003-06-01

    SDZ RAD and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) are increasingly used in the prevention of renal allograft rejection. SDZ RAD, having a macrolide structure, and MMF, known with gastrointestinal side-effects, may have gastric motility modifying properties. Gastric emptying was examined 1 yr after renal transplantation in eight patients taking corticosteroids (CS), cyclosporin A (CsA) and SDZ RAD and six patients treated with CS, CsA and MMF. Comparing the two groups, no significant differences in gastric emptying of solids and liquids were noted. Compared with normal volunteers, solid gastric emptying was faster in the SDZ RAD group and similar in the MMF group. It is concluded that in stable renal transplant recipients treated with MMF, gastric emptying was normal. Because of the impact on drug absorption and gastrointestinal symptoms, further studies are indicated to corroborate the potential prokinetic properties of SDZ RAD.

  12. Comprehensive characterization of the genomic alterations in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Juan; Yin, Yanbin; Ma, Qin; Wang, Guoqing; Olman, Victor; Zhang, Yu; Chou, Wen-Chi; Hong, Celine S.; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Sha; Mao, Xizeng; Li, Ying; Qin, Steve; Zhao, Shaying; Jiang, Jing; Hastings, Phil; Li, Fan; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent and aggressive cancers worldwide, and its molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. Here we report the genomic landscape in primary gastric adenocarcinoma of human, based on the complete genome sequences of five pairs of cancer and matching normal samples. In total, 103,464 somatic point mutations, including 407 nonsynonymous ones, were identified and the most recurrent mutations were harbored by Mucins (MUC3A and MUC12) and transcription factors (ZNF717, ZNF595 and TP53). 679 genomic rearrangements were detected, which affect 355 protein-coding genes; and 76 genes show copy number changes. Through mapping the boundaries of the rearranged regions to the folded three-dimensional structure of human chromosomes, we determined that 79.6% of the chromosomal rearrangements happen among DNA fragments in close spatial proximity, especially when two endpoints stay in a similar replication phase. We demonstrated evidences that microhomology-mediated break-induced replication was utilized as a mechanism in inducing ~40.9% of the identified genomic changes in gastric tumor. Our data analyses revealed potential integrations of Helicobacter pylori DNA into the gastric cancer genomes. Overall a large set of novel genomic variations were detected in these gastric cancer genomes, which may be essential to the study of the genetic basis and molecular mechanism of the gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:25422082

  13. Mucosal mast cells and developmental changes in gastric absorption.

    PubMed

    Catto-Smith, A G; Ripper, J L

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to establish whether gastric mucosal mast cells undergo degranulation during normal postnatal development and to correlate this with gastric electrical parameters, paracellular permeability, and macromolecular absorption. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied between 10 and 30 days after birth. Gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation occurred and was maximal on days 15 and 17, measured by histology and gastric and serum levels of rat mast cell protease II. Short-circuit current, transepithelial conductance, and permeability of voltage-clamped glandular stomach were elevated in younger animals, falling with age except for a transient but significant increase in conductance and permeability at 17 days, closely correlated with maximal mast cell degranulation. Macromolecular uptake was significantly increased in animals aged 10-15 days. Concanavalin A and antigen-induced mast cell degranulation increased conductance and permeability in vitro in younger animals. We conclude that 1) gastric mucosal mast cells degranulate during development, 2) the neonatal stomach has increased permeability and uptake of macromolecules, and 3) gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation during development may affect mucosal permeability.

  14. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2016-06-24

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  15. Influence of thyroid states on stress gastric ulcer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Walker, C.H.; Mason, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that thyroid states may affect the acute development of gastric lesions induced by cold-resistant stress. Normal (euthyroid), hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats were used. Gastric lesion incidence and severity was significantly increased in hypothyroid rats, whereas in contrast hyperthyroid rats developed significantly less gastric lesions. As anticipated, plasma levels of thyroxin (T/sub 4/) were significantly elevated in hyperthyroid rats, and undetectable in hypothyroid rats. Acute pretreatment with i.p. cimetidine, but not T/sub 4/ 1 h prior to stress completely prevented gastric lesions formation in hypothyroid rats. Finally, binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on brain membranes prepared from frontal cortex was reduced by 20% in hypothyroid rats after 3 h of stress. These and other data contained herein suggest that thyroid hormones contribute to modulate the responsiveness of the gastric mucosa to stress. The increase rate of ulcerogenesis observed in hypothyroid rats appears to be mediated by gastric acid secretion. The central mechanism for this response may involve decreased brain nonadrenergic receptor function.

  16. Her-2 Positive Gastric Cancer Presented with Thrombocytopenia and Skin Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Deniz; Tatlı, Ali Murat; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Başsorgun, Cumhur İbrahim; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savaş, Burhan

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the 5th most frequent cancer around the world and the 3rd most frequent reason of deaths due to cancer. Every year, about 1 million new cases are taking place, with varying geographical distribution. Gastric cancer is often metastatic to liver, lungs, and bones in hematogenous way, to peripheral lymph nodes in lymphogenous way, and to peripheral tissues in adjacency way, yet bone marrow (BM) and cutaneous metastasis are quite seldom. Pancytopenia is a more frequent finding identified in BM metastasis of solid organ cancers, and isolated thrombocytopenia is less often. The human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER-2) is positive in gastric cancer at a rate of 7–34%. Here, we have presented our HER-2 positive gastric cancer incident which presented with BM and cutaneous metastasis, and has no 18F-fluoro-2-deoxi-D-glucose (FDG) involvement except bone metastases. PMID:25045559

  17. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  18. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase: a potential biomarker for worse prognosis in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Xin; Huang, Xing; Yong, Hongmei; Shen, Jiajia; Tang, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Ni, Jian; Feng, Zhenqing

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, cancer stage (or grade) and some biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA199, are widely used to predict the prognosis of gastric carcinoma patients. Due to the limited role of prognostic indicators for gastric carcinoma, this condition remains one of the most fatal human malignancies with a dismal prognosis. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT, EC.2.1.1.1), a metabolizing enzyme, is involved in the development and progression of various carcinomas. However, the prognostic and biological functions of NNMT in gastric carcinoma are not yet clear. In the present study, NNMT was found to be overexpressed at the mRNA and protein levels in gastric carcinoma tissues compared with adjacent tissues. Importantly, the survival analysis verified that NNMT expression is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of gastric cancer patients. Moreover, NNMT expression was related to primary tumor size, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM (tumor, node, and metastasis) stage. We also demonstrated that knockdown of NNMT inhibits cellular proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the results of this study suggest that NNMT is a promising prognostic predictor for gastric cancer patients and could be used as a new target for gastric cancer therapy.

  19. The expression and location of midkine in gastric carcinomas of Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaling; Cao, Guochun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qingling; Hou, Yayi

    2007-04-01

    Midkine (MK), a heparin-binding growth factor, can regulate cell growth, survival and differentiation. MK is expressed at high levels in a variety of human carcinomas. Recently, the urine and serum MK concentration was analyzed in gastric cancer patient. However, the association of the cytokine mRNA expression with the categorical clinicopathological variables of the tumors and the location of its protein expression in the tumor tissues are still elusive. MK mRNA expression from the surgically resected specimens of healthy gastric tissues (9 cases), gastric cancer tissues and the matched non-cancerous tissues adjacent to the cancer (37 cases) were assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to locate MK in gastric cancer. The expression of MK mRNA in gastric cancer was much higher in tumor tissues than that in the non-cancerous tissues and control tissue samples. And its expression was significantly associated with the pTNM stage and distant metastasis, but not with the differentiation grade, tumor size and nodal involvement. MK protein was ubiquitous in the tumor, especially in the adenoid part of tumors. In addition, it was found in the cytoplasm of tumor cells and highly concentrated in nucleus and nucleolus. The expression level and location of MK in gastric tumor tissues of Chinese patients may be related to the tumor genesis and progression. Further study is necessary on the mechanism of MK in gastric tumorigenesis and tumor growth.

  20. Forkhead box protein A1 is a prognostic predictor and promotes tumor growth of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongyu; Zhang, Pei; Tang, Yong; Wu, Mengping; Zhang, Weikang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the cancer-type specific role of forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) in human malignancies. However, the clinical significance of FOXA1 and its biological function in gastric cancer remain unknown. In this study, the expression of FOXA1 in 80 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and corresponding non-tumor tissues was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that the levels of FOXA1 protein and mRNA in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in matched tumor-adjacent tissues. Furthermore, clinical association analysis indicated that the positive expression of FOXA1 was associated with adverse clinicopathological characteristics of gastric cancer patients including poor tumor differentiation, large tumor size, and advanced tumor-node-metastasis tumor stage. Notably, gastric cancer patients with positive expression of FOXA1 had a poorer 5-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival. In addition, FOXA1 knockdown remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in both SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells. In vivo studies indicated that FOXA1 knockdown prominently suppressed tumor growth of gastric cancer in a nude mouse xenograft model. Mechanistically, we disclosed that the expression of Yes-associated protein was decreased accordingly after FOXA1 knockdown in both SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that FOXA1 may serve as a promising prognostic indicator and an attractive therapeutic target of gastric cancer. PMID:26527889

  1. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  2. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  3. Metabolomic analysis reveals altered metabolic pathways in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinping; Hu, Xiaomin; Shao, Wei; Ji, Tianhai; Yang, Wensheng; Zhuo, Huiqin; Jin, Zeyu; Huang, Huiying; Chen, Jiacheng; Huang, Caihua; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. Alterations in metabolic pathways are inextricably linked to GC progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis of sera derived from a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis, revealed significantly altered metabolic pathways correlated with the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. Rats were histologically classified into four pathological groups (gastritis, GS; low-grade gastric dysplasia, LGD; high-grade gastric dysplasia, HGD; GC) and the normal control group (CON). The metabolic profiles of the five groups were clearly distinguished from each other. Furthermore, significant inter-metabolite correlations were extracted and used to reconstruct perturbed metabolic networks associated with the four pathological stages compared with the normal stage. Then, significantly altered metabolic pathways were identified by pathway analysis. Our results showed that oxidative stress-related metabolic pathways, choline phosphorylation and fatty acid degradation were continually disturbed during gastric carcinogenesis. Moreover, amino acid metabolism was perturbed dramatically in gastric dysplasia and GC. The GC stage showed more changed metabolite levels and more altered metabolic pathways. Two activated pathways (glycolysis; glycine, serine and threonine metabolism) substantially contributed to the metabolic alterations in GC. These results lay the basis for addressing the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis and extend our understanding of GC progression. PMID:27527852

  4. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  5. A gastric acid secretion model.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A M; Fabry, T L; Lacker, H M

    1993-01-01

    A theory of gastric acid production and self-protection is formulated mathematically and examined for clinical and experimental correlations, implications, and predictions using analytic and numerical techniques. In our model, gastric acid secretion in the stomach, as represented by an archetypal gastron, consists of two chambers, circulatory and luminal, connected by two different regions of ion exchange. The capillary circulation of the gastric mucosa is arranged in arterial-venous arcades which pass from the gastric glands up to the surface epithelial lining of the lumen; therefore the upstream region of the capillary chamber communicates with oxyntic cells, while the downstream region communicates with epithelial cells. Both cell types abut the gastric lumen. Ion currents across the upstream region are calculated from a steady-state oxyntic cell model with active ion transport, while the downstream ion fluxes are (facilitated) diffusion driven or secondarily active. Water transport is considered iso-osmotic. The steady-state model is solved in closed form for low gastric lumen pH. A wide variety of previously performed static and dynamic experiments on ion and CO2 transport in the gastric lumen and gastric blood supply are for the first time correlated with each other for an (at least) semiquantitative test of current concepts of gastric acid secretion and for the purpose of model verification. Agreement with the data is reported with a few outstanding and instructive exceptions. Model predictions and implications are also discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8396457

  6. Rett syndrome and gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Malay B; Bittner, James G; Edwards, Michael A

    2008-04-01

    Rett Syndrome is associated with decreased peristaltic esophageal waves and gastric dysmotility, resulting in swallowing difficulties and gastric dilation. Rarely, gastric necrosis and perforation occur. Our case represents the third reported case of gastric necrosis and perforation associated with Rett Syndrome. A 31-year-old female after 11 hours of intermittent emesis and constant, sharp abdominal pain presented with evidence of multiorgan system failure including hypovolemic shock, metabolic acidosis, coagulopathy, and hepatorenal failure. A chest radiograph revealed intra-abdominal free air necessitating emergent laparotomy. During exploration, a severely dilated, thin-walled stomach with an area of necrosis and gross perforation was noted. Wedge resection of the necrotic tissue and primary closure were performed. Despite aggressive perioperative resuscitation and ventilation support, the patient died 3 hours postoperatively secondary to refractory shock and hypoxemia. Severe gastric dilation can occur with Rett Syndrome and may cause gastric necrosis and perforation. Prolonged elevated gastric pressures can decrease perfusion and may contribute to perforation. Timely decompression via percutaneous endoscopic or surgical gastrostomy could decrease the risk of perforation particularly when significant gastric distention is present. Consideration of gastric necrosis and perforation in patients with Rett Syndrome may lead to earlier intervention and decreased mortality.

  7. Clinical significance of putative markers of cancer stem cells in gastric cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    He, Du; Lu, Zheng-Hao; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Wei-Han; Wang, Wei; Li, Chang-Chun; Xue, Lian; Zhao, Lin-Yong; Yang, Kun; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun; Mo, Xian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought as the source of tumor maintaining and many CSCs markers have been identified. Regarding the heterogeneity in gastric cancer (GC), TNM stage is not enough to accurately predict the prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of CSCs markers (Lgr5, Oct4, CD133, EpCAM, CD54 and Sox2) and establish a new model based on these markers to accurately predict prognosis of GC. We retrospectively enrolled 377 GC tissues from January 2006 to October 2012 to perform immunohistochemistry (IHC), and 93 pairs of GC tissues and corresponding adjacent normal gastric tissues to perform quantitative PCR (qPCR) from December 2011 to October 2012. The clinicopathological and follow-up characteristics were collected. In IHC, Oct4, CD133 and EpCAM were independently related to tumor progression, while Sox2 were associated with well or moderate differentiation (all p<0.05). Cox regression showed that Oct4-EpCAM was an independently prognostic factor, indicating that double low expression of Oct4-EpCAM group had significantly better prognosis than control group (p=0.035). Regarding qPCR, CD133 was an independent prognostic factor, showing that the prognosis of patients with CD133 high expression was significantly worse than that of patients with CD133 low expression (p<0.001). The prognostic prediction accuracy of nomogram based on Oct4-EpCAM expression in IHC was significantly better than TNM stage alone (p=0.003). Low expressions of Oct4-EpCAM in IHC and CD133 in qPCR were favorable prognostic factors in GC. The nomogram based on Oct4-EpCAM was valuable in prognostic prediction of GC patients. PMID:27557490

  8. Acetaminophen absorption kinetics in altered gastric emptying: establishing a relevant pharmacokinetic surrogate using published data.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen has been used as a tool for clinical and nonclinical experimental designs that evaluate gastric emptying because acetaminophen is not absorbed in stomach but efficiently absorbed from the small intestine. Published pharmacokinetic data of acetaminophen in subjects with normal gastric emptying vs. impaired gastric emptying (i.e., morphine treatment) were evaluated to select a key surrogate. Using Caverage (average concentration), computed from the exposure within the first hour, individual rank distribution was plotted across different studies. Caverage was highly correlated with Cmax (maximum concentration) in subjects with normal gastric emptying (R(2) = .7532) but not in those where gastric emptying was impaired (R(2) = .0213). The 50th percentile value of the distribution pattern of 1/Caverage in acetaminophen+morphine-treated group (coincided with the first shift in the slope) was considered as the cutoff point to figure out the impaired gastric emptying. The individual rank distribution plots for 1/Caverage across different studies supported similar trends in subjects with normal gastric emptying but showed a distinct distribution pattern in the cohort of impaired gastric emptying. Caverage, calculated within the first hour of dosing of acetaminophen (average concentration at 0-1 hour, C0-1havg), can be used as a key surrogate to distinguish the effects of gastric emptying on the absorption of acetaminophen. A 4 μg/mL C0-1havg of acetaminophen (dose: 1.5 g) may be used as cutoff point in future clinical investigations of acetaminophen to clarify the role of gastric emptying.

  9. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  10. Laparoscopic retrosternal gastric pull-up for fistulized mediastinal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mungo, Benedetto; Barbetta, Arianna; Lidor, Anne O; Stem, Miloslawa; Molena, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient successfully reconstructed with laparoscopic retrosternal gastric pull-up after esophagectomy for unresectable posterior mediastinal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, eroding into the esophagus and compressing the airways. A partial esophagectomy with esophagostomy was performed for treatment of esophageal pleural fistula and empyema, while the airways were managed with the placement of an endobronchial stent. Gastrointestinal reconstruction was performed using a laparoscopic approach to create a retrosternal tunnel for gastric conduit pull-up and cervical anastomosis. The patient was discharged uneventfully after 6 d, and has done very well at home with normal diet.

  11. Altered expression profile of micrornas in gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Wang, Qi-xian; Zhu, You-qing

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in carcinogenesis, but the global miRNA expression profile in gastric stromal tumor tissues remains unclear. This study was to examine the miRNA expression profile in gastric stromal tumor tissues and explore the function of dysregulated miRNAs by performing gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis. Total RNA was extracted and purified from 3 pairs of frozen gastric stromal tumor tissues and the adjacent non-tumor tissues by using mirVana™ miRNA isolation kit. The miRNA expression was analyzed with Affymetrix microarrays (version 4.0) containing 2578 human mature microRNA probes. The dysregulated microRNAs were validated by quantitative RT-PCR in 30 pairs of gastric stromal tumor tissues. The target gene of the dysregulated microRNAs was predicted by miRanda, TargetScan and PicTar. GO and pathway enrichment analysis was conducted to examine the potential function of miR-3178 and miR-193a-5p. The results showed that there were 12 differently expressed microRNAs in gastric stromal tumor tissues, among which 10 miRNAs were down-regulated, and 2 were up-regulated (P<0.05). The validation results by RT-PCR were in accordance with those by microRNA microarry. GO analysis found that the target genes of miR-3178 were involved in 5 GO terms and those of miR-193a-5p in 7 GO terms in level 2. Pathway enrichment analysis suggested that miR-3178 and miR-193a-5p were related to 57 and 122 signaling pathways, respectively. It was concluded that gastric stromal tumor displays a unique miRNA signature. This specific expression may become a new diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for gastric stromal tumor. miR-3178 and miR-193a-5p function as suppressive microRNAs, and they may also become diagnosis and treatment targets for gastric stromal tumor.

  12. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  13. Gastric acid barrier to ingested microorganisms in man: studies in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giannella, R A; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1972-04-01

    Reassessment of the ;gastric bactericidal barrier' to enteric bacteria in man included studies of the bactericidal activity of (1) the normal and achlorhydric stomach in vivo and (2) normal and achlorhydric gastric juice and other media in vitro. Within 30 minutes virtually all bacteria (Serratia marcescens) were eliminated in the normal stomach whereas no reduction occurred in the achlorhydric stomach in one hour. In vitro, identical bactericidal activity was observed at the same pH (from 2.0 to 7.0) in normal gastric juice, achlorhydric gastric juice, aqueous HCl, and nutrient broth. At pH less than 4.0, 99.9% of the bacteria were killed within 30 minutes. The presence of profuse bacterial flora, including coliforms, found in markedly acid-deficient but not in normal stomachs, correlates well with the absence of bactericidal activity. Thus, the ;gastric bactericidal barrier' is primarily pH-hydrochloric acid dependent, with other constituents of gastric juice contributing little, if any, detectable effect on the destruction of microorganisms.

  14. Gastric acid barrier to ingested microorganisms in man: studies in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, R. A.; Broitman, S. A.; Zamcheck, N.

    1972-01-01

    Reassessment of the `gastric bactericidal barrier' to enteric bacteria in man included studies of the bactericidal activity of (1) the normal and achlorhydric stomach in vivo and (2) normal and achlorhydric gastric juice and other media in vitro. Within 30 minutes virtually all bacteria (Serratia marcescens) were eliminated in the normal stomach whereas no reduction occurred in the achlorhydric stomach in one hour. In vitro, identical bactericidal activity was observed at the same pH (from 2·0 to 7·0) in normal gastric juice, achlorhydric gastric juice, aqueous HCl, and nutrient broth. At pH less than 4·0, 99·9% of the bacteria were killed within 30 minutes. The presence of profuse bacterial flora, including coliforms, found in markedly acid-deficient but not in normal stomachs, correlates well with the absence of bactericidal activity. Thus, the `gastric bactericidal barrier' is primarily pH-hydrochloric acid dependent, with other constituents of gastric juice contributing little, if any, detectable effect on the destruction of microorganisms. PMID:4556018

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Jiajia; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiujun; Hu, Fen

    2015-05-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  17. Radionuclide gastric emptying studies in patients with anorexia nervosa

    SciTech Connect

    Domstad, P.A.; Shih, W.J.; Humphries, L.; DeLand, F.H.; Digenis, G.A.

    1987-05-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients, 26 patients (17 females, two males, ranging in age from 13 to 40 yr) with upper GI symptoms ingested 150-200 microCi (/sup 99m/Tc)triethelenetetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to obtain the gastric emptying time (GET). The results of the studies were divided into three categories: prolonged, 13 patients; rapid, 11; and normal 3. Twelve of 13 patients with prolonged GET were given 10 mg metoclopramide i.v. injections; nine of the 12 patients had a good response and three had no response. Five of the nine patients underwent metoclopramide therapy and four of the patients showed benefit from the therapy. One patient discontinued metoclopramide therapy because of somnolence. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, our results indicated only 50% had objectively prolonged GET, and another 50% showed normal or even rapid GET. Therefore, this radionuclide study enables quantitatively objective documentation of gastric emptying, separation of those patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, thereby avoiding the possible side effects from metoclopramide medication, and prediction of effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in patients with prolonged GET.

  18. Telomere length shortening in gastric mucosa is a field effect associated with increased risk of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Nakano, Naoko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Telomere shortening occurs in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by oxidative injury and rapid cell turnover. Short telomeres initiate chromosomal instability and may eventually contribute to tumorigenesis. To evaluate telomere length as potential biomarker for gastric cancer (GC) risk, we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in GC tissues and in non-neoplastic mucosa from patients with GC and without GC. We obtained of 217 GC patients matched biopsies from the GC and adjacent tissues as well as gastric biopsies of 102 subjects without GC. Relative telomere length was measured in genomic DNA by real-time PCR. Relative telomere length decreased gradually in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and positive gastric mucosa of GC free subjects compared with adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue from GC patients (4.03 ± 0.3 vs. 2.82 ± 0.19 vs. 0.82 ± 0.07 vs. 0.29 ± 0.09, P < 0.0001). In non-neoplastic mucosa of GC patients, shorter telomeres were found significantly more often than in that of GC free subjects (age, sex, and H. pylori adjusted odds ratio = 7.81, 95 % confidence interval = 4.71-12.9, P < 0.0001). Telomere shortening in non-neoplastic mucosa was associated with chronic inflammation (P = 0.0018) and intestinal metaplasia (P < 0.0001). No significant associations were found between relative telomere length and clinicopathological features of GC and overall survival. Telomere shortening in gastric mucosa reflects a field effect in an early stage of carcinogenesis and is associated with an increased risk of GC. Telomere length in GC is not associated with clinicopathological features or prognosis.

  19. Gut microbiota and gastric disease.

    PubMed

    Sgambato, Dolores; Miranda, Agnese; Romano, Lorenzo; Romano, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The gut microbiota may be considered a crucial "organ" of human body because of its role in the maintenance of the balance between health as well as disease. It is mainly located in the small bowel and colon, while, the stomach was long thought to be sterile in particular for its high acid production. In particular, stomach was considered "an hostile place" for bacterial growth until the identification of Helicobacter pylori (HP). Now, the stomach and its microbiota can be considered as two different "organs" that share the same place and they have an impact on each other. In fact microscopic structures of gastric mucosa (mucus layer and luminal contents) influence local microflora and vice versa. In this article our attention is directed specifically to explain the effects of this "cross-talk" on gastric homeostais. The gastric microbiota grossly consists of two macrogroups: HP and non-HP bacteria. Here, we review the relationship between these two populations and their role in the development of the different gastric disorders: functional dyspepsia, gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and gastric cancer. Moreover we focus on the effects on the gastric microbiota of exogenous interference as diet and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

  20. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig.

  1. Gastric Helicobacter Spp. Infection in Captive Neotropical Brazilian Feline

    PubMed Central

    Luiz de Camargo, Pedro; Akemi Uenaka, Simone; Bette Motta, Maitê; Harumi Adania, Cristina; Yamasaki, Letícia; Alfieri, Amauri A.; Bracarense, Ana Paula F. R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ten captive neotropical Brazilian feline were submitted to gastroscopic examination and samples of gastric mucosa from fundus, corpus and pyloric antrum were evaluated for the presence of Helicobacter species. Warthin-Starry (WS) staining and PCR assay with species-specific primers and enzymatic cleavage were applied for bacterial detection and identification. Histological lesions were evaluated by haematoxylin and eosin staining. All animals showed normal gross aspect of gastric mucosa. Helicobacter heilmannii was confirmed in 100% of the samples by WS and PCR assay. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate in the lamina propria was observed in eight animals, mainly in the fundus region. Small lymphoid follicles were seen in three animals. No significant association between Helicobacter infection and histological findings was verified. These observations suggest that gastric Helicobacter spp. could be a commensal or a eventual pathogen to captive neotropical feline, and that procedures, way life, and stress level on the shelter apparently had no negative repercussion over the integrity of the stomach. PMID:24031634

  2. Gastric Intramural and Portal Venous Gas Following Blunt Abdominal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Indrani; Samarasam, Inian; Chandran, Sudhakar; Mathew, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Gastric emphysema or pneumatosis is a rare finding. Early endoscopy and urgent laparotomy is advised in post-trauma patients. Case Presentation A 29 year old man presented with blunt abdominal injury following a high-speed motorbike crash He complained of abdominal pain and abdomen was distended. CT abdomen revealed air in the gastric wall with disruption of gastric mucosa. He had normal white cell counts, bleeding parameters and blood gases. He was treated conservatively with nasogastric decompression, intravenous analgesics and antibiotics with which he recovered well. Conclusions Early surgical management is indicated in post-trauma patients in whom bowel infarction is suspected. In a stable patient, a negative laparotomy is a major additional stress post trauma - conservative management with close clinical observation is a suitable management alternative. PMID:24396802

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2012-06-01

    Cancer is considered one of the major health issues worldwide, and gastric cancer accounted for 8% of total cases and 10% of total deaths in 2008. Gastric cancer is considered an age-related disease, and the total number of newly diagnosed cases has been increasing as a result of the higher life expectancy. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis is worth investigation. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling complex and miRNA, involved in gastric cancer. As the studies in gastric cancer continue, the mapping of an epigenome code is not far for this disease. In conclusion, an epigenetic therapy might appear in the not too distant future.

  4. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p < 0.05), 146.5% (p < 0.05), 282.4% (p < 0.05), 32.4% (p < 0.05), 56.00 (p < 0.05) and 83.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p < 0.05), 262.9% (p < 0.05), 660.1% (p < 0.05) and 34% (p < 0.05), 72. 2% (p < 0.05), 113.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were

  5. Gastric mucosal hyperplasia via upregulation of gastrin induced by persistent activation of gastric innate immunity in major histocompatibility complex class II deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, T; Nishio, A; Okazaki, K; Uza, N; Ueno, S; Kido, M; Inoue, S; Kitamura, H; Kiriya, K; Ohashi, S; Asada, M; Tamaki, H; Matsuura, M; Kawasaki, K; Suzuki, K; Uchida, K; Fukui, H; Nakase, H; Watanabe, N; Chiba, T

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Major histocompatibility complex class II deficient (Aα0/0) mice have decreased CD4+ T cells, making them immunologically similar to patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Both patients with AIDS and Aα0/0 mice have hypertrophic gastric folds. To clarify the mechanism of gastric mucosal hyperplasia, we investigated the pathophysiology and the role of the innate immunity in the stomach of Aα0/0 mice. Methods Stomachs from 1–6 month old Aα0/0 mice, kept under specific pathogen free conditions, were examined at 1 month intervals histologically and immunohistochemically. Gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, Toll‐like receptors (TLRs), cyclooxygenase (COX)‐2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the gastric mucosa was investigated. Serum gastrin levels and gastric acidity were measured. Bacterial culture of the stomach was performed. To clarify the roles of hypergastrinaemia in the gastric mucosa, a gastrin receptor antagonist (AG041R) was administered. Results Aα0/0 mice had a diffusely thick corpus mucosa with infiltration of CD11b+ granulocytes and macrophages. Anti‐Ki67 staining demonstrated expansion of the proliferating neck zone. Gene expression of interleukin 1β, interferon γ, TLR‐2, TLR‐4, and COX‐2 were upregulated, and MPO activity was increased. Only a small amount of non‐pathogenic bacteria was detected in the stomach. Serum gastrin levels and Reg‐Iα positive cells in the gastric mucosa increased, despite normal gastric acidity. After treatment with AG041R, gastric mucosal thickness was significantly reduced. Conclusion Persistent activation of innate immunity in the stomach induced gastric mucosal hyperplasia through upregulation of gastrin synthesis in Aα0/0 mice, suggesting a pathophysiology similar to the gastric changes in patients with AIDS. PMID:16322110

  6. Methylation-silencing RCC1 expression is associated with tumorigenesis and depth of invasion in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Huang, Chu-Chun; P’eng, Fang-Ku; Tsai, Tung-Chou; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) is a critical cell cycle regulator. We firstly identified RCC1 gene hypermethylation in gastric tumor tissues using the differential methylation hybridization (DMH) microarray, but the role of RCC1 in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma is largely unknown. Methods: Three gastric cancer cell lines (AGS, MKN45, and TSGH9201) were used to analyze RCC1 gene methylation, mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, 85 pairs of matched human gastric carcinoma samples in a tissue microarray were used to analyze RCC1 expression by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: A differential methylation pattern was found in TSGH9201 (100%), MKN45 (87%), and AGS (62%) cell lines at the 9th CpG site of RCC1 exon 1. RCC1 mRNA and protein expressions in AGS cells were significantly higher than in TSGH9201 and MKN45 cell lines (P < 0.05). Tissue array data showed that RCC1 expression was detected in 21% (18/85) of gastric carcinoma tissues and in 80% (76/95) of adjacent non-tumor tissues. The expression of RCC1 in gastric carcinoma tissues was significantly lower than in adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.001). Furthermore, an association between RCC1 expression and clinicopathological features showed that RCC1 expression was closely correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data indicate that RCC1 expression is frequently lost in poorly differentiated gastric cell lines and gastric carcinoma tissues. Loss of RCC1 expression is correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion. These findings suggest that RCC1 may play a tumor suppressor role in gastric carcinoma. PMID:26823742

  7. Notch signaling regulates gastric antral LGR5 stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, Elise S; Gifford, Gail B; Keeley, Theresa M; Carulli, Alexis J; VanDussen, Kelli L; Thomas, Dafydd; Giordano, Thomas J; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Samuelson, Linda C

    2015-10-14

    The major signaling pathways regulating gastric stem cells are unknown. Here we report that Notch signaling is essential for homeostasis of LGR5(+) antral stem cells. Pathway inhibition reduced proliferation of gastric stem and progenitor cells, while activation increased proliferation. Notch dysregulation also altered differentiation, with inhibition inducing mucous and endocrine cell differentiation while activation reduced differentiation. Analysis of gastric organoids demonstrated that Notch signaling was intrinsic to the epithelium and regulated growth. Furthermore, in vivo Notch manipulation affected the efficiency of organoid initiation from glands and single Lgr5-GFP stem cells, suggesting regulation of stem cell function. Strikingly, constitutive Notch activation in LGR5(+) stem cells induced tissue expansion via antral gland fission. Lineage tracing using a multi-colored reporter demonstrated that Notch-activated stem cells rapidly generate monoclonal glands, suggesting a competitive advantage over unmanipulated stem cells. Notch activation was associated with increased mTOR signaling, and mTORC1 inhibition normalized NICD-induced increases in proliferation and gland fission. Chronic Notch activation induced undifferentiated, hyper-proliferative polyps, suggesting that aberrant activation of Notch in gastric stem cells may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis.

  8. Outlook on epigenetic therapeutic approaches for treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2017-02-03

    The incidence of gastric cancer has been declining globally in the last decades. Despite the improvements in the diagnostic procedures, most cases are still detected at advanced stages due to lack of specific symptoms associated with early phases of tumour development. Consequently, gastric cancer poses a major health burden worldwide due to high mortality rates. Continuing advances in high-throughput technologies are revealing an intricate network of genetic and epigenetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. In addition, several risk factors, both environmental and genetic, have been recognized, which promote accumulation of diverse alterations affecting the expression of oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and other genes, implicated in normal gastric cell functions. A plethora of aberrant molecular events found in patients with this disease and intragenic heterogeneity of tumours from individuals are delaying the development of targeted biological therapies. Frequent occurrence of characteristic CpG island methylator phenotypes (CIMP phenotypes) in gastric cancers, particularly in association with Helicobacter pylori or EBV infection, could lead to introduction of epigenetic modulators into standard treatment regimens used against early and advanced forms of adenocarcinomas. This review highlights aberrant DNA methylation events in the development of gastric tumours and addresses the different aspects associated with the application of therapeutic epigenetic modulation in the management of the disease.

  9. Involvement of Aquaporin 3 in Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shen, Lizong

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common and lethal malignant cancers worldwide, and numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays a key role in the development of gastric carcinomas. Our previous studies showed that aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is overexpressed in gastric carcinoma and promotes the migration and proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells, suggesting that AQP3 may be a potentially important determinant of gastric carcinoma. However, the role of AQP3 in H. pylori carcinogenesis is unknown. Methods The AQP3 protein and H. pylori were detected in human gastric tissues by immunohistochemistry and modified Giemsa staining respectively. AQP3 knockdown was obtained by small interfering (si) RNA. Western blot assays and RT-PCR were used to evaluate the change of AQP3 in the human gastric cancer AGS and SGC7901 cell lines after co-culture with H. pylori. Sprague Dawley rats were orally inoculated with H. pylori to establish a rat model colonized by H. pylori. Results The present study found that AQP3 expression correlated with H. pylori infection status in gastric cancer tissues and corresponding normal mucosa, and H. pylori co-culture upregulated AQP3 expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. H. pylori infection also increased AQP3 expression in gastric mucosa colonized by H. pylori in a Sprague Dawley rat model. Conclusions These findings provide further information to understand the mechanism of H. pylori carcinogenesis and a potential strategy for the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinoma. PMID:23152856

  10. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  11. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, P.; Kosunen, T. U.; Valle, J.; Riihelä, M.; Seppälä, K.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: Serum IgG antibodies for H pylori were determined in 54 consecutive patients with gastric carcinoma. The prevalence of H pylori in gastric mucosa was also examined histologically (modified Giemsa) in 32 patients from whom adequate biopsy specimens of the antrum and corpus were available. Thirty five patients with gastrointestinal tumours outside the stomach and 48 with non-gastrointestinal malignancies served as controls. RESULTS: Of the 54 patients, 38 (70%) had H pylori antibodies (IgG) in their serum (three additional patients had H pylori antibodies IgA, class specific but not IgG specific). This prevalence was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) than that (49%) in the 35 controls. No differences in prevalence of H pylori antibodies were found between gastric cancer cases of intestinal (IGCA) or diffuse (DGCA) type, both these types showing H pylori antibodies (IgG) in 71% of the patients. In the subgroup of 32 subjects, five patients had normal gastric mucosa and four showed corpus limited atrophy ("pernicious anaemia type" atrophy of type A). All of these nine patients had no evidence of current or previous H pylori infection in serum (no IgG antibodies) or in tissue sections (negative Giemsa staining). The remaining 23 patients had antral or pangastritis, and all had evidence of current or previous H pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS: H pylori associated chronic gastritis was the associated disease in 75% of the patients with gastric cancer occurring equally often in both IGCA and DGCA groups. About 25% of cases seem to have a normal stomach or severe corpus limited atrophy, neither of which showed evidence of concomitant H pylori infection. PMID:1577969

  13. Effects of gastric vagotomy on visceral cell proliferation induced by ventromedial hypothalamic lesions: role of vagal hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Yuri; Osaka, Toshimasa; Suzuki, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Takeo; Niijima, Akira; Kageyama, Haruaki; Fumiko, Takenoya; Shioda, Seiji; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-07-01

    In rats, ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions induce cell proliferation in the visceral organs (stomach, small intestine, liver, and pancreas) due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve. To investigate the effects of selective gastric vagotomy on VMH lesion-induced cell proliferation and secretion of gastric acid, we assessed the mitotic index (the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive cells per 1,000 cells in the gastric mucosal cell layer) and measured the volume of secreted basal gastric acid. Furthermore, to explore whether or not ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) lead to ulcer formation in VMH-lesioned rats, we assessed the ulcer index of both sham-operated and VMH-lesioned rats after administration of ethanol. VMH lesions resulted in an increased mitotic index and thickness of the gastric mucosal cell layer and gave rise to the hypersecretion of gastric acid. Selective gastric vagotomy restored these parameters to normal without affecting cell proliferation in other visceral organs. Ethanol-induced AGML caused ulcers in sham VMH-lesioned rats, whereas VMH-lesioned rats were less likely to exhibit such ulcers. These results suggest that VMH lesion-induced vagally mediated cell proliferation in the visceral organs is associated with hyperfunction in these organs, and VMH lesion-induced resistance to ethanol may be due to thickening of the gastric mucosal cell layer resulting from cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa-this in turn is due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve.

  14. Pediatric Gastric Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela-Ramos, Marco Cesar; Mendizábal-Méndez, Ana Luisa; Ríos-Contreras, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Montes, Claudia Esther

    2010-01-01

    Neoplasms from germ cell origin are a heterogeneous group of tumors rarely seen in the pediatric population, teratoma is the most frequent among them. They can occur in either gonadal or extragonadal locations. Extragonadal teratoma arising from abdominal viscera is very unusual. There are less than a hundred reported cases of gastric teratoma in the worldwide literature. Since the occurrence of this pathology in the pediatric age group is quite rare, we describe a case of a teratoma located in the lesser curvature of the stomach in an infant with an emphasis in radiologic-pathologic correlation. PMID:22470691

  15. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: a state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Sauid; Nunn, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. It is now well- established that Helicobacter pylori infection predispose individuals toward gastric adenocarcinoma later in life. It has since been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Research suggests that the oncogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori can occur through a variety of mechanisms, including the indirect inflammatory effects of Helicobacter pylori on the gastric mucosa and the direct epigenetic effects of Helicobacter pylori on individual cells. Whilst infected with Helicobacter pylori, a combination of environmental and host-dependent factors determines the likelihood of developing gastric cancer. Controversy remains regarding the effects of eradication of Helicobacter pylori on the prevention of further progression of gastric lesions and the possibility for regression of atrophic gastritis. The aim of this review is to synthesis different elements that contribute to the step-wise progression of normal gastric mucosa to gastric adenocarcinoma. This review helps clinicians to better identify those infected individuals who are at high risk of developing gastric cancer and implement the necessary investigations and treatment.

  16. Higher incidence of Gastrospirillum sp. in swine with gastric ulcer of the pars oesophagea.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A J; Silva, J C; Nogueira, A M; Paulino Júnior, E; Miranda, C R

    1995-03-01

    Gastric ulcer in swine is characterized by an area of acid-peptic digestion, occurs usually in the pars oesophagea of the stomach, and has unknown etiopathogenesis. The present work was carried out to investigate the prevalence of the newly described spiral-shaped microorganism Gastrospirillum sp. ("Gastrospirillum suis") in stomachs of abattoir pigs with and without gastric ulcer. Stomachs were removed from 32 consecutive pigs presenting apparently normal mucosa and from 32 additional consecutive pigs presenting frank, chronic gastric ulcer of the pars oesophagea. Fragments of antral, oxyntic, cardiac and pars oesophagea regions were taken from each stomach and processed for histology and for identification of Gastrospirillum sp. in tissue sections. The microorganisms were identified mainly in the mucous layer and in gastric foveolas of the antral and oxyntic mucosa. Forty pigs (62.5%) were positive for Gastrospirillum sp.; among them, 27 (67.5%) had gastric ulcer, and 13 (32.5%) had no ulcer. Twenty-four pigs (37.5%) were negative for Gastrospirillum sp.; among them, five (20.8%) presented with gastric ulcer, and 19 (79.2%) had no ulcer. There was a significant difference between pigs with and without gastric ulcer in regard to the presence of Gastrospirillum sp. (P < 0.01). The spiral-shaped microorganism Gastrospirillum sp. that inhabits the stomach of pigs should be considered a possible factor connected with the etiopathogenesis of swine gastric ulcer.

  17. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  18. Effect of sucralfate on gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.M.; Caride, V.J.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients may have accelerated gastric emptying (GE) suggesting that there is an increase in unbuffered gastric acid reaching the duodenum contributing to DU disease. Aluminum-containing antacids were shown to delay GE. The authors' aim was to investigate whether another aluminum-containing compound, Sucralfate, affects GE in normal and DU patients. Nine normal volunteers and 10 patients with documented DU disease were studied. For each test the subject ingested a meal composed of chicken liver Tc-99m-S-C mixed with beef stew and eaten with 4 oz. of water labelled with 100..mu..Ci of III-in-DTPA. On two separate days, subjects received 1 gram of Sucralfate (190 mg of aluminum per gram) or placebo in a randomized double-blind fashion one hour prior to the test meal. GE of liquids and solids in normal subjects was not significantly changed by Sucralfate. Sucralfate in the DU patients significantly slowed liquid emptying in the initial 40 min and solid food throughout the study compared to placebo (p<0.05). This paper summarizes that; GE of solids but not liquids is accelerated in DU patients compared to normal subjects; and sucralfate delays GE of both liquid and solid components of a meal in DU patients but has no effect on GE in normals. The authors conclude that a slowing of gastric emptying possibly mediated by aluminum ions, may be one mechanism by which Sucralfate enhances healing and decreases recurrence of DU.

  19. A newly designed big cup nitinol stent for gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ding; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Geng, Jian-Ping

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To find out whether a newly designed big cup nitinol stent is suitable for treatment of patients with gastric outlet obstruction resulting from gastric cancer. METHODS: The new stent is composed of a proximal big cup segment (20 mm in length and 48-55 mm in diameter), a middle part (60 mm in length and 20 mm in diameter) covered by a polyethylene membrane and a distal sphericity (20 mm in length and 28 mm in diameter). Half of the proximal big cup segment is also covered by a polyethlene membrane, which is adjacent to the middle part of the stent. The stent is preloaded in a 6.0-mm-diameter introducer system. Thirteen patients with gastric outlet obstruction resulting from gastric cancer received the new stents under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in 12 of 13 (92.3%) patients. Among the 12 patients in whom endoscopic stent was placed successfully, the clinical success rate was 91.7% during a follow-up of average 6.5 mo. During the first month follow-up, the migration rate was 0%, recurrent obstruction 0% and gastric bleeding 8.3%. During the follow-up between 2-12 mo, no migration, recurrent obstruction and gastric bleeding occurred. CONCLUSION: The proximal big cup segment seems to be effective and promising for technical efficacy, clinical outcome, and preventing migration and tumor ingrowth and increasing the emptying rate of sinus ventriculi. PMID:20806440

  20. Potassium selectivity of frog gastric luminal membrane.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, D K

    1986-06-01

    Transmural potential difference (PD) and resistance (R) changes after luminal or serosal instillation of K+ were determined under various conditions in chambered preparations of frog gastric mucosae. Potassium selectivity of the luminal membrane is indicated by the rapid reversal of the inverted PD of mucosae bathed in NaCl-free, choline sulfate (Ch2SO4)-Ringer on the serosal side and unbuffered hypertonic Ch2SO4 solution on the luminal side on luminal K+ instillation. The delta PD responses are significantly attenuated, however, in histamine-stimulated mucosae bathed in hypotonic or in burimamide-inhibited mucosae bathed in hyper- and hypotonic luminal media, which suggests that the K+ selectivity of the luminal membrane resides largely in the tubular cell apical membrane. Imposing a serosal-to-luminal transmucosal K+ gradient in both histamine-stimulated and omeprazole-inhibited mucosae also reversed the normal orientation of PD but not in those inhibited with burimamide. In the latter, the PD inversion was attenuated but maintained its normal orientation. These data suggest that burimamide, but not omeprazole, acts by blocking luminal membrane K+ conductance. The inverted PD in mucosae bathed in Cl-free media may thus be due partially or fully to K+ diffusion driven by the cell-to-lumen K+ gradient via the luminal K+ conductance pathway. These findings have implications for the controversy surrounding the postulated electrogenicity of the gastric proton pump.

  1. Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Bianca; Jacobson, Adam S; Alon, Eran E; Via, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 μg/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended.

  2. KLF4 deletion alters gastric cell lineage and induces MUC2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Lin, T; Liu, J; Li, M; Zhang, W; Xu, X; Zhao, W; Liu, M; Napier, D L; Wang, C; Evers, B M; Liu, C

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the world, particularly in underdeveloped countries. The mechanism of gastric cancer is less understood compared with other types of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger transcription factor and is a potential tumor suppressor in GI cancers. In this study, we have generated two mouse models, Rosa-Cre;Klf4fl/fl and Lgr5-Cre;Klf4fl/fl. KLF4 was deleted by Rosa-Cre in the gastric epithelia cells or by Lgr5-Cre in the antral stem cells in the adult mice. KLF4 deletion resulted in increased proliferating cells and decreased pit mucous cells. Surprisingly, the intestinal goblet cell marker, MUC2, which is not expressed in normal gastric tissues, was strongly induced at the base of the KLF4-deleted antral glands. To understand the clinical relevance of these findings, we analyzed the expression of KLF4 and MUC2 in human gastric cancer. In a subset of human gastric cancer, the expression of KLF4 is negatively associated with MUC2 expression. In conclusion, KLF4 is essential for normal homeostasis of antral stem cells; loss of KLF4 and expression of MUC2 could be important markers for gastric cancer diagnosis. PMID:27277677

  3. On-chip lectin microarray for glycoprofiling of different gastritis types and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bibhas; Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mishra, Debasish; Das, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman; Maiti, Tapas K.

    2014-01-01

    An on-chip lectin microarray based glycomic approach is employed to identify glyco markers for different gastritis and gastric cancer. Changes in protein glycosylation have impact on biological function and carcinogenesis. These altered glycosylation patterns in serum proteins and membrane proteins of tumor cells can be unique markers of cancer progression and hence have been exploited to diagnose various stages of cancer through lectin microarray technology. In the present work, we aimed to study the alteration of glycan structure itself in different stages of gastritis and gastric cancer thoroughly. In order to perform the study from both serum and tissue glycoproteins in an efficient and high-throughput manner, we indigenously developed and employed lectin microarray integrated on a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platform. We analyzed serum and gastric biopsy samples from 8 normal, 15 chronic Type-B gastritis, 10 chronic Type-C gastritis, and 6 gastric adenocarcinoma patients and found that the glycoprofile obtained from tissue samples was more distinctive than that of the sera samples. We were able to establish signature glycoprofile for the three disease groups, that were absent in healthy normal individuals. In addition, our findings elucidated certain novel signature glycan expression in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. In silico analysis showed that glycoprofile of chronic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma formed close clusters, confirming the previously hypothesized linkage between them. This signature can be explored further as gastric cancer marker to develop novel analytical tools and obtain in-depth understanding of the disease prognosis. PMID:24959308

  4. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  5. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruyi; Liu, Wenming; Qiu, Xingfeng; Lin, Zhenghe; Xie, Yan; Hong, Xingya; Paerhati, Reyila; Qi, Zhongquan; Zhuang, Guohong; Liu, Zhongchen

    2016-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC.

  6. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    HU, RUYI; LIU, WENMING; QIU, XINGFENG; LIN, ZHENGHE; XIE, YAN; HONG, XINGYA; PAERHATI, REYILA; QI, ZHONGQUAN; ZHUANG, GUOHONG; LIU, ZHONGCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC. PMID:26998086

  7. Role of peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Jiang; Song, Xiuqi

    2016-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4) post-translationally converts peptidylarginine to citrulline, appearing to be overexpressed in numerous carcinomas. The current study aimed to investigate the expression of PADI4 in gastric cancer tissues and its effect on the biological activities of SGC-7901 and AGS tumor cell lines. The expression of PADI4 was determined in gastric cancer and normal gastric mucosa tissues using western blot analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Gastric cancer cell lines were divided into the following groups: Mock group (subjected to transfection reagent); negative group [subjected to small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection]; PADI4 siRNA group (subjected to PADI4 siRNA transfection); 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) group (subjected to 5-Fu); and 5-Fu + siRNA transfection group (subjected to 5-Fu and PADI4 siRNA transfection). The effects of silencing PADI4 with the above measures on the proliferation and invasion of SGC-7901 and AGS cells were determined by MTT and Transwell chamber assays. In addition, propidium iodide staining was performed to detect the effects of PADI4 on the cell cycle. A significant increase in the expression of PADI4 mRNA in gastric cancer tissue compared with normal mucosa tissue was identified (P<0.05). The proliferation and invasion of SGC-7901 and AGS cells were significantly decreased in the PADI4 siRNA group. Furthermore, flow cytometry DNA analysis revealed that silencing PADI4 resulted in significant S phase arrest and marked decrease of cells in the G2/M phase. PADI4 siRNA coupled with 5-Fu significantly enhanced its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, PADI4 demonstrated high expression in gastric cancer and served an important role in the biological activities of gastric cancer cells involving cell proliferation, invasion and cell cycle. As a result, PADI4 may be a valid cancer susceptibility gene and potential target for cancer

  8. Feasibility of terahertz reflectometry for discrimination of human early gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Gyu Min; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Oh, Seung Jae; Lee, Sang Kil; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of THz time-domain reflectometry for the discrimination of human early gastric cancer (EGC) from the normal gastric region. Eight fresh EGC tissues, which were resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection, were studied. Of them, six lesions were well discriminated on THz images and the regions well correlated with tumor regions on pathologically mapped images. Four THz parameters could be suggested for quantitative discrimination of EGCs. PMID:25909023

  9. Ibuprofen hepatic encephalopathy, hepatomegaly, gastric lesion and gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Spomenko; Drmic, Domagoj; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Radic, Bozo; Djuzel, Viktor; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Romic, Zeljko; Dzidic, Senka; Kalogjera, Livije; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2011-09-30

    Chronic ibuprofen (0.4 g/kg intraperitoneally, once daily for 4 weeks) evidenced a series of pathologies, not previously reported in ibuprofen-dosed rats, namely hepatic encephalopathy, gastric lesions, hepatomegaly, increased AST and ALT serum values with prolonged sedation/unconsciousness, and weight loss. In particular, ibuprofen toxicity was brain edema, particularly in the cerebellum, with the white matter being more affected than in gray matter. In addition, damaged and red neurons, in the absence of anti-inflammatory reaction was observed, particularly in the cerebral cortex and cerebellar nuclei, but was also present although to a lesser extent in the hippocampus, dentate nucleus and Purkinje cells. An anti-ulcer peptide shown to have no toxicity, the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, MW 1419, 10 μg, 10 ng/kg) inhibited the pathology seen with ibuprofen (i) when given intraperitoneally, immediately after ibuprofen daily or (ii) when given in drinking water (0.16 μg, 0.16 ng/ml). Counteracted were all adverse effects, such as hepatic encephalopathy, the gastric lesions, hepatomegaly, increased liver serum values. In addition, BPC 157 treated rats showed no behavioral disturbances and maintained normal weight gain. Thus, apart from efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease and various wound treatments, BPC 157 was also effective when given after ibuprofen.

  10. High PARP-1 expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Ying; Gao, Dongna; Xing, Jing; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) was previously demonstrated to be overexpressed in numerous malignant tumors and associated with invasiveness and poor prognosis. However, the expression of the PARP-1 protein in gastric cancer and its association with clinical outcomes requires further investigation. In the present study, the expression of PARP-1 in 564 gastric cancer tissues and 335 tumor-adjacent control tissues is investigated, using tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry. PARP-1 expression levels were demonstrated to be significantly higher in gastric cancer tissue samples, as compared with control tissue samples. In gastric cancer, high PARP-1 expression levels were significantly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection (P=0.032), decreased differentiation (P<0.001), increased depth of invasion (P=0.037), presence of lymphatic invasion (P<0.001), presence of lymph node metastasis (P<0.001), and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.015). High PARP-1 expression levels were associated with a significantly shorter overall survival rate (P<0.001) and disease-free survival rate (P=0.001) in patients with gastric cancer, particularly a subset of patients with H. pylori infection or an advanced TNM stage. In addition, univariate analysis indicated that PARP-1 high expression levels were significantly associated with a poor prognosis in gastric cancer. These results suggest that PARP-1 expression may be involved in the progression and prognosis of gastric cancer, particularly H. pylori-positive or advanced-stage gastric cancer. PMID:27895737

  11. Motility and chemotaxis mediate the preferential colonization of gastric injury sites by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Eitaro; Closson, Chet; Matthis, Andrea L; Schumacher, Michael A; Engevik, Amy C; Zavros, Yana; Ottemann, Karen M; Montrose, Marshall H

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a pathogen contributing to peptic inflammation, ulceration, and cancer. A crucial step in the pathogenic sequence is when the bacterium first interacts with gastric tissue, an event that is poorly understood in vivo. We have shown that the luminal space adjacent to gastric epithelial damage is a microenvironment, and we hypothesized that this microenvironment might enhance H. pylori colonization. Inoculation with 106 H. pylori (wild-type Sydney Strain 1, SS1) significantly delayed healing of acetic-acid induced ulcers at Day 1, 7 and 30 post-inoculation, and wild-type SS1 preferentially colonized the ulcerated area compared to uninjured gastric tissue in the same animal at all time points. Gastric resident Lactobacillus spp. did not preferentially colonize ulcerated tissue. To determine whether bacterial motility and chemotaxis are important to ulcer healing and colonization, we analyzed isogenic H. pylori mutants defective in motility (ΔmotB) or chemotaxis (ΔcheY). ΔmotB (10(6)) failed to colonize ulcerated or healthy stomach tissue. ΔcheY (10(6)) colonized both tissues, but without preferential colonization of ulcerated tissue. However, ΔcheY did modestly delay ulcer healing, suggesting that chemotaxis is not required for this process. We used two-photon microscopy to induce microscopic epithelial lesions in vivo, and evaluated accumulation of fluorescently labeled H. pylori at gastric damage sites in the time frame of minutes instead of days. By 5 min after inducing damage, H. pylori SS1 preferentially accumulated at the site of damage and inhibited gastric epithelial restitution. H. pylori ΔcheY modestly accumulated at the gastric surface and inhibited restitution, but did not preferentially accumulate at the injury site. H. pylori ΔmotB neither accumulated at the surface nor inhibited restitution. We conclude that bacterial chemosensing and motility rapidly promote H. pylori colonization of injury sites, and thereby

  12. Downregulation of homeobox gene Barx2 increases gastric cancer proliferation and metastasis and predicts poor patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chongzhi; Li, Jikun; Wang, Zhanshan; Sun, Huimin; Tang, Huamei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhihai; Wen, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Barx2 is a Bar family homeodomain transcription factor shown to play a critical role in cell adhesion and cytoskeleton remodeling, key processes in carcinogenesis and metastasis. Using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry, we found that Barx2 is expressed at lower levels in human gastric cancer (GC) tissues than in adjacent normal mucosa. In a multivariate analysis, Barx2 expression emerged as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a trend toward even shorter overall survival in the patient group with Barx2-negative tumors, independent of advanced UICC stage and tumor relapse. Using in vitro and in vivo assays, we demonstrated that under normal conditions Barx2 inhibited GC cell proliferation and invasiveness through inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings indicate that reduction or loss of Barx2 dis-inhibits GC cell proliferation and invasion, and that reduction in Barx2 could serve as an independent prognostic biomarker for poor outcome in GC patients. PMID:27533254

  13. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  14. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  15. Impact of Transient and Persistent Acute Kidney Injury on Chronic Kidney Disease Progression and Mortality after Gastric Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Seong; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Kim, Soo Wan

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after gastric surgery for gastric cancer and associated with adverse outcomes. However, the impact of transient or persistent AKI on clinical outcomes after gastric surgery for gastric cancer has not been described. We performed a retrospective study of 4,886 patients with normal renal function who underwent partial or total gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2002 and December 2012. AKI patients were classified as transient and persistent AKI based on the return of serum creatinine to the level indicating no AKI within 7 days. Our outcomes included occurrence of new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) and mortality 1 year after gastric surgery. AKI occurred in 638 (13.1%) after gastric surgery. Transient AKI was documented in 574 (90%). Use of diuretics and contrast agents was a common risk factor for persistent and transient AKI. Length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay, and ICU admission rate were higher in patients with transient AKI than in those without AKI. Although patients with persistent AKI had a higher new-onset CKD 1 year after gastric surgery after adjusting for multiple covariates, transient AKI was not associated with new-onset CKD. The 1-year mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with transient and persistent AKI. Not only persistent AKI but transient AKI is associated with increased risk of hospital complications and a significantly higher risk of long-term mortality than patients without AKI after gastric surgery. Moreover, persistent AKI, but not transient AKI, is associated with CKD progression at 1 year. PMID:27936153

  16. Inflammation, atrophy, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic inflammation and cancer is now well established. This association has recently received renewed interest with the recognition that microbial pathogens can be responsible for the chronic inflammation observed in many cancers, particularly those originating in the gastrointestinal system. A prime example is Helicobacter pylori, which infects 50% of the world’s population and is now known to be responsible for inducing chronic gastric inflammation that progresses to atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. This Review provides an overview of recent progress in elucidating the bacterial properties responsible for colonization of the stomach, persistence in the stomach, and triggering of inflammation, as well as the host factors that have a role in determining whether gastritis progresses to gastric cancer. We also discuss how the increased understanding of the relationship between inflammation and gastric cancer still leaves many questions unanswered regarding recommendations for prevention and treatment. PMID:17200707

  17. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Stomach (gastric) cancer Gastritis , when the lining of the stomach becomes ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Biopsy Peptic Ulcer Stomach Cancer Stomach Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  18. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  19. The surgical treatment of chronic gastric atony following Roux-Y diversion for alkaline reflux gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, S.B.; Woodward, E.R.

    1989-06-01

    Symptoms of severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and frequent bezoars, as well as objective gastric retention, can occur following Roux-Y biliary diversion for alkaline reflux gastritis. Medical therapy and prokinetic drugs have proven ineffective. This review evaluates 37 patients who underwent further gastric resection from 1979 to 1987 to improve gastric emptying and resolve symptoms. Fifteen patients underwent perioperative radionuclide solid-food gastric emptying studies. Seventy-three per cent (27 of 37 patients) of the patients who underwent further gastric resection (70% to 95%) had a satisfactory postoperative response. Twenty patients were graded Visick 1 or 2 and 7 Visick-3 patients, although much improved, still had some symptoms of gastroparesis. Twenty-seven per cent (10 of 37 patients) failed to improve and underwent completion total gastrectomy. Overall, 70% of this group had almost complete resolution of their symptoms. Three of 10 patients were considered ''failures'' due to postprandial pain in 1 and early vasomotor dumping in 2. Of the 10 patients who failed initial revisional surgery, 7 underwent a 70% to 80% subtotal gastric resection (STG) and 3 patients underwent 85% to 95% extensive resection (EXT.G.). Of the 15 patients who underwent perioperative radionuclide evaluation, a mean two-hour gastric retention of 61.4% +/- 4% (SEM) decreased to 25% +/- 4% following further gastric resection. Eight patients were in the STG group and seven patients were in the EXT.G group. Following STG, mean two-hour gastric retention of 58.2% +/- 3.5% decreased to 38% +/- 3% (p less than 0.05). In seven patients who underwent EXT.G, mean two-hour retention of 65% +/- 4% decreased to 10% +/- 2.5% (p less than 0.005). EXT.G resulted in normal gastric emptying and few late failures.

  20. Expression of the Ets-1 proto-oncogene in human gastric carcinoma: correlation with tumor invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, T.; Ito, M.; Ohtsuru, A.; Naito, S.; Nakashima, M.; Fagin, J. A.; Yamashita, S.; Sekine, I.

    1996-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Ets-1 is a transcription factor known to control the expression of a number of genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and has been postulated to play a role in cell migration and tumor invasion. To elucidate the involvement of Ets-1 in human gastric carcinomas, we examined 11 cases of gastric adenoma and 110 cases of gastric carcinoma by immunohistochemistry and compared the degree of Ets-1 expression with the depth of carcinoma invasion. Ets-1 was not expressed either in the normal gastric epithelium or in gastric adenomas. Among the 110 cases with gastric adenocarcinoma, 70 (63.6%) showed positive staining for the Ets-1 protein. In mucosal carcinomas, only 3 of 26 cases (11.5%) showed positive immunostaining for Ets-1. In contrast, 67 of 84 cases (79.8%) with submucosal or more invasive carcinomas showed immunopositivity and intense staining for Ets-1 in the tumor cells. The pattern of Ets-1 immunostaining in mucosal carcinomas was weak and differed from that of other local invasive carcinomas (P < 0.001). Histologically, signet-ring cell and mucinous carcinomas expressed relatively weak positivity for Ets-1. Ets-1 expression correlated significantly with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). In situ hybridization, using an Ets-1 oligonucleotide probe, also confirmed the presence of Ets-1 mRNA in gastric carcinomas. Expression of Ets-1 mRNA was also detected in four different kinds of cultured human gastric carcinoma cell lines by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. These findings suggest that Ets-1 is overexpressed in gastric mucosal cells that have undergone malignant conversion and that Ets-1 is one of the factors involved in the penetration of gastric carcinoma beyond the muscularis mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952528

  1. BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for in vivo targeted magnetofluorescent imaging of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is 2th most common cancer in China, and is still the second most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. How to recognize early gastric cancer cells is still a great challenge for early diagnosis and therapy of patients with gastric cancer. This study is aimed to develop one kind of multifunctional nanoprobes for in vivo targeted magnetofluorescent imaging of gastric cancer. Methods BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody was prepared, was used as first antibody to stain 50 pairs of specimens of gastric cancer and control normal gastric mucous tissues, and conjugated with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles with 50 nm in diameter, the resultant BRCAA1-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoprobes were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectrometry, as-prepared nanoprobes were incubated with gastric cancer MGC803 cells, and were injected into mice model loaded with gastric cancer of 5 mm in diameter via tail vein, and then were imaged by fluorescence optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging, their biodistribution was investigated. The tissue slices were observed by fluorescent microscopy, and the important organs such as heart, lung, kidney, brain and liver were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stain method. Results BRCAA1 monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared, BRCAA1 protein exhibited over-expression in 64% gastric cancer tissues, no expression in control normal gastric mucous tissues, there exists statistical difference between two groups (P < 0.01). The BRCAA1-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoprobes exhibit very low-toxicity, lower magnetic intensity and lower fluorescent intensity with peak-blue-shift than pure FMNPs, could be endocytosed by gastric cancer MGC803 cells, could target in vivo gastric cancer tissues loaded by mice, and could be used to image gastric cancer tissues by fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging, and mainly distributed in local gastric cancer

  2. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  3. Endovascular management of gastric varices.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E

    2014-11-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices is a major complication of portal hypertension. Although less common than bleeding associated with esophageal varices, gastric variceal bleeding has a higher mortality. From an endovascular perspective,transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) to decompress the portal circulation and/or balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) are utilized to address bleeding gastric varices. Until recently, there was a clear medical cultural divide between the strategy of decompressing the portal circulation (TIPS creation, for example) and transvenous obliteration for the management of gastric varices. However, the practice of BRTO is gaining acceptance in the United States and its practice is spreading rapidly. Recently, the American College of Radiology has identified BRTO to be a viable alternative to TIPS in particular anatomical and clinical scenarios. However, the anatomical and clinical applications of BRTO were not defined beyond the conservative approach of resorting to BRTO in non-TIPS candidates. The article discusses the outcomes of BRTO and TIPS for the management of gastric varices individually or in combination. Definitions, endovascular technical concepts and contemporary vascular classifications of gastric variceal systems are described in order to help grasp the complexity of the hemodynamic pathology and hopefully help define the pathology better for future reporting and lay the ground for more defined stratification of patients not only based on comorbidity and hepatic reserve but on anatomy and hemodynamic classifications.

  4. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do PMID:26566288

  5. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  6. Histological and Pathological Assessment of miR-204 and SOX4 Levels in Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao; Wang, Shuanhu; Liu, Mulin; Lu, Zhen; Zhan, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers and the efficient therapeutic methods are limited. Further study of the exact molecular mechanism of gastric cancer to develop novel targeted therapies is necessary and urgent. We herein systematically examined that miR-204 suppressed both proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer AGS cells. miR-204 directly targeted SOX4. In clinical tissue research, we determined that miR-204 was expressed much lower and SOX4 expressed much higher in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal gastric tissues. Associated analysis with clinicopathological parameters in gastric cancer patients showed miR-204 was associated with no lymph node metastasis and early tumor stages whereas SOX4 was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced tumor stages. In addition, miR-204 and SOX4 were negatively correlated in tissues from gastric cancer patients. Our findings examined the important role of miR-204 and SOX4 played in gastric cancer, and they could be used as candidate therapeutic targets for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:28133610

  7. Histological and Pathological Assessment of miR-204 and SOX4 Levels in Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao; Wang, Shuanhu; Liu, Mulin; Lu, Zhen; Zhan, Yanqing; Wang, Wenbin; Xu, A-Man

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers and the efficient therapeutic methods are limited. Further study of the exact molecular mechanism of gastric cancer to develop novel targeted therapies is necessary and urgent. We herein systematically examined that miR-204 suppressed both proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer AGS cells. miR-204 directly targeted SOX4. In clinical tissue research, we determined that miR-204 was expressed much lower and SOX4 expressed much higher in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal gastric tissues. Associated analysis with clinicopathological parameters in gastric cancer patients showed miR-204 was associated with no lymph node metastasis and early tumor stages whereas SOX4 was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced tumor stages. In addition, miR-204 and SOX4 were negatively correlated in tissues from gastric cancer patients. Our findings examined the important role of miR-204 and SOX4 played in gastric cancer, and they could be used as candidate therapeutic targets for gastric cancer therapy.

  8. Reduced expression of the long non-coding RNA AI364715 in gastric cancer and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengqian; Mao, Jinqin; Shao, Yongfu; Chen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Dingli; Zhang, Xinjun; Guo, Junming

    2015-09-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), which is greater than 200 nucleotides, is a class of RNA molecules without protein coding function. In recent years, studies have shown that lncRNAs are associated with cancers. They are affecting the occurrence and development of cancers. However, the diagnostic significances of lncRNAs in gastric cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we focused on AI364715, one typical lncRNA. A total of 186 samples were collected from two cancer centers. To find the potential association between its level and gastric cancer, we first collected 75 paired gastric cancer tissues and normal tissues, which are 5 cm away from the edge of carcinoma. Besides, 18 human healthy gastric mucosa and 18 gastric precancerous lesions (dysplasia) were also collected. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was first used to detect the expression level of AI364715 at multiple stages of gastric tumorigenesis. Then, the relationships between AI364715 level and the clinicopathological factors of patients with gastric cancer were analyzed. The results showed that the expression level of AI364715 in gastric cancer tissues was downregulated. Meanwhile, its expression level was closely associated with tumor size and differentiation. More importantly, AI364715 expression level was significantly changed in dysplasia, the typical precancerous lesions. Taken together, AI364715 may be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  9. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  10. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-30

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  11. 18F-FLT PET/CT in Patients with Gastric Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Małkowski, Bogdan; Staniuk, Tomasz; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Studniarek, Michał

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of 18F-FLT PET/CT in the detection and differentiation of gastric cancers (GC). 104 consecutive patients (57 cases of adenocarcinoma tubulare (G2 and G3), 17 cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma, 6 cases of undifferentiated carcinoma, 14 cases of adenocarcinoma partim mucocellulare, and 10 cases of end stage gastric cancer) with newly diagnosed advanced gastric cancer were examined with FLT PET/CT. For quantitative and comparative analyses, the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was calculated for both the tumors and noninvaded gastric wall. Results. There were found, in the group of adenocarcinoma tubulare, SUVmax 1.5–23.1 (7.46 ± 4.57), in mucinous adenocarcinoma, SUVmax 2.3–10.3 (5.5 ± 2.4), in undifferentiated carcinoma, SUVmax 3.1–13.6 (7.28 ± 3.25), in adenocarcinoma partim mucocellulare, SUVmax 2–25.3 (7.7 ± 6.99), and, in normal gastric wall, SUVmax 1.01–2.55 (1.84 ± 0.35). For the level of 2.6 cut-off value between the normal wall and neoplasm FLT uptake from ROC analysis, all but five gastric cancers showed higher accumulation of FLT than noninfiltrated mucosa. Conclusion. Gastric cancer presents higher accumulation of 18F-FLT than normal, distended gastric mucosa. Significantly higher accumulation was shown in cancers better differentiated and with higher cellular density. PMID:24454342

  12. Wandering spleen causing gastric outlet obstruction and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ramon; Lobert, Philip; Herman, Richard; O'Malley, Ryan; Mychaliska, George

    2010-12-01

    Excessive splenic mobility (i.e. wandering spleen) is a rare condition caused by laxity or deficiency of all the spleen's normal ligamentous attachments in the left hypochondrium. In the pediatric population, a wandering spleen may present as an incidental finding, an abdominal mass or torsion of the vascular pedicle causing venous congestion and acute abdominal pain, and eventually infarction. We present an unusual case of wandering spleen causing pancreatitis and gastric outlet obstruction via direct external compression.

  13. Caspases and their role in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Frejlich, Ewelina; Rudno-Rudzińska, Julia; Janiszewski, Kacper; Salomon, Lukasz; Kotulski, Krzysztof; Pelzer, Oskar; Grzebieniak, Zygmunt; Tarnawa, Robert; Kielan, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Caspases (Cysteine Aspartate Specific Proteases) are a group of cysteine-containing proteolytic enzymes produced by the cells of living organisms. They participate in immunological functions, proliferation, cell migration and organization. Caspases also influence the secretion of various regulative factors. Moreover, they are responsible for cellular maturation and reconstruction, and for regulating the number and quality of cells initiating the apoptosis of old cells or those that cannot play their normal role due to abnormalities. Multiple pathological processes are associated with disorders in the activity of caspases. Changes in expression of individual caspases have been observed in gastric cancer. The expression of some caspases is also correlated with particular histological traits and the frequency of metastases, which suggests their possible use as a prognostic factor. It has also been discovered that some somatic mutations in caspase coding genes might lead to inhibition of apoptosis and the progression of the disease. Gene polymorphism may be a gastric cancer risk factor, but may also play a protective function. Considering the less than satisfactory effects of conventional therapeutic methods, the search for alternative ways to activate apoptosis - through gene therapy or selective activation of individual elements of the apoptotic pathways - constitutes a promising direction for studies of new therapeutic strategies. Caspases, enzymes playing a central role in the process of programmed cellular death, may possibly be a key to the development of a more effective anti-cancer therapy.

  14. Portal hypertensive gastric mucosa: an endoscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Papazian, A; Braillon, A; Dupas, J L; Sevenet, F; Capron, J P

    1986-01-01

    The endoscopic features of the gastric mucosa in patients with cirrhosis have not been systematically investigated. In these patients, we observed an endoscopic aspect, consisting of multiple small erythematous areas, outlined by a subtle yellowish network (resembling a mosaic), mainly located in the proximal part of the stomach. We tested the value of this sign by comparing two groups: 100 patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis, and 300 control patients without signs of liver disease or portal hypertension. This endoscopic pattern was observed in 94 of the patients with cirrhosis, whereas oesophageal varices were seen in 78 only. In contrast, only one patient of the control group had this aspect. Moreover, this sign was also found in seven of eight patients with non cirrhotic portal hypertension, but was seen neither in 100 patients with chronic alcoholism but without liver disease, nor in 10 cirrhotic patients with end-to-side portacaval shunts. These endoscopic changes might be because of mucosal and/or submucosal oedema and congestion highlighting the normal areae gastricae pattern and related to raised portal pressure. We conclude that the mosaic pattern of the gastric mucosa is a sensible and specific sign for diagnosis of portal hypertension, whatever the cause. Images Figure PMID:3781334

  15. Measurement of Gastric Circumference in Foetuses with Oesophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Hoopmann, M.; Kagan, K. O.; Borgmeier, F.; Seitz, G.; Arand, J.; Wagner, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The specific recognition of oesophageal atresia (OA) with or without a tracheal fistula in a foetus is a diagnostic challenge for prenatal medicine. The aim of the present work is to analyse the value of the measurement of gastric size in the diagnosis of this significant malformation. Materials and Methods: Altogether, the examinations of 433 pregnancies between the 18.4 and 39.1 weeks of gestation were retrospectively analysed. 59 of these foetuses exhibited an OA. By means of a linear regression analysis with normal foetuses, significant parameters influencing gastric size were examined. Subsequently the gastric sizes were transformed into z values and a comparison was made between OA with and without fistulae with the help of t tests. Results: In the normal foetuses there was a significant association between the gastric circumference and the abdominal circumference (circumference = 6.809 + 0.179 × abdominal circumference, r = 0.686, p < 0.0001). In the normal group the average was 43.0 (standard deviation [SD] 13.7) mm and those in foetuses with and without fistuale were 33.8 (SD 22.7) and 0.9 (SD 3.7) mm. In 34 (57.6 %) foetuses with an OA, the gastric circumference was below the 5th percentile. In detail, there were 13 (34.2 %) foetuses with a fistula and 21 (100 %) without a fistula. The average z values in the normal group and in the groups of OA with fistula and without fistula amounted to 0.0 (SD 1.0), −1.3 (SD 2.2) and −4.5 (SD 1.0). Conclusion: Measurements of the gastric circumference below the 5th percentile should lead to further diagnostic measures, especially when associated with polyhydramnios. Although OA without a fistula is always conspicuous, only about one in three OAs with fistula are associated with a significantly smaller stomach. PMID:26719598

  16. Measurement of Gastric Circumference in Foetuses with Oesophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Hoopmann, M; Kagan, K O; Borgmeier, F; Seitz, G; Arand, J; Wagner, P

    2015-11-01

    Background: The specific recognition of oesophageal atresia (OA) with or without a tracheal fistula in a foetus is a diagnostic challenge for prenatal medicine. The aim of the present work is to analyse the value of the measurement of gastric size in the diagnosis of this significant malformation. Materials and Methods: Altogether, the examinations of 433 pregnancies between the 18.4 and 39.1 weeks of gestation were retrospectively analysed. 59 of these foetuses exhibited an OA. By means of a linear regression analysis with normal foetuses, significant parameters influencing gastric size were examined. Subsequently the gastric sizes were transformed into z values and a comparison was made between OA with and without fistulae with the help of t tests. Results: In the normal foetuses there was a significant association between the gastric circumference and the abdominal circumference (circumference = 6.809 + 0.179 × abdominal circumference, r = 0.686, p < 0.0001). In the normal group the average was 43.0 (standard deviation [SD] 13.7) mm and those in foetuses with and without fistuale were 33.8 (SD 22.7) and 0.9 (SD 3.7) mm. In 34 (57.6 %) foetuses with an OA, the gastric circumference was below the 5th percentile. In detail, there were 13 (34.2 %) foetuses with a fistula and 21 (100 %) without a fistula. The average z values in the normal group and in the groups of OA with fistula and without fistula amounted to 0.0 (SD 1.0), -1.3 (SD 2.2) and -4.5 (SD 1.0). Conclusion: Measurements of the gastric circumference below the 5th percentile should lead to further diagnostic measures, especially when associated with polyhydramnios. Although OA without a fistula is always conspicuous, only about one in three OAs with fistula are associated with a significantly smaller stomach.

  17. CD147 expression in human gastric cancer is associated with tumor recurrence and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dake; Zhu, Shaojun; Li, Jipeng; Ji, Gang; Wang, Weizhong; Wu, Guosheng; Zheng, Jianyong

    2014-01-01

    CD147 is correlated with tumor aggressiveness in various human malignancies. Here, we investigated CD147 protein expression in 223 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and analyzed its association with disease-free and overall survival. CD147 was increased in gastric cancer compared to normal tissues. Additionally, CD147 expression was associated with gastric cancer invasion, metastasis and TNM stage, whereas it was not related to age, sex, differentiation status, tumor site or Lauren classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that CD147 was associated with disease-free and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer; i.e., patients with positive CD147 staining tend to have worse disease-free and overall survival. Moreover, Cox's proportional hazards analysis demonstrated that CD147 was an independent marker of disease-free and overall survival for patients with gastric cancer. These results confirm the association of CD147 with gastric cancer invasion and metastasis and prove that CD147 might be an indicator of tumor recurrence and prognosis in gastric cancer.

  18. Optical imaging of gastric cancer with near-infrared heptamethine carbocyanine fluorescence dyes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Bai, Bing; An, Jiaze; Zhang, Hai; Wu, Jason Boyang; Shi, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agents are promising tools for noninvasive cancer imaging. Here, we explored the tumor-specific targeting ability of NIRF heptamethine carbocyanine MHI-148 dye in cultured gastric cancer cells, gastric cancer cell-derived and patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models. We show that the NIRF dye specifically accumulated in tumor regions of both xenograft models, suggesting the potential utility of the dye for tumor-specific imaging and targeting in gastric cancer. We also demonstrated significant correlations between NIRF signal intensity and tumor volume in PDX models. Mechanistically, the higher cellular uptake of MHI-148 in gastric cancer cells than in normal cells was stimulated by hypoxia and activation of a group of organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) genes. Importantly, this NIRF dye was not retained in inflammatory stomach tissues induced by gastric ulcer in mice. In addition, fresh clinical gastric tumor specimens, when perfused with NIR dye, exhibited increased uptake of NIR dye in situ. Together, these results show the possibility of using NIRF dyes as novel candidate agents for clinical imaging and detection of gastric cancer. PMID:27329598

  19. CDH1 methylation in preoperative peritoneal washes is an independent prognostic factor for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qi-Ming; Wang, Xin-Bao; Luo, Jun; Wang, Shi; Fang, Xian-Hua; Yu, Jiang-Liu; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives To investigate the clinical value of CDH1 methylation in preoperative peritoneal washes (PPW) from gastric cancer patients. Methods CDH1 methylation was detected by real-time methylation specific-PCR in tumor tissues and corresponding PPW from 92 gastric cancer patients, gastric mucosa from 40 chronic gastritis patients and 48 normal persons. Results CDH1 methylation was found in 75 of 92 (81.5%) gastric cancer tissues, which significantly correlated with size, growth pattern, differentiation, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM stage of tumor (all P < 0.05), but its relationship to age, gender, tumor site, and H. pylori infection was not found (all P > 0.05). The percentage of CDH1 methylation in PPW was 48.9%, of which the Aζ value of ROC curve was 0.8 compared to that in gastric cancer tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that there was a significant difference in disease-free survival (DFS) between the patients with or without methylated CDH1 in their PPW (χ2 = 109.64, P < 0.000). Cox regression analysis revealed CDH1 methylation in PPW was an independent risk factor for gastric cancer patients, with a remarkable decrease in DFS after postoperative 30 months. Conclusions Methylated CDH1 in PPW predicts poor prognosis for gastric cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2012; 106:765–771. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22514028

  20. Risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis occurred after endoscopic submucosal dissection adjacent to pylorus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Un; Park, Moon Sik; Yun, So Hee; Yang, Min A.; Han, Shang Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Jung, Gum Mo; Kim, Ji Woong; Cho, Yong Keun; Cho, Jin Woong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been widely accepted as a curative treatment for gastric neoplasm. Pyloric stenosis is a chronic complication that can be caused by ESD. The aim of this study is to clarify the risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis. From January 2004 to January 2014, a total of 126 patients who underwent ESD adjacent to pylorus were reviewed retrospectively. Pyloric mucosal defect was defined as when any resection margin of ESD was involved in the pyloric ring. Pyloric stenosis was defined as when a conventional endoscope could not be passed to the duodenum. Among the 126 patients, pyloric stenosis was identified in 9. In a univariate analysis, pyloric stenosis was more common in older patients (P < 0.05) and in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, the factor that was associated with pyloric stenosis was the extent of the pyloric ring dissection (P < 0.001). Four of the 9 patients with pyloric stenosis had mild dyspepsia, and the others had gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. The 5 symptomatic patients underwent endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), and the frequency of EBD was 1 to 8 times. The asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. The incidence of pyloric stenosis was higher in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference. Although EBD was an effective treatment for pyloric stenosis, conservative management was also helpful in patients who had mild symptoms. PMID:27977608

  1. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bin; Du, Juan; Deng, Neng; Ren, Ji-Chen; Shu, Zhen-Bo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles were analyzed to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). A gene expression dataset (accession number GSE29272) was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, and consisted of 62 GCA samples and 62 normal controls, as well as 72 GNCA samples and 72 normal controls. The two groups of differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were compared to obtain common and unique DEGs. A differential analysis was performed using the Linear Models for Microarray Data package in R. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed for the DEGs with information from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes. Subnetworks were extracted from the whole network with Cytoscape. Compared with the control, 284 and 268 genes were differentially-expressed in GCA and GNCA, respectively, of which 194 DEGs were common between GCA and GNCA. Common DEGs [e.g., claudin (CLDN)7, CLDN4 and CLDN3] were associated with cell adhesion and digestion. GCA-unique DEGs [e.g., MAD1 mitotic arrest deficient like 1, cyclin (CCN)B1, CCNB2 and CCNE1] were associated with the cell cycle and the regulation of cell proliferation, while GNCA-unique DEGs (e.g., GATA binding protein 6 and hyaluronoglucosaminidase 1) were implicated in cell death. A PPI network with 141 nodes and 446 edges were obtained, from which two subnetworks were extracted. Genes [e.g., fibronectin 1, collagen type I α2 chain (COL1A2) and COL1A1] from the two subnetworks were implicated in extracellular matrix organization. These common DEGs could advance our understanding of the etiology of gastric cancer, while the unique DEGs in GCA and GNCA could better define the properties of specific cancers and provide potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis or therapy

  2. Allelic loss of chromosome 6q in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Brenda C Y; Chan, Wing Y; Li, Christine Y S; Chow, Chit; Ng, Enders K W; Chung, S C Sydney

    2003-12-01

    Loss of the long arm of chromosome 6 (6q) has frequently been reported in gastric carcinoma, and most gastric cancer patients have evidence of intestinal metaplasia in the stomach. However, the relationship between loss of chromosome 6q and intestinal metaplasia has not been studied. In the first part of the study, we define the critical deletion region of chromosome 6q using loss of heterozygosity technique (LOH). Seventeen microsatellite markers were used to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 37 microdissected gastric tumors. We also examined intestinal metaplasia (IM) foci of the stomach in the same cancer patient (17 cases). Losses on chromosome 6q were detected in high frequency (51%) by LOH. Two distinct regions of common allelic loss were identified: one centered on the marker D6S300 (at 6q16.1) and the second on D6S446 (at 6q27), with LOH frequency of 36% and 31.3%, respectively. The deletions fall into 2 discrete regions, suggesting the existence of at least 2 tumor suppressor genes in 6q. The losses at 6q27 were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization study (FISH). In the cases with LOH in the tumor, no LOH were detected in the autologous IM areas, but losses were detected by FISH. In some cases, these genetic changes may be acquired in the transition from normal gastric mucosa to intestinal metaplasia.

  3. [The gastric mucosal adhesiveness of Z-103 in rats with chronic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Seiki, M; Aita, H; Mera, Y; Arai, K; Toyama, S; Furuta, S; Morita, H; Hori, Y; Yoneta, T; Tagashira, E

    1992-04-01

    The gastric mucosal adhesiveness of Z-103 in rats with acetic acid ulcer was studied macroscopically, histologically, and biochemically. From macroscopical observations, when Z-103 was orally administered to an acetic acid ulcer model, there was adhesion of Zn to the normal mucosa as well as the ulcerous site under both the fasting condition and after feeding. It was also proven that the strength and duration of adhesiveness were increased dose-dependently under fasting conditions. In addition, histological localization of Zn was noted from the covering epithelial cell layer to the gastric lamina propria mucosae in the normal tissue and in the most superficial ulcerous layer and the granulous layer of the ulcerous site. Measurement of the gastric tissue Zn content after oral administration of 100 mg/kg of Zn showed that the Zn content was significantly increased for 6 hr at the normal site and for 24 hr at the ulcerous site. On the other hand, although ZnSO4 and ZnSO4+carnosine combination macroscopically produced generally the same level of adhesiveness as Z-103, when the gastric tissue Zn content for Z-103 and ZnSO4 were compared, the Zn content of ZnSO4 was lower than that for Z-103 at both the normal and ulcerous site. In summary, Z-103 shows a long-term adhesive and permeable action on the gastric mucosa in acetic acid ulcer rats, and it has a comparable high affinity at the ulcerous site.

  4. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  5. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  6. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  7. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  8. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  9. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  14. Long non-coding RNA CCAT2 is up-regulated in gastric cancer and associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen-Yu; Hua, Long; Yao, Kun-Hou; Chen, Jiang-Tao; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Hu, Jun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in tumor progression. The aim of our study was to explore the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of lncRNA CCAT2 expression in human gastric cancer. Methods: Expression levels of lncRNA CCAT2 in 85 pairs of gastric cancer and adjacent non-tumor tissues were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In order to determine its prognostic value, overall survival and progression-free survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: Expression levels of lncRNA CCAT2 in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in adjacent non-tumor tissues. By statistical analyses, high lncRNA CCAT2 expression was observed to be closely correlated with higher incidence of lymph node metastasis and distance metastasis. Moreover, patients with high lncRNA CCAT2 expression had shorter overall survival and progression-free survival compared with the low lncRNA CCAT2 group. Multivariate analyses indicated that high lncRNA CCAT2 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor for gastric cancer patients. Conclusions: Our results suggested that up-regulation of lncRNA CCAT2 was correlated with gastric cancer progression, and lncRNA CCAT2 might be a potential molecular biomarker for predicting the prognosis of patients. PMID:25755774

  15. Neuropilin2 expressed in gastric cancer endothelial cells increases the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells in response to VEGF

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Myung Hwan; Seo, Ji Heun; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min A; Lee, You Mie

    2009-08-01

    The structure and characteristics of the tumor vasculature are known to be different from those of normal vessels. Neuropilin2 (Nrp2), which is expressed in non-endothelial cell types, such as neuronal or cancer cells, functions as a receptor for both semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After isolating tumor and normal endothelial cells from advanced gastric cancer tissue and normal gastric mucosa tissues, respectively, we identified genes that were differentially expressed in gastric tumor endothelial (TEC) and normal endothelial cells (NEC) using DNA oligomer chips. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we confirmed the chip results by showing that Nrp2 gene expression is significantly up-regulated in TEC. Genes that were found to be up-regulated in TEC were also observed to be up-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were co-cultured with gastric cancer cells. In addition, HUVECs co-cultured with gastric cancer cells showed an increased reactivity to VEGF-induced proliferation and migration. Moreover, overexpression of Nrp2 in HUVECs significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration induced by VEGF. Observation of an immunohistochemical analysis of various human tumor tissue arrays revealed that Nrp2 is highly expressed in the tumor vessel lining and to a lesser extent in normal tissue microvessels. From these results, we suggest that Nrp2 may function to increase the response to VEGF, which is more significant in TEC than in NEC given the differential expression, leading to gastric TEC with aggressive angiogenesis phenotypes.

  16. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL‐10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins’ capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  17. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  18. An Inverse Relationship between the Expression of the Gastric Tumor Suppressor RUNX3 and Infection with Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Epithelial Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woo Chul; Joo, Kyu Re; Kim, Min Ji; Youn, Gun Jung; Kim, Yaeni; Lee, Joune Seup; Lee, Hyewon; Jung, Ji Han; Lee, Yun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims This study was performed to determine the association between RUNX3 expression and Helicobacter pylori infection in premalignant gastric lesions. Methods We examined 107 patients with gastric epithelial dysplasia who had undergone endoscopic mucosal resection or submucosal dissection. All tissue samples were evaluated by RUNX3 staining and subclassified by immunophenotype. H. pylori infection in dysplastic lesions and the normal surrounding tissue was examined by silver staining, and cagA status was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. Results The loss of RUNX3 expression was observed in 62 cases (57.9%), and an association with H. pylori infection was found in 54 cases (50.5%). The infection rate with the cagA-positive H. pylori strain was 63.0%. In RUNX3-negative lesions, the rate of H. pylori infection (p=0.03) and the frequency of category 4 lesions (according to the revised Vienna classification) were high (p=0.02). In addition, the gastric mucin phenotype was predominant. In RUNX3-negative category 4 lesions, the rate of cagA-positive H. pylori infection rate was high but not significantly increased (p=0.08). Conclusions Infection with H. pylori is associated with inactivation of RUNX3 in early gastric carcinogenesis. This mechanism was prominent in gastric cancer with a gastric mucin phenotype. PMID:24312710

  19. Acetaldehyde and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Salaspuro, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene polymorphisms associating with enhanced acetaldehyde exposure and markedly increased cancer risk in alcohol drinkers provide undisputable evidence for acetaldehyde being a local carcinogen not only in esophageal but also in gastric cancer. Accordingly, acetaldehyde associated with alcoholic beverages has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen to humans. Microbes are responsible for the bulk of acetaldehyde production from ethanol both in saliva and Helicobacter pylori-infected and achlorhydric stomach. Acetaldehyde is the most abundant carcinogen in tobacco smoke and it readily dissolves into saliva during smoking. Many foodstuffs and 'non-alcoholic' beverages are important but unrecognized sources of local acetaldehyde exposure. The cumulative cancer risk associated with increasing acetaldehyde exposure suggests the need for worldwide screening of the acetaldehyde levels of alcoholic beverages and as well of the ethanol and acetaldehyde of food produced by fermentation. The generally regarded as safe status of acetaldehyde should be re-evaluated. The as low as reasonably achievable principle should be applied to the acetaldehyde of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and food. Risk groups with ADH-and ALDH2 gene polymorphisms, H. pylori infection or achlorhydric atrophic gastritis, or both, should be screened and educated in this health issue. L-cysteine formulations binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde locally in the stomach provide new means for intervention studies.

  20. Gastric MALT lymphoma presenting as Waldenström's macroglobulinemia without bone marrow involvement.

    PubMed

    Salle, Valéry; Smail, Amar; Joly, Jean-Paul; Capiod, Jean-Claude; Gontier, Marie-Francine; Duhaut, Pierre; Ducroix, Jean-Pierre

    2007-07-01

    We report a case of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma with macroglobulinemia in a 59-year-old man who presented with melena. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed irregular thickening of the wall of the stomach, and endoscopic examination disclosed enlarged and inflammatory folds of the fundus. Histopathologic examination of gastric samples showed mucosal infiltration by small lymphocytes, which were positive for CD20 and negative for CD10 and CD23, confirming the diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma. Serum electrophoresis detected a monoclonal peak and immunoelectrophoresis revealed an immunoglobulin M kappa component. Bone marrow aspirate and biopsy results were normal. The patient received chemotherapy. After treatment, he was in complete remission, and the serum monoclonal component had disappeared. Our observation is uncommon because of important macroglobulinemia occurring in gastric MALT lymphoma without bone marrow involvement.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, J; Vandersteen, D; Goates, J; Sibley, R K; Pritikin, J; Chang, Y

    1991-05-01

    Gastric cancer can be divided into two histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. To determine whether Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium linked with gastritis, was associated with either cancer type, we reviewed histologic sections from stomachs of patients who had undergone gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Of 37 of the sections with evidence of intestinal-type cancer, 33 (89.2%) contained H pylori in noncancerous tissue compared with 7 (31.8%) of 22 of the sections with evidence of diffuse-type cancer (odds ratio = 17.7; P less than .001). This association remained strong when controlled for age, sex, site, and number of sections reviewed. The prevalence of H pylori in intestinal-type gastric cancer far exceeded the prevalence of H pylori in diffuse disease and that described in the normal US population. This finding suggests that H pylori may be a cofactor in development of intestinal-type gastric cancer.

  2. Plasma catecholamines and postoperative gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A; Henry, D P; Kopin, I J

    1975-03-01

    The role of adrenal medullary discharge of catecholamines on inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion after laparotomy was examined in rats. The rate of movement of a 51Cr-labeled liquid test meal, which had been introduced by gastric intubation, out of the stomach and through the small intestine, was retarded 12 hr after laparotomy. Adrenal demedullation produced a striking decrease in plasma catecholamines and abolished surgically induced elevation of the catecholamines, but had no significant effect on gastric emptying or intestinal propulsion in rats subjected to laparotomy or in the unoperated control animals. Thus circulating catecholamines play little if any role in controlling normal gastroinestinal motility or in the postoperative decrease in rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal motility.

  3. Gastric emptying for solids in patients with duodenal ulcer before and after highly selective vagotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Mistiaen, W.; Van Hee, R.; Blockx, P.; Hubens, A. )

    1990-03-01

    In a series of 31 duodenal ulcer patients (23 males and 8 females), who underwent a highly selective vagotomy, gastric emptying characteristics of a solid meal, labeled with (99mTc)stannous colloid, were assessed before, two weeks and six months after operation. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy and x-ray; failure of treatment with H2 antagonists or antacids during 1-18 (mean 5) years was the direct indication for operative treatment. A temporary delay in gastric emptying is noted two weeks after operation (T1/2: 124 vs 57 min). After six months, gastric emptying time has practically normalized. It appears that this is the result of the preservation of the antropyloric vagal nerve supply. In these patients, a 10% recurrence rate is noted, comparable to the results in the literature. Highly selective vagotomy proves to be a safe and effective procedure with few side effects. It does not impair gastric motility.

  4. CDKN1A histone acetylation and gene expression relationship in gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Demachki, Sâmia; Artigiani, Ricardo; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Lourenço, Laércio Gomes; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    CDKN1A is a tumor suppressor gene involved in gastric carcinogenesis and is a potential target for histone deacetylase inhibitor-based therapies. Upregulation of CDKN1A is generally observed in several cell lines after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment; however, little is known about the histone acetylation status associated with this gene in clinical samples, including gastric tumor tissue samples. Therefore, our goal was to quantify the H3K9 and H4K16 acetylation levels associated with three CDKN1A regions in 21 matched pairs of gastric adenocarcinoma and corresponding adjacent non-tumor samples by chromatin immunoprecipitation and to correlate these data with the gene expression. Our results demonstrated that the -402, -20, and +182 CDKN1A regions showed a significantly increased acetylation level in at least one of the histones evaluated (p < 0.05, for all comparisons), and these levels were positively correlated in gastric tumors. However, an inverse correlation was detected between both H3K9 and H4K16 acetylation at the -402 CDKN1A region and mRNA levels in gastric tumors (r = -0.51, p = 0.02; r = -0.60, p < 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, increased H4K16 acetylation at the -20 CDKN1A region was associated with gastric tumors of patients without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.04). These results highlight the complexity of these processes in gastric adenocarcinoma and contribute to a better understanding of CDKN1A regulation in carcinogenesis.

  5. Gastric ulceration in an equine neonate

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A 24-hour-old colt presented with clinical signs consistent with gastric ulceration. Treatment was initiated with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist and clinical signs resolved. Gastroscopy at 16 d confirmed the presence of a gastric ulcer. Although gastric ulceration is common in foals, it is rarely reported in foals this young. PMID:12757136

  6. Esophageal motility disorders after gastric banding.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Deveney, C W; McConnell, D B; Wolfe, B M; Jobe, B A

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effects of gastric banding on esophageal function are not well described. This report describes a 28-year-old woman who developed signs and symptoms of abnormal esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter hypotension after gastric banding for morbid obesity. The current literature addressing the effects of gastric banding on esophageal function in light of this case report is discussed.

  7. [Nutritional follow-up after gastric bypass].

    PubMed

    Gasteyger, C; Giusti, V

    2006-03-29

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has become one of the main bariatric procedures. This surgical operation shows excellent results in weight evolution and quality of life and allows a decrease of mortality. However, it leads, relatively often, to nutritional deficiencies which need an effective post-operative follow-up. This follow-up includes not only medical and dietetic encounters but also regular blood analyses made every 3 months during the first post-operative year, every 6 months the second year, then each year. The most frequent deficiencies are those in vitamin B12, iron and folic acid. The secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by an increase of PTH associated to a low vitamin D and a normal calcium, is quite frequent.

  8. MiR-218 inhibits multidrug resistance (MDR) of gastric cancer cells by targeting Hedgehog/smoothened.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Liang; Shi, Hui-Juan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Tang, Hong-Sheng; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to successful chemotherapy for patients with gastric cancer. The microRNA miR-218 influences various pathobiological processes in gastric cancer, and its down-regulation in this disease raises the question of whether it normally inhibits MDR. In this study we observed that two MDR gastric cancer cell lines showed lower expression of miR-218 compared with their chemosensitive parental cell line. Overexpressing miR-218 chemosensitizes gastric cancer cells, slowed efflux of adriamycin, and accelerated drug-induced apoptosis. We identified the smoothened (SMO) gene as a functional target of miR-218, and found that SMO overexpression counteracts the chemosensitizing effects of miR-218. These findings suggest that miR-218 inhibits MDR of gastric cancer cells by down-regulating SMO expression.

  9. Near-infrared raman spectroscopy for detection of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Mao, Wei-zheng; Xu, Ming; Gong, Long-jing; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Han-jing; Zheng, Rong-er

    2011-07-01

    The nude mice injected with human gastric cancer cells (SGC-7901) in their peritoneums were chosen as the animal models of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination in this research. The Raman spectra at 785nm excitation of both these nude mice which were in different tumor planting periods and the normal counterpart were taken in vivo in the imitate laparotomy. 205 spectra were collected. The spectra of different tissue types were compared and classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm. Significant differences were showed between normal and malignant tissues. The gastric cancer nodules had lower Raman intensities at 870, 1330, 1450, and 1660cm-1, but higher at 1007, 1050, 1093 and 1209cm-1, compared with normal tissues. Additionally, the spectra of malignant tissues had two peaks around 1330 cm-1 (1297cm-1 and 1331cm-1), while the spectra of normal tissues had only one peak (1297cm-1). The differences were attributed to the intensities of the stretching bands of the nucleic acid, protein and water. These features could be used to diagnose gastric cancer. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm was used to classify these spectra. For normal and malignant tissues, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 95.73%, 70.73% and 90.73%, respectively, while for different tumor planting periods, they were 98.82%, 98.73% and 98.78%. The experimental results show that Raman spectra differ significantly between cancerous and normal gastric tissues, which provides the experimental basis for the diagnosis of gastric cancer by Raman spectroscopy technology. And SVM algorithm can give the well generalized classification performance for the samples, which expands the application of mathematical algorithms in the classification.

  10. Endoscopic full-thickness resection for gastric submucosal tumors arising from the muscularis propria layer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liu-Ye; Cui, Jun; Lin, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Bo; Wu, Cheng-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFR) for the treatment of gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) arising from the muscularis propria. METHODS: A total of 35 gastric SMTs arising from the muscularis propria layer were resected by EFR between January 2010 and September 2013. EFR consists of five major steps: injecting normal saline into the submucosa; pre-cutting the mucosal and submucosal layers around the lesion; making a circumferential incision as deep as the muscularis propria around the lesion using endoscopic submucosal dissection and an incision into the serosal layer around the lesion with a Hook knife; a full-thickness resection of the tumor, including the serosal layer with a Hook or IT knife; and closing the gastric wall with metallic clips. RESULTS: Of the 35 gastric SMTs, 14 were located at the fundus, and 21 at the corpus. EFR removed all of the SMTs successfully, and the complete resection rate was 100%. The mean operation time was 90 min (60-155 min), the mean hospitalization time was 6.0 d (4-10 d), and the mean tumor size was 2.8 cm (2.0-4.5 cm). Pathological examination confirmed the presence of gastric stromal tumors in 25 patients, leiomyomas in 7 and gastric autonomous nerve tumors in 2. No gastric bleeding, peritonitis or abdominal abscess occurred after EFR. Postoperative contrast roentgenography on the third day detected no contrast extravasation into the abdominal cavity. The mean follow-up period was 6 mo, with no lesion residue or recurrence noted. CONCLUSION: EFR is efficacious, safe and minimally invasive for patients with gastric SMTs arising from the muscularis propria layer. This technique is able to resect deep gastric lesions while providing precise pathological information about the lesion. With the development of EFR, the indications of endoscopic resection might be extended. PMID:25320536

  11. Association between polymorphisms in segregation genes BUB1B and TTK and gastric cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra; Britovsek, Nina Kocevar; Grazio, Snjezana Frkovic; Komel, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant transformation of normal gastric cells is a complex and multistep process, resulting in development of heterogeneous tumours. Susceptible genetic background, accumulation of genetic changes, and environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mitotic segregation genes could be responsible for inducing the slow process of accumulation of genetic changes, leading to genome instability. Patients and methods We performed a case-control study of polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK rs151658 and BUB1B rs1031963 and rs1801376 to assess their effects on gastric cancer risk. We examined the TTK abundance in gastric cancer tissues using immunoblot analysis. Results C/G genotype of rs151658 was more frequent in patients with diffuse type of gastric cancer and G/G genotype was more common in intestinal types of gastric cancers (p = 0.049). Polymorphic genotype A/A of rs1801376 was associated with higher risk for developing diffuse type of gastric cancer in female population (p = 0.007), whereas A/A frequencies were increased in male patients with subserosa tumour cell infiltration (p = 0.009). T/T genotype of rs1031963 was associated with well differentiated tumours (p = 0.035). TT+CT genotypes of rs1031963 and GG+AG genotypes of rs1801376 were significantly associated with gastric cancer risk (dominant model; OR = 2,929, 95% CI: 1.281-6.700; p = 0.017 and dominant model; OR = 0,364, 95% CI: 0.192-0.691; p = 0.003 respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK and BUB1B may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis and risk of tumour development. Further investigations on large populations and populations of different ethnicity are needed to determine their clinical utility. PMID:27679546

  12. Upregulation of miR-222 in both Helicobacter pylori- infected and noninfected gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Noormohammad, Mina; Sadeghi, Samira; Tabatabaeian, Hossein; Ghaedi, Kamran; Talebi, Ardeshir; Azadeh, Mansoureh; Khatami, Mehri; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    Despite of promising improvements in treatment of gastric cancer, the mortality rate of this malignancy remains high. Chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, interfering with intracellular signalling pathways, is the main risk factor for gastric cancer. Some evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNA), the small noncoding RNA molecules, can play role as oncogenes or tumour suppressors in the cells. MiR-222 is one of the remarkable miRNAs undergoing upregulation in gastric cancer. However, the association between miR-222 upregulation and H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues remains unclear. The aim of this study was to analyse the expression level of miR-222 in gastric cancer tissues, evaluating the relationship between miR-222 expression level and H. pylori infection and also finding novel miR-222 targets based on in silico investigations. MiR-222 expression level in 200 patients including 112 H. pylori positive and 88 H. pylori negative was relatively measured using RT-qPCR and compared with 88 healthy samples. In silico enrichment analysis of miR-222 targets was performed by DAVID database to evaluate the possible role(s) of miR-222 in gastric tumourigenesis. We observed upregulated level of miR-222 in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal samples (P<0.05). However, no significant difference between miR-222 expression in H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative cases was observed. Our in silico analyses showed the possible role of p53, p27, PTEN and Elongin B in gastric cancer tumourigenesis. MiR-222 functions as an onco-miRNA and its overexpression can be involved in pathogenesis of gastric cancer, independent of H. pylori infection.

  13. Adjustable gastric banding (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal digestive process. In this procedure, a hollow band made of special material is placed around the ... pouch and causes a feeling of fullness. The band can be tightened or loosened over time to ...

  14. Human gut microbiota in obesity and after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Husen; DiBaise, John K; Zuccolo, Andrea; Kudrna, Dave; Braidotti, Michele; Yu, Yeisoo; Parameswaran, Prathap; Crowell, Michael D; Wing, Rod; Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2009-02-17

    Recent evidence suggests that the microbial community in the human intestine may play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. We examined 184,094 sequences of microbial 16S rRNA genes from PCR amplicons by using the 454 pyrosequencing technology to compare the microbial community structures of 9 individuals, 3 in each of the categories of normal weight, morbidly obese, and post-gastric-bypass surgery. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that although the Bacteria in the human intestinal community were highly diverse, they fell mainly into 6 bacterial divisions that had distinct differences in the 3 study groups. Specifically, Firmicutes were dominant in normal-weight and obese individuals but significantly decreased in post-gastric-bypass individuals, who had a proportional increase of Gammaproteobacteria. Numbers of the H(2)-producing Prevotellaceae were highly enriched in the obese individuals. Unlike the highly diverse Bacteria, the Archaea comprised mainly members of the order Methanobacteriales, which are H(2)-oxidizing methanogens. Using real-time PCR, we detected significantly higher numbers of H(2)-utilizing methanogenic Archaea in obese individuals than in normal-weight or post-gastric-bypass individuals. The coexistence of H(2)-producing bacteria with relatively high numbers of H(2)-utilizing methanogenic Archaea in the gastrointestinal tract of obese individuals leads to the hypothesis that interspecies H(2) transfer between bacterial and archaeal species is an important mechanism for increasing energy uptake by the human large intestine in obese persons. The large bacterial population shift seen in the post-gastric-bypass individuals may reflect the double impact of the gut alteration caused by the surgical procedure and the consequent changes in food ingestion and digestion.

  15. Human gut microbiota in obesity and after gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Husen; DiBaise, John K.; Zuccolo, Andrea; Kudrna, Dave; Braidotti, Michele; Yu, Yeisoo; Parameswaran, Prathap; Crowell, Michael D.; Wing, Rod; Rittmann, Bruce E.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the microbial community in the human intestine may play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. We examined 184,094 sequences of microbial 16S rRNA genes from PCR amplicons by using the 454 pyrosequencing technology to compare the microbial community structures of 9 individuals, 3 in each of the categories of normal weight, morbidly obese, and post-gastric-bypass surgery. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that although the Bacteria in the human intestinal community were highly diverse, they fell mainly into 6 bacterial divisions that had distinct differences in the 3 study groups. Specifically, Firmicutes were dominant in normal-weight and obese individuals but significantly decreased in post-gastric-bypass individuals, who had a proportional increase of Gammaproteobacteria. Numbers of the H2-producing Prevotellaceae were highly enriched in the obese individuals. Unlike the highly diverse Bacteria, the Archaea comprised mainly members of the order Methanobacteriales, which are H2-oxidizing methanogens. Using real-time PCR, we detected significantly higher numbers of H2-utilizing methanogenic Archaea in obese individuals than in normal-weight or post-gastric-bypass individuals. The coexistence of H2-producing bacteria with relatively high numbers of H2-utilizing methanogenic Archaea in the gastrointestinal tract of obese individuals leads to the hypothesis that interspecies H2 transfer between bacterial and archaeal species is an important mechanism for increasing energy uptake by the human large intestine in obese persons. The large bacterial population shift seen in the post-gastric-bypass individuals may reflect the double impact of the gut alteration caused by the surgical procedure and the consequent changes in food ingestion and digestion. PMID:19164560

  16. Loss of RUNX3 increases osteopontin expression and promotes cell migration in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Shan, Yan-Shen; Huang, Chi-Ying; Lin, Forn-Chia; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ling; Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Hsiao, Michael; Lu, Pei-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Loss of RUNX3 expression is frequently observed in gastric cancer and is highly associated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of gastric cancer remain unknown. In this study, we found that the protein levels of RUNX3 and osteopontin (OPN) are inversely correlated in gastric cancer clinical specimens and cell lines. Furthermore, similar inverse trends between RUNX3 and OPN messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were demonstrated in six out of seven normal-tumor-paired gastric cancer clinical specimens. In addition, low RUNX3 and high OPN expression were associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Ectopic expression of green fluorescent protein-RUNX3 reduced OPN protein and mRNA expression in the AGS and SCM-1 gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, knockdown of RUNX3 in GES-1, a normal gastric epithelial cell line, increased OPN expression. Although three RUNX3-binding sequences have been identified in the OPN promoter region, direct binding of RUNX3 to the specific binding site, -142 to -137bp, was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The binding of RUNX3 to the OPN promoter significantly decreased OPN promoter activity. The knockdown of OPN or overexpression of RUNX3 inhibited cell migration in AGS and SCM-1 cells; however, the coexpression of RUNX3 and OPN reversed the RUNX3-reduced migration ability in AGS and SCM-1 cells. In contrast, the knockdown of both RUNX3 and OPN inhibited RUNX3-knockdown-induced migration of GES-1 cells. Together, our data demonstrated that RUNX3 is a transcriptional repressor of OPN and that loss of RUNX3 upregulates OPN, which promotes migration in gastric cancer cells.

  17. Etiology and Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous malignant disease associated with environmental and genetic predisposing factors. While gastric cancer incidence and mortality fell greatly globally over the past decades, it remains the fourth cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Thus, prevention of gastric cancer is still a major strategy for improvement of gastric cancer prognosis. Summary Helicobacter pylori infection has been demonstrated to be a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Unhealthy diet and lifestyle, including high-salt food, smoking and drinking, are able to induce genotypic and phenotypic transformation of gastric epithelial cells. Gene mutations (such as E-cadherin) in stomach epithelial cells are major genetic causes for gastric cancer. The eradication of H. pylori has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Increased intake of a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits as well as smoking cessation have been shown to reduce the incidence of gastric cancer. The secondary prevention strategy is to screen premalignant gastric lesions by endoscopy. Biomarker tests are also reliable methods to identify gastric precancerous lesions. Endoscopy screening is still the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Key Message H. pylori infection, a diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, as well as gene mutations are major risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. Practical Implications The eradication of H. pylori is a major primary preventive strategy of gastric cancer. A healthy lifestyle, including increased intake of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, reduced intake of salted and smoked food and red meat, a reduction of alcohol intake as well as smoking cessation will be effective approaches for the prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27722154

  18. Autophagy impairment by Helicobacter pylori-induced methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 promotes gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Nanjo, Sohachi; Ando, Takayuki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Maekita, Takao; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces methylation silencing of tumor suppressor genes causing gastric carcinogenesis. Impairment of autophagy induces DNA damage leading to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. We aimed to identify whether H. pylori infection induced methylation silencing of host autophagy-related (Atg) genes, impairing autophagy and enhancing gastric carcinogenesis. Gastric mucosae were obtained from 41 gastric cancer patients and 11 healthy volunteers (8 H. pylori-uninfected and 3 H. pylori-infected). Methylation status of Atg genes was analyzed by a methylation microarray and quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP); mRNA expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were assessed in normal rat gastric epithelial cells. Gene knock-down was performed by siRNA. Autophagy was assessed by western blotting. Of 34 Atg genes, MAP1LC3A variant 1 (MAP1LC3Av1) and ULK2 were identified by methylation microarray analysis as exhibiting specific methylation in H. pylori-infected mucosae and gastric cancer tissues. Methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 was confirmed by qMSP, qRT-PCR and de-methylation treatment in two gastric cancer cell lines. Knock-down of map1lc3a, the rat homolog of the human MAP1LC3Av1, inhibited autophagy response and increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion in normal rat gastric epithelial cells, despite the presence of map1lc3b, the rat homolog of the human MAP1LC3B gene important for autophagy. Furthermore, MAP1LC3Av1 was methylation-silenced in 23.3% of gastric cancerous mucosae and 40% of non-cancerous mucosae with H. pylori infection. MAP1LC3Av1 is essential for autophagy and H. pylori-induced methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 may impair autophagy, facilitating gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Association of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation with reduced NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer cells and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Shuanglong; Ma, Jinguo; Li, Zhenhua; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Lu, Yao; Dai, Dongqiu

    2013-05-01

    NDRG1 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1) plays a role in cell differentiation and suppression of tumor metastasis. This study aims to determine the expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer cell lines and tissue specimens and then assess the possible cause of its aberrant expression. Six gastric cancer cell lines and 20 pairs of normal and gastric cancer tissue samples were used to assess NDRG1 expression using Real-time PCR and Western blot. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) were performed to detect gene mutation and methylation, respectively, in cell lines and tissues samples. Expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was downregulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Specifically, expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was lower in all six gastric cancer cell lines than that of normal gastric cells, while 15 out of 20 cases of gastric cancer tissues had the reduced levels of NDRG1 mRNA and protein. HRM data showed that there was no mutation in NDRG1 gene, but MSP data showed high levels of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation in the CpG islands in both cell lines and tissue samples. Moreover, treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine upregulated NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer HGC27 cells, but not in the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A-treated HGC27 cells. In conclusion, this study has shown that expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was reduced in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues, which is due to methylation of NDRG1 gene promoter. Further study will unearth the clinical significance of the reduced NDRG1 protein in gastric cancer.

  20. CEACAM6 is upregulated by Helicobacter pylori CagA and is a biomarker for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Supriya; Samanta, Animesh; Sharma, Neel; Tan, Kar Tong; Yang, Henry; Voon, Dominic C.; Pang, Brendan; Teh, Ming; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Chang, Young-Tae; Yong, Wei Peng; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ho, Khek Yu; Tan, Patrick; Soong, Richie; Koeffler, Phillip H.; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of gastric cancers saves lives, but remains a diagnostic challenge. In this study, we aimed to identify cell-surface biomarkers of early gastric cancer. We hypothesized that a subset of plasma membrane proteins induced by the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA will be retained in early gastric cancers through non-oncogene addiction. An inducible system for expression of CagA was used to identify differentially upregulated membrane protein transcripts in vitro. The top hits were then analyzed in gene expression datasets comparing transcriptome of gastric cancer with normal tissue, to focus on markers retained in cancer. Among the transcripts enriched upon CagA induction in vitro, a significant elevation of CEACAM6 was noted in gene expression datasets of gastric cancer. We used quantitative digital immunohistochemistry to measure CEACAM6 protein levels in tissue microarrays of gastric cancer. We demonstrate an increase in CEACAM6 in early gastric cancers, when compared to matched normal tissue, with an AUC of 0.83 for diagnostic validity. Finally, we show that a fluorescently conjugated CEACAM6 antibody binds avidly to freshly resected gastric cancer xenograft samples and can be detected by endoscopy in real time. Together, these results suggest that CEACAM6 upregulation is a cell surface response to H. pylori CagA, and is retained in early gastric cancers. They highlight a novel link between CEACAM6 expression and CagA in gastric cancer, and suggest CEACAM6 to be a promising biomarker to aid with the fluorescent endoscopic diagnosis of early neoplastic lesions in the stomach. PMID:27421133

  1. MicroRNA‑145 inhibits the malignant phenotypes of gastric carcinoma cells via downregulation of fascin 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xue, Minghui; Zhao, Lunde; Yang, Fang; Li, Zhenjuan; Li, Guangyan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)‑145 has been demonstrated to act as a tumor suppressor, and deregulation of fascin 1 (FSCN1) has been observed in several types of human malignancy, including gastric carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the function of miR‑145, specifically its targets in gastric carcinoma have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present study, downregulation of miR‑145 and upregulation of FSCN1 was identified in gastric carcinoma cell lines, compared with normal gastric mucosal epithelial cells. A luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR‑145 was able to bind to the 3'‑untranslated region of FSCN1 mRNA. Overexpression of miR‑145 led to a significant decrease in FSCN1 expression levels, whereas knockdown of miR‑145 resulted in increased FSCN1 expression levels in gastric carcinoma cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR‑145 inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion in gastric carcinoma cells. Similar effects were also observed in gastric carcinoma cells transfected with FSCN1 small interfering RNA. In addition, overexpression of FSCN1 reversed the suppressive effects of miR‑145 upregulation on proliferation, migration and invasion in gastric carcinoma cells, suggesting that FSCN1 is indeed involved in the miR‑145‑mediated malignant phenotype of gastric carcinoma cells. The present study revealed an anti‑oncogenic role of miR‑145 in gastric carcinoma via inhibition of FSCN1, and suggested that miR‑145 may be used for the treatment of gastric carcinoma.

  2. PDCD4 functions as a suppressor for pT2a and pT2b stage gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Tao; Yang, Dong; Sun, Zhe; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2013-03-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer‑related mortality worldwide. Loss of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) expression has been detected in gastric cancer. However, the effects of PDCD4 on pT2 stage gastric cancer remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between PDCD4 expression and clinicopathological features of patients with pT2 stage gastric cancer. In the present study, 122 pT2 stage gastric cancer specimens were subclassified as pT2a and pT2b stage. The levels of PDCD4 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer tissues were lower compared to that in normal tissues as detected by real‑time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, both PDCD4 mRNA and protein in pT2b stage gastric cancer were lower when compared to that in pT2a stage gastric cancer. Finally, we used immuno-histochemistry to determine the protein expression and analyzed the relationship between PDCD4 expression and the clinicopathological features of pT2 stage gastric cancer patients. Cumulative survival rate of patients with PDCD4 expression was significantly higher compared to the patients without PDCD4 expression. PDCD4 expression in gastric cancer can be employed to indicate a favorable prognosis for the disease outcome.

  3. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  4. [Changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianbao; Li, Zhaoshen; Cui, Zhongmin; Duan, Yimin; Nie, Shinan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Guoming

    2002-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the changes of rat gastric mucosal barrier under conditions of water immersion restraint stress. METHODS Eighty rats were randomly divided into Group A (20 rats), B (40 rats) and C (20 rats) after being fasted for 24 hours. And then Group A was divided into two subgroups with ten rats in each. The two subgroups in Group A were given normal saline or omeprazole respectively while under the stress condition. The changes of gastric acid or bicarbonate secretion were determined. Group B (40 rats) were randomly divided into four subgroups,which were subgroup control, 1h, 2h and 4h after beginning of the stress. The quantity of glandular mucosal adherent mucus, the thickness of mucus gel layer and ulcer index were measured after stress in Group B. The glandular mucosal samples were labeled by Lanthanum and observed by transmission electromicroscopy. Group C was randomly divided into two subgroups in the same way with Group A. And each subgroup received normal saline or omeprazole respectively H(+) loss in gastric lumen was calculated by determining the difference of acidity between lavage and drainage fluid H(+) concentration. RESULTS It was found that gastric alkaline secretion decreased progressively (P < 0.05), while gastric acid secretion increased progressively under stress conditions (P < 0.05). The mucus quantity(A/g) in the four subgroups in Group B were 0.137 +/- 0.030, 0.143 +/- 0.012, 0.066 +/- 0.016 and 0.016 +/- 0.016 respectively. The mucus gel thickness(microm) were 71.08 +/- 5.85, 74.50 +/- 12.85, 57.63 +/- 6.45 and 51.35 +/- 2.84 respectively. The ulcer index were 0.2 +/- 0.1,0.4 +/- 0.1,5.2 +/- 1.3 and 10.0 +/- 0.5 respectively. Statistics showed that the mucus quantity was correlated with the mucus gel thickness positively(r = 0.89), while either of them was correlated with the ulcer index negatively(r = 0.85 and "r = 0.83). And it was also found that Lanthanum rarely stained the glandular mucosa in control subgroup, while heavily

  5. Primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Petranovic, Duska; Pilcic, Gorazd; Peitl, Milena; Cubranic, Aleksandar; Valkovic, Toni; Nacinovic, Antica Duletic; Lucin, Ksenija; Jonjic, Nives

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma represents 2.5–7% all of non Hodgkin's lymphomas. Stomach is the most common site of extranodal lymphoma. However, that is not the case with mantle cell lymphoma, which is extremely rare. We present a case of 71-year-old woman admitted to the Internal Clinic of the University Clinical Hospital Center Rijeka, because of stomach discomfort and melena. Endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a polyp in gastric antrum. Histopathologic, immunohistochemic and genetic methods were also performed and the results were consistent with primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma without periepigastric and/or local or distant abdominal lymph node involvement. PMID:22567215

  6. Gastric lymphoma: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Savio, Antonella

    2011-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma is frequently difficult for the general histopathologist. During recent years there have been relevant changes in the therapeutic approach to gastric MALT lymphoma and our knowledge about its pathogenesis has greatly improved. The management of this disease actually requires a close cooperation between the histopathologist and the clinicians. The histology report of biopsies of a newly diagnosed or of an already treated case implies information of clinical and therapeutical relevance. This paper aims at giving the histopathologist a general knowledge about the state of art of this disease and its management. The diagnostic process leading to a complete and competent report is then described step by step.

  7. Gastric cancer in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, F; Buiatti, E; Palli, D

    1991-01-01

    Although Gastric Cancer (GC) death rates are decreasing worldwide, in high risk areas GC is still a major public health problem. Italy is one of the European countries with the highest mortality rates for GC (males: 17.3; females: 8.2 x 100,000 inhabitants in 1987) which represents the third cause of death due to cancer in 1987, accounting for over 14,000 deaths per year (10% of cancer deaths). Reasons for the geographic variability in GC occurrence within the country are reviewed, discussing the results of two recent analytical epidemiological studies carried out in Italy. These large case-control studies focused on dietary factors, involving high and low-risk areas for GC (Florence, Siena, Forlì, Imola, Cremona, Genoa, Cagliari, and Milan). Low socio-economic status, family history of GC, residence in rural areas were associated to GC risk, while migration from southern areas and body mass index were inversely related to GC. Consumption of traditional soups, meat, salted and dried fish, cold cuts and seasoned cheeses, as well as the intake of animal proteins and nitrites were related to an increased GC risk. On the contrary consumption of fresh fruit, citrus fruit, raw vegetables, spices, garlic and olive oil, and vitamin C, E and beta-carotene intake were found to be protective factors. Among diet-related factors, preference for salty foods and frequent broiling were positively related to GC, while the longstanding availbility of a refrigerator or freezer and the habits of consuming frozen foods were associated with decreased GC risk. These results are discussed in detail, considering the main hypotheses on GC carcinogenesis.

  8. Curcumin Blocks Naproxen-Induced Gastric Antral Ulcerations through Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation and Activation of Enzymatic Scavengers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jin, Soojung; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-08-28

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, which is used for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The present study was undertaken to determine the protective effect of curcumin against naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations in rats. Different doses (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg) of curcumin or vehicle (curcumin, 0 mg/kg) were pretreated for 3 days by oral gavage, and then gastric mucosal lesions were caused by 80 mg/kg naproxen applied for 3 days. Curcumin significantly inhibited the naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcer area and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin markedly increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, 100 mg/kg curcumin completely protected the gastric mucosa against the loss in the enzyme, resulting in a drastic increase of activities of radical scavenging enzymes up to more than the level of untreated normal rats. Histological examination obviously showed that curcumin prevents naproxen-induced gastric antral ulceration as a result of direct protection of the gastric mucosa. These results suggest that curcumin blocks naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of radical scavenging enzymes, and it may offer a potential remedy of gastric antral ulcerations.

  9. Effect of lysozyme chloride on betel quid chewing aggravated gastric oxidative stress and hemorrhagic ulcer in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chen-Road

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of lysozyme chloride on betel quid chewing (BQC) aggravated gastric oxidative stress and hemorrhagic ulcer in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS: Male Wistar rats were challenged intravenously with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) to induce DM. Rats were fed with regular pellet food or BQC-containing diets. After 90 d, rats were deprived of food for 24 h. Rat stomachs were irrigated for 3 h with normal saline or simulated gastric juice. Rats were killed and gastric specimens were harvested. RESULTS: An enhancement of various gastric ulcerogenic parameters, including acid back-diffusion, mucosal lipid peroxide generation, as well as decreased glutathione levels and mucus content, were observed in DM rats. After feeding DM rats with BQC, an exacerbation of these ulcero-genic parameters was achieved. Gastric juice caused a further aggravation of these ulcerogenic parameters. Daily intragastric lysozyme chloride dose-dependently inhibited exacerbation of various ulcerogenic parameters in those BQC-fed DM rats. CONCLUSION: (1) Gastric juice could aggravate both DM and BQC-fed DM rat hemorrhagic ulcer; (2) BQC exacerbated gastric hemorrhagic ulcer in DM rats via enhancing oxidative stress and reducing defensive factors; (3) lysozyme chloride effectively protected BQC aggravated gastric damage in DM rats. PMID:16270397

  10. Aberrant expression of microRNAs in gastric cancer and biological significance of miR-574-3p.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingying; Ni, Zhaohui; Wang, Guoqing; Cui, Juan; Wei, Chengguo; Wang, Jihan; Yang, Qing; Xu, Ying; Li, Fan

    2012-08-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) provides a new and powerful tool for studying the mechanisms, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. In this study, we employed AFFX miRNA expression chips to search for miRNAs that may be aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and to investigate the potential roles that miRNAs may play in the development and progression of gastric cancer. 14 miRNAs were found to be down-regulated and 2 miRNAs up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues compared to the normal gastric tissues. Among the aberrantly expressed miRNAs, miR-574-3p was selected to further study its expression features and functional roles. Interestingly, the reduced expression of miR-574-3p occurred mainly in the early stages of gastric cancer or in cancers with high level of differentiation, suggesting that it can be used as a marker for a mild case of gastric cancer. Functional study revealed that cell proliferation, migration and invasion were significantly inhibited in miR-574-3p-transfected gastric cancer SGC7901 cells. Computational prediction and experimental validation suggest that Cullin2 may be one of the targets of miR-574-3p. Overall our study suggests that the aberrantly expressed miRNAs may play regulatory and functional roles in the development and progression of gastric cancer.

  11. Exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells activate NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Hui; Yuan, Xiao; Sun, Yaoxiang; Pan, Zhaoji; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2016-09-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized membrane vesicles secreted by both normal and cancer cells. Emerging evidence indicates that cancer cells derived exosomes contribute to cancer progression through the modulation of tumor microenvironment. However, the effects of exosomes derived from gastric cancer cells on macrophages are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the biological role of gastric cancer cells derived exosomes in the activation of macrophages. We demonstrated that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes activated macrophages to express increased levels of proinflammatory factors, which in turn promoted tumor cell proliferation and migration. In addition, gastric cancer cells derived exosomes remarkably upregulated the phosphorylation of NF-κB in macrophages. Inhibiting the activation of NF-κB reversed the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in macrophages and blocked their promoting effects on gastric cancer cells. Moreover, we found that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes could also activate macrophages from human peripheral blood monocytes through the activation of NF-κB. In conclusion, our results suggest that gastric cancer cells derived exosomes stimulate the activation of NF-κB pathway in macrophages to promote cancer progression, which provides a potential therapeutic approach for gastric cancer by interfering with the interaction between exosomes and macrophages in tumor microenvironment.

  12. RhoE Promotes Metastasis in Gastric Cancer through a Mechanism Dependent on Enhanced Expression of CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hefei; Shang, Yulong; Bai, Ming; Liang, Jie; Wang, Xin; Fan, Daiming

    2013-01-01

    RhoE, a novel member of the Rho protein family, is a key regulator of the cytoskeleton and cell migration. Our group has previously shown that RhoE as a direct target for HIF-1α and mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, we assumed that RhoE might play an important role in gastric cancer metastasis. In the present study, we have explored the role of RhoE expression in gastric cancer, cell invasion and metastasis, and the influence of RhoE on regulating the potential expression of down-stream genes. RhoE expression was elevated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with normal gastric tissues. We also found a close correlation between the histological grade and the diagnosis of the patient. Up-regulation of RhoE significantly enhanced the migratory and invasive abilities of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, down-regulation of RhoE diminished the metastatic potential of cancer cells. PCR array and subsequent transwell assay showed that the regulation of gastric cancer metastasis by RhoE was partially mediated by CXCR4. This observation suggested that CXCR4 might be a downstream effector for RhoE. In summary, our study identified RhoE as a novel prognostic biomarker and metastatic-promoting gene of gastric cancer. PMID:24312338

  13. Gastric Rupture in Pregnancy: Case Series from a Tertiary Institution in Rwanda and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ntirushwa, David; Rulisa, Stephen; Muhorakeye, Febronie; Bazzett-Matabele, Lisa; Rurangwa, Theogene; Small, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric rupture is a rare, life-threatening condition during pregnancy. Case study We present three cases of gastric perforation during pregnancy and the puerperium. The first patient presented with gastric perforation 4 days following an uncomplicated cesarean delivery for obstetric indications. She initially complained of epigastric pain; however, those symptoms resolved. She later demonstrated worsening abdominal distension, intra-abdominal free fluid, and signs of peritonitis. At laparotomy, an ascariasis-associated gastric rupture was diagnosed. She died from sepsis 4 days following the laparotomy. The second patient presented 19 days following a normal vaginal delivery. She presented with hemodynamic instability and underwent emergent laparotomy due to suspected septic shock peritonitis. Gastric rupture was diagnosed intraoperatively. She improved clinically and was discharged home. The third patient underwent emergency cesarean delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status in the setting of preeclampsia. She was initially diagnosed with ascites and pulmonary edema as a result of preeclampsia. Later in her course, she developed features in favor of acute abdomen and signs of sepsis. At the time of emergent laparotomy, a gastric rupture was identified and repaired. She died 2 days later from sepsis. Conclusion We report the management and outcome of three cases of pregnancy-related gastric rupture. To our knowledge, these three cases represent the largest series of pregnancy-related gastric ruptures from a single institution. PMID:28078172

  14. Vulnerability of Gastric Mucosa in Diabetic Rats, Its Pathogenesis and Amelioration by Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Vador, N; Jagtap, Aarti G; Damle, Archana

    2012-09-01

    Various studies have indicated that peptic ulcers occurring during the course of diabetic state are more severe and often associated with complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding. This study is the first attempt to understand the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers occurring during the diabetic state considering alternate biochemical pathways using suitable markers and its amelioration by Cuminum cyminum. In this study, diabetic rats showed a progressive increase in the stomach advanced glycated end products formation, gastric mucosal tumour necrosis factor-α and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels as compared to normal control (nondiabetic) rats. There was decrease in gastric mucosal content, antioxidant enzymes and cellular ATPase enzyme levels of diabetic gastric mucosa when compared to the normal control group. mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor was found to be significantly higher as compared to normal control animals. Further methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum treatment to diabetic animals caused a reduction in blood glucose, and ulcer score when compared to diabetic control rats. It significantly increased gastric mucus content, antioxidant status and cellular ATPase enzyme levels as compared to diabetic control animals. Methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibited advanced glycated end products formation in vitro as well as in vivo.

  15. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  16. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  17. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  18. Expression of aurora kinase A correlates with the Wnt-modulator RACGAP1 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bornschein, Jan; Nielitz, Jessica; Drozdov, Ignat; Selgrad, Michael; Wex, Thomas; Jechorek, Doerthe; Link, Alexander; Vieth, Michael; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify the link between Wnt signaling and aurora kinase A (AURKA), a target for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. Publicly available microarray data were used to identify phenotype-specific protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks. The in silico analysis revealed a gastric cancer-specific PPI subnetwork consisting of 2745 proteins and 50,935 interactions. We focused on the link of AURKA to a Wnt-specific interaction module consisting of 92 proteins. There was a direct association of AURKA with Rac GTPase-activating protein 1 (RACGAP1), as well as with CTNBB1 (β-catenin) and CDKN1A as second-order interactors. Differential expression analysis revealed a significant downregulation of both AURKA and RACGAP1 in gastric cancer compared to noncancer controls. Biopsies from a prospective cohort of 56 patients with gastric cancer (32 intestinal type, 24 diffuse type) and 20 noncancer controls were used for validation of the identified targets. The RT-PCR data confirmed a strong correlation of AURKA and RACGAP1 gene expression both in the tumor, the tumor-adjacent and the tumor-distant mucosa. RACGAP1 in the tumor was also associated with CTNBB1 expression, and inversely associated with CDKN1A gene expression. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of the RACGAP1 protein in gastric cancer and the tumor-adjacent mucosa. RACGAP1 expression was not associated with tumor stage, grading, Lauren type, Helicobacter pylori infection, or age. In conclusion, AURKA is directly associated with the expression of RACGAP1, a modulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway.

  19. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; ALMEIDA, Élia Cláudia de Souza; CAMILO, Silvia Maria Perrone; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; GUIMARÃES, Lucinda Calheiros; DUQUE, Ana Cristina da Rocha; ETCHEBEHERE, Renata Margarida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. Aim: To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. Methods: This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. Results: In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. Conclusion: There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. PMID:27683773

  20. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  1. Exploring the physiologic role of human gastroesophageal reflux by analyzing time-series data from 24-h gastric and esophageal pH recordings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Luo; Mu, John C; Sloan, Sheldon; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2014-07-16

    Our previous finding of a fractal pattern for gastric pH and esophageal pH plus the statistical association of sequential pH values for up to 2 h led to our hypothesis that the fractal pattern encodes information regarding gastric acidity and that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity by influencing gastric secretion of acid or bicarbonate. Under our hypothesis values of gastric pH should provide information regarding values of esophageal pH and vice versa. We used vector autoregression, a theory-free set of inter-related linear regressions used to measure relationships that can change over time, to analyze data from 24-h recordings of gastric pH and esophageal pH. We found that in pH records from normal subjects, as well as from subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease alone and after treatment with a proton pump inhibitor, gastric pH values provided important information regarding subsequent values of esophageal pH and values of esophageal pH provided important information regarding subsequent values of gastric pH. The ability of gastric pH and esophageal pH to provide information regarding subsequent values of each other was reduced in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared to normal subjects. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity, and that this ability is impaired in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  2. Adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene selectively kills gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian-Run; Li, Jian-Sheng; Niu, Ying; Miao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene (CD/TK) for selective killing of gastric cancer cells. Gastric cancer cells SCG7901 and normal gastric epithelial cell lines were infected by adenoviruses Ad-survivin/GFP and Ad-survivin/CD/TK. GFP expression and CD-TK were detected by fluorescence microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. After treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs ganciclovir (GCV) and/or 5-FC, the cell growth status was evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell cycle changes were detected using flow cytometry. In nude mice bearing human gastric cancer, the recombinant adenovirus vector was injected directly into the tumor followed by an intraperitoneal injection of GCV and/or 5-FC. The subsequent tumor growth was then observed. The GFP gene driven by survivin could be expressed within the gastric cancer line SCG7901, but not in normal gastric epithelial cells. RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of the CD/TK gene product in the infected SCG7901 cells, but not in the infected normal gastric epithelial cells. The infected gastric cancer SCG7901, but not the gastric cells, was highly sensitive to the pro-drugs. The CD/TK fusion gene system showed significantly greater efficiency than either of the single suicide genes in killing the target cells (P<0.01). Treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs resulted in increased cell percentage in G0-Gl phase and decreased percentage in S phase. In nude mice bearing SCG7901 cells, treatment with the double suicide gene system significantly inhibited tumor growth, showing much stronger effects than either of the single suicide genes (P<0.01). The adenovirus-mediated CD/TK double suicide gene driven by survivin promoter combined with GCV an 5-FC treatment could be an effective therapy against experimental gastric cancer with much greater efficacy than the single suicide gene CD/TK combined

  3. Gastric trichobezoars in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Mook, Deborah M

    2002-12-01

    On physical examination, a 5 x 10-cm abdominal mass was found in an eight-year-old female rhesus macaque. Radiography revealed an opaque mass in the cranial portion of the abdomen, displacing the stomach craniad. Percutaneous biopsy obtained hair with little tissue, confirming a diagnosis of trichobezoar. Initially, the hairball was medically managed by oral administration of lubricants. Medical management proved unsuccessful, the macaque began to lose weight, and two gastric trichobezoars were subsequently removed surgically. Normal appetite and activity were regained within one week. Gastric trichobezoars may lead to severe clinical illness, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for anorexia and/or weight loss in any nonhuman primate. Trichobezoars may also be detected and treated prior to development of illness.

  4. Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... add in soft foods , and then regular foods. Wound Care Keep your dressings (bandage) on your wounds clean and dry. If you have sutures (stitches) ... or wet. You may have bruising around your wound. This is normal. It will go away on ...

  5. Hypercalcemia as Initial Presentation of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Gastric Origin: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kumar, Vinod; Kaur, Supreet; Maroules, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy due to metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma is extremely rare; in fact, to the best of our knowledge, only three case reports of hypercalcemia associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma have been published in the literature to date. Herein, we report a rare case involving a 61-year-old African-American female who had hypercalcemia at initial presentation and who was later diagnosed with poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma with extensive liver metastases, without bone involvement. She was found to have elevated parathyroid hormone-related peptide and normal parathyroid hormone levels. Despite aggressive treatment, she died within a few months of diagnosis. PMID:27752397

  6. Familial gastric cancer - clinical management.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Caldas, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The clinical management of familial gastric cancer is the same as that for sporadic gastric cancer at the current time. As the causative mutations for these cases are identified this should lead to the development of specific treatments which target the molecular abnormality. The only germline mutations identified so far occur within the E-cadherin gene (CDHI) and they account for approximately 30% of familial gastric cancer cases. When index patients fulfilling the clinical criteria for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer syndrome have a CDHI mutation identified then genetic testing of asymptomatic relatives should be considered. The clinical sequelae of testing positive for such a mutation are profound and therefore it is essential that counselling is given prior to genetic testing. The management options are surveillance endoscopy and prophylactic gastrectomy. In this chapter the practicalities of genetic testing are discussed as well as the pros and cons of the two management options. It is essential that experience of these rare families is pooled so that surveillance and treatment can be optimised in the future.

  7. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.J.; Pitman, K.; Starr, G.; Wood, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease. These mice exhibited aganglionosis of the terminal segment of the large intestine. This condition was accompanied by fecal stasis and megacolon. Gastric emptying of saline or milk meals was slower in the mice with aganglionic or induced megacolon than in the normal mice, but the rate of emptying was faster than after administration of morphine (10 mg/kg). In the small intestine, the distribution of the radiolabeled marker and the advancing edge of the marker profile were abnormal in the mice with megacolon. There were small differences between the megacolonic and normal mice in the distance traversed by the advancing edge of the intraluminal profile of the marker. These results are evidence for disturbances of gastric and small intestinal motor function that occur in mice secondary to development of megacolon.

  8. Critical evaluation of the tetracycline fluorescence test in the diagnosis of gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    WORSLEY, G H; McKENNA, R D; BECKIT

    1963-06-29

    Exfoliative cytology is a useful tool in the differential diagnosis of gastric lesions. The simplified method developed by Klinger and Katz(4) using tetracycline fluorescence was subjected to a critical evaluation. Five cases of gastric carcinoma, two of esophageal carcinoma, 21 of benign peptic ulcer, one case of carcinoma eroding into the bile duct, one case of carcinoma of the pancreas penetrating into the stomach, five normal controls on no medication and two normal controls taking vitamin B(2) were studied. The most apparent drawback of this technique is the number of false negatives encountered in cases of gastric carcinoma (three negative results in five cases of carcinoma). One false-positive test was recorded among 21 patients with benign ulcer. Vitamin B(2) if taken a half hour prior to the test will also produce a false-positive test. It is concluded, therefore, that the tetracycline fluorescence test is inferior to accurate studies of exfoliative cytology.

  9. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Panis, C.; Victorino, V. J.; Herrera, A. C. S. A.; Cecchini, A. L.; Simão, A. N. C.; Tomita, L. Y.; Cecchini, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  10. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  11. Identification of aberrantly expressed glycans in gastric cancer by integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometric analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Guan, Feng; Li, Dongliang; Tan, Zengqi; Yang, Ganglong; Wu, Yanli; Huang, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is usually associated with alterations of glycan expression patterns. Little is known regarding global glycomics in gastric cancer, the most common type of epithelial cancer. We integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) methods to profile glycan expression in three gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901, HGC-27, and MGC-803) and one normal gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1). Significantly altered glycans were confirmed by lectin staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The three cancer cell lines showed increased levels of core-fucosylated N-glycans, GalNAcα-Ser/Thr (Tn antigen), and Sia2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc N-glycans, but reduced levels of biantennary N-glycans, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr (T antigen), and (GlcNAc)n N-glycans. Lectin histochemistry was used to validate aberrant expression of four representative glycans (core-fucosylation, Sia2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, biantennary N-glycans, T antigen, recognized respectively by lectins LCA, SNA, PHA-E+L, and ACA) in clinical gastric cancer samples. Lower binding capacity for ACA was correlated with significantly poorer patient prognosis. Our findings indicate for the first time that glycans recognized by LCA, ACA, and PHA-E+L are aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer, and suggest that ACA is a potential prognostic factor for gastric cancer. PMID:27895315

  12. Assessment of gastric sensorimotor function in paediatric patients with unexplained dyspeptic symptoms and poor weight gain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, I; Vos, R; Tack, J

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that impaired meal accommodation or hypersensitivity to distention are highly prevalent in adult functional dyspepsia (FD). Our aim was to investigate whether similar abnormalities also occur in paediatric FD. Sixteen FD patients (15 girls, 10-16 years) were studied. The severity (0-3; 0, absent; 3, severe) of eight dyspeptic symptoms (epigastric pain, fullness, bloating, early satiety, nausea, vomiting, belching and epigastric burning) and the amount of weight loss were determined by questionnaire. All children underwent a gastric barostat study after an overnight fast to determine sensitivity to distention and meal-induced accommodation, which were compared with normal values in young adults (18-22 years). On a separate day, all patients underwent a gastric emptying breath test. A mean weight loss of 4.8 +/- 0.9 kg was present in 14 children. Compared with controls, patients had lower discomfort thresholds to gastric distention (8.8 +/- 1.0 mmHg vs 13.9 +/- 1.9 mmHg, P < 0.02) and gastric accommodation (87 +/- 25 mL vs 154 +/- 20 mL P < 0.04). Hypersensitivity to distention and impaired accommodation were present in respectively nine (56%) and 11 (69%) patients. No relationship was found between barostat and gastric emptying, which was delayed in only three patients. The majority of children with unexplained epigastric symptoms have abnormalities of gastric sensorimotor function.

  13. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  14. Gastric emptying in Parkinson's disease: patients with and without response fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Djaldetti, R; Baron, J; Ziv, I; Melamed, E

    1996-04-01

    Delayed gastric emptying may be an important pharmacokinetic mechanism underlying some of the response fluctuations that develop after long-term levodopa therapy. We performed a radionuclide gastric emptying study using a standard Tc-99m colloid-labeled solid meal in 30 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 15 fluctuators with "delayed-on" and "no-on" phenomena, and 15 nonfluctuators. Fasting patients were given the standard meal, and gastric emptying was monitored with a gamma camera positioned over the stomach, recording data for 1 hour. PD patients had prolonged gastric emptying measured after 60 minutes compared with the normal control subjects (70.7 +/- 16% versus < 60%). Gastric retention measured after 1 hour was increased in patients with fluctuations compared with patients without fluctuations (77.4 +/- 15.5% versus 64.0 +/- 14.3%; p < 0.05). Half-time emptying was significantly delayed in patients with, as compared with those without, response fluctuations (221 +/- 202 minutes versus 85 +/- 31 minutes; p < 0.05). This demonstrates that delayed gastric emptying is common in PD patients and is more marked in those with response fluctuations. The stomach is an important target organ in PD, affected either by the basic PD pathology, chronic drug administration, or both.

  15. Loss of gastrokine-2 drives premalignant gastric inflammation and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; O’Connor, Louise; Chionh, Yok Teng; Scurr, Michelle; Rollo, Benjamin N.; Ng, Garrett Z.; Jacobs, Shelley; Catubig, Angelique; Kurklu, Bayzar; Mercer, Stephen; Minamoto, Toshinari; Ong, David E.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Judd, Louise M.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucosal inflammation is associated with a greater risk of gastric cancer (GC) and, therefore, requires tight control by suppressive counter mechanisms. Gastrokine-2 (GKN2) belongs to a family of secreted proteins expressed within normal gastric mucosal cells. GKN2 expression is frequently lost during GC progression, suggesting an inhibitory role; however, a causal link remains unsubstantiated. Here, we developed Gkn2 knockout and transgenic overexpressing mice to investigate the functional impact of GKN2 loss in GC pathogenesis. In mouse models of GC, decreased GKN2 expression correlated with gastric pathology that paralleled human GC progression. At baseline, Gkn2 knockout mice exhibited defective gastric epithelial differentiation but not malignant progression. Conversely, Gkn2 knockout in the IL-11/STAT3-dependent gp130F/F GC model caused tumorigenesis of the proximal stomach. Additionally, gastric immunopathology was accelerated in Helicobacter pylori–infected Gkn2 knockout mice and was associated with augmented T helper cell type 1 (Th1) but not Th17 immunity. Heightened Th1 responses in Gkn2 knockout mice were linked to deregulated mucosal innate immunity and impaired myeloid-derived suppressor cell activation. Finally, transgenic overexpression of human gastrokines (GKNs) attenuated gastric tumor growth in gp130F/F mice. Together, these results reveal an antiinflammatory role for GKN2, provide in vivo evidence that links GKN2 loss to GC pathogenesis, and suggest GKN restoration as a strategy to restrain GC progression. PMID:26974160

  16. Acute gastric pH changes alter intraluminal but not plasma peptide levels.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C R; Ure, T; O'Dorisio, T M; Barrie, R J; Woltering, E A

    1991-12-01

    Gastric acidity is influenced by systemic and local peptide effects. Previous work by others has shown that intraluminally secreted peptides may have a role in local control of gastric acidity; however, the response of these peptides to acute changes in gastric pH is unknown. To determine the effects of acute changes in pH on systemic and intraluminal peptide levels, 14 normal volunteers underwent placement of a nasogastric tube after an overnight fast. Blood and gastric fluid were analyzed on a control day, 2 hours after completion of 24 hours of aluminum-magnesium antacid therapy and after 24 hours of H2 blockade. Plasma and acid-alcohol-extracted gastric peptide levels were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. Specimens were subdivided into two groups: 28 gastric fluid specimens with a pH less than 4 and 10 specimens with a pH greater than 4. In the patients with a pH greater than 4, the luminal peptides, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, substance P, and gastrin, were decreased by 50% to 90% and gastrin-releasing peptide was decreased by 36% compared with specimens with a pH less than 4. Conversely, intraluminal vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and calcitonin levels were elevated by 60% and 27%, respectively, in the samples with a pH greater than 4. Intraluminal peptide concentrations are responsive to changes in intragastric pH; however, this response was not seen in plasma peptide levels.

  17. Current issues in gastric cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Patru, C L; Surlin, V; Georgescu, I; Patru, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most common malignant tumors of digestive tract continues to be a major health problem by frequency, aggressiveness and low rate of cure in symptomatic stage. Although its incidence is decreasing (especially in the West), globally the gastric cancer is ranked fourth in incidence among cancers at various sites. Despite these developments, the gastric cancer mortality, overall declining globally, is high. especially in the West where even if diagnosed fewer cases of gastric cancer, TNM stages are advanced and have a poor prognosis. In contrast, in Japan, where the incidence is still high, the percentage of cases diagnosed at the stage of "early gastric cancer" has greatly increased, thus improving prognosis. Gastric neoplasia affects more men, age range 50-70 years, disadvantaged social classes and black race. In Romania the gastric cancer incidence is increasing over recent years, presenting variations across the country being more common in men compared with women, reaching a peak of incidence around age 60. Gastric cancer mortality in the world places Romania among the countries with average mortality. Gastric cancer prognosis remains extremely reserved, in close correlation with tumor stage at diagnosis, surgical treatment being the only possibility to provide improved survival, especially in the early stages. Improvement of survival rate in recent years is due to increased gastric resectability result of an earlier diagnosis, a more complex treatment and a closer monitoring of the population at risk.

  18. Gastric metastasis of bilateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belaïd, Asma; Mghirbi, Fahmi; Béhi, Khalil; Doghri, Raoudha; Benna, Farouk

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The most frequent metastatic sites are lung, bone, liver and brain. On the other hand, gastric metastases are rare. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) occurs rarely. Lobular carcinoma is the histological type most often associated with bilateral breast carcinomas and gastric metastases. We made a retrospective study including four patients followed in the Salah Azaiez Institute, for a bilateral breast cancer with gastric metastases. We analyzed the epidemiological, anatomoclinical and therapeutic particularities of this rare entity. Symptoms were unspecific. The diagnosis of gastric metastasis of the SBBC was confirmed by a histopathological examination of an endoscopic biopsy. The median age was 46.2 years (range, 36–51 years) and the median time until the gastric involvement was 19 months (range, 0–41 months). None of patients had a surgical treatment for the gastric location. All Patients received at least one line of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival following the detection of gastric involvement was 22 months (range, 1–56 months). Gastric metastases from breast cancer are rare and frequently associated with other distant metastasis. Symptoms are unspecific and endoscopy may not be contributive. Therefore, gastric involvement is underestimated. Lobular infiltrating carcinoma (LIC) is the most histological type incriminated in its occurrence. The supply of immunohistochemistry is crucial to distinguish between primary or metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:28280631

  19. Non-coding RNAs and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Fei; Chen, Sheng-Can; Xia, Tian; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Shao, Yong-Fu; Xiao, Bing-Xiu; Guo, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play key roles in development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Altered ncRNA expression is associated with gastric cancer occurrence, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is significantly related to gastric cancer tumor stage, size, differentiation and metastasis. MiRNAs interrupt cellular signaling pathways, inhibit the activity of tumor suppressor genes, and affect the cell cycle in gastric cancer cells. Some miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-106a and miR-421, could be potential markers for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new research hotspot among cancer-associated ncRNAs, play important roles in epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Several gastric cancer-associated lncRNAs, such as CCAT1, GACAT1, H19, and SUMO1P3, have been explored. In addition, Piwi-interacting RNAs, another type of small ncRNA that is recognized by gastroenterologists, are involved in gastric carcinogenesis, and piR-651/823 represents an efficient diagnostic biomarker of gastric cancer that can be detected in the blood and gastric juice. Small interfering RNAs also function in post-transcriptional regulation in gastric cancer and might be useful in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833871

  20. Modeling human development and disease in pluripotent stem cell-derived gastric organoids

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Catá, Emily M.; Crawford, Calyn M.; Sinagoga, Katie L.; Schumacher, Michael; Rockich, Briana E.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Spence, Jason R.; Zavros, Yana; Wells, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world’s population and are largely due to chronic H. pylori infection1–3. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis4, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We identified that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signaling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signaling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signaling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a novel and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease. PMID:25363776

  1. Gastric and pancreatic responses to meals varying in pH

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, A.; Konturek, S. J.; Thor, P.

    1974-01-01

    1. Gastric acid response to a test meal of 10% peptone was measured in chronic gastric and pancreatic fistula cats using the Fordtran and Walsh method, monitoring the rate at which a solution of 0·5 M sodium bicarbonate had to be added to maintain constant pH of gastric content at pre-selected values ranging from 5·0 to 1·0. Simultaneously, pancreatic secretion was determined by the standard collection technique. In this way the pH profile for the inhibition of gastric secretion and stimulation of pancreatic secretion has been established in cats. 2. A peptone meal adjusted to pH 5·0 produced gastric acid output similar to the maximal response to histamine or pentagastrin. It provoked a negligible stimulation of pancreatic flow rate and bicarbonate output but a large protein output. 3. Graded decrease of the peptone meal pH to below 4·0 resulted in inhibition of gastric acid production and in a concomitant stimulation of pancreatic secretory volume and bicarbonate output. A meal adjusted to pH 1·0 stimulated gastric secretion only about 30% of the response recorded at pH 5·0. Pancreatic secretion with a meal adjusted to pH 3·0 reached the highest level of about 70% of the maximal response to exogenous secretin. 4. Since the observed changes in the secretory activity of the stomach and the pancreas induced by test meals adjusted to pH 3·0 can be fully reproduced by exogenous secretin, it is suggested that in the cat this hormone may be responsible for the gastric inhibitory and pancreatic stimulatory mechanisms activated during normal digestion of food. PMID:4449058

  2. Gastroprotective Effects of Astragaloside IV against Acute Gastric Lesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shuai; Yang, Guang; Li, Winny; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Hailong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Minzhou

    2016-01-01

    Background Protection of the gastric mucosa from acute lesions induced by various irritants is a pertinent issue in the field of critical care medicine. In this study, we investigated the gastroprotective effects of astragaloside IV on acute gastric lesions in rats under stressful conditions. Methods Rats were randomized into six groups. Group 1 and 2 received 10% Tween 80 (vehicle). Group 3 received 20 mg/kg of omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor. Groups 4, 5 and 6 received astragaloside IV at concentration of 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. As a means to induce gastric lesions, Groups 2–6 were subjected to water immersion and restraint stress for 12 hours after treatment. Results Our present studies show that compared to rats in group 2, treatment with 1 to 50 mg/kg astragaloside IV significantly decreased the size of gastric lesions, MDA, TNFα and MCP1 levels, in addition to normalizing gastric pH, gastric mucus and SOD levels (P<0.05). Histomorphological examination confirmed that treatment with astragaloside IV elicited a dosage-dependent protective effect on the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, pretreatment with astragaloside IV resulted in significant elevations in HSP70 and reduction in Bax, along with over-expression of PLCγ response level, which was further confirmed via immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusions The acute gastric lesions induced are attenuated by pretreatment with astragaloside IV which is possibly due to the enhancing of the expression of HSP70 with concomitant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic capacity. PMID:26845156

  3. The role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric mucosal protection

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Susan; Steele, Islay; Lyons, Suzanne; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Dimaline, Rod; Pritchard, D. Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Gastric mucosal health is maintained in response to potentially damaging luminal factors. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) disrupt protective mechanisms leading to bleeding and ulceration. The plasminogen activator system has been implicated in fibrinolysis following gastric ulceration, and an inhibitor of this system, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, is expressed in gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with normal gastric histology taking aspirin or NSAIDs, we found elevated gastric PAI-1 mRNA abundance compared with controls; the increase in patients on aspirin was independent of whether they were also taking proton pump inhibitors. In the same patients, aspirin tended to lower urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA. Immunohistochemistry indicated PAI-1 localization to epithelial cells. In a model system using MKN45 or AGS-GR cells transfected with a PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct, we found no evidence for upregulation of PAI-1 expression by indomethacin, and, in fact, cyclooxygenase products such as PGE2 and PGI2 weakly stimulated expression. Increased gastric PAI-1 mRNA was also found in mice following gavage with ethanol or indomethacin, but plasma PAI-1 was unaffected. In PAI-1−/− mice, gastric hemorrhagic lesions in response to ethanol or indomethacin were increased compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice in which PAI-1 is overexpressed in parietal cells, there were decreased lesions in response to ethanol and indomethacin. Thus, PAI-1 expression is increased in gastric epithelial cells in response to mucosal irritants such as aspirin and NSAIDs probably via an indirect mechanism, and PAI-1 acts as a local autoregulator to minimize mucosal damage. PMID:23494120

  4. Salty Food Preference and Intake and Risk of Gastric Cancer: The JACC Study

    PubMed Central

    Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Iso, Hiroyasu; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Kikuchi, Shogo; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background High sodium intake is a potential risk factor of gastric cancer. However, limited information is available on the relationship between salty food preference or intake and risk of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between these variables among the Japanese population. Methods Between 1988 and 1990, 15 732 men and 24 997 women aged 40–79 years old with no history of cancer or cardiovascular disease completed a lifestyle questionnaire that included information about food intake. The subjects were enrolled in the Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC) Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk Sponsored by Monbusho. After a median follow-up of 14.3 years, 787 incident gastric cancers were documented. We examined the associations between salty food preference and intake and gastric cancer incidence using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results The risk of gastric cancer among subjects with a strong preference for salty food was approximately 30% higher than among those who preferred normal-level salty food (hazard ratio [HR] 1.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.67). The risk of gastric cancer in subjects who consumed 3 and ≥4 bowls/day of miso soup was approximately 60% higher than in those who consumed less miso soup (HR 1.67; 95% CI, 1.16–2.39 and HR 1.64; 95% CI, 1.11–2.42, respectively). Sodium intake correlated positively and linearly with risk of gastric cancer (P for trend = 0.002). Conclusions The present study showed that salty food preference, consumption of large quantities of miso soup, and high sodium intake were associated with increased risk of gastric cancer among Japanese people. PMID:26477994

  5. Laparoscopic gastropexy for the treatment of gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen.

    PubMed

    François-Fiquet, Caroline; Belouadah, Mohamed; Chauvet, Philippe; Lefebvre, Francis; Lefort, Gérard; Poli-Merol, Marie Laurence

    2009-04-01

    A 2.5-year-old boy was referred to the emergency room for a sudden onset of diffuse and increasing abdominal pain with lethargy, abdominal distension, and vomiting, all in the past 24 hours. A plain abdominal X-ray showed gastric distension. Two liters of gastric contents were evacuated by suction. The abdominal sonogram showed an unusual position of the spleen in the left-lower quadrant, with no splenic ischemia. The diagnosis of gastric volvulus associated with a wandering spleen was then evoked. Laparoscopic exploration revealed a nonischemic spleen, absence of normal supporting ligaments for the spleen, and gastric distension with flaccid gastric walls. The spleen was then easily moved in the left-under quadrant. A parietal peritoneal posterolateral incision was made, opposite the large gastric curve, up to the diaphragm (7 cm). This delimitated a sharp demarcation zone between the two edges of the incised peritoneum. The stomach was fixed to the peritoneal incision, covering and anchoring the spleen in a good position. Recovery was uneventful, and an abdominal sonogram performed 4 years after the surgery shows a viable spleen in its correct location. The rarity of gastric volvulus associated with a wandering spleen and its fast clinical improvement with medical treatment often delays the diagnosis and the surgical treatment. Laparoscopy in this case has a dual relevance: diagnosis and therapeutic management (splenectomy or gastropexy). Laparoscopic gastropexy for the treatment of gastric volvulus associated with a wandering spleen is an easy procedure and combines the advantages of all the surgical techniques previously described.

  6. Overexpressed CISD2 has prognostic value in human gastric cancer and promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis via AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Ouyang, Fei; Liu, Xiaobo; Wu, Shu; Wu, Hong-mei; Xu, Yuandong; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Jinrong; Xu, Xuehu; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    CDGSH iron sulfur domain 2 (CISD2) is localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane and mediates mitochondrial integrity and lifespan in mammals, but its role in cancer is unknown. In the current study, we reported that CISD2 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer cells compared to normal gastric epithelial cells (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis of 261 paraffin-embedded archived gastric cancer tissues showed that high CISD2 expression was significantly associated with clinical stage, TNM classifications, venous invasion and lymphatic invasion. Univariate and multivariate analysis indicated that high CISD2 expression was an independent prognostic factor for poorer overall survival in the entire cohort. Overexpressing CISD2 promoted, while silencing CISD2 inhibited, the proliferation of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that silencing endogenous CISD2 also significantly inhibited the proliferation and tumorigenicity of MGC-803 and SGC-7901 cells not only in vitro but also in vivo in NOD/SCID mice (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that CISD2 affected cell proliferation and tumorigenicity of gastric cancer cells through mediating the G1-to-S phase transition. Moreover, we demonstrated that the pro-proliferative effect of CISD2 on gastric cancer cells was associated with downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, and activation of AKT signaling. The findings of this study indicate that CISD2 may promote proliferation and tumorigenicity, potentially representing a novel prognostic marker for overall survival in gastric cancer. PMID:26565812

  7. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  8. Gastric cytoprotection and honey intake in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Alagwu, E A; Nneli, R O; Egwurugwu, J N; Osim, E E

    2011-11-23

    Beneficial effect of honey has been widely reported particularly on wound healings, gastrointestinal disorders and as antibacterial agent. However, there is paucity of report on its cytoprotective effect on the gastric mucosa despite its common usage worldwide including Nigeria. This study was therefore carried out to evaluate the effect of this widely consumed substance on gastric mucosa using animal model and also to explore possible mechanism of its action on the gastric mucosa .Twenty male adult albino rats of Wistar strain, weighing between 210-220g were used in the experiment. They were randomly assigned into two groups, the control group and the honey-fed (test) group, each containing ten rats. The Control group was fed on normal rat feed and water while the test group was fed on normal rat feed with honey added to its drinking water (1ml of honey for every initial 10ml of water for each rat daily) for twenty two weeks. After twenty two weeks the rats were weighed after being starved overnight. They were anaesthetized with urethane (0.6ml/100g body weight). Gastric ulceration was induced using 1.5ml acid-alcohol prepared from equivolume of 0.1NHCl and 70% methanol introduced into the stomach via a portex cannula tied and left in place following an incision made on the antral-pyloric junction of the stomach. The acid-alcohol was allowed to stay for 1hr. After 1hr, laparatomy was performed and the stomach isolated, cut open along the greater curvature, rinsed with normal saline and fastened in place with pins on a dissecting board for ulcer examination and scores. The result obtained showed mean ulcer scores of 14.5+/-0.70 for the control group and 1.6+/-0.11 for the test group. The result showed that honey significantly reduced ulcer scores as well as caused scanty haemorrhage in the test group compared with increased ulcer scores and multiple haemorrhage in the control group. It is therefore concluded that honey intake offered cytoprotection on the gastric

  9. Gastric emptying of indigestible tablets in relation to composition and time of ingestion of meals studied by metal detector.

    PubMed

    Ewe, K; Press, A G; Bollen, S; Schuhn, I

    1991-02-01

    Enteric-coated tablets leave the stomach mainly during the interdigestive phase. Composition as well as time of ingestion of meals may influence their gastric emptying considerably. In 12 normal volunteers gastric emptying of a plastic tablet with a metal core was followed by a metal detector in relation to different compositions and various times of ingestion of meals. With an empty stomach and after ingestion of 250 ml water, the mean time for gastric emptying of the tablet was 38 +/- 11 min (mean +/- SEM) and 38 +/- 8 min. Two hundred fifty milliliters of milk (652 kJ) and a formula diet (1000 kJ) delayed gastric emptying time to 128 +/- 14 and 152 +/- 6 min, respectively (P less than 0.05). Breakfast (2200 kJ) further retarded gastric emptying compared with both liquids to 249 +/- 24 min (P less than 0.05). There was a close correlation between nutritive density and gastric emptying of the tablet (r = 0.92; P less than 0.001). Main meals also delayed gastric emptying of tablets when compared to empty stomach (P less than 0.05). A snack after breakfast further delayed gastric emptying from 201 +/- 10 to 278 +/- 19 min (P less than 0.05). The largest delay was observed following ingestion of breakfast, lunch, dinner, and additional snacks (509 +/- 220 min). We conclude that the delay of gastric emptying of enteric-coated tablets by food is related to its nutritive density and eating habits. The gastric emptying of an enteric coated tablet that is ingested early in the morning may be delayed until late at night when several meals and snacks are ingested during the day, leading to unwanted alterations in bioavailability and to possible adverse effects.

  10. MiRNA-27a promotes the proliferation and invasion of human gastric cancer MGC803 cells by targeting SFRP1 via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Li, Jun; Guo, Ni; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Liao, Yu-Qian

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the effects of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) on the proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer (GC) cells by targeting SFRP1 via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. GC and normal adjacent tissues were collected from 273 GC patients. Human gastric cancer cell line (MGC803) and normal human gastric mucosal cell line (GES-1) were cultured. The miR-27a mRNA expression was analyzed using Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) test was used to detect miR-27a and SFRP1 protein expressions. After transfection, cells were divided into five groups: the negative control (NC) group, the miR-27a inhibitor group, the miR-27a mimics group, the miR-27a inhibitor + SFRP1 siRNA group and the miR-27a mimics + SFRP1 overexpression group. Western blotting was conducted to test SFRP1 and Wnt/β-catenin protein expression. Analysis for the target gene of miR-27a was performed using Luciferase assay. Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were determined by CCK8 and Transwell assay. The dual-luciferase reporter assay system was applied to analyze the effects of miR-27a on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In GC tissue and cell line, miR-27a protein and mRNA expressions were up-regulated, and SFRP1 protein and mRNA expressions were down-regulated. Luciferase assay indicated that miR-27a might target SFRP1 and regulate its expressions. When miR-27a was down-regulated, SFRP1 was up-regulated, and β-catenin, Wnt, p-β-catenin, and p-Wnt were significantly down-regulated. Compared with the NC group, the proliferation, migration and invasion of GC cells were remarkably increased in the miR-27a group, but these were declined in the miR-27a mimics + SFRP1 overexpression group. The proliferation, migration and invasion of GC cells were elevated in the miR-27a inhibitor + SFRP1 siRNA group compared with the miR-27a inhibitor group. These results showed that miR-27a was highly expressed in GC tissues and cells, and it might

  11. ZnRF3 Induces Apoptosis of Gastric Cancer Cells by Antagonizing Wnt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongzhen; Cai, Aizhen; Xi, Hongqing; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of malignant cancers of the stomach are gastric adenocarcinoma type. In spite of many studies, the molecular basis for this cancer is still unclear. Deregulated cell proliferative signaling via Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways is considered important in the pathogenesis of many cancers including the gastric cancer. Recent studies identified ZnRF3 protein, which is a E3-ubiquitin ligase and which is either deleted or mutated in cancers, to inhibit Wnt signaling. However, the significance of ZnRF3 in the control of gastric cancer and whether it also regulates Hedgehog signaling pathway, is not known. In the present study, we assessed the expression of ZnRF3 in gastric tumors and paracancerous tissues from 58 patients (44 male and 14 female) of different ages and related this to patient survival. We observed a clear relationship between ZnRF3 expression in paracancerous tissue and tumor size. Also, ZnRF3 expression was much higher in tumors from aged patients. Male patients showed higher mortality than the females. Mechanistic studies using normal gastric cells (GES1) and gastric cancer cells (MGC-803) infected with either AdZnRF3 or AdGFP viral vectors, revealed that ZnRF3 overexpression causes significantly more apoptosis and lowered proliferation of cancer cells. ZnRF3 overexpression led to greatly reduced levels of Lgr5, a component of Wnt signaling and also Gli1, a component of Hedgehog signaling. Thus, ZnRF3 negatively influences both the Wnt and Hedgehog proliferative pathways, and probably this way it negatively regulates cancer progression. These results suggest the importance of normal ZnRF3 function in checking the progression of cancer cell growth and indicate that a lack of this protein can lead to poorer clinical outcomes for gastric cancer patients.

  12. Combining near-infrared-excited autofluorescence and Raman spectroscopy improves in vivo diagnosis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-06-15

    This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the combined near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) and Raman spectroscopy for improving in vivo detection of gastric cancer at clinical gastroscopy. A rapid Raman endoscopic technique was employed for in vivo spectroscopic measurements of normal (n=1098) and cancer (n=140) gastric tissues from 81 gastric patients. The composite NIR AF and Raman spectra in the range of 800-1800 cm(-1) were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant (LDA) to extract diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic processes of gastric malignancies. High quality in vivo composite NIR AF and Raman spectra can routinely be acquired from the gastric within 0.5s. The integrated intensity over the range of 800-1800 cm(-1) established the diagnostic implications (p=1.6E-14) of the change of NIR AF intensity associated with neoplastic transformation. PCA-LDA diagnostic modeling on the in vivo tissue NIR AF and Raman spectra acquired yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 92.2% (sensitivity of 97.9% and specificity of 91.5%) for identifying gastric cancer from normal tissue. The integration area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve using the combined NIR AF and Raman spectroscopy was 0.985, which is superior to either the Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This work demonstrates that the complementary Raman and NIR AF spectroscopy techniques can be integrated together for improving the in vivo diagnosis and detection of gastric cancer at endoscopy.

  13. Accumulation of hypericin in human gastric tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Braun, Evgeniy M.; Kikot, Vladimir O.; Chernyj, Vyacheslav A.

    1996-04-01

    Hypericin has been studied as a novel natural photosensitizer for PDT. It has been extracted from plants (St.-John's-wort). Oral administration (10% alcohol solution in a dose 2 mg/kg b.w.) was applied for 15 patients with gastric cancers 18 - 48 h before surgery. Normal and cancerous tissue samples were resected and underwent fluorescence analysis 1 - 2 h after resection. Tissue fluorescence was excited by He-Cd (20 mW, 442 nm) and Ar laser beams (100 mW, 488 nm) and registered from 510 to 725 nm. In tissue hypericin has maximum fluorescence peak at 603 nm for both excitation wavelengths. Fluorescence intensity ratio I603/I503 chosen as a criterion for tissue classification was varied from 1.6 to 3.2 (mean 2.5) for adenocarcinoma under He-Cd excitation whereas Ar laser excitation gave from 2.5 up to 4.2 (mean 3.5). Normal tissue had this ratio from 0.48 to 0.65 (mean 0.55) and from 0.53 to 0.75 (mean 3.5) for He-Cd and Ar laser excitation, respectively. No side effects were observed in patients during 6 month follow-up.

  14. Gastric intestinal metaplasia is associated with gastric dysplasia but is inversely correlated with esophageal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Justin M; Patrie, James T; Bleibel, Wissam; Frye, Jeanetta W; Sauer, Bryan G; Shami, Vanessa M; Stelow, Edward B; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Wang, Andrew Y

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine which clinical factors might be associated with gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) in a North American population. METHODS Pathology and endoscopy databases at an academic medical center were reviewed to identify patients with and without gastric IM on biopsies for a retrospective cohort study. Patient demographics, insurance status, and other clinical factors were reviewed. RESULTS Four hundred and sixty-eight patients with gastric IM (mean age: 61.0 years ± 14.4 years, 55.5% female) and 171 without gastric IM (mean age: 48.8 years ± 20.8 years, 55.0% female) were compared. The endoscopic appearance of atrophic gastritis correlated with finding gastric IM on histopathology (OR = 2.05, P = 0.051). Gastric IM was associated with histologic findings of chronic gastritis (OR = 2.56, P < 0.001), gastric ulcer (OR = 6.97, P = 0.015), gastric dysplasia (OR = 6.11, P = 0.038), and gastric cancer (OR = 6.53, P = 0.027). Histologic findings of Barrett’s esophagus (OR = 0.28, P = 0.003) and esophageal dysplasia (OR = 0.11, P = 0.014) were inversely associated with gastric IM. Tobacco use (OR = 1.73, P = 0.005) was associated with gastric IM. CONCLUSION Patients who smoke or have the endoscopic finding of atrophic gastritis are more likely to have gastric IM and should have screening gastric biopsies during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Patients with gastric IM are at increased risk for having gastric dysplasia and cancer, and surveillance EGD with gastric biopsies in these patients might be reasonable. PMID:28250898

  15. Percutaneous drainage of gastric remnant dilatation after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Bibyan, M; Khandelwal, R G; Parmar, A K; Reddy, P K

    2012-05-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a commonly performed bariatric procedure worldwide. Gastric remnant dilatation is an uncommon early complication of this procedure that can be fatal if treatment is delayed, as it can cause peritonitis and death. Herein we report a gastric bypass patient who presented with profound shock 3 months after the surgery. After resuscitation and evaluation, she was diagnosed as having a massive dilatation of gastric remnant, which we managed with percutaneous drainage.

  16. Quantitative expression of the homeobox and integrin genes in human gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi Degl'Innocenti, Duccio; Castiglione, Francesca; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Bechi, Paolo; Taddei, Gian Luigi; Freschi, Giancarlo; Taddei, Antonio

    2007-10-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a large family of regulator genes involved in the control of developmental processes and cell differentiation. The HOX genes encode transcription factors, and an increasing number of studies have shown that these genes may be implicated in the growth and the progression of many types of tumours. The present study investigated the expression of the HOX and integrin genes and their relationships in gastric carcinoma. We analyzed the RNA expression of 13 HOX genes from HOXA, C and D clusters and alphaV, alpha5 and alpha8 integrin genes in 24 gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the HOXA2 gene and the alpha8 integrin gene had a lower expression in tumour samples than in normal gastric mucosas. The comparison between the HOX and integrin genes showed that HOXA2 and alphaV integrin expression presented the same trend in 83% of the samples. Moreover, in cancer samples that expressed the HOXD11 gene, the expression of alphaV integrin was lower with respect to normal mucosas. The different roles of HOX and integrin genes in gastric carcinoma remain to be fully elucidated. These findings suggest that the HOX genes may play a critical role in the genesis, maintenance and diffusion of gastric carcinoma.

  17. Toward the virtual stomach: progress in multiscale modeling of gastric electrophysiology and motility.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; O'Grady, Gregory; Gao, Jerry; Sathar, Shameer; Cheng, Leo K

    2013-01-01

    Experimental progress in investigating normal and disordered gastric motility is increasingly being complimented by sophisticated multiscale modeling studies. Mathematical modeling has become a valuable tool in this effort, as there is an ever-increasing need to gain an integrative and quantitative understanding of how physiological mechanisms achieve coordinated functions across multiple biophysical scales. These interdisciplinary efforts have been particularly notable in the area of gastric electrophysiology, where they are beginning to yield a comprehensive and integrated in silico organ modeling framework, or 'virtual stomach'. At the cellular level, a number of biophysically based mathematical cell models have been developed, and these are now being applied in areas including investigations of gastric electrical pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, and electromechanical coupling. At the tissue level, micro-structural models are being creatively developed and employed to investigate clinically significant questions, such as the functional effects of ICC degradation on gastrointestinal (GI) electrical activation. At the organ level, high-resolution electrical mapping and modeling studies are combined to provide improved insights into normal and dysrhythmic gastric electrical activation. These efforts are also enabling detailed forward and inverse modeling studies at the 'whole body' level, with implications for diagnostic techniques for gastric dysrhythmias. These recent advances, together with several others highlighted in this review, collectively demonstrate a powerful trend toward applying mathematical models to effectively investigate structure-function relationships and overcome multiscale challenges in basic and clinical GI research.

  18. Gastric Hamartomatous Polyps—Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Monika; Yang, Xiu; Zhang, Xuchen

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps are frequently encountered on endoscopic examinations. While many of these represent true epithelial lesions, some of the polyps may result from underlying stromal or lymphoid proliferations or even heterotopic tissue. Histologic examination is essential for accurate typing of the polyps to predict malignant potential and underlying possible genetic abnormalities. The focus of this review is on gastric hamartomatous polyps, which are relatively rare and diagnostically challenging. Though most of the gastric hamartomatous polyps are benign, certain types are associated with increased malignant potential. These include certain polyps associated with specific genetic familial polyposis syndromes and gastric inverted hamartomatous polyps. Identification of these polyps can result in the prevention or early diagnosis of gastric carcinoma and also help in the identification of family members with polyposis syndromes. The aim of this review is to categorize gastric hamartomatous polyps and aid in the identification of high-risk categories. PMID:27081323

  19. [Intra-gastric penetration of an adjustable gastric band].

    PubMed

    Ablassmaier, B; Opitz, I; Jacobi, C A; Müller, J M

    2001-07-01

    Between November 1995 and August 2000 we performed adjustable silicone gastric banding laparoscopically in 252 patients. The body mass index varied from 37 to 86 kg/m2. We report on a 38-year-old woman who was operated on in 1997 with a body mass index of 47 kg/m2 (167 cm, 132 kg). The postoperative follow-up was uneventful until January 2000. The patient lost weight until she weighed 78 kg. Then she complained of diffuse epigastric pain. Gastroscopy revealed gastritis. Omeprazol was prescribed. No amelioration occurred. Endoscopic control showed partial intragastric migration of the band. After laparoscopic removal of the band, the patient was free of symptoms. Band erosion is a possible complication of adjustable gastric banding. As is known from intragastric penetration of the Angelchik prosthesis, the clinical symptoms of this complication may be mild. Since the follow-up of most patients with gastric banding is less than 5 years, more complications similar to that one described may be diagnosed in the future.

  20. Human gastric epithelial cells contribute to gastric immune regulation by providing retinoic acid to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bimczok, D; Kao, J Y; Zhang, M; Cochrun, S; Mannon, P; Peter, S; Wilcox, C M; Mönkemüller, K E; Harris, P R; Grams, J M; Stahl, R D; Smith, P D; Smythies, L E

    2015-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule retinol (ROL), and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of ROL synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation.

  1. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health.

  2. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-jun; Sun, Hai-jian; Wu, Yu-zhang

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26186252

  3. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  4. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. A Study of the Pronunciation of Words Containing Adjacent Vowels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greif, Ivo P.

    To determine the usefulness of the commonly taught phonics rule, "only pronounce the first vowel in words that contain adjacent vowels" (the VV rule, with the first "v" pronounced with the long vowel sound), two new studies applied it to words with adjacent vowels in several lists and dictionaries. The first study analyzed words containing…

  6. 47 CFR 90.221 - Adjacent channel power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent channel power limits. 90.221 Section 90.221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.221 Adjacent channel...

  7. 47 CFR 90.221 - Adjacent channel power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent channel power limits. 90.221 Section 90.221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.221 Adjacent channel...

  8. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  10. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  11. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  13. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  14. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  15. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  16. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  17. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  18. Pathogenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Qu, Yi-Ping; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a major public health issue as the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent advances have improved our understanding of its molecular pathogenesis, as best exemplified by elucidating the fundamental role of several major signaling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these signaling pathways, such as gene mutations, copy number variants, aberrant gene methylation and histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs. Some of these genetic/epigenetic alterations represent effective diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for GC. This information has now opened unprecedented opportunities for better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis and the development of novel therapeutic strategies for this cancer. The pathogenetic mechanisms of GC are the focus of this review. PMID:25320518

  19. Selected Endoscopic Gastric Devices for Obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Kartik; Rothstein, Richard I

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on the stomach target devices that are currently in various stages of development. Approved intragastric balloons, devices targeting small bowel and aspiration techniques, are described in other contributions to this issue. Bariatric endoscopic devices targeting the stomach directly alter gastric physiology and promote weight loss by potentially changing functional gastric volume, gastric emptying, gastric wall compliance, neurohormonal signaling, and, thereby, satiety. Many stomach-targeting devices are on the horizon for clinical use, and further study will determine the safety and efficacy for clinical use.

  20. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  1. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir; Khoury, Tawfik

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk.

  2. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Craanen, M E; Blok, P; Dekker, W; Tytgat, G N

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal metaplasia were significantly more common in intestinal type early gastric cancer compared with diffuse type early gastric cancer (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). H pylori was found in 61.3% of intestinal type early gastric cancer and in 54.5% of diffuse type early gastric cancer (NS). The age adjusted prevalence of intestinal metaplasia in the patients with antral gastritis was higher in H pylori positive patients in all age groups studied. Comparing gastritis patients with patients with intestinal type early gastric cancer showed the age adjusted prevalence of intestinal metaplasia to be significantly higher in the patients with early gastric cancer in all age groups studied. In conclusion, H pylori is associated with both types of early gastric carcinoma. Intestinal metaplasia formation seems to be a multifactorial process in which H pylori may play a part. These findings suggest that gastric cancer may be included in the spectrum of H pylori associated diseases, although many questions about causality remain to be answered. PMID:7959189

  3. hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b differential expression as potential biomarker of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Amanda Ferreira; Cruz, Aline MP; Magalhães, Leandro; Pereira, Adenilson L; Anaissi, Ana KM; Alves, Nélisson CF; Albuquerque, Paulo JBS; Burbano, Rommel MR; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression profiles of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in gastric mucosal samples and their values as gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers. METHODS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in normal gastric mucosa, non-atrophic chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. The difference between hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expression profiles in the grouped samples was evaluated by ANOVA and Student’s t-test tests. The results were adjusted for multiple testing by using Bonferroni’s correction. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. To evaluate hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expressions as potential biomarkers of gastric carcinogenesis, we performed a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and the derived area under the curve, and a Categorical Principal Components Analysis. In silico identification of the genetic targets of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b was performed using different prediction tools, in order to identify possible genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. RESULTS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c were higher in normal gastric mucosal samples, and decreased progressively in non-atrophic chronic gastritis samples, intestinal metaplasia samples and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma samples. The expression of hsa-miR-29c in the gastric lesions showed that non-atrophic gastritis have an intermediate profile to gastric normal mucosa and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma, and that intestinal metaplasia samples presented an expression pattern similar to that in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. This microRNA (miRNA) has a good discriminatory accuracy between normal gastric samples and (1) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma; and (2) intestinal metaplasia, and regulates the DMNT3A oncogene. hsa-miR-135b is up-regulated in non-atrophic chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia samples

  4. Gastric antibacterial efficiency is different for pepsin A and C.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sören; Bücker, Roland; Groll, Claudia; Azevedo-Vethacke, Marina; Scheid, Peter; Gatermann, Sören; Josenhans, Christine; Suerbaum, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    The gastric lumen represents a bactericidal barrier, whose major components are an acidic pH and a family of isoenzymes of the gastric aspartate protease, pepsin. To evaluate whether specific pepsins are specialized in antibacterial protection, we tested their effects on the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. In a recent study we found pepsin to affect the motility of the bacteria, one of its most important virulence factors. We were able to show that the antibacterial effect of pepsin occurs in two phases: rapid loss of motility and subsequent destruction. In the present study we used the rapid pepsin-induced bacterial immobilization as a marker of antibacterial efficiency. The proteolytic activity of different pepsins was normalized to values between 2 and 200 U/ml in the hemoglobin degradation test of Anson, performed at pH 2 and 5. We found that pepsin C completely inactivates H. pylori at proteolytic activities of 2 (pH 5) and 20 (pH 2) U/ml. In contrast, the activities of pepsin A and chymosin required to affect Helicobacter motility were ten times higher.

  5. Gastric myoelectrical activity in patients with Parkinson's disease: evidence of a primary gastric abnormality.

    PubMed

    Soykan, I; Lin, Z; Bennett, J P; McCallum, R W

    1999-05-01

    Parkinson's disease patients may experience various gastrointestinal symptoms; however, the exact pathophysiology of these symptoms is not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of gastric myoelectrical activity in patients with Parkinson's disease. Eleven patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 healthy subjects participated in the study. Patients were stratified as "receiving dopaminergic therapy" (N = 5) and "off therapy" (N = 6). Gastric myoelectrical activity was measured by means of surface electrogastrography (EGG) for 30 min before and for 90 min after a standardized meal. The dominant frequency, postprandial EGG power change, and the percentage of normal 2-4 cycles/min (cpm) slow-wave activity in the three groups were calculated and compared. The mean postprandial EGG power increase in the untreated patients was smaller than in the treated patients (-3.11 +/- 1.01 and 1.17 +/- 1.96 dB; P = 0.072). Moreover, both of these values were significantly decreased when compared to the control group (untreated vs control: -3.11 +/- 1.01 vs 8.01 +/- 1.86 dB; P = 0.04 and treated vs control: 1.17 +/- 1.96 vs 8.01 +/- 1.86 dB; P = 0.02). The percentage of normal 2-4 cpm slow waves in untreated patients was not different from the treated patients (82.6 +/- 6.6% vs 75.8 +/- 13.6%, P = NS) or from the control group (88.2 +/- 5.4%, P = NS). The dominant frequency after the meal was similar to that in the fasting state both in the untreated (3.3 +/- 0.1 vs 3.2 +/- 0.2 cpm; P = NS) and treated patients (3.2 +/- 0.1 vs 3.1 +/- 0.1 cpm, P = NS), whereas the dominant frequency significantly increased postprandially in the control group (2.88 +/- 0.12 vs 3.05 +/- 0.16; P < 0.05). Abnormalities in gastric myoelectrical activity in untreated Parkinson's disease patients reflect direct involvement of the gastrointestinal tract by the primary disease process. EGG can be regarded as a useful diagnostic tool in evaluating gastrointestinal

  6. Acupuncture and gastric acid studies.

    PubMed

    Sodipo, J O; Falaiye, J M

    1979-01-01

    The effects of therapeutic acupuncture on gastric acid secretion on pain relief in chronic duodenal ulcer patients were studied. Ten adult Nigerian patients with clinical, endoscopic as well as radiological evidence of duodenal ulcer constituted the "Ulcer Group." Four other patients who gave history of dyspepsia formed the "Dyspeptic Group." Pentagastrin stimulation test was performed on all subjects pre- and post-acupuncture therapy. The classical Chinese acupuncture loci were employed. The mean Basal Acid Output (BAO) in the duodenal ulcer group was markedly reduced from 4.04 +/- 1.01 mMols/hour to 1.05 +/- 2.5 mMols/hour. The mean Maximal Acid Output (MAO) was lowered from 34.72 +/- 13.81 mMols/hour to 15.34 +/- 4.01 mMols/hour. The difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). It is more probable, therefore, that the relief of pain is attributable to the therapeutic inhibition of gastric hyperacidity in our patients. Thus, though pain relief has been previously demonstrated in response to acupuncture, the results of this investigation have gone further to show that acupunture achieves symptomatic relief through therapeutic gastric depression in duodenal ulcer patients.

  7. Expression pattern and clinical significance of DNA methyltransferase 3B variants in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianwei; Lv, Chengyu; Qiao, Fengchang; Qiu, Xuemei; Huang, Wenbin; Wu, Qingxiang; Zhao, Zhujiang; Fan, Hong

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the expression pattern of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) variants in primary gastric cancer (GC) and to explore the clinical significance of DNMT3B variants in gastric carcinogenesis. Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets were designed to distinguish individual DNMT3B variants according to their splicing patterns. Expression levels of DNMT3B variants were assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in gastric cancer tissue, normal gastric mucosae and GC cell lines. The relationship between the expression patterns of the DNMT3B variants and corresponding clinical information was analyzed by observing the expression levels of different variants in the tumors. These results demonstrate that DNMT3B overexpression is related to late phase invasion (P=0.029) and intestinal type (P=0.012) in GC. DNMT3B3 expression was higher in normal tissue, compared to tumor tissue (P=0.033). In contrast, only 18, 32 and 35% of the patient tumors overexpressed DNMT3B1, DNMT3B4 and DNMT3B5, respectively. While taking into account environmental factors (H. pylori, Epstein-Barr virus infection), H. pylori infection elevated DNMT3B1 and DNMT3B3 variants in tumors, while increasing DNMT3B4 in both tumor and non-cancerous tissues. Our findings indicated that the expression of DNMT3B3 is the major splice variant in normal gastric mucosae and may be affected by H. pylori infection. Elevated DNMT3B variants may influence the progression of gastric cancer and may possibly be a powerful indicator for the disease.

  8. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Yang, Jianjun; Hong, Liu; Sun, Li; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and gastric cancer is relatively high, and its prognosis is controversial due to the complex and variant kinds of presentation. Thus, the present study aimed to explore the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer. From May 2010 to November 2015, a total of 241 gastric GIST patients were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. The patients with coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer were recorded. The clinicopathological features and prognoses of patients were analyzed. Among 241 patients, 24 patients had synchronous gastric cancer (synchronous group) and 217 patients did not (no-synchronous group). The synchronous group presented a higher percentage of elders (66.7% vs 39.6%, P = 0.001) and males (87.5% vs 48.4%, P < 0.001) than the no-synchronous group. The tumor diameter, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health degree were also significantly different between the 2 groups (all P < 0.05). The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival rates of synchronous group were significantly lower than those of no-synchronous group (54.9% vs 93.5%, P < 0.001; 37.9% vs 89.9%, P < 0.001, respectively). However, the 5-year overall survival rates between synchronous and gastric cancer groups were comparable (37.9% vs 57.6%, P = 0.474). The coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer was common in elder male patients. The synchronous GIST was common in low-risk category. The prognosis of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer was worse than that of primary-single gastric GIST, but was comparable with primary-single gastric cancer. PMID:27828865

  9. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Yang, Jianjun; Hong, Liu; Sun, Li; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Fan

    2016-11-01

    The coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and gastric cancer is relatively high, and its prognosis is controversial due to the complex and variant kinds of presentation. Thus, the present study aimed to explore the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer.From May 2010 to November 2015, a total of 241 gastric GIST patients were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. The patients with coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer were recorded. The clinicopathological features and prognoses of patients were analyzed.Among 241 patients, 24 patients had synchronous gastric cancer (synchronous group) and 217 patients did not (no-synchronous group). The synchronous group presented a higher percentage of elders (66.7% vs 39.6%, P = 0.001) and males (87.5% vs 48.4%, P < 0.001) than the no-synchronous group. The tumor diameter, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health degree were also significantly different between the 2 groups (all P < 0.05). The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival rates of synchronous group were significantly lower than those of no-synchronous group (54.9% vs 93.5%, P < 0.001; 37.9% vs 89.9%, P < 0.001, respectively). However, the 5-year overall survival rates between synchronous and gastric cancer groups were comparable (37.9% vs 57.6%, P = 0.474).The coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer was common in elder male patients. The synchronous GIST was common in low-risk category. The prognosis of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer was worse than that of primary-single gastric GIST, but was comparable with primary-single gastric cancer.

  10. A nonsense mutation in the Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F (XPF) gene is associated with gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong-Hua; Guo, Wen-Huan; Wu, Jun; Suo, Wen-Hao; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2014-03-10

    XPF/ERCC1 endonuclease is required for DNA lesion repair. To assess effects of a C2169A nonsense mutation in XPF at position 2169 in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines, genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 488 cancer patients and 64 gastric tumors. The mutation was mapped using a TaqMan MGB probe. In addition, gastric cancer cell lines were transfected with mutated XPF to explore XPF/ERCC1 interaction, XPF degradation, and DNA repair by a comet assay. The C2169A mutation was not detected in 488 samples of blood genomic DNA, yet was found in 32 of 64 gastric cancer tissue samples (50.0%), resulting in a 194C-terminal amino acid loss in XPF protein and lower expression. Laser micro-dissection confirmed that this point mutation was not present in surrounding normal tissues from the same patients. The truncated form of XPF (tXPF) impaired interaction with ERCC1, was rapidly degraded via ubiquitination, and resulted in reduced DNA repair. In gastric cancers, the mutation was monoallelic, indicating that XPF is a haplo-insufficient DNA repair gene. As the C2169A mutation is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis in the Chinese population, our findings shine light on it as a therapeutic target for early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.

  11. Coupling CDH17 and CLDN18 markers for comprehensive membrane-targeted detection of human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsusaka, Keisuke; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Urabe, Masayuki; Fukuyo, Masaki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Seto, Yasuyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Hamakubo, Takao; Kaneda, Atsushi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with gastric cancer typically face gastrectomies even when few or no nodal metastases are reported. Current procedures poorly predict lymphatic metastases; thus, evaluation of target molecules expressed on cancer cell membranes is necessary for in vivo detection. However, marker development is limited by the intratumoral heterogeneity of gastric cancer cells. In this study, multiple gene expression arrays of 42 systemic normal tissue samples and 56 gastric cancer samples were used to investigate two adhesion molecules, cadherin 17 (CDH17) and claudin 18 (CLDN18), which are intestinal and gastric markers, respectively. Expression of CDH17 and CLDN18 was partially redundant, but overlapped in 50 of 56 cases (89.3%). Tissue microarrays constructed using primary lesions and nodal metastases of 106 advanced gastric cancers revealed CDH17 and CLDN18 expression in 98 positive cases of 106 (92%). Hierarchical clustering classified gastric cancers into three subgroups, CDH17(++)/CLDN18(+/−), CDH17(++)/CLDN18(++) or CDH17(+)/CLDN18(+), and CDH17(−)/CLDN18(++/+/−). Whole tissue sections displayed strong, homogeneous staining for CDH17 and CLDN18. Together, these results indicate that CDH17 and CLDN18 are useful target molecules; moreover, their coupling can aid in the comprehensive detection and localization of gastric cancer metastases in vivo to overcome challenges associated with intratumoral heterogeneity. PMID:27580354

  12. Gastric clearance of alpha-1-antitrypsin under cimetidine perfusion. New test to detect protein-losing gastropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Florent, C.; Vidon, N.; Flourie, B.; Carmantrand, A.; Zerbani, A.; Maurel, M.; Bernier, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Gastric losses of plasma are usually measured with radiolabeled macromolecules. This method is expensive and cumbersome. Direct measurement of exudated plasma proteins are ineffective since proteins are denaturated by acidic gastric juice and pepsin. It was recently shown that albumin measurement after immediate neutralization allowed detection of gastric protein losses, but this method is quite complex and time consuming. We studied alpha 1-antitrypsin and 51Cr-labeled protein clearance in gastric juice during normal saline and cimetidine (1.5 mg/kg/hr) infusion in six healthy volunteers and six patients with exudative gastropathy. alpha 1-Antitrypsin was measurable in all samples during cimetidine infusion: alpha 1-AT and 51Cr losses were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001). The upper limit of gastric alpha 1-AT clearance in controls was 0.86 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD). Using this value, there was no overlapping between patients and controls. The upper limit of 51Cr test was 1.87 ml/hr (mean + 2 SD) in controls but gastric clearance of 51Cr was below this value in one patient. This suggests that the measurement of alpha 1-AT gastric clearance during cimetidine perfusion is a good test to detect an exudative gastropathy. This test is inexpensive and lasts only 3 hr.

  13. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  14. Prediction of esophageal and gastric histology by macroscopic diagnosis during upper endoscopy in pediatric celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Boschee, Erin D; Yap, Jason Y K; Turner, Justine M

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the sensitivity of macroscopic appearance for predicting histological diagnosis at sites other than duodenum in pediatric celiac disease (CD). METHODS Endoscopic and histologic findings in pediatric patients undergoing upper endoscopy for first-time diagnosis of CD at Stollery Children’s Hospital from 2010-2012 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Clinical charts from 140 patients were reviewed. Esophageal and gastric biopsies were taken in 54.3% and 77.9% of patients, respectively. Endoscopic appearance was normal in the esophagus and stomach in 75% and 86.2%. Endoscopic esophageal diagnoses were eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) (11.8%), esophagitis (7.9%), glycogenic acanthosis (1.3%) and non-specific abnormalities (3.9%). Endoscopic gastric diagnoses were gastritis (8.3%), pancreatic rest (0.9%), and non-specific abnormalities (4.6%). Histology was normal in 76.3% of esophageal and 87.2% of gastric specimens. Abnormal esophageal histology was EE (10.5%), esophagitis (10.5%), glycogenic acanthosis (1.3%) and non-specific (1.3%). Gastritis was reported in 12.8% of specimens. Sensitivity and specificity of normal endoscopy for predicting normal esophageal histology was 86.2% and 61.1%, and for normal gastric histology was 87.4% and 21.4%. CONCLUSION In the absence of macroscopic abnormalities, routine esophageal and gastric biopsy during endoscopy for pediatric CD does not identify major pathologies. These findings have cost and time saving implications for clinical practice. PMID:28216971

  15. Gastroprotective Effects of Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin Extracts against Nonsteroid Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastric Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Jeon, Eun Jeong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Chang Whan; Kim, Sung Soo; Park, Soo-Heon; Han, Sok Won; Kim, Myung Jun; Lee, Youn Soo; Cho, Mi-La; Chang, Jae Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims To investigate the gastroprotective effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts (GSPEs) against nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the normal control, indomethacin, low-dose GSPE, high-dose GSPE and misoprostol groups. All groups except the normal control group received pretreatment drugs for 6 consecutive days. On the 5th and 6th day, indomethacin was administered orally to all groups except for normal control group. The microscopic features of injury were analyzed. The levels of gastric mucosal glutathione, gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokines were investigated. Results The total areas of ulceration in the GSPE and misoprostol groups were significantly decreased compared with the indomethacin group (p<0.05). However, a difference in ulcer formation among the drug treatment groups was not observed. Meanwhile, the glutathione levels in the high-dose GSPE group were higher than those of both the indomethacin and misoprostol groups (p<0.05) and were similar to those of the normal control group. Additionally, there was no difference among the groups in the levels of gastric mucosal PGE2 and proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions High-dose GSPE has a strong protective effect against NSAID-induced gastric mucosal injury, which may be associated with the antioxidant effects of GSPE. PMID:23710308

  16. NERP-2 regulates gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying via the orexin pathway.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Cherl; Toshinai, Koji; Waise, T M Zaved; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Kazuki; Ueta, Yoichi; Kim, Min-Seon; Minamino, Naoto; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-02-16

    Neuroendocrine regulatory peptide (NERP)-2 is derived from a distinct region of VGF, a neurosecretory protein originally identified as a product of a nerve growth factor-responsive gene in rat PC12 cells. Colocalization of NERP-2 with orexin-A in the lateral hypothalamus increases orexin-A-induced feeding and energy expenditure in both rats and mice. Orexigenic and anorectic peptides in the hypothalamus modulate gastric function. In this study, we investigated the effect of NERP-2 on gastric function in rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of NERP-2 to rats increased gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying, whereas peripheral administration did not affect gastric function. NERP-2-induced gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying were blocked by an orexin 1 receptor antagonist, SB334867. NERP-2 also induced Fos expression in the lateral hypothalamus and the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus X, which are key sites in the central nervous system for regulation of gastric function. Atropine, a blocker of vagal efferent signal transduction, completely blocked NERP-2-induced gastric acid secretion. These results demonstrate that central administration of NERP-2 activates the orexin pathway, resulting in elevated gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying.

  17. CDK5RAP3 acts as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through inhibition of β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Bin; Wang, Zu-Wei; Li, Yun; Huang, Chao-Qun; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-Long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong; Lin, Yao; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2017-01-28

    CDK5RAP3 was isolated as a binding protein of the Cdk5 activator p35. Although CDK5RAP3 has been implicated in cancer progression, its expression and function have not been investigated in gastric cancer. Our study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of CDK5RAP3 were markedly decreased in gastric tumor tissues when compared with respective adjacent non-tumor tissues. CDK5RAP3 in gastric cancer cells significantly reduced cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tumor xenograft growth through inhibition of β-catenin. Secondly, CDK5RAP3 was found to suppress the phosphorylation of GSK-3β (Ser9), leading to the phosphorylation (Ser37/Thr41) and subsequent degradation of β-catenin. Lastly, the prognostic value of CDK5RAP3 for overall survival was found to be dependent on β-catenin cytoplasm/nucleus localization in human gastric cancer samples. Collectively, our results demonstrated that CDK5RAP3 negatively regulates the β-catenin signaling pathway by repressing GSK-3β phosphorylation and could be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  18. Double contrast-enhanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional ultrasonography for evaluation of gastric lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Yu, Xiu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Zhang; Guo, Yuan; Zhang, Hong; Qian, Bin; Wei, Zhang-Rui; Li, Li; Wang, Xian-Chen; Kong, Zi-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the value of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) double contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCUS) imaging for evaluation of gastric lesions. METHODS: 2D and 3D DCUS imaging with both oral and intravenous administrations of contrast agents was used to assess gastroscopiclly-confirmed gastric lesions in 46 patients with benign and malignant diseases. Initially, liquid-based ultrasound contrast agent (Xinzhang®) was given orally at dose of 500-600 mL for conventional ultrasound examination of the gastric lesions, and then a microbubble-based contrast agent (SonoVue) was injected intravenously at dose of 1.2-2.4 mL in bolus fashion to assess the perfusion pattern of the lesions using contrast imaging modes. The parameters derived from time-intensity curves including the arrival time (AT), time to peak (TTP), peak intensity (PI) and enhanced intensity (EI) were measured on the 2D DCUS imaging. 3D DCUS of the lesions was acquired to demonstrate the value of this imaging mode. RESULTS: There were 22 cases with benign lesions including chronic gastritis (n = 5), gastric ulcer (n = 9), gastric polyps (n = 3), gastric stromal tumors (n = 5), and 24 cases with malignant lesions including gastric cancer (n = 20), gastric cardia carcinoma (n = 3) and post-operative recurrent gastric cancer (n = 1) in the study. The oral contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) imaging of the stomach clearly demonstrated the anatomy of the stomach and morphologic features of gastric lesions. With optimal scanning window and imaging display under oral CEUS, intravenous CEUS clearly showed the perfusion of gastric lesions with various characteristic manifestations. Both 2D and 3D DCUS images clearly demonstrated normal gastric wall as a three-layer structure, from the inside out, hyperechoic mucosa, hypoechoic muscularis and hyperechoic serosa, respectively. There were statistical significant differences of AT (8.68 ± 2.06 vs 10.43 ± 2.75, P = 0.017), PI (34.64

  19. Duodeno-gastric reflux and gastric adenomas: a scintigraphic study in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed Central

    Spigelman, A D; Granowska, M; Phillips, R K

    1991-01-01

    To test whether the presence of gastric adenomas (dysplasia) was associated with gastric reflux of duodenal contents, six patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) who had gastric adenomas and nine matched FAP patients without gastric adenomas underwent scintigraphic duodeno-gastric reflux scanning. Reflux was graded 0-6, where 0 = no reflux, 1 = intermittent reflux into antrum only, 2 = prolonged reflux into antrum only, 3 = intermittent reflux into body, 4 = prolonged reflux into body, 5 = intermittent reflux into body and fundus, and 6 = prolonged reflux into body and fundus. FAP patients with gastric adenomas had more severe reflux (median 6, range 4-6) than did controls (median 3, range 0-6; P = 0.009, Mann-Whitney U test). These results are consistent with a role for bile in the development of gastric adenomatous polyps and suggest that bile is involved in the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:1653358

  20. Increased Serum Pepsinogen II Level as a Marker of Pangastritis and Corpus-Predominant Gastritis in Gastric Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Massarrat, Sadegh; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan

    2016-02-01

    Serum pepsinogen I and II are considered as indicators of changes in gastric morphology. Important publications from the last decades are reviewed with regard to the serum level of these biomarkers for the diagnosis of normal gastric mucosa, diffuse gastritis and its change to atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia as well as gastric cancer. Due to the low sensitivity of serum biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer, especially at its early stage and the poor prognosis of the tumor at the time of diagnosis, its prevention by eradication of H. pylori remains the mandatory strategy. On the other hand, the severity of regression and non-reversibility of precancerous lesions and intestinal metaplasia in gastric mucosa through eradication of H. pylori make it necessary to diagnose diffuse gastritis at its early stage. Increased serum pepsinogen II compared to normal serum pepsinogen I seems to indicate the presence of diffuse gastritis without precancerous lesions suitable for eradication of H. pylori infection, when it is serologically positive. A diagram illustrates the strategy of this therapeutic measure depending on the age of people and the level of serum biomarkers in areas with high gastric cancer prevalence.

  1. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  2. Distinction of gastric cancer tissue based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Zhou, Hanjing; Gong, Longjing; Liu, Shu; Zhou, Zhenghua; Mao, Weizheng; Zheng, Rong-er

    2012-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors with high recurrence rate and mortality rate in China. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic capability of Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on gold colloids for distinguishing gastric tissues. Gold colloids were directly mixed with the supernatant of homogenized tissues to heighten the Raman signal of various biomolecule. A total of 56 samples were collected from normal (30) and cancer (26). Raman spectra were obtained with a 785nm excitation in the range of 600-1800 cm-1. Significant spectral differences in SERS mainly belong to nucleic acid, proteins and lipids, particularly in the range of 653, 726, 828, 963, 1004, 1032, 1088, 1130, 1243, 1369, 1474, 1596, 1723 cm-1. PCA-LDA algorithms with leave-one-patient-out cross validation yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 90% (27/30), specificities of 88.5% (23/26), and accuracy of 89.3% (50/56), for classification of normal and cancer tissues. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) surface is 0.917, illustrating the diagnostic utility of SERS together with PCA-LDA to identify gastric cancer from normal tissue. This work demonstrated the SERS techniques can be useful for gastric cancer detection, and it is also a potential technique for accurately identifying cancerous tumor, which is of considerable clinical importance to real-time diagnosis.

  3. Use of hyperspectral imaging technology to develop a diagnostic support system for gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Jun; Kiyotoki, Shu; Nakamura, Munetaka; Nishimura, Junichi; Okamoto, Takeshi; Ogihara, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaida, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a new technology that obtains spectroscopic information and renders it in image form. This study examined the difference in the spectral reflectance (SR) of gastric tumors and normal mucosa recorded with a hyperspectral camera equipped with HSI technology and attempted to determine the specific wavelength that is useful for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. A total of 104 gastric tumors removed by endoscopic submucosal dissection from 96 patients at Yamaguchi University Hospital were recorded using a hyperspectral camera. We determined the optimal wavelength and the cut-off value for differentiating tumors from normal mucosa to establish a diagnostic algorithm. We also attempted to highlight tumors by image processing using the hyperspectral camera's analysis software. A wavelength of 770 nm and a cut-off value of 1/4 the corrected SR were selected as the respective optimal wavelength and cut-off values. The rates of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the algorithm's diagnostic capability were 71%, 98%, and 85%, respectively. It was possible to enhance tumors by image processing at the 770-nm wavelength. HSI can be used to measure the SR in gastric tumors and to differentiate between tumorous and normal mucosa.

  4. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  5. Oral versus intubated feeding and the effect on glycaemic and insulinaemic responses, gastric emptying and satiety.

    PubMed

    Morey, S; Shafat, A; Clegg, M E

    2016-01-01

    Cephalic phase responses (CPR) are important in early initiation of digestion and maximal absorption of nutrients prior to ingestion. Bypassing CPR has been shown to have consequences on metabolic responses that may influence satiety. The aim of this study was to investigate if using gastric intubation to bypass oro-pharyngeal and oesophageal exposure would reduce CPR including insulin and blood glucose and whether these impact on gastric emptying and satiety. Ten male subjects were tested on 2 occasions, 3-7 days apart after an overnight fast, in randomized order. Subjects were cannulated and intubated with a gastric tube for both tests. For test one, subjects ate 400 ml soup with a spoon and for test two the soup was infused into the stomach at an equivalent rate. Subsequently measurements of glycaemic (GR) and insulinaemic responses (IR) from cannula samples, breath samples for measurement of gastric emptying using the [(13)C] sodium acetate breath test and visual analogue scales (VAS) for satiety were taken over 180 min. There were differences in IR over the first 15 min (Oral: 169.0 ± 22.1; Gastric 124.1 ± 18.8; t(9) = 2.67; p = 0.028) but no difference in GR. There were differences in gastric emptying half time (Oral: 85.0 ± 2.7; Gastric 79.4 ± 3.3; t(9) = 2.40; p = 0.04) and ascension time (Oral: 68.2 ± 2.2; Gastric 64.0 ± 2.2; t(9) = 2.57; p = 0.03) with food taking longer to empty from the stomach on the Oral test day than on the Gastric test day. There was no significant difference in the satiety ratings. This study demonstrated that bypassing oro-pharyngeal and oesophageal exposure decreases the normal physiological CPR with detriment to IR and gastric emptying.

  6. Characterization of Gastric Microbiota in Twins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Quanjiang; Xin, Yongning; Wang, Lili; Meng, Xinying; Yu, Xinjuan; Lu, Linlin; Xuan, Shiying

    2017-02-01

    Contribution of host genetic backgrounds in the development of gastric microbiota has not been clearly defined. This study was aimed to characterize the biodiversity, structure and composition of gastric microbiota among twins. A total of four pairs of twins and eight unrelated individuals were enrolled in the study. Antral biopsies were obtained during endoscopy. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced. Sequences were analyzed for the composition, structure, and α and β diversities of gastric microbiota. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the most predominant phyla of gastric microbiota. Each individual, twins as well as unrelated individuals, harbored a microbiota of distinct composition. There was no evidence of additional similarity in the richness and evenness of gastric microbiota among co-twins as compared to unrelated individuals. Calculations of θYC and PCoA demonstrated that the structure similarity of gastric microbial community between co-twins did not increase compared to unrelated individuals. In contrast, the structure of microbiota was altered enormously by Helicobacter pylori infection. These results suggest that host genetic backgrounds had little effect in shaping the gastric microbiota. This property of gastric microbiota could facilitate the studies discerning the role of microbiota from genetic grounds in the pathogenesis.

  7. Nutrition and Gastric Cancer Risk: An Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data from epidemiologic, experimental, and animal studies indicate that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer. High intake of fresh fruit and vegetable, lycopene and lycopene-containing food products, and potentially vitamin C and selenium may reduce the risk for gastric can...

  8. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in Two Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Akalonu, Amaka; Yasrebi, Mona; Rios, Zarela Molle

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Female, 11 • Male, 15 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous gastric perforation Symptoms: Abdominal pain • distention • vomiting • leukocytosis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Both patients had surgery Specialty: Gastroenterology Objective: Rare etiology Background: Spontaneous gastric perforation is a rare clinical disorder. The majority of the available data have been reported in the neonatal age group. There are a few cases of spontaneous gastric perforation in preschool children. To our knowledge, there is no published information on spontaneous gastric perforation in older children and adolescents. Case Report: We describe the presentation and clinical course of two adolescent children who presented with spontaneous gastric perforation. Both children presented with acute onset abdominal pain, which progressively worsened. In both cases, the patient were taken urgently to the operating room after imaging studies had shown pneumoperitoneum. In both cases, surgery revealed gastric perforation with no obvious etiology, specifically no ulcer, inflammation, or other pathology. Conclusions: These two cases highlight the importance of including spontaneous gastric perforation, not just the typical duodenal/gastric ulcer, in the differential of a patient with severe abdominal pain and distension, who has imaging showing pneumoperitoneum. PMID:27686129

  9. Nutrition and gastric cancer in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Suayib

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains to be one of leading causes of cancer deaths despite worldwide decreasing incidence. In Turkey gastric cancer incidence is 9.6/100,000 in men and 5.7/100,000 in females. Gastric cancer is also one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in Turkey with a crude death rate of 5.84/100,000 in men, 3.7/100,000 in women. The mean age of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer is 56 years in Turkey. The relatively high rate of gastric cancer in Turkey is mainly due to dietary factors. The traditional food preservation such as salt curing or smoking and lack of refrigeration of food play a significant role in gastric cancer development in the country. There are etiological and epidemiological differences among geographical regions in Turkey. Gastric cancer is seen much more often in the central, northeastern, and eastern part of Turkey. Increased HP pylori infection is also another important reason for increased incidence of gastric cancer in some parts of the country.

  10. The apoptotic effect of apigenin on human gastric carcinoma cells through mitochondrial signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiayu; Chen, Jiaqi; Li, Zhaoyun; Liu, Chibo; Yin, Lihui

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to explore the apoptotic function of apigenin on the gastric cancer cells and the related mechanism. The gastric cancer cell lines HGC-27 and SGC-7901, and normal gastric epithelial cell line GES1 were treated with different concentrations of apigenin. Cell proliferation was tested. Morphological changes of the apoptotic cells were observed after Hoechst33342 staining. The apoptosis rate of the gastric cancer cells were measured with flow cytometry. Changes of the cell cycle were explored. The mitochondrial membrane potential changes were analyzed after JC-1 staining. Bcl-2 family proteins and caspases-3 expression with apigenin treatment was analyzed by real-time PCR. Cell proliferation of HGC-27 and SGC-7901 was inhibited by apigenin, and the inhibition was dose-time-dependent. Gastric carcinoma cells treated by apigenin had no obvious cell cycle arrest, but were observed with the higher apoptosis rate and the typical apoptotic morphological changes of the cell nucleus. JC-1 staining showed that apigenin could reduce mitochondrial membrane potential of gastric carcinoma cells. Real-time PCR results showed that apigenin significantly increased caspase-3 and Bax expression level, and down-regulated Bcl-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner in gastric carcinoma cells. However, the GES1 was almost not affected by apigenin treatment. Apigenin can inhibit cell lines HGC-27 and SGC-7901 proliferation in a time and dose-dependent manner, reduce anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 levels, enhance apoptosis-promoting protein Bax level, result in mitochondrial membrane potential decreasing and caspase-3 enzyme activating, then lead to cell apoptosis.

  11. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  12. Identification of Annexin A1 protein expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma using proteomics and tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xiu-Juan; Liu, Gui-Tao; Xia, Yu; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wen, Hao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the differential expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1) protein in human gastric adenocarcinoma. This study was also designed to analyze the relationship between ANXA1 expression and the clinicopathological parameters of gastric carcinoma. METHODS: Purified gastric adenocarcinoma cells (GAC) and normal gastric epithelial cells (NGEC) were obtained from 15 patients with gastric cancer by laser capture microdissection. All of the peptide specimens were labeled as 18O/16O after trypsin digestion. Differential protein expressions were quantitatively identified between GAC and NGEC by nanoliter-reverse-phase liquid chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry (nano-RPLC-MS/MS). The expressions of ANXA1 in GAC and NGEC were verified by western blot analysis. The tissue microarray containing the expressed ANXA1 in 75 pairs of gastric carcinoma and paracarcinoma specimens was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The relationship between ANXA1 expression and clinicopathological parametes of gastric carcinoma was analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 78 differential proteins were identified. Western blotting revealed that ANXA1 expression was significantly upregulated in GAC (2.17/1, P < 0.01). IHC results showed the correlations between ANXA1 protein expression and the clinicopathological parameters, including invasive depth (T stage), lymph node metastasis (N stage), distant metastasis (M stage) and tumour-lymph node metastasis stage (P < 0.01). However, the correlations between ANXA1 protein expression and the remaining clinicopathological parameters, including sex, age, histological differentiation and the size of tumour were not found (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The upregulated ANXA1 expression may be associated with carcinogenesis, progression, invasion and metastasis of GAC. This protein could be considered as a biomarker of clinical prognostic prediction and targeted therapy of GAC. PMID:24282368

  13. Tissue fibrinolysis in experimental gastric ulcer: a study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, B; Risberg, B; Hedman, L; Peterson, H I

    1981-10-01

    Gastric mucosal lesions were induced in rats by pyloric ligature and intragastric instillation of hydrochloric acid. Within 4 h all rats developed focal mucosal lesions. Early regeneration was observed 72 h after release of the pyloric ligature and replacement of the hydrochloric acid by a phosphate buffer. A significantly increased gastric mucosal fibrinolytic activity was found 4 h after pylorus ligation. The submucosal vascular fibrinolysis remained unchanged. Following release of the pyloric ligature the increased mucosal fibrinolysis returned to normal values after 72 h. Intravenous administration of tranexamic acid significantly decreased the mucosal and vascular fibrinolytic activity without influencing the formation of induced gastric lesions. Increased mucosal fibrinolysis is probably not involved in the development of mucosal lesions.

  14. Diagnostic imaging and endoscopic finding in dogs and cats with gastric tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Terragni, R; Vignoli, M; van Bree, H J; Gaschen, L; Saunders, J H

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging is an essential part of the diagnostic workup of many gastrointestinal disorders. This paper reviews imaging and endoscopy of gastric tumors in dogs and cats and the techniques used. The appearance of the normal as well as the various aspects of gastric tumors are described for these different modalities. Plain radiography is widely available but has limited diagnostic value. Contrast radiography has higher sensitivity but is laborious and time-consuming. Ultrasonography (if an adequate acoustic window is available), endosonography and endoscopy are the most appropriate modalities for diagnosing gastric tumors. They are especially useful when obtaining samples for cytologic or histopathologic examination, because the imaging modalities do not always differentiate between inflammatory or infectious conditions and neoplastic disorders. Hydro-helical CT was found helpful for evaluating the location and local invasiveness of the lesion. Ultrasonography and endoscopy are useful modalities for taking adequate biopsies.

  15. [Gastric uptake of gallium67 in the human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Escalera Temprado, T; Banzo Marraco, J; Abós Olivares, M D; Olave Rubio, M T; Prats Rivera, E; García López, F; Razola Alba, P

    2004-02-01

    Nowadays, the human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is a chronic disease. In the frequent clinical situations with fever, lymph nodes and loss weight it is necessary to determine their etiology, for establishing a specific treatment. Gastrointestinal opportunistic infections or gastric lymphomatous or sarcomatous process, which can accumulate Ga67, may be present in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report 2 cases with gastric uptake in which endoscopy and biopsy was obtained. In the first one, with previous treatment with omeprazol and almalgate for gastroesophagic reflux, endoscopy and biopsy were normal and in the second patient an Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed. We think that gastric uptake of Ga67 in HIV patients, must indicate to the clinician to rule out associated pathologies.

  16. Expression of Melatonin Synthesizing Enzymes in Helicobacter pylori Infected Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chojnacki, Cezary; Popławski, Tomasz; Reiter, Russel J.; Klupinska, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonization of gastric mucosa causes pain of unknown etiology in about 15–20% of infected subjects. The aim of the present work was to determine the level of expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of melatonin in gastric mucosa of asymptomatic and symptomatic H. pylori infected patients. To diagnose H. pylori infection, histological analysis and the urea breath test (UBT C13) were performed. The levels of mRNA expression of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) and acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) were estimated in gastric mucosa with RT-PCR. The level of AA-NAT expression and AMST was decreased in H. pylori infected patients and was increased after H. pylori eradication. We conclude that decreased expression of melatonin synthesizing enzymes, AA-NAT and ASMT, in patients with symptomatic H. pylori infection returns to normal level after H. pylori eradication. PMID:23936850

  17. Factors controlling gastric-glucagon release.

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, P J; Luyckx, A S

    1977-01-01

    A system consisting of an isolated dog stomach perfused with whole blood has been designed to study gastric glucagon secretion. Under basal conditions, gastric glucagon release was 0.0-3.1 ng glucagon/100g of stomach per min. Arginine, at an arterial plasma concentration averaging 10 mM, elicited a rapid glucagon release. This gastric glucagon release was almost completely abolished by somatostatin (100 ng/ml). The release of gastric glucagon was not affected by hyperglycemia alone but was reduced by about 40% when hyperglycemia was concomitant with an hyperinsulinemia within the physiological range. These observations support the concept that adequate concentrations of insulin are necessary in order for hyperglycemia to inhibit gastric glucagon secretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that the isolated perfused dog stomach might provide a unique tool permitting investigation of alpha-cell function in the absence of endogenously released insulin. PMID:845258

  18. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies. PMID:26151041

  19. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  20. Gastric Pneumatosis in a Premature Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Yuk Joseph; Chan, Kwong-leung; Wong, Siu-chun Mabel; Chim, Stella; Wong, Kar-yin

    2011-01-01

    Gastric pneumatosis is extremely rare during infancy. It has been reported in association with necrotizing enterocolitis or congenital abnormalities such as pyloric stenosis. Here, we report a case of gastric pneumatosis in a premature neonate on synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation. No pneumatosis was noted in the rest of the bowel or esophagus. There could have been mild damage in the gastric mucosa, either related to the placement of the feeding tube or secondary to the use of indomethacin or both. The condition was further aggravated by noninvasive ventilation. An increase in intragastric pressure resulted in the submucosal dissection of air followed by the development of gastric pneumatosis. Conservative management strategies, including the use of a nasogastric tube for decompression and the withholding of feeding, successfully managed the gastric pneumatosis in our patient. An uneventful recovery was made after conservative management. Prompt recognition and evaluation of this condition were essential for making the diagnosis. PMID:23705077

  1. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  2. Gastric acid secretion: changes during a century.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, Francesco; Goni, Elisabetta

    2014-12-01

    The advances in knowledge of gastric physiology within the past century have been the most exciting and important in this area of interest for many decades. The aim of this presentation consists of a comprehensive review of the extensive recent literature on this topic in order to highlight milestones in the field of gastric physiology, in particular in gastric acid secretion, gastric pathophysiology, acid-related diseases and use of acid regulatory drugs. Moreover, in the 21st century there have been many epidemiologic changes as well as a decrease of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer together with an increase of gastroesophageal reflux disease and the related increase of pomp proton inhibitor wide use.

  3. Overall view of tower and adjacent aircraft shelters on flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of tower and adjacent aircraft shelters on flight line. View to east. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Security Guard Tower, Florida Street at Aircraft Shelters Area, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  4. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  5. 10. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  6. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  7. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  8. 1. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING SOUTH. GARAGE TO EXTREME LEFT, BUILDING 1 TO EXTREME RIGHT. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  9. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING SOUTH. GARAGE TO EXTREME LEFT, BUILDING 1 TO EXTREME RIGHT. - Techwood Homes, Building No. 16, 488-514 Techwood Drive, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  10. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting c