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Sample records for adjacent normal gastric

  1. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of tenascin in normal stomach tissue, gastric carcinomas and gastric carcinoma in lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kajiyama, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Sasaki, O.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression of tenascin was examined in the normal adult mucosa of the stomach, primary tumours and lymph node metastases of gastric cancer patients. In normal gastric tissue tenascin was expressed in the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propria and vessel walls, however it was not expressed in either the mucosal connective tissue or the stromal tissue in the submucosal layer. In gastric cancer, tenascin was expressed in 35 of 85 primary tumours, and in 8 of 25 metastases in lymph nodes. Tenascin was located in the fibrous stroma surrounding foci of cancer. The expression of tenascin in the primary tumour did not correlate with the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis or prognosis. Tenascin appears during the process of either malignant transformation or tumour progression in gastric cancer, and the positive expression of tenascin may be useful as a stromal marker for the early detection of gastric cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:7541237

  3. Immunohistochemical detection of gastric mucin in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K L; Mall, A S; Barnard, R A; Ho, S B; Cruse, J P

    1998-01-01

    At least seven human mucin genes have been described, which express glycoproteins MUC1-7 in various tissues. It has been shown that different mucins are expressed in various gastric disease states compared to the normal. In this study we used histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to determine the type and pattern of mucin in 54 patients with a variety of gastric conditions [i.e., normal controls, fetal stomachs, gastritis, low-grade dysplasia, intestinal metaplasia (associated with gastritis, benign ulcers, dysplasia, and cancer), early and advanced intestinal type adenocarcinoma, and diffuse adenocarcinoma]. We report for the first time the use of all seven MUC antibodies in the various conditions. Normal controls were immunoreactive for MUC4, 5, and 6 , and gastritis specimens showed similar results, although the latter showed more MUC1 immunoreactivity. Whereas early fetal stomach showed no MUC immunoreactivity, MUC4, 5, and 6 were present from the early second trimester onwards. There was no significant difference between dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia, both categories showing the presence of MUC2 and 3 predominantly. Early intestinal type adenocarcinomas did not show any mucins in the majority of cases. Advanced intestinal type adenocarcinomas showed immunoreactivity predominantly for MUC1, 5, and 6, as well as MUC2 in some cases. Diffuse adenocarcinomas showed strong positive MUC2 and 6 staining, and in some cases MUC5 and 7. In conclusion, we have shown different patterns of mucin immunoreactivity in various gastric disease states. Specimens with dysplasia, intestinal metaplasia, late intestinal type adenocarcinoma, and diffuse gastric cancer were characterized by increased diversity of mucin types, whereas early intestinal cancer showed loss of mucin immunoreactivity.

  4. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Tumor, Adjacent, and Normal Tissues of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhenzhu; Shen, Yanting; Lu, Jiafeng; Xie, Xueying; Ge, Qinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major type of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma (AC), one major subtype of NSCLC. In this study, the miRNAs were detected in normal, adjacent, and tumor tissues by next-generation sequencing. Then the expression levels of differential miRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In the results, 259, 401, and 389 miRNAs were detected in tumor, adjacent, and normal tissues of pooled AC samples, respectively. In addition, for the first time we have found that miR-21-5p and miR-196a-5p were gradually upregulated from normal to adjacent to tumor tissues; miR-218-5p was gradually downregulated with 2-fold or greater change in AC tissues. These 3 miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Lastly, we predicted target genes of these 3 miRNAs and enriched the potential functions and regulatory pathways. The aberrant miR-21-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-218-5p may become biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. This research may be useful for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and the study of pathology in lung cancer. PMID:27247934

  5. Gene expression changes in patient-matched gastric normal mucosa, adenomas, and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunki; Eun, Jung Woo; Lee, Hanna; Nam, Suk Woo; Rhee, Hwanseok; Koh, Kwi Hye; Kim, Hoguen

    2011-04-01

    A subset of gastric carcinomas shows histologic evidence of a multistep process, progressing from gastric adenoma to gastric carcinoma. We examined gene expression changes during the gastric adenoma-carcinoma sequence in 26 snap-frozen samples (normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma samples from eight patients and two additional carcinomas) by oligonucleotide microarray. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrated differential gene expression between gastric normal mucosa, adenomas and carcinomas. We identified 319 and 422 genes differentially regulated in adenoma and carcinoma, respectively, relative to normal mucosa, using a combination of Welch's t-test and fold-change analysis. Applying a combination of robust multi-category support vector machines to the data, reveal that 39 and 21 genes were gradually up- and down-regulated, respectively, in succession in normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma samples. We validated gene expression levels of four genes: hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase 15 (HPGD), follistatin-like 1, trefoil factor 1 (TTF1) and trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) by RT-PCR and found direct correlation with microarray results. The expressions of the TFF2 and HPGD genes were further evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 103 adenomas and 70 carcinomas; expression of both proteins was decreased in these tissues. The progressive alteration in gene expression in the transition from normal mucosa to carcinoma suggests that these changes may play critical roles in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:21185829

  6. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  7. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  8. Mist1 Expressing Gastric Stem Cells Maintain the Normal and Neoplastic Gastric Epithelium and Are Supported by a Perivascular Stem Cell Niche.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Stancikova, Jitka; Sakitani, Kosuke; Asfaha, Samuel; Renz, Bernhard W; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida A; Shibata, Wataru; Wang, Hongshan; Westphalen, Christoph B; Chen, Xiaowei; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Kim, Woosook; Khurana, Shradha S; Tailor, Yagnesh; Nagar, Karan; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Setlik, Wanda; Gershon, Michael D; Saha, Subhrajit; Ding, Lei; Shen, Zeli; Fox, James G; Friedman, Richard A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Worthley, Daniel L; Korinek, Vladimir; Wang, Timothy C

    2015-12-14

    The regulation and stem cell origin of normal and neoplastic gastric glands are uncertain. Here, we show that Mist1 expression marks quiescent stem cells in the gastric corpus isthmus. Mist1(+) stem cells serve as a cell-of-origin for intestinal-type cancer with the combination of Kras and Apc mutation and for diffuse-type cancer with the loss of E-cadherin. Diffuse-type cancer development is dependent on inflammation mediated by Cxcl12(+) endothelial cells and Cxcr4(+) gastric innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). These cells form the perivascular gastric stem cell niche, and Wnt5a produced from ILCs activates RhoA to inhibit anoikis in the E-cadherin-depleted cells. Targeting Cxcr4, ILCs, or Wnt5a inhibits diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis, providing targets within the neoplastic gastric stem cell niche.

  9. Characteristics of Patients with Chronic Unexplained Nausea and Vomiting and Normal Gastric Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Colvin, Ryan; Yates, Katherine; Hasler, William L.; Abell, Thomas L.; Ünalp-Arida, Aynur; Nguyen, Linda; Farrugia, Gianrico; Koch, Kenneth L.; Parkman, Henry P.; Snape, William J.; Lee, Linda; Tonascia, James; Hamilton, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic nausea and vomiting with normal gastric emptying is a poorly understood syndrome; we analyzed its characteristics. Methods We collected and analyzed data from 425 patients with chronic nausea and vomiting, enrolled at 6 centers by the Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Gastroparesis Registry. Results Among the patients, 319 (75%) had delayed emptying, defined by the results of a standardized, low-fat meal, and 106 had normal gastric emptying. Patients with or without delayed emptying did not differ in age, sex, or race, although those with normal gastric emptying were less likely to be diabetic. Symptom severity indices were similar between groups for nausea, retching, vomiting, stomach fullness, inability to complete a meal, feeling excessively full after meals, loss of appetite, bloating, and visibly larger stomach. There were no differences in health care utilization, quality of life indices, depression, or trait anxiety scores. However, state anxiety scores were slightly higher among patients with delayed gastric emptying. Total gastroparesis cardinal symptom index scores were not correlated with gastric retention after 2 or 4 hours in either group. Patients with the syndrome were not adequately captured by the stand-alone criteria for the Rome III diagnoses of chronic idiopathic nausea and functional vomiting. With rare exceptions, the diagnosis remained stable after a 48-weeks follow-up period. Conclusions Patients with nausea and vomiting with normal gastric emptying represent a significant medical problem and are, for the most part, indistinguishable from those with gastroparesis. This syndrome is not categorized in the medical literature—it might be a separate clinical entity. PMID:21397732

  10. Overexpression of neuritin in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, MING; LI, YONGJUN; ZHONG, CHEN; LI, YONGKANG; NIU, JIANHUA; GONG, JIANPING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of neuritin in gastric cancer tissues, in order to explore the association between the expression of neuritin and the occurrence and development of gastric cancer. Tissue specimens were collected from 58 patients with gastric cancer. Immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to determine the expression of neuritin in the gastric cancer and corresponding adjacent normal gastric tissues. The expression rate of neuritin in gastric cancer tissues was 96.55% (56/58), demonstrating no statistically significant difference from the expression rate in the adjacent normal tissues (94.83%) (P>0.05). However, the rate of strong neuritin expression in gastric cancer tissues (82.76%) was significantly increased compared with the rate in the adjacent normal tissues (15.52%) (P<0.05). Neuritin expression exhibited no correlation with the gender or age of patients, tumor-node-metastasis staging, tumor depth, presence of lymph node metastasis, histological or pathological type of the tumor or presence of distant metastasis (P>0.05). As determined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis, the mRNA expression of neuritin in gastric cancer tissues was markedly increased compared with the expression in the adjacent normal tissues. In conclusion, neuritin is highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues, suggesting that neuritin may act as a novel potential target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26788217

  11. Distinctive Glycerophospholipid Profiles of Human Seminoma and Adjacent Normal Tissues by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Mattarozzi, Monica; Cheng, Liang; Beck, Stephen D. W.; Bianchi, Federica; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-08-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been successfully used to discriminate between normal and cancerous human tissue from different anatomical sites. On the basis of this, DESI-MS imaging was used to characterize human seminoma and adjacent normal tissue. Seminoma and adjacent normal paired human tissue sections (40 tissues) from 15 patients undergoing radical orchiectomy were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen and sectioned to 15 μm thickness and thaw mounted to glass slides. The entire sample was two-dimensionally analyzed by the charged solvent spray to form a molecular image of the biological tissue. DESI-MS images were compared with formalin-fixed, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides of the same material. Increased signal intensity was detected for two seminolipids [seminolipid (16:0/16:0) and seminolipid (30:0)] in the normal tubule testis tissue; these compounds were undetectable in seminoma tissue, as well as from the surrounding fat, muscle, and blood vessels. A glycerophosphoinositol [PI(18:0/20:4)] was also found at increased intensity in the normal testes tubule tissue when compared with seminoma tissue. Ascorbic acid (i.e., vitamin C) was found at increased amounts in seminoma tissue when compared with normal tissue. DESI-MS analysis was successfully used to visualize the location of several types of molecules across human seminoma and normal tissues. Discrimination between seminoma and adjacent normal testes tubules was achieved on the basis of the spatial distributions and varying intensities of particular lipid species as well as ascorbic acid. The increased presence of ascorbic acid within seminoma compared with normal seminiferous tubules was previously unknown.

  12. Assessment of gastric emptying in normal subjects with sucralfate (Carafate) and Amphojel

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; McCallum, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum-containing antacids (e.g Amphojel) and aluminum-containing compounds such as sucralfate (Carafate) have been shown in animal and human studies to delay gastric emptying, and are one proposed mechanism of action for healing of duodenal ulcers. Therefore, the authors designed a study to study the effects of Carafate and Amphojel on gastric emptying. Ten normal volunteers of mean age 27 years with no previous history of upper gastrointestinal diseases were studied. For each test the subject ingested a meal composed of 30gm of cooked chicken liver injected with lmCi of 99m-Tc-S-C, mixed with 7.5 oz. of beef stew, and eaten with 4 oz. of water labeled with 100..mu..Ci of 111-In-DTPA. Immediately after ingestion of the meal, the subject was placed supine under a gamma camera. Gastric emptying (GE) was expressed as percent emptied. On separate days the subject was given either lgm of Carafate (190mg Al/gm) or placebo in a double blind fashion one hour prior to the test meal. On the third day, each subject was given 30cc of Amphojel (105mg Al/5cc) followed 30 minutes later by the test meal. GE at 2 hours for the solid meal was 60%, 69%, and 54% and 79%, 86% and 68% at 3 hours for placebo, Carafate, and Amphojel respectively. A small but not significant difference in gastric emptying between Amphojel and placebo was seen from 2 to 3 hours. For the liquid meal approximately 90% emptying was present at 1 hour for all three studies. Further studies are needed to determine whether these medications administered in the standard doses given here may affect gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients.

  13. Sensitivity of gastric adenocarcinoma and normal cell lines against combined or conjugated antimetabolites.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Jürgen; Struller, Florian; Küper, Markus; Hack, Anita; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schott, Timm C

    2013-04-01

    The in-vitro growth inhibition of cancer and normal cell lines caused by mixed or covalently linked antimetabolites should clarify whether the conjugation of antimetabolites influences cell sensitivity and growth inhibition in a manner that differs from an equimolar mixture of the same antimetabolites or not. Growth inhibition of the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines 23132/87 and MKN-45 in comparison with normal gastric intestinal CCL-241 and the dermal fibroblast cell line NHDF was evaluated using CASY technology. The cell lines were incubated with an equimolar mixture of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (5FdU)+3'-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd) or the covalently linked duplex drug 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd. The drug and metabolites of the assays and medium were determined semiquantitatively using high-performance liquid chromatography. The sensitivity of cancer and nonmalignant cell lines was clearly different against the duplex drug. A measure of 0.65 µmol/l 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd, for example, reduced the growth of MKN-45 or 23132/87 gastric cancer cells from 100% on day 0 to about 50 or 20% on day 10, respectively. However, under the same conditions, the growth of the nonmalignant NHDF and CCL-241 cell lines was not markedly inhibited. The cytostatic activity of the duplex drug is based on the active metabolites in and outside the cell formed by the degradation of 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd. The sensitivity of cell lines against the duplex drug depended on its ability to metabolize the duplex drug. 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd should be more advantageous for specific and efficient polychemotherapy of gastric cancer than the corresponding equimolar mixture of 5FdU+ECyd or a standard combination regime of single drugs.

  14. Lectin histochemistry of the gastric mucosa in normal and Helicobacter pylori infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lueth, M; Sturegård, E; Sjunnesson, H; Wadström, T; Schumacher, U

    2005-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori attaches via lectins, carbohydrate binding proteins, to the carbohydrate residues of gastric mucins. Guinea-pigs are a suitable model for a H. pylori infection and thus the carbohydrate composition of normal and H. pylori infected gastric mucosa was investigated by lectin histochemistry. The stomach of all infected animals showed signs of an active chronic gastritis in their mucosa, whereas no inflammation was present in the control animals. The corpus-fundus regions of the controls showed heterogeneous WGA, SNA-I, UEA-I and HPA binding in almost all parts of the gastric glands. While these lectins labelled the superficial mucous cells and chief cells heterogeneously, the staining of the parietal cells was limited to WGA and PHA-L. Mucous neck cells reacted heterogeneously with UEA-I, HPA, WGA and PHA-L. In the antrum, the superficial mucous cells and glands were stained by WGA, UEA-I, HPA, SNA-I or PHA-L. WGA, UEA-I, SNA-I and HPA labelled the surface lining cells strongly. The mucoid glands reacted heterogeneously with WGA, UEA-I, HPA, SNA-I and PHA-L. In both regions, the H. pylori infected animals showed similar lectin binding pattern as the controls. No significant differences in the lectin binding pattern and thus in the carbohydrate composition between normal and H. pylori infected mucosa could be detected, hence H. pylori does not induce any changes in the glycosylation of the mucosa of the guinea-pig. This unaltered glycosylation is of particular relevance for the sialic acid binding lectin SNA-I as H. pylori uses sialic acid binding adhesin for its attachment to the mucosa. As sialic acid binding sites are already expressed in the normal mucosa H. pylori can immediately attach via its sialic acid binding adhesin to the mucosa making the guinea-pig particularly useful as a model organism.

  15. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  16. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  17. Expression of four CEA family antigens (CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2) in normal and cancerous gastric epithelial cells: up-regulation of BGP and CGM2 in carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, T; Kuroki, M; Takeo, H; Matsuo, Y; Ohshima, K; Yamashita, Y; Shirakusa, T; Matsuoka, Y

    1998-03-30

    Four human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family members, CEA (CD66e), non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA, CD66c), biliary glycoprotein (BGP, CD66a) and CEA gene-family member 2 (CGM2), are expressed in normal mucosal epithelia of the colon. Expression of BGP and CGM2 has recently been demonstrated to be down-regulated in colorectal adenocarcinomas. We have now investigated the expression of the 4 CEA family antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma and carcinoma cell lines in comparison with adjacent normal gastric mucosa. The transcripts of the CEA, NCA and BGP genes evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were detectable at various levels in all the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines tested, while CGM2 mRNA was detectable in the cell lines of poorly differentiated but not of well-differentiated carcinomas. The levels of CEA mRNA in normal gastric mucosa were variable but mostly increased in adenocarcinomas. The sparse expression of NCA observed in the normal tissues was markedly up-regulated in the carcinomas. In contrast to previous findings on normal and cancerous colonic tissues, the transcripts of CGM2 were totally undetectable and those of BGP were recognized only marginally, if at all, in normal gastric mucosa, while both messages were detected at significant levels in most of the gastric adenocarcinomas. This was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our findings indicate that expression of the CEA family antigens, particularly that of BGP and CGM2, is differently regulated in epithelial cells of the colon and the stomach.

  18. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  19. Differential expression of the Na+/I− symporter protein in thyroid cancer and adjacent normal and nodular goiter tissues

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHASHA; LIANG, JUN; LIN, YANSONG; YAO, RUYONG

    2013-01-01

    The ability of differentiated thyroid cancer and adjacent thyroid cells to concentrate iodine is dependent on their expression of a functional NA+/I− symporter (NIS). Thyroid cancer is insensitive to 131I treatment if the thyroid cells lack the ability to concentrate iodide. Thus, in this study, we aimed to determine whether the NIS protein was differentially expressed in thyroid cancer and various surrounding tissues. We recruited 114 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and divided them into two groups: 60 patients of 9 males and 51 females with a mean age of 49.55 years who had PTC with surrounding nodular goiter tissue (simplified as GNG), and 54 patients of 8 males and 46 females with a mean age of 45.78 years who had PTC with surrounding normal tissue (Gnormal) after total or near total thyroidectomy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections were prepared for immunohistochemical staining of the NIS protein and semi-quantitative analysis. The NIS protein was expressed in the basolateral membrane of the normal epithelium, while PTC and nodular goiter cells expressed NIS in the cytoplasm and basolateral membrane. The expression levels of the NIS protein were higher in the adjacent normal tissues compared with those of the surrounding nodular goiter tissues (P=0.002) and expression levels of the NIS protein were higher in PTC tissues compared with the surrounding nodular goiter tissues (P=0.008). The data from this study indicate that cancer-surrounding tissues may play a significant role in mediating the sensitivity of PTC patients to radioactive iodine treatment. PMID:23255951

  20. Normal Solid Gastric Emptying Values Measured by Scintigraphy Using Asian-style Meal:A Multicenter Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Vasavid, Pataramon; Chaiwatanarat, Tawatchai; Pusuwan, Pawana; Sritara, Chanika; Roysri, Krisana; Namwongprom, Sirianong; Kuanrakcharoen, Pichit; Premprabha, Teerapon; Chunlertrith, Kitti; Thongsawat, Satawat; Sirinthornpunya, Siam; Ovartlarnporn, Bancha; Kachintorn, Udom; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Chakkaphak, Suriya; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To report gastric emptying scintigraphy, normal values should be established for a specific protocol. The aim of this study was to provide normal gastric emptying values and determine factors affecting gastric emptying using Asian rice-based meal in healthy volunteers. Methods One hundred and ninety-two healthy volunteers were included at 7 tertiary care centers across Thailand. Gastric emptying scintigraphy was acquired in 45 degree left anterior oblique view immediately after ingestion of a 267 kcal steamed-rice with technetium-99m labeled-microwaved egg meal with 100 mL water for up to 4 hours. Results One hundred and eighty-nine volunteers (99 females, age 43 ± 14 years) completed the study. The medians (5–95th percentiles) of lag time, gastric emptying half time (GE T1/2) and percent gastric retentions at 2 and 4 hours for all volunteers were 18.6 (0.5–39.1) minutes, 68.7 (45.1–107.8) minutes, 16.3% (2.7–49.8%) and 1.1% (0.2–8.8%), respectively. Female volunteers had significantly slower gastric emptying compared to male (GE T1/2, 74 [48–115] minutes vs. 63 (41–96) minutes; P < 0.05). Female volunteers who were in luteal phase of menstrual cycle had significantly slower gastric emptying compared to those in follicular phase or menopausal status (GE T1/2, 85 [66–102] mintes vs. 69 [50–120] minutes or 72 [47–109] minutes, P < 0.05). All of smoking volunteers were male. Smoker male volunteers had significantly faster gastric emptying compared to non-smoker males (GE T1/2, 56 [44–80] minutes vs. 67 [44–100] minutes, P < 0.05). Age, body mass index and alcohol consumption habits did not affect gastric emptying values. Conclusions A steamed-rice with microwaved egg meal was well tolerated by healthy volunteers. Gender, menstrual status and smoking status were found to affect solid gastric emptying. PMID:24948129

  1. Utility of ancillary stains for Helicobacter pylori in near-normal gastric biopsies.

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Ross, Dara S; Bernheim, Oren E; Landzberg, Zachary B; Schuetz, Audrey N; Jenkins, Stephen G; Landzberg, Brian R; Jessurun, Jose; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2015-03-01

    Documentation of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication is important, prompting some clinicians and pathologists to request ancillary stains on all gastric samples that do not demonstrate H. pylori on initial histologic review. Studies evaluating the utility of ancillary stains in patients with minimal inflammation are lacking. We used Giemsa, Warthin-Starry, acridine orange, and immunohistochemical stains to search for organisms in 56 patients with biochemical evidence of H. pylori infection (positive Campylobacter-like organism test) and gastric mucosal samples interpreted to be H pylori negative by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). We correlated the findings with severity of inflammation and patients' histories of medication use. Nineteen (34%) patients had histologically normal mucosae, 22 (39%) had chronic inflammation with or without focal activity, and 15 (27%) had chemical gastropathy. Fifty (89%) cases were negative for H. pylori with additional stains, and 6 contained bacteria that were detected with all 4 ancillary stains and on retrospective review of H&E-stained sections that also showed chronic inflammation. Eleven (20%) patients were taking proton pump inhibitors, and 4 (7%) had previously received H. pylori eradication therapy. We conclude that H&E stains demonstrate H. pylori in most infected patients, so preemptive stain requests are largely unnecessary. Failure to identify bacteria by H&E evaluation generally reflects their absence in biopsy material, even among Campylobacter-like organism test--positive patients. However, organisms may be overlooked in patients with mild inflammation and in those receiving proton pump inhibitor or antibiotic therapy, so one should consider ordering ancillary stains to enhance detection of bacteria in these settings.

  2. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant human gastric tissue.

    PubMed

    Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad; Khadjvand, Tahereh

    2011-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy can be considered to be a fast and non-invasive tool for distinguishing between normal and cancerous cells and tissues without the need for laborious and invasive sampling procedures. Gastric samples from four patients (age, 65±2 years) were analysed. Samples were obtained from the organs removed during gastrectomy and then classified as normal or cancerous. Classification was based on histopathological examinations at our institution. Formalin-fixed sections of gastric tissue were analysed by FTIR-microspectroscopy. To characterize differences between sections of normal and cancerous tissue, specific regions of the spectra were analysed to study variations in the levels of metabolites. To distinguish between two conditions (normal and cancerous), changes in the relative intensity of bands in the range 600-4000 cm⁻¹ were analysed. A FTIR spectral map of the bands in the region 2800-3100 cm⁻¹ and 900-1800 cm⁻¹ were created to analyse pathological changes in tissues. The limited data available showed that normal gastric tissue had stronger absorption than cancerous tissue over a wide region in the four patients. There was a significant decrease in total biomolecular components for cancerous tissue compared with normal tissue.

  3. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  4. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying.

  5. Effect of DA-9701 on the Normal Motility and Clonidine-induced Hypomotility of the Gastric Antrum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Je Wook; Han, Dae Kyeong; Kim, Ock Nyun; Lee, Kwang Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-9701 is a novel prokinetic agent. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DA-9701 on the motility of the gastric antrum in the normal and clonidine-induced hypomotility in an in vivo animal model. Methods A strain gauge force transducer was sutured on the gastric antrum to measure the contractile activity in rats. A total of 28 rats were subclassified into the 4 groups: (1) the placebo group, (2) the DA-9701 group, (3) the placebo group in the clonidine-pretreated rats, and (4) the DA-9701 group in the clonidine-pretreated rats. After the basal recording, either placebo (3% [w/v] hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose) or DA-9701 was administered. Contractile signals were measured after the administration and after a meal. In the clonidine-pretreated rats, either placebo or DA-9701 was administered. Contractile signals were measured after the administration and after a meal. Results Oral administration of DA-9701 did not significantly alter the motility index of the gastric antrum in the preprandial and postprandial periods, compared with the placebo group. The administration of clonidine decreased the motility index of the gastric antrum in the preprandial and postprandial periods, compared with the administration of placebo. This reduction of the antral motility by the administration of clonidine was not observed in the clonidine-pretreated DA-9701 group. The percentage of the motility index in the postprandial period was significantly greater in the clonidine-pretreated DA-9701 group, compared with the clonidine-pretreated placebo group. Conclusions DA-9701 improves the hypomotility of the gastric antrum induced by clonidine, suggesting its gastroprokinetic effect in the pathologic condition. PMID:26755679

  6. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  8. Persisting and Increasing Neutrophil Infiltration Associates with Gastric Carcinogenesis and E-cadherin Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hualin; Ma, Yue; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Chunlei; Huang, Hai; Xia, Ying; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation is considered the most important cause of gastric cancer. The actual process how chronic inflammation triggers gastric carcinogenesis is still not clear. In this study, neutrophils and relative markers in gastric cancer development were examined with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence RNA in situ hybridization methods. On average, 24 times more neutrophils were found in gastric cancer tissues and about 9 times more neutrophils were found in gastric intestinal metaplasia tissues comparing to normal gastric tissue controls. CagA+ H. pylori infection in cancer adjacent tissues or EBV infection in cancer tissues did not increase neutrophil infiltration into gastric cancer tissues significantly. Neutrophil density was positively correlated with cell proliferation while negatively correlated with E-cadherin intensity. E-cadherin is also transcriptionally downregulated in gastric cancer tissues comparing to adjacent tissue controls. The increased neutrophils in the gastric cancer tissues appear to be related to increased chemoattractant IL-8 levels. In gastric cancers, neutrophil numbers were higher comparing to cancer adjacent tissues and not associated with patient ages, tumor invasion depth, tumor staging, metastasis or cancer types. The conclusion is that persisting and increasing neutrophil infiltration is associated with E-cadherin downregulation, cell proliferation and gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27412620

  9. Retroperitoneal gastric duplication cyst: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pachl, Max; Patel, Kamlesh; Bowen, Claire; Parikh, Dakshesh

    2012-01-01

    A rare case of retroperitoneal gastric duplication is reported and discussed. An intra-abdominal cyst was detected at 31 weeks gestation and was followed up prenatally as a left sided duplex kidney. Post-natal ultrasound however, showed a normal kidney, but a cyst with features of enteric duplication in the left upper quadrant adjacent and compressing the kidney. Surgery was carried out during infancy and a retroperitoneal cyst was excised that contained heterotrophic gastric mucosa.

  10. [Gastric emptying of a solid-liquid meal in normal subjects: validity of the labeling (99mTc) of chicken liver by a multipuncture technic].

    PubMed

    Hostein, J; Capony, P; Busquet, G; Bost, R; Fournet, J

    1985-04-01

    For gastric emptying studies of a solid-liquid meal by the scintigraphic method, a valid isotope labeling method for each phase of the meal must be obtained. The aim of this study was to validate a simple chicken liver labeling method in normal subjects by multipuncture technic with 99mtechnetium. Labeling according to Meyer's method was chosen as a reference. Simultaneously, a study of the quality of liquid phase labeling by 111indium was done. The labeling process quality for each phase of the meal was assessed: a) in vitro, after incubation of the meal with human gastric juice (n = 12); b) in vivo, after meal ingestion and sequential collection of gastric contents by aspiration (n = 4). Furthermore, in 8 healthy volunteers, gastric emptying curves of the solid and liquid phases of the meal were determined scintigraphically and compared. Our results showed: a) for the solid phase: a good specificity of the marker, which was assessed in vitro and in vivo, after liver labeling with multipuncture technique (89 p. 100 and 92 p. 100 after 180 min, respectively); b) for the liquid phase: a good specificity of the marker in vitro and a poor specificity in vivo (82 p. 100 and 27 p. 100 after 180 min, respectively); c) similar half-gastric emptying times and cumulative percentages for the solid and liquid phases with both liver labeling methods. In conclusion, the multipuncture technique for chicken liver labeling may be used for gastric emptying studies in humans.

  11. Tumor-induced solid stress activates β-catenin signaling to drive malignant behavior in normal, tumor-adjacent cells

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guanqing; Weaver, Valerie Marie

    2016-01-01

    Recent work by Fernández-Sánchez and coworkers examining the impact of applied pressure on the malignant phenotype of murine colon tissue in vivo revealed that mechanical perturbations can drive malignant behavior in genetically normal cells. Their findings build upon an existing understanding of how the mechanical cues experienced by cells within a tissue become progressively modified as the tissue transforms. Using magnetically stimulated ultra-magnetic liposomes to mimic tumor growth -induced solid stress, Fernández-Sánchez and coworkers were able to stimulate β-catenin to promote the cancerous behavior of both a normal and genetically modified colon epithelium. In this perspective, we discuss their findings in the context of what is currently known regarding the role of the mechanical landscape in cancer progression and β-catenin as a mechanotransducer. We review data that suggest that mechanically regulated activation of β-catenin fosters development of a malignant phenotype in tissue and predict that mechanical cues may contribute to tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26439949

  12. High expression of DEK predicts poor prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DEK, as an oncoprotein, plays an important role in cancer development and progression. This study aimed to investigate the clinicopathological significance of DEK overexpression in patients with gastric cancer. Materials and methods The expression of DEK protein was evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of 172 gastric cancer samples with complete clinicopathological features, and the correlation between DEK expression and clinicopathological features was examined. Survival rates were also calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method in gastric cancer patients with complete survival data. Results DEK protein showed a strictly nuclear staining pattern in gastric cancers with IHC and immunofluorescence. The strongly positive rate of DEK protein was 60.5% (104/172) in gastric cancers, which was significantly higher than that in either gastric dysplasia (19.4%, 7/36) or adjacent normal mucosa (0%, 0/27). DEK expression in gastric cancer correlated to tumor size, differentiation, clinical stage, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates. Further analysis showed that patients with early-stage gastric cancer and high DEK expression had shorter disease-free survival and overall survival duration than those with low DEK expression. Conclusion High level of DEK protein expression predicts the poor prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. DEK expression might be potentially used as an independent effective biomarker for prognostic evaluation of gastric cancers. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5050145571193097 PMID:24650035

  13. Lipid Profiles of Canine Invasive Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder and Adjacent Normal Tissue by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Allison L.; Ifa, Demian R.; Manicke, Nicholas E.; Costa, Anthony B.; Ramos-Vara, José A.; Knapp, Deborah W.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2009-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used in an imaging mode to interrogate the lipid profiles of thin tissue sections of canine spontaneous invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder (a model of human invasive bladder cancer) as well as adjacent normal tissue from four different dogs. The glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids that appear as intense signals in both the negative ion and positive ion modes were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) product ion scans using collision-induced dissociation. Differences in the relative distributions of the lipid species were present between the tumor and adjacent normal tissue in both the negative and positive ion modes. DESI-MS images showing the spatial distributions of particular glycerophospholipids, sphinoglipids and free fatty acids in both the negative and positive ion modes were compared to serial tissue sections that were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Increased absolute and relative intensities for at least five different glycerophospholipids and three free fatty acids in the negative ion mode and at least four different lipid species in the positive ion mode were seen in the tumor region of the samples in all four dogs. In addition, one sphingolipid species exhibited increased signal intensity in the positive ion mode in normal tissue relative to the diseased tissue. Principal component analysis (PCA) was also used to generate unsupervised statistical images from the negative ion mode data and these images are in excellent agreement with the DESI images obtained from the selected ions and also the H&E stained tissue PMID:19810710

  14. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  15. Role of PTCH1 gene methylation in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yun; Song, Yu; Zhang, Min; Xu, Zhen; Qian, Xiaolan

    2014-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of PTCH1 methylation in gastric carcinogenesis and the therapeutic effect of the methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), in the treatment of gastric cancer. Total RNA was extracted from 20 gastric cancer tissues, their corresponding adjacent normal tissues and a gastric cancer AGS cell line. PTCH1 mRNA expression was detected by quantitative PCR, and the PTCH1 methylation of the promoter was examined by methylation-specific PCR. The AGS cells were treated with 5-Aza-dC; apoptosis and the cell cycle were examined by flow cytometry, and the PTCH1 methylation level was observed. PTCH1 expression was negatively correlated with promoter methylation in the gastric cancer tissues, their corresponding adjacent normal tissues and the gastric cancer AGS cell line (r=-0.591, P=0.006). 5-Aza-dC treatment caused apoptosis and the G0/G1 phase arrest of the AGS cells, and also induced the demethylation and increased expression of PTCH1. In conclusion, the study found that the hypermethylation of the PTCH1 gene promoter region is one of the main causes of low PTCH1 expression in AGS cells. Demethylation agent 5-Aza-dC can reverse the methylation status of PTCH1 and regulate the expression of PTCH1, indicating its potential role in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:25013484

  16. The accumulation of DNA demethylation in Sat α in normal gastric tissues with Helicobacter pylori infection renders susceptibility to gastric cancer in some individuals.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masaaki; Suzuki, Koichi; Maeda, Takafumi; Kato, Takaharu; Kamiyama, Hidenori; Koizumi, Kei; Miyaki, Yuichiro; Okada, Shinichiro; Kiyozaki, Hirokazu; Konishi, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is widely recognized as a risk factor for gastric cancer, but only a minority of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether DNA demethylation in non-cancerous gastric mucosa (NGM) significantly enhances susceptibility to gastric cancer. A total of 165 healthy volunteers, including 83 HP-positive and 82-negative individuals, as well as 83 patients with single and 18 with synchronous double gastric cancer (GC) were enrolled in this study. The relative demethylation levels (RDLs) of repetitive sequences, including Alu, LINE-1 and Sat α, were quantified by real-time methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The Alu RDL did not exhibit any differences within each respective group, whereas LINE-1 RDL was significantly elevated in cancer tissues compared with the NGM in the other groups (P<0.001). Our results indicated that a gradual increase in Sat α RDL correlated with HP infection and cancer development. Sat α RDL was significantly elevated in the NGM in HP-positive compared with HP-negative (P<0.001), and significantly elevated in cancer tissues (P<0.001). Although the Sat α RDL of the NGM in the total population increased in an age-dependent manner, it was significantly increased in a fraction of younger GC patients (<45 years) compared with all of the others (45 years or older, P=0.0391). In addition, double GC exhibited a significantly higher Sat α RDL in the NGM compared with single GC (P=0.0014). In these two fractions, Sat α RDL in the NGM exhibited an inverse correlation with age. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the accumulation of DNA demethylation in Sat α RDL in the NGM with HP infection potentially renders susceptibility to gastric cancer in a fraction of GC patients younger than 45 years or in patients with multiple cancers. PMID:22426602

  17. Ki-67 Expression in Sclerosing Adenosis and Adjacent Normal Breast Terminal Ductal Lobular Units: A Nested Case-Control Study from the Mayo Benign Breast Disease Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Aziza; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Stallings-Mann, Melody L.; Degnim, Amy C.; Radisky, Derek C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Visscher, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sclerosing adenosis (SA) increases risk for invasive breast cancer (BC) 2.1 times relative to that in the general population. Here, we sought to evaluate whether the proliferation marker Ki-67 stratifies risk among women with SA. Methods A nested case-control sample of patients with SA was obtained from the Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort. Ki-67 expression was evaluated in SA lesions and in the adjacent normal terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) in women who did (cases, n =133) or did not (controls, n =239) develop BC. Ki67 was scored by intensity and number of positively stained cells per one high-power field (magnification, ×40) (40×HPF) for both SA and normal TDLU. Associations of Ki-67 expression with case-control status were assessed using conditional logistic regression. Results Higher Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with case-control status in both SA (P=.03) and normal background TDLU (P=.006). For the SA lesion, >2 average positively stained cells/40×HPF showed an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.1–3.4) compared to samples with an average of ≤2 positively stained cells. For background TDLU, lobules with >2 but ≤6 average positively stained cells showed an adjusted OR of 1.3 to 1.5, whereas those with an average of >6 positively stained cells had an OR of 2.4 (95% CI, 1.1–5.3) compared to those with an average of <2 positively stained cells. Conclusions Among women with SA, increased Ki-67 expression in either the SA lesion or the normal background TDLU carried an approximately 2-fold increased odds of subsequent BC as compared to lower Ki-67 expression. PMID:25863475

  18. KDM5B is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is required for gastric cancer cell proliferation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenran; Tang, Fang; Qi, Guangying; Yuan, Shengguang; Zhang, Guangyu; Tang, Bo; He, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. KDM5B (also known as JARID1B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 4 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of KDM5B. However, the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of KDM5B in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis, western blotting, and qRT-PCR were used to measure the levels of KDM5B in gastric cancer cell lines, 45 pairs of gastric cancer tissues and the adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. KDM5B and shKDM5B were transfected into gastric cancer cells to investigate its role on regulating cell proliferation which was measured by MTT and colony formation assay. Cell’s migration and invasion were measured by Transwell and Matrigel analysis in vitro. PCNA expression was measured by immunofluorescence staining and immunohistochemical analysis. The in vivo tumorigenesis and metastasis assays were performed in SCID mice. In clinical gastric cancer samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly up-regulated in cancer lesions compared with paired normal gastric tissues. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in gastric cancer cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth and metastasis in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that KDM5B not only dramatically promoted gastric cancer cell xenograft formation and growth but also promoted gastric cancer cell metastasis in a liver metastasis model. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted gastric cancer metastasis via regulation of the Akt pathway. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in gastric cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer management. PMID:25628922

  19. Expression of trefoil peptides (TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3) in gastric carcinomas, intestinal metaplasia, and non-neoplastic gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai K; Yu, Jun; Chan, Francis K L; To, Ka F; Chan, Michael W Y; Ebert, M P A; Ng, Enders K W; Chung, S C Sydney; Malfertheiner, Peter; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2002-08-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) domain peptides consist of three members that play a role in intestinal mucosal defence and repair, and in tumourigenesis. The role of the three TFF members in the gastric carcinogenesis cascade remains poorly defined. This study examined seven gastric cell lines, 50 gastric cancers and their adjacent non-cancer tissues, and tissues from 40 non-cancer patients, in order to elucidate the chronology of TFF expression in various stages of gastric carcinogenesis. TFF expression was determined by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot. Aberrant expression of TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3 was frequently detected in gastric cell lines. Specifically, TFF1 was detected in all non-cancer patients, but was detected in only 50% of gastric cancer and 66% of adjacent normal tissues. TFF2 expression was demonstrated in 87.5% of non-cancer patients, 34% of gastric carcinomas, and 58% of adjacent non-cancer tissues. There was a significant correlation between TFF1 and TFF2 expression in gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancer tissues (p<0.001). By contrast, TFF3 was detected in 25% of non-cancer patients and showed a predilection for areas with intestinal metaplasia (p=0.005). Sixty-two per cent of gastric cancers and 24% of neighbouring non-cancer tissues showed TFF3 expression. Immunoreactivity against TFF3 was demonstrated in goblet cells of intestinal metaplasia and within the cytoplasm and nuclei of tumour cells. Progressive loss of TFF1 and TFF2, together with the induction of TFF3, is likely to be involved in the early stage of the multi-step gastric carcinogenesis pathway.

  20. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  1. A comparison of the gastric and central nervous system effects of two substituted benzamides in normal volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, G R; Sutton, J A

    1986-01-01

    Eight healthy male volunteers participated in a single-blind, random allocation, crossover, comparison of intravenous metoclopramide (10 mg), the peripherally acting, gastrointestinal stimulant BRL 20627 (10 mg) and saline. The central nervous system effects were assessed by quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) and by visual analogue scales. Gastric motility and emptying were assessed by epigastric impedance. Metoclopramide increased the EEG amplitude by 10.4% (a statistically significant, P less than 0.05, effect) and increased frequencies above 22 Hz, whereas both BRL 20627 and placebo had only minor effect on the EEG frequencies and slightly decreased the EEG amplitude. Ratings on visual analogue scales showed that metoclopramide caused statistically significant (P less than 0.01 difference from placebo) restlessness and slight but significantly less (P less than 0.05 difference from placebo) feeling of happiness. Epigastic impedance changes indicated that both metoclopramide and BRL 20627 increased gastric contractile activity, but the rate of gastric emptying was not significantly altered by either drug although it tended to be shortened following metoclopramide but not BRL 20627 treatment. It is concluded that since the published animal data show that BRL 20627 has only weak dopamine antagonistic properties this study further implicates dopamine receptor blockade in the akathisia but not in the gastric effect of metoclopramide. PMID:3755051

  2. Expression of stem cell markers nanog and PSCA in gastric cancer and its significance

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XUANZHONG; WANG, FENG; HOU, MINGXING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of stem cell markers Nanog compared with PSCA in gastric cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues, and to investigate the association between tumor stem cells and initiation, progression, metastasis, and prognosis of gastric cancer. One hundred chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-naive patients with pathologically confirmed gastric cancer were enrolled from the General Surgery Department and Surgical Oncology Department of the Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University (Hohhot, P.R. China), between October 2011 and June 2013. Surgically resected specimens of cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues (>5 cm from the boundary of cancerous component) were collected. The mRNA expression levels of Nanog and PSCA in those tissues was determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The correlation between the expression of stem cell markers Nanog and PSCA in gastric cancer tissues and clinicopathological factors was analyzed. The qPCR results demonstrated that the relative expression of Nanog was increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with in the adjacent tissues (P<0.05); and relative expression of PSCA was reduced in gastric cancer tissues compared with adjacent tissues (P<0.05). The expression of Nanog and PSCA in gastric cancer tissues was associated with tumor differentiation. The expression of Nanog was increased in poorly-differentiated and undifferentiated tumors compared with moderately- and well-differentiated tumors (P<0.05). The expression of PSCA was reduced in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated tumors compared with moderately- and well-differentiated tumors (P<0.05). However, the expression of Nanog and PSCA was not associated with age, gender, tumor size, TNM stage, depth of invasion, or lymph node metastasis. Therefore, Nanog and PSCA may have potential as molecular markers to reflect the differentiation status of gastric cancer. PMID

  3. Increased expression of long intergenic non-coding RNA LINC00152 in gastric cancer and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Pang, Qianqian; Ge, Jiaxin; Shao, Yongfu; Sun, Weiliang; Song, Haojun; Xia, Tian; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2014-06-01

    It has been known that differential expression of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays critical roles in carcinogenesis. However, the significance of lncRNA, especially long intergenic ncRNA (lincRNA, the main type of lncRNA family), in the diagnosis of gastric cancer is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the expression level of LINC00152, a newfound lincRNA, in gastric carcinoma and its clinical association. The expression of LINC00152 in 71 pairs of tumorous and adjacent normal tissues from patients with gastric cancer was detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. And then, the potential associations between its level in gastric cancer tissue and the clinicopathological features were analyzed. Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for differentiating patients with gastric cancer from patients with benign gastric diseases. The results showed that the expression level of LINC00152 in gastric carcinoma was significantly increased, compared with matched normal tissue (P=0.045) and normal mucosa from health control (P=0.004), respectively. Levels of LINC00152 in gastric cancer cell lines, BGC-823, MGC-803, and SGC-7901, were significantly higher than those in human normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. In addition, high expression of LINC00152 was correlated with invasion (P=0.042). LINC00152 levels in gastric juice from patients with gastric cancer were further found significantly higher than those from normal controls (P=0.002). Moreover, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was up to 0.645 (95 % CI=0.559-0.740, P=0.003). This study highlights that lincRNA LINC00152 might be a novel biomarker for predicting gastric cancer.

  4. Computed tomography of gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Buy, J N; Moss, A A

    1982-05-01

    The CT features in 12 patients with gastric lymphoma, four primary and eight secondary, were analyzed, correlated with other diagnostic studies, surgery, and pathologic features, and compared with the CT findings in 22 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. An abnormally thickened gastric wall (mean, 4.0 cm) was found in all patients with gastric lymphoma. Lymphomas of the stomach often involved more than one region of the stomach (83%). The contour of the outer gastric wall was smooth or lobulated in 42%, perigastric lymph adenopathy was common (58%), extension into adjacent organs was found in 42%, and 42% had lymphadenopathy at or below the renal pedicle.

  5. Intravenous infusion of L-isomers of phenylalanine and tryptophan stimulate gastric acid secretion at physiologic plasma concentrations in normal subjects and after parietal cell vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, K E; Isenberg, J I; Hogan, D L; Dreier, S J

    1983-01-01

    To determine whether intravenous infusion of individual amino acids stimulated gastric acid secretion in man, graded doses of phenylalanine, tryptophan, glycine, alanine, histidine, and NaCl control were infused on separate days in nine healthy subjects. Intravenous infusion of phenylalanine and tryptophan significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion to 50 and 52%, respectively, of the acid secretory response to intragastric peptone. Intravenous alanine and histidine were without effect, whereas glycine produced a slight response. Serum gastrin concentrations did not significantly change during intravenous amino acid infusion, except in response to 0.1 M phenylalanine. However, the increase in serum gastrin occurred 2 h after acid secretion had significantly increased in response to the 0.025 M phenylalanine infusion. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured during intravenous amino acid infusion and in response to a steak meal in five of the subjects. At a time when acid secretion was significantly increased during intravenous infusion of phenylalanine and tryptophan, plasma amino acids were similar to, or less than, that observed after the steak meal, suggesting that circulating levels of these three amino acids have a physiologic effect on gastric secretion in man. Intravenous infusion of a combination of graded doses of phenylalanine plus a continuous infusion of 0.01 M tryptophan shifted the dose-response curve to the left and resulted in a significantly greater response than to either amino acid alone. In five subjects with parietal cell vagotomy, intravenous phenylalanine and tryptophan stimulated acid secretion, whereas histidine was without effect, similar to normal subjects. These studies indicate that intravenous infusion of small amounts of phenylalanine (0.025 M, 3.1 mmol/h) and tryptophan (0.01 M, 1.25 mmol/h) stimulated gastric acid secretion at plasma concentrations similar to those observed after a steak meal, suggesting a physiologic role

  6. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  7. Differential expression of CCN family members CYR611, CTGF and NOV in gastric cancer and their association with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Gao, Xiangyu; Ji, Ke; Sanders, Andrew J.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Jiang, Wen G.; Ji, Jiafu; Ye, Lin

    2016-01-01

    CCN is an acronym for cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV). Aberrations of certain CCN members including CYR61, CTGF, Wnt1-inducible signalling pathway protein (WISP)-1 and -3 have been reported in gastric cancer. The present study aimed to examine the clinical relevance of NOV along with CYR61 and CTGF in gastric cancer by analysing their transcript levels. CYR61, CTGF and NOV transcript expression in 324 gastric cancer samples with paired adjacent normal gastric tissues were determined using real-time quantitative PCR and the results were statistically analysed against patient clinicopathological data using SPSS software. NOV mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly elevated when compared with levels in their paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Local advanced tumours with invasive expansion (T3 and T4) expressed higher levels of NOV (p=0.013) compared with the less invasive tumours (T1 and T2). CYR61 transcript levels were also significantly increased in gastric cancers compared with levels in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with CYR61-low transcript levels had longer overall survival (OS) (p=0.018) and disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.015). NOV overexpression promoted the in vitro proliferation of AGS cells while the knockdown resulted in a reduced proliferation of HGC27 cells. A similar effect was observed for the invasion of these two gastric cancer cell lines. NOV expression was increased in gastric cancer which was associated with local invasion and distant metastases. Taken together, the expression of NOV and CYR61 was increased in gastric cancer. The elevated expression of CYR61 was associated with poorer survival. NOV promoted proliferation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Further investigations may highlight their predictive and therapeutic potential in gastric cancer. PMID:27633176

  8. Prostaglandin synthesis and catabolism in the gastric mucosa: studies in normal rabbits and rabbits immunized with prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Redfern, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    Antral and fundic mucosal homogenates obtained from prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits converted 14C-arachidonic acid to prostaglandin E2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and prostaglandin D2. Percentage conversion of 14C-arachidonic acid to these prostaglandin products was not significantly different in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits compared with control rabbits (thyroglobulin-immunized and unimmunized rabbits combined). Synthesis of 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin E2 and 13,14-dihydro 15-keto prostaglandin E2 from endogenous arachidonic acid after vortex mixing fundic mucosal homogenates was similar in prostaglandin E2 immunized rabbits and control rabbits. Both in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits and controls, 3H-prostaglandin E2 was catabolized extensively by the fundic mucosa, whereas 3H-6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, 3H-prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 3H-prostaglandin D2 were not catabolized to any appreciable extent. The rate of catabolism of PGs was not significantly different in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits and control rabbits, with the exception of prostaglandin F2 alpha which was catabolized slightly more rapidly in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits. These results indicate that development of gastric ulcers in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits is not associated with an alteration in the capacity of the gastric mucosa to synthesize or catabolize prostaglandins.

  9. Kir1.1 (ROMK) and Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) are essential for normal gastric acid secretion: importance of functional Kir1.1.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Esad; Alfadda, Tariq; MacGregor, Gordon G; Dong, Ke; Wang, Tong; Geibel, John P

    2015-07-01

    Potassium channels comprise the apical leak pathway supplying extracellular K(+) for exchange with protons by the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase and provide potential therapeutic targets for inhibiting gastric acid secretion. The Kir1.1 (ROMK) potassium channel mediates the high capacity K(+) recycling necessary for NaCl reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the kidney, and this channel exhibits functional and regulatory characteristic well suited for K(+) recycling by gastric parietal cells. We report here that Kir1.1 channels are required for gastric acid secretion and that this channel participates with Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) in the potassium recycling process. We show that Kir1.1 colocalizes with the β-subunit of H(+), K(+)-ATPase in gastric parietal cells of Kir1.1 wild-type mice. In Kir1.1-deficient mice, gastric mucosal morphology, as well as parietal cell number, proliferation index, and ultrastructure were normal but secretagogue-stimulated gastric acid secretion in whole stomach and perfused gastric glands was absent. Luminal application of potassium-restored acid secretion in perfused gastric glands from Kir1.1-deficient as well as barium-blocked wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, both luminal Tertiapin-Q, an inhibitor of Kir1.1, as well as XE991, an inhibitor of Kv7.1, reduced proton secretion. We propose that Kir1.1 and Kv7.1 channels collaborate in potassium and current recycling across the apical pole of parietal cells. PMID:25127675

  10. Galectin-1 mediates TGF-β-induced transformation from normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and promotes tumor progression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lingyan; Xu, Cong; Guan, Zhonghai; Su, Xingyun; Xu, Zhenzhen; Cao, Jiang; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Rcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells can induce the transformation from normal fibroblasts (NFs) into CAFs, reciprocally, CAFs promote tumor invasion and proliferation. TGF-β has been the mostly accepted factor to fuel NFs transformation into CAFs. Galectin-1 (Gal1) is highly upregulated in CAFs of multiple human cancers, and overexpression of Gal1 in CAFs promotes tumor progression. The effect of Gal1 on TGF-β-induced CAFs activation has not yet been established in gastric cancer (GC). In this study, we show that Gal1 expression in stroma is positively related to TGF-β in epithelial cells by retrospective analysis of GC patient samples. Meanwhile, conditioned media (CMs) from gastric cancer cells induce expression of both Gal1 and the CAFs marker alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in NFs via TGF-β secretion. Knockdown of Gal1 prevents TGF-β-induced the conversion of NFs to CAFs. CMs from fibroblasts overexpressing Gal1 inhibits cancer cells apoptosis, promotes migration and invasion in vitro. Thus, Gal1 is significantly involved in the development of tumor-promoting microenvironment by enhancing TGF-β signaling in a positive feedback loop. Targeting Gal1 in tumor stroma should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:27186290

  11. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Fatemeh E; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Pourpak, Zahra; Asefi, Hoda; Amini, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81) in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (< 14 years old), with gastrointestinal complaints who underwent endoscopy were selected and antral biopsies were obtained for histological examination. Among these children, those who had normal or erythematous (but not nodular or ulcerative) gastric mucosa on endoscopic view, plus pathologic report of normal mucosa or mild gastritis in addition to mast cell count more than 30/25 mm2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93). Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58) had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20) had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7) had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1) had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and

  12. Specific expression and methylation of SLIT1, SLIT2, SLIT3, and miR-218 in gastric cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mirang; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2016-06-01

    SLIT has been suggested as a key regulator of cancer development and a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Herein, we analyzed expression and methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 in 11 gastric cancer cell lines, 96 paired gastric tumors and adjacent normal gastric tissues, and 250 gastric cancers provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. Methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 was found both in early gastric cancers, and in advanced gastric cancers. Even normal gastric tissue showed increased methylation of SLIT1 and SLIT3 that correlated with patient age. Furthermore, epigenetic inactivation of SLIT occurred in a gastric cancer subtype-dependent manner. SLIT2 and SLIT3 expression was reduced in Epstein-Barr virus-positive and microsatellite instability subtypes, but increased in the genomically stable subtype. Expression of miR‑218 correlated negatively with methylation of SLIT2 or SLIT3. These findings suggest that a molecular subtype-specific therapeutic strategy is needed for targeting SLITs and miR-218 in treatment of gastric cancer.

  13. Expression of FoxM1 and the EMT-associated protein E-cadherin in gastric cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Ke-Jian; Wu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Qiu, Zheng-Jun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) and E-cadherin in tissues of gastric cancer in order to reveal any correlation between FoxM1, E-cadherin and clinicopathological parameters. The association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin in the development and progression of gastric cancer was also investigated. The expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissue on tissue microarray was detected using immunohistochemistry. The clinicopathological significance of FoxM1 and E-cadherin in gastric cancer was explored, and the association between FoxM1 and E-cadherin was further examined using statistical techniques. In gastric cancer tissues, the expression of FoxM1 and E-cadherin was strongly positive, but it was weak in normal gastric mucosa. Overexpression of FoxM1 was evident in gastric cancer, and was associated with poor tumor differentiation (P<0.05), advanced tumor state (P<0.05) and lymph node (or distant) metastasis (P<0.05), whereas E-cadherin had the opposite effects. Furthermore, the correlation between FoxM1 and E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue was negative. In conclusion, the high FoxM1 expression and low E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer tissue suggests that these proteins play a critical role in the development and progression of gastric cancer.

  14. Expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone, gastric-inhibitory polypeptide, and vasopressin in normal adrenal glands and cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Galac, S; Kars, V J; Klarenbeek, S; Teerds, K J; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S

    2010-07-01

    Hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocortical tumor (AT) results from adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Studies in humans demonstrate that steroidogenesis in ATs may be stimulated by ectopic or overexpressed eutopic G protein-coupled receptors. We report on a screening of 23 surgically removed, cortisol-secreting ATs for the expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone (LH), gastric-inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and vasopressin (V(1a), V(1b), and V(2)). Normal adrenal glands served as control tissues. Abundance of mRNA for these receptors was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), and the presence and localization of these receptors were determined by immunohistochemistry. In both normal adrenal glands and ATs, mRNA encoding for all receptors was present, although the expression abundance of the V(1b) receptor was very low. The mRNA expression abundance for GIP and V(2) receptors in ATs were significantly lower (0.03 and 0.01, respectively) than in normal adrenal glands. The zona fasciculata of normal adrenal glands stained immunonegative for the GIP receptor. In contrast, islands of GIP receptor-immunopositive cells were detected in about half of the ATs. The zona fasciculata of both normal adrenal glands and AT tissue were immunopositive for LH receptor; in ATs in a homogenous or heterogenous pattern. In normal adrenal glands, no immunolabeling for V(1b)R and V(2) receptor was present, but in ATs, V(2) receptor-immunopositive cells were detected. In conclusion, QPCR analysis did not reveal overexpression of LH, GIP, V(1a), V(1b), or V(2) receptors in the ATs. However, the ectopic expression of GIP and V(2) receptor proteins in tumorous zona fasciculata tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine cortisol-secreting ATs.

  15. Silencing of glutathione peroxidase 3 through DNA hypermethylation is associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dun-Fa; Hu, Tian-Ling; Schneider, Barbara G; Chen, Zheng; Xu, Ze-Kuan; El-Rifai, Wael

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. H. pylori infection, a major risk factor for gastric cancer, generates high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3), a plasma GPX member and a major scavenger of ROS, catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides by reduced glutathione. To study the expression and gene regulation of GPX3, we examined GPX3 gene expression in 9 gastric cancer cell lines, 108 primary gastric cancer samples and 45 normal gastric mucosa adjacent to cancers using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Downregulation or silencing of GPX3 was detected in 8 of 9 cancer cell lines, 83% (90/108) gastric cancers samples, as compared to non-tumor adjacent normal gastric samples (P<0.0001). Examination of GPX3 promoter demonstrated DNA hypermethylation (≥ 10% methylation level determined by Bisulfite Pyrosequencing) in 6 of 9 cancer cell lines and 60% of gastric cancer samples (P = 0.007). We also detected a significant loss of DNA copy number of GPX3 in gastric cancers (P<0.001). Treatment of SNU1 and MKN28 cells with 5-Aza-2' Deoxycytidine restored the GPX3 gene expression with a significant demethylation of GPX3 promoter. The downregulation of GPX3 expression and GPX3 promoter hypermethylation were significantly associated with gastric cancer lymph node metastasis (P = 0.018 and P = 0.029, respectively). We also observed downregulation, DNA copy number losses, and promoter hypermethylation of GPX3 in approximately one-third of tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissue samples, suggesting the presence of a field defect in areas near tumor samples. Reconstitution of GPX3 in AGS cells reduced the capacity of cell migration, as measured by scratch wound healing assay. Taken together, the dysfunction of GPX3 in gastric cancer is mediated by genetic and epigenetic alterations, suggesting impairment of mechanisms that regulate ROS and its possible involvement in gastric

  16. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  17. Localization of transforming growth factor alpha and its receptor in gastric mucosal cells. Implications for a regulatory role in acid secretion and mucosal renewal.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, R D; Barnard, J A; McCutchen, C M; Cherner, J A; Coffey, R J

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) shares with epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural homology (35%), a common cell-surface membrane receptor (TGF alpha/EGF receptor), and a nearly identical spectrum of biological activity, including inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Herein, we report expression of TGF alpha mRNA in normal gastric mucosa of the adult guinea pig, rat, and dog. TGF alpha mRNA was also detected in matched surgically resected gastric mucosa and adjacent gastric carcinoma from 10 patients, and in gastric mucosa adjacent to a benign ulcer from an additional patient. TGF alpha protein was quantitated by radioimmunoassay and was present in tumor and adjacent mucosa. TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA was also detected in gastric mucosa from all species studied. Localization of TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA expression was examined in samples of unfractionated guinea pig gastric mucosa and from chief cell-enriched and parietal cell-enriched fractions. All samples exhibited TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor expression. The TGF alpha signal was greatest in the parietal cell fraction (5.8-fold increase), but was also enhanced in the chief cell fraction (1.9-fold increase) relative to the unfractionated gastric mucosa. Like TGF alpha expression, TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA expression was most intense in the parietal cell-enriched fraction (7.8-fold increase), but was also increased in the chief cell-enriched fraction (2.7-fold increase) relative to the unfractionated guinea pig gastric mucosa. We conclude that TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor genes are expressed in normal adult mammalian gastric mucosa. These findings, when interpreted in light of described actions of TGF alpha and EGF, provide evidence that local production of TGF alpha could play an important role in the regulation of acid secretion and mucosal renewal in the stomach. Images PMID:2760208

  18. Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery on Bile Acid Metabolism in Normal and Obese Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Hina Y; Rajpal, Neetu; White, Wendy; Freudenberg, Johannes M.; Liu, Yaping; Way, James; Rajpal, Deepak; Cooper, David C.; Young, Andrew; Tavakkoli, Ali; Chen, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA) are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and Peptide YY (PYY), 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (P<0.001) in 24-hour fecal BA excretion on post-operative day 3 compared to ZDF-SHAM, which paralleled a significant increase in plasma PYY. Ratios of plasma and fecal cholic acid/chenodeoxycholic acid derived BAs were decreased in RYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans. PMID:25798945

  19. Nicotinic Receptor Subtypes Mediating Relaxation of the Normal Human Clasp and Sling Fibers of the Upper Gastric Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Miller, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper function of the gastroesophageal high pressure zone is essential for the integrity of the antireflux barrier. Mechanisms include tonic contractions as well as the decreased tone during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. Methods We characterized the pharmacology of nicotinic receptors mediating relaxations of the human upper gastric sphincter (clasp and sling fibers) using currently available subtype selective nicotinic antagonists in tissue from organ transplant donors. Donors with either a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease or histologic evidence of Barrett’s esophagus were excluded. Clasp and sling muscle fiber strips were used for one of three paradigms. For paradigm 1, each strip was exposed to carbachol, washed, exposed to nicotinic antagonists then re-exposed to carbachol. In paradigm 2, strips were exposed to a near maximally effective bethanechol concentration then nicotine was added. Strips then were washed, exposed to nicotinic antagonists then re-exposed to bethanechol followed by nicotine. In paradigm 3, strips were exposed to bethanechol then choline or cytisine. Key Results 100 µM methyllycaconitine has no inhibitory effects on relaxations, eliminating homomeric α7 subtypes. Subtypes composed of α4β2 subunits are also eliminated because choline acts as an agonist and dihydro-beta-erythroidine is ineffective. Conclusions & Inferences Because mecamylamine blocks the relaxations and both choline and cytisine act as agonists in both clasp and sling fibers, the nicotinic receptor subtypes responsible for these relaxations could be composed of α3β4β2, α2β4 or α4β4 subunits. PMID:24827539

  20. Reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR data in gastric tissues and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; dos Santos, Leonardo Caires; Gigek, Carolina de Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Assumpção, Mônica Barauna; Demachki, Sâmia; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the suitability of reference genes in gastric tissue samples and cell lines. METHODS: The suitability of genes ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, RPL29, and 18S rRNA was assessed in 21 matched pairs of neoplastic and adjacent non-neoplastic gastric tissues from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, 27 normal gastric tissues from patients without cancer, and 4 cell lines using reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The ranking of the best single and combination of reference genes was determined by NormFinder, geNorm™, BestKeeper, and DataAssist™. In addition, GenEx software was used to determine the optimal number of reference genes. To validate the results, the mRNA expression of a target gene, DNMT1, was quantified using the different reference gene combinations suggested by the various software packages for normalization. RESULTS: ACTB was the best reference gene for all gastric tissues, cell lines and all gastric tissues plus cell lines. GAPDH + B2M or ACTB + B2M was the best combination of reference genes for all the gastric tissues. On the other hand, ACTB + B2M was the best combination for all the cell lines tested and was also the best combination for analyses involving all the gastric tissues plus cell lines. According to the GenEx software, 2 or 3 genes were the optimal number of references genes for all the gastric tissues. The relative quantification of DNMT1 showed similar patterns when normalized by each combination of reference genes. The level of expression of DNMT1 in neoplastic, adjacent non-neoplastic and normal gastric tissues did not differ when these samples were normalized using GAPDH + B2M (P = 0.32), ACTB + B2M (P = 0.61), or GAPDH + B2M + ACTB (P = 0.44). CONCLUSION: GAPDH + B2M or ACTB + B2M is the best combination of reference gene for all the gastric tissues, and ACTB + B2M is the best combination for the cell lines tested. PMID:24222956

  1. Characterization of the molecular forms of glutathione S-transferase P1 in human gastric cancer cells (Kato III) and in normal human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Perungavar N; Whalen, Richard; Boyer, Thomas D

    2005-03-15

    GSTP1 (glutathione S-transferase pi) is involved in stress responses and in cellular proliferation pathways as an inhibitor of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). It has been proposed that monomeric GSTP1 functions as a JNK inhibitor. All of the studies to date have been performed using rodent cells, and it is unclear if monomeric GSTP1 exists in human cells. Monomeric GSTP1 was sought in human gastric cancer cells (Kato III) and in normal human erythrocytes using gel filtration, ELISA and Western blots. Monomeric GSTP1 was found in conditioned medium, in cytosol of Kato III cells and in cytosol of erythrocytes. GSTP1 subunits from Kato III cells and erythrocytes were heterogeneous when analysed by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight) MS, suggesting that there were post-translational modifications to GSTP1. One post-translational modification, phosphorylation of a serine residue in the C-terminal portion of GSTP1 where JNK binds, was identified in GSTP1 purified from Kato III cells, but not in GSTP1 purified from human erythrocytes. Therefore normal and malignant human cells contain GSTP1 monomers with post-translational modifications, and it is likely that GSTP1 monomers regulate JNK activity in human cells in the same manner as in rodent cells. PMID:15471539

  2. Characterization of the molecular forms of glutathione S-transferase P1 in human gastric cancer cells (Kato III) and in normal human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    GSTP1 (glutathione S-transferase pi) is involved in stress responses and in cellular proliferation pathways as an inhibitor of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). It has been proposed that monomeric GSTP1 functions as a JNK inhibitor. All of the studies to date have been performed using rodent cells, and it is unclear if monomeric GSTP1 exists in human cells. Monomeric GSTP1 was sought in human gastric cancer cells (Kato III) and in normal human erythrocytes using gel filtration, ELISA and Western blots. Monomeric GSTP1 was found in conditioned medium, in cytosol of Kato III cells and in cytosol of erythrocytes. GSTP1 subunits from Kato III cells and erythrocytes were heterogeneous when analysed by MALDI–TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight) MS, suggesting that there were post-translational modifications to GSTP1. One post-translational modification, phosphorylation of a serine residue in the C-terminal portion of GSTP1 where JNK binds, was identified in GSTP1 purified from Kato III cells, but not in GSTP1 purified from human erythrocytes. Therefore normal and malignant human cells contain GSTP1 monomers with post-translational modifications, and it is likely that GSTP1 monomers regulate JNK activity in human cells in the same manner as in rodent cells. PMID:15471539

  3. High-Throughput miRNA Sequencing Reveals a Field Effect in Gastric Cancer and Suggests an Epigenetic Network Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Monica B; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Magalhães, Leandro; Vidal, Amanda; Pereira, Adenilson; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Assumpção, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Field effect in cancer, also called “field cancerization”, attempts to explain the development of multiple primary tumors and locally recurrent cancer. The concept of field effect in cancer has been reinforced, since molecular alterations were found in tumor-adjacent tissues with normal histopatho-logical appearances. With the aim of investigating field effects in gastric cancer (GC), we conducted a high-throughput sequencing of the miRnome of four GC samples and their respective tumor-adjacent tissues and compared them with the miRnome of a gastric antrum sample from patients without GC, assuming that tumor-adjacent tissues could not be considered as normal tissues. The global number of miRNAs and read counts was highest in tumor samples, followed by tumor-adjacent and normal samples. Analyzing the miRNA expression profile of tumor-adjacent miRNA, hsa-miR-3131, hsa-miR-664, hsa-miR-483, and hsa-miR-150 were significantly downregulated compared with the antrum without tumor tissue (P-value < 0.01; fold-change <5). Additionally, hsa-miR-3131, hsa-miR-664, and hsa-miR-150 were downregulated (P-value < 0.001) in all paired samples of tumor and tumor-adjacent tissues, compared with antrum without tumor mucosa. The field effect was clearly demonstrated in gastric carcinogenesis by an epigenetics-based approach, and potential biomarkers of the GC field effect were identified. The elevated expression of miRNAs in adjacent tissues and tumors tissues may indicate that a cascade of events takes place during gastric carcinogenesis, reinforcing the notion of field effects. This phenomenon seems to be linked to DNA methylation patterns in cancer and suggests the involvement of an epigenetic network mechanism. PMID:26244015

  4. High-Throughput miRNA Sequencing Reveals a Field Effect in Gastric Cancer and Suggests an Epigenetic Network Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Monica B; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Magalhães, Leandro; Vidal, Amanda; Pereira, Adenilson; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea; Assumpção, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Field effect in cancer, also called "field cancerization", attempts to explain the development of multiple primary tumors and locally recurrent cancer. The concept of field effect in cancer has been reinforced, since molecular alterations were found in tumor-adjacent tissues with normal histopatho-logical appearances. With the aim of investigating field effects in gastric cancer (GC), we conducted a high-throughput sequencing of the miRnome of four GC samples and their respective tumor-adjacent tissues and compared them with the miRnome of a gastric antrum sample from patients without GC, assuming that tumor-adjacent tissues could not be considered as normal tissues. The global number of miRNAs and read counts was highest in tumor samples, followed by tumor-adjacent and normal samples. Analyzing the miRNA expression profile of tumor-adjacent miRNA, hsa-miR-3131, hsa-miR-664, hsa-miR-483, and hsa-miR-150 were significantly downregulated compared with the antrum without tumor tissue (P-value < 0.01; fold-change <5). Additionally, hsa-miR-3131, hsa-miR-664, and hsa-miR-150 were downregulated (P-value < 0.001) in all paired samples of tumor and tumor-adjacent tissues, compared with antrum without tumor mucosa. The field effect was clearly demonstrated in gastric carcinogenesis by an epigenetics-based approach, and potential biomarkers of the GC field effect were identified. The elevated expression of miRNAs in adjacent tissues and tumors tissues may indicate that a cascade of events takes place during gastric carcinogenesis, reinforcing the notion of field effects. This phenomenon seems to be linked to DNA methylation patterns in cancer and suggests the involvement of an epigenetic network mechanism. PMID:26244015

  5. Effect of gastric acid suppressants on human gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, H; Urbain, J; Knight, L; Brown, K; Trate, D; Miller, M; Maurer, A; Fisher, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The effect of histamine H2 receptor antagonists on gastric emptying is controversial. 
Aims—To determine the effects of ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole on gastric motility and emptying. 
Patients and methods—Fifteen normal subjects underwent simultaneous antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography (EGG), and gastric emptying with dynamic antral scintigraphy (DAS). After 30 minutes of fasting manometry and EGG recording, subjects received either intravenous saline, ranitidine, or famotidine, followed by another 30 minutes recording and then three hours of postprandial recording after ingestion of a radiolabelled meal. Images were obtained every 10-15 minutes for three hours to measure gastric emptying and assess antral contractility. Similar testing was performed after omeprazole 20 mg daily for one week. 
Results—Fasting antral phase III migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were more common after ranitidine (9/15 subjects, 60%), famotidine (12/15, 80%), and omeprazole (8/12, 67%) compared with placebo (4/14, 29%; p<0.05). Postprandially, ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole slowed gastric emptying, increased the amplitude of DAS contractions, increased the EGG power, and increased the antral manometric motility index. 
Conclusions—Suppression of gastric acid secretion with therapeutic doses of gastric acid suppressants is associated with delayed gastric emptying but increased antral motility. 

 Keywords: gastric motility; gastric emptying; histamine H2 receptor antagonists; proton pump inhibitors; gastric acid secretion; scintigraphy PMID:9536950

  6. Treatment of Patients with Obese Type 2 Diabetes with Tantalus-DIAMOND® Gastric Electrical Stimulation: Normal Triglycerides Predict Durable Effects for at Least 3 Years.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, H E; Ludvik, B; Yaniv, I; Schwartz, T; Zelewski, M; Gutterman, D D

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the present work are to evaluate long-term benefit of nonexcitatory gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by the DIAMOND(®) device on glycemic control and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral agents and to determine the magnitude of the modulating effects of fasting plasma triglyceride (FTG) levels on these effects of GES. Sixty one patients with type 2 diabetes [HbA1c > 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) to < 10.5% (91 mmol/mol)] were implanted with the DIAMOND(®) GES device and treated with meal-mediated antral electrical stimulation for up to 36 months. The effects of baseline HbA1c and FTG on glycemic control, body weight, and systolic blood pressure were measured. GES reduced mean HbA1c by 0.9% and body weight by 5.7%. The effects were greater in patients with normal fasting plasma triglycerides (NTG) as compared to those with hypertriglyceridemia. The mean decrease in HbA1c in patients with NTG averaged 1.1% and was durable over 3 years of follow-up. ANCOVA indicated that improvement in HbA1c was a function of both baseline FTG group (p = 0.02) and HbA1c (p = 0.001) and their interaction (p = 0.01). Marked weight loss (≥ 10%) was observed in a significant proportion of NTG patients by 12 months of treatment and persisted through the 3 years. GES improves glycemic control and reduces body weight by a triglyceride-dependent mechanism in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral agents. It is postulated that this is through a gut-brain interaction that modulates effects on the liver and pancreatic islets. PMID:25993254

  7. Treatment of Patients with Obese Type 2 Diabetes with Tantalus-DIAMOND® Gastric Electrical Stimulation: Normal Triglycerides Predict Durable Effects for at Least 3 Years.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, H E; Ludvik, B; Yaniv, I; Schwartz, T; Zelewski, M; Gutterman, D D

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the present work are to evaluate long-term benefit of nonexcitatory gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by the DIAMOND(®) device on glycemic control and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral agents and to determine the magnitude of the modulating effects of fasting plasma triglyceride (FTG) levels on these effects of GES. Sixty one patients with type 2 diabetes [HbA1c > 7.0% (53 mmol/mol) to < 10.5% (91 mmol/mol)] were implanted with the DIAMOND(®) GES device and treated with meal-mediated antral electrical stimulation for up to 36 months. The effects of baseline HbA1c and FTG on glycemic control, body weight, and systolic blood pressure were measured. GES reduced mean HbA1c by 0.9% and body weight by 5.7%. The effects were greater in patients with normal fasting plasma triglycerides (NTG) as compared to those with hypertriglyceridemia. The mean decrease in HbA1c in patients with NTG averaged 1.1% and was durable over 3 years of follow-up. ANCOVA indicated that improvement in HbA1c was a function of both baseline FTG group (p = 0.02) and HbA1c (p = 0.001) and their interaction (p = 0.01). Marked weight loss (≥ 10%) was observed in a significant proportion of NTG patients by 12 months of treatment and persisted through the 3 years. GES improves glycemic control and reduces body weight by a triglyceride-dependent mechanism in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on oral agents. It is postulated that this is through a gut-brain interaction that modulates effects on the liver and pancreatic islets.

  8. The RNA-binding protein PCBP2 facilitates gastric carcinoma growth by targeting miR-34a

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Cheng-En; Liu, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Hui-Dong; Huang, Guang-Jian

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • PCBP2 is overexpressed in human gastric cancer. • PCBP2 high expression predicts poor survival. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer apoptosis by targeting miR-34a. - Abstract: Gastric carcinoma is the fourth most common cancer worldwide, with a high rate of death and low 5-year survival rate. However, the mechanism underling gastric cancer is still not fully understood. Here in the present study, we identify the RNA-binding protein PCBP2 as an oncogenic protein in human gastric carcinoma. Our results show that PCBP2 is up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues, and that high level of PCBP2 predicts poor overall and disease-free survival. Knockdown of PCBP2 in gastric cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro, whereas opposing results are obtained when PCBP2 is overexpressed. Our in vivo subcutaneous xenograft results also show that PCBP2 can critically regulate gastric cancer cell growth. In addition, we find that PCBP2-depletion induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via up-regulating expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins. Mechanically, we identify that miR-34a as a target of PCBP2, and that miR-34a is critically essential for the function of PCBP2. In summary, PCBP2 promotes gastric carcinoma development by regulating the level of miR-34a.

  9. Gastric conduit perforation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh; Kaushal, Arvind; Jain, Amit; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2014-08-16

    As patients with carcinoma of the esophagus live longer, complications associated with the use of a gastric conduit are increasing. Ulcers form in the gastric conduit in 6.6% to 19.4% of patients. There are a few reports of perforation of a gastric conduit in the English literature. Almost all of these were associated with serious complications. We report a patient who developed a tension pneumothorax consequent to spontaneous perforation of an ulcer in the gastric conduit 7 years after the index surgery in a patient with carcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction. He responded well to conservative management. Complications related to a gastric conduit can be because of multiple factors. Periodic endoscopic surveillance of gastric conduits should be considered as these are at a higher risk of ulcer formation than a normal stomach. Long term treatment with proton pump inhibitors may decrease complications. There are no guidelines for the treatment of a perforated gastric conduit ulcer and the management should be individualized.

  10. Decreased expression of the long non-coding RNA FENDRR is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer and FENDRR regulates gastric cancer cell metastasis by affecting fibronectin1 expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background FENDRR is a long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) that binds to polycomb repressive complexe 2 (PRC2) to epigenetically regulate the expression of its target gene. The clinical role of FENDRR in carcinomas remains yet to be found. Method Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to examine FENDRR expression in gastric cancer cell lines/tissues compared with normal epithelial cells/adjacent non-tumorous tissues. Cell proliferation assays, Wound healing assays, and in vitro and in vivo invasion and migration assays were performed to detect the biological effects of FENDRR in gastric cancer cells. Real-time PCR, western-blot and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression of fibronectin1 (FN1). Secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities were detected and characterized using gelatin zymography assay. Results FENDRR was downregulated in gastric cancer cell lines and cancerous tissues, as compared with normal gastric epithelial cells and adjacent noncancerous tissue samples. Low FENDRR expression was correlated with deeper tumor invasion (p < 0.001), higher tumor stage (p = 0.001), and lymphatic metastasis (p = 0.007). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that low FENDRR expression predicted poor prognosis. Histone deacetylation was involved in the downregulation of FENDRR in gastric cancer cells. FENDER overexpression suppressed invasion and migration by gastric cancer cells in vitro, by downregulating FN1 and MMP2/MMP9 expression. Conclusion Low expression of the lncRNA FENDRR occurs in gastric cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Thus, FENDRR plays an important role in the progression and metastasis of gastric cancer. PMID:25167886

  11. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  12. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  13. [Gastric emptying and functional dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aros, S

    2006-01-01

    Dyspeptic syndrome includes symptoms such as upper abdominal pain, nausea and/or vomiting. These symptoms are common to highly diverse processes such as duodenal ulcer, pancreatitis and even intestinal ischemia, among many others. However, most patients who consult for this syndrome do not have any of these well known processes. New mechanisms have been proposed that could explain the symptoms presented by these patients. Among these mechanisms are those relating to an alteration of normal gastroduodenal motor function, such as alterations of gastric compliance, antral distension, gastric accommodation to anomalous ingestion, and alterations of gastric emptying. The present review evaluates the role of gastric emptying in producing dyspeptic symptoms according to the evidence available to date. We discuss gastric emptying in patients with functional or idiopathic dyspepsia compared with that in the healthy population, the correlation between gastric emptying and dyspeptic symptoms, and the response of dyspeptic symptoms to the prokinetic therapies carried out to date.

  14. Association between the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 and the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LING; YANG, XIGUI; YANG, XIANGSHAN; FAN, KAIXI; XIAO, PING; ZHANG, JING; WANG, XIUWEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) in gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 expression levels in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples (with and without lymph node metastasis), adjacent normal tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples were detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between TNFAIP8 expression levels and clinicopathological data and gastric adenocarcinoma prognosis was analyzed. The results demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression in gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples and metastatic lymph node tissue samples markedly increased at a rate of 47.2% (50/106) and 81.7% (49/60), respectively, as compared with the adjacent normal tissue samples in which no TNGFAIP8 expression was detected (0%). This increase in TNFAIP8 expression was statistically significant. TNFAIP8 expression rates in the primary tumors (60%, 36/60) of patients with lymph node metastasis were significantly higher compared with the primary tumors of patients without lymph node metastasis (30.4%, 14/46). TNFAIP8 expression was associated with an increase in the severity of TNM stage, tumor grade, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis and serum CA72-4 levels. The overall survival rate of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and high TNFAIP8 expression was poorer compared with patients with low TNFAIP8 expression, and TNFAIP8 expression was negatively correlated with patient prognosis. The results also demonstrated that TNFAIP8 was an independent prognostic marker in gastric adenocarcinoma (relative risk, 1.736; P=0.029). In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that TNFAIP8 expression was associated with the occurrence, development and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma, and negatively correlated with the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. TNFAIP8 may therefore serve as a prognostic factor for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27347043

  15. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 2 Dysfunction Contributes to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine Depletion in Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Nan-Hua; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Tu, Ya-Ting; Wang, Kuo-Chiang; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Po-Min; Li, Guan-Cheng; Lam, Hing-Chung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Kuo-Wang

    2016-08-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) family of enzymes comprises of the key functional metabolic enzymes in the Krebs cycle that catalyze the conversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). α-KG acts as a cofactor in the conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). However, the relationship between 5hmC and IDH in gastric cancer remains unclear. Our study revealed that the 5hmC level was substantially lower and 5mC level was slightly higher in gastric cancer tissues; however, 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) levels did not change significantly in these tissues. We further examined the expression levels of IDH1 and IDH2 in gastric cancer tissues and observed that IDH2 levels were significantly lower in gastric cancer tissues than in the adjacent normal tissues. The ectopic expression of IDH2 can increase 5hmC levels in gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggested that IDH2 dysfunction is involved in 5hmC depletion during gastric cancer progression. PMID:27466503

  16. Hypermethylation Status of E-Cadherin Gene in Gastric Cancer Patients in a High Incidence Area.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Haroon; Alam, Khursheed; Afroze, Dil; Yousuf, Adfar; Banday, Manzoor; Kawoosa, Fizalah

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most prevalant cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. As in other cancers gastric carcinogenesis is multifactorial involving environmental, genetic and epigenetic components. Epigenetic silencing due to hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes is one of the key events in gastric carcinogenesis. This study was aimed to analyse the hypermethylation status of the E-Cadherin (CDH1) gene promoter in GCs in the ethnic Kashmiri population. In this study a total of 80 GC patients were recruited. Hypermethylation in tumour tissue was detected by methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR). Hypermethylation of CDH1 promoter was observed in 52 (65%) of gastric carcinoma cases which was significantly much higher than adjacent normal tissue [p≤0.0001]. Further the frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation was significantly different with intestinal and diffuse types of gastric cancer [55.7% vs 82.1%; <0.05]. Moreover females and cases with lymph node invasion had higher frequencies of CDH1 hypermethylation [P≤0.05]. Thus the current data indicate a vital role of epigenetic alteration of CDH1 in the causation and development of gastric cancer, particularly of diffuse type, in our population.

  17. Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in the Distal Part of Esophagus in a Teenager

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuta; Paduraru, Gabriela; Mihaila, Doina; Burlea, Marin; Ciubara, Anamaria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) of the esophagus is a congenital anomaly consisting of ectopic gastric mucosa. It may be connected with disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, exacerbated by Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis of HGM is confirmed via endoscopy with biopsy. Histopathology provides the definitive diagnosis by demonstrating gastric mucosa adjacent to normal esophageal mucosa. HGM located in the distal esophagus needs differentiation from Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant injury for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Malignant progression of HGM occurs in a stepwise pattern, following the metaplasia–dysplasia–adenocarcinoma sequence. We present a rare case of a teenage girl with HGM located in the distal esophagus, associated with chronic gastritis and biliary duodenogastric reflux. Endoscopy combined with biopsies is a mandatory method in clinical evaluation of metaplastic and nonmetaplastic changes within HGM of the esophagus. PMID:26496283

  18. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  19. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  20. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Patients with Gastric Cancer according to the Expression of LIN28A

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Although LIN28A is known to potentially play a role in the oncogenesis of various cancers, whether LIN28A expression is a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer has not been fully explored. We sought to evaluate clinicopathological characteristics according to the expression of LIN28A in numerous gastric cancer tissue samples. Methods LIN28A expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of a tissue microarray comprising 288 gastric cancer tissues and 288 adjacent normal tissues. Clinicopathological characteristics, including overall survival, were compared according to LIN28A expression. Results The IHC staining score was lower for the cancer tissues than the normal tissues (p<0.001). However, no significant differences were observed in the clinicopathological characteristics between the low and high LIN28A expression groups. In addition, the 5-year overall survival rate did not differ between the two groups: 75.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 69.3% to 81.7%) versus 71.6% (95% CI, 63.3% to 80.9%) for low versus high expression, respectively. Conclusions The expression of LIN28A did not appear to play a distinct role in predicting the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with gastric cancer. In addition, LIN28A expression was not an independently associated factor for overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26893371

  1. [Gastric magnetic resonance study (methods, semiotics)].

    PubMed

    Stashuk, G A

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows the potentialities of gastric study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The methodic aspects of gastric study have been worked out. The MRI-semiotics of the unchanged and tumor-affected wall of the stomach and techniques in examining patients with gastric cancer of various sites are described. Using the developed procedure, MRI was performed in 199 patients, including 154 patients with gastric pathology and 45 control individuals who had no altered gastric wall. Great emphasis is placed on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of endophytic (diffuse) gastric cancer that is of priority value in its morphological structure. MRI was found to play a role in the diagnosis of the spread of a tumorous process both along the walls of the stomach and to its adjacent anatomic structures.

  2. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features. Methods A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs) diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored. Results The majority of EGCs (63/64) were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, P<0.0001; metaplasia, 1.68+/-0.13 vs. 0.48+/-0.1, P<0.0001). The degree of endoscopic atrophy improved in the patients with longer post-H. pylori eradication periods; however, this trend was not observed for the histological parameters, and high degrees of atrophy and metaplasia were observed in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs compared with the corpus during all periods (all P<0.05). The histological degrees of atrophy and metaplasia in the adjacent mucosa were particularly higher in the patients who underwent eradication due to gastric ulcers. Conclusions Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27706195

  3. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  4. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Y; Tanaka, K; Inoue, Y; Kawamura, M; Kawamoto, A; Hiro, J; Saigusa, S; Toiyama, Y; Ohi, M; Uchida, K; Mohri, Y; Kusunoki, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neutrophin family that is known to activate the high-affinity tropomyosin-related receptor kinase B (TrkB). This study aimed to clarify the clinical and biological significance of the BDNF/TrkB pathway in gastric cancer. Methods: We analysed BDNF and TrkB expression in gastric cancer samples by real-time reverse transcription PCR and immunohistochemistry. To investigate the biological role of BDNF/TrkB axis, recombinant human BDNF (rhBDNF) and the Trk antagonist K252a were used for in vitro and in vivo analysis. Results: The BDNF expression at the invasive front of primary tumours was significantly elevated compared with that in the tumour core and adjacent normal mucosa. Increased BDNF expression at the invasive front was significantly correlated with factors reflecting disease progression, and poor prognosis. Increased co-expression of the BDNF/TrkB axis was significantly correlated with poor prognosis. Gastric cancer cells expressed BDNF, and administration of rhBDNF promoted proliferation, migration, invasion, and inhibition of anoikis. These effects were generally inhibited by K252a. In an in vivo assay, BDNF(+)/TrkB(+) gastric cancer cells injected into nude mice established peritoneal dissemination, whereas K252a inhibited tumour growth. Conclusion: The BDNF/TrkB pathway might be deeply involved in gastric cancer disease progression. PMID:23175149

  6. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y gastric bypass; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass ... Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you are very obese and have not been able to ...

  7. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  8. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Position paper update: gastric lavage for gastrointestinal decontamination. Clin Toxicol (Phila) . 2013;51(3); 140-146. ... 2012:chap 49. Zeringe M, Fowler GC. Gastrointesinal decontamination. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's ...

  9. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor as a potential prognostic factor in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-Jun; Xie, Dan; Hu, Pin-Jin; Liao, Yi-Ji; Deng, Hai-Xia; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Zhu, Sen-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression and its clinical relevance in gastric cancer, and effects of MIF knockdown on proliferation of gastric cancer cells. METHODS: Tissue microarray containing 117 samples of gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancer normal tissues was studied for MIF expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) semiquantitatively, and the association of MIF expression with clinical parameters was analyzed. MIF expression in gastric cancer cell lines was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Two pairs of siRNA targeting the MIF gene (MIF si-1 and MIF si-2) and one pair of scrambled siRNA as a negative control (NC) were designed and chemically synthesized. All siRNAs were transiently transfected in AGS cells with OligofectamineTM to knock down the MIF expression, with the NC group and mock group (OligofectamineTM alone) as controls. At 24, 48, and 72 h after transfection, MIF mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR, and MIF and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins were detected by Western blot. The proliferative rate of AGS cells was assessed by methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and colony forming assay. RESULTS: The tissue microarray was informative for IHC staining, in which the MIF expression in gastric cancer tissues was higher than that in adjacent non-cancer normal tissues (P < 0.001), and high level of MIF was related to poor tumor differentiation, advanced T stage, advanced tumor stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor patient survival (P < 0.05 for all). After siRNA transfection, MIF mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, and MIF protein and PCNA were assessed by Western blot analysis. We found that compared to the NC group and mock group, MIF expression was knocked down successfully in gastric cancer cells, and PCNA expression was downregulated with MIF knockdown as well. The cell counts and the doubling times were assayed by MTT 4 d after transfection, and

  10. High expression of RELM-α correlates with poor prognosis and promotes angiogenesis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhao, Deshou; Wang, Weiyi; Zhang, Yongping; Yuan, Yaozong; Wang, Lifu; Wu, Yunlin

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that resistin-like molecule-α (RELM-α) is involved in angiogenesis, while the clinical significance and the exact role of RELM-α in gastric cancer remain obscure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of RELM-α in gastric cancer, and to investigate its effective mechanisms in order to identify a potential therapeutic target. The expression levels of RELM-α in 92 gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues were investigated and the relationship between RELM-α expression and the clinicopathological characteristics was explored. To investigate the potential role of RELM-α in gastric cancer cell biological behavior, the cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays were conducted using two gastric cancer cell lines (SGC7901 and MKN45). We also assessed whether RELM-α gene silencing modulates angiogenesis using small interference RNA in cancer cell lines, and investigated its effect on nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and MMP-9 expression. Contrasting sharply with the strong RELM-α-positive tumors, adjacent normal tissues and cell lines exhibited negative or weakly positive expression (P<0.01). High expression level of RELM-α was associated with advanced stage and tumor size (P<0.01). The silencing of RELM-α expression by Ad5/F35-siRNA treatment significantly inhibited cell migratory and invasive ability in SGC7901 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells compared with the control and Ad5/F35 vector-transfected cell lines (P<0.01). However, the silencing of RELM-α expression also significantly blocked NF-κB activation and attenuated VEGF and MMP-9 expression. The data demonstrated that RELM-α is a promising novel biomarker of angiogenesis in patients with gastric cancer. The study identified that the silencing of RELM-α expression may regulate the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by targeting VEGF/MMP-9, and the mechanism

  11. High expression of RELM-α correlates with poor prognosis and promotes angiogenesis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhao, Deshou; Wang, Weiyi; Zhang, Yongping; Yuan, Yaozong; Wang, Lifu; Wu, Yunlin

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that resistin-like molecule-α (RELM-α) is involved in angiogenesis, while the clinical significance and the exact role of RELM-α in gastric cancer remain obscure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of RELM-α in gastric cancer, and to investigate its effective mechanisms in order to identify a potential therapeutic target. The expression levels of RELM-α in 92 gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues were investigated and the relationship between RELM-α expression and the clinicopathological characteristics was explored. To investigate the potential role of RELM-α in gastric cancer cell biological behavior, the cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays were conducted using two gastric cancer cell lines (SGC7901 and MKN45). We also assessed whether RELM-α gene silencing modulates angiogenesis using small interference RNA in cancer cell lines, and investigated its effect on nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and MMP-9 expression. Contrasting sharply with the strong RELM-α-positive tumors, adjacent normal tissues and cell lines exhibited negative or weakly positive expression (P<0.01). High expression level of RELM-α was associated with advanced stage and tumor size (P<0.01). The silencing of RELM-α expression by Ad5/F35-siRNA treatment significantly inhibited cell migratory and invasive ability in SGC7901 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells compared with the control and Ad5/F35 vector-transfected cell lines (P<0.01). However, the silencing of RELM-α expression also significantly blocked NF-κB activation and attenuated VEGF and MMP-9 expression. The data demonstrated that RELM-α is a promising novel biomarker of angiogenesis in patients with gastric cancer. The study identified that the silencing of RELM-α expression may regulate the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by targeting VEGF/MMP-9, and the mechanism

  12. OTUB1 promotes tumor invasion and predicts a poor prognosis in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Weiwei; Zhang, Qiongyan; Xu, Midie; Wu, Yong; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Chen; Chen, Xiaochen; Wang, Yiqin; Sheng, Weiqi

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds: The deubiquitinating enzyme OTUB1 participates in multiple cellular processes. However, its expression and functions in gastric adenocarcinoma remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of OTUB1 and its biological role in gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: We used immunohistochemistry to analyze OTUB1 expressions levels in 80 paired samples of gastric adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal tissue (ANT) and 30 samples of intraepithelial neoplasia (IN). We also analyzed the correlation between OTUB1 expression and clinicopathological parameters and patient survival status. Moreover, we performed wound-healing, transwell, RT-qPCR and Western blot assays to evaluate the impact of OTUB1 on tumor migration and invasion. Results: In gastric adenocarcinomas, staining for OTUB1 was localized in the cytoplasm. The proportion of samples that expressed OTUB1 and the intensity of its expression were much higher in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues (61 out of 80, 76.25%) than that in either IN (10 out of 30, 33.33%, p<0.001) or ANT (7 out of 80, 8.75%, p<0.001) samples. In malignant cases, higher expression OTUB1 levels were significantly associated with deeper tumor invasion depths (p=0.02), advanced lymph node status (p=0.008) and TNM stage (p=0.001), lymph duct invasion (p<0.001) and nerve invasion (p=0.013). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that OTUB1 was an independent risk factor for disease-specific survival but not disease-free survival. In vitro wound-healing and transwell assays showed that OTUB1 overexpression promoted tumor cell migration and invasion in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion: OTUB1 contributes to gastric cancer development by enhancing tumor invasiveness. Targeting OTUB1 should be considered in future molecular therapies. PMID:27347330

  13. In situ detection of Epstein-Barr virus in gastric and colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yuen, S T; Chung, L P; Leung, S Y; Luk, I S; Chan, S Y; Ho, J

    1994-11-01

    The association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma in the nasopharynx, which is common in Chinese from the southern region, is well established. Recently, EBV has also been found to be associated with lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas (LELCs) and carcinomas with prominent lymphoid infiltrates in the stomach. We investigated for the presence of EBV in 74 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 36 cases of colorectal adenocarcinoma from Chinese patients by in situ hybridization (ISH) using an antisense EBER probe. In seven cases (9.5%) of gastric carcinoma, EBER was highly expressed in the adenocarcinoma cells and metastatic tumor cells in regional lymph nodes. In all these cases, the normal gastric epithelium was EBV negative. None of the colorectal carcinomas showed a positive signal. Isolated positive lymphoid cells were frequently found in both tumors. Of the seven positive cases, only one was LELC, and the others were conventional adenocarcinomas of the intestinal type. Five showed expression of the viral RNA in all tumor cells as well as the surrounding dysplastic epithelium. Interestingly, the sixth case showed distinct negative islands of dysplastic glands adjacent to strongly positive dysplastic glands and invasive carcinoma cells. This pattern of positivity, together with negative normal gastric epithelium and positive metastatic tumor, suggested that EBV infection occurred in the dysplastic phase and that an apparent growth advantage was conferred by the EBV infection.

  14. Photodynamic therapy of gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzin, N. M.; Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Sclyanskaya, Olga A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the use of laser endoscopic spectrum analyzer (LESA-5), the spectral-analyzing video-imaging system, Kr laser and various types of catheters for different tumor localizations, and Phthalocyanine aluminum photosensitizers in patients with gastric cancer was discussed. PDT was carried out in fifteen patients with gastric cancer. There were the following indications for PDT: early gastric cancer (3 patients), malignant stenosis of the cardia or pyloric portion of the stomach (4 patients), cancer of gastric stump with stenosis of gastrojejunal anastomosis (1 patient), preoperative treatment of patients with large but probably resectable gastric tumor size (7 patients). Usually we used 3 - 4 seances of laser treatment 10 - 30 minutes long. Concentration of photosensitizer in normal and malignant tissue was controlled by LESA-5. Treatment was monitored by spectral-analyzing video- imaging system in fluorescent light. The results show high efficiency of PDT especially in patients with early gastric cancer (necrosis of all tumor mass, i.e. complete regression of tumor). For all other patients we obtained partial regression of gastric cancer.

  15. Overexpressed targeting protein for Xklp2 (TPX2) serves as a promising prognostic marker and therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zheng, Wenjuan; Fang, Lu; Wu, Linquan; Zhou, Fan; Yin, Xiangbao; Yu, Xin; Zou, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    The targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 (TPX2) is a putative oncogene in different human cancers. This study assessed TPX2 expression in gastric cancer tissue samples and then determined the effects of TPX2 knockdown on the regulation of gastric cancer cell malignant behaviors in vitro. Tissue samples from 115 gastric cancer patients were analyzed for TPX2 expression. The effects of TPX2 siRNA on gastric cancer cells were assessed in vitro, including cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. The data showed that TPX2 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared to that in the adjacent normal epithelia. Moreover, TPX2 overexpression was associated with a poor overall survival and was an independent prognostic predictor of gastric cancer. In addition, the in vitro study further confirmed the ex vivo data, i.e., knockdown of TPX2 expression reduced gastric cancer cell viability but induced apoptosis and arrested cells at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Knockdown of TPX2 expression also inhibited the tumor cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro. At the gene level, knockdown of TPX2 expression upregulated the levels of cyclin B1, cdk4, p53, Bax, caspase-3, and E-cadherin, but downregulated the levels of cyclin D1, cdk2, N-cadherin, slug, matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2, and MMP-9, suggesting that knockdown of TPX2 expression suppressed tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This study demonstrated that detection of TPX2 overexpression could serve as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for gastric cancer. PMID:27314162

  16. Overexpression of DEK is an indicator of poor prognosis in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    OU, YINGFU; XIA, RONGJUN; KONG, FANYONG; ZHANG, XIAOKANG; YU, SHENGJIN; JIANG, LILI; ZHENG, LINLIN; LIN, LIJUAN

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of the human DEK proto-oncogene (DEK) gene has been associated with numerous human malignancies. The DEK protein is associated with chromatin reconstruction and gene transcription, and is important in cell apoptosis. The present study aimed to elucidate the role of DEK with regard to gastric adenocarcinoma tumor progression and patient prognosis. DEK protein expression was analyzed using immunohistochemistry in 192 tumors paired with adjacent non-cancerous gastric mucosa that had been surgically resected from patients with primary gastric adenocarcinoma. The association between DEK expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of the patients was evaluated using the χ2 test and Fisher's exact test. The survival rates of the patients were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox analysis evaluated the association between the expression of DEK and the survival rate of the patients. The DEK protein was expressed in 84 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (43.8%) and in 20 of the paired normal gastric mucosa tissues (11.5%). The DEK expression rate was found to be associated with tumor size (P=0.006), tumor grade (P=0.023), lymph node metastasis (P=0.018), serous invasion (P=0.026), tumor stage (P=0.001) and Ki-67 expression (P=0.003). Furthermore, patients with gastric adenocarcinoma that expressed DEK had decreased disease-free (log-rank, 16.785; P<0.0001) and overall (log-rank, 15.759; P<0.0001) survival rates compared with patients without DEK expression. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma that expressed DEK exhibited a lower overall survival rate compared with patients without DEK expression (P=0.002). Additional analysis revealed that DEK expression was an independent prognostic factor for the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma (hazard ratio, 0.556; 95% confidence interval, 0.337–0.918; P=0.022). From the results of the present study, it can be concluded that the detection of DEK protein expression in gastric

  17. Gastric Adenocarcinoma after Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maxwel Capsy Boga; Lopes, Luiz Roberto; Coelho Neto, João de Souza; Tercioti, Valdir; Andreollo, Nelson Adami

    2013-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma after gastric bypass for morbid obesity is rare but has been described. The diet restriction, weight loss, and difficult assessment of the bypassed stomach, after this procedure, hinder and delay its diagnosis. We present a 52-year-old man who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass 2 years ago and whose previous upper digestive endoscopy was considered normal. He presented with weight loss, attributed to the procedure, and progressive dysphagia. Upper digestive endoscopy revealed stenosing tumor in gastric pouch whose biopsy showed diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma. He underwent total gastrectomy, left lobectomy, distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, segmental colectomy, and bowel resection with esophagojejunal anastomosis. The histopathological analysis confirmed the presence of gastric cancer. The pathogenesis of gastric pouch adenocarcinoma is discussed with a literature review. PMID:23509467

  18. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  19. Up-regulation of CLDN1 in gastric cancer is correlated with reduced survival

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic changes in gastric adenocarcinoma are extremely complex and reliable tumor markers have not yet been identified. There are also remarkable geographical differences in the distribution of this disease. Our aim was to identify the most differentially regulated genes in 20 gastric adenocarcinomas from a Norwegian selection, compared to matched normal mucosa, and we have related our findings to prognosis, survival and chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Biopsies from gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent normal gastric mucosa were obtained from 20 patients immediately following surgical resection of the tumor. Whole genome, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on the RNA isolated from the sample pairs to compare the gene expression profiles between the tumor against matched mucosa. The samples were microscopically examined to classify gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was examined using microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Results 130 genes showed differential regulation above a predefined cut-off level. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Claudin-1 (CLDN1) were the most consistently up-regulated genes in the tumors. Very high CLDN1 expression in the tumor was identified as an independent and significant predictor gene of reduced post-operative survival. There were distinctly different expression profiles between the tumor group and the control mucosa group, and the histological subsets of mixed type, diffuse type and intestinal type cancer demonstrated further sub-clustering. Up-regulated genes were mapped to cell-adhesion, collagen-related processes and angiogenesis, whereas normal intestinal functions such as digestion and excretion were associated with down-regulated genes. We relate the current findings to our previous study on the gene response of gastric epithelial cells to H. pylori infection. Conclusions CLDN1 was highly up-regulated in gastric cancer, and CLDN1 expression was independently associated with a poor post

  20. Sensitive and Specific Detection of Early Gastric Cancer Using DNA Methylation Analysis of Gastric Washes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun Soo; Castoro, Ryan J.; Chung, Woonbok; Estecio, Marcos R. H.; Kondo, Kimie; Guo, Yi; Ahmed, Saira S.; Toyota, Minoru; Itoh, Fumio; Suk, Ki Tae; Cho, Mee-Yon; Shen, Lanlan; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Aberrant DNA methylation is an early and frequent process in gastric carcinogenesis and could be useful for detection of gastric neoplasia. We hypothesized that methylation analysis of DNA recovered from gastric washes could be used to detect gastric cancer. Methods We studied 51 candidate genes in 7 gastric cancer cell lines and 24 samples (training set) and identified 6 for further studies. We examined the methylation status of these genes in a test set consisting of 131 gastric neoplasias at various stages. Finally, we validated the 6 candidate genes in a different population of 40 primary gastric cancer samples and 113 non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples. Results 6 genes (MINT25, RORA, GDNF, ADAM23, PRDM5, MLF1) showed frequent differential methylation between gastric cancer and normal mucosa in the training, test and validation sets. GDNF and MINT25 were most sensitive molecular markers of early stage gastric cancer while PRDM5 and MLF1 were markers of a field defect. There was a close correlation (r=0.5 to 0.9, p=0.03 to 0.001) between methylation levels in tumor biopsy and gastric washes. MINT25 methylation had the best sensitivity (90%), specificity (96%), and area under the ROC curve (0.961) in terms of tumor detection in gastric washes. Conclusions These findings suggest MINT25 is a sensitive and specific marker for screening in gastric cancer. Additionally we have developed a new methodology for gastric cancer detection by DNA methylation in gastric washes. PMID:19375421

  1. Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression identified by the transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory network analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, XiaoTian; Ni, ZhaoHui; Duan, ZiPeng; Xin, ZhuoYuan; Wang, HuaiDong; Tan, JiaYi; Wang, GuoQing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at the transcription and translation levels; thus, both transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNA) play roles in regulation of gene expression. This study profiled differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues to construct a TF and miRNA co-regulatory network in order to identify altered genes in gastric cancer progression. A total of 70 cases gastric cancer and paired adjacent normal tissues were subjected to cDNA and miRNA microarray analyses. We obtained 887 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes and 41 down-regulated and 4 up-regulated miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues. Using the Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, we obtained 105 genes that are regulated by the E2F family of genes and using Targetscan, miRanda, miRDB and miRWalk tools, we predicted potential targeting genes of these 45 miRNAs. We then built up the E2F-related TF and miRNA co-regulatory gene network and identified 9 hub-genes. Furthermore, we found that levels of E2F1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 mRNAs associated with gastric cancer cell invasion capacity, and has associated with tumor differentiation. These data showed Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression.

  2. miR-363 promotes proliferation and chemo-resistance of human gastric cancer via targeting of FBW7 ubiquitin ligase expression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mi; Zhu, Ling-Yin; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Jin-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNA expression is involved in several pathological activities associated with gastric cancer progression and chemo-resistance. However, the role and molecular mechanisms of miR-363 in the progression and chemo-resistance of gastric cancer remain enigmatic. In this study, we validated that miR-363 expression was higher in gastric cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissues. Multivariate analysis identifies high levels of miR-363 expression as an independent predictor for postoperative recurrence and lower overall survival. Increased miR-363 expression promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation and chemo-resistance through directly targeting the tumor suppressor F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBW7). Clinically, our data reveal that overexpression of miR-363 correlates with the poor survival outcomes in patients with gastric cancer, and docetaxel + cisplatin + 5-FU (DCF) regimen response is impaired in patients with miR-363 overexpression. These data suggest that miR-363 may be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for predicting response to DCF regimen treatment. PMID:27167197

  3. Different binding properties of three monoclonal antibodies to sialyl Le(x) glycolipids in a gastric cancer cell line and normal stomach tissue.

    PubMed

    Dohi, T; Nemoto, T; Ohta, S; Shitara, K; Hanai, N; Nudelman, E; Hakomori, S; Oshima, M

    1993-01-01

    We established a mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) KM93 which recognized sialyl Le(x)-carbohydrate epitope determined by solid phase radioimmunoassay using a panel of authentic glycolipids. The specificity of KM93 was similar to another anti-sialyl Le(x) Mab CSLEX-1 established previously, and different from that of Mab FH6 which recognized sialyl Le(x)-i (sialyl dimeric Le(x)). In a further study, however, we found that KM93 reacted with some glycolipids much more strongly than CSLEX-1 did on thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. We purified two gangliosides named K-1 and K-2 from gastric cancer cell line KATOIII, and three gangliosides named H-1, H-2, and H-3 from human stomach. KM93 reacted with all of these glycolipids. CSLEX-1 reacted with K-1 and K-2 with less intensity than KM93 did, and faintly reacted with H-1, but not at all with H-2 or H-3. FH6 did not react with K-1, K-2 or H-1, while it stained H-2 and H-3. In spite of this different reactivity with Mabs, analysis by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) proved that carbohydrate structure of K-1 and H-2 were the same: NeuAc alpha 2-->3Ga1 beta 1-->4 [Fuc alpha 1-->3] G1cNAc beta 1-->3 Ga1 beta 1-->4G1c beta 1-->1Cer. The H1 NMR spectrum of H-3 also indicated that H-3 consisted of the same sugars as K-1. These results indicated that KM93 had wider reactivity than CSLEX-1, and that the distinct reactivity of KM93 from CSLEX-1 was not caused by sugar moiety. It was also shown that the interaction of sialyl Le(x) sugar determinant with MAb depended on the tissue origin of molecules carrying carbohydrate. PMID:8239497

  4. Decreased Core-Fucosylation Contributes to Malignancy in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; You, Qing; Yi, Chang-Hong; Ji, Jun; Gu, Xing; Zhou, Ping-Ting; Cheng, Cheng; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study is to identify N-glycan profiling changes associated with gastric cancer and explore the impact of core-fucosylation on biological behaviors of human gastric cancer cells. A total of 244 subjects including gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and healthy control were recruited. N-glycan profiling from serum and total proteins in gastric tissues was analyzed by DNA sequencer-assisted fluorophore-assisted capillary electrophoresis. The abundance of total core-fucosylated residues and the expression of enzymes involved in core-fucosylation were analyzed with lectin blot, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot, Immunohistochemical staining and lectin-histochemical staining. The recombinant plasmids of GDP-fucose transporter and α-1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) were constructed and transfected into gastric cancer cell lines BGC-823 and SGC-7901. CCK-8 and wound healing assay were used to assess the functional impact of core-fucosylation modulation on cell proliferation and migration. Characteristic serum N-glycan profiles were found in gastric cancer. Compared with the healthy control, a trianntenary structure abundance, peak 9 (NA3Fb), was increased significantly in gastric cancer, while the total abundance of core-fucosylated residues (sumfuc) was decreased. Core-fucosylated structures, peak6(NA2F) and peak7(NA2FB) were deceased in gastric tumor tissues when compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues. Consistently, lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA)-binding proteins were decreased significantly in sera of gastric cancer, and protein level of Fut8 was decreased significantly in gastric tumor tissues compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues. Upregulation of GDP-Tr and Fut8 could inhibit proliferation, but had no significant influence on migration of BGC-823 and SGC-7901 cells. Core-fucosylation is down regulated in gastric cancer. Upregulation of core-fucosylation could inhibit proliferation of the human

  5. Expression and clinical significance of Beclin-1 in gastric cancer tissues of various clinical stages

    PubMed Central

    FEI, BINGYUAN; JI, FUJIAN; CHEN, XUEBO; LIU, ZHUO; LI, SHUO; MO, ZHANHAO; FANG, XUEDONG

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a common phenomenon in cancer metabolism. However the mechanism and guiding significance of autophagy in the development of gastric cancer has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, 75 gastric cancer tissue specimens were collected at The China Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China). Of these samples, 16 cases were stage 1, 40 stage 2 and 19 stage 3. Polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the messenger RNA and protein expression of Beclin-1, a significant protein associated with cellular autophagy. It was found that expression of Beclin-1 in cancer tissues from stages 1 and 2 was higher, while in stage 3 cases levels were significantly lower than that of adjacent normal tissues. In addition, the infiltration of inflammatory cytokines was also increased in stage 1 and 2 cases. In vitro studies revealed that following stimulation with interferon-γ (IFN-γ), autophagy-associated proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 were activated. Furthermore, activation of autophagy inhibited xenograft growth in nude mice. The results of these in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that in gastric cancer tissues, autophagy was downregulated following the development of cancer tissue and that inflammation may be a significant factor in this process. IFN-γ may be involved in the mediation of this process and thus present a novel target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26998161

  6. Expression of SPARC like protein 1 (SPARCL1), extracellular matrix-associated protein is down regulated in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakharia, Aniruddha; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti

    2016-01-01

    Background SPARC-like protein 1 (SPARCL1/Hevin), a member of the SPARC family is defined by the presence of a highly acidic domain-I, a follistatin-like domain, and an extracellular calcium (EC) binding domain. SPARCL1 has been shown to be down-regulated in many types of cancer and may serve as a negative regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Methods Both tumor and adjacent normal tissue were collected from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Monoclonal antibody developed against recombinant SPARCL1 was used to analyze the expression of SPARCL1 by immunohisto chemical and western blotting (WB) analysis. Results The expression of SPARCL1 was found to be significantly lower or negligible in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues in nearly all of the cases in comparison with adjacent normal tissue. This comparison was found to be independent of the patient’s age, sex, and stage of cancer. Conclusions We postulate that down regulation of SPARCL1 may be related to inactivation of its tumor suppressor functions and might play an important role in the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27034797

  7. Gastric mycosis following gastric resection and vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Rehnberg, O; Faxen, A; Haglund, U; Kewenter, J; Stenquist, B; Olbe, L

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective five-year follow-up study of 289 consecutive patients subjected to antrectomy and gastroduodenostomy with or without vagotomy, 130 patients underwent gastroscopy. Gastric mycosis was present almost exclusively in patients subjected to combined antrectomy and vagotomy (36%). Gastric acidity seemed to be of only minor or no importance in the development of the mycosis. The residual volume in the gastric remnant was significantly higher in patients with gastric mycosis. The impaired emptying of the gastric remnant is most likely a vagotomy effect and may be the main reason for the development of gastric mycosis. A simple but effective method was developed to evacuate gastric yeast cell aggregates. Gastric mycosis seems to give rise to only slight symptoms, mainly nausea and foul-smelling belching, whereas the reflux of duodenal contents that often occurred in combination with gastric mycosis was more likely to cause gastritis and substantial discomfort. PMID:7092348

  8. Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge; Obesity gastric banding discharge; Weight loss - gastric banding discharge ... as your body gets used to your weight loss and your weight becomes stable. Weight loss may be slower after ...

  9. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity gastric bypass discharge; Weight loss - gastric bypass discharge ... al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised ...

  10. Gastric adenocarcinoma with prostatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Roshni, S; Anoop, Tm; Preethi, Tr; Shubanshu, G; Lijeesh, Al

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma to the prostate gland is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old man with prostatic metastasis diagnosed through the analysis of biopsy specimens from representative lesions in the stomach and prostate gland. Immunohistochemistry of the prostatic tissue showed positive staining for cytokeratin 7 and negative staining for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), whereas the serum PSA level was normal, confirming the diagnosis of prostatic metastasis from carcinoma of the stomach. PMID:25061542

  11. Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Prostatic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, S; Preethi, TR; Shubanshu, G; Lijeesh, AL

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma to the prostate gland is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old man with prostatic metastasis diagnosed through the analysis of biopsy specimens from representative lesions in the stomach and prostate gland. Immunohistochemistry of the prostatic tissue showed positive staining for cytokeratin 7 and negative staining for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), whereas the serum PSA level was normal, confirming the diagnosis of prostatic metastasis from carcinoma of the stomach. PMID:25061542

  12. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  13. Identification of Gastric Cancer Biomarkers Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gokula Krishnan; Yong, Wei Peng; Yeow, Chen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Existing gastric cancer diagnosing methods were invasive, hence, a reliable non-invasive gastric cancer diagnosing method is needed. As a starting point, we used 1H NMR for identifying gastric cancer biomarkers using a panel of gastric cancer spheroids and normal gastric spheroids. We were able to identify 8 chemical shift biomarkers for gastric cancer spheroids. Our data suggests that the cancerous and non-cancerous spheroids significantly differ in the lipid composition and energy metabolism. These results encourage the translation of these biomarkers into in-vivo gastric cancer detection methodology using MRI-MS. PMID:27611679

  14. Surrounding Gastric Mucosa Findings Facilitate Diagnosis of Gastric Neoplasm as Gastric Adenoma or Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miike, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Miyata, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Tomoya; Noda, Yuko; Noda, Takaho; Suzuki, Sho; Takeda, Sachiko; Natsuda, Shuichiro; Sakaguchi, Mai; Maemura, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Kanna; Yamaji, Takumi; Abe, Hiroo; Iwakiri, Hisayoshi; Tahara, Yoshihiro; Hasuike, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Kitanaka, Akira; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. It is difficult to master the skill of discriminating gastric adenoma from early gastric cancer by conventional endoscopy or magnifying endoscopy combined with narrow-band imaging, because the colors and morphologies of these neoplasms are occasionally similar. We focused on the surrounding gastric mucosa findings in order to determine how to discriminate between early gastric cancer and gastric adenoma by analyzing the characteristics of the gastric background mucosa. Methods. We retrospectively examined 146 patients who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric neoplasm between October 2009 and January 2015. The boundary of atrophic gastritis was classified endoscopically according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification system. Of 146 lesions, 63 early gastric cancers and 21 gastric adenomas were ultimately evaluated and assessed. Results. Almost all gastric adenomas were accompanied by open-type gastritis, whereas 47 and 16 early gastric cancers were accompanied by open-type and closed-type gastritis, respectively (p = 0.037). Conclusions. The evaluation of the boundary of atrophic gastritis associated with gastric neoplasms appears to be useful for discrimination between early gastric cancer and gastric adenoma. When gastric neoplasm is present in the context of surrounding localized gastric atrophy, gastric cancer is probable but not certain. PMID:26858751

  15. [Gastric epithelial polyps (part two)].

    PubMed

    Espejo Romero, Luis Hernán; Navarrete Siancas, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    The following is a statistical report regarding gastric polyps: Frequency determined through endoscopic examinations was 3.6%. The terms hyperplastic polyps and adenomas were used for the classification of epithelial polyps, considering the suprafoveal hyperplasias within the hyperplastic polyps, provided they were elevated lesions. Out of 2,283 polyps, 1,959 were hyperplastic (86%) and 324 were adenomas (14%). When analyzing 780 polyps, 86 (11%) were found to have the Nakamura III category. With regard to topography, in an examination of 2253 polyps, hyperplastic polyps were located as follows: 325 (17%) in the antrum, 1402 (73%) in the body and 202 (10%) in the fundus. Adenomas had a different distribution: 212 (65%) in the antrum, 100 (31%) in the body and 12 (4%) in the fundus. Out of 371 hyperplastic polyps examined, 49% were pediculate and 51% were sessile; on the contrary, 86 % of adenomas were sessile. The average age was 66.2 years in adenoma carriers, 58.5 in those having hyperplastic polyps, and 57.4 for suprafoveal hyperplasias. In 287 adenomas, 94.1% of carriers were over 40 years old. Out of 92 adenomas examined, 21.7% evidenced adenoma metaplasia and 72.8% evidenced metaplasia in adjacent areas. Only 5.5% had no metaplasia. In 105 hyperplastic polyps studied, intestinal metaplasia was found: 16.7% in the polyp and 60% in adjacent areas. No metaplasia was found in the remaining 23.3%. Average size of the adenomas was 14 mm and of hyperplastic polyps, 11 mm. A total of 195 adenomas were smaller than 10 mm. The percentage of malignization in 288 adenomas examined was closely related to their size: 214 (66%) smaller than 20 mm, had a malignization percentage of 7%; 74 (34%) larger than 20 mm, had 51% malignization, and 86.2% malignization was found in adenomas of over 40 mm. Global malignization percentage of adenomas was 18%. However, when adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the 4.1 category of the Viena classification (non-invasive high grade

  16. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  17. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-10-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis.

  18. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  19. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  20. Gastric leiomyoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bose, B.; Candy, J.

    1970-01-01

    This paper describes two cases of gastric leiomyoblastoma (bizarre smooth muscle tumour), one of them having evidence of metastases. Both patients remain well after seven years and three and a half years respectively. The literature is reviewed, and the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed. The histological appearances are described in detail and an attempt is made to assess the criteria for the diagnosis of malignancy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:5485837

  1. Variation in Gene Expression Patterns in Human Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Leung, Suet Y.; Yuen, Siu T.; Chu, Kent-Man; Ji, Jiafu; Li, Rui; Chan, Annie S.Y.; Law, Simon; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Wong, John; So, Samuel; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the world's second most common cause of cancer death. We analyzed gene expression patterns in 90 primary gastric cancers, 14 metastatic gastric cancers, and 22 nonneoplastic gastric tissues, using cDNA microarrays representing ∼30,300 genes. Gastric cancers were distinguished from nonneoplastic gastric tissues by characteristic differences in their gene expression patterns. We found a diversity of gene expression patterns in gastric cancer, reflecting variation in intrinsic properties of tumor and normal cells and variation in the cellular composition of these complex tissues. We identified several genes whose expression levels were significantly correlated with patient survival. The variations in gene expression patterns among cancers in different patients suggest differences in pathogenetic pathways and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:12925757

  2. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  3. Identifying module biomarkers from gastric cancer by differential correlation network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Chang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (stomach cancer) is a severe disease caused by dysregulation of many functionally correlated genes or pathways instead of the mutation of individual genes. Systematic identification of gastric cancer biomarkers can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this deadly disease and help in the development of new drugs. In this paper, we present a novel network-based approach to predict module biomarkers of gastric cancer that can effectively distinguish the disease from normal samples. Specifically, by assuming that gastric cancer has mainly resulted from dysfunction of biomolecular networks rather than individual genes in an organism, the genes in the module biomarkers are potentially related to gastric cancer. Finally, we identified a module biomarker with 27 genes, and by comparing the module biomarker with known gastric cancer biomarkers, we found that our module biomarker exhibited a greater ability to diagnose the samples with gastric cancer. PMID:27703371

  4. Do calories or osmolality determine gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.B.; Levine, A.S.; Marlette, J.M.; Morley, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Recent animal studies suggest that gastric emptying is dependent on the caloric and osmotic content of the ingested food. These studies have involved intubation with infusion of liquid meals into the stomach. Scintigraphic methods, which are non-invasive and do not alter normal physiology, are now available for precise quantitation of gastric emptying. To study the role of calories and osmolality on gastric emptying, the authors employed a standardized /sup 99m/Tc-scrambled egg meal washed with 50 cc tap water in 10 normal human volunteers. A variety of simple and complex sugars, non-absorbable complex carbohydrate (polycose), medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) and gluten were dissolved in water and ingested with the test meal. Each subject acted as his own control. Coefficient of variation in control tests in each subject 12 weeks apart was 9.9%. Results showed that incremental glucose (25-66 gm) produced a linear increase in gastric emptying (T/2 control 50 +- 3, 25 gm 60 +- 3, 50 gm 79 +- 3 and 66 gm 102 +- 3 minutes). 25 gm fructose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) and 25 gm polycose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) had similar effects to glucose. 25 gm sucrose and 25 gm gluten did not significantly differ from controls. MCFA had an effect similar to 50 gm glucose - suggesting that calories are important in gastric emptying. However, 25 gm xylose markedly prolonged gastric emptying to 80 +- 5 minutes. The rank order for osmolality for substances tested MCFA = gluten < polycose < polycose < fructose < sucrose = glucose < xylose defined no relationship to gastric emptying. The authors' results suggest that neither calories nor osmolality alone determine gastric emptying. A specific food does not necessarily have the same effect on gastric emptying in different individuals.

  5. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  6. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  7. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  8. The relationship between gastric motility and nausea: gastric prokinetic agents as treatments.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Gareth J; Broad, John; Andrews, Paul L R

    2013-09-01

    Nausea is one of a cluster of symptoms described subjectively by patients with delayed gastric emptying. The mechanisms and treatments are unclear (anti-emetic drugs are not fully effective against nausea). Can nausea be relieved by stimulating gastric emptying? Physostigmine (together with atropine) has been shown experimentally to stimulate gastric motility, relieve nausea and restore normal gastric motility. Is this mimicked by gastric prokinetic drugs? The answer is complicated by mixed pharmacology. Metoclopramide increases gastric motility by activating myenteric 5-HT4 receptors but also directly inhibits vomiting via D2 and 5-HT3 receptor antagonism; relationships between increased gastric motility and relief from nausea are therefore unclear. Similarly, the D2 receptor antagonist domperidone has direct anti-emetic activity. Nevertheless, more selective 5-HT4 and motilin receptor agonists (erythromycin, directly stimulating gastric motility) inhibit vomiting in animals; low doses of erythromycin can also relieve symptoms in patients with gastroparesis. Ghrelin stimulates gastric motility and appetite mostly via vagus-dependent pathways, and inhibits vomiting in animals. To date, ghrelin receptor activation has failed to consistently improve gastric emptying or symptoms in patients with gastroparesis. We conclude that nausea can be relieved by gastric prokinetic drugs, but more clinical studies are needed using drugs with selective activity. Other mechanisms (e.g. ghrelin, vagal and central pathways, influencing a mechanistic continuum between appetite and nausea) also require exploration. These and other issues will be further explored in a forthcoming special issue of the European Journal of Pharmacology, which focusses on mechanisms of nausea and vomiting.

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  10. Effect of MWCNTs on Gastric Emptying in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Qi, W.; Geng, Yx; Pan, Dq; Lu, Y.; Xu, Jz; Wu, Ws

    2011-12-01

    After making model of gastric functional disorder (FD), part of model mice were injected intravenously (i.v.) with oxide multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs) to investigate effect of carbon nanotubes on gastric emptying. The results showed that NO content in stomach, compared with model group, was decreased significantly and close to normal level post-injection with oMWCNTs (500 and 800 μg/mouse). In contrast to FD or normal groups, the content of acetylcholine (Ach) in stomach was increased obviously in injection group with 500 or 800 μg/mouse of oMWCNTs. The kinetic curve of emptying was fitted to calculate gastric motility factor k; the results showed that the k of injection group was much higher than FD and normal. In other words, the gastric motility of FD mice was enhanced via injection with oMWCNTs. In certain dosage, oMWCNTs could improve gastric emptying and motility.

  11. Long-Term Effects of Gastric Stimulation on Gastric Electrical Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Patrick A.; Nikitina, Yana; Kedar, Archana; Lahr, Christopher J.; Helling, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluates the modeling of gastric electrophysiology tracings during long-term gastric electrical stimulation for gastroparesis. We hypothesized that serosal electrogastrogram may change over time representing gastric remodeling from gastric stimulation. Patients Sixty-five patients with gastroparesis underwent placement of gastric stimulator for refractory symptoms. Mean age at initial stimulator placement was 44 years (range, 8–76), current mean age was 49, and the majority of the subjects were female (n = 51, 78 %). Only a minority had diabetes-induced gastroparesis (n = 16, 25 %); the remainder were either idiopathic or postsurgical. Methods At the time of stimulator placement, electrogastrogram was performed after the gastric leads were placed but before stimulation was begun. Patients underwent continuous stimulation until pacer batteries depleted. At the time of replacement, before the new pacemaker was attached, electrogastrogram was again performed. Results After a mean of 3.9 years of stimulation therapy, the mean of baseline frequency before stimulation therapy was 5.06 cycles/min and declined to 3.66 after replacement (p = 0.0000002). The mean amplitude was 0.33 mV before stimulation therapy and decreased to 0.31 mV (p = 0.73). The frequency/amplitude ratio was 38.4 before stimulation therapy and decreased to 21.9 (p = 0.001). Conclusion Long-term gastric electrical stimulation causes improvement in basal unstimulated gastric frequency to near normal. PMID:22956404

  12. Anethole restores delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Asano, Teita; Aida, Shuji; Suemasu, Shintaro; Mizushima, Tohru

    2016-03-25

    Functional dyspepsia (FD), a functional gastrointestinal disorder, is characterized by persistent or recurrent postprandial upper abdominal discomfort and epigastric pain. The high prevalence of FD and associated healthcare costs suggests that treatment of this condition by methods other than prescribed medicines, such as natural products, could be beneficial. Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation play important roles in the development of FD. Anethole (1-methoxy-4-((E)-propenyl)-benzene), a major component of essential fennel oil, has been used as a flavoring, in alcoholic beverage production and in pharmaceutical formulations for many years. In this study, we examined the effects of anethole on delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation in rodents. Oral administration of anethole improved clonidine-induced delayed gastric emptying but did not affect normal gastric emptying in mice. Fennel oil and Anchu-san (a Japanese herbal medicine containing anethole) also restored delayed gastric emptying. Furthermore, oral administration of anethole stimulated gastric accommodation in rats. These results suggest that anethole could be beneficial for the treatment of FD. PMID:26915803

  13. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  14. Hematogenous Gastric Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Okamoto, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While the gastric involvement of pancreatic cancer is occasionally observed as the result of direct invasion, hematogenous gastric metastasis is rare. A 72-year-old Japanese male presented with general fatigue, pollakiuria, and thirst. Computed tomography revealed a 4.6-cm solid mass in the pancreatic tail and a 4.2-cm multilocular cystic mass in the pancreatic head with multiple liver and lymphatic metastasis. Notably, two solid masses were detected in the gastric wall of the upper body and the antrum; both were separated from the primary pancreatic cancer and seemed to be located in the submucosal layer. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a submucosal tumor with a normal mucosa in the posterior wall of the upper body of the stomach, suggesting the gastric hematogenous metastasis of pancreatic cancer. The suspected diagnosis was unresectable pancreatic cancer with multiple metastases that was concomitant with the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas. PMID:27403106

  15. A model study of the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Van Duijn, B; Ypey, D L; de Goede, J; Verveen, A A; Hekkens, W

    1989-07-01

    A computer simulation model is presented of the gastric phase regulation of gastric acid secretion in humans. The model is based on experimental data from the literature and includes terms representing gastric pH and gastric volume-dependent gastrin secretion, gastrin-dependent acid secretion, food storage in the stomach, and gastric emptying. We have explored the predictive value of the model in assessing the relative importance of gastric pH-dependent and gastric volume-dependent acid secretion mechanisms under various conditions. Similarly we have studied the role of gastric acid deregulation in achlorhydria, the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and duodenal ulcer, and the influence of the antacid drugs cimetidine and ranitidine under duodenal ulcer conditions. Model analysis of normal gastric acid regulation suggests that gastric volume-controlled acid secretion is of major importance during eating and predicts that pH-dependent gastrin secretion is of major importance in preventing excessively low pH levels between meals and during the night.

  16. Teaching normal birth, normally.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Teaching normal-birth Lamaze classes normally involves considering the qualities that make birth normal and structuring classes to embrace those qualities. In this column, teaching strategies are suggested for classes that unfold naturally, free from unnecessary interventions. PMID:19436595

  17. RABEX-5 overexpression in gastric cancer is correlated with elevated MMP-9 level

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lili; Hao, Xuwen; Tang, Yanping; Wei, Xiaodong; Gong, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate mRNA and protein expression levels of RABEX-5 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), their mutual correlation, and biological behavior in gastric cancer (GC) patients. Methods: The expression levels of RABEX-5 and MMP-9 were determined by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting in cell lines, GC tissues, and adjacent normal tissues. In addition, RABEX-5 and MMP-9 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed tissues from 113 GC patients. Results: The mRNA and protein expression levels of RABEX-5 and MMP-9 in GC cell lines and GC tissues were higher than those in normal gastric mucosa cell line and adjacent normal tissues. RABEX-5 expression and MMP-9 expression in GC tissues were significantly and positively correlated. In addition, the size of tumor (p<0.001), Lauren’s classification (p=0.009), and N stage (p<0.001) were identified as the relative factors of RABEX-5 expression, whereas the expression of MMP-9 was correlated with N stage (p=0.003). The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that the independent predictive factors of overall survival were T stage (hazard ratio (HR)=2.382; p=0.028), N stage (HR=1.755; p<0.001), RABEX-5 expression (HR=0.452; p=0.004), and MMP-9 expression (HR=0.561; p=0.032). Conclusions: RABEX-5 and MMP-9 expression levels were elevated in GC tissues and were associated with tumor invasion, metastasis, and prognosis. Therefore, they may be promising prognostic indicators of survival in GC patients. PMID:27347344

  18. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  19. Decrease in nucleophosmin/B23 mRNA and telomerase activity during indomethacin-induced apoptosis of gastric KATO-III cancer cells.

    PubMed

    You, B J; Huang, I J; Liu, W H; Hung, Y B; Chang, J H; Yung, B Y

    1999-12-01

    The mRNA expression of nucleophosmin/B23 in gastric cancers (T) and the matched adjacent "normal" gastric mucosa (N) obtained from patients without any preoperative treatment were determined. Telomerase activity was detected in tumor tissues from six of seven patients. Analysis of the adjacent "normal" gastric mucosa in the same patients revealed all seven were negative for telomerase activity. In comparing clinical data for all seven patients, the stages of cancer seemed to be associated with T/N nucleophosmin/B23 mRNA expression. Cancers of later stages seemed to have higher T/N nucleophosmin/B23 mRNA ratio. After 3-4 days of 1 mM indomethacin treatment about 60-85% of gastric cultured KATO III cancer cells exhibited the features with highly condensed nuclei and decrease in cell size. Concomitant with the increase in the percentage of KATO III cells exhibiting the morphological features of apoptosis, there was a decrease in the viability of cells as determined by exclusion of trypan blue. A decline in telomerase activity in indomethacin-treated versus untreated cells was observed over times (2-4 days). The steady-state level of nucleophosmin/B23 mRNA, as determined by the levels of radioactivity of the hybridizing bands also decreased during the indomethacin treatment. At some times after the removal of indomethacin, cell growth and telomerase activity resumed in little extent (approx. 60%). When nucleophosmin/B23 antisense oligonucleotide was included in the cell culture upon removal of indomethacin, virtually no recovery of cell growth and telomerase activity were observed. PMID:10619186

  20. Clinicopathologic and molecular features associated with patient age in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Yeon; Jin, Eun Hyo; Jo, Hyun Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Nayoung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Lee, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare characteristics and prognosis of gastric cancer based on age. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on clinical and molecular data from patients (n = 1658) with confirmed cases of gastric cancer in Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Seoul, South Korea) from 2003 to 2010 after exclusion of patients diagnosed with lymphoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and metastatic cancer in the stomach. DNA was isolated from tumor and adjacent normal tissue, and a set of five markers was amplified by polymerase chain reaction to assess microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI was categorized as high, low, or stable if ≥ 2, 1, or 0 markers, respectively, had changed. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue sections to detect levels of expression of p53, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor. Statistical analysis of clinical and molecular data was performed to assess prognosis based on the stratification of patients by age (≤ 45 and > 45 years). RESULTS: Among the 1658 gastric cancer patients, the number of patients with an age ≤ 45 years was 202 (12.2%; 38.9 ± 0.4 years) and the number of patients > 45 years was 1456 (87.8%; 64.1 ± 0.3 years). Analyses revealed that females were predominant in the younger group (P < 0.001). Gastric cancers in the younger patients exhibited more aggressive features and were at a more advanced stage than those in older patients. Precancerous lesions, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, were observed less frequently in the older than in the younger group (P < 0.001). Molecular characteristics, including overexpression of p53 (P < 0.001), overexpression of HER-2 (P = 0.006), and MSI (P = 0.006), were less frequent in gastric cancer of younger patients. Cancer related mortality was higher in younger patients (P = 0.048), but this difference was not significant after adjusting for the stage of cancer. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer is distinguishable

  1. Primary gastric tuberculosis mimicking gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eray, İsmail Cem; Rencüzoğulları, Ahmet; Yalav, Orçun; Dalcı, Kubilay; Kakil, Erdem; Bağır, Emine; Parsak, Cem Kaan

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old female patient with no previous known diseases who had complaints of postprandial epigastric pain and weight loss and who could not be diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy, although gastric cancer was suspected radiologically and endoscopically, was diagnosed with primary gastric tuberculosis by laparotomy and frozen section. Following anti-tuberculosis treatment, a complete clinical, radiological, and endoscopic response was achieved. PMID:26504425

  2. Nebivolol prevents indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Eman G; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Selim, Hend M

    2016-07-01

    Gastric ulcer is a very common gastrointestinal disease that may lead to dangerous complications and even death. This study was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effect of nebivolol against indomethacin [INDO]-induced gastric ulcer. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: normal control, ulcer control (INDO only), omeprazole before INDO and nebivolol before INDO. Each rat to receive nebivolol and omeprazole was given the agent orally (by gavage) daily for 10 days prior to induction of ulcer by oral dosing with INDO. Four hours after INDO treatment, all rats were euthanized and their stomachs obtained for measures of gastric acidity, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, as well as cytoprotective mediators. The results showed that a single oral dose of INDO (100 mg/kg) induced gastric acidity, an ulcer index of 2900 and significantly increased levels of gastric tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and malondialdehyde (MDA) and significantly decreased levels of gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO), compared to in normal control counterpart stomachs. Giving nebivolol before INDO corrected the gastric acidity and resulted in a significant increase in GSH, PGE2 and NO and a significant decrease in TNFα and MDA gastric levels, compared to ulcer control values. Results obtained with nebivolol were comparable to those with omeprazole; the preventive index in the nebivolol group was 90.7% compared to 94.5% in rats in the omeprazole group. These studies showed that nebivolol provided a valuable role in preventing gastric ulcers induced by INDO and provided a promise for potentially protecting hypertensive patients from experiencing gastric ulcer. Thus, it is possible that, pending further studies, nebivolol could be used for pre-exposure prophylaxis from gastric ulcer in these patients.

  3. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described.

  4. [Gastric cancer in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Wu, M S; Lin, J T; Lee, W J; Yu, S C; Wang, T H

    1994-09-01

    The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis and thus primary prevention is feasible after improvement of these factors. The 5-year survival rate of resected early gastric cancer is over 90% and this provides an excellent paradigm for secondary prevention. Though its mortality rate has declined since 1970, gastric cancer remains common and carries a high mortality in Taiwan where about 2,000 patients die of gastric cancer annually. The age-adjusted mortality is 16.54 and 8.16/100,000 for male and female, ranking the third and fourth cancer death respectively. Epidemiologic data disclose a positive association between gastric cancer and some dietary factors in Taiwan. However, the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and hereditary susceptibility should be elucidated in the future. Endoscopy with biopsy is an excellent method of the diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its invasiveness makes it impractical as a screening tool and thus the proportion of early gastric cancer to gastric cancer remains as low as 30% in most reports. The value of lymph node dissection remains controversial although surgery is one of the most effective methods of eradicating gastric cancer. Overall, the 5 year survival rate is 24.5% to 54%. Laser therapy is usually reserved for patients with high operative risk and specific types of gastric cancer. To improve the survival results, development of a simple and economic screening program based on the epidemiologic results and utilization of noninvasive examinations such as serologic markers to diagnose and treat gastric cancer at its earliest stage deserves further study.

  5. PINCH Expression and Its Clinicopathological Significance in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen-Long; Yan, Bao-Yong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Zheng-Min; Zhang, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) is an important component of the local adhesion complexes and upregulated in several types of malignancies, and involved in the incidence and development of tumours. PINCH expression is also independently correlated with poorer survival in patients with colorectal cancer. However, there is no study of PINCH in gastric cancer, therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate PINCH expression and its clinicopathological significance in gastric adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods: PINCH expression was immunohistochemically examined in normal gastric mucous (n = 30) and gastric adenocarcinoma (n = 73), from gastric cancer patients. Results: PINCH expression in the associated-stroma of gastric cancers was heterogeneous, and its positive rate (75%) was higher than that of normal gastric mucosa (43%, X2 = 9.711, p = 0.002). The stronger staining was observed at the invasive edge of tumour when compared to the inner area of tumour. The rate of positive PINCH (88%) in the cases with lymph node metastasis was higher than that (52%) in the cases without metastasis (X2 = 11.151, p = 0.001). PINCH expression was not correlated with patients’ gender, age, tumour size, differentiation and invasion depth (p > 0.05). Comclusion: PINCH protein might play an important role in the tumourigenesis and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:22976000

  6. Metastasis-associated long non-coding RNA drives gastric cancer development and promotes peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toiyama, Yuji; Hur, Keun; Toden, Shusuke; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato; Boland, C Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of gastric cancer (GC) patients with peritoneal dissemination remains poor, and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is critical for the development of new treatments that will improve survival in these patients. This study aimed to clarify the clinical and biological role of two key metastasis-associated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in GC. We analyzed the expression levels of two lncRNAs-Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) and HOX-Antisense Intergenic RNA (HOTAIR)-by real-time reverse transcription PCR in 300 gastric tissues (150 GC and 150 adjacent normal mucosa), and in seven GC cell lines. Functional characterization for the role of HOTAIR in GC was performed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown, followed by series of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. Expression of both lncRNAs was significantly higher in cancerous tissues than in corresponding normal mucosa, and higher expression of these lncRNAs significantly correlated with peritoneal metastasis in GC patients. In addition, elevated HOTAIR expression emerged both as an independent prognostic and risk factor for peritoneal dissemination. SiRNA knockdown of HOTAIR in GC cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, but concurrently enhanced the anoikis rate in transfected cells. In an in vivo assay, HOTAIR siRNA-transfected MKN45 cells injected into nude mice inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors and peritoneal metastasis compared with controls. Our data provide novel evidence for the biological and clinical significance of HOTAIR expression as a potential biomarker for identifying patients with peritoneal metastasis, and as a novel therapeutic target in patients with gastric neoplasia.

  7. Metastasis-associated long non-coding RNA drives gastric cancer development and promotes peritoneal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toiyama, Yuji; Hur, Keun; Toden, Shusuke; Saigusa, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato; Boland, C.Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of gastric cancer (GC) patients with peritoneal dissemination remains poor, and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is critical for the development of new treatments that will improve survival in these patients. This study aimed to clarify the clinical and biological role of two key metastasis-associated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in GC. We analyzed the expression levels of two lncRNAs—Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) and HOX-Antisense Intergenic RNA (HOTAIR)—by real-time reverse transcription PCR in 300 gastric tissues (150 GC and 150 adjacent normal mucosa), and in seven GC cell lines. Functional characterization for the role of HOTAIR in GC was performed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown, followed by series of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. Expression of both lncRNAs was significantly higher in cancerous tissues than in corresponding normal mucosa, and higher expression of these lncRNAs significantly correlated with peritoneal metastasis in GC patients. In addition, elevated HOTAIR expression emerged both as an independent prognostic and risk factor for peritoneal dissemination. SiRNA knockdown of HOTAIR in GC cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, but concurrently enhanced the anoikis rate in transfected cells. In an in vivo assay, HOTAIR siRNA-transfected MKN45 cells injected into nude mice inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors and peritoneal metastasis compared with controls. Our data provide novel evidence for the biological and clinical significance of HOTAIR expression as a potential biomarker for identifying patients with peritoneal metastasis, and as a novel therapeutic target in patients with gastric neoplasia. PMID:25280565

  8. Changes in gastric myoelectric activity during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Sandoz, Gwenn R.; Stern, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine postprandial myoelectric activity of the stomach and gastric activity associated with space motion sickness using electrogastrography. Three crewmembers participated in this investigation. Preflight, subjects exhibited normal postprandial responses to the ingestion of a meal. Inflight, crewmembers exhibited an abnormal decrease in the power of the normal gastric slow wave after eating on flight day 1, but had a normal postprandial response by flight day 3. Prior to and during episodes of nausea and vomiting, the electrical activity of the stomach became dysrhythmic with 60-80% of the spectral power in the bradygastric and tachygastric frequency ranges. These findings indicate that gastric motility may be decreased during the first few days of space flight. In addition, changes in the frequency of the gastric slow wave associated with space motion sickness symptoms are consistent with those reported for laboratory-induced motion sickness.

  9. Gastroprotective potentials of the ethanolic extract of Mukia maderaspatana against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Gomathy, G; Venkatesan, D; Palani, S

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of the ethanolic extract of Mukia maderaspatana against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Gastric ulceration was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of indomethacin (30 mg/kg b.wt.). M. maderaspatana extract produced significant reduction in gastric mucosal lesions, malondialdehyde and serum tumour necrosis factor-α associated with a significant increase in gastric juice mucin content and gastric mucosal catalase, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 levels. The volume and acidity of the gastric juice decreased in pretreated rats. The plant extract was evaluated in the gastric juice of rats, untreated has showed near normal levels in pretreated rats. The M. maderaspatana was able to decrease acidity and increase the mucosal defence in the gastric area, therefore justifying its use as an antiulcerogenic agent. Ranitidine significantly increased pH value and decreased pepsin activity and gastric juice free and total acidity. The anti-ulcer effect was further confirmed histologically.

  10. Increased gastric PCO2 during exercise is indicative of gastric ischaemia: a tonometric study

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, J; Groeneveld, A; van der Berg, F G; Rauwerda, J; Meuwissen, S

    1999-01-01

    Background—Diagnosis of gastric ischaemia is difficult and angiography is an invasive procedure. Angiographic findings may not correlate with clinical importance. 
Aims—To investigate whether tonometric measurement of intragastric PCO2 during exercise can be used to detect clinically important gastric ischaemia. 
Methods—Fourteen patients with unexplained abdominal pain or weight loss were studied. Splanchnic angiography served as the gold standard. Three patients were studied again after a revascularisation procedure. Gastric PCO2 was measured from a nasogastric tonometer, with 10 minute dwell times, and after acid suppression. Gastric and capillary PCO2 were measured before, during, and after submaximal exercise of 10 minutes duration. 
Results—Seven patients had normal angiograms; seven had more than 50% stenosis in the coeliac (n=7) or superior mesenteric artery (n=4). Normal subjects showed no changes in tonometry. In patients with stenoses, the median intragastric PCO2 (PiCO2) at rest was 5.2 kPa (range 4.8-11.2) and rose to 6.4 kPa (range 5.7-15.7) at peak exercise; the median intragastric blood PCO2 gradient increased from 0.0 kPa (range −0.8 to 5.9) to 1.7 kPa (range 0.9 to 10.3; p<0.01). Only two subjects had abnormal tonometry at rest; all had supernormal values at peak exercise. The PCO2 gradient correlated with clinical and gastroscopic severity; in patients reexamined after revascularisation (n=3), exercise tonometry returned to normal. 
Conclusion—Gastric tonometry during exercise is a promising non-invasive tool for diagnosing and grading gastrointestinal ischaemia and evaluating the results of revascularisation surgery for symptomatic gastric ischaemia. 

 Keywords: gastric ischaemia; tonometry; carbon dioxide; exercise test PMID:9895373

  11. Spontaneous decrease in gastric secretory response to humoral stimuli.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, W

    1969-11-22

    The gastric response to pentagastrin was studied over a period of seven months in a healthy 25-year-old man without symptoms or history of gastrointestinal disease. An abrupt impairment of the gastric response to several stimulants was observed one month after starting the tests. Periodic testing since that time has shown no reversion to the type of response seen during the initial period of testing. A second subject with proved chronic duodenal ulceration presented an identical change in pattern of gastric response to stimulants.This study suggests that such a variation in the response to gastric stimulation in a subject with a normal stomach should be borne in mind when interpreting results of gastric secretory studies.

  12. Denervation suppresses gastric tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yosuke; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Westphalen, Christoph B.; Andersen, Gøran T.; Flatberg, Arnar; Johannessen, Helene; Friedman, Richard A.; Renz, Bernhard W.; Sandvik, Arne K.; Beisvag, Vidar; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Quante, Michael; Li, Zhishan; Gershon, Michael D.; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Chen, Duan

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of epithelial homeostasis and has also been postulated to play a role in tumorigenesis. We provide evidence that proper innervation is critical at all stages of gastric tumorigenesis. In three separate mouse models of gastric cancer, surgical or pharmacological denervation of the stomach (bilateral or unilateral truncal vagotomy, or local injection of botulinum toxin type A) markedly reduced tumor incidence and progression, but only in the denervated portion of the stomach. Vagotomy or botulinum toxin type A treatment also enhanced the therapeutic effects of systemic chemotherapy and prolonged survival. Denervation-induced suppression of tumorigenesis was associated with inhibition of Wnt signaling and suppression of stem cell expansion. In gastric organoid cultures, neurons stimulated growth in a Wnt-mediated fashion through cholinergic signaling. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the muscarinic acetylcholine M3 receptor suppressed gastric tumorigenesis. In gastric cancer patients, tumor stage correlated with neural density and activated Wnt signaling, whereas vagotomy reduced the risk of gastric cancer. Together, our findings suggest that vagal innervation contributes to gastric tumorigenesis via M3 receptor–mediated Wnt signaling in the stem cells, and that denervation might represent a feasible strategy for the control of gastric cancer. PMID:25143365

  13. Ramucirumab for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kohei; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, various molecular target agents have been investigated for gastric cancer. VEGF is one of the most potent angiogenic factors and is a signaling molecule secreted by many solid tumors. High VEGF expression is one of the characteristic features of gastric carcinomas, thus targeting VEGF is considered a promising strategy for gastric cancer. Ramucirumab, an anti-VEGF receptor antibody, has proven to be effective for previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Details of ramucirumab, including two pivotal Phase III studies, will be discussed in this review. Ramucirumab, with or without chemotherapy, improved survival in gastric cancer after previous systemic chemotherapy, thus becoming the standard of care for this patient population. Optimal timing of ramucirumab use and adequate biomarkers for patient selection as well as mechanism of resistance should be explored in future research.

  14. [Intermediate gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Fontán, A N; Marzano, C A; Martínez, M M; Palau, G; Rubio, H H

    1980-01-01

    Gastric Cancer comprises two basic types: Advanced Gastric Cancer (A.G.C.) and Early Gastric Cancer (E.G.C.). A.G.C. extends beyond the proper muscle layer with a 5 to 17%, five years survival rate after surgery. E.G.C. does not extend beyond the submucosa (with or without metastasis to regional lymph nodes) and has a 80 - 95% five years survival rate. Intermediate Gastric Cancer, PM G.C. (Gastric cancer of the proper muscle layer) does not surpass the proper muscle layer and offers a five years life expectance of near 60% after adequate surgical treatment, with peculiar features in radiology, endoscopy and evolutivity. We report a case of PM G.C., "depressed" and "protruded". The proper muscle layer was invaded by the depressed lesion". Both lesions were continguous.

  15. Identification and validation of genes involved in gastric tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the common cancers seen in south India. Unfortunately more than 90% are advanced by the time they report to a tertiary centre in the country. There is an urgent need to characterize these cancers and try to identify potential biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets. Materials and methods We used 24 gastric cancers, 20 Paired normal (PN) and 5 apparently normal gastric tissues obtained from patients with non-gastric cancers (Apparently normal - AN) for the microarray study followed by validation of the significant genes (n = 63) by relative quantitation using Taqman Low Density Array Real Time PCR. We then used a custom made Quantibody protein array to validate the expression of 15 proteins in gastric tissues (4 AN, 9 PN and 9 gastric cancers). The same array format was used to study the plasma levels of these proteins in 58 patients with gastric cancers and 18 from patients with normal/non-malignant gastric conditions. Results Seventeen genes (ASPN, CCL15/MIP-1δ, MMP3, SPON2, PRSS2, CCL3, TMEPAI/PMEPAI, SIX3, MFNG, SOSTDC1, SGNE1, SST, IGHA1, AKR1B10, FCGBP, ATP4B, NCAPH2) were shown to be differentially expressed between the tumours and the paired normal, for the first time. EpCAM (p = 0.0001), IL8 (p = 0.0003), CCL4/MIP-1β (p = 0.0026), CCL20/MIP-3α (p = 0.039) and TIMP1 (p = 0.0017) tissue protein levels were significantly different (Mann Whitney U test) between tumours versus AN & PN. In addition, median plasma levels of IL8, CXCL9/MIG, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL20/MIP-3α, PDGFR-B and TIMP1 proteins were significantly different between the non-malignant group and the gastric cancer group. The post-surgical levels of EpCAM, IGFBP3, IL8, CXCL10/IP10, CXCL9/MIG, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL20/MIP-3α, SPP1/OPN and PDGFR-B showed a uniform drop in all the samples studied. Conclusions Our study has identified several genes differentially expressed in gastric cancers, some for the first time. Some of these have been confirmed at the protein level

  16. Expression of Pdx-1 in human gastric metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leys, Charles M; Nomura, Sachiyo; Rudzinski, Erin; Kaminishi, Michio; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Washington, Mary Kay; Goldenring, James R

    2006-09-01

    Metaplastic lineages represent critical putative preneoplastic precursors for gastrointestinal metaplasia. Two metaplastic processes are associated with gastric cancer: intestinal metaplasia (the presence of intestinal goblet cell containing lineages in the stomach) and spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM; antralization of the gastric fundus). The transcription factor Pdx-1 is expressed in the adult pancreatic islet cells as well as the gastric antrum and duodenum. We have previously noted the increase in Pdx-1 expression in models of TGFalpha overexpression in mice but not in other models of SPEM in rodents. We have therefore sought to examine the presence of Pdx-1 expression in gastric metaplasias and gastric adenocarcinoma in humans. Tissue microarrays containing gastric cancers from the fundus and antrum and samples of SPEM and intestinal metaplasia were immunostained for Pdx-1. Nuclear Pdx-1 expression was observed in only 50% of antral-derived cancers and was present in 40% of fundic tumors. Pdx-1 expression did not correlate with clinical outcome. Although SPEM lineages did not show any staining for Pdx-1, intestinal metaplasia showed strong nuclear staining for Pdx-1. Thus, Pdx-1 expression is not associated with antralizing metaplasia (SPEM) but is associated with intestinal metaplasia. Given the pattern of normal Pdx-1 expression in the duodenum, goblet cell metaplasia in the stomach may reflect the adoption of a duodenal lineage paradigm.

  17. Sustained pectin ingestion delays gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S E; Levine, R A; Singh, A; Scheidecker, J R; Track, N S

    1982-10-01

    The effects of sustained fiber ingestion on gastric emptying glucose tolerance, hormone responses, and jejunal absorption of glucose and lysine were studied in healthy volunteers. Subjects were placed on a low-fiber (3 g) diet for 2 wk, followed by 4 wk of an isocaloric diet supplemented with 20 g/day of either apple pectin (7 subjects) or alpha-cellulose (6 subjects). At the conclusion of each dietary period subjects ingested a low-fiber breakfast surface-labeled with 99mtechnetium sulfur-colloid. Gastric emptying half-time, plasma glucose, calcium, phosphorus, insulin, glucagon, gastrin, human pancreatic polypeptide, and motilin were determined. Gastric emptying half-time was prolonged approximately twofold after pectin supplementation (p less than 0.005) and returned to normal 3 wk after discontinuing pectin supplementation. Cellulose supplementation did not alter the gastric emptying rate. Plasma glucose, calcium, phosphorus, and hormonal responses to the meal were unchanged after either pectin or cellulose supplementation. Pectin ingestion did not impair intestinal absorption of glucose or lysine. In contrast to sustained cellulose ingestion, sustained pectin ingestion slows the gastric emptying rate; the mechanism underlying this adaptive effect is unknown.

  18. Sox2 Suppresses Gastric Tumorigenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abby; Huebner, Aaron J; Sulahian, Rita; Anselmo, Anthony; Xu, Xinsen; Flattery, Kyle; Desai, Niyati; Sebastian, Carlos; Yram, Mary Anna; Arnold, Katrin; Rivera, Miguel; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Bronson, Roderick; Bass, Adam J; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2016-08-16

    Sox2 expression marks gastric stem and progenitor cells, raising important questions regarding the genes regulated by Sox2 and the role of Sox2 itself during stomach homeostasis and disease. By using ChIP-seq analysis, we have found that the majority of Sox2 targets in gastric epithelial cells are tissue specific and related to functions such as endoderm development, Wnt signaling, and gastric cancer. Unexpectedly, we found that Sox2 itself is dispensable for gastric stem cell and epithelial self-renewal, yet Sox2(+) cells are highly susceptible to tumorigenesis in an Apc/Wnt-driven mouse model. Moreover, Sox2 loss enhances, rather than impairs, tumor formation in Apc-deficient gastric cells in vivo and in vitro by inducing Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription and upregulating intestinal metaplasia-associated genes, providing a mechanistic basis for the observed phenotype. Together, these data identify Sox2 as a context-dependent tumor suppressor protein that is dispensable for normal tissue regeneration but restrains stomach adenoma formation through modulation of Wnt-responsive and intestinal genes. PMID:27498859

  19. Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Alekshun, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Case: A 63-year-old male presented with unintentional weight loss of 20 pounds over a 4-month duration. He reported loss of appetite, intermittent post-prandial nausea, bloating and early satiety. He also complained of dyspepsia and had been treated for reflux during the previous 2 years. He denied vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, abdominal pain, melena, hematochezia, or alterations in bowel habits. Additionally, he denied fevers, night sweats, cough, or dyspnea. He quit smoking 25 years ago, and denied alcohol use. His past medical history was significant for basal cell carcinoma treated with local curative therapy and he was without recurrence on surveillance. Pertinent family history included a paternal uncle with lung cancer at the age of 74. Physical examination was unremarkable except for occult heme-positive stools. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (ALT-112, AST-81, AlkPhos-364). CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse heterogeneous liver with extensive nodularity, raising the concern for metastases. Serum tumor-markers: PSA, CEA, CA 19-9, and AFP were all within normal limits. Screening colonoscopy was normal, but esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a malignant-appearing ulcerative lesion involving the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric cardia. Pathology confirmed an invasive gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of a hepatic lesion revealed malignant cells with cytologic features consistent with large-cell type carcinoma and positive immunostaining for synaptophysin favoring neuroendocrine differentiation. A PET-CT demonstrated intense diffuse FDG uptake of the liver, suggesting diffuse hepatic parenchymal infiltration by tumor. There were multiple foci of intense osseous FDG uptake with corresponding osteolytic lesions seen on CT scan. The remaining intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic structures were unremarkable. The patient will receive palliative systemic therapy

  20. Tests of gastric neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Jones, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Tests of gastric neuromuscular function are used to evaluate patients with symptoms referable to the upper digestive tract. These symptoms can be associated with alterations in the rates of gastric emptying, impaired accommodation, heightened gastric sensation, or alterations in gastric myoelectrical function and contractility. Management of gastric neuromuscular disorders requires an understanding of pathophysiology and treatment options as well as the appropriate use and interpretation of diagnostic tests. These tests include measures of gastric emptying; contractility; electrical activity; regional gastric motility of the fundus, antrum, and pylorus; and tests of sensation and compliance. Tests are also being developed to improve our understanding of the afferent sensory pathways from the stomach to the central nervous system that mediate gastric sensation in health and gastric disorders. This article reviews tests of gastric function and provides a basic description of the tests, the methodologies behind them, descriptions of the physiology that they assess, and their clinical utility. PMID:19293005

  1. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band after laparoscopic gastric bypass and following placement of adjustable gastric band

    PubMed Central

    Lanaia, Andrea; Zizzo, Maurizio; Cartelli, Concetto M.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Bonilauri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Banded gastric bypass is a bariatric surgical intervention that has been regularly performed in many centers. According to some series, banded gastric bypass is safe and feasible. We describe the case of a 42-year-old woman undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass in 2008. Subsequently, she underwent surgery in order to place adjustable gastric banding on previous bypass because of gastric pouch dilatation. Five months later, patient showed anorexia and signs of malnutrition. For this reason, she underwent laparoscopic removal of gastric banding. In our opinion, placing a device to restrict an already dilated gastric pouch must be avoided. PMID:26232597

  2. PIVKA-II-producing advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shigetsugu; Honda, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Soda, Hiroaki; Nagata, Matsuo; Hoshino, Isamu; Takenouchi, Toshinao; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2004-08-01

    We describe the case of a 68-year-old man with primary advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach, who displayed extremely high plasma levels of protein induced by vitamin K antagonist (PIVKA)-II (15 600 mAU/ml) and normal levels of alphafetoprotein (AFP) (4 ng/ml). Ultrasonography and dynamic computed tomography ruled out hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastasis. After preoperative chemotherapy, pancreatico-spleno total gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy was performed. Postoperatively, plasma levels of PIVKA-II returned to within the normal range (29 mAU/ml). Microscopic examination revealed stomach adenocarcinoma showing various histological types, such as moderately to poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma, but hepatoid differentiation of gastric adenocarcinoma was not detected. Localization of PIVKA-II and AFP within tumor cells was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that tumor cells from gastric cancer may produce PIVKA-II. Some cases of PIVKA-II- and AFP-producing advanced gastric cancer with liver metastasis have been reported, but this is the first report of gastric cancer without liver metastasis producing PIVKA-II alone.

  3. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  4. [Elevated gastric lesions].

    PubMed

    de Careaga, B; Villagómez, G; Pabón, J; Calderón, O; Elío, D; Pérez, J; Martínez, M; Patiño, F; Ponce, R; Lora, J

    1986-01-01

    Elevated gastric lesions, represent an important group among gastric pathology. To establish its incidence in our experience, we studied the endoscopic reports of two important hospitals in La Paz city: Instituto de Gastroenterología Boliviano Japonés and Hospital Obrero No. 1. In order to make a good endoscopic diagnosis among different elevated lesions we use some parameters like: location, shape, size, diameter, surface of the lesion and surrounding mucosa and characteristics of the falls. 10.472 endoscopic reports were reviewed, 497 elevated gastric lesions were found, 475 corresponded to mucosal lesions (352 benign lesions and 123 malignant lesions), 11 to submucosal and 11 extragastric lesions.

  5. Helicobacter pylori modulation of gastric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Calam, J.

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays major causative roles in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Elevated acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcers (DUs) contributes to duodenal injury, and diminished acid secretion in patients with gastric cancer allows carcinogen-producing bacteria to colonize the stomach. Eradication of H. pylori normalizes acid secretion both in hyper-secreting DU patients and hypo-secreting relatives of gastric cancer patients. Therefore, we and others have asked how H. pylori causes these disparate changes in acid secretion. H. pylori gastritis more or less restricted to the gastric antrum in DU patients is associated with increased acid secretion. This is probably because gastritis increases release of the antral acid-stimulating hormone gastrin and diminished mucosal expression of the inhibitory peptide somatostatin. Bacterial products and inflammatory cytokines including TNFalpha may cause these changes in endocrine function. Gastritis involving the gastric corpus tends to diminish acid secretion, probably because bacterial products and cytokines including IL-1 inhibit parietal cells. Pharmacological inhibition of acid secretion increases corpus gastritis in H. pylori-infected subjects, so it is envisaged that gastric hypo-secretion of any cause might become self-perpetuating. H. pylori-associated mucosal atrophy will also contribute to acid hypo-secretion and is more likely in when the diet is high in salt or lacking in antioxidant vitamins. Data on gastric acid secretion in patients with esophagitis are limited but suggest that acid secretion is normal or slightly diminished. Nevertheless, H. pylori infection may be relevant to the management of esophagitis because: (i) H. pylori infection increases the pH-elevating effect of acid inhibiting drugs; (ii) proton pump inhibitors may increase the tendency of H. pylori to cause atrophic gastritis; and (iii) successful eradication of H. pylori is reported to increase the likelihood of

  6. Gastric Duplication Cyst With Elevated Amylase: An Unusual Presentation Mimicking Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Karanovic, Djuro; Chalhoub, Walid; Ajmera, Akash; Maufa, Fuad; Zeck, Jay C.; Shafa, Shervin; Johnson, Lynt; Haddad, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts (EDCs) are benign congenital anomalies that are found incidentally in adults. Gastric duplication cysts (GDCs) are the least common subtype of EDC, but when located near the pancreas, may resemble other neoplastic conditions. We report a case of GDC adjacent to the pancreas with high cystic fluid amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 3 different epithelia (respiratory, gastric, and intestinal), all diagnosed via endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration. PMID:26157922

  7. Gastric Duplication Cyst With Elevated Amylase: An Unusual Presentation Mimicking Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Mohamed; Karanovic, Djuro; Chalhoub, Walid; Ajmera, Akash; Maufa, Fuad; Zeck, Jay C; Shafa, Shervin; Johnson, Lynt; Haddad, Nadim

    2015-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts (EDCs) are benign congenital anomalies that are found incidentally in adults. Gastric duplication cysts (GDCs) are the least common subtype of EDC, but when located near the pancreas, may resemble other neoplastic conditions. We report a case of GDC adjacent to the pancreas with high cystic fluid amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and 3 different epithelia (respiratory, gastric, and intestinal), all diagnosed via endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration.

  8. In vivo gastric mucosal histopathology using endocytoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Chiaki; Phlanusittepha, Chainarong; Hayee, Bu’Hussain; Santi, Esperanza Grace R; Kobayashi, Yasutoshi; Kudo, Shin-ei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the ability of endocytoscopy to identify normal gastric mucosa and to exclude Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. METHODS: Endocytoscopic examination of the gastric corpus and antrum was performed in 70 consecutive patients. Target biopsy specimens were also obtained from the assessed region and multiple H. pylori tests were performed. The normal endocytoscopy patterns of the corpus and antrum were divided into the normal pit-dominant type (n-Pit) or the normal papilla-dominant type (n-Pap), respectively characterized as either regular pits with capillary networks or round, smooth papillary structures with spiral capillaries. On the other hand, normal mucosa was defined as mucosa not demonstrating histological abnormalities, including inflammation and atrophy. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of n-Pit for normal mucosa in the gastric corpus were 94.4% and 97.1%, respectively, whereas those of n-Pap for normal mucosa in the antrum were 92.0% and 86.7%, respectively. The positive predictive values of n-Pit and n-Pap for H. pylori-negative tissue were 88.6% and 93.1%, respectively, and their negative predictive values for H. pylori-negative tissues were 42.9% and 41.5%, respectively. The inter-observer agreement for determining n-Pit and n-Pap for normal mucosa were 0.857 and 0.769, respectively, which is considered reliable. CONCLUSION: N-Pit and n-Pap, seen using EC, are considered useful predictors of normal mucosa and the absence of H. pylori infection. PMID:25945015

  9. VEGF promotes gastric cancer development by upregulating CRMP4

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianjun; Zhai, Ertao; He, Yulong; Wu, Hui; Chen, Chuangqi; Ma, Jinping; Wang, Zhao; Cai, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the precise role of CRMP4 in gastric tumor growth and patient survival. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CRMP4, VEGF and VEGFR2 were validated by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. We investigated the effects on tumor growth of overexpression and knockdown of CRMP4 both in vitro and in vivo by constructing stable gastric cell lines using lentiviral-mediated transduction and shRNA interference-mediated knockdown of CRMP4 expression. We further validated the role of the ERK/AKT signaling pathways in VEGF and CRMP4 expression using ERK and PI3K inhibitors. Increased expression of VEGF and CRMP4 were observed in gastric cancer tissues compared with tumor-adjacent tissue. We found that higher CRPM4 expression was associated with lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, tumor differentiation and poorer prognosis in gastric cancer patients. In HGC27 and SGC7901 gastric cancer cells, VEGF upregulated CRMP4 in time and dose-dependent manners. Overexpression of CRMP4 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of CRMP4 expression had opposite effects. VEGF activated CRMP4 expression in gastric cancer cells, and this effect was significantly inhibited by MAPK and PI3K inhibitors (PD98059 and LY294002). In mice, CRMP4 overexpression also resulted in increased tumor growth. These results suggest that increased CRMP4 expression mediated by the activation of VEGF signaling facilitates gastric tumor growth and metastasis, which may have clinical implications associated with a reduced survival rate in gastric cancer patients. PMID:26934554

  10. Automated analysis for scintigraphic evaluation of gastric emptying using invariant moments.

    PubMed

    Abutaleb, A; Delalic, Z J; Ech, R; Siegel, J A

    1989-01-01

    This study introduces a method for automated analysis of the standard solid-meal gastric emptying test. The purpose was to develop a diagnostic tool to characterize more reproducibly abnormalities of solid-phase gastric emptying. The processing of gastric emptying is automated using geometrical moments that are invariant to scaling, rotation, and shift. Twenty subjects were studied. The first step was to obtain images of the stomach using a nuclear gamma camera immediately after the subject had eaten a radio-labeled meal. The second step was to process and analyze the images by a recently developed automated gastric emptying analysis (AGEA) method, which determines the gastric contour and the geometrical properties include such parameters as area, centroid, orientation, and moments of inertia. Statistical tests showed that some of the moments were sensitive to the patient's gastric status (normal versus abnormal). The difference between the normal and abnormal patients became noticeable approximately 1 h after meal ingestion. PMID:18230536

  11. Cancer stem cells in Helicobacter pylori infection and aging: Implications for gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Edi; Sochacki, Paula; Khoury, Nabiha; Patel, Bhaumik B; Majumdar, Adhip PN

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrated the combined effects of aging and carcinogen treatment on cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs) of gastric mucosa in an animal model. METHODS: In this study we investigated the effects of aging and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) inflammation as a model for inflammation induced carcinogenesis in human and rat gastric mucosa samples. In aging studies, we compared 4-mo old (young) with 22 mo (aged) old Fischer-344 rats. For human studies, gastric biopsies and resection specimens representing normal mucosa or different stages of H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas were used for determining the expression of stem cell markers CD166, ALDH1 and LGR5. In addition we performed immunofluorescent double labeling for B-catenin and Lgr5 in both rat and human gastric tissues to examine the status of Wnt signaling in these cells. RESULTS: CSC markers ALDH1, LGR5, and CD166 were expressed in very low levels in normal human gastric mucosa or young rat gastric mucosa. In contrast, level of expression for all three markers significantly increased in H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas as well as in normal gastric mucosa in aged rats. We also observed cytoplasmic B-catenin staining in both aged rat and human H. pylori inflamed gastric mucosa, which were found to be colocalized with Lgr5 immunoreactive cells. The increased number of ALDH1, CD166 and LGR5 positive cells in H. pylori gastritis indicates that increased number of stem-like cells in gastric mucosa is an early event, and may constitute an important step in the progression to neoplasia. CONCLUSION: Our observation of the age-related increase in cancer stem/stem-like cells in the gastric mucosa may explain the increased incidence of gastric cancer during aging. Combination of aging and H. pylori infection may have additive effects in progression to neoplasia. PMID:25133037

  12. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    León-Barúa, R; Recavarren-Arce, S; Berendson, R; Gilman, R H

    1995-01-01

    A review is done on the evidence in favor of a link between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer of the intestinal type. In countries at high risk of gastric cancer, like Perú, Hp infection begins early in life and is highly frequent and persistent. When Hp colonizes the gastric mucosa, it causes active chronic gastritis. Initially, the gastritis is of the superficial type. With time, and probably as a result of the concurrent action of nutritional, epidemiologic and immunologic modulating factors, chronic superficial gastritis may give rise to a progressive gastric pathology that leads to gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and increases the predisposition to gastric cancer. The principal modulating factors are described. The epidemiology of gastric premalignant lesions in Perú is also described. Finally, a discussion is done on the effect that eradication of Hp infection might have on the prevalence of gastric cancer.

  13. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  14. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  15. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  16. Inhibitory neurotransmission regulates vagal efferent activity and gastric motility.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, Caitlin A; Travagli, R Alberto; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract receives extrinsic innervation from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which regulate and modulate the function of the intrinsic (enteric) nervous system. The stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract in particular are heavily influenced by the parasympathetic nervous system, supplied by the vagus nerve, and disruption of vagal sensory or motor functions results in disorganized motility patterns, disrupted receptive relaxation and accommodation, and delayed gastric emptying, amongst others. Studies from several laboratories have shown that the activity of vagal efferent motoneurons innervating the upper GI tract is inhibited tonically by GABAergic synaptic inputs from the adjacent nucleus tractus solitarius. Disruption of this influential central GABA input impacts vagal efferent output, hence gastric functions, significantly. The purpose of this review is to describe the development, physiology, and pathophysiology of this functionally dominant inhibitory synapse and its role in regulating vagally determined gastric functions. PMID:27302177

  17. [A case of subcapsular liver abscess secondary to perforating ulcer of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Gwang; Kim, Do Hyeong; Lee, Chang Hun

    2010-08-01

    Intrahepatic abscess is an unusual complication of peptic ulcer disease. We present a case of gastric cancer in which the ulcer penetrated into the left lobe of liver with subsequent abscess and fistula formation. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy confirmed ulcers and a fistula opening in the antrum. Abdominal computed tomogram showed a subcapsular liver abscess adjacent to the gastric antrum. Subtotal gastrectomy with curettage of the fistulous tract was performed. The final diagnosis was the signet ring cell gastric carcinoma complicating subcapsular liver abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in Korea.

  18. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Jason D; Lee, Monica D; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  19. Molecular disorganization of axons adjacent to human lacunar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Monica D.; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microvascular disease predominantly affects brain white matter and deep grey matter, resulting in ischaemic damage that ranges from lacunar infarcts to white matter hyperintensities seen on magnetic resonance imaging. These lesions are common and result in both clinical stroke syndromes and accumulate over time, resulting in cognitive deficits and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that these lesions progress over time, accumulate adjacent to prior lesions and have a penumbral region susceptible to further injury. The pathological correlates of this adjacent injury in surviving myelinated axons have not been previously defined. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular organization of axons in tissue adjacent to lacunar infarcts and in the regions surrounding microinfarcts, by determining critical elements in axonal function: the morphology and length of node of Ranvier segments and adjacent paranodal segments. We examined post-mortem brain tissue from six patients with lacunar infarcts and tissue from two patients with autosomal dominant retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy (previously known as hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke) who accumulate progressive white matter ischaemic lesions in the form of lacunar and microinfarcts. In axons adjacent to lacunar infarcts yet extending up to 150% of the infarct diameter away, both nodal and paranodal length increase by ∼20% and 80%, respectively, reflecting a loss of normal cell-cell adhesion and signalling between axons and oligodendrocytes. Using premorbid magnetic resonance images, brain regions from patients with retinal vasculopathy and cerebral leukoencephalopathy that harboured periventricular white matter hyperintensities were selected and the molecular organization of axons was determined within these regions. As in regions adjacent to lacunar infarcts, nodal and paranodal length in white matter of these patients is

  20. An Adult Gastric Duplication Cyst Mimicking a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Takenori; Furihata, Makoto; Nagao, Sayaka; Wada, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a rare case of a 24-year-old man who presented with severe epigastralgia after consuming a considerable amount of broiled meat. Computed tomography revealed a cystic lesion adjacent to the distal stomach, with high intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Upper endoscopy showed a cystic mass measuring 6 cm in diameter, mimicking a submucosal tumor adjacent to the pyloric valve, with duodenum invagination, characteristic of ball valve syndrome. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed that the lesion was contiguous through the first to the third layer of the stomach. Therefore, we performed distal gastrectomy. Pathology showed that the lesion was a gastric duplication cyst without malignancy. PMID:27580540

  1. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlGhamdi, Salem; Al-Kasim, Fawaz; Habib, Zakaria; Ourfali, Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:24707411

  2. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty

  3. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  4. Gastric tube perforation after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Hideyuki; Nakachi, Takeshi; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Takemura, Akira; Shimazaki, Jiro; Konishi, Satoru; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2011-05-01

    We searched for cases of perforation of the gastric tube after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer by reviewing the literature. Only 13 cases were found in the English literature, and serious complications were seen in all cases, especially in cases of posterior mediastinal reconstruction. However, in the Japanese literature serious complications were also frequently seen in retrosternal reconstruction. Gastric tubes are at a higher risk of developing an ulcer than the normal stomach, including an ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori infection, insufficient blood supply, gastric stasis, and bile juice regurgitation. H. pylori eradication and acid-suppressive medications are important preventive therapies for ordinary gastric ulcers, but for gastric tube ulcers the effects of such treatments are still controversial. We tried to determine the most appropriate treatment to avoid serious complications in the gastric tubes, but we could not confirm an optimal route because each had advantages and disadvantages. However, at least in cases with severe atrophic gastritis due to H. pylori infection or a history of frequent peptic ulcer treatment, the antesternal route is clearly the best. Many cases of gastric tube ulcers involve no pain, and vagotomy may be one of the reasons for this absence of pain. Therefore, periodic endoscopic examination may be necessary to rule out the presence of an ulcer.

  5. Detection of microsatellite instability in gastric cancer and dysplasia tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Liu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Shao-Hua; Sun, Peng; Gong, Fang-Ming; Jia, Bao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between gastric cancer and microsatellite instability (MSI) in the present study. Method: Phenol-chloroform method was employed for DNA extraction from the cancer tissues of 65gastric cancer patients and the dysplasia tissues and normal control tissues of 32 non-gastric cancer patients. The microsatellite loci Bat25, Bat26, D2S123, D5S346 and D17S250 were detected by using PCR-SSCP silver staining technique, and the MSI of the gastric cancer tissues and the precancerous tissues was analyzed. Results: Of 65 gastric cancer cases, MSI was detected in 43 cases, with the detection rate of 66.2%. There were 13 cases showing MSI-H and 30 cases showing MSI-L, accounting for 30.2% and 69.8%, respectively. Among 32 cases of dysplasia tissues, MSI was detected in 10 cases, with the detection rate of 31.3%. Two cases of dysplasia tissues showed MSI-H and 8 cases showed MSI-L, accounting for 20.0% and 80.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Gastric cancer patients had a high detection rate of MSI. It is speculated that MSI is another molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and may serve as a sensitive diagnostic indicator of gastric cancer. PMID:26885089

  6. Biphasic nature of gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J A; Urbain, J L; Adler, L P; Charkes, N D; Maurer, A H; Krevsky, B; Knight, L C; Fisher, R S; Malmud, L S

    1988-01-01

    The existence of a lag phase during the gastric emptying of solid foods is controversial. It has been hypothesised that among other early events, the stomach requires a period of time to process solid food to particles small enough to be handled as a liquid. At present no standardised curve fitting techniques exist for the characterisation and quantification of the lag phase or the emptying rate of solids and liquids. We have evaluated the ability of a modified power exponential function to define the emptying parameters of two different solid meals. Dual labelled meals were administered to 24 normal volunteers. The subjects received meals consisting of either Tc-99m in vivo labelled chicken liver or Tc-99m-egg, which have different densities, and In-111-DTPA in water. The emptying curves were biphasic in nature. For solids, this represented an initial delay in emptying or lag phase followed by an equilibrium emptying phase characterised by a constant rate of emptying. The curves were analysed using a modified power exponential function of the form y(t) = 1-(1-e-kt)beta, where y(t) is the fractional meal retention at time t, k is the gastric emptying rate in min-1, and beta is the extrapolated y-intercept from the terminal portion of the curve. The length of the lag phase and half-emptying time increased with solid food density (31 +/- 8 min and 77.6 +/- 11.2 min for egg and 62 +/- 16 min and 94.1 +/- 14.2 min for chicken liver, respectively). After the lag phase, both solids had similar emptying rates, and these rates were identical to those of the liquids. In vitro experiments indicated that the egg meal disintegrated much more rapidly than the chicken liver under mechanical agitation in gastric juice, lending further support to the hypothesis that the initial lag in emptying of solid food is due to the processing of food into particles small enough to pass the pylorus. We conclude that the modified power exponential model permits characterisation of the biphasic

  7. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance ratio for in vitro detection of human gastric pre-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Q.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; Wu, G. Y.; Xie, S. S.; Zhong, H. Q.; Li, X. Y.; Zhao, Q. L.; Guo, X.

    2010-07-01

    Oxygenated hemoglobin diffuse reflectance (DR) ratio (R540/R575) method based on DR spectral signatures is used for early diagnosis of malignant lesions of human gastric epithelial tissues in vitro. The DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues were measured using a spectrometer with an integrating sphere detector in the spectral range from 400 to 650 nm. The results of measurement showed that the average DR spectral intensity for the epithelial tissues of normal stomach is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of chronic and malignant stomach and that for the epithelial tissues of chronic gastric ulcer is higher than that for the epithelial tissues of malignant stomach. The average DR spectra for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues show dips at 542 and 577 nm owing to absorption from oxygenated Hemoglobin (HbO2). The differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands are 6.84% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and chronic gastric ulcer, 14.7% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma and 22.6% between the epithelial tissues of normal stomach and undifferentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. It is evident from results that there were significant differences in the mean R540/R575 ratios of HbO2 bands for four different kinds of gastric epithelial tissues in vitro ( P < 0.01).

  9. [Tumor markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Hisanao

    2002-04-01

    There are two markers, pepsinogen isoenzymes and antibody against Helicobactor pyroli, for screening of high-risk group for gastric cancer. Most of markers are used in diagnosis, staging, monitoring and differentiating subgroups of gastric cancer. Markers in ascitic fluid are used for diagnosing peritoneal invasion of gastric cancer. PMID:11977555

  10. Assessment of gastric motility using meal labeled with technetium-99m sulfur colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.

    1983-12-01

    During a 2 year period, 83 patients with gastric motility problems were evaluated using radionuclide imaging. The patients presented with epigastric distress, postprandial fullness, pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; signs and symptoms suggestive of either gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy, or both, demonstrated no mechanical obstruction. After oral administration of a 300 g meal labeled with 600 muCi of technetium-99m sulfur colloid, a gastric emptying study consisting of serial images and data acquisition was performed. Of the patients studied, 52 had had peptic ulcer surgery, 17 were suspected of having gastroesophageal reflux, 8 were diabetic and suspected of having visceral enteropathy, and 6 had a history of irritable bowel syndrome. The normal mean gastric half emptying time was 77 +/- 16 minutes. Of the patients who had had gastric surgery, 90.4 percent had abnormal emptying: 69.2 percent had delayed gastric emptying and 21.2 percent had rapid gastric emptying time; 9.6 percent had normal emptying time. Of the gastroesophageal reflux group, all but two had normal gastric emptying time; 65 percent demonstrated gastroesophageal reflux within 15 minutes. Two of the patients with irritable bowel syndrome had prolonged emptying; the rest had normal emptying. All diabetic patients with gastroparesis had prolonged gastric emptying time, and all responded favorably to metoclopramide. Of the patients who previously had peptic ulcer surgery and had prolonged emptying time, 72 percent also responded favorably to metoclopramide. We conclude that radionuclide gastric imaging is a useful diagnostic test for the measurement of gastric emptying in patients with a variety of gastrointestinal motility disorders and may be helpful in assessing medical therapy and selecting those who may be candidates for surgery.

  11. Ganoderma lucidum Pharmacopuncture for the Treatment of Acute Gastric Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Heung; Jang, Kyung-Jun; kim, Cheol-Hong; Lee, Yoo-Hwan; Lee, Soo-Jung; kim, Bum-Hoi; Yoon, Hyun-Min

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The gastric ulcer is a common disorder of the stomach and duodenum. The basic physiopathology of a gastric ulcer results from an imbalance between some endogenous aggressive and cytoprotective factors. This study examined whether Ganoderma lucidum pharmacopuncture (GLP) would provide protection against acute gastric ulcers in rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into 4 groups of 8 rats each: normal, control, normal saline (NP) and GLP groups. The experimental acute gastric ulcer was induced by using an EtOH/HCl solution and the normal group received the same amount of normal saline instead of ethanol. The NP and the GLP groups were treated once with injections of saline and GLP, respectively. Two local acupoints were used: CV12 (中脘) which is the alarm point of the Stomach Meridian, and ST36 (足三里), which is the sea point of the Stomach Meridian. The stomachs from the rats in each group were collected and analyzed for gross appearance and histology. Also, immunohistochemistry staining for BAX, Bcl-2 and TGF-β1 was performed. Results: Histological observations of the gastric lesions in the control group showed comparatively extensive damage of the gastric mucosa and necrotic lesions had penetrated deeply into the mucosa. The lesions were long, hemorrhagic, and confined to the glandular portions. The lesions were measured microscopically by using the clear depth of penetration into the gastric mucosal surface. The length and the width of the ulcer were measured and the inhibition percentage was calculated. Wound healing of the acute gastric ulcer was promoted by using GLP, and significant alterations of indices in gastric mucosa were observed. Such protection was shown by gross appearance, histology and immunohistochemistry staining for BAX, Bcl-2 and TGF-β1. Conclusion: These results suggest that GLP administered at CV12 and ST36 can provide significant protection to the gastric mucosa against an ethanol-induced acute

  12. Effect of ranitidine on healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in ponies.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, C G; Sangiah, S

    1993-07-01

    Thirty young ponies were examined endoscopically for evidence of gastric ulceration. Seven ponies had noninduced gastric ulcers present at the initial examination and were eliminated from the study. In an attempt to induce gastric ulcers experimentally, flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg of body weight, IM, q 8 h) was administered for 7 days to the 23 ponies with endoscopically normal gastric mucosa. During the 7 days of flunixin administration, 11 ponies developed gastric ulcers that were appropriate for study. The 11 ponies were randomly allotted to 2 groups. Group-A (n = 5) and group-B (n = 6) ponies received ranitidine (4.4 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h) and corn syrup, respectively, until ulcers healed or for a maximum of 40 days. General anesthesia was induced every 3 to 5 days for visual evaluation of ulcer healing by use of a video endoscope. The earliest complete healing of gastric lesions observed in a corn syrup-treated pony was at 17 days. At 40 days, 3 of 5 and 3 of 6 ponies of the ranitidine and corn syrup-treated groups, respectively, had healed ulcers. Results of this study indicate that: noninduced gastric ulcers may be common in young ponies, flunixin meglumine may be effective in inducing gastric ulcers for gastric healing studies in young ponies, and ranitidine (4.4 mg/kg, q 8 h) is not significantly effective in accelerating healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in ponies under conditions of this study. PMID:8368605

  13. Microbiological profiles of sputum and gastric juice aspirates in Cystic Fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-momani, H.; Perry, A.; Stewart, C. J.; Jones, R.; Krishnan, A.; Robertson, A. G.; Bourke, S.; Doe, S.; Cummings, S. P.; Anderson, A.; Forrest, T.; Griffin, S. M.; Brodlie, M.; Pearson, J.; Ward, C.

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux (GOR) is a key problem in Cystic Fibrosis (CF), but the relationship between lung and gastric microbiomes is not well understood. We hypothesised that CF gastric and lung microbiomes are related. Gastric and sputum cultures were obtained from fifteen CF patients receiving percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. Non-CF gastric juice data was obtained through endoscopy from 14 patients without lung disease. Bacterial and fungal isolates were identified by culture. Molecular bacterial profiling used next generation sequencing (NGS) of the 16S rRNA gene. Cultures grew bacteria and/or fungi in all CF gastric juice and sputa and in 9/14 non-CF gastric juices. Pseudomonas aeruginosa(Pa) was present in CF sputum in 11 patients, 4 had identical Pa strains in the stomach. NGS data from non-CF gastric juice samples were significantly more diverse compared to CF samples. NGS showed CF gastric juice had markedly lower abundance of normal gut bacteria; Bacteroides and Faecalibacterium, but increased Pseudomonas compared with non-CF. Multivariate partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated similar bacterial profiles of CF sputum and gastric juice samples, which were distinct from non-CF gastric juice. We provide novel evidence suggesting the existence of an aerodigestive microbiome in CF, which may have clinical relevance. PMID:27245316

  14. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  15. Association between serum vitamin D levels and gastric cancer: A retrospective chart analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neil; Companioni, Rafael Ching; Tiba, Melik; Alkhawam, Hassan; Catalano, Carmine; Sogomonian, Robert; Baum, Joel; Walfish, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether there is an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma associated with vitamin D deficiency (VDd). METHODS A retrospective case control study was performed of all patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma between 2005 and 2015. After we excluded the patients without a documented vitamin D level, 49 patients were included in our study. RESULTS The average age of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and documented vitamin D level was 64 years old (95%CI: 27-86) and average vitamin D level was 20.8 mg/dL (95%CI: 4-44). Compared to a matched control group, the prevalence of VDd/insufficiency in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than normal vitamin D levels (83.7% vs 16.3%). Forty-one patients (83.7%) with adenocarcinoma showed VDd/insufficiency compared to 18 (37%) patients with normal vitamin D level without gastric cancer (OR: 8.8, 95%CI: 5-22, P value < 0.0001). The average age of males with gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosis was 60 years old vs 68 years old for females (P = 0.01). Stage II gastric adenocarcinoma was the most prevalent in our study (37%). CONCLUSION We reported a positive relationship between VDd and gastric adenocarcinoma, that is to say, patients with decreased VDd levels have an increased propensity for gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27672427

  16. Association between serum vitamin D levels and gastric cancer: A retrospective chart analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Neil; Companioni, Rafael Ching; Tiba, Melik; Alkhawam, Hassan; Catalano, Carmine; Sogomonian, Robert; Baum, Joel; Walfish, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether there is an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma associated with vitamin D deficiency (VDd). METHODS A retrospective case control study was performed of all patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma between 2005 and 2015. After we excluded the patients without a documented vitamin D level, 49 patients were included in our study. RESULTS The average age of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and documented vitamin D level was 64 years old (95%CI: 27-86) and average vitamin D level was 20.8 mg/dL (95%CI: 4-44). Compared to a matched control group, the prevalence of VDd/insufficiency in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than normal vitamin D levels (83.7% vs 16.3%). Forty-one patients (83.7%) with adenocarcinoma showed VDd/insufficiency compared to 18 (37%) patients with normal vitamin D level without gastric cancer (OR: 8.8, 95%CI: 5-22, P value < 0.0001). The average age of males with gastric adenocarcinoma diagnosis was 60 years old vs 68 years old for females (P = 0.01). Stage II gastric adenocarcinoma was the most prevalent in our study (37%). CONCLUSION We reported a positive relationship between VDd and gastric adenocarcinoma, that is to say, patients with decreased VDd levels have an increased propensity for gastric adenocarcinoma.

  17. Ameliorating Effects of Auricular Electroacupuncture on Rectal Distention-Induced Gastric Dysrhythmias in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric slow waves (GSW) are known to regulate gastric motility and are impaired with rectal distention (RD). Electroacupuncture (EA) at body acupoints, such as ST 36, has been shown to improve gastric dysrhythmias; however, little is known about the possible effects of auricular electroacupuncture (AEA) on GSW. To study effects and possible mechanisms of AEA on RD-induced gastric dysrhythmias in rats, ten male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats implanted with gastric serosal electrodes were studied in two different experiments in fed state. Four sessions were performed in experiment 1 as follows: control (RD, no stimulation), RD+AEA, RD+EA at body points and RD+sham AEA. Two sessions were included in experiment 2 to study mechanisms of AEA: RD + atropine and RD + atropine + AEA. It was found that 1) RD significantly decreased the percentage of normal GSW from 89.8±3.5% to 76.0±3.3% (P<0.05); 2) AEA increased the percentage of normal GSW during RD to 94.0±2.1% (P<0.05 vs. RD) via a reduction in the percentages of tachygastria and arrhythmia (P<0.05 vs. RD); 3) atropine blocked the ameliorating effect of AEA on RD-induced gastric dysrhythmias. Our results demonstrated that RD induces gastric dysrhythmias in fed state in rats. AEA improves RD-induced gastric dysrhythmias via the vagal pathway. AEA may have a therapeutic potential in treating gastric dysrhythmias. PMID:25643282

  18. Fra-1 is upregulated in gastric cancer tissues and affects the PI3K/Akt and p53 signaling pathway in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Junyu; Zhu, Guangchao; Gao, Lu; Chen, Pan; Long, Yuehua; Liao, Shan; Yi, Hong; Yi, Wei; Pei, Zhen; Wu, Minghua; Li, Xiaoling; Xiang, Juanjuan; Peng, Shuping; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Ming; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Xiang, Bo; Tang, Ke; Cao, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Fra-1 (FOSL1) plays important roles in oncogenesis in various malignancies. We investigated the expression of Fra-1 in gastric cancer (GC) tissues by qPCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blot technologies. The results showed that Fra-1 was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues compared with the adjacent non‑cancerous tissues. To explore the possible mechanism of Fra-1 in GC, we elucidated the effect of Fra-1 in the apoptosis and cell cycle of gastric cancer cells, AGS, and found that a considerable decrease in apoptotic cells and increase of S phase rate were observed for AGS cells with Fra-1 overexpession. We identified and confirmed that Fra-1 affected the expression level of CTTN and EZR in vitro through LC-MS/MS analyses and western blot technology. Furthermore, we found that Fra-1 was correlated with dysregulation PI3K/Akt and p53 signaling pathway in gastric cancer tissues in vitro. Moreover, we found that Fra-1 overexpression affected the expression of PI3K, Akt, MDM2 and p53 in vivo. In summary, our results suggest that Fra-1 is upregulated in gastric cancer tissues and plays its function by affecting the PI3K/Akt and p53 signaling pathway in gastric cancer.

  19. Lower expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) association with poor prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yachao; Deng, Jingyu; Zhang, Li; Xie, Xingming; Guo, Xiaofan; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Rupeng; Liang, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) in gastric cancer (GC), and its potential influence on the prognosis of GC patients. Methods: At present study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of PHLPP1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing 135 gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and 135 matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addition, both semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting analysis (WB) were adopted to detect of the expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines (AGS, SUN-1, KATO-III, BGC-823, MGC-803, SGC-7901, and HGC-27) and the normal gastric cell line GES-1. Survival analysis was used to investigate the efficiency of the prognostic evaluation of PHLPP1 expression in GC patients. Results: Positive expression rate of PHLPP1 in the primary GC tissues was significantly lower than that in adjacent non-tumor tissues (55.6% vs. 87.4%, P<0.001). Both gene transcription (mRNA) and Protein expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines were significantly lower than those in the GES-1 cell line, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients presented PHLPP1 negative expression in the GC tissues had significantly lower overall survival rate than those presented PHLPP1 positive expression in the GC tissues (P=0.008). With the multivariate survival analysis (Cox regression), PHLPP1 expression in the GC tissue was identified as an independent predictor of the survival of patients. Conclusions: This study indicated that aberrant PHLPP1 expression was observed in GC tissues, which was significantly associated with the poor prognostic outcomes of GC patients. PMID:26884964

  20. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  1. miR-449a and CDK6 in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, LI-PING; WU, WEI-JING; SUN, DA-YONG; XIE, ZI-YING; MA, YAN-CHUN; ZHAO, YA-GANG

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the association between microRNA (miR/miRNA)-449a, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)6 protein and gastric carcinoma, and discuss the effect of miR-449a on the expression of the CDK6 protein. Quantitative (q)PCR and western blot analysis were used to analyze the expression of the miR-449a and the CDK6 protein in gastric carcinoma and tumor-adjacent normal tissues. The real-time cell analyzer and the DAPI staining test were used to monitor the different miR-449a levels regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of the MGC-803 cell line. Immunofluorescence and western blot analyses were used to detect the expression level of the CDK6 protein in the cells of the miR-449a upregulation and downregulation groups, and a control group. A scratch test was used to study the effects of miR-449a expression on migration and invasion. It was found that the expression of miR-449a was downregulated and the expression of CDK6 protein was upregulated in gastric carcinoma tissue. The level of MGC-803 cell proliferation was decreased and the apoptosis level was increased by the upregulation of miR-449a expression, and the opposite effect was shown by the downregulation of expression. The expression of the CDK6 protein in the MGC-803 cells was downregulated by upregulating the expression of miR-449a. The distance of the scratch was shortened markedly after 12 h by downregulating the expression of miR-449a in the MGC-803 cells. The present study identified that a lower expression level of miR-449 and a higher expression level of CDK6 may contribute to the occurrence and development of gastric cancer. Furthermore, it was shown that miR-449a is able to regulate the expression of the CDK6 protein. PMID:25202363

  2. Frequent amplification of PTP1B is associated with poor survival of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; She, Junjun; Liu, Wei; Shi, Jing; Yang, Qi; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a non-transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been implicated in gastric pathogenesis. Several lines of recent evidences have shown that PTP1B is highly amplified in breast and prostate cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate PTP1B amplification in gastric cancer and its association with poor prognosis of gastric cancer patients, and further determine the role of PTP1B in gastric tumorigenesis. Our data demonstrated that PTP1B was significantly up-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric tissues by using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay. In addition, copy number analysis showed that PTP1B was amplified in 68/131 (51.9%) gastric cancer cases, whereas no amplification was found in the control subjects. Notably, PTP1B amplification was positively associated with its protein expression, and was significantly related to poor survival of gastric cancer patients. Knocking down PTP1B expression in gastric cancer cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrested and apoptosis. Mechanically, PTP1B promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasiveness through modulating Src-related signaling pathways, such as Src/Ras/MAPK and Src/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Collectively, our data demonstrated frequent overexpression and amplification PTP1B in gastric cancer, and further determined the oncogenic role of PTP1B in gastric carcinogenesis. Importantly, PTP1B amplification predicts poor survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25590580

  3. Oxyntic atrophy, metaplasia and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, James R.; Nam, Ki Taek

    2015-01-01

    The process of gastric carcinogenesis involves the loss of parietal cells (oxyntic atrophy) and subsequent replacement of the normal gastric lineages with metaplastic lineages. In humans, two metaplastic lineages develop as sequelae of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection: intestinal metaplasia and Spasmolytic Polypeptide-expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Mouse models of both chronic Helicobacter infection and acute pharmacological oxyntic atrophy have led to the recognition that SPEM arises from transdifferentiation of mature chief cells. The presence of inflammation promotes the expansion of SPEM in mice. Furthermore, studies in Mongolian gerbils as well as increasing evidence from human studies indicates that SPEM likely represents a precursor for development of intestinal metaplasia. These findings indicate that loss of parietal cells, augmented by chronic inflammation, leads to a cascade of metaplastic events. Identification of specific biomarkers for SPEM and intestinal metaplasia hold promise for providing both early detection of pre-neoplasia as well as information on prognostic outcome following curative resection. PMID:21075342

  4. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  5. Melanoma with gastric metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W.; Bhatia, Abhijit S.; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  6. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  7. Melanoma with gastric metastases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W; Bhatia, Abhijit S; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  8. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  9. Comprehensive mutation profiling of mucinous gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, Hirofumi; Hosoda, Fumie; Hama, Natsuko; Nakamura, Hiromi; Totoki, Yasushi; Furukawa, Eisaku; Arakawa, Erika; Ohashi, Shoko; Urushidate, Tomoko; Satoh, Hironori; Shimizu, Hiroko; Igarashi, Keiko; Yachida, Shinichi; Katai, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Fukayama, Masashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    Mucinous gastric carcinoma (MGC) is a unique subtype of gastric cancer with a poor survival outcome. Comprehensive molecular profiles and putative therapeutic targets of MGC remain undetermined. We subjected 16 tumour-normal tissue pairs to whole-exome sequencing (WES) and an expanded set of 52 tumour-normal tissue pairs to subsequent targeted sequencing. The latter focused on 114 genes identified by WES. Twenty-two histologically differentiated MGCs (D-MGCs) and 46 undifferentiated MGCs (U-MGCs) were analysed. Chromatin modifier genes, including ARID1A (21%), MLL2 (19%), MLL3 (15%), and KDM6A (7%), were frequently mutated (47%) in MGC. We also identified mutations in potential therapeutic target genes, including MTOR (9%), BRCA2 (9%), BRCA1 (7%), and ERBB3 (6%). RHOA mutation was detected only in 4% of U-MGCs and in no D-MGCs. MYH9 was recurrently (13%) mutated in MGC, with all these being of the U-MGC subtype (p = 0.023). Three U-MGCs harboured MYH9 nonsense mutations. MYH9 knockdown enhanced cell migration and induced intracytoplasmic mucin and cellular elongation. BCOR mutation was associated with improved survival. In U-MGCs, the MLH1 expression status and combined mutation status (TP53/BCL11B or TP53/MLL2) were prognostic factors. A comparative analysis of driver genes revealed that the mutation profile of D-MGC was similar to that of intestinal-type gastric cancer, whereas U-MGC was a distinct entity, harbouring a different mutational profile to intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric cancers. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27313181

  10. Influence of thyroid states on stress gastric ulcer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Walker, C.H.; Mason, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that thyroid states may affect the acute development of gastric lesions induced by cold-resistant stress. Normal (euthyroid), hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats were used. Gastric lesion incidence and severity was significantly increased in hypothyroid rats, whereas in contrast hyperthyroid rats developed significantly less gastric lesions. As anticipated, plasma levels of thyroxin (T/sub 4/) were significantly elevated in hyperthyroid rats, and undetectable in hypothyroid rats. Acute pretreatment with i.p. cimetidine, but not T/sub 4/ 1 h prior to stress completely prevented gastric lesions formation in hypothyroid rats. Finally, binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on brain membranes prepared from frontal cortex was reduced by 20% in hypothyroid rats after 3 h of stress. These and other data contained herein suggest that thyroid hormones contribute to modulate the responsiveness of the gastric mucosa to stress. The increase rate of ulcerogenesis observed in hypothyroid rats appears to be mediated by gastric acid secretion. The central mechanism for this response may involve decreased brain nonadrenergic receptor function.

  11. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  12. The normal antireflux mechanism.

    PubMed

    Paterson, W G

    2001-08-01

    The normal antireflux mechanism consists of several components, any one of which may malfunction and render an individual prone to the development of GERD. The LES is clearly the most important component because gastroesophageal reflux almost always occurs when the sphincter pressure equals that of the stomach. Usually, an LES pressure of just 2 to 3 mm Hg above intragastric pressure is sufficient to prevent reflux. Other factors certainly play significant ancillary roles in preventing reflux. In the absence of a hiatal hernia, the crural fibers of the diaphragm serve as an "extrinsic" sphincter. Furthermore, the unique anatomy of the proximal stomach (e.g., the angle of His, mucosal flap valve, posterolateral location of the fundus) serves to keep gastric contents away from the gastroesophageal junction, making it less likely for reflux to occur when the LES relaxes. When a hiatal hernia is present, these factors are lost, and the hernia sac provides a reservoir for gastric juices with ready access to the LES. Finally, some degree of reflux occurs in all individuals, but esophageal clearance and acid neutralization provide an important last line of defense.

  13. Her-2 Positive Gastric Cancer Presented with Thrombocytopenia and Skin Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Deniz; Tatlı, Ali Murat; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Başsorgun, Cumhur İbrahim; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savaş, Burhan

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the 5th most frequent cancer around the world and the 3rd most frequent reason of deaths due to cancer. Every year, about 1 million new cases are taking place, with varying geographical distribution. Gastric cancer is often metastatic to liver, lungs, and bones in hematogenous way, to peripheral lymph nodes in lymphogenous way, and to peripheral tissues in adjacency way, yet bone marrow (BM) and cutaneous metastasis are quite seldom. Pancytopenia is a more frequent finding identified in BM metastasis of solid organ cancers, and isolated thrombocytopenia is less often. The human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER-2) is positive in gastric cancer at a rate of 7–34%. Here, we have presented our HER-2 positive gastric cancer incident which presented with BM and cutaneous metastasis, and has no 18F-fluoro-2-deoxi-D-glucose (FDG) involvement except bone metastases. PMID:25045559

  14. Potential role of aquaporin 3 in gastric intestinal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haijian; Yang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yangchun; Zhang, Weiming; Wang, Yao; Wen, Jianfei; Zhang, Zhihong; Shen, Lizong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a pre-cancerous condition and a pivotal step in the formation of gastric cancer (GC). Aquaporin 3 (AQP3) has been found to be expressed in goblet cells rather than mucus-secreting glands. To investigate the characteristics of GIM in non-cancerous tissues adjacent to GC, as well as the expression and role of AQP3 in GIM tissues, 16 patients diagnosed with gastric adenocarcinoma of intestinal type located in the lesser curve of the antrum were consecutively enrolled in this study. A new pathological technology called “gastric mucosal sausage roll” was introduced. GIM was determined according to the updated Sydney system, and AQP3 expression in goblet cells was determined by immunohistochemistry. GIM was found in all stomach specimens, and its incidence increased with progression to GC (P < 0.001). GIM prevalence displayed remarkable association with the distance to GC in the anterior gastric wall tissues (P = 0.016) and tissues toward the cardia (P = 0.014), such that GIM was more common in the areas closer to GC (P < 0.001). AQP3 was found to be expressed in 67.71% of parts with GIM, and AQP3 immunoreactivity was identified more frequently in severe GIM areas (P < 0.001). In short, the incidence and severity of GIM correlated with the distance from GC, and AQP3 was differentially expressed in goblet cells, with most AQP3-positive goblet cells presenting in severe GIM. Together, this study suggests that AQP3 may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis from GIM. PMID:26506416

  15. Microvessel density is a prognostic marker of human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Chuan; Qin, Rong; Chen, Xiao-Xin; Sheng, Xia; Wu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Dao-Bin; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether microvessel density (MVD) is related with prognosis in gastric cancer patients, and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vessel endothelial growth factor (VEGF) so as to determine the possible role of COX-2 and VEGF in gastric cancer angiogenesis. METHODS: Forty-seven formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of gastric cancer were evaluated for COX-2, VEGF by immunohistochemical staining. To assess tumor angiogenesis, MVD was determined by immunohistochemical staining of endothelial protein factor VIII-related antigen. The relationship among COX-2 and VEGF expression, MVD, and clinicopathologic parameters was analyzed. RESULTS: Among the 67 samples, high MVD was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival. Multivariate survival analysis showed that MVD value and lymph node metastasis were independent prognostic factors. The expression rate of COX-2 and VEGF was significantly higher than that of the adjacent tissues. COX-2 and VEGF expression in gastric cancer was significantly correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion, but not with survival. The mean MVD value of COX-2 or VEGF positive tumors was higher than that of COX-2 or VEGF negative tumors. A significant correlation was found between the expressions of COX-2 and VEGF. CONCLUSION: MVD may be one of the important prognostic factors for gastric cancer patients. COX-2 and VEGF may play an important role in tumor progression by stimulating angiogenesis. VEGF might play a main role in the COX-2 angiogenic pathway. The inhibition of angiogenesis or COX-2, VEGF activity may have an important therapeutic benefit in the control of gastric cancer. PMID:17171787

  16. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  17. Prolapsing Gastric Polyp Causing Intermittent Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kosai, Nik Ritza; Gendeh, Hardip Singh; Norfaezan, Abdul Rashid; Razman, Jamin; Sutton, Paul Anthony; Das, Srijit

    2015-06-01

    Gastric polyps are often an incidental finding on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with an incidence up to 5%. The majority of gastric polyps are asymptomatic, occurring secondary to inflammation. Prior reviews discussed Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-associated singular gastric polyposis; however, we present a rare and unusual case of recurrent multiple benign gastric polyposis post H pylori eradication resulting in intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. A 70-year-old independent male, Chinese in ethnicity, with a background of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and a simple renal cyst presented with a combination of melena, anemia, and intermittent vomiting of partially digested food after meals. Initial gastroscopy was positive for H pylori; thus he was treated with H pylori eradication and proton pump inhibitors. Serial gastroscopy demonstrated multiple sessile gastric antral polyps, the largest measuring 4 cm. Histopathologic examination confirmed a benign hyperplastic lesion. Computed tomography identified a pyloric mass with absent surrounding infiltration or metastasis. A distal gastrectomy was performed, whereby multiple small pyloric polyps were found, the largest prolapsing into the pyloric opening, thus explaining the intermittent nature of gastric outlet obstruction. Such polyps often develop from gastric ulcers and, if left untreated, may undergo neoplasia to form malignant cells. A distal gastrectomy was an effective choice of treatment, taking into account the polyp size, quantity, and potential for malignancy as opposed to an endoscopic approach, which may not guarantee a complete removal of safer margins and depth. Therefore, surgical excision is favorable for multiple large gastric polyps with risk of malignancy.

  18. Prognostic significance of Versican expression in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, X-H; Lin, W-R; Xu, M-D; Qi, P; Dong, L; Zhang, Q-Y; Ni, S-J; Weng, W-W; Tan, C; Huang, D; Ma, Y-Q; Zhang, W; Sheng, W-Q; Wang, Y-Q; Du, X

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the leading malignancy in the digestive system. Versican is a ubiquitous component of the extracellular matrix and has a role in tumor progression. We aim to examine the expression of Versican in GC and the relationship between Versican levels and patient survival. We detected the mRNA expression of Versican in tumorous pairs and adjacent normal tissues (ANTs) of 78 GC patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Versican in 101 cases of matched GC and ANT, as well as in 27 intraepithelial neoplastic (IN) samples, was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We analyzed the correlation between Versican levels and clinical outcomes. Finally, we performed CCK-8 cell counting assay and transwell assay in GC cell lines. Versican mRNA expression was significantly greater in tumor tissues (P<0.001) than in ANT. Versican was majorly expressed in the stroma surrounding tumor epithelium and minorly some areas of tumor epithelium. The Versican expression level was higher in GC than in ANT (P=0.004), but no significant difference was observed between ANT and IN (P=0.517). The Versican mRNA and protein levels were consistent in GC. High Versican mRNA and protein expression correlated with greater tumor invasion depth (P=0.030, P=0.027). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that patients with high Versican mRNA expression exhibited poor disease-specific survival (P<0.001). In vitro experiments showed that Versican overexpression promoted cell proliferation and invasion. Our data indicate that Versican may be a novel prognostic indicator in GC and may be a potential target for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26619403

  19. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  20. Prognostic value of microRNA-126 and CRK expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shun; Shi, Huichang; Han, Jun; Zhang, Tiecheng; Zhu, Weiguo; Zhang, Dahong

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miR)-126, acting as a tumor suppressor, has been reported to inhibit the invasion of gastric cancer cells in part by targeting v-crk sarcoma virus CT10 oncogene homologue (CRK). The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-126/CRK axis in gastric cancer. Methods miR-126 and CRK mRNA expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 220 self-pairs of gastric cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues. Results Expression levels of miR-126 and CRK mRNA in gastric cancer tissues were, respectively, lower and higher than those in adjacent noncancerous tissues (both P<0.001). Low miR-126 expression and high CRK expression, alone or in combination, were all significantly associated with positive lymph node and distant metastases and advanced TNM stage of human gastric cancer (all P<0.05). We also found that the overall survival rates of the patients with low miR-126 expression and high CRK expression were, respectively, shorter than those with high miR-126 expression and low CRK expression. Interestingly, miR-126-low/CRK-high expression was associated with a significantly worse overall survival of all miR-126/CRK groups (P<0.001). Moreover, multivariate analysis identified miR-126 and/or CRK expression as independent prognostic factors for patients with gastric cancer. Notably, the prognostic relevance of miR-126 and/or CRK expression was more obvious in the subgroup of patients with TNM stage IV. Conclusion Dysregulation of miR-126/CRK axis may promote the malignant progression of human gastric cancer. miR-126 and CRK combined expression may serve as an independent predictor of overall survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:27785060

  1. Slit2 expression and its correlation with subcellular localization of β-catenin in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rongliang; Liu, Weiyan; Liu, Bingya; Xu, Ziping; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Ziping

    2013-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. Several signaling pathways are involved in gastric cancer development and progression. Slit2 was recently found to be involved in cancer; however, its expression pattern in gastric cancer has not been discovered yet. In the present study, we investigated the expression of Slit2 in human gastric cancer and its correlation with the expression and subcellular localization of β-catenin. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining revealed that Slit2 was highly expressed in human gastric cancer tissues, while it was low or weakly expressed in normal gastric tissues. The differences in clinicopathological features between different groups were determined using Pearson's χ2 test. Slit2 levels were significantly associated with differentiation, Lauren's classification, lymph node metastasis and TNM staging. Slit2 levels were positively correlated with β-catenin level in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines. High levels of Slit2 were correlated with the membrane localization of β-catenin, and low levels of Slit2 were correlated with nuclear translocation of β-catenin in both gastric cancer tissues and cell lines assayed by IHC and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. Our data suggest that Slit2 was highly expressed in gastric cancer patients with less advanced clinicopathological features. Slit2 levels were correlated with β-catenin level and subcellular localization.

  2. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase: a potential biomarker for worse prognosis in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Xin; Huang, Xing; Yong, Hongmei; Shen, Jiajia; Tang, Qi; Zhu, Jin; Ni, Jian; Feng, Zhenqing

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, cancer stage (or grade) and some biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA199, are widely used to predict the prognosis of gastric carcinoma patients. Due to the limited role of prognostic indicators for gastric carcinoma, this condition remains one of the most fatal human malignancies with a dismal prognosis. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT, EC.2.1.1.1), a metabolizing enzyme, is involved in the development and progression of various carcinomas. However, the prognostic and biological functions of NNMT in gastric carcinoma are not yet clear. In the present study, NNMT was found to be overexpressed at the mRNA and protein levels in gastric carcinoma tissues compared with adjacent tissues. Importantly, the survival analysis verified that NNMT expression is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of gastric cancer patients. Moreover, NNMT expression was related to primary tumor size, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and TNM (tumor, node, and metastasis) stage. We also demonstrated that knockdown of NNMT inhibits cellular proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro and in vivo. Overall, the results of this study suggest that NNMT is a promising prognostic predictor for gastric cancer patients and could be used as a new target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27152242

  3. Gastric volvulus and associated gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, M; Burge, D M; Griffiths, D M

    1995-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1994, 10 neurologically normal children between 2 and 24 months were diagnosed as having gastric volvulus with associated gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR). The common features at presentation were episodic colicky abdominal pain, non-bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, haematemesis, and failure to thrive. Anterior gastropexy and conservative management of GOR was curative. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554369

  4. Galectin-7 is epigenetically-regulated tumor suppressor in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jun; Hwang, Jung-Ah; Ro, Jae Y.; Lee, Yeon-Su; Chun, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death and remains a major clinical challenge due to poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis deserve investigation. Although regulation of the galactoside-binding lectin galectin-7 in cancer has been studied, its role in tumor formation and progression remains controversial. In this study, we investigated galectin-7 expression and its role in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical staining using a tissue microarray of gastric cancer patients revealed significantly low expression levels of galectin-7 in malignant tissues compared with matched normal tissues, and decreased expression of galectin-7 in malignant tissues was associated with advanced TMN stage disease (p =0.034). Importantly, low expression of galectin-7 in normal tissues was associated with a poor survival rate (p =0.0561). Over-expression of galectin-7 in AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, whereas ablation of galectin-7 in KATO III gastric carcinoma cells reversed these properties. AGS cells that overexpressed galectin-7 could not form gastric tumors in xenografted mice. More than 70% hypermethylation was observed in 7 of 9 gastric cancer cell lines tested and 5-aza-cytidine treatment lowered galectin-7 expression by reducing methylation in 24 cancer cell lines from five different organ origins. We analyzed CpG islands in the galectin-7 genomic region and detected hypermethylation at +1566bp of exon 2, the predicted p53 binding region. DNA hypermethylation of this region was also detected in gastric cancer tissues from 20 patients. Taken together, our data indicate that galectin-7 has a tumor suppressive function, and that the gene is epigenetically modified by DNA methylation and significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer. Further study of galectin-7 regulation may lead to improved gastric cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID

  5. Downregulation of human Wnt3 in gastric cancer suppresses cell proliferation and induces apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Sheng; Nie, Xiaobo; Wu, Rui-Bing; Yuan, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yue-Hong; Liu, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Jian-Yu; Deng, Xiu-Ling; Na, Qin; Jin, Hai-Yan; Bian, Yan-Chao; Gao, Yu-Min; Wang, Yan-Dong; Chen, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways is closely involved in the occurrence and progression of several types of human malignancies. However, as a fundamental component in this cascade, Wnt3 has not been well understood for the expression level and pathogenic mechanism in gastric carcinogenesis. Here, this research was undertaken to elucidate the important role of Wnt3 in gastric cancer. Wnt3 expression in gastric carcinomas and their respective normal tissues was examined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. In all cases, Wnt3 expression was significantly elevated in gastric carcinomas compared with normal tissues. Knocking down Wnt3 in MGC-803 gastric cancer cells by small interfering RNAs transfection led to an obvious decrease in both transcript and protein levels. Silence of Wnt3 expression in gastric cancer cells inhibited the expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1 genes in Wnt/β-catenin pathway, significantly blocked cellular proliferation, delayed cell cycle, suppressed cell invasion and metastasis, accompanied by a higher apoptosis rate. Together, we conclude that upregulation of Wnt3 plays a crucial role in gastric tumorigenesis by inducing proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibiting apoptosis of cancer cells, and Wnt3 might be a potential target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27390525

  6. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  7. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  8. Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Michel; Giusti, Vittorio; Worreth, Marc; Héraief, Eric; Calmes, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of laparoscopic gastric banding using 2 different bands (the Lapband [Bioenterics, Carpinteria, CA] and the SAGB [Swedish Adjustable Gastric Band; Obtech Medical, 6310 Zug, Switzerland]) in terms of weight loss and correction of comorbidities, short-and long-term complications, and improvement of quality of life in morbidly obese patients Summary Background Data: During the past 10 years, gastric banding has become 1 of the most common bariatric procedures, at least in Europe and Australia. Weight loss can be excellent, but it is not sufficient in a significant proportion of patients, and a number of long-term complications can develop. We hypothesized that the type of band could be of importance in the outcome. Methods: One hundred eighty morbidly obese patients were randomly assigned to receive the Lapband or the SAGB. All the procedures were performed by the same surgeon. The primary end point was weight loss, and secondary end points were correction of comorbidities, early- and long-term complications, importance of food restriction, and improvement of quality of life. Results: Initial weight loss was faster in the Lapband group, but weight loss was eventually identical in the 2 groups. There was a trend toward more early band-related complications and more band infections with the SAGB, but the study had limited power in that respect. Correction of comorbidities, food restriction, long-term complications, and improvement of quality of life were identical. Only 55% to 60% of the patients achieved an excess weight loss of at least 50% in both groups. There was no difference in the incidence of long-term complications. Conclusions: Gastric banding can be performed safely with the Lapband or the SAGB with similar short- and midterm results with respect to weight loss and morbidity. Only 50% to 60% of the patients will achieve sufficient weight loss, and close to 10% at least will develop severe

  9. Acetaminophen absorption kinetics in altered gastric emptying: establishing a relevant pharmacokinetic surrogate using published data.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen has been used as a tool for clinical and nonclinical experimental designs that evaluate gastric emptying because acetaminophen is not absorbed in stomach but efficiently absorbed from the small intestine. Published pharmacokinetic data of acetaminophen in subjects with normal gastric emptying vs. impaired gastric emptying (i.e., morphine treatment) were evaluated to select a key surrogate. Using Caverage (average concentration), computed from the exposure within the first hour, individual rank distribution was plotted across different studies. Caverage was highly correlated with Cmax (maximum concentration) in subjects with normal gastric emptying (R(2) = .7532) but not in those where gastric emptying was impaired (R(2) = .0213). The 50th percentile value of the distribution pattern of 1/Caverage in acetaminophen+morphine-treated group (coincided with the first shift in the slope) was considered as the cutoff point to figure out the impaired gastric emptying. The individual rank distribution plots for 1/Caverage across different studies supported similar trends in subjects with normal gastric emptying but showed a distinct distribution pattern in the cohort of impaired gastric emptying. Caverage, calculated within the first hour of dosing of acetaminophen (average concentration at 0-1 hour, C0-1havg), can be used as a key surrogate to distinguish the effects of gastric emptying on the absorption of acetaminophen. A 4 μg/mL C0-1havg of acetaminophen (dose: 1.5 g) may be used as cutoff point in future clinical investigations of acetaminophen to clarify the role of gastric emptying.

  10. Electron microscopy of the oxyntic cell in the gastric glands of the bullfrog, Rana catesbiana. II. The acid-secreting gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    SEDAR, A W

    1961-05-01

    The oxyntic cell in the gastric glands of the bullfrog was examined in lead hydroxide-stained sections of gastric mucosae fixed in buffered osmium tetroxide and embedded in n-butyl methacrylate. During gastric acid secretion (pH 1-2) induced by histamine administration in cannulated frogs, the pattern of fine structure in the oxyntic cell differs strikingly from that in the oxyntic cell of the non-acid-secreting stomach. The relative number of smooth surfaced profiles decreases and a greater concentration of these elements is associated with the apical region of the oxyntic cell facing the lumen of the gastric gland. Similar concentrations of these elements are found in those regions of cytoplasm surrounding intercellular canaliculi which lie between adjacent cells and communicate with the lumen of a gastric gland. In these regions, the smooth surfaced profiles (35 to 65 mmicro in width) characteristically form a tubular network. The membrane-bounded contents appear to be continuous with the extracellular medium, both on the capillary side and at the apical surface of the cell adjoining the lumen of the gastric gland. Mitochondria are distributed randomly in the cytoplasmic matrix of the oxyntic cell. PMID:13749582

  11. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with multiple gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Otowa, Yasunori; Mitsutsuji, Masaaki; Urade, Takeshi; Chono, Teruhiro; Morimoto, Haruki; Yokoyama, Kunio; Hirata, Kenro; Kawamura, Shiro; Shimada, Etsuji; Fujita, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is an inflammation of the digestive tract that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration. There are no specific symptoms, and are related to the layer in which eosinophilic infiltration is observed. A 69-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital with a history of general malaise, diarrhea, and dysgeusia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed reddish elevated lesions that were edematous all over the gastric mucosa. In addition, three tumors were also observed. The biopsies of the reddish elevated mucosa revealed eosinophilic infiltration and tubular adenocarcinoma from the tumors. Colonoscopy showed abnormal reddish elevated mucosa. The biopsies from the reddish elevated mucosa showed eosinophilic infiltration. From the abdominal contrast computed tomography scan, tumor stain was seen in the anterior wall of the gastric body. No ascites, intestinal wall thickening, or lymph node swelling were found. A slight elevation in the serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), 480 IU/ml, was found from the laboratory test results; other laboratory results were within normal limits including the number of peripheral eosinophils. No specific allergen was found from the multiple antigen simultaneous test and from the skin patch test. The parasitic immunodiagnosis was negative. He was diagnosed with EG associated with gastric cancer and underwent total gastrectomy, regional lymph node dissection with reconstruction by a Roux-en-Y method. He was prescribed prednisolone after the operation and showed a good clinical response. There are many case reports on EG, but none of them were associated with cancer. We encountered a case of EG associated with multiple gastric cancer; the patient underwent total gastrectomy.

  12. Effects of Pithecellobium jiringa ethanol extract against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Qader, Suhailah Wasmn; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Nimir, Amal R; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Al-Bayaty, Fouad Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Current anti-gastric ulcer agents have side effects, despite the progression and expansion of advances in treatment. This study aimed to investigate the gastroprotective mechanisms of Pithecellobium jiringa ethanol extract against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal ulcers in rats. For this purpose, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: Group 1 (normal control) rats were orally administered with vehicle (carboxymethyl cellulose), Group 2 (ulcer control) rats were also orally administered with vehicle. Group 3 (positive control) rats were orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole, Groups 4 and 5 (experimental groups) received ethanol extract of Pithecellobium jiringa ethanol extract at a concentration of 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Sixty minutes later, vehicle was given orally to the normal control group, and absolute ethanol was given orally to the ulcer control, positive control and experimental groups to generate gastric mucosal injury. The rats were sacrificed an hour later. The effect of oral administration of plant extract on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury was studied grossly and histology. The level of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde-MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and gastric wall mucus were measured from gastric mucosal homogenate. The ulcer control group exhibited severe gastric mucosal injury, and this finding was also confirmed by histology of gastric mucosa which showed severe damage to the gastric mucosa with edema and leucocyte infiltration of the submucosal layer. Pre-treatment with plant extract significantly reduced the formation of ethanol-induced gastric lesions, and gastric wall mucus was significantly preserved. The study also indicated a significant increase in SOD activity in gastric mucosal homogenate, whereas a significant decrease in MDA was observed. Acute toxicity tests did not show any signs of toxicity and mortality up to 5 g/kg. The ulcer protective effect of this plant may possibly be due to its

  13. Gastric distention exacerbates ischemia in a rodent model of partial gastric devascularization.

    PubMed

    Urschel, J D; Antkowiak, J G; Takita, H

    1997-11-01

    Occult ischemia of the mobilized gastric fundus is an important etiologic factor for esophagogastric anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. Postoperative gastric distention is another possible predisposing factor for anastomotic leakage. We hypothesized that gastric distention could worsen gastric ischemia. To test this hypothesis, gastric tissue perfusion was studied in 20 Sprague-Dawley rats. Baseline serosal gastric tissue perfusion was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry at a point 10 mm distal to the gastroesophageal junction. Perfusion was measured after left gastric artery occlusion, gastric distention to 20 cm water pressure, and combined left gastric artery occlusion and gastric distention. Gastric tissue perfusion (in tissue perfusion units, TPU) was 64.2 +/- 9.1 TPU at baseline measurement, 18.6 +/- 4.3 TPU after left gastric artery occlusion, 22.0 +/- 4.1 TPU after gastric distention, and 7.8 +/- 1.8 TPU after combined left gastric artery occlusion and gastric distention. Distention (P < 0.0001) and arterial occlusion (P < 0.0001) both reduced gastric tissue perfusion; of the two, arterial occlusion produced the greatest reduction in perfusion (P < 0.021). The combination of distention and arterial occlusion caused greater reduction in gastric perfusion than either factor alone (P < 0.0001). In this model, gastric distention exacerbated the ischemia produced by partial gastric devascularization. In clinical esophageal surgery, postoperative gastric distention may similarly potentiate the ischemic effects of gastric transposition for esophageal reconstruction.

  14. Helicobacter suis Causes Severe Gastric Pathology in Mouse and Mongolian Gerbil Models of Human Gastric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flahou, Bram; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank; D'Herde, Katharina; Driessen, Ann; Van Deun, Kim; Smet, Annemieke; Duchateau, Luc; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background “Helicobacter (H.) heilmannii” type 1 is the most prevalent gastric non-H. pylori Helicobacter species in humans suffering from gastric disease. It has been shown to be identical to H. suis, a bacterium which is mainly associated with pigs. To obtain better insights into the long-term pathogenesis of infections with this micro-organism, experimental infections were carried out in different rodent models. Methodology/Principal Findings Mongolian gerbils and mice of two strains (BALB/c and C57BL/6) were infected with H. suis and sacrificed at 3 weeks, 9 weeks and 8 months after infection. Gastric tissue samples were collected for PCR analysis, histological and ultrastructural examination. In gerbils, bacteria mainly colonized the antrum and a narrow zone in the fundus near the forestomach/stomach transition zone. In both mice strains, bacteria colonized the entire glandular stomach. Colonization with H. suis was associated with necrosis of parietal cells in all three animal strains. From 9 weeks after infection onwards, an increased proliferation rate of mucosal epithelial cells was detected in the stomach regions colonized with H. suis. Most gerbils showed a marked lymphocytic infiltration in the antrum and in the forestomach/stomach transition zone, becoming more pronounced in the course of time. At 8 months post infection, severe destruction of the normal antral architecture at the inflamed sites and development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma-like lesions were observed in some gerbils. In mice, the inflammatory response was less pronounced than in gerbils, consisting mainly of mononuclear cell infiltration and being most severe in the fundus. Conclusions/Significance H. suis causes death of parietal cells, epithelial cell hyperproliferation and severe inflammation in mice and Mongolian gerbil models of human gastric disease. Moreover, MALT lymphoma-like lesions were induced in H. suis-infected Mongolian gerbils. Therefore, the

  15. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  16. Gastric hyalinization as a possible consequence of corrosive injury.

    PubMed

    Kazsuba, A; Vitéz, A; Gáll, J; Máthé, L; Ludmány, E; Krasznai, G

    2000-04-01

    We report a case of gastric obstruction due to hyalinization of the antrum. The endoscopic appearance of the lesion was suggestive of Crohn's disease or gastric neoplasm. Biopsy showed pseudopolypous gastritis with ulceration and fibroid granulation. Surgery was carried out to relieve the obstruction. Examination of the resected specimen showed massive hyalinization of all layers of the antral wall with circular collagenous infiltration and a normal duodenal bulb. The question of hyaloid gastritis as a unique entity is raised. Subsequently, information from the patient revealed the cause: voluntary acid ingestion causing corrosive injury. PMID:10774977

  17. Radionuclide gastric emptying studies in patients with anorexia nervosa

    SciTech Connect

    Domstad, P.A.; Shih, W.J.; Humphries, L.; DeLand, F.H.; Digenis, G.A.

    1987-05-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients, 26 patients (17 females, two males, ranging in age from 13 to 40 yr) with upper GI symptoms ingested 150-200 microCi (/sup 99m/Tc)triethelenetetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to obtain the gastric emptying time (GET). The results of the studies were divided into three categories: prolonged, 13 patients; rapid, 11; and normal 3. Twelve of 13 patients with prolonged GET were given 10 mg metoclopramide i.v. injections; nine of the 12 patients had a good response and three had no response. Five of the nine patients underwent metoclopramide therapy and four of the patients showed benefit from the therapy. One patient discontinued metoclopramide therapy because of somnolence. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, our results indicated only 50% had objectively prolonged GET, and another 50% showed normal or even rapid GET. Therefore, this radionuclide study enables quantitatively objective documentation of gastric emptying, separation of those patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, thereby avoiding the possible side effects from metoclopramide medication, and prediction of effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in patients with prolonged GET.

  18. Prognostic value of decreased expression of RBM4 in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hongmei; Zhu, Huijun; Zhang, Shu; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Chen, Chen; Ding, Guipeng; Zhu, Lun; Zhu, Ziyuan; Liu, Huaidong; Zhang, Yongjie; Wen, Jinbo; Kang, Xing; Zhu, Jin; Feng, Zhenqing; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding motif 4 (RBM4) is a multifunctional protein that participates in regulating alternative splicing and mRNA translation. Its reduced expression has been associated with poor overall survival in lung cancer, breast cancer and ovarian cancer. We assessed RBM4 protein expression levels with immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays containing malignant gastric cancer tissues and benign tissues from 813 patients. We also examined the expression levels of RBM4 mRNA in twenty-five paired gastric cancer samples and adjacent noncancerous tissues. Both RBM4 protein and mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in gastric cancer tissues compared with the adjacent noncancerous tissues. There was a significant association between reduced RBM4 protein expression and differentiation (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.026), TNM state (P = 0.014) and distant metastasis (P = 0.036). Patients with reduced RBM4 expression (P < 0.001, CI = 0.315–0.710) and TNM stage III and IV (P < 0.001, CI = 4.757–11.166) had a poor overall survival. These findings suggest that RBM4 is a new biomarker in gastric cancer, as the reduced expression of this protein is correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node status and distant metastasis. Further, lower RBM4 expression is an independent prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:27324405

  19. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  20. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig.

  1. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  2. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  3. Gastric pseudolipomatosis, usual or unusual? Re-evaluation of 909 endoscopic gastric biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Alper, Murat; Akcan, Yusuf; Belenli, Olcay K; Çukur, Selma; Aksoy, Kamuran A; Suna, Mazlume

    2003-01-01

    Microvesicular pneumatosis intestinalis, also called “pseudolipomatosis” for resembling fatty infiltration, is characterized by the presence of small gas voids in the gastrointestinal wall, especially in mucosa. These voids are not lined with epithelia. There are few reported cases about colon, duodenum and skin. Because there is only one case report about pseudolipomatosis in the stomach, we re-evaluated 909 endoscopic biopsies taken from gastric corpus to check the presence of pseudolipomatosis. We determined pseudolipomatosis foci in 3 percent (n = 27) of biopsies. In two cases there were pseudolipomatosis foci in endoscopic biopsies having otherwise normal histologic findings, while there were pseudolipomatosis foci in endoscopic biopsies of 25 patients with gastritis. Helicobacter pylori was found in 85% of biopsies having pseudolipomatosis foci. In this study, we presented some histopathologic characteristics of pseudolipomatosis seen in gastric mucosa. PMID:14669349

  4. The vagus, the duodenal brake, and gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, M; Kennedy, T L; Parks, T G

    1975-01-01

    It has been suggested that an intact vagal supply is essential for the normal function of the recptors in the duodenum and proximal small bowel, which influence the rate of gastric emptying. This paper reports the effect of vagal denervation on gastric emptying and also examines the site and mode of action of receptors in the proximal small bowel.It has been demonstrated in the dog that most, if not all, the receptors controlling gastric emptying lie in the proximal 50 cm of the small bowel. Following truncal vagotomy the emptying time of each instillation increased significantly and the differential rate of emptying of different instillations remained unchanged. The proximal 50 cm of small bowel was capable to differentiating between different instillates even after selective extragastric vagotomy, in which the duodenum was vagally denervated and, therefore, duodenal braking receptors function independently of vagal innervation. PMID:1140630

  5. Epigenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2012-06-01

    Cancer is considered one of the major health issues worldwide, and gastric cancer accounted for 8% of total cases and 10% of total deaths in 2008. Gastric cancer is considered an age-related disease, and the total number of newly diagnosed cases has been increasing as a result of the higher life expectancy. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis is worth investigation. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling complex and miRNA, involved in gastric cancer. As the studies in gastric cancer continue, the mapping of an epigenome code is not far for this disease. In conclusion, an epigenetic therapy might appear in the not too distant future.

  6. Notch signaling regulates gastric antral LGR5 stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Demitrack, Elise S; Gifford, Gail B; Keeley, Theresa M; Carulli, Alexis J; VanDussen, Kelli L; Thomas, Dafydd; Giordano, Thomas J; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Samuelson, Linda C

    2015-01-01

    The major signaling pathways regulating gastric stem cells are unknown. Here we report that Notch signaling is essential for homeostasis of LGR5+ antral stem cells. Pathway inhibition reduced proliferation of gastric stem and progenitor cells, while activation increased proliferation. Notch dysregulation also altered differentiation, with inhibition inducing mucous and endocrine cell differentiation while activation reduced differentiation. Analysis of gastric organoids demonstrated that Notch signaling was intrinsic to the epithelium and regulated growth. Furthermore, in vivo Notch manipulation affected the efficiency of organoid initiation from glands and single Lgr5-GFP stem cells, suggesting regulation of stem cell function. Strikingly, constitutive Notch activation in LGR5+ stem cells induced tissue expansion via antral gland fission. Lineage tracing using a multi-colored reporter demonstrated that Notch-activated stem cells rapidly generate monoclonal glands, suggesting a competitive advantage over unmanipulated stem cells. Notch activation was associated with increased mTOR signaling, and mTORC1 inhibition normalized NICD-induced increases in proliferation and gland fission. Chronic Notch activation induced undifferentiated, hyper-proliferative polyps, suggesting that aberrant activation of Notch in gastric stem cells may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:26271103

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, P.; Kosunen, T. U.; Valle, J.; Riihelä, M.; Seppälä, K.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: Serum IgG antibodies for H pylori were determined in 54 consecutive patients with gastric carcinoma. The prevalence of H pylori in gastric mucosa was also examined histologically (modified Giemsa) in 32 patients from whom adequate biopsy specimens of the antrum and corpus were available. Thirty five patients with gastrointestinal tumours outside the stomach and 48 with non-gastrointestinal malignancies served as controls. RESULTS: Of the 54 patients, 38 (70%) had H pylori antibodies (IgG) in their serum (three additional patients had H pylori antibodies IgA, class specific but not IgG specific). This prevalence was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) than that (49%) in the 35 controls. No differences in prevalence of H pylori antibodies were found between gastric cancer cases of intestinal (IGCA) or diffuse (DGCA) type, both these types showing H pylori antibodies (IgG) in 71% of the patients. In the subgroup of 32 subjects, five patients had normal gastric mucosa and four showed corpus limited atrophy ("pernicious anaemia type" atrophy of type A). All of these nine patients had no evidence of current or previous H pylori infection in serum (no IgG antibodies) or in tissue sections (negative Giemsa staining). The remaining 23 patients had antral or pangastritis, and all had evidence of current or previous H pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS: H pylori associated chronic gastritis was the associated disease in 75% of the patients with gastric cancer occurring equally often in both IGCA and DGCA groups. About 25% of cases seem to have a normal stomach or severe corpus limited atrophy, neither of which showed evidence of concomitant H pylori infection. PMID:1577969

  8. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  9. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  10. Gastric band migration following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB): two cases of endoscopic management using a gastric band cutter.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Pawel; Hady, Hady Razak; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kaminski, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-06-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is one of the most frequently used minimally invasive and reversible procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity. Migration of the gastric band into the gastric lumen is a rare late complication of LAGB. Previous attempts at endoscopic removal of migrated bands have included the use of endoscopic scissors, laser ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). We report two cases of successful endoscopic management of gastric band migration using a gastric band cutter. PMID:23256012

  11. Methylation-silencing RCC1 expression is associated with tumorigenesis and depth of invasion in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Huang, Chu-Chun; P’eng, Fang-Ku; Tsai, Tung-Chou; Wu, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) is a critical cell cycle regulator. We firstly identified RCC1 gene hypermethylation in gastric tumor tissues using the differential methylation hybridization (DMH) microarray, but the role of RCC1 in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma is largely unknown. Methods: Three gastric cancer cell lines (AGS, MKN45, and TSGH9201) were used to analyze RCC1 gene methylation, mRNA and protein expressions. Furthermore, 85 pairs of matched human gastric carcinoma samples in a tissue microarray were used to analyze RCC1 expression by immunohistochemistry staining. Results: A differential methylation pattern was found in TSGH9201 (100%), MKN45 (87%), and AGS (62%) cell lines at the 9th CpG site of RCC1 exon 1. RCC1 mRNA and protein expressions in AGS cells were significantly higher than in TSGH9201 and MKN45 cell lines (P < 0.05). Tissue array data showed that RCC1 expression was detected in 21% (18/85) of gastric carcinoma tissues and in 80% (76/95) of adjacent non-tumor tissues. The expression of RCC1 in gastric carcinoma tissues was significantly lower than in adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.001). Furthermore, an association between RCC1 expression and clinicopathological features showed that RCC1 expression was closely correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data indicate that RCC1 expression is frequently lost in poorly differentiated gastric cell lines and gastric carcinoma tissues. Loss of RCC1 expression is correlated with tumor differentiation and depth of invasion. These findings suggest that RCC1 may play a tumor suppressor role in gastric carcinoma. PMID:26823742

  12. Update on gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is an uncommon entity that can often present like classic adenocarcinoma. The most common organ site involved is the stomach. Important prognostic indicators include location of lymph node involvement, histologic subtype, lymphocyte lineage, gross size, and location of the tumor. Surgical resection is the mainstay of curative therapy. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have a role either separately or as part of a multimodality treatment program. Clinicians are encouraged to enter patients with primary gastric lymphoma into multi-institutional, cooperative group clinical trials to more clearly define the best treatment strategy. PMID:1956083

  13. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A; Al Kharusi, Suad S; Al Bahrani, Bassim J; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-09-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  14. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A.; Al Kharusi, Suad S.; Al Bahrani, Bassim J.; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  15. Gastric cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition are inhibited by γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Chun; Peng, Yang; Liu, Yan-Mim; Wang, Lu-Lu; Wu, Xiao-Ling

    2014-06-01

    The Notch signaling pathway may be important in the development and progression of several malignancies. However, the functions of Notch signaling in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remain largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to delineate Notch1 expression in gastric cancer (GC) and its function in GC EMT. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, the expression of Notch1 was found to increase in GC cell lines compared with the normal gastric mucosa cell line. In addition, Notch1 expression was found to be downregulated in the non-metastatic-derived GC cell line compared with the metastatic-derived cell line. Furthermore, Notch1 expression was significantly increased in the tumor tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa tissues, as well as in patients with metastases than in patients without metastases. To explore the role of the Notch1 signaling pathway in EMT, the GC cell lines, AGS and MKN45, were treated with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Using MTT, Transwell and clonality assays, DAPT was found to inhibit the expression of the Notch1 downstream target, Hes1, and impair the ability of the GC cell lines to migrate, invade and proliferate. The protein levels of the mesenchymal markers, vimentin, neural cadherin and Snail, were decreased; however, the expression of the epithelial marker, epithelial cadherin, was increased in the GC cell lines treated with DAPT. These results indicated that the Notch1 signaling pathway may be important in the development and progression of GC. In conclusion, DAPT inhibits the Notch1 signaling pathway, as well as the growth, invasion, metastasis and EMT of GC cells. PMID:24932308

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  17. Congenital B12 deficiency following maternal gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Celiker, M Y; Chawla, A

    2009-09-01

    Here we present a case of severe B12 deficiency in an exclusively breastfed infant, born to a mother who had undergone gastric bypass 6 years earlier. At 4 months of age, the infant presented with pancytopenia and developmental delay. Our evaluation revealed physical and neurological developmental delay, pancytopenia with macrocytosis, with head imaging showing cortical and subcortical atrophy. Serum studies showed low B12, normal folate and iron. Treatment with parenteral B12 led to the resolution of the pancytopenia, steady weight gain and improved neurological status. The child is currently 16 months old with normal anthropometric and hematological parameters and normal B12 levels on a regular diet. Gross motor and speech developments are significantly delayed. This case illustrates that maternal B12 deficiency following gastric bypass surgery may lead to severe B12 deficiency with long-term neurological sequelae in their infants. Screening and prompt treatment of these deficiencies both during pregnancy and during infancy are important.

  18. Absence of cyclin D2 expression is associated with promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Leung, W K; Ebert, M P A; Leong, R W L; Tse, P C H; Chan, M W Y; Bai, A H C; To, K F; Malfertheiner, P; Sung, J J Y

    2003-05-19

    Expression of cyclin D2 is absent in 30-70% of gastric cancers. We investigated the role of promoter hypermethylation in the transcriptional silencing of cyclin D2 in five gastric cell lines and 47 primary gastric carcinomas. CpG island methylation status of the cyclin D2 gene was studied by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulphite sequencing. RNA and protein expression was analysed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Dense methylation of cyclin D2 was detected in three cell lines (KATOIII, AGS and NCI-N87), which also lacked cyclin D2 mRNA and protein expression. Bisulphite DNA sequencing revealed that loss of cyclin D2 expression was closely associated with the density of methylation in the promoter region. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, restored the cyclin D2 expression level in methylated gastric cells. Among the 47 primary gastric cancers, cyclin D2 hypermethylation was detected in 23 (48.9%) cases. None of the 23 normal gastric biopsies from noncancer patients showed hypermethylation. Hypermethylation was associated with loss of mRNA (P&<0.001) and protein (P=0.006) expressions. Our study showed that cyclin D2 hypermethylation is associated with loss of cyclin D2 expression in a subset of gastric cancers, which may suggest an alternative gastric carcinogenesis pathway in the absence of cyclin D2 expression. PMID:12771922

  19. [Influence of Helicobacter pylori on gastric secretion. Study on variously associated gastric body, fundus and antrum chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Cheli, R

    1995-10-01

    Among the various themes related to Helicobacter pylori (HP) which is still a subject of discussion, there is the possible influence of this bacterium on gastric secretory physiology. In the present study, an evaluation has been carried out of stimulated gastrinemia, stimulated acid secretion and total peptic activity in gastric juice in the course of a paradigmatic condition, as autonomous chronic gastritis, in order to reveal possible modifications induced by the HP infection. In cases of HP positive chronic superficial antral gastritis associated either with normal body-fundic mucosa or with superficial gastritis, there is a significant increase of stimulated gastrinemia in comparison to HP negative groups and controls. In the course of body-fundic atrophic and preatrophic chronic gastritis associated either with antral superficial chronic gastritis or with antral atrophic gastritis, there are no statistically significant differences between HP positive and HP negative subjects. As regards acid and pepsin secretion no significant differences emerge in any group between HP positive and HP negative subjects. In the HP positive subjects with antral superficial gastritis and higher gastrin values the study of acid and pepsin secretion has yielded no significant variations. From the results of this study it emerges how gastric secretory parameters vary exclusively according to the histologic state of gastric mucosa. Therefore, the lesion action of HP may mainly be attributed to a direct action, rather than to substantial gastric secretory changes.

  20. MicroRNA-190 regulates FOXP2 genes in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wen-Zhuo; Yu, Tao; An, Qi; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Zhu; Liu, Xiao; Xiao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate how microRNA-190 (miR-190) regulates FOXP2 genes in gastric cancer (GC) cell line SGC7901. Methods We identified that miR-190 could target FOXP2 genes by using dual luciferase enzyme assay. Precursor fragment transfection of miR-190 was performed with GC cell line SGC7901 and human gastric mucosal cell line GES-1. miR-190 expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and FOXP2 protein expression was measured by Western blotting. Results FOXP2-3′-untranslated region (UTR) in miR-190 transfection group was significantly decreased as compared with other groups. There were no significant differences in fluorescence signals of FOXP2mut-3′-UTR in each group. Therefore, it was assumed that miR-190 can target FOXP2 genes. Through RT-PCR verification, it was observed that the expression level of miR-190 was significantly higher in GC cell line SGC7901 than in human gastric mucosa cell line GES-1 after transfection with miR-190 mimics. The expression level of miR-190 was significantly higher in GES-1 cells than in SGC7901 cells after transfection with miR-190 inhibitors. Western blotting results showed the expression level of FOXP2 was significantly lower in GC cell line SGC7901 than in GES-1 cells. Compared with blank, mimics control, and inhibitors control groups, the miR-190 mimics group showed significantly enhanced proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities, while miR-190 inhibitors group showed decreased abilities toward proliferation, migration, and invasion (P<0.05). The transcription level of miR-190 and the expression level of FOXP2 in tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues in GC patients were verified to be consistent with those of cell line experiments. Conclusion Upregulation of miR-190 can lead to downregulation of FOXP2 protein expression. miR-190 may serve as a potential target for GC diagnosis. PMID:27382302

  1. Effect of sucralfate on gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.M.; Caride, V.J.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.; McCallum, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    Duodenal ulcer (DU) patients may have accelerated gastric emptying (GE) suggesting that there is an increase in unbuffered gastric acid reaching the duodenum contributing to DU disease. Aluminum-containing antacids were shown to delay GE. The authors' aim was to investigate whether another aluminum-containing compound, Sucralfate, affects GE in normal and DU patients. Nine normal volunteers and 10 patients with documented DU disease were studied. For each test the subject ingested a meal composed of chicken liver Tc-99m-S-C mixed with beef stew and eaten with 4 oz. of water labelled with 100..mu..Ci of III-in-DTPA. On two separate days, subjects received 1 gram of Sucralfate (190 mg of aluminum per gram) or placebo in a randomized double-blind fashion one hour prior to the test meal. GE of liquids and solids in normal subjects was not significantly changed by Sucralfate. Sucralfate in the DU patients significantly slowed liquid emptying in the initial 40 min and solid food throughout the study compared to placebo (p<0.05). This paper summarizes that; GE of solids but not liquids is accelerated in DU patients compared to normal subjects; and sucralfate delays GE of both liquid and solid components of a meal in DU patients but has no effect on GE in normals. The authors conclude that a slowing of gastric emptying possibly mediated by aluminum ions, may be one mechanism by which Sucralfate enhances healing and decreases recurrence of DU.

  2. [Role of animal gastric Helicobacter species in human gastric pathology].

    PubMed

    Pozdeev, O K; Pozdeeva, A O; Pozdnyak, A O; Saifutdinov, R G

    2015-01-01

    Animal Helicobacter species other than Helicobacter pylori are also able to cause human gastritis, gastric ulcers, and MALT lymphomas. Animal Helicobacter species are presented with typical spiral fastidious microorganisms colonizing the gastric mucosa of different animals. Bacteria initially received their provisional name Helicobacter heilmannii, and out of them at least five species colonizing the gastric mucosa of pigs, cats, and dogs were isolated later on. A high proportion of these diseases are shown to be zoonotic. Transmission of pathogens occurs by contact. The factors of bacterial pathogenicity remain little studied.

  3. Cytogenetic studies in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Abarbanel, J; Shabtai, F; Kyzer, S; Chaimof, C

    1991-01-01

    Banded cytogenetic studies of gastric carcinoma are still relatively scarce, comprised of only a small number of patients. This study was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes and malignant cells of 16 patients with gastric carcinoma. The lymphocytes were analyzed by standard techniques. All patients had a normal constitutional karyotype; 90% of the patients presented an increased breakage rate and nonrandom chromosomal instability mainly in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. Decreased response to phytohemagglutinin was observed in 6 (38%) patients. The tissue specimens were analyzed using direct techniques. Normal ploidy was observed in only one patient, 3 tumors were near-diploid, 4 hyperdiploid, 4 near-triploid, and 4 near-tetraploid. Those with the near-triploid or near-tetraploid constitution were in a more advanced pathological stage, most of them with a more complex cytogenetic profile. Particular involvement was found for chromosomes 1 to 4, 7 to 9, 17, and 20, but the more specific nonrandom changes seemed to involve chromosomes 7, 8, 9, and 17. PMID:1767545

  4. Association of COX2 gene hypomethylation with intestinal type gastric cancer in samples of patients from northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Cynthia Farias Vieira; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; da Silva, Juarez Nóbrega; Cardoso Smith, Marilia de Arruda; de Araújo, Rubistenia Miranda; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Lima, Eleonidas Moura

    2014-02-01

    To verify the methylation status of THBS1, GPX3, and COX2 genes and to evaluate their association with Helicobacter pylori in gastric adenocarcinomas. Methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme PCR assay was performed in 16 diffuse type gastric cancer samples, 23 intestinal type, and 15 normal stomach tissue. The presence of H. pylori was performed by amplification of the fragment of the 16S rRNA. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test. The hypermethylation of GPX3, THBS1, and COX2 occurred in 18 (n = 7), 5 (n = 2), and 36 % (n = 14) of gastric cancer samples, respectively, whereas in normal samples, it was found in 13, 7, and 67 %. The presence of H. pylori was detected in 67 % of gastric cancer samples and 67 % in normal gastric samples. The methylation of THBS1 and GPX3 was not significantly different between the types of tumors, normal sample, the presence of H. pylori, or clinicopathological variables studied (P > 0.05). However, the methylation status of the gene COX2 is significantly different between normal tissue and intestinal type gastric cancer (P = 0.02). Therefore, our results suggest that the methylation status of the gene COX2 is associated with the intestinal type of gastric cancer. PMID:24014049

  5. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  6. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  7. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  8. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  9. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  10. Acetylated histone H4 is reduced in human gastric adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Oue, N; Kuniyasu, H; Suzuki, T; Ito, R; Matsusaki, K; Ishikawa, T; Tahara, E; Yasui, W

    2002-09-01

    Acetylation of core histones is closely linked to transcriptional activation of various genes. The acetylation levels of nucleosomal histones can be modified through a balance of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. To elucidate the role of histone acetylation in human gastric carcinogenesis, we studied the status of histone H4 acetylation in gastric carcinoma tissues and corresponding non-neoplastic mucosa. The status of histone acetylation was assessed by examining the expression of acetylated histone H4 through Western blotting and immunohistochemistry using an anti-acetylated histone H4 antibody. The levels of acetylated histone H4 expression were obviously reduced in 72% (13/18) of gastric carcinomas in comparison with non-neoplastic mucosa by Western blotting. In immunohistochemistry, acetylated histone H4 was clearly detected in the nuclei of both non-neoplastic epithelial and stromal cells, whereas the levels of acetylated histone H4 were heterogeneous or reduced in 66% (38/57) of gastric carcinomas and 46% (6/13) of gastric adenomas. Reduced expression of acetylated histone H4 was also observed in some areas of intestinal metaplasia adjacent to carcinomas. Reduction in the expression of acetylated histone H4 was significantly correlated with advanced stage, depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis. These results suggest that low levels of histone acetylation may be closely associated with the development and progression of gastric carcinomas, possibly through alteration of gene expression.

  11. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Human Saliva using Tandem Mass Tags Quantification for Gastric Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hua; Zhang, Yan; Kim, Yong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jae Joon; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Yoshizawa, Janice; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Wong, David T. W.

    2016-01-01

    Novel biomarkers and non-invasive diagnostic methods are urgently needed for the screening of gastric cancer to reduce its high mortality. We employed quantitative proteomics approach to develop discriminatory biomarker signatures from human saliva for the detection of gastric cancer. Salivary proteins were analyzed and compared between gastric cancer patients and matched control subjects by using tandem mass tags (TMT) technology. More than 500 proteins were identified with quantification, and 48 of them showed significant difference expression (p < 0.05) between normal controls and gastric cancer patients, including 7 up-regulated proteins and 41 down-regulated proteins. Five proteins were selected for initial verification by ELISA and three were successfully verified, namely cystatin B (CSTB), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI1), and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1). All three proteins could differentiate gastric cancer patients from normal control subjects, dramatically (p < 0.05). The combination of these three biomarkers could reach 85% sensitivity and 80% specificity for the detection of gastric cancer with accuracy of 0.93. This study provides the proof of concept of salivary biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of gastric cancer. It is highly encouraging to turn these biomarkers into an applicable clinical test after large scale validation. PMID:26911362

  12. An 8-gene signature, including methylated and down-regulated glutathione peroxidase 3, of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglan; Yang, Jung-Jin; Kim, Yoon Sun; Kim, Ki-Yeol; Ahn, Woong Shick; Yang, Sanghwa

    2010-02-01

    We have identified an 8-gene signature with significant expression differences between gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues. This 8-gene set can predict the normal and cancer status of gastric tissues with more than 96% accuracy in a totally independent microarray dataset. The 8 genes are composed of down-regulated KLF4, GPX3, SST and LIPF, together with up-regulated SERPINH1, THY1 and INHBA in gastric cancer. To corroborate the differential gene expression pattern, we chose GPX3 and examined its expression pattern in detail. A comparison of GPX3 expression pattern shows a broader down-regulated pattern in multiple types of cancers, including cervical, thyroid, head and neck, lung cancers and melanoma than in healthy controls. An immuno-histostaining analysis in tissue microarrays confirms GPX3 down-regulation in gastric cancer. Mechanism-wise GPX3 down-regulation in gastric cancer is due to promoter hypermethylation. Collectively, these results show a correct identification of 8 genes as gastric cancer biomarkers. PMID:20043075

  13. Other Helicobacters and gastric microbiota.

    PubMed

    De Witte, Chloë; Schulz, Christian; Smet, Annemieke; Malfertheiner, Peter; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2016-09-01

    This article aimed to review the literature from 2015 dealing with gastric and enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). A summary of the gastric microbiota interactions with H. pylori is also presented. An extensive number of studies were published during the last year and have led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of infections with NHPH. These infections are increasingly reported in human patients, including infections with H. cinaedi, mainly characterized by severe bacteremia. Whole-genome sequencing appears to be the most reliable technique for identification of NHPH at species level. Presence of NHPH in laboratory animals may influence the outcome of experiments, making screening and eradication desirable. Vaccination based on UreB proteins or bacterial lysate with CCR4 antagonists as well as oral glutathione supplementation may be promising strategies to dampen the pathogenic effects associated with gastric NHPH infections. Several virulent factors such as outer membrane proteins, phospholipase C-gamma 2, Bak protein, and nickel-binding proteins are associated with colonization of the gastric mucosae and development of gastritis. The development of high-throughput sequencing has led to new insights in the gastric microbiota composition and its interaction with H. pylori. Alterations in the gastric microbiota caused by the pH-increasing effect of a H. pylori infection may increase the risk for gastric cancer. PMID:27531542

  14. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Ramos, Alberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Rolando

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery and identification in gastric tissue by Marshall and Warren in 1983, our knowledge about the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection has grown considerably. Its role in the multifactorial pathology of peptic ulcer disease (gastrodudodenal ulcer disease), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma is now widely accepted while its involvement in extraintestinal disease is still controversial.The correlation between the colonization of the stomach by H. pylori and gastric lymphoma has been demonstrated in multiple studies. Between 65 and 80% of distal gastric adenocarcinomas are attributed to H. pylori infection. However, gastric carcinogenesis cannot be explained by H. pylori infection alone. Among those individuals infected by this bacteria, only a small percentage (2-5%) ever develops gastric cancer, the majority exhibit benign lesions. There is a wide individual variation in the outcome of this infection in patients. This individual and population specific variation is due to the intricate relationship between genetics, the environment, bacterial virulence, diet, and socio-economic status and it explains the multiple outcomes of this infection. In this article, we conduct a review of the widely accepted theories regarding gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori, the correlations and enigmas between them, the reported geographical variations, and the various proposed hypotheses on the carcinogenic mechanism of Helicobacter pylori.

  15. Analysis of gastric emptying data

    SciTech Connect

    Elashoff, J.D.; Reedy, T.J.; Meyer, J.H.

    1982-12-01

    How should gastric emptying data be summarized to allow comparisons between males or between groups of subjects within a study, and to facilitate comparisons of results from study to study. We review standardization issues for reporting gastric emptying data, discuss criteria for choosing a method of analysis, review methods which have been used to describe gastric emptying data, recommend trial of the power exponential curve, and illustrate its use in the analysis and interpretation of data from several studies involving different types of meals and different types of subjects. We show why nonlinear curves should be fit using nonlinear least squares.

  16. Feasibility of terahertz reflectometry for discrimination of human early gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Gyu Min; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Oh, Seung Jae; Lee, Sang Kil; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of THz time-domain reflectometry for the discrimination of human early gastric cancer (EGC) from the normal gastric region. Eight fresh EGC tissues, which were resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection, were studied. Of them, six lesions were well discriminated on THz images and the regions well correlated with tumor regions on pathologically mapped images. Four THz parameters could be suggested for quantitative discrimination of EGCs. PMID:25909023

  17. Ibuprofen hepatic encephalopathy, hepatomegaly, gastric lesion and gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Spomenko; Drmic, Domagoj; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Radic, Bozo; Djuzel, Viktor; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Romic, Zeljko; Dzidic, Senka; Kalogjera, Livije; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2011-09-30

    Chronic ibuprofen (0.4 g/kg intraperitoneally, once daily for 4 weeks) evidenced a series of pathologies, not previously reported in ibuprofen-dosed rats, namely hepatic encephalopathy, gastric lesions, hepatomegaly, increased AST and ALT serum values with prolonged sedation/unconsciousness, and weight loss. In particular, ibuprofen toxicity was brain edema, particularly in the cerebellum, with the white matter being more affected than in gray matter. In addition, damaged and red neurons, in the absence of anti-inflammatory reaction was observed, particularly in the cerebral cortex and cerebellar nuclei, but was also present although to a lesser extent in the hippocampus, dentate nucleus and Purkinje cells. An anti-ulcer peptide shown to have no toxicity, the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, MW 1419, 10 μg, 10 ng/kg) inhibited the pathology seen with ibuprofen (i) when given intraperitoneally, immediately after ibuprofen daily or (ii) when given in drinking water (0.16 μg, 0.16 ng/ml). Counteracted were all adverse effects, such as hepatic encephalopathy, the gastric lesions, hepatomegaly, increased liver serum values. In addition, BPC 157 treated rats showed no behavioral disturbances and maintained normal weight gain. Thus, apart from efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease and various wound treatments, BPC 157 was also effective when given after ibuprofen. PMID:21645505

  18. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  19. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management. PMID:27126070

  20. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  1. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8 in stage III gastric cancer and the correlation with DcR3 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    HU, RUYI; LIU, WENMING; QIU, XINGFENG; LIN, ZHENGHE; XIE, YAN; HONG, XINGYA; PAERHATI, REYILA; QI, ZHONGQUAN; ZHUANG, GUOHONG; LIU, ZHONGCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) is a recently identified protein that is considered to be associated with various malignancies, including esophageal, breast and pancreatic cancer; however, the importance of TIPE in gastric cancer (GC) remains unknown. Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily that is expressed in digestive system neoplasms. The expression of DcR3 is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of TIPE, ERK and DcR3 in the pathological and tumor-adjacent normal gastric tissues of 30 patients that demonstrated stage III gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression and distribution of the TIPE protein was examined using immunohistochemistry, and the clinical significance and expression levels of DcR3 and ERK1/2 were evaluated. The expression of TIPE, ERK1/2 and DcR3 in the tumor tissues of GC was significantly increased compared with paracarcinoma tissues (P<0.05). In addition, TIPE expression positively correlated with DcR3 and ERK1 levels (r=0.538 and r=0.462, respectively; P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between tumor tissues from patients with varying age, gender, differentiation or lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). TIPE may be vital in the progression of GC. TIPE may be associated with the expression of DcR3 and ERK1/2, which may be involved in the cell apoptosis of GC. The present study elucidates the potential function of TIPE as a novel marker and therapeutic target for GC. PMID:26998086

  2. Effects of cholecystectomy on gastric emptying and myoelectrical activity in man.

    PubMed

    Riezzo, G; Chiloiro, M; Pezzolla, F; Lorusso, D

    1997-10-01

    To investigate the effects of cholecystectomy on gastric motor function, 13 patients with symptomatic gallstones were studied before and 8-12 months after surgery. Twelve healthy subjects entered the study as control group. The cutaneous electrogastrography and ultrasound examination of gastric emptying were simultaneously performed at pre- and post-prandial states. The dominant gastric frequency and its coefficient of variation were not affected by surgery. After cholecystectomy, an increase in normal 3 cpm wave percentage and a decrease in power ratio were found (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Gastric emptying recorded after cholecystectomy was faster than before surgery (306.9 +/- 15.9 min vs 336.9 +/- 11.8 min, respectively; P < 0.05). Such changes were associated with the relief of symptoms, and the comparison between patients and controls showed a normalization of the gastric electrical activity and gastric emptying after surgery. In conclusion, in symptomatic patients, gallstones are associated with motor dysfunctions, and cholecystectomy seems to induce a normalization of gastrointestinal motility.

  3. Study of gastric cancer samples using terahertz techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected human gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and spectroscopic THz imaging at 201 and 590 GHz. The work shows that it is possible to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, as well as 2-D transmission THz images are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  4. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  5. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  6. Gastric cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hilmar; Marques, Miguel S; Zietlow, Rike; Meyer, Thomas F; Machado, Jose C; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) results from a multistep process that is influenced by Helicobacter pylori infection, genetic susceptibility of the host, as well as of other environmental factors. GC results from the accumulation of numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, leading to dysregulation of multiple signaling pathways, which disrupt the cell cycle and the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. For this special issue, we have selected to review last year's advances related to three main topics: the cell of origin that initiates malignant growth in GC, the mechanisms of direct genotoxicity induced by H. pylori infection, and the role of aberrantly expressed long noncoding RNAs in GC transformation. The understanding of the molecular basis of GC development is of utmost importance for the identification of novel targets for GC prevention and treatment. PMID:27531537

  7. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  8. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  9. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do. PMID:26566288

  10. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do.

  11. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sébastien A. B.; Allaire, Joannie M.; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1aΔMES). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1aΔMES stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation.

  12. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sébastien A. B.; Allaire, Joannie M.; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1aΔMES). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1aΔMES stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation. PMID:27609464

  13. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sébastien A B; Allaire, Joannie M; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1a(ΔMES)). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1a(ΔMES) stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation. PMID:27609464

  14. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 and feeding on gastric volumes in diabetes mellitus with cardio-vagal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aros, S; Vella, A; Camilleri, M; Low, P A; Burton, D D; Thomforde, G M; Stephens, D

    2003-08-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases gastric volume in humans possibly through the vagus nerve. Gastric volume response to feeding is preserved after vagal denervation in animals. We evaluated gastric volume responses to GLP-1 and placebo in seven diabetic patients with vagal neuropathy in a crossover study. We also compared gastric volume response to feeding in diabetes with that in healthy controls. We measured gastric volume using SPECT imaging. Data are median (interquartile range). In diabetic patients, GLP-1 did not increase gastric volume during fasting [5 mL (-3; 30)] relative to placebo [4 mL (-14; 50) P = 0.5], or postprandially [Delta postprandial minus fasting volume 469 mL (383; 563) with GLP-1 and 452 mL (400; 493) with placebo P = 0.3]. Change in gastric volume over fasting in diabetic patients on placebo was comparable to that of healthy controls [452 mL (400; 493)], P = 0.5. In contrast to effects in health, GLP-1 did not increase gastric volume in diabetics with vagal neuropathy, suggesting GLP-1's effects on stomach volume are vagally mediated. Normal gastric volume response to feeding in diabetics with vagal neuropathy suggests that other mechanisms compensate for vagal denervation.

  15. Deregulation of Annexin-A1 and Galectin-1 Expression in Precancerous Gastric Lesions: Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ana Flávia Teixeira; Duarte, Márcia Cristina; Poltronieri, Ayla Blanco; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Jorge, Yvana Cristina; de-Santi Neto, Dalísio; Rahal, Paula; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Annexin-A1 (ANXA1/AnxA1) and galectin-1 (LGALS1/Gal-1) are mediators that play an important role in the inflammatory response and are also associated with carcinogenesis. We investigated mRNA and protein expression in precancerous gastric lesions that participate in the progression cascade to gastric cancer, such as intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric ulcer (GU). Methods. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemical techniques were used to analyze the relative quantification levels (RQ) of ANXA1 and LGALS1 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Results. Increased relative expression levels of ANXA1 were found in 100% of cases, both in IM (mean RQ = 6.22 ± 0.06) and in GU (mean RQ = 6.69 ± 0.10). However, the LGALS1 presented basal expression in both groups (IM: mean RQ = 0.35 ± 0.07; GU: mean RQ = 0.69 ± 0.09). Immunohistochemistry revealed significant positive staining for both the AnxA1 and Gal-1 proteins in the epithelial nucleus and cytoplasm as well as in the stroma of the IM and GU groups (P < 0.05) but absence or low immunorectivity in normal mucosa. Conclusion. Our results bring an important contribution by evidencing that both the AnxA1 and Gal-1 anti-inflammatory proteins are deregulated in precancerous gastric lesions, suggesting their involvement in the early stages of gastric carcinogenesis, possibly due to an inflammatory process in the gastric mucosa. PMID:24719523

  16. Discovery of SLC3A2 Cell Membrane Protein as a Potential Gastric Cancer Biomarker: Implications in Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yixuan; Toy, Weiyi; Choong, Lee Yee; Hou, Peiling; Ashktorab, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2013-01-01

    Despite decreasing incidence and mortality, gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Successful management of gastric cancer is hampered by lack of highly sensitive and specific biomarkers especially for early cancer detection. Cell surface proteins that are aberrantly expressed between normal and cancer cells are potentially useful for cancer imaging and therapy due to easy accessibility of these targets. Combining two-phase partition and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification methods, we compared the relative expression levels of membrane proteins between noncancer and gastric cancer cells. About 33% of the data set was found to be plasma membrane and associated proteins using this approach (compared to only 11% in whole cell analysis), several of which have never been previously implicated in gastric cancer. Upregulation of SLC3A2 in gastric cancer cells was validated by immunoblotting of a panel of 13 gastric cancer cell lines and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays comprising 85 matched pairs of normal and tumor tissues. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry both confirmed the plasma membrane localization of SLC3A2 in gastric cancer cells. The data supported the notion that SLC3A2 is a potential biomarker that could be exploited for molecular imaging-based detection of gastric cancer. PMID:23116296

  17. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer

  18. Foveolar hyperplasia at the gastric cardia: prevalence and associations

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, M; Juhola, M; Färkkilä, M; Sipponen, P

    2002-01-01

    Aims: In the gastric antrum and body, foveolar hyperplasia is a feature of reactive gastritis resulting from—for example, duodenogastric bile reflux and the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence and clinical relevance of gastric cardiac foveolar hyperplasia. Methods: The study population was drawn from a consecutive series of 1698 patients sent for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Only cases without chronic gastritis or Barrett's oesophagus were included. The final study population consisted of 307 patients. Results: Foveolar hyperplasia was seen in the gastric cardiac mucosa in 31 (10%) patients with histologically normal stomach mucosa, but none had endoscopically noticeable hyperplastic polyps. Compared with patients without gastric cardiac hyperplasia, those with hyperplasia more often had chronic inflammation and complete intestinal metaplasia in the junctional biopsies (48% v 77% and 9% v 26%, respectively). Logistic regression analysis revealed that chronic cardiac inflammation (odds ratio (OR), 3.2; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3 to 7.8) and intestinal metaplasia of the complete type (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 7.1) were independent risk factors for cardiac foveolar hyperplasia. In univariate analysis, endoscopic erosive oesophagitis (endoscopy positive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease) and the use of NSAIDs were not related to the presence of foveolar hyperplasia. Conclusions: Foveolar hyperplasia in the gastric cardiac mucosa occurs in patients with histologically normal non-gastritic stomachs and may develop as a consequence of chronic inflammation limited to the gastro-oesophageal junction (“junctitis”). It is not associated directly with endoscopy positive gastro-oesophageal reflux disease or the use of NSAIDs. PMID:11986340

  19. A Multiscale Tridomain Model for Simulating Bioelectric Gastric Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sathar, Shameer; Trew, Mark L.; O’Grady, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Goal Gastric motility disorders have been associated with abnormal slow wave electrical activity (‘gastric dysrhythmias’). Gastric pacing is a potential therapy for gastric dysrhythmias, however, new pacing protocols are required that can effectively modulate motility patterns, while being power efficient. This study presents a novel comprehensive 3D multi-scale modeling framework of the human stomach, including anisotropic conduction, capable of evaluating pacing strategies. Methods A high resolution anatomically realistic mesh was generated from CT images taken from a human stomach. Principal conduction axes were calculated and embedded within this model based on a modified Laplace-Dirichlet rule based algorithm. A continuum based tridomain formulation was implemented and evaluated for performance, and used to model the slow wave propagation, which takes into account the two main cell types present in gastric musculature. Model parameters were found by matching predicted normal slow-wave activity to experimental observation and data. These simulation parameters were applied while modeling an external pacing event to entrain slow wave patterns. Results The proposed formulation was found to be 2 times more efficient than a previous formulation for a normal slow wave simulation. Convergence analysis showed that a mesh resolution of ≈ 0.4 –0.5mm is required for an accurate solution process. Conclusion The effect of different pacing frequencies on entrainment demonstrated that the pacing protocols are limited by the frequency of the native propagation and the refractory period of the cellular activity. Significance The model is expected to become an important tool in studying pacing protocols for both efficiency and effectiveness. PMID:26080372

  20. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  1. Gastric lactobezoar - a rare disorder?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Gastric lactobezoar, a pathological conglomeration of milk and mucus in the stomach of milk-fed infants often causing gastric outlet obstruction, is a rarely reported disorder (96 cases since its first description in 1959). While most patients were described 1975-1985 only 26 children have been published since 1986. Clinically, gastric lactobezoars frequently manifest as acute abdomen with abdominal distension (61.0% of 96 patients), vomiting (54.2%), diarrhea (21.9%), and/or a palpable abdominal mass (19.8%). Respiratory (23.0%) and cardiocirculatory (16.7%) symptoms are not uncommon. The pathogenesis of lactobezoar formation is multifactorial: exogenous influences such as high casein content (54.2%), medium chain triglycerides (54.2%) or enhanced caloric density (65.6%) of infant milk as well as endogenous factors including immature gastrointestinal functions (66.0%), dehydration (27.5%) and many other mechanisms have been suggested. Diagnosis is easy if the potential presence of a gastric lactobezoar is thought of, and is based on a history of inappropriate milk feeding, signs of acute abdomen and characteristic features of diagnostic imaging. Previously, plain and/or air-, clear fluid- or opaque contrast medium radiography techniques were used to demonstrate a mass free-floating in the lumen of the stomach. This feature differentiates a gastric lactobezoar from intussusception or an abdominal neoplasm. Currently, abdominal ultrasound, showing highly echogenic intrabezoaric air trapping, is the diagnostic method of choice. However, identifying a gastric lactobezoar requires an investigator experienced in gastrointestinal problems of infancy as can be appreciated from the results of our review which show that in not even a single patient gastric lactobezoar was initially considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Furthermore, in over 30% of plain radiographs reported, diagnosis was initially missed although a lactobezoar was clearly demonstrable on repeat

  2. Stromal fibroblasts in the microenvironment of gastric carcinomas promote tumor metastasis via upregulating TAGLN expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts play a critical role in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. However, their detailed molecular characteristics and clinical significance are still elusive. TAGLN is an actin-binding protein that plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Results We investigated the interaction between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment to determine how the fibroblasts from human gastric carcinoma facilitate tumorigenesis through TAGLN. QRT-PCR and Western blot indicated that TAGLN expression was upregulated in gastric carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), we found that CAFs enhanced tumor metastasis through upregulated TAGLN in vitro and in vivo. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was significantly lower after TAGLN knock-down by siRNA. TAGLN levels were elevated in human gastric cancer stroma than normal gastric stroma and associated with differentiation and lymph node metastasis of gastric cancer. Conclusion CAFs may promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion via upregulating TAGLN and TAGLN induced MMP-2 production. PMID:23510049

  3. Gene cataloging and expression profiling in human gastric cancer cells by expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Soon; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Oh, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Min; Park, Hong-Seog; Kim, Sangsoo; Song, Kyu-Sang; Rho, Seung-Moo; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Kim, Yong Sung

    2004-06-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism associated with gastric carcinogenesis, we identified genes expressed in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Of 97,609 high-quality ESTs sequenced from 36 cDNA libraries, 92,545 were coalesced into 10,418 human Unigene clusters (Build 151). The gene expression profile was produced by counting the cluster frequencies in each library. Although the profiles of highly expressed genes varied greatly from library to library, those genes related to cell structure formation, heat shock proteins, the glycolysis pathway, and the signaling pathway were highly represented in human gastric cancer cell lines and in primary tumors. Conversely, the genes encoding immunoglobulins, ribosomal proteins, and digestive proteins were down-regulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal tissues. The transcription levels of some of these genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. We found that genes related to cell adhesion, apoptosis, and cytoskeleton formation were particularly up-regulated in the gastric cancer cell lines established from malignant ascites compared to those from primary tumors. This comprehensive molecular profiling of human gastric cancer should be useful for elucidating the genetic events associated with human gastric cancer. PMID:15177556

  4. Efficacy of oncolytic reovirus against human gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis in experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Nishizono, Akira; Shiraishi, Norio; Kitano, Seigo

    2010-12-01

    The prognosis of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination is extremely poor, and the development of an effective treatment is necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of oncolytic reovirus against peritoneal metastasis in human gastric cancer using an experimental animal model. Four human gastric cancer cell lines, including MKN45p, NUGC4, MKN7 and KatoIII, a normal NIH3T3 cell line as a control, and reovirus serotype 3, were used in this study. We evaluated the cytopathic effect of reovirus and the Ras activity in each gastric cancer cell line in vitro. To evaluate oncolytic efficacy in vivo, reovirus (1x10(8) PFU) was administered into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice on days 7, 8 and 9 after inoculation with MKN45p cells. Mean volume of ascites and the total number and weight of the peritoneal tumors were measured after sacrifice. After reovirus infection, cytopathic effect was observed in all four gastric cancer cell lines, but not in the control cells. Ras activation assay showed that Ras activity in all four gastric cancer cell lines increased to a higher level than that in the control cells. In the animal model experiments, mean volume of ascites and the total number and weight of the peritoneal tumors in the reovirus treatment group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In conclusions, intraperitoneal administration of reovirus could be useful as a new modality against peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:21042711

  5. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  6. Differential expression of histone deacetylase and acetyltransferase genes in gastric cancer and their modulation by trichostatin A.

    PubMed

    Wisnieski, Fernanda; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Santos, Leonardo Caires; Pontes, Thaís Brilhante; Rasmussen, Lucas Trevizani; Payão, Spencer Luiz Marques; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Lourenço, Laércio Gomes; Demachki, Sâmia; Artigiani, Ricardo; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2014-07-01

    Gastric cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, even though its incidence and mortality have declined over the recent few decades. Epigenetic control using histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A (TSA), is a promising cancer therapy. This study aimed to assess the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of three histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3), two histone acetyltransferases (GCN5 and PCAF), and two possible targets of these histone modifiers (MYC and CDKN1A) in 50 matched pairs of gastric tumors and corresponding adjacent nontumors samples from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as their correlations and their possible associations with clinicopathological features. Additionally, we evaluated whether these genes are sensitive to TSA in gastric cancer cell lines. Our results demonstrated downregulation of HDAC1, PCAF, and CDKN1A in gastric tumors compared with adjacent nontumors (P < 0.05). On the other hand, upregulation of HDAC2, GCN5, and MYC was observed in gastric tumors compared with adjacent nontumors (P < 0.05). The mRNA level of MYC was correlated to HDAC3 and GCN5 (P < 0.05), whereas CDKN1A was correlated to HDAC1 and GCN5 (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). In addition, the reduced expression of PCAF was associated with intestinal-type gastric cancer (P = 0.03) and TNM stages I/II (P = 0.01). The increased expression of GCN5 was associated with advanced stage gastric cancer (P = 0.02) and tumor invasion (P = 0.03). The gastric cell lines treated with TSA showed different patterns of histone deacetylase and acetyltransferase mRNA expression, downregulation of MYC, and upregulation of CDKN1A. Our findings suggest that alteration of histone modifier genes play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis, contributing to MYC and CDKN1A deregulation. In addition, all genes studied here are modulated by TSA, although this modulation appears to be dependent of the genetic background of the cell

  7. Effect of Several Drugs on Gastric Potential Difference in Man

    PubMed Central

    Murray, H. S.; Strottman, M. P.; Cooke, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement of gastric mucosal potential difference was used to study the effect on the gastric mucosal barrier in six volunteer subjects of several drugs known to provoke ulcers. Potential differences were also recorded in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis being treated with long-term aspirin and five patients on long-term prednisone. Unbuffered aspirin and ethanol “broke” the barrier as shown by a rapid fall in potential difference. The effects of aspirin were dose related, with 600 mg causing a greater reduction than 300 mg. The effects of aspirin and ethanol given together were additive and caused the greatest fall in potential difference. Sodium acetylsalicylate did not alter the normal potential difference. Indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone all failed to cause any change in potential difference. The patients on long-term aspirin and prednisone had readings within the normal range and responded the same as normal subjects to an acute challenge. These studies show that aspirin and ethanol will damage the gastric mucosal barrier but that indomethacin, phenylbutazone, and prednisone do not. PMID:4808815

  8. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  9. Aldioxa improves delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance, pathophysiologic mechanisms of functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Teita; Aida, Shuji; Suemasu, Shintaro; Tahara, Kayoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Mizushima, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation (decreased gastric compliance) play important roles in functional dyspepsia (FD). Here we screen for a clinically used drug with an ability to improve delayed gastric emptying in rats. Oral administration of aldioxa (dihydroxyaluminum allantoinate) partially improved clonidine- or restraint stress-induced delayed gastric emptying. Administration of allantoin, but not aluminium hydroxide, restored the gastric emptying. Both aldioxa and allantoin inhibited clonidine binding to the α-2 adrenergic receptor, suggesting that antagonistic activity of the allantoin moiety of aldioxa on this receptor is involved in the restoration of gastric emptying activity. Aldioxa or aluminium hydroxide but not allantoin restored gastric compliance with restraint stress, suggesting that aluminium hydroxide moiety is involved in this restoration. We propose that aldioxa is a candidate drug for FD, because its safety in humans has already been confirmed and its ameliorating effect on both of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance are confirmed here. PMID:26620883

  10. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  11. Neuropilin2 expressed in gastric cancer endothelial cells increases the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells in response to VEGF

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Myung Hwan; Seo, Ji Heun; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min A; Lee, You Mie

    2009-08-01

    The structure and characteristics of the tumor vasculature are known to be different from those of normal vessels. Neuropilin2 (Nrp2), which is expressed in non-endothelial cell types, such as neuronal or cancer cells, functions as a receptor for both semaphorin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). After isolating tumor and normal endothelial cells from advanced gastric cancer tissue and normal gastric mucosa tissues, respectively, we identified genes that were differentially expressed in gastric tumor endothelial (TEC) and normal endothelial cells (NEC) using DNA oligomer chips. Using reverse transcriptase-PCR, we confirmed the chip results by showing that Nrp2 gene expression is significantly up-regulated in TEC. Genes that were found to be up-regulated in TEC were also observed to be up-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that were co-cultured with gastric cancer cells. In addition, HUVECs co-cultured with gastric cancer cells showed an increased reactivity to VEGF-induced proliferation and migration. Moreover, overexpression of Nrp2 in HUVECs significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration induced by VEGF. Observation of an immunohistochemical analysis of various human tumor tissue arrays revealed that Nrp2 is highly expressed in the tumor vessel lining and to a lesser extent in normal tissue microvessels. From these results, we suggest that Nrp2 may function to increase the response to VEGF, which is more significant in TEC than in NEC given the differential expression, leading to gastric TEC with aggressive angiogenesis phenotypes.

  12. [Homeostasis in the gastric mucosa and blood circulation. Part 1. Mechanisms of the adequate blood flow maintenance in the gastric mucosa].

    PubMed

    Samonina, G E; Zhuĭkova, S E

    2001-01-01

    The increase of mucosal blood flow in response to food entrance into stomach or different irritant action is the component of gastric mucosal defence barrier. Sufficient blood flow ensures normal acid-bicarbonate balance in gastric mucosa, supports the healing process and prevents superficial damages from developing into deep ones. Capsaicin-sensitive afferent nerve fibers play the large role in the blood flow regulation. The influence of these nerve fibers on the gastric blood flow is mediated by the calcitonin-gene related peptide. This peptide released from peripheral afferent terminals improves microcirculation in stomach walls. Moreover nerve impulses from afferent neurons modulate parasympathetic activity that in turn induces the increase of gastric mucosal blood flow through both choilinergic and noncholinergic mechanisms. The gastric mucosal blood flow may be also regulated by humoral and paracrine metabolites. Nitric oxide and prostaglandines are the most important low molecular weight compounds. They play the main role in the maintenance of the basal gastric mucosal blood flow and in the development of hyperemic responses to harmful agents.

  13. Gastric emptying for solids in patients with duodenal ulcer before and after highly selective vagotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Mistiaen, W.; Van Hee, R.; Blockx, P.; Hubens, A. )

    1990-03-01

    In a series of 31 duodenal ulcer patients (23 males and 8 females), who underwent a highly selective vagotomy, gastric emptying characteristics of a solid meal, labeled with (99mTc)stannous colloid, were assessed before, two weeks and six months after operation. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy and x-ray; failure of treatment with H2 antagonists or antacids during 1-18 (mean 5) years was the direct indication for operative treatment. A temporary delay in gastric emptying is noted two weeks after operation (T1/2: 124 vs 57 min). After six months, gastric emptying time has practically normalized. It appears that this is the result of the preservation of the antropyloric vagal nerve supply. In these patients, a 10% recurrence rate is noted, comparable to the results in the literature. Highly selective vagotomy proves to be a safe and effective procedure with few side effects. It does not impair gastric motility.

  14. [Laparoscopic treatment of a large trichobezoar in the stomach with gastric perforation and abdominal wall abscess].

    PubMed

    Zaharie, F; Iancu, C; Tanţău, M; Mocan, L; Bartoş, A; Mihăileanu, F; Iancu, D; Tomuş, C; Zaharie, R; Vlad, L

    2010-01-01

    Trichobezoar represents a mass of swallowed hair inside the stomach. Here we report a 17-year-old girl who presented in our department with symptoms of gastric ulcer. Ultrasound examination followed by upper endoscopy revealed a large trichobezoar in the stomach with simultaneous gastric perforation. Laparoscopy also revealed a penetration into the anterior abdominal wall accompanied by abscess at this level. We performed a laparoscopic gastrotomy with trichobezoar extraction and laparoscopic treatment of perforation and abdominal wall abscess. The postoperative evolution was normal and the patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. We show that laparoscopic approach may be safely used in the treatment of the large gastric complicated trichobezoar. Several laparoscopic approaches were described for the treatment of tricobezoar and its complications but as far as we know this is the first report of laparoscopic treatment of large tricobezoar and associate gastric perforation.

  15. Gastric emptying of combined liquid-solid meals in healed duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; McIntyre, B.; Alazraki, N.

    1985-12-01

    The gastric emptying rates of combined liquid and solid radioisotopically labeled meals in 47 healed duodenal ulcer subjects and 17 healthy control subjects are compared. No significant differences were found between the groups in emptying slopes and the emptying half-times or in the percent retention values at any of the counting intervals for either the liquid or solid meals. These results are compatible with the observation that the rapid gastric emptying in many patients with duodenal ulcer is associated with the disease and that healing results in a return to normal gastric emptying rates. However, since gastric emptying rates during active ulceration were not determined in our patients, a more definitive interpretation awaits a study comparing emptying rates obtained during and after healing of active ulceration in the same patient.

  16. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL‐10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins’ capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  17. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins' capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  18. [Unusual cause of gastric bleeding: leiomyoma].

    PubMed

    Alberti, P; Pruneri, U; Bianchi, P; Cerra, V

    1996-10-01

    The gastric leiomyoma is a rare non-epithelial tumor of the stomach that can either be asymptomatic (autoptical diagnosis) or, on the contrary, suddenly appear with severe gastric hemorrhage. The authors review the literature and report their own experience concerning 6 cases of gastric leiomyoma observed during 5 years. They discuss the clinical presentation, the difficulties of diagnosis and the therapeutic choices.

  19. Protective effect of palm vitamin E and α-tocopherol against gastric lesions induced by water immersion restraint stress in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Yusof, Kamisah; Ismail, Nafeeza Mohd; Fahami, Nur Azlina Mohd

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Stress can lead to various changes in the gastrointestinal tract of rats. The present study was designed to compare the effect of palm vitamin E (PVE) and α-tocopherol (α-TF) supplementations on the gastric parameters important in maintaining gastric mucosal integrity in rats exposed to water immersion restraint stress (WRS). These parameters include gastric acidity, plasma gastrin level, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and gastric lesions. Materials and Methods: Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were divided into three equal groups: a control group, which received a normal rat diet (RC), and two treatment groups, receiving oral supplementation of either PVE or α-TF at 60 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Each group was further divided into two groups: the nonstress and stress groups. The stress groups were subjected to 3.5 h of WRS once at the end of the treatment period. Blood samples were then taken to measure the gastrin level, after which the rats were killed. Gastric juice was collected for measurement of gastric acidity and gastric tissue was taken for measurement of gastric mucosal lesions and PGE2. Results: Exposure to stress resulted in the production of gastric lesions. PVE and α-TF lowered the lesion indices as compared to the stress control group. Stress reduced gastric acidity but pretreatment with PVE and α-TF prevented this reduction. The gastrin levels in the stress group were lower as compared to that in the nonstress control. However, following treatment with PVE and α-TF, gastrin levels increased and approached the normal level. There was also a significant reduction in the gastric PGE2 content with stress exposure, but this reduction was blocked with treatment with both PVE and α-TF. Conclusion: In conclusion, WRS leads to a reduction in the gastric acidity, gastrin level, and gastric PGE2 level and there is increased formation of gastric lesions. Supplementation with either PVE or α-TF reduces the formation of gastric

  20. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  1. Near-infrared raman spectroscopy for detection of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Mao, Wei-zheng; Xu, Ming; Gong, Long-jing; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Han-jing; Zheng, Rong-er

    2011-07-01

    The nude mice injected with human gastric cancer cells (SGC-7901) in their peritoneums were chosen as the animal models of gastric cancer peritoneal dissemination in this research. The Raman spectra at 785nm excitation of both these nude mice which were in different tumor planting periods and the normal counterpart were taken in vivo in the imitate laparotomy. 205 spectra were collected. The spectra of different tissue types were compared and classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm. Significant differences were showed between normal and malignant tissues. The gastric cancer nodules had lower Raman intensities at 870, 1330, 1450, and 1660cm-1, but higher at 1007, 1050, 1093 and 1209cm-1, compared with normal tissues. Additionally, the spectra of malignant tissues had two peaks around 1330 cm-1 (1297cm-1 and 1331cm-1), while the spectra of normal tissues had only one peak (1297cm-1). The differences were attributed to the intensities of the stretching bands of the nucleic acid, protein and water. These features could be used to diagnose gastric cancer. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm was used to classify these spectra. For normal and malignant tissues, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 95.73%, 70.73% and 90.73%, respectively, while for different tumor planting periods, they were 98.82%, 98.73% and 98.78%. The experimental results show that Raman spectra differ significantly between cancerous and normal gastric tissues, which provides the experimental basis for the diagnosis of gastric cancer by Raman spectroscopy technology. And SVM algorithm can give the well generalized classification performance for the samples, which expands the application of mathematical algorithms in the classification.

  2. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1), pepsinogen 2 (PG2) and gastrin 17 (G17) offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation), degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy) and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status). Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003). The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058). The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p < 0.01). Laurén-specific analysis revealed that this is only true for intestinal type tumors. Univariate ANOVA revealed atrophy and CagA-status as the only independent factors for low PG1 and a low PG1/2-ratio. Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer. PMID:22289789

  3. IGFBP3, a Transcriptional Target of Homeobox D10, Is Correlated with the Prognosis of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guoming; Zhuo, Wei; Zhong, Jing; Qian, Cuijuan; Wang, Lan; Wang, Liangjing; Si, Jianmin; Chen, Shujie

    2013-01-01

    Homeobox D10 (HoxD10) plays important roles in the differentiation of embryonic cells and progression of breast cancer. Our previous report revealed that insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) was regulated by HoxD10 in gastric cancer cells; however, the functional roles and underlying mechanisms of IGFBP3 in gastric cancer remain unclear. Here, we found that the expression of IGFBP3 were upregulated after ectopic expression of HoxD10 in gastric cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that HoxD10 bound to three potential regions of IGFBP3 promoter. Exogenous HoxD10 significantly enhanced the activity of luciferase reporter containing these binding regions in gastric cancer cells. Further data showed that all of these binding sites had Hox binding element “TTAT”. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that IGFBP3 expression was significantly downregulated in 86 gastric adenocarcinomas tissues relative to their adjacent non-cancerous tissues (p<0.001). Moreover, IGFBP3 expression was significantly lower in gastric tumor with lymph node metastasis compared with that without lymph node metastasis (p=0.045). Patients with high expression level of IGFBP3 showed favorable 5 year overall survival (p=0.011). Knockdown of IGFBP3 accelerated gastric cancer cell migration and invasion and induced the expression of invasive factors including MMP14, uPA and uPAR. Thus, our data suggest that HoxD10-targeted gene IGFBP3 may suppress gastric cancer cell invasion and favors the survival of gastric cancer patients. PMID:24386080

  4. Association between polymorphisms in segregation genes BUB1B and TTK and gastric cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra; Britovsek, Nina Kocevar; Grazio, Snjezana Frkovic; Komel, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant transformation of normal gastric cells is a complex and multistep process, resulting in development of heterogeneous tumours. Susceptible genetic background, accumulation of genetic changes, and environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mitotic segregation genes could be responsible for inducing the slow process of accumulation of genetic changes, leading to genome instability. Patients and methods We performed a case-control study of polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK rs151658 and BUB1B rs1031963 and rs1801376 to assess their effects on gastric cancer risk. We examined the TTK abundance in gastric cancer tissues using immunoblot analysis. Results C/G genotype of rs151658 was more frequent in patients with diffuse type of gastric cancer and G/G genotype was more common in intestinal types of gastric cancers (p = 0.049). Polymorphic genotype A/A of rs1801376 was associated with higher risk for developing diffuse type of gastric cancer in female population (p = 0.007), whereas A/A frequencies were increased in male patients with subserosa tumour cell infiltration (p = 0.009). T/T genotype of rs1031963 was associated with well differentiated tumours (p = 0.035). TT+CT genotypes of rs1031963 and GG+AG genotypes of rs1801376 were significantly associated with gastric cancer risk (dominant model; OR = 2,929, 95% CI: 1.281-6.700; p = 0.017 and dominant model; OR = 0,364, 95% CI: 0.192-0.691; p = 0.003 respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK and BUB1B may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis and risk of tumour development. Further investigations on large populations and populations of different ethnicity are needed to determine their clinical utility.

  5. Association between polymorphisms in segregation genes BUB1B and TTK and gastric cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hudler, Petra; Britovsek, Nina Kocevar; Grazio, Snjezana Frkovic; Komel, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant transformation of normal gastric cells is a complex and multistep process, resulting in development of heterogeneous tumours. Susceptible genetic background, accumulation of genetic changes, and environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mitotic segregation genes could be responsible for inducing the slow process of accumulation of genetic changes, leading to genome instability. Patients and methods We performed a case-control study of polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK rs151658 and BUB1B rs1031963 and rs1801376 to assess their effects on gastric cancer risk. We examined the TTK abundance in gastric cancer tissues using immunoblot analysis. Results C/G genotype of rs151658 was more frequent in patients with diffuse type of gastric cancer and G/G genotype was more common in intestinal types of gastric cancers (p = 0.049). Polymorphic genotype A/A of rs1801376 was associated with higher risk for developing diffuse type of gastric cancer in female population (p = 0.007), whereas A/A frequencies were increased in male patients with subserosa tumour cell infiltration (p = 0.009). T/T genotype of rs1031963 was associated with well differentiated tumours (p = 0.035). TT+CT genotypes of rs1031963 and GG+AG genotypes of rs1801376 were significantly associated with gastric cancer risk (dominant model; OR = 2,929, 95% CI: 1.281-6.700; p = 0.017 and dominant model; OR = 0,364, 95% CI: 0.192-0.691; p = 0.003 respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that polymorphisms in mitotic kinases TTK and BUB1B may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis and risk of tumour development. Further investigations on large populations and populations of different ethnicity are needed to determine their clinical utility. PMID:27679546

  6. Slow overmethylation of housekeeping genes in the body mucosa is associated with the risk for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Rhyu, Mun-Gan; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Wook; Kim, Suk-Il; Hong, Seung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection increases age-related diverse overmethylation in gene-control regions, which increases the risk of gastric cancer. The H. pylori-associated overmethylation changes subsequently disappear when gastric atrophy and cancer develop. To identify cancer-risk epigenotypes, we traced dynamic methylation changes in the background mucosa of the stomach depending on the extent of gastric atrophy. Paired biopsy specimens were obtained from the noncancerous antrum and body mucosa of 102 patients with cancer and 114 H. pylori-positive and 112 H. pylori-negative controls. The grade of gastric atrophy was evaluated using the endoscopic atrophic border score. The methylation-variable sites at the CpG-island margins and near the transcriptional start sites lacking CpG islands were semiquantitatively analyzed by radioisotope-labeling methylation-specific PCR. We selected eight housekeeping genes adjacent to Alu (CDH1, ARRDC4, PPARG, and TRAPPC2L) or LTR retroelements (MMP2, CDKN2A, RUNX2, and RUNX3) and eight stomach-specific genes (TFF2, PGC, ATP4B, TFF1, TFF3, GHRL, PGA, and ATP4A). Analysis of age-related methylation in the H. pylori-positive controls revealed slow overmethylation in the body and in the LTR-adjacent genes. A high-frequency overmethylation defined based on the slowly overmethylated genes was frequently observed in the body of patients with gastric cancer with open-type atrophy (OR, 12.7; 95% confidence interval, 3.2-49.8). The rapidly changing methylation of Alu-adjacent genes was barely increased in the antrum of patients with gastric cancer. Among diverse methylation changes associated with H. pylori infection, an increase in slowly changing methylation could serve as a cancer-risk marker.

  7. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  8. Shuidouchi (Fermented Soybean) Fermented in Different Vessels Attenuates HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury.

    PubMed

    Suo, Huayi; Feng, Xia; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Cun; Zhao, Xin; Kan, Jianquan

    2015-11-02

    Shuidouchi (Natto) is a fermented soy product showing in vivo gastric injury preventive effects. The treatment effects of Shuidouchi fermented in different vessels on HCl/ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury mice through their antioxidant effect was determined. Shuidouchi contained isoflavones (daidzein and genistein), and GVFS (glass vessel fermented Shuidouchi) had the highest isoflavone levels among Shuidouchi samples fermented in different vessels. After treatment with GVFS, the gastric mucosal injury was reduced as compared to the control mice. The gastric secretion volume (0.47 mL) and pH of gastric juice (3.1) of GVFS treated gastric mucosal injury mice were close to those of ranitidine-treated mice and normal mice. Shuidouchi could decrease serum motilin (MTL), gastrin (Gas) level and increase somatostatin (SS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) level, and GVFS showed the strongest effects. GVFS showed lower IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ cytokine levels than other vessel fermented Shuidouchi samples, and these levels were higher than those of ranitidine-treated mice and normal mice. GVFS also had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide (NO) and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents in gastric tissues than other Shuidouchi samples. Shuidouchi could raise IκB-α, EGF, EGFR, nNOS, eNOS, Mn-SOD, Gu/Zn-SOD, CAT mRNA expressions and reduce NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS expressions as compared to the control mice. GVFS showed the best treatment effects for gastric mucosal injuries, suggesting that glass vessels could be used for Shuidouchi fermentation in functional food manufacturing.

  9. [Genetic factors in gastric carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ohgaki, H

    1983-02-01

    Genetic control of susceptibility of rats to gastro-carcinogenesis by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was studied in susceptible ACI strain rats, resistant Buffalo strain rats, and their F1 and F2 offsprings. Rats were given MNNG at a concentration of 83 micrograms/ml in drinking water for 32 weeks and sacrificed on week 72. The incidence of gastric adenocarcinomas in F1 was as low as that in Buffalo rats. The results showed that susceptibility to MNNG was controlled genetically and that the resistance of Buffalo strain rats was autosomal dominant. To clarify the mechanisms which determine susceptibility to MNNG, some biochemical parameters such as pH of gastric juice, glutathione content in the gastric mucosa and the binding of MNNG to DNA, were analysed. No difference was observed between ACI and Buffalo strains in regard to the events leading to the binding of MNNG to DNA.

  10. Etiology and Prevention of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous malignant disease associated with environmental and genetic predisposing factors. While gastric cancer incidence and mortality fell greatly globally over the past decades, it remains the fourth cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Thus, prevention of gastric cancer is still a major strategy for improvement of gastric cancer prognosis. Summary Helicobacter pylori infection has been demonstrated to be a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Unhealthy diet and lifestyle, including high-salt food, smoking and drinking, are able to induce genotypic and phenotypic transformation of gastric epithelial cells. Gene mutations (such as E-cadherin) in stomach epithelial cells are major genetic causes for gastric cancer. The eradication of H. pylori has been demonstrated to be an effective approach for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Increased intake of a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits as well as smoking cessation have been shown to reduce the incidence of gastric cancer. The secondary prevention strategy is to screen premalignant gastric lesions by endoscopy. Biomarker tests are also reliable methods to identify gastric precancerous lesions. Endoscopy screening is still the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Key Message H. pylori infection, a diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, as well as gene mutations are major risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. Practical Implications The eradication of H. pylori is a major primary preventive strategy of gastric cancer. A healthy lifestyle, including increased intake of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, reduced intake of salted and smoked food and red meat, a reduction of alcohol intake as well as smoking cessation will be effective approaches for the prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27722154

  11. Association of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation with reduced NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer cells and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Shuanglong; Ma, Jinguo; Li, Zhenhua; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Lu, Yao; Dai, Dongqiu

    2013-05-01

    NDRG1 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1) plays a role in cell differentiation and suppression of tumor metastasis. This study aims to determine the expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer cell lines and tissue specimens and then assess the possible cause of its aberrant expression. Six gastric cancer cell lines and 20 pairs of normal and gastric cancer tissue samples were used to assess NDRG1 expression using Real-time PCR and Western blot. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) were performed to detect gene mutation and methylation, respectively, in cell lines and tissues samples. Expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was downregulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Specifically, expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was lower in all six gastric cancer cell lines than that of normal gastric cells, while 15 out of 20 cases of gastric cancer tissues had the reduced levels of NDRG1 mRNA and protein. HRM data showed that there was no mutation in NDRG1 gene, but MSP data showed high levels of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation in the CpG islands in both cell lines and tissue samples. Moreover, treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine upregulated NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer HGC27 cells, but not in the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A-treated HGC27 cells. In conclusion, this study has shown that expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was reduced in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues, which is due to methylation of NDRG1 gene promoter. Further study will unearth the clinical significance of the reduced NDRG1 protein in gastric cancer.

  12. Gastric accommodation in non-ulcer dyspepsia and the roles of Helicobacter pylori infection and vagal function

    PubMed Central

    Thumshirn, M; Camilleri, M; Saslow, S; Williams, D; Burton, D; Hanson, R

    1999-01-01

    Background—The pathophysiological mechanisms in non-ulcer dyspepsia are incompletely understood. 
Aims—To compare gastric motor and sensory functions in Helicobacter pylori positive or negative patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. 
Patients—Seventeen patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia and 16 asymptomatic controls. 
Methods—The following were evaluated: gastrointestinal symptoms; gastric emptying and orocaecal transit of solids; abdominal vagal function; gastric compliance; fasting and postprandial gastric tone and phasic contractions; symptoms during ingestion of cold water and during the distension of an intragastric bag; and somatic sensitivity and personality profile (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, MMPI). 
Results—Gastric accommodation was reduced in H pylori negative dyspeptics relative to controls; the degree of accommodation was unrelated to H pylori status in dyspeptics. Increased postprandial gastric sensation was more frequent among H pylori positive patients (4/5 H pylori positive versus 4/12 H pylori negative patients). Intragastric meal distribution and orocaecal transit were normal; gastric emptying at four hours was abnormal in 4/17 patients. Vagal dysfunction was rare. Eight of 17 patients had somatisation or depression on MMPI. 
Conclusion—Impaired gastric accommodation is frequent in non-ulcer dyspepsia and seems to be unrelated to vagal efferent dysfunction. H pylori infection does not seem to influence gastric accommodation, but is associated with heightened sensitivity in dyspeptics. Therapeutic approaches that restore normal postprandial accommodation and gastric sensitivity should be tested in non-ulcer dyspepsia. 

 Keywords: non-ulcer dyspepsia; Helicobacter pylori; vagal function PMID:9862826

  13. Gastric lymphoma: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Savio, Antonella

    2011-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma is frequently difficult for the general histopathologist. During recent years there have been relevant changes in the therapeutic approach to gastric MALT lymphoma and our knowledge about its pathogenesis has greatly improved. The management of this disease actually requires a close cooperation between the histopathologist and the clinicians. The histology report of biopsies of a newly diagnosed or of an already treated case implies information of clinical and therapeutical relevance. This paper aims at giving the histopathologist a general knowledge about the state of art of this disease and its management. The diagnostic process leading to a complete and competent report is then described step by step.

  14. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  15. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  16. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  1. Curcumin Blocks Naproxen-Induced Gastric Antral Ulcerations through Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation and Activation of Enzymatic Scavengers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jin, Soojung; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-08-28

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, which is used for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The present study was undertaken to determine the protective effect of curcumin against naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations in rats. Different doses (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg) of curcumin or vehicle (curcumin, 0 mg/kg) were pretreated for 3 days by oral gavage, and then gastric mucosal lesions were caused by 80 mg/kg naproxen applied for 3 days. Curcumin significantly inhibited the naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcer area and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin markedly increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, 100 mg/kg curcumin completely protected the gastric mucosa against the loss in the enzyme, resulting in a drastic increase of activities of radical scavenging enzymes up to more than the level of untreated normal rats. Histological examination obviously showed that curcumin prevents naproxen-induced gastric antral ulceration as a result of direct protection of the gastric mucosa. These results suggest that curcumin blocks naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of radical scavenging enzymes, and it may offer a potential remedy of gastric antral ulcerations.

  2. RhoE Promotes Metastasis in Gastric Cancer through a Mechanism Dependent on Enhanced Expression of CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hefei; Shang, Yulong; Bai, Ming; Liang, Jie; Wang, Xin; Fan, Daiming

    2013-01-01

    RhoE, a novel member of the Rho protein family, is a key regulator of the cytoskeleton and cell migration. Our group has previously shown that RhoE as a direct target for HIF-1α and mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, we assumed that RhoE might play an important role in gastric cancer metastasis. In the present study, we have explored the role of RhoE expression in gastric cancer, cell invasion and metastasis, and the influence of RhoE on regulating the potential expression of down-stream genes. RhoE expression was elevated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with normal gastric tissues. We also found a close correlation between the histological grade and the diagnosis of the patient. Up-regulation of RhoE significantly enhanced the migratory and invasive abilities of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, down-regulation of RhoE diminished the metastatic potential of cancer cells. PCR array and subsequent transwell assay showed that the regulation of gastric cancer metastasis by RhoE was partially mediated by CXCR4. This observation suggested that CXCR4 might be a downstream effector for RhoE. In summary, our study identified RhoE as a novel prognostic biomarker and metastatic-promoting gene of gastric cancer. PMID:24312338

  3. Effect of lysozyme chloride on betel quid chewing aggravated gastric oxidative stress and hemorrhagic ulcer in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chen-Road

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of lysozyme chloride on betel quid chewing (BQC) aggravated gastric oxidative stress and hemorrhagic ulcer in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS: Male Wistar rats were challenged intravenously with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) to induce DM. Rats were fed with regular pellet food or BQC-containing diets. After 90 d, rats were deprived of food for 24 h. Rat stomachs were irrigated for 3 h with normal saline or simulated gastric juice. Rats were killed and gastric specimens were harvested. RESULTS: An enhancement of various gastric ulcerogenic parameters, including acid back-diffusion, mucosal lipid peroxide generation, as well as decreased glutathione levels and mucus content, were observed in DM rats. After feeding DM rats with BQC, an exacerbation of these ulcero-genic parameters was achieved. Gastric juice caused a further aggravation of these ulcerogenic parameters. Daily intragastric lysozyme chloride dose-dependently inhibited exacerbation of various ulcerogenic parameters in those BQC-fed DM rats. CONCLUSION: (1) Gastric juice could aggravate both DM and BQC-fed DM rat hemorrhagic ulcer; (2) BQC exacerbated gastric hemorrhagic ulcer in DM rats via enhancing oxidative stress and reducing defensive factors; (3) lysozyme chloride effectively protected BQC aggravated gastric damage in DM rats. PMID:16270397

  4. Curcumin Blocks Naproxen-Induced Gastric Antral Ulcerations through Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation and Activation of Enzymatic Scavengers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jin, Soojung; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-08-28

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, which is used for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The present study was undertaken to determine the protective effect of curcumin against naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations in rats. Different doses (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg) of curcumin or vehicle (curcumin, 0 mg/kg) were pretreated for 3 days by oral gavage, and then gastric mucosal lesions were caused by 80 mg/kg naproxen applied for 3 days. Curcumin significantly inhibited the naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcer area and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin markedly increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, 100 mg/kg curcumin completely protected the gastric mucosa against the loss in the enzyme, resulting in a drastic increase of activities of radical scavenging enzymes up to more than the level of untreated normal rats. Histological examination obviously showed that curcumin prevents naproxen-induced gastric antral ulceration as a result of direct protection of the gastric mucosa. These results suggest that curcumin blocks naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of radical scavenging enzymes, and it may offer a potential remedy of gastric antral ulcerations. PMID:27197667

  5. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  6. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad; Merchant, Juanita L

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the various experimental models to study gastric cancer pathogenesis, with the role of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) used as the major examples. We review differences in human stomach anatomy compared to the stomachs of the experimental models, including the mouse and invertebrate models such as Drosophila and C. elegans. The contribution of major signaling pathways, e.g., Notch, Hedgehog, AKT/PI3K is discussed in the context of their potential contribution to foregut tumorigenesis. We critically examine the rationale behind specific GEMMs, chemical carcinogens, dietary promoters, Helicobacter infection, and direct mutagenesis of relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor that have been developed to study gastric cancer pathogenesis. Despite species differences, more efficient and effective models to test specific genes and pathways disrupted in human gastric carcinogenesis have yet to emerge. As we better understand these species differences, "humanized" versions of mouse models will more closely approximate human gastric cancer pathogenesis. Towards that end, epigenetic marks on chromatin, the gut microbiota, and ways of manipulating the immune system will likely move center stage, permitting greater overlap between rodent and human cancer phenotypes thus providing a unified progression model. PMID:27573785

  7. Vulnerability of Gastric Mucosa in Diabetic Rats, Its Pathogenesis and Amelioration by Cuminum cyminum.

    PubMed

    Vador, N; Jagtap, Aarti G; Damle, Archana

    2012-09-01

    Various studies have indicated that peptic ulcers occurring during the course of diabetic state are more severe and often associated with complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding. This study is the first attempt to understand the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers occurring during the diabetic state considering alternate biochemical pathways using suitable markers and its amelioration by Cuminum cyminum. In this study, diabetic rats showed a progressive increase in the stomach advanced glycated end products formation, gastric mucosal tumour necrosis factor-α and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels as compared to normal control (nondiabetic) rats. There was decrease in gastric mucosal content, antioxidant enzymes and cellular ATPase enzyme levels of diabetic gastric mucosa when compared to the normal control group. mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor was found to be significantly higher as compared to normal control animals. Further methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum treatment to diabetic animals caused a reduction in blood glucose, and ulcer score when compared to diabetic control rats. It significantly increased gastric mucus content, antioxidant status and cellular ATPase enzyme levels as compared to diabetic control animals. Methanol extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibited advanced glycated end products formation in vitro as well as in vivo.

  8. Delayed gastric emptying in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marrinan, Sarah; Emmanuel, Anton V; Burn, David J

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are evident in all stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the gastrointestinal abnormalities associated with PD are attributable to impaired motility. At the level of the stomach, this results in delayed gastric emptying. The etiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD is probably multifactorial but is at least partly related to Lewy pathology in the enteric nervous system and discrete brainstem nuclei. Delayed gastric emptying occurs in both early and advanced PD but is underdetected in routine clinical practice. Recognition of delayed gastric emptying is important because it can cause an array of upper gastrointestinal symptoms, but additionally it has important implications for the absorption and action of levodopa. Delayed gastric emptying contributes significantly to response fluctuations seen in people on long-term l-dopa therapy. Neurohormonal aspects of the brain-gut axis are pertinent to discussions regarding the pathophysiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD and are also hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD itself. Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone with potential as a therapeutic agent for delayed gastric emptying and also as a novel neuroprotective agent in PD. Recent findings relating to ghrelin in the context of PD and gastric emptying are considered. This article highlights the pathological abnormalities that may account for delayed gastric emptying in PD. It also considers the wider relevance of abnormal gastric pathology to our current understanding of the etiology of PD. PMID:24151126

  9. Absence of tpr-met and expression of c-met in human gastric mucosa and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heideman, D A; Snijders, P J; Bloemena, E; Meijer, C J; Offerhaus, G J; Meuwissen, S G; Gerritsen, W R; Craanen, M E

    2001-08-01

    The c-met proto-oncogene, encoding the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, can be activated by various mechanisms. These include, among others, gene amplification with concomitant overexpression and the tpr-met oncogenic rearrangement. In the case of gastric cancer, contradictory results on the presence of the tpr-met oncogenic rearrangement have been published. The current study aimed therefore to assess the prevalence of tpr-met expression in Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas, to evaluate the importance of this oncogene in their carcinogenesis. In addition, the level of c-met expression was determined, to evaluate the role of this alternative mode of activation of the proto-oncogene. A series of Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas (n=43) and normal gastric mucosal samples (n=14) was analysed for tpr-met and c-met expression. Expression of tpr-met mRNA in the samples was performed by two reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, with excellent correlation. The specificity of both methods was confirmed by direct sequencing of the PCR products of the MNNG-HOS cell line, which is known to contain the rearrangement. The level of c-met expression was assessed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR assays and immunohistochemistry (IHC). None of the normal gastric mucosal or gastric adenocarcinoma samples expressed tpr-met mRNA, as determined by both RT-PCR assays. Seventy per cent of the adenocarcinomas showed overexpression of c-met, according to elevated c-met mRNA levels, compared with the expression level of normal gastric mucosa. A significant correlation was found between the level of c-met mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that tpr-met activation does not play a role in Caucasian gastric carcinogenesis, while overexpression of the c-met gene occurs in the majority of Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas.

  10. Effects of celecoxib on acid-challenged gastric mucosa of rats: comparison with metamizol and piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Bettina; Alarcón De La Lastra, Catalina; Motilva, Virginia; La Casa, Carmen; Herrerias, Juan Manuel; Pozo, David; Calero, María José Martin

    2004-06-01

    Selective COX-2 inhibitors have been shown to produce fewer gastrointestinal adverse reactions than classical NSAIDs. Nevertheless, these new agents may worsen and delay the healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in animals. In this study, we compared the effects of a selective COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib), a preferential COX-1 inhibitor (piroxicam), and a nonnarcotic analgesic (metamizol) on normal gastric mucosa of rats and, on the other hand, in a setting of preexisting acute gastric lesions induced by 0.6 N hydrochloric acid. Under normal conditions, only piroxicam produced appreciable gastric lesions. However, after acid challenge the three assayed drugs induced significant macroscopic and microscopic damage. Myeloperoxidase activity as an index of neutrophil infiltration was elevated with celecoxib and piroxicam on normal gastric mucosa. On inflamed mucosa, celecoxib augmented enzymatic activity at the lower dose, which was parallelled by an increase in the interleukin 1beta level. Acid instillaton produced a significant rise in PGE2 content at 7 hr. Drug treatment after acid challenge decreased prostaglandin values in all cases, although to a lesser extent than after single drug dose administration. COX-2 mRNA expression was visible 1 hr after acid application, whereas COX-2 protein could only be detected at 7 hr. Piroxicam increased both expression levels. All NSAIDs enhanced transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor immunoreactivity around the acid-induced lesions. It is concluded that selective COX-2 inhibitors, like conventional NSAIDs, impair the healing of gastric damage, and therefore special attention should be paid in patients with gastric pathologies.

  11. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier.

    PubMed

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-10-28

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection.

  12. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  13. Tight junction disruption: Helicobacter pylori and dysregulation of the gastric mucosal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Tyler J; Scott, Kathleen E; Fox, James G; Hagen, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Long-term chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a risk factor for gastric cancer development. In the multi-step process that leads to gastric cancer, tight junction dysfunction is thought to occur and serve as a risk factor by permitting the permeation of luminal contents across an otherwise tight mucosa. Mechanisms that regulate tight junction function and structure in the normal stomach, or dysfunction in the infected stomach, however, are largely unknown. Although conventional tight junction components are expressed in gastric epithelial cells, claudins regulate paracellular permeability and are likely the target of inflammation or H. pylori itself. There are 27 different claudin molecules, each with unique properties that render the mucosa an intact barrier that is permselective in a way that is consistent with cell physiology. Understanding the architecture of tight junctions in the normal stomach and then changes that occur during infection is important but challenging, because most of the reports that catalog claudin expression in gastric cancer pathogenesis are contradictory. Furthermore, the role of H. pylori virulence factors, such as cytotoxin-associated gene A and vacoulating cytotoxin, in regulating tight junction dysfunction during infection is inconsistent in different gastric cell lines and in vivo, likely because non-gastric epithelial cell cultures were initially used to unravel the details of their effects on the stomach. Hampering further study, as well, is the relative lack of cultured cell models that have tight junction claudins that are consistent with native tissues. This summary will review the current state of knowledge about gastric tight junctions, normally and in H. pylori infection, and make predictions about the consequences of claudin reorganization during H. pylori infection. PMID:26523106

  14. CEUS and strain elastography in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Vito; Rubini, Antonello; Miniagio, Guglielmo

    2013-07-18

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer, but diagnosis is often delayed. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy is currently the gold standard for evaluating gastric cancer. Also other imaging modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are employed for identifying gastric cancer, but particularly for cancer staging. Ultrasound (US) is a first-line imaging modality used to examine organs in the abdomen, and during these examinations gastric cancer may be incidentally detected. Very few studies in the literature have investigated the role of US in gastric disease. However, more recently, some authors have reported on the use of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) and US-elastography in gastric disease using both endoscopic and transabdominal approach. In this paper, we present a case of gastric cancer studied by CEUS and transabdominal US-elastography.

  15. Functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged intracellular organelles. Perturbations in autophagy are found in gastric cancer. In host gastric cells, autophagy can be induced by Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori) infection, which is associated with the oncogenesis of gastric cancer. In gastric cancer cells, autophagy has both pro-survival and pro-death functions in determining cell fate. Besides, autophagy modulates gastric cancer metastasis by affecting a wide range of pathological events, including extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, and tumor microenvironment. In addition, some of the autophagy-related proteins, such as Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3), and p62/sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) have certain prognostic values for gastric cancer. In this article, we review the recent studies regarding the functional role of autophagy in gastric cancer. PMID:26910278

  16. GASTRIC AND JEJUNAL HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Rosemary Simões Nomelini; ALMEIDA, Élia Cláudia de Souza; CAMILO, Silvia Maria Perrone; TERRA-JÚNIOR, Júverson Alves; GUIMARÃES, Lucinda Calheiros; DUQUE, Ana Cristina da Rocha; ETCHEBEHERE, Renata Margarida

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Morbid obesity is a multifactorial disease that increasingly is being treated by surgery. Aim: To evaluate gastric histopathological changes in obese, and to compare with patients who underwent gastrojejunal bypass and the jejunal mucosa after the surgery. Methods: This is an observational study performed at a tertiary public hospital, evaluating endoscopic biopsies from 36 preoperative patients and 35 postoperative. Results: In the preoperative group, 80.6% had chronic gastritis, which was active in 38.9% (77.1% and 20.1%, respectively, in the postoperative). The postoperative group had a significant reduction in H. pylori infection (p=0.0001). A longer length of the gastric stump and a time since surgery of more than two years were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was normal in 91.4% and showed slight nonspecific chronic inflammation in 8.6%. Conclusion: There was a reduction in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the postoperative group. A longer length of the gastric stump and longer time elapsed since surgery were associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The jejunal mucosa was considered normal in an absolute majority of patients. PMID:27683773

  17. Exploring the physiologic role of human gastroesophageal reflux by analyzing time-series data from 24-h gastric and esophageal pH recordings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Luo; Mu, John C; Sloan, Sheldon; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2014-07-16

    Our previous finding of a fractal pattern for gastric pH and esophageal pH plus the statistical association of sequential pH values for up to 2 h led to our hypothesis that the fractal pattern encodes information regarding gastric acidity and that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity by influencing gastric secretion of acid or bicarbonate. Under our hypothesis values of gastric pH should provide information regarding values of esophageal pH and vice versa. We used vector autoregression, a theory-free set of inter-related linear regressions used to measure relationships that can change over time, to analyze data from 24-h recordings of gastric pH and esophageal pH. We found that in pH records from normal subjects, as well as from subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease alone and after treatment with a proton pump inhibitor, gastric pH values provided important information regarding subsequent values of esophageal pH and values of esophageal pH provided important information regarding subsequent values of gastric pH. The ability of gastric pH and esophageal pH to provide information regarding subsequent values of each other was reduced in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared to normal subjects. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity, and that this ability is impaired in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  18. Hypercalcemia as Initial Presentation of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of Gastric Origin: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kumar, Vinod; Kaur, Supreet; Maroules, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy due to metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma is extremely rare; in fact, to the best of our knowledge, only three case reports of hypercalcemia associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma have been published in the literature to date. Herein, we report a rare case involving a 61-year-old African-American female who had hypercalcemia at initial presentation and who was later diagnosed with poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma with extensive liver metastases, without bone involvement. She was found to have elevated parathyroid hormone-related peptide and normal parathyroid hormone levels. Despite aggressive treatment, she died within a few months of diagnosis. PMID:27752397

  19. Gastric stimulation for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Meir; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Ilan, Yaron

    2012-05-21

    The prevalence of obesity is growing to epidemic proportions, and there is clearly a need for minimally invasive therapies with few adverse effects that allow for sustained weight loss. Behavior and lifestyle therapy are safe treatments for obesity in the short term, but the durability of the weight loss is limited. Although promising obesity drugs are in development, the currently available drugs lack efficacy or have unacceptable side effects. Surgery leads to long-term weight loss, but it is associated with morbidity and mortality. Gastric electrical stimulation (GES) has received increasing attention as a potential tool for treating obesity and gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders. GES is a promising, minimally invasive, safe, and effective method for treating obesity. External gastric pacing is aimed at alteration of the motility of the gastrointestinal tract in a way that will alter absorption due to alteration of transit time. In addition, data from animal models and preliminary data from human trials suggest a role for the gut-brain axis in the mechanism of GES. This may involve alteration of secretion of hormones associated with hunger or satiety. Patient selection for gastric stimulation therapy seems to be an important determinant of the treatment's outcome. Here, we review the current status, potential mechanisms of action, and possible future applications of gastric stimulation for obesity. PMID:22654422

  20. Neural invasion in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, M; Adachi, Y; Kamakura, T; Ikeda, Y; Maehara, Y; Sugimachi, K

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To determine whether neural invasion in advanced gastric cancer is of clinicopathological significance. METHODS--The study population comprised 121 cases of primary advanced gastric carcinoma. Two paraffin wax embedded blocks taken from the central tissue slice in each primary tumour were used. For definitive recognition of neural invasion, immunostaining for S-100 protein was applied to one slide; the other slide was stained with haematoxylin and eosin. RESULTS--Neural invasion was recognised in 34 of 121 (28%) primary gastric carcinomas. There were significant differences in tumour size, depth of tumour invasion, stage, and curability between patients with and without neural invasion. The five year survival rates of patients with and without neural invasion were 10 and 50%, respectively. Multivariate analysis, however, demonstrated that neural invasion was not an independent prognostic factor. CONCLUSIONS--Neural invasion could be an additional useful factor for providing information about the malignant potential of gastric carcinoma. This may be analogous to vessel permeation which is thought to be important, but is not an independent prognostic factor. Images PMID:7745113

  1. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  2. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.J.; Pitman, K.; Starr, G.; Wood, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease. These mice exhibited aganglionosis of the terminal segment of the large intestine. This condition was accompanied by fecal stasis and megacolon. Gastric emptying of saline or milk meals was slower in the mice with aganglionic or induced megacolon than in the normal mice, but the rate of emptying was faster than after administration of morphine (10 mg/kg). In the small intestine, the distribution of the radiolabeled marker and the advancing edge of the marker profile were abnormal in the mice with megacolon. There were small differences between the megacolonic and normal mice in the distance traversed by the advancing edge of the intraluminal profile of the marker. These results are evidence for disturbances of gastric and small intestinal motor function that occur in mice secondary to development of megacolon.

  3. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  4. Distinguishing epigenetic features of preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to seminomas and nonseminomas

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Yulia V.; Zinovyeva, Marina V.; Stukacheva, Elena A.; Klimov, Alexey; Tryakin, Alexey A.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.

    2016-01-01

    PIWI pathway proteins are expressed during spermatogenesis where they play a key role in germ cell development. Epigenetic loss of PIWI proteins expression was previously demonstrated in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), implying their involvement in TGCT development. In this work, apart from studying only normal testis and TGCT samples, we also analyzed an intermediate stage, i.e. preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to TGCTs. Importantly, in this study, we minimized the contribution of patient-to-patient heterogeneity by using matched preneoplastic/TGCT samples. Surprisingly, expression of germ cell marker DDX4 suggests that spermatogenesis is retained in premalignant testis tissues adjacent to nonseminoma, but not those adjacent to seminoma. Moreover, this pattern is followed by expression of PIWI pathway genes, which impacts one of their functions: DNA methylation level over LINE-1 promoters is higher in preneoplastic testis tissues adjacent to nonseminomas than those adjacent to seminomas. This finding might imply distinct routes for development of the two types of TGCTs and could be used as a novel diagnostic marker, possibly, noninvasively. Finally, we studied the role of CpG island methylation in expression of PIWI genes in patient samples and using in vitro experiments in cell line models: a more complex interrelation between DNA methylation and expression of the corresponding genes was revealed. PMID:26843623

  5. Advances in gastric cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Antonio; Cito, Letizia

    2012-09-10

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial neoplastic pathology numbering among its causes both environmental and genetic predisposing factors. It is mainly diffused in South America and South-East Asia, where it shows the highest morbility percentages and it is relatively scarcely diffused in Western countries and North America. Although molecular mechanisms leading to gastric cancer development are only partially known, three main causes are well characterized: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mutations. Unhealthy diet and H. pylori infection are able to induce in stomach cancer cells genotypic and phenotypic transformation, but their effects may be crossed by a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits. Various authors have recently focused their attention on the importance of a well balanced diet, suggesting a necessary dietary education starting from childhood. A constant surveillance will be necessary in people carrying E-cadherin mutations, since they are highly prone in developing gastric cancer, also within the inner stomach layers. Above all in the United States, several carriers decided to undergo a gastrectomy, preferring changing their lifestyle than living with the awareness of the development of a possible gastric cancer. This kind of choice is strictly personal, hence a decision cannot be suggested within the clinical management. Here we summarize the key points of gastric cancer prevention analyzing possible strategies referred to the different predisposing factors. We will discuss about the effects of diet, H. pylori infection and E-cadherin mutations and how each of them can be handled. PMID:23061031

  6. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yantao; Gao, Yaohui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Yinan; Jiang, Yannan; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Chen, Xuehua; Yang, Qiumeng; Su, Liping; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Wang, Lishun; Yu, Yingyan

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily and is involved with the metabolic processing of aldehydes. ALDH2 plays a cytoprotective role by removing aldehydes produced during normal metabolism. We examined the cytoprotective role of ALDH2 specifically in gastric mucosa cells. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased the viability of gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2, while knockdown of ALDH2 had an opposite effect. Moreover, overexpression of ALDH2 protected gastric mucosa cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342, and TUNEL assays. Consistently, ALDH2 knockdown had an opposite effect. Additionally, DNA damage was ameliorated in ALDH2-overexpressing gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2. We further identified that this cytoprotective role of ALDH2 was mediated by metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Consistently, 4-HNE mimicked the oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in gastric mucosa cells. Treatment with 4-HNE increased levels of DNA damage in ALDH2-knockdown GES-1 cells, while overexpression of ALDH2 decreased 4-HNE-induced DNA damage. These findings suggest that ALDH2 can protect gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress by reducing levels of 4-HNE.

  7. Piperlongumine as a direct TrxR1 inhibitor with suppressive activity against gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Ji, Jiansong; Chen, Weiqian; Zhang, Jinsan; Chen, Xi; Rajamanickam, Vinothkumar; Chen, Gaozhi; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Lingfeng; Wang, Yifeng; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-05-28

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the fruit of long pepper, is known to selectively kill tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. However, the cellular target and potent anticancer efficacy of PL in numerous types of human cancer cells have not been fully defined. We report here that PL may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, PL induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to PL treatment, and PL displays synergistic lethality with GSH inhibitors (BSO and Erastin) against gastric cancer cells. In vivo, PL treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden. Remarkably, TrxR1 was significantly overexpressed in gastric cancer cell lines and human gastric cancer tissues. Targeting TrxR1 with PL thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of PL and provides an in-depth insight into the action of PL in the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26963494

  8. Loss of gastrokine-2 drives premalignant gastric inflammation and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Menheniott, Trevelyan R; O'Connor, Louise; Chionh, Yok Teng; Däbritz, Jan; Scurr, Michelle; Rollo, Benjamin N; Ng, Garrett Z; Jacobs, Shelley; Catubig, Angelique; Kurklu, Bayzar; Mercer, Stephen; Minamoto, Toshinari; Ong, David E; Ferrero, Richard L; Fox, James G; Wang, Timothy C; Sutton, Philip; Judd, Louise M; Giraud, Andrew S

    2016-04-01

    Chronic mucosal inflammation is associated with a greater risk of gastric cancer (GC) and, therefore, requires tight control by suppressive counter mechanisms. Gastrokine-2 (GKN2) belongs to a family of secreted proteins expressed within normal gastric mucosal cells. GKN2 expression is frequently lost during GC progression, suggesting an inhibitory role; however, a causal link remains unsubstantiated. Here, we developed Gkn2 knockout and transgenic overexpressing mice to investigate the functional impact of GKN2 loss in GC pathogenesis. In mouse models of GC, decreased GKN2 expression correlated with gastric pathology that paralleled human GC progression. At baseline, Gkn2 knockout mice exhibited defective gastric epithelial differentiation but not malignant progression. Conversely, Gkn2 knockout in the IL-11/STAT3-dependent gp130F/F GC model caused tumorigenesis of the proximal stomach. Additionally, gastric immunopathology was accelerated in Helicobacter pylori-infected Gkn2 knockout mice and was associated with augmented T helper cell type 1 (Th1) but not Th17 immunity. Heightened Th1 responses in Gkn2 knockout mice were linked to deregulated mucosal innate immunity and impaired myeloid-derived suppressor cell activation. Finally, transgenic overexpression of human gastrokines (GKNs) attenuated gastric tumor growth in gp130F/F mice. Together, these results reveal an antiinflammatory role for GKN2, provide in vivo evidence that links GKN2 loss to GC pathogenesis, and suggest GKN restoration as a strategy to restrain GC progression.

  9. Loss of gastrokine-2 drives premalignant gastric inflammation and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; O’Connor, Louise; Chionh, Yok Teng; Scurr, Michelle; Rollo, Benjamin N.; Ng, Garrett Z.; Jacobs, Shelley; Catubig, Angelique; Kurklu, Bayzar; Mercer, Stephen; Minamoto, Toshinari; Ong, David E.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Judd, Louise M.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mucosal inflammation is associated with a greater risk of gastric cancer (GC) and, therefore, requires tight control by suppressive counter mechanisms. Gastrokine-2 (GKN2) belongs to a family of secreted proteins expressed within normal gastric mucosal cells. GKN2 expression is frequently lost during GC progression, suggesting an inhibitory role; however, a causal link remains unsubstantiated. Here, we developed Gkn2 knockout and transgenic overexpressing mice to investigate the functional impact of GKN2 loss in GC pathogenesis. In mouse models of GC, decreased GKN2 expression correlated with gastric pathology that paralleled human GC progression. At baseline, Gkn2 knockout mice exhibited defective gastric epithelial differentiation but not malignant progression. Conversely, Gkn2 knockout in the IL-11/STAT3-dependent gp130F/F GC model caused tumorigenesis of the proximal stomach. Additionally, gastric immunopathology was accelerated in Helicobacter pylori–infected Gkn2 knockout mice and was associated with augmented T helper cell type 1 (Th1) but not Th17 immunity. Heightened Th1 responses in Gkn2 knockout mice were linked to deregulated mucosal innate immunity and impaired myeloid-derived suppressor cell activation. Finally, transgenic overexpression of human gastrokines (GKNs) attenuated gastric tumor growth in gp130F/F mice. Together, these results reveal an antiinflammatory role for GKN2, provide in vivo evidence that links GKN2 loss to GC pathogenesis, and suggest GKN restoration as a strategy to restrain GC progression. PMID:26974160

  10. Identification of non-neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shanghai; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Gastric polyps can be broadly defined as luminal lesions projecting above the plane of the mucosal surface. They are generally divided into non-neoplastic and neoplastic polyps. Accurate diagnosis of neoplastic polyps is important because of their well-known relationship with gastric cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. In this study, we used MPM to image the microstructure of gastric polyps, including fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, inflammatory fibroid polyps and adenomas, then compared with gold-standard hematoxylin- eosin(H-E)-stained histopathology. MPM images showed that different gastric polyps have different gland architecture and cell morphology. Dilated, elongated or branch-like hyperplastic polyps are arranged by columnar epithelial cells. Inflammatory fibroid polyps are composed of small, thin-walled blood vessels surrounded by short spindle cells. Fundic glands polyps are lined by parietal cells and chief cells, admixed with normal glands. Gastric adenomas are generally composed of tubules or villi of dysplastic epithelium, which usually show some degree of intestinal-type differentiation toward absorptive cells, goblet cells, endocrine cells. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be used to identify non- neoplastic and neoplastic gastric polyps without the need of any staining procedure.

  11. Abnormal gastric morphology and function in CCK-B/gastrin receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, G.; Langhans, N.; Rehfeld, J. F.; Beinborn, M.; Kopin, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    Mice lacking the cholecystokinin (CCK)-B/gastrin receptor have been generated by targeted gene disruption. The roles of this receptor in controlling gastric acid secretion and gastric mucosal growth have been assessed. The analysis of homozygous mutant mice vs. wild type included measurement of basal gastric pH, plasma gastrin concentrations as well as quantification of gastric mucosal cell types by immunohistochemistry. Mutant mice exhibited a marked increase in basal gastric pH (from 3.2 to 5.2) and about a 10-fold elevation in circulating carboxyamidated gastrin compared with wild-type controls. Histologic analysis revealed a decrease in both parietal and enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells, thus explaining the reduction in acid output. Consistent with the elevation in circulating gastrin, antral gastrin cells were increased in number while somatostatin cells were decreased. These data support the importance of the CCK-B/gastrin receptor in maintaining the normal cellular composition and function of the gastric mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10461365

  12. A possible role of GDDR in the development of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Fei; Fang, Cheng; Wang, Gang; Shuang, Jianbo; Chu, Guanghui; Hu, Sijun; Chen, Lin; Du, Jianjun

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays an important part in the development of gastric carcinoma. GDDR has been confirmed as a tumor suppressor gene in gastric tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanism of GDDR in H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is not well known. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinicopathological significance and possible molecular mechanism of GDDR in gastric cancer associated with H. pylori. Western blot, real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression level of GDDR with or without H. pylori infection. The function and possible related molecular mechanisms of GDDR were further explored in vitro and in vivo. The variability of GDDR expression appeared in the early stage of gastric carcinogenesis with positive H. pylori infection status. GDDR might inhibit the progression of normal gastric epithelial cells to cancer cells by suppressing NF-kappaB signaling pathway, which in turn could be regulated by H. pylori infection. Our results suggested, for the first time, that the gradual change in GDDR expression might not only be directly related to H. pylori infection but also be an early molecular event in the development of gastric carcinoma.

  13. UCH-LI acts as a novel prognostic biomarker in gastric cardiac adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Honghong; Zhang, Chunhong; Fang, Shan; Ou, Rongying; Li, Wenfeng; Xu, Yunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cardiac adenocarcinoma (GCA) accounts for a majority of gastric cancer population and harbors unfavorable outcome. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) belongs to the deubiquitinating enzyme family, which could regulate cell growth in human cancers. In the present study, expression of UCH-L1 was evaluated in 196 GCAs by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray and its function on gastric cancer cells was measured. UCH-L1 expression was increased in GCA specimens, compared with their normal tissues and UCH-L1 overexpression is tightly correlated with tumor size and overall TNM stage. Log-rank analysis showed that UCH-L1 positive is reversely associated with cumulative survival (P<0.001). Multivariate Cox regression model showed that UCH-L1 overexpression is a remarkably negative predictor in GCA prognosis (Hazard Ratio=0.53, P<0.01), along with advanced TNM stage that is a known negative factor in gastric cancers (Hazard Ratio=0.33, P<0.05). Silencing of UCH-L1 reduced the ability of cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our findings suggest that UCH-L1 is a promising prognostic biomarker for GCAs and might play an important role in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:26823707

  14. The effect of trimebutine maleate on gastric emptying in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Aktas, A; Caner, B; Ozturk, F; Bayhan, H; Narin, Y; Mentes, T

    1999-08-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effect of trimebutine maleate, a drug used in both hyperkinetic and hypokinetic motility disorders, on gastric emptying in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia having prolonged gastric emptying rates and to compare the parameters used for the determination of the lag period observed during the emptying of solid foods from the stomach. Gastric emptying was measured by the radionuclide technique. Twenty normal volunteers and 43 patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia participated in the study. Radionuclide imaging was performed by using a solid meal labeled with 99mTc-tin colloid. Of the patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, 20 had prolonged gastric emptying. They were given three weeks of oral treatment with trimebutine maleate and had their radionuclide gastric emptying study repeated. Treatment with trimebutine maleate resulted in reduction in duration of the lag period and less retention of food at 100 minutes (p < 0.0005). After treatment with trimebutine maleate, no significant difference has been observed in the mean symptom score of patients with prolonged gastric emptying. Among the parameters used for the determination of the lag period, lag period determined by a mathematical equation (TLAG) has been found to be longer than the lag period determined by visual inspection of the images (VLAG) and there was correlation between the two parameters when the lag time was short. PMID:10510878

  15. Remodeling in myocardium adjacent to an infarction in the pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Scott D; Criscione, John; Covell, James W

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the structure of the "normal" ventricular wall adjacent to an infarcted area involve all components of the myocardium (myocytes, fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and the coronary vasculature) and their three-dimensional structural relationship. Assessing changes in these components requires tracking material markers in the remodeling tissue over long periods of time with a three-dimensional approach as well as a detailed histological evaluation of the remodeled structure. The purpose of the present study was to examine the hypotheses that changes in the tissue adjacent to an infarct are related to myocyte elongation, myofiber rearrangement, and changes in the laminar architecture of the adjacent tissue. Three weeks after myocardial infarction, noninfarcted tissue adjacent to the infarct remodeled by expansion along the direction of the fibers and in the cross fiber direction. These changes are consistent with myocyte elongation and myofiber rearrangement (slippage), as well as a change in cell shape to a more elliptical cross section with the major axis in the epicardial tangent plane, and indicate that reorientation of fibers either via "cell slippage" or changes in orientation of the laminar structure of the ventricular wall are quantitatively important aspects of the remodeling of the normally perfused myocardium.

  16. Non-coding RNAs and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Fei; Chen, Sheng-Can; Xia, Tian; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Shao, Yong-Fu; Xiao, Bing-Xiu; Guo, Jun-Ming

    2014-05-14

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play key roles in development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Altered ncRNA expression is associated with gastric cancer occurrence, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is significantly related to gastric cancer tumor stage, size, differentiation and metastasis. MiRNAs interrupt cellular signaling pathways, inhibit the activity of tumor suppressor genes, and affect the cell cycle in gastric cancer cells. Some miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-106a and miR-421, could be potential markers for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new research hotspot among cancer-associated ncRNAs, play important roles in epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Several gastric cancer-associated lncRNAs, such as CCAT1, GACAT1, H19, and SUMO1P3, have been explored. In addition, Piwi-interacting RNAs, another type of small ncRNA that is recognized by gastroenterologists, are involved in gastric carcinogenesis, and piR-651/823 represents an efficient diagnostic biomarker of gastric cancer that can be detected in the blood and gastric juice. Small interfering RNAs also function in post-transcriptional regulation in gastric cancer and might be useful in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833871

  17. Gastroprotective Effects of Astragaloside IV against Acute Gastric Lesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shuai; Yang, Guang; Li, Winny; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Hailong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Minzhou

    2016-01-01

    Background Protection of the gastric mucosa from acute lesions induced by various irritants is a pertinent issue in the field of critical care medicine. In this study, we investigated the gastroprotective effects of astragaloside IV on acute gastric lesions in rats under stressful conditions. Methods Rats were randomized into six groups. Group 1 and 2 received 10% Tween 80 (vehicle). Group 3 received 20 mg/kg of omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor. Groups 4, 5 and 6 received astragaloside IV at concentration of 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. As a means to induce gastric lesions, Groups 2–6 were subjected to water immersion and restraint stress for 12 hours after treatment. Results Our present studies show that compared to rats in group 2, treatment with 1 to 50 mg/kg astragaloside IV significantly decreased the size of gastric lesions, MDA, TNFα and MCP1 levels, in addition to normalizing gastric pH, gastric mucus and SOD levels (P<0.05). Histomorphological examination confirmed that treatment with astragaloside IV elicited a dosage-dependent protective effect on the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, pretreatment with astragaloside IV resulted in significant elevations in HSP70 and reduction in Bax, along with over-expression of PLCγ response level, which was further confirmed via immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusions The acute gastric lesions induced are attenuated by pretreatment with astragaloside IV which is possibly due to the enhancing of the expression of HSP70 with concomitant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic capacity. PMID:26845156

  18. Oral magnesium reduces gastric mucosa susceptibility to injury in experimental diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ige, A O; Adewoye, E O; Okwundu, N C; Alade, O E; Onuobia, P C

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of magnesium on the gastric defence mechanism in alloxan-diabetic male Wistar rats. Sixty rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, A (n=40) and B (n=20). Each group was subdivided into control, diabetic untreated (DU), diabetic magnesium (250mg/kg) treated (DMg250) and diabetic insulin (3IU/kgs.c) treated (DI). Diabetes was induced with alloxan (120mg/kg) and both groups were treated for 14days. By day 14, group A rats were sacrificed, the stomach excised and evaluated for histopathology, mucus content, parietal and mucus cell counts. Blood was withdrawn from the orbital sinus of group B rats for biochemical evaluation (blood glucose, superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitric oxide (NO)) and later sacrificed for gastric SOD, LP and NO evaluation. Blood glucose level was reduced (p<0.05) in all treatment groups compared to DU. Gastric SOD, parietal and mucus cell counts were increased (p<0.05) in the DMg250 and DI compared to DU. Serum LP and NO were reduced while gastric LP was increased in the DMg250 compared to DU. Gastric NO and mucous content were significantly reduced (p<0.05) in all diabetic groups compared to control. The gastric mucosa of the DU group had haemorrhage, inflammation and parasites embedded. The DMg250 and DI had normal submucus and muscle layers with reduced inflammation. Oral magnesium treatment in diabetes exerts hypoglycaemic effects, reduces serum nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation, increases gastric superoxide dismutase, mucous cell count and reduces the susceptibility of the gastric mucosa to ulceration. PMID:27133222

  19. CMTM3 inhibits cell migration and invasion and correlates with favorable prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Lianhai; Liu, Baocai; Yuan, Wanqiong; Mo, Xiaoning; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Henan; Xing, Xiaofang; Cheng, Xiaojing; Dong, Bin; Hu, Ying; Du, Hong; Zhu, Yubing; Ding, Ning; Li, Jiyou; Liu, Weili; Ma, Yongzhen; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Jiafu; Han, Wenling

    2014-01-01

    The CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 3 (CMTM3) gene is a novel tumor suppressor with frequent epigenetic inactivation. In this study, we showed the role played by CMTM3 in gastric cancer cells as a tumor suppressor gene, and examined the correlation between CMTM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters using immunohistochemistry in gastric cancer patients with different pathological stages (n = 350). We found that CMTM3 expression was reduced or silenced by epigenetic regulation in gastric cell lines, and dramatically downregulated in primary gastric cancer tissues. Restoration of CMTM3 significantly affected migration and invasion of AGS and SGC-7901 cells (P < 0.001). In vivo experiments showed that peritoneal disseminated metastases were significantly suppressed by CMTM3 (P < 0.001). We further showed that the expression of MMP2 and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 were decreased when CMTM3 was restored. In addition, by immunohistochemical staining, we found that the expression of CMTM3 was remarkably weaker in gastric cancer tissues than in normal mucosae (P = 0.008), and was significantly correlated with gender (P = 0.033), tumor depth (P = 0.049), stage (P = 0.021), and histological grade (P = 0.022). More importantly, CMTM3 expression was associated with prognosis in gastric cancer patients (P = 0.041), and was a significant independent prognostic indicator (hazard ratio = 0.704, 95% confidence interval, 0.498–0.994; P = 0.046). Our findings indicate that CMTM3 regulates migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Moreover, CMTM3 is a candidate marker for prognosis of gastric cancer in the clinic. PMID:24131472

  20. The role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric mucosal protection

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Susan; Steele, Islay; Lyons, Suzanne; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Dimaline, Rod; Pritchard, D. Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Gastric mucosal health is maintained in response to potentially damaging luminal factors. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) disrupt protective mechanisms leading to bleeding and ulceration. The plasminogen activator system has been implicated in fibrinolysis following gastric ulceration, and an inhibitor of this system, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, is expressed in gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with normal gastric histology taking aspirin or NSAIDs, we found elevated gastric PAI-1 mRNA abundance compared with controls; the increase in patients on aspirin was independent of whether they were also taking proton pump inhibitors. In the same patients, aspirin tended to lower urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA. Immunohistochemistry indicated PAI-1 localization to epithelial cells. In a model system using MKN45 or AGS-GR cells transfected with a PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct, we found no evidence for upregulation of PAI-1 expression by indomethacin, and, in fact, cyclooxygenase products such as PGE2 and PGI2 weakly stimulated expression. Increased gastric PAI-1 mRNA was also found in mice following gavage with ethanol or indomethacin, but plasma PAI-1 was unaffected. In PAI-1−/− mice, gastric hemorrhagic lesions in response to ethanol or indomethacin were increased compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice in which PAI-1 is overexpressed in parietal cells, there were decreased lesions in response to ethanol and indomethacin. Thus, PAI-1 expression is increased in gastric epithelial cells in response to mucosal irritants such as aspirin and NSAIDs probably via an indirect mechanism, and PAI-1 acts as a local autoregulator to minimize mucosal damage. PMID:23494120

  1. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  2. An unusual case showing fatal rupture of a gastric ulcer or gastromalacia? The importance/role of histology for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    De-Giorgio, Fabio; Lodise, Maria; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Spagnolo, Antonio G; d'Aloja, Ernesto; Arena, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Gastromalacia is the acute autolytic erosion of the gastric wall. It generally occurs postmortem, and it appears as a slimy brownish black region of the wall which occurs principally in the gastric fundus. A 59-year-old woman died in the Emergency Department following a 2-day period of mild abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. A forensic autopsy was performed which revealed a rupture of the gastric fundus that had caused leakage of gastric content into the abdominal cavity. There was no macroscopic evidence of peritonitis, and the stomach wall adjacent to the rupture site showed marked thinning. The gross appearance was typical of gastromalacia. In contrast, histological observations revealed the presence of an ulcer at the site of perforation and a severe acute inflammatory reaction indicating a robust reaction with an antemortem rupture.

  3. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  4. Irinotecan, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  5. Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Early Gastric Cancer in the West: A Changing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Justin M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the fifth leading cancer diagnosis worldwide, and it is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The incidence of gastric cancer within the United States, however, has remained substantially lower than elsewhere, which has led to a lack of screening and surveillance in clinical practice. Patients with known premalignant lesions, such as gastric intestinal metaplasia, which can increase the risk of gastric cancer by as much as 6-fold, might benefit from surveillance guidelines to detect gastric cancer at an earlier, potentially curative stage. Chro-moendoscopy with optical magnification, narrow-band imaging, and other image-enhanced endoscopic techniques are commercially available to assist in the diagnosis of premalignant gastric lesions and early gastric cancer. Furthermore, endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection have become more widely available and offer potentially curative endoscopic resection for dysplastic lesions of the stomach and early gastric cancers, which is an alternative to traditional surgical resection. PMID:25013389

  6. [A Case of Gastro-Gastric Intussusception Secondary to Primary Gastric Lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jo, Hyeong Ho; Kang, Sun Mi; Kim, Si Hye; Ra, Moni; Park, Byeong Kyu; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Jin Tae; Kim, Ho Gak; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Kang, Ung Rae

    2016-07-25

    In adults, most intussusceptions develop from a lesion, usually a benign or malignant neoplasm, and can occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract. Intussusception in the proximal gastrointestinal tract is uncommon, and gastro-gastric intussusception is extremely rare. We present a case of gastro-gastric intussusception secondary to a primary gastric lymphoma. An 82-year-old female patient presented with acute onset chest pain and vomiting. Abdominal CT revealed a gastro-gastric intussusception. We performed upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, revealing a large gastric mass invaginated into the gastric lumen and distorting the distal stomach. Uncomplicated gastric reposition was achieved with endoscopy of the distal stomach. Histological evaluation of the gastric mass revealed a diffuse large B cell lymphoma that was treated with chemotherapy.

  7. Gastric emptying of indigestible tablets in relation to composition and time of ingestion of meals studied by metal detector.

    PubMed

    Ewe, K; Press, A G; Bollen, S; Schuhn, I

    1991-02-01

    Enteric-coated tablets leave the stomach mainly during the interdigestive phase. Composition as well as time of ingestion of meals may influence their gastric emptying considerably. In 12 normal volunteers gastric emptying of a plastic tablet with a metal core was followed by a metal detector in relation to different compositions and various times of ingestion of meals. With an empty stomach and after ingestion of 250 ml water, the mean time for gastric emptying of the tablet was 38 +/- 11 min (mean +/- SEM) and 38 +/- 8 min. Two hundred fifty milliliters of milk (652 kJ) and a formula diet (1000 kJ) delayed gastric emptying time to 128 +/- 14 and 152 +/- 6 min, respectively (P less than 0.05). Breakfast (2200 kJ) further retarded gastric emptying compared with both liquids to 249 +/- 24 min (P less than 0.05). There was a close correlation between nutritive density and gastric emptying of the tablet (r = 0.92; P less than 0.001). Main meals also delayed gastric emptying of tablets when compared to empty stomach (P less than 0.05). A snack after breakfast further delayed gastric emptying from 201 +/- 10 to 278 +/- 19 min (P less than 0.05). The largest delay was observed following ingestion of breakfast, lunch, dinner, and additional snacks (509 +/- 220 min). We conclude that the delay of gastric emptying of enteric-coated tablets by food is related to its nutritive density and eating habits. The gastric emptying of an enteric coated tablet that is ingested early in the morning may be delayed until late at night when several meals and snacks are ingested during the day, leading to unwanted alterations in bioavailability and to possible adverse effects.

  8. Gene expression profiling of metaplastic lineages identifies CDH17 as a prognostic marker in early-stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Nam, Ki Taek; Park, Heae Surng; Kim, Min A; LaFleur, Bonnie J.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Goldenring, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Intestinal metaplasia (IM) and spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) are precursors to gastric carcinogenesis. We sought to identify molecular biomarkers of gastric metaplasias and gastric cancer by gene expression profiling of metaplastic lesions from patients. Methods cDNA microarray analysis was performed on IM and SPEM cells isolated from patient samples using laser capture microdissection. Up-regulated transcripts in metaplstic lesions were confirmed by immunostaining analysis in IM, SPEM, and gastric cancer tissues. Proteins that were highly expressed specifically in gastric cancer tissues were analyzed for their association with survival in a test set (n=450) and a validation set (n=502) of samples from gastric cancer patients. Results Compared to normal chief cells, 858 genes were differentially expressed in IM or SPEM samples. Immunostaining was detected for 12 proteins, including 3 new markers of IM (ACE2, LGALS4, AKR1B10) and 3 of SPEM (OLFM4, LYZ, DPCR1). Of 13 proteins expressed in IM or SPEM, 8 were expressed by 17%–50% of human gastric cancer tissues (MUC13, OLFM4, CDH17, KRT20, MUC5AC, LGALS4, AKR1B10, REG4). Expression of CDH17 or MUC13 correlated with patient survival in the test and a validation sets. Multivariate analysis showed that CDH17 was an independent prognostic factor in patients with stage I or node-negative disease. Conclusion We identified several novel biomarkers for IM, SPEM, and gastric cancer using gene expression profiling of human metaplastic lesions. Expression of CDH17 and MUC13 was upregulated in gastric cancer tissues. CDH17 is a promising prognostic marker for early-stage gastric cancer. PMID:20398667

  9. COL4A3 expression correlates with pathogenesis, pathologic behaviors, and prognosis of gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiao-cui; Wang, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Wan; Xu, Xiao-yan; Xing, Ya-nan; Yu, Miao; Liu, Yun-peng; Takano, Yasuo; Zheng, Hua-chuan

    2013-01-01

    COL4A3 protein belongs to type IV collagen family and is closely linked to kidney diseases and cancer. To clarify the roles of COL4A3 in gastric carcinogenesis and subsequent progression, its expression was examined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays containing gastric carcinomas, adjacent intestinal metaplasia, pure intestinal metaplasia, and gastritis. Gastric carcinoma tissue and cell lines were studied for COL4A3 expression by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that COL4A3 was differentially expressed in GES-1, AGS, BGC-823, GT-3 TKB, HGC-27, KATO-III, MGC-803, MKN28, MKN45, SCH, SGC-7901, and STKM-2 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Carcinomas showed statistically lower COL4A3 expression than matched nonneoplastic mucosa (P < .05). Expression was strong in intestinal metaplasia in comparison with gastritis and carcinoma (P < .05). There was greater COL4A3 expression in carcinoma than gastritis (P < .05). Expression of COL4A3 protein was positively correlated with tumor size, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and TNM stage (P < .05). There was more COL4A3 expression in diffuse than in intestinal-type carcinomas regardless of invasion into the muscularis propria (P < .05). Histologically, all signet ring cell (n = 43) and mucinous (n = 12) carcinomas showed COL4A3 expression. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that COL4A3 expression was negatively associated with a favorable prognosis of overall, advanced, and intestinal-type gastric carcinomas (P < .05). Aberrant COL4A3 expression might play an important role in the pathogenesis and subsequent progression of gastric carcinoma. COL4A3 overexpression might be used as a marker of gastric intestinal metaplasia and mucinous and signet ring cell carcinoma.

  10. ZnRF3 Induces Apoptosis of Gastric Cancer Cells by Antagonizing Wnt and Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hongzhen; Cai, Aizhen; Xi, Hongqing; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of malignant cancers of the stomach are gastric adenocarcinoma type. In spite of many studies, the molecular basis for this cancer is still unclear. Deregulated cell proliferative signaling via Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways is considered important in the pathogenesis of many cancers including the gastric cancer. Recent studies identified ZnRF3 protein, which is a E3-ubiquitin ligase and which is either deleted or mutated in cancers, to inhibit Wnt signaling. However, the significance of ZnRF3 in the control of gastric cancer and whether it also regulates Hedgehog signaling pathway, is not known. In the present study, we assessed the expression of ZnRF3 in gastric tumors and paracancerous tissues from 58 patients (44 male and 14 female) of different ages and related this to patient survival. We observed a clear relationship between ZnRF3 expression in paracancerous tissue and tumor size. Also, ZnRF3 expression was much higher in tumors from aged patients. Male patients showed higher mortality than the females. Mechanistic studies using normal gastric cells (GES1) and gastric cancer cells (MGC-803) infected with either AdZnRF3 or AdGFP viral vectors, revealed that ZnRF3 overexpression causes significantly more apoptosis and lowered proliferation of cancer cells. ZnRF3 overexpression led to greatly reduced levels of Lgr5, a component of Wnt signaling and also Gli1, a component of Hedgehog signaling. Thus, ZnRF3 negatively influences both the Wnt and Hedgehog proliferative pathways, and probably this way it negatively regulates cancer progression. These results suggest the importance of normal ZnRF3 function in checking the progression of cancer cell growth and indicate that a lack of this protein can lead to poorer clinical outcomes for gastric cancer patients. PMID:27352324

  11. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intended to measure the acidity of gastric fluid. Measurements of gastric acidity are used in the diagnosis...-secreting tumor of the pancreas), and related gastric disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  12. Accumulation of hypericin in human gastric tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Braun, Evgeniy M.; Kikot, Vladimir O.; Chernyj, Vyacheslav A.

    1996-04-01

    Hypericin has been studied as a novel natural photosensitizer for PDT. It has been extracted from plants (St.-John's-wort). Oral administration (10% alcohol solution in a dose 2 mg/kg b.w.) was applied for 15 patients with gastric cancers 18 - 48 h before surgery. Normal and cancerous tissue samples were resected and underwent fluorescence analysis 1 - 2 h after resection. Tissue fluorescence was excited by He-Cd (20 mW, 442 nm) and Ar laser beams (100 mW, 488 nm) and registered from 510 to 725 nm. In tissue hypericin has maximum fluorescence peak at 603 nm for both excitation wavelengths. Fluorescence intensity ratio I603/I503 chosen as a criterion for tissue classification was varied from 1.6 to 3.2 (mean 2.5) for adenocarcinoma under He-Cd excitation whereas Ar laser excitation gave from 2.5 up to 4.2 (mean 3.5). Normal tissue had this ratio from 0.48 to 0.65 (mean 0.55) and from 0.53 to 0.75 (mean 3.5) for He-Cd and Ar laser excitation, respectively. No side effects were observed in patients during 6 month follow-up.

  13. Resistin-Like Molecule-β Promotes Invasion and Migration of Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Zhao, Chunming; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Shengxi; Sun, Xiaogang; Tian, Yang; Song, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistin-like molecule-β (RELMβ) is a novel secretory protein from intestinal goblet cells and participates in epithelial differentiation, tumor occurrence, and immune response. RELMβ is absent in normal gastric mucosa but is abundantly expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues, and is correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism governing tumor cell invasion. This study thus investigated the modulation of RELMβ in gastric cancer metastasis and its correlation with EMT. Material/Methods We used RELMβ-low expression AGS cell line of gastric cancer and normal mucosa cell line GES1 as in vitro models, on which RELMβ0-expressing vector was transfected. The invasion and migration of cells were quantified by Transwell assay. EMT-related protein including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Vimentin were detected by Western blotting in transfected AGS cells. Results RELMβ transfection significantly potentiated invasion and migration abilities of AGS cells, whose RELMβ protein level was significantly elevated compared to those in untransfected AGS or GES1 cells. After RELMβ transfection, EMT-related proteins, including N-cadherin, Snail, and Vimentin levels, were elevated, but E-cadherin expression was depressed. Conclusions RELMβ-overexpression can facilitate invasion and migration of gastric carcinoma cells and it increases the expression of EMT-related proteins, such as N-cadherin, Snail, Vimentin, but decreases E-cadherin level, thus promoting the progression of EMT. PMID:27001185

  14. [Effects of aloe extracts, aloctin A, on gastric secretion and on experimental gastric lesions in rats].

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Imanishi, K; Okabe, S

    1989-05-01

    Effect of aloctin A, glycoprotein isolated from leaves of Aloe arborescens MILL, on gastric secretion and on acute gastric lesions in rats were examined. Aloctin A given intravenously dose-dependently inhibited the volume of gastric juice, acid and pepsin output in pylorus-ligated rats. Aloctin A given intravenously significantly inhibited the development of Shay ulcers and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in rats. It also inhibited water-immersion stress lesions induced in pylorus-ligated rats.

  15. Protective role of hydrogen-rich water on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Yao; Wu, Qi-Fei; Wan, Yong; Song, Si-Dong; Xu, Jia; Xu, Xin-Sen; Chang, Hu-Lin; Tai, Ming-Hui; Dong, Ya-Feng; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of the hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in the prevention of aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. METHODS: Forty male rats were allocated into four groups: normal control group, HRW group, aspirin group, and HRW plus aspirin group. The protective efficacy was tested by determining the gastric mucosal damage score. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interleukin (IL)-06 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in gastric tissues were evaluated. The serum levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were also detected. Histopathology of gastric tissues and localization of Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were detected using hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment with HRW obviously reduced aspirin-induced gastric damage scores (4.04 ± 0.492 vs 2.10 ± 0.437, P < 0.05). The oxidative stress levels of MDA and MPO in the gastric tissues increased significantly in the aspirin-treated group compared with the HRW group (2.43 ± 0.145 vs 1.79 ± 0.116 nmol/mg prot, P < 0.05 and 2.53 ± 0.238 vs 1.40 ± 0.208 U/g tissue, P < 0.05, respectively). HRW could obviously elevated the SOD levels in the gastric tissues (37.94 ± 8.44 vs 59.55 ± 9.02 nmol/mg prot, P < 0.05). Pretreatment with HRW significantly reduced IL-06 and TNF-α in the gastric tissues (46.65 ± 5.50 vs 32.15 ± 4.83 pg/mg, P < 0.05 and 1305.08 ± 101.23 vs 855.96 ± 93.22 pg/mg, P < 0.05), and IL-1β and TNF-α in the serum (505.38 ± 32.97 vs 343.37 ± 25.09 pg/mL, P < 0.05 and 264.53 ± 28.63 vs 114.96 ± 21.79 pg/mL, P < 0.05) compared to treatment with aspirin alone. HRW could significantly decrease the COX-2 expression in the gastric tissues (staining score: 8.4 ± 2.1 vs 2.9 ± 1.5, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HRW pretreatment alleviated the aspirin-induced gastric lesions by inhibiting the oxidative stress, inflammatory reaction and reducing the COX-2 in the gastric tissues. PMID:24587639

  16. THE CYTOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF GASTRIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Charles D.; Johnson, William D.; Wilbur, Richard S.; Lack, Arthur J.

    1961-01-01

    Established centers find that cytological study of gastric washings with saline or chymotrypsin, adequately performed, is a valuable diagnostic tool in the detection of early and curable gastric carcinoma. Our experience with a small series of 150 patients, studied by saline gastric washing, has emphasized the difficulties of collection and the particular importance of obtaining, by repeated washings if necessary, an adequate specimen of gastric epithelial cells for diagnosis, before an opinion is given. It seems likely that the cytological method will be of future value in study of the natural history of gastric malignant disease and in detection of its surface lesions in their earliest form in asymptomatic, known-susceptible persons. Further, it should become a complementary part of the “stomach profile” in gastric diagnostic problems, where roentgenologic and gastroscopic studies may be expected to reveal the older, necrotic, or infiltrative lesions; cytological study, the earlier and more superficial stages of disease. PMID:13862364

  17. Gastric Hamartomatous Polyps—Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Monika; Yang, Xiu; Zhang, Xuchen

    2016-01-01

    Gastric polyps are frequently encountered on endoscopic examinations. While many of these represent true epithelial lesions, some of the polyps may result from underlying stromal or lymphoid proliferations or even heterotopic tissue. Histologic examination is essential for accurate typing of the polyps to predict malignant potential and underlying possible genetic abnormalities. The focus of this review is on gastric hamartomatous polyps, which are relatively rare and diagnostically challenging. Though most of the gastric hamartomatous polyps are benign, certain types are associated with increased malignant potential. These include certain polyps associated with specific genetic familial polyposis syndromes and gastric inverted hamartomatous polyps. Identification of these polyps can result in the prevention or early diagnosis of gastric carcinoma and also help in the identification of family members with polyposis syndromes. The aim of this review is to categorize gastric hamartomatous polyps and aid in the identification of high-risk categories. PMID:27081323

  18. [Early gastric cancer--two case reports].

    PubMed

    Neziha, Belkahla; Houneida, Bouzi; Mohamed, Jouini; Hajer, Ouerghi; Nadia, Maamouri; Imed, Cheikh; Faouzi, Chebbi; Saadia, Bouraoui; Nidhameddine, Kchir; Ahmed, Ben Ammar

    2005-11-01

    Gastric cancer is a serious disease with a high mortality rate. Early diagnosis of the disease improves its prognosis. We report two cases of early gastric cancer and we specify the clinical, endoscopic, histologic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. This study is about two female patients, respectively, 36 and 70 years old. The diagnosis of early gastric cancer was based on pathologic examination of the resected stomach. The two patients are in remission 2 years and 6 months later, respectively. The diagnosis of early gastric cancer is often made on nonspecific symptoms. Oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy shows gastric mucosal anomalies. Pathologic examination of gastric biopsies confirm the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound is essential; it specifies the submucosal infiltration and evaluates the lymph node invasion. Surgery is the primary treatment but in some cases endoscopic mucosal resection provides good long-term results. Early diagnosis of adenocarcinoma improves the prognosis of the disease, which remains poor nowadays.

  19. Lack of rearranged Tpr-met mRNA expression in human gastric cancer cell lines and gastric mucosa and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Osaki, M; Miyata, H; Hayashi, A; Gomyo, Y; Tatebe, S; Ito, H

    1996-01-01

    The met protooncogene was activated by a rearrangement involving the fusion of tpr (1q25) and met (7q21-31) gene sequence in a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS) incubated in vitro with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We examined the expression of tpr-met mRNA by means of the reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) in human two gastric cell lines (MKN-1 and MKN-45), T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia cell line (MOLT-4), and in gastric tissue samples including normal mucosa, intestinal metaplasia and carcinoma from three surgical specimens. A DNA fragment of 88-bp was amplified in MKN-1 and MOLT-4, 96-bp in MKN-45 and of 58-bp in all nine tissue samples including gastric carcinomas. The amplified DNA sequences were not homologous with the rearranged tpr-met gene. Our study indicated that rearranged tpr-met mRNA is not expressed either in human gastric carcinoma cell lines or in gastric mucosa and carcinoma.

  20. [Use of a standard radioactive paste in the study of esophago-gastric kinesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ugolotti, G; Contini, C; Calbiani, B

    1978-01-01

    The behaviour of esophago-gastric kinesis has been studied comparatively by administering BaSO4 and normal food respectively, labelled with 1 mCi of 99mTc-DTPA. The results are discussed and the differences observed are stressed. These confirm the non-physiological nature of the conventional opaque paste employed in X-ray diagnosis.

  1. Diversity of the Gastric Microbiota in Thoroughbred Racehorses Having Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hee-Jin; Ho, Hungwui; Hwang, Hyeshin; Kim, Yongbaek; Han, Janet; Lee, Inhyung; Cho, Seongbeom

    2016-04-28

    Equine gastric ulcer syndrome is one of the most frequently reported diseases in thoroughbred racehorses. Although several risk factors for the development of gastric ulcers have been widely studied, investigation of microbiological factors has been limited. In this study, the presence of Helicobacter spp. and the gastric microbial communities of thoroughbred racehorses having mild to severe gastric ulcers were investigated. Although Helicobacter spp. were not detected using culture and PCR techniques from 52 gastric biopsies and 52 fecal samples, the genomic sequences of H. pylori and H. ganmani were detected using nextgeneration sequencing techniques from 2 out of 10 representative gastric samples. The gastric microbiota of horses was mainly composed of Firmicutes (50.0%), Proteobacteria (18.7%), Bacteroidetes (14.4%), and Actinobacteria (9.7%), but the proportion of each phylum varied among samples. There was no major difference in microbial composition among samples having mild to severe gastric ulcers. Using phylogenetic analysis, three distinct clusters were observed, and one cluster differed from the other two clusters in the frequency of feeding, amount of water consumption, and type of bedding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the gastric microbiota of thoroughbred racehorses having gastric ulcer and to evaluate the microbial diversity in relation to the severity of gastric ulcer and management factors. This study is important for further exploration of the gastric microbiota in racehorses and is ultimately applicable to improving animal and human health.

  2. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  3. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  4. Electron microscopy of the oxyntic cell in the gastric glands of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana). I. The non-acid-secreting gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    SEDAR, A W

    1961-01-01

    The fine structure of the oxyntic cell from the gastric glands of the bullfrog was studied in lead hydroxide-stained sections of gastric mucosa fixed in buffered osmium tetroxide and embedded in n-butyl methacrylate. The oxyntic cell in non-acid-secreting stomachs (gastric juice pH, 7.4-7.8) is characterized by: (a) numerous closely packed smooth surfaced vesicular and tubular profiles disposed randomly in the cell; some of these elements show interconnections making it possible to identify this component with smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticula of certain other cell types, (b) a small percentage of rough surfaced profiles characteristic of endoplasmic reticula possessing RNP particles on the outer membrane surfaces, (c) a Golgi complex consisting of multiple isolated non-polarized arrays of smooth surfaced parallel elongated profiles and associated vesicular elements, (d) a sparse granular component (140 A) scattered freely in the cytoplasmic matrix, (e) numerous mitochondria with a dense matrix and containing an unusually large number of closely approximated cristae, (f) a number of zymogen granules consisting of either a dense body limited by a membrane or surrounded by a halo of less dense material which is in turn limited by a membrane, and (g) a number of granules ( approximately 260 A) containing several smaller granules ( approximately 80 A) identified presumably as glycogen. Intracellular canaliculi were not observed. Instead the free surface of the oxyntic cell facing the lumen of the gastric gland shows a complicated plication of the plasma membrane. Intercellular canaliculi are seen frequently between adjacent oxyntic cells. The walls of these canaliculi are made up of folded and ruffled cell membranes. The basal surface of the cell also exhibited this type of configuration. Occasional smooth surfaced profiles are seen communicating with the free surface, the wall of an intercellular canaliculus, or the basal surface of the cell. Although nerve endings

  5. MicroRNA‑21 expression is associated with the clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma and affects the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by regulating Noxa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haibin; Wang, Panzhi; Zhang, Qiangnu; He, Xiaoyan; Zai, Guozhen; Wang, Xudong; Ma, Mei; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    The expression levels of microRNA‑21 (miR‑21) are increased in a number of types of solid tumors. However, the association between miR‑21 expression and clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma, and gastric cancer proliferation, invasion and migration remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of miR‑21 on the clinical features, proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms associated with Noxa. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) was performed to detect the expression levels of miR‑21 and Noxa in samples of gastric cancer tissue and matched, adjacent, non‑tumor tissue. The association between miR‑21 expression and the clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma, as well as the correlation between the mRNA and protein expression levels of miR‑21 and Noxa were analyzed. SGC‑7901 gastric cancer cells were cultured in vitro and transfected with an miR‑21 mimic. The effect of miR‑21 upregulation on proliferation and the cell cycle was determined using the MTT assay and flow cytometry. In addition, migration and invasion of SGC‑7901 cells were observed using the Transwell assay. The target gene of miR‑21 was identified using bioinformatics software and a dual luciferase reporting system. The effect of miR‑21 upregulation on Noxa expression levels in SGC‑7901 cells was also analyzed by RT‑qPCR and western blotting. Increased levels of miR‑21 expression and decreased levels of Noxa expression were observed in gastric cancer tissue samples when compared with the adjacent non‑tumor tissue samples. An increased miR‑21 expression level was identified as a risk factor for advanced stage gastric cancer, lymph node metastasis and larger primary tumors. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR‑21 inhibited Noxa expression levels in SGC‑7901 cells. Therefore, high levels of miR‑21 expression may induce gastric cancer

  6. Molecular Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Norihiko; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in gastric carcinogenesis. H pylori exerts oncogenic effects on gastric mucosa through complex interaction between bacterial virulence factors and host inflammatory responses. On the other hand, gastric cancer develops via stepwise accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Recent comprehensive analyses of gastric cancer genomes indicate a multistep process of genetic alterations as well as possible molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Both genetic processes of gastric cancer development and molecular oncogenic pathways related to H pylori infection are important to completely understand the pathogenesis of H pylori-related gastric cancer.

  7. Gastric cancer: new genetic developments.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Grady, William; Suriano, Gianpaolo; Huntsman, David

    2005-06-01

    Gastric cancer's (GC) incidence shows large geographic differences worldwide with the lowest rates occurring in most Western industrialized countries including the United States and the United Kingdom; in contrast, relatively high rates of GC occur in Japan, Korea, China, and South America, particularly Chile. The Laurén classification system classifies GC under two major histopathological variants: 1) an intestinal type and 2) a diffuse type. The intestinal type is more common in the general population, more likely to be sporadic and related to environmental factors such as diet, particularly salted fish and meat as well as smoked foods, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use. It exhibits components of glandular, solid, or intestinal architecture, as well as tubular structures. On the other hand, the diffuse type is more likely to have a primary genetic etiology, a subset of which, known as hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), is due to the E-cadherin (CDH1) germline mutation. The diffuse type pathology is characterized by poorly cohesive clusters of cells which infiltrate the gastric wall, leading to its widespread thickening and rigidity of the gastric wall, known as linitis plastica. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with risk for both the intestinal and diffuse varieties of gastric cancer. Germline truncating mutations of the CDH1 gene, which codes for the E-cadherin protein, were initially identified in three Maori families from New Zealand that were predisposed to diffuse GC. Since then, similar mutations have been described in more than 40 additional HDGC families of diverse ethnic backgrounds. It is noteworthy that two-thirds of HDGC families reported to date have proved negative for the CDH1 germline mutation. A number of candidate genes have been identified through analysis of the molecular biology of E-cadherin. Patients with evidence of the CDH1 germline mutation in the context of a family history of HDGC must be considered as candidates

  8. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  9. hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b differential expression as potential biomarker of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Amanda Ferreira; Cruz, Aline MP; Magalhães, Leandro; Pereira, Adenilson L; Anaissi, Ana KM; Alves, Nélisson CF; Albuquerque, Paulo JBS; Burbano, Rommel MR; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression profiles of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in gastric mucosal samples and their values as gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers. METHODS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in normal gastric mucosa, non-atrophic chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. The difference between hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expression profiles in the grouped samples was evaluated by ANOVA and Student’s t-test tests. The results were adjusted for multiple testing by using Bonferroni’s correction. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. To evaluate hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expressions as potential biomarkers of gastric carcinogenesis, we performed a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and the derived area under the curve, and a Categorical Principal Components Analysis. In silico identification of the genetic targets of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b was performed using different prediction tools, in order to identify possible genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. RESULTS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c were higher in normal gastric mucosal samples, and decreased progressively in non-atrophic chronic gastritis samples, intestinal metaplasia samples and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma samples. The expression of hsa-miR-29c in the gastric lesions showed that non-atrophic gastritis have an intermediate profile to gastric normal mucosa and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma, and that intestinal metaplasia samples presented an expression pattern similar to that in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. This microRNA (miRNA) has a good discriminatory accuracy between normal gastric samples and (1) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma; and (2) intestinal metaplasia, and regulates the DMNT3A oncogene. hsa-miR-135b is up-regulated in non-atrophic chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia samples

  10. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-jun; Sun, Hai-jian; Wu, Yu-zhang

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma. PMID:26186252

  11. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography comparison of gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Qiang; Dong, You-Wen; Liu, Jian-Jing; Song, Xiu-Yu; Dai, Dong; Zuo, Cong; Xu, Wen-Gui

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) features in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. METHODS Patients with newly diagnosed gastric lymphoma or gastric carcinoma who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment were included in this study. We reviewed and analyzed the PET/CT features of gastric wall lesions, including FDG avidity, pattern (focal/diffuse), and intensity [maximal standard uptake value: (SUVmax)]. The correlation of SUVmax with gastric clinicopathological variables was investigated by χ2 test, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the differential diagnostic value of SUVmax-associated parameters in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. RESULTS Fifty-two patients with gastric lymphoma and 73 with gastric carcinoma were included in this study. Abnormal gastric FDG accumulation was found in 49 patients (94.23%) with gastric lymphoma and 65 patients (89.04%) with gastric carcinoma. Gastric lymphoma patients predominantly presented with type I and type II lesions, whereas gastric carcinoma patients mainly had type III lesions. The SUVmax (13.39 ± 9.24 vs 8.35 ± 5.80, P < 0.001) and SUVmax/THKmax (maximal thickness) (7.96 ± 4.02 vs 4.88 ± 3.32, P < 0.001) were both higher in patients with gastric lymphoma compared with gastric carcinoma. ROC curve analysis suggested a better performance of SUVmax/THKmax in the evaluation of gastric lesions between gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma in comparison with that of SUVmax alone. CONCLUSION PET/CT features differ between gastric lymphoma and carcinoma, which can improve PET/CT evaluation of gastric wall lesions and help differentiate gastric lymphoma from gastric carcinoma. PMID:27678362

  12. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography comparison of gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Qiang; Dong, You-Wen; Liu, Jian-Jing; Song, Xiu-Yu; Dai, Dong; Zuo, Cong; Xu, Wen-Gui

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) features in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. METHODS Patients with newly diagnosed gastric lymphoma or gastric carcinoma who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT prior to treatment were included in this study. We reviewed and analyzed the PET/CT features of gastric wall lesions, including FDG avidity, pattern (focal/diffuse), and intensity [maximal standard uptake value: (SUVmax)]. The correlation of SUVmax with gastric clinicopathological variables was investigated by χ2 test, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the differential diagnostic value of SUVmax-associated parameters in gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma. RESULTS Fifty-two patients with gastric lymphoma and 73 with gastric carcinoma were included in this study. Abnormal gastric FDG accumulation was found in 49 patients (94.23%) with gastric lymphoma and 65 patients (89.04%) with gastric carcinoma. Gastric lymphoma patients predominantly presented with type I and type II lesions, whereas gastric carcinoma patients mainly had type III lesions. The SUVmax (13.39 ± 9.24 vs 8.35 ± 5.80, P < 0.001) and SUVmax/THKmax (maximal thickness) (7.96 ± 4.02 vs 4.88 ± 3.32, P < 0.001) were both higher in patients with gastric lymphoma compared with gastric carcinoma. ROC curve analysis suggested a better performance of SUVmax/THKmax in the evaluation of gastric lesions between gastric lymphoma and gastric carcinoma in comparison with that of SUVmax alone. CONCLUSION PET/CT features differ between gastric lymphoma and carcinoma, which can improve PET/CT evaluation of gastric wall lesions and help differentiate gastric lymphoma from gastric carcinoma.

  13. CpG island promoter hypermethylation of Ras association domain family 1A gene contributes to gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Key Hyeon; Park, Jong-Jae; Yoo, Hyo Soon; Choe, Jungwan; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2015-04-01

    Methylation rates of the Ras association domain family 1A gene (RASSF1A) have been variously reported as between 7.5 and 66.7% in gastric carcinoma tissues. The role of this gene in gastric cancer also remains to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether promoter hypermethylation of RASSF1A occurs in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cell lines, and to determine the effects of RASSF1A in gastric carcinoma cell lines. The results showed a methylation‑specific band only in SNU‑719, MKN28 and AGS human gastric cancer cells (indicating full methylation), none of which exhibited RASSF1A expression. By contrast, SNU‑16, MKN‑45 and KATO‑III human gastric carcinoma cells exhibited methylation as well as unmethylation‑specific bands (indicating partial methylation), and all displayed positive or weakly positive expression of RASSF1A. Bisulfite sequencing in AGS and SNU‑719 cells revealed that virtually all CpG sites were densely methylated. When SNU‑719, MKN‑28 and AGS cells were treated with the demethylating agent 5‑aza‑2'‑deoxycytidine, RASSF1A gene expression was restored and the methylation‑specific polymerase chain reaction pattern was altered in all three cell lines. Transfection of a plasmid expressing RASSF1A into AGS and SNU‑719 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Exogenous RASSF1A also reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and phospho‑retinoblastoma protein, and increased that of p27 as demonstrated by western blot analysis. Furthermore, RASSF1A expression was significantly reduced (P=0.048) and the methylation rate was elevated in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues, compared with those in adjacent healthy intestinal metaplasia (34.6 vs. 66.7%, P=0.029). The present study indicated that epigenetic silencing of RASSF1A is frequently caused by promoter hypermethylation in gastric cancer cell lines as well as in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues, which may contribute to gastric

  14. The psyche and gastric functions.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Gerardo; Compare, Debora

    2014-01-01

    Although the idea that gastric problems are in some way related to mental activity dates back to the beginning of the last century, until now it has received scant attention by physiologists, general practitioners and gastroenterologists. The major breakthrough in understanding the interactions between the central nervous system and the gut was the discovery of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in the 19th century. ENS (also called 'little brain') plays a crucial role in the regulation of the physiological gut functions. Furthermore, the identification of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the development of specific CRF receptor antagonists have permitted to characterize the neurochemical basis of the stress response. The neurobiological response to stress in mammals involves three key mechanisms: (1) stress is perceived and processed by higher brain centers; (2) the brain mounts a neuroendocrine response by way of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS), and (3) the brain triggers feedback mechanisms by HPA and ANS stimulation to restore homeostasis. Various stressors such as anger, fear, painful stimuli, as well as life or social learning experiences affect both the individual's physiologic and gastric function, revealing a two-way interaction between brain and stomach. There is overwhelming experimental and clinical evidence that stress influences gastric function, thereby outlining the pathogenesis of gastric diseases such as functional dyspepsia, gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. A better understanding of the role of pathological stressors in the modulation of disease activity may have important pathogenetic and therapeutic implications. PMID:24732184

  15. Imaging gastric pennies in children.

    PubMed

    Lane, Joshua E; Boltri, John M

    2005-04-01

    Pennies are among the most common foreign objects ingested by children. This occurrence has traditionally been managed conservatively. However, more recent studies indicate that the higher zinc composition of pennies produced after 1982 may be more dangerous than previously believed. We reported earlier the in situ reaction of such pennies following immersion in hydrochloric acid at gastric pH. The present study examines the utility of radiographic examination of such pennies.

  16. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  17. The source of carbon dioxide for gastric acid production.

    PubMed

    Steer, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The source of carbon dioxide for the chemical reaction leading to the production of gastric acid is unknown. The decarboxylation of an amino acid releases carbon dioxide. Pepsinogens provide a rich source of the amino acid arginine. Both the source of carbon dioxide, arginine, and the consequence of arginine decarboxylation, agmatine, have been studied. The site of carbon dioxide production has been related to the survival of the parietal cell. An immunohistochemical study has been carried out on glycol methacrylate embedded gastric biopsies from the normal stomach of 38 adult patients. The sections have been stained using polyclonal antibody to pepsinogen II, polyclonal antibody to agmatine, and polyclonal antibody to Helicobacter pylori. Pepsinogen II and agmatine are found in the parietal cell canaliculi. This is consistent with the production of carbon dioxide from arginine in the parietal cell canaliculi. Evidence is presented for the decarboxylation of arginine derived from the activation segment of pepsinogen as the source of carbon dioxide for the production of gastric acid. The production of carbon dioxide by the decarboxylation of arginine in the parietal cell canaliculus enables the extracellular hydration of carbon dioxide at the known site of carbonic anhydrase activity. The extracellular production of acid in the canaliculus together with the presence of agmatine helps to explain why the parietal cells are not destroyed during the formation of gastric acid. Agmatine is found in the mucus secreting cells of the stomach and its role in acid protection of the stomach is discussed. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18951509

  18. Ius Chasma Tributary Valleys and Adjacent Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image covers valley tributaries of Ius Chasma, as well as the plains adjacent to the valleys. Ius Chasma is one of several canyons that make up the Valles Marineris canyon system. Valles Marineris likely formed by extension associated with the growth of the large volcanoes and topographic high of Tharsis to the northwest. As the ground was pulled apart, large and deep gaps resulted in the valleys seen in the top and bottom of this HiRISE image. Ice that was once in the ground could have also melted to create additional removal of material in the formation of the valleys. HiRISE is able to see the rocks along the walls of both these valleys and also impact craters in the image. Rock layers that appear lower down in elevation appear rougher and are shedding boulders. Near the top of the walls and also seen in patches along the smooth plains are brighter layers. These brighter layers are not shedding boulders so they must represent a different kind of rock formed in a different kind of environment than those further down the walls. Because they are highest in elevation, the bright layers are youngest in age. HiRISE is able to see dozens of the bright layers, which are perhaps only a meter in thickness. Darker sand dunes and ripples cover most of the plains and fill the floors of impact craters.

    Image PSP_001351_1715 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 9, 2006. The complete image is centered at -8.3 degrees latitude, 275.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 254.3 km (158.9 miles). At this distance the image scale ranges from 25.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 101.8 cm/pixel (with 4 x 4 binning). The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:32 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 59 degrees, thus the sun was about

  19. Discovery and validation of an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (INPROGAS) using antibody microarray-based oncoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Costa, Manuel; Codina-Cazador, Antonio; Cortés-Pastoret, Elisabet; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Flaquer, Sílvia; Llopis-Puigmarti, Francesca; Pujol-Amado, Eulalia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Ortiz, Rosa; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Queralt, Bernardo; Guardeño, Raquel; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Roig, Josep; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to improve gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis by identifying and validating an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (hereafter INPROGAS) using low-cost affinity proteomics. The detection of 120 cytokines, 43 angiogenic factors, 41 growth factors, 40 inflammatory factors and 10 metalloproteinases was performed using commercially available human antibody microarray-based arrays. We identified 21 inflammation-related proteins (INPROGAS) with significant differences in expression between GC tissues and normal gastric mucosa in a discovery cohort of matched pairs (n=10) of tumor/normal gastric tissues. Ingenuity pathway analysis confirmed the “inflammatory response”, “cellular movement” and “immune cell trafficking” as the most overrepresented biofunctions within INPROGAS. Using an expanded independent validation cohort (n = 22), INPROGAS classified gastric samples as “GC” or “non-GC” with a sensitivity of 82% (95% CI 59-94) and a specificity of 73% (95% CI 49-89). The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. Antibody microarray analyses of the GC-associated inflammatory proteome identified a 21-protein INPROGAS that accurately discriminated GC from noncancerous gastric mucosa. PMID:24722433

  20. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  1. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Delayed Acquisition of Non-Adjacent Vocalic Distributional Regularities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gomez, Nayeli; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compute non-adjacent regularities is key in the acquisition of a new language. In the domain of phonology/phonotactics, sensitivity to non-adjacent regularities between consonants has been found to appear between 7 and 10 months. The present study focuses on the emergence of a posterior-anterior (PA) bias, a regularity involving two…

  3. Distinction of gastric cancer tissue based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Zhou, Hanjing; Gong, Longjing; Liu, Shu; Zhou, Zhenghua; Mao, Weizheng; Zheng, Rong-er

    2012-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors with high recurrence rate and mortality rate in China. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic capability of Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on gold colloids for distinguishing gastric tissues. Gold colloids were directly mixed with the supernatant of homogenized tissues to heighten the Raman signal of various biomolecule. A total of 56 samples were collected from normal (30) and cancer (26). Raman spectra were obtained with a 785nm excitation in the range of 600-1800 cm-1. Significant spectral differences in SERS mainly belong to nucleic acid, proteins and lipids, particularly in the range of 653, 726, 828, 963, 1004, 1032, 1088, 1130, 1243, 1369, 1474, 1596, 1723 cm-1. PCA-LDA algorithms with leave-one-patient-out cross validation yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 90% (27/30), specificities of 88.5% (23/26), and accuracy of 89.3% (50/56), for classification of normal and cancer tissues. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) surface is 0.917, illustrating the diagnostic utility of SERS together with PCA-LDA to identify gastric cancer from normal tissue. This work demonstrated the SERS techniques can be useful for gastric cancer detection, and it is also a potential technique for accurately identifying cancerous tumor, which is of considerable clinical importance to real-time diagnosis.

  4. Oral versus intubated feeding and the effect on glycaemic and insulinaemic responses, gastric emptying and satiety.

    PubMed

    Morey, S; Shafat, A; Clegg, M E

    2016-01-01

    Cephalic phase responses (CPR) are important in early initiation of digestion and maximal absorption of nutrients prior to ingestion. Bypassing CPR has been shown to have consequences on metabolic responses that may influence satiety. The aim of this study was to investigate if using gastric intubation to bypass oro-pharyngeal and oesophageal exposure would reduce CPR including insulin and blood glucose and whether these impact on gastric emptying and satiety. Ten male subjects were tested on 2 occasions, 3-7 days apart after an overnight fast, in randomized order. Subjects were cannulated and intubated with a gastric tube for both tests. For test one, subjects ate 400 ml soup with a spoon and for test two the soup was infused into the stomach at an equivalent rate. Subsequently measurements of glycaemic (GR) and insulinaemic responses (IR) from cannula samples, breath samples for measurement of gastric emptying using the [(13)C] sodium acetate breath test and visual analogue scales (VAS) for satiety were taken over 180 min. There were differences in IR over the first 15 min (Oral: 169.0 ± 22.1; Gastric 124.1 ± 18.8; t(9) = 2.67; p = 0.028) but no difference in GR. There were differences in gastric emptying half time (Oral: 85.0 ± 2.7; Gastric 79.4 ± 3.3; t(9) = 2.40; p = 0.04) and ascension time (Oral: 68.2 ± 2.2; Gastric 64.0 ± 2.2; t(9) = 2.57; p = 0.03) with food taking longer to empty from the stomach on the Oral test day than on the Gastric test day. There was no significant difference in the satiety ratings. This study demonstrated that bypassing oro-pharyngeal and oesophageal exposure decreases the normal physiological CPR with detriment to IR and gastric emptying.

  5. Vagal nerve and the gastric mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Mózsik, G; Karádi, O; Király, A; Matus, Z; Sütö, G; Tóth, G; Vincze, A

    1993-01-01

    An essential role for an intact vagal nerve has been proven in the development of gastric mucosal cyto- and general protection. On the other hand, chemically-induced (ethanol, HCl, indomethacin) gastric mucosal damage is enhanced after acute surgical vagotomy. The aims of this paper were to study the possible mechanisms of the vagal nerve in the development of gastric mucosal defense. The following questions were addressed: 1) effect of surgical vagotomy on the development of ethanol- (ETOH), HCl-, and indomethacin (IND)-induced gastric mucosal damage: 2) changes in the gastric mucosal defense by scavengers, prostacyclin and other compounds (small doses of atropine and cimetidine; 3) changes in the gastric mucosal vascular permeability due to chemicals; 4) effect of indomethacin in the ETOH and HCl models with and without surgical vagotomy; 5) changes in the gastric mucosal content of prostacyclin and PGE2 in the ETOH and HCl models after surgical vagotomy; and 6) changes in the role of SH-groups in gastric mucosal defense after surgical vagotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Laparoscopic gastric band removal complicated by splenosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Schoucair, Ramy; Shimlati, Rasha; Rached, Linda; Khoury, George

    2016-08-01

    In any patient, the occurrence of postsplenectomy splenosis can complicate the planning of further surgeries. In our case, the gastric sleeve procedure was aborted, as it would have put the patient's life in danger. Therefore, only the gastric band was removed, eliminating future erosion. PMID:27525091

  7. The journey of personalizing gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the fourth most prevalent malignancy yet it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Every year, gastric cancer adds nearly 1 million new cancer cases, and 723,000 or 10% of cancer deaths to the global cancer burden. Approximately, 405,000 or 43% of the new cases and 325,000 or 45% of the deaths are in China, making gastric cancer a particularly challenging malignancy. This thematic series discusses the molecular classifications of gastric cancer by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) as well as the implications in personalized therapeutic choices; discusses the evolution of gastric surgery and presents perspectives on surgical techniques in treating gastric cancer; and reviews current and emerging targeted agents as well as immunotherapies in treating gastric cancer. With these advancements in molecular characterization, surgical intervention, and targeted and immunotherapies, gastric cancer will enter a personalized medicine era in the next 5 years. PMID:27581614

  8. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in Two Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Akalonu, Amaka; Yasrebi, Mona; Rios, Zarela Molle

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Female, 11 • Male, 15 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous gastric perforation Symptoms: Abdominal pain • distention • vomiting • leukocytosis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Both patients had surgery Specialty: Gastroenterology Objective: Rare etiology Background: Spontaneous gastric perforation is a rare clinical disorder. The majority of the available data have been reported in the neonatal age group. There are a few cases of spontaneous gastric perforation in preschool children. To our knowledge, there is no published information on spontaneous gastric perforation in older children and adolescents. Case Report: We describe the presentation and clinical course of two adolescent children who presented with spontaneous gastric perforation. Both children presented with acute onset abdominal pain, which progressively worsened. In both cases, the patient were taken urgently to the operating room after imaging studies had shown pneumoperitoneum. In both cases, surgery revealed gastric perforation with no obvious etiology, specifically no ulcer, inflammation, or other pathology. Conclusions: These two cases highlight the importance of including spontaneous gastric perforation, not just the typical duodenal/gastric ulcer, in the differential of a patient with severe abdominal pain and distension, who has imaging showing pneumoperitoneum. PMID:27686129

  9. Ramucirumab: successfully targeting angiogenesis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Javle, Milind; Smyth, Elizabeth C; Chau, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally and represents the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality. Early detection, aggressive surgical resection, and postoperative adjuvant therapy have led to survival improvement for early-stage gastric cancer, particularly in Asian countries. Unfortunately, advanced gastric cancer continues to pose a formidable challenge with few gains being reported recently. Trastuzumab was the first targeted agent to be approved for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer in 2010. The failure of the AVAGAST trial was a setback for antiangiogenic therapy for this disease. Ramucirumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-R2 and prevents its activation. The recent REGARD trial was a randomized phase III trial of ramucirumab vs. placebo for patients with advanced, pretreated gastric cancer that met its primary endpoint of increased overall survival. The toxicity of ramucirumab was modest in this setting, with an increased risk of grade 3 or higher hypertension (8% vs. 3%, with ramucirumab and placebo, respectively). The subsequent RAINBOW trial of paclitaxel plus ramucirumab vs. paclitaxel plus placebo for advanced pretreated gastric cancer confirmed the survival advantage of this antiangiogenic agent in gastric cancer. Ramucirumab is the first FDA-approved therapy for advanced gastric cancer after prior chemotherapy.

  10. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed. PMID:26814181

  11. Laparoscopic gastric band removal complicated by splenosis.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gregory; Schoucair, Ramy; Shimlati, Rasha; Rached, Linda; Khoury, George

    2016-08-01

    In any patient, the occurrence of postsplenectomy splenosis can complicate the planning of further surgeries. In our case, the gastric sleeve procedure was aborted, as it would have put the patient's life in danger. Therefore, only the gastric band was removed, eliminating future erosion.

  12. miRNA-558 promotes gastric cancer progression through attenuating Smad4-mediated repression of heparanase expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liduan; Jiao, Wanju; Song, Huajie; Qu, Hongxia; Li, Dan; Mei, Hong; Chen, Yajun; Yang, Feng; Li, Huanhuan; Huang, Kai; Tong, Qiangsong

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that as the only mammalian endo-β-D-glucuronidase, heparanase (HPSE) is up-regulated and associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer, while the underlying mechanisms still remain to be determined. Herein, through integrative analysis of public datasets, we found microRNA-558 (miR-558) and SMAD family member 4 (Smad4) as the crucial transcription regulators of HPSE expression in gastric cancer, with their adjacent target sites within the promoter of HPSE. We identified that endogenous miR-558 activated the transcription and expression of HPSE in gastric cancer cell lines. In contrast, Smad4 suppressed the nascent transcription and expression of HPSE via directly binding to its promoter. Mechanistically, miR-558 recognized its complementary site within HPSE promoter to decrease the binding of Smad4 in an Argonaute 1-dependent manner. Ectopic expression or knockdown experiments indicated that miR-558 promoted the in vitro and in vivo tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of gastric cancer cell lines via attenuating Smad4-mediated repression of HPSE expression. In clinical gastric cancer specimens, up-regulation of miR-558 and down-regulation of Smad4 were positively correlated with HPSE expression. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that miR-558 and Smad4 were associated with unfavourable and favourable outcome of gastric cancer patients, respectively. Therefore, these findings demonstrate that miR-558 facilitates the progression of gastric cancer through directly targeting the HPSE promoter to attenuate Smad4-mediated repression of HPSE expression. PMID:27685626

  13. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  14. Alterations of sucrose preference after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Bueter, M; Miras, A D; Chichger, H; Fenske, W; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Unwin, R J; Lutz, T A; Spector, A C; le Roux, C W

    2011-10-24

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (gastric bypass) patients reportedly have changes in perception and consumption of sweet-tasting foods. This study aimed to further investigate alterations in sweet food intake in rats and sucrose detection in humans after gastric bypass. Wistar rats were randomized to gastric bypass or sham-operations and preference for sucrose (sweet), sodium chloride (salty), citric acid (sour) and quinine hydrochloride (bitter) was assessed with standard two-bottle intake tests (vs. water). Intestinal T1R2 and T1R3 expression and plasma levels of glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) were measured. Furthermore, obese patients and normal weight controls were tested for sucrose taste detection thresholds pre- and postoperatively. Visual analogue scales measuring hedonic perception were used to determine the sucrose concentration considered by patients and controls as "just about right" pre- and postoperatively. Gastric bypass reduced the sucrose intake relative to water in rats (p<0.001). Preoperative sucrose exposure reduced this effect. Preference or aversion for compounds representative of other taste qualities in naïve rats remained unaffected. Intestinal T1R2 and T1R3 expression was significantly decreased in the alimentary limb while plasma levels of GLP-1 and PYY were elevated after bypass in rats (p=0.01). Bypass patients showed increased taste sensitivity to low sucrose concentrations compared with controls (p<0.05), but both groups considered the same sucrose concentration as "just about right" postoperatively. In conclusion, gastric bypass reduces sucrose intake relative to water in sucrose-naïve rats, but preoperative sucrose experience attenuates this effect. Changes in sucrose taste detection do not predict hedonic taste ratings of sucrose in bypass patients which remain unchanged. Thus, factors other than the unconditional affective value of the taste may also play a role in determining food preferences after gastric bypass

  15. Expression of early growth response gene-1 in precancerous lesions of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Su-Mi; Chung, Jin Ook; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Jung, Young-Do; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between the expression of early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1) and the progression of gastric cancers at advanced stages. However, the effects of EGR-1 expression on human gastric cancer progression, particularly on precancerous lesions, have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluate EGR-1 expression levels in target mucosa from patients with early gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and assess whether EGR-1 expression affects the oncogenic phenotypes of human gastric cancer cells. EGR-1 protein levels were measured in tissues from subjects with normal mucosa (n=6), low-grade dysplasia (n=6), high-grade dysplasia (n=4) and adenocarcinoma (n=3) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry analyses. We also investigated the role of EGR-1 in tumor cell behavior by transiently expressing a dominant active EGR-1 variant in cultured cells. A positive correlation was observed between EGR-1 expression and gastric carcinogenesis (P=0.016). Furthermore, there was an increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of EGR-1 in accordance with the histological grade (P for trends=0.003 and 0.003, respectively), and a positive association between the sum of the nuclear and cytoplasmic EGR-1 expression values and the histological grade (P=0.003). In addition, transient overexpression of EGR-1 enhanced cell proliferation, stimulated cell migration, and promoted the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and AKT in gastric cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that EGR-1 may contribute to the early stages of gastric carcinogenesis via the alteration of tumor cell behaviors. PMID:27698846

  16. Expression of early growth response gene-1 in precancerous lesions of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Su-Mi; Chung, Jin Ook; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Jung, Young-Do; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between the expression of early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1) and the progression of gastric cancers at advanced stages. However, the effects of EGR-1 expression on human gastric cancer progression, particularly on precancerous lesions, have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluate EGR-1 expression levels in target mucosa from patients with early gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and assess whether EGR-1 expression affects the oncogenic phenotypes of human gastric cancer cells. EGR-1 protein levels were measured in tissues from subjects with normal mucosa (n=6), low-grade dysplasia (n=6), high-grade dysplasia (n=4) and adenocarcinoma (n=3) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry analyses. We also investigated the role of EGR-1 in tumor cell behavior by transiently expressing a dominant active EGR-1 variant in cultured cells. A positive correlation was observed between EGR-1 expression and gastric carcinogenesis (P=0.016). Furthermore, there was an increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of EGR-1 in accordance with the histological grade (P for trends=0.003 and 0.003, respectively), and a positive association between the sum of the nuclear and cytoplasmic EGR-1 expression values and the histological grade (P=0.003). In addition, transient overexpression of EGR-1 enhanced cell proliferation, stimulated cell migration, and promoted the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and AKT in gastric cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that EGR-1 may contribute to the early stages of gastric carcinogenesis via the alteration of tumor cell behaviors.

  17. Spontaneous perforation in the upper oesophagus resulting from ulcer in heterotopic gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Righini, C A; Faure, Cl; Karkas, A; Schmerber, S; Reyt, E

    2007-01-01

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) can be found throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract, more frequently in the cervical oesophagus. Macroscopic HGM is named inlet patch (IP). The great majority of IPs are asymptomatic and discovered incidently during oesophageal endoscopy performed for another pathology. However, complications can occur. Among these, perforation is extremely rare. We report a case of a 27-year old man who presented with a perforation of an upper oesophageal ulcer arising from an IP. The diagnosis was made during endoscopy and confirmed with biopsy of the tissue surrounding the perforation, showing histologic modifications consistent with heterotopic gastric mucosa. Medical treatment using a proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics delivered with a gastric tube was advocated. The perforation was closed at day 7 and plasma Argon coagulation of the inlet patch was performed two months later. Annual endoscopy has been normal for three years.

  18. Diagnostic imaging and endoscopic finding in dogs and cats with gastric tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Terragni, R; Vignoli, M; van Bree, H J; Gaschen, L; Saunders, J H

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging is an essential part of the diagnostic workup of many gastrointestinal disorders. This paper reviews imaging and endoscopy of gastric tumors in dogs and cats and the techniques used. The appearance of the normal as well as the various aspects of gastric tumors are described for these different modalities. Plain radiography is widely available but has limited diagnostic value. Contrast radiography has higher sensitivity but is laborious and time-consuming. Ultrasonography (if an adequate acoustic window is available), endosonography and endoscopy are the most appropriate modalities for diagnosing gastric tumors. They are especially useful when obtaining samples for cytologic or histopathologic examination, because the imaging modalities do not always differentiate between inflammatory or infectious conditions and neoplastic disorders. Hydro-helical CT was found helpful for evaluating the location and local invasiveness of the lesion. Ultrasonography and endoscopy are useful modalities for taking adequate biopsies.

  19. Endoscopic pyloroplasty for severe gastric outlet obstruction due to alkali ingestion in a child.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Aldaghi, Mitra; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    A common belief is that alkali ingestion causes severe esophageal damage and limited gastric injury due to the buffering action of acid. Gastric injury has been observed in patients who ingested alkali. Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) secondary to caustic ingestion occurs due to fibrosis after resolution of the acute injury and inflammation, most commonly 6 to 12 weeks after initial ingestion. The traditional treatment for GOO related to ingestion of corrosive agents is surgery. Experience with endoscopic balloon dilation of corrosive-induced GOO is limited in children. This is the first report of endoscopic pyloroplasty in a child with GOO due to caustic alkalis ingestion that was treated with balloon dilation (using TTS balloon ranging from 6-15 mm) in Iran. Four dilation sessions were required for symptomatic relief of dysphagia. After one year of follow up, weight gain was normal. PMID:26744617

  20. Endoscopic pyloroplasty for severe gastric outlet obstruction due to alkali ingestion in a child

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Aldaghi, Mitra; Javaherizadeh, Hazhir

    2016-01-01

    A common belief is that alkali ingestion causes severe esophageal damage and limited gastric injury due to the buffering action of acid. Gastric injury has been observed in patients who ingested alkali. Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) secondary to caustic ingestion occurs due to fibrosis after resolution of the acute injury and inflammation, most commonly 6 to 12 weeks after initial ingestion. The traditional treatment for GOO related to ingestion of corrosive agents is surgery. Experience with endoscopic balloon dilation of corrosive-induced GOO is limited in children. This is the first report of endoscopic pyloroplasty in a child with GOO due to caustic alkalis ingestion that was treated with balloon dilation (using TTS balloon ranging from 6-15 mm) in Iran. Four dilation sessions were required for symptomatic relief of dysphagia. After one year of follow up, weight gain was normal. PMID:26744617

  1. [Gastric uptake of gallium67 in the human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Escalera Temprado, T; Banzo Marraco, J; Abós Olivares, M D; Olave Rubio, M T; Prats Rivera, E; García López, F; Razola Alba, P

    2004-02-01

    Nowadays, the human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is a chronic disease. In the frequent clinical situations with fever, lymph nodes and loss weight it is necessary to determine their etiology, for establishing a specific treatment. Gastrointestinal opportunistic infections or gastric lymphomatous or sarcomatous process, which can accumulate Ga67, may be present in the patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We report 2 cases with gastric uptake in which endoscopy and biopsy was obtained. In the first one, with previous treatment with omeprazol and almalgate for gastroesophagic reflux, endoscopy and biopsy were normal and in the second patient an Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed. We think that gastric uptake of Ga67 in HIV patients, must indicate to the clinician to rule out associated pathologies.

  2. [Hemodynamic restructuring of the gastric macro- and microcirculatory bed in disordered circulation].

    PubMed

    Khaimov, G N

    1980-07-01

    Species-specific peculiarities of extra- and intraorganic gastric blood vessels in some representatives of carnivores, herbivores, omnivores (220 animals) have been studied. Sources of the gastric blood supply have been defined in dogs, foxes, cats, rabbits, guinea-pigs, white rats, pigs; intraorganic distribution of blood vessels and local peculiarities of the microcirculatory bed have been studied in the normal organ. Structural bases during restorative processes of the gastric circulation after subtotal and partial devascularization have been revealed; collateral pathways, plastic properties of vessels having various diameters have been described in detales. A great attention has been paid to rearrangement of some microcirculatory links, to certain capacity changes, with special reference to dynamics of morphological indices.

  3. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  4. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer. PMID:27573782

  5. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
.

  6. Identification of novel molecular markers for detection of gastric cancer cells in the peripheral blood circulation using genome-wide microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Nobuyuki; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Tsuruma, Tetsuhiro; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Denno, Ryuichi; Hirata, Koichi

    2011-07-01

    Although metastasis or relapse is a leading cause of death for patients with gastric cancer, the hematogenous spread of cancer cells remains undetected at the time of initial therapy. The development of novel diagnostic molecular marker(s) to detect circulating gastric cancer cells is an issue of great clinical importance. We obtained peripheral blood samples from 10 patients with gastric cancer who underwent laparotomy and 4 healthy volunteers. Microarray analysis consisting of 30,000 genes or ESTs was carried out using eight gastric cancer tissues and normal gastric mucosae. We selected 53 genes up-regulated in gastric cancer compared to normal gastric mucosae from our microarray data set, and, among these, identified five candidate marker genes (TSPAN8, EPCAM, MMP12, MMP7 and REG3A) which were not expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 4 healthy volunteers. We further carried out semi-quantitative nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for HRH1, EGFR, CK20 and CEA in addition to the five newly identified genes using PBMCs of patients with gastric cancer, and found that expression of one or more genes out of the nine was detected in 80% of the patients with gastric cancer. Moreover, the numbers of genes expressed in PBMCs were ≤2 and ≥2 in all vascular invasion-negative cases and in 5 of 6 positive cases, respectively, showing significant differences between the two groups (P=0.041). Nested RT-PCR analysis for the set of nine marker genes using PBMCs may provide the potential for detection of circulating gastric cancer cells prior to metastasis formation in other organs.

  7. Post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia: a review.

    PubMed

    Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn C; Torquati, Alfonso; Corsino, Leonor

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is a highly effective treatment for severe obesity, resulting in substantial weight loss and normalizing obesity-related comorbidities. However, long-term consequences can occur, such as postbariatric surgery hypoglycaemia. This is a challenging medical problem, and the number of patients presenting with it has been increasing. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most popular bariatric procedure, and it is the surgery most commonly associated with the development of postbariatric surgery hypoglycaemia. To date, the pathogenesis of this condition has not been completely established. However, various factors - particularly increased postprandial glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 secretion - have been considered as crucial mediator. The mechanisms responsible for diabetic remission after bariatric surgery may be responsible for the development of hypoglycaemia, which typically occurs 1-3 h after a meal and is concurrent with inappropriate hyperinsulinaemia. Carbohydrate-rich foods usually provoke hypoglycaemic symptoms, which can typically be alleviated by strict dietary modifications, including carbohydrate restriction and avoidance of high glycaemic index foods and simple sugars. Few patients require further medical intervention, such as medications, but some patients have required a pancreatectomy. Because this option is not always successful, it is no longer routinely recommended. Clinical trials are needed to further determine the pathophysiology of this condition as well as the best diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients.

  8. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew F G

    2015-12-01

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as "the gastric precancerous cascade". This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context.

  9. Whole genome and transcriptome sequencing of matched primary and peritoneal metastatic gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Huang, J. Y.; Chen, Y. N.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, H.; Yan, F. H.; Wang, M. J.; Wang, G.; Su, M.; Lu, G; Huang, Y.; Dai, H.; Ji, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. N.; Jiang, Y. N.; Chen, S. J.; Zhu, Z. G.; Yu, Y. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Approximately 40% of global gastric cancer cases occur in China, with peritoneal metastasis being the prevalent form of recurrence and metastasis in advanced disease. Currently, there are limited clinical approaches for predicting and treatment of peritoneal metastasis, resulting in a 6-month average survival time. By comprehensive genome analysis will uncover the pathogenesis of peritoneal metastasis. Here we describe a comprehensive whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing analysis of one advanced gastric cancer case, including non-cancerous mucosa, primary cancer and matched peritoneal metastatic cancer. The peripheral blood is used as normal control. We identified 27 mutated genes, of which 19 genes are reported in COSMIC database (ZNF208, CRNN, ATXN3, DCTN1, RP1L1, PRB4, PRB1, MUC4, HS6ST3, MUC17, JAM2, ITGAD, IREB2, IQUB, CORO1B, CCDC121, AKAP2, ACAN and ACADL), and eight genes have not previously been described in gastric cancer (CCDC178, ARMC4, TUBB6, PLIN4, PKLR, PDZD2, DMBT1and DAB1).Additionally,GPX4 and MPND in 19q13.3-13.4 region, is characterized as a novel fusion-gene. This study disclosed novel biological markers and tumorigenic pathways that would predict gastric cancer occurring peritoneal metastasis. PMID:26330360

  10. Integrated exome and transcriptome sequencing reveals ZAK isoform usage in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; McCleland, Mark; Stawiski, Eric W.; Gnad, Florian; Mayba, Oleg; Haverty, Peter M.; Durinck, Steffen; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Klijn, Christiaan; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Lawrence, Michael; Liu, Hanbin; Wan, Yinan; Chopra, Vivek; Yaylaoglu, Murat B.; Yuan, Wenlin; Ha, Connie; Gilbert, Houston N.; Reeder, Jens; Pau, Gregoire; Stinson, Jeremy; Stern, Howard M.; Manning, Gerard; Wu, Thomas D.; Neve, Richard M.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Firestein, Ron; Zhang, Zemin

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, yet the underlying genomic alterations remain poorly understood. Here we perform exome and transcriptome sequencing and SNP array assays to characterize 51 primary gastric tumours and 32 cell lines. Meta-analysis of exome data and previously published data sets reveals 24 significantly mutated genes in microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours and 16 in microsatellite instable (MSI) tumours. Over half the patients in our collection could potentially benefit from targeted therapies. We identify 55 splice site mutations accompanied by aberrant splicing products, in addition to mutation-independent differential isoform usage in tumours. ZAK kinase isoform TV1 is preferentially upregulated in gastric tumours and cell lines relative to normal samples. This pattern is also observed in colorectal, bladder and breast cancers. Overexpression of this particular isoform activates multiple cancer-related transcription factor reporters, while depletion of ZAK in gastric cell lines inhibits proliferation. These results reveal the spectrum of genomic and transcriptomic alterations in gastric cancer, and identify isoform-specific oncogenic properties of ZAK. PMID:24807215

  11. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew FG

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as “the gastric precancerous cascade”. This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context. PMID:26668499

  12. Novel Method for Differentiating Histological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma by Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma, a single heterogeneous disease with multiple epidemiological and histopathological characteristics, accounts for approximately 10% of cancers worldwide. It is categorized into four histological types: papillary adenocarcinoma (PAC), tubular adenocarcinoma (TAC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC), and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (SRC). Effective differentiation of the four types of adenocarcinoma will greatly improve the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma to increase its five-year survival rate. We reported here the differentiation of the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma from the molecularly structural viewpoint of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In total, 79 patients underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy during 2008-2011: 21 for signet ring cell carcinoma, 21 for tubular adenocarcinoma, 14 for papillary adenocarcinoma, 6 for mucinous carcinoma, and 17 for normal gastric mucosas obtained from patients underwent operation for other benign lesions. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed from medical charts, and Raman data were processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two-dimensional plots of PCA and LDA clearly demonstrated that the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma could be differentiated, and confocal Raman microspectroscopy provides potentially a rapid and effective method for differentiating SRC and MAC from TAC or PAC. PMID:27472385

  13. Identification of CEACAM5 as a Biomarker for Prewarning and Prognosis in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinfeng; Fan, Xing; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Fenli; Dong, Jiaqiang; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-12-01

    MGd1, a monoclonal antibody raised against gastric cancer cells, possesses a high degree of specificity for gastric cancer (GC). Here we identified that the antigen of MGd1 is CEACAM5, and used MGd1 to investigate the expression of CEACAM5 in non-GC and GC tissues (N=643), as a biomarker for prewarning and prognosis. The expression of CEACAM5 was detected by immunohistochemistry in numerous tissues; its clinicopathological correlation was statistically analyzed. CEACAM5 expression was increased progressively from normal gastric mucosa to chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally to GC (p<0.05). In gastric precancerous lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia), CEACAM5-positive patients had a higher risk of developing GC as compared with CEACAM5-negative patients (OR = 12.68, p<0.001). Besides, CEACAM5 was found positively correlated with invasion depth of gastric adenocarcinoma (p<0.001). In survival analysis, CEACAM5 was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic predictor for patients with GC of clinical stage IIIA/IV (p=0.033). Our results demonstrate that CEACAM5 is a promising biomarker for GC prewarning and prognostic evaluation. PMID:26374829

  14. Identification of CEACAM5 as a Biomarker for Prewarning and Prognosis in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinfeng; Fan, Xing; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Fenli; Dong, Jiaqiang; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-12-01

    MGd1, a monoclonal antibody raised against gastric cancer cells, possesses a high degree of specificity for gastric cancer (GC). Here we identified that the antigen of MGd1 is CEACAM5, and used MGd1 to investigate the expression of CEACAM5 in non-GC and GC tissues (N=643), as a biomarker for prewarning and prognosis. The expression of CEACAM5 was detected by immunohistochemistry in numerous tissues; its clinicopathological correlation was statistically analyzed. CEACAM5 expression was increased progressively from normal gastric mucosa to chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally to GC (p<0.05). In gastric precancerous lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia), CEACAM5-positive patients had a higher risk of developing GC as compared with CEACAM5-negative patients (OR = 12.68, p<0.001). Besides, CEACAM5 was found positively correlated with invasion depth of gastric adenocarcinoma (p<0.001). In survival analysis, CEACAM5 was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic predictor for patients with GC of clinical stage IIIA/IV (p=0.033). Our results demonstrate that CEACAM5 is a promising biomarker for GC prewarning and prognostic evaluation.

  15. Correlation Between Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 Expression and Gastric Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongyu; Nong, Zhiwei; Lu, Guohao

    2015-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays an anti-oxidative and phase II detoxification function via its up-regulation on various antioxidant response elements (ARE) genes. Nrf2 can protect both normal and cancer cells from damages of cell stress, thereby exerting a critical role in the development of cancer. The expression and significance of Nrf2 in gastric cancer, however, has not been reported. This study thus aimed to investigate the expression of Nrf2 in gastric cancer tissues via immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Material/Methods Gastric carcinoma tissues from a total of 175 patients during surgical resection were examined for Nfr2 expression profiles using IHC staining on paraffin-embedded slides. Between-group-comparisons were performed by chi-square, Fisher’s exact, or Mann-Whitney U test. The correlation between Nfr2 expression and clinical indexes was further analyzed by Kaplan-Meier test, univariate/multivariate analysis, and log-rank test. Results Nrf2 is mainly expressed in nuclei of gastric carcinoma tissues, with significant correlation with clinical indexes, including tumor size, invasive depth, lymph node metastasis, and invasion. Patients with Nrf2-positive expression had significantly lower survival rates compared to those in the negative group (p<0.01), with chemo-resistance against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (p<0.05). Conclusions Nrf2 expression is positively correlated with invasive gastric cancer, suggesting its utility as a predictive index for unfavorable prognosis. PMID:26410168

  16. Novel Method for Differentiating Histological Types of Gastric Adenocarcinoma by Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma, a single heterogeneous disease with multiple epidemiological and histopathological characteristics, accounts for approximately 10% of cancers worldwide. It is categorized into four histological types: papillary adenocarcinoma (PAC), tubular adenocarcinoma (TAC), mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC), and signet ring cell adenocarcinoma (SRC). Effective differentiation of the four types of adenocarcinoma will greatly improve the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma to increase its five-year survival rate. We reported here the differentiation of the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma from the molecularly structural viewpoint of confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In total, 79 patients underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy during 2008–2011: 21 for signet ring cell carcinoma, 21 for tubular adenocarcinoma, 14 for papillary adenocarcinoma, 6 for mucinous carcinoma, and 17 for normal gastric mucosas obtained from patients underwent operation for other benign lesions. Clinical data were retrospectively reviewed from medical charts, and Raman data were processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Two-dimensional plots of PCA and LDA clearly demonstrated that the four histological types of gastric adenocarcinoma could be differentiated, and confocal Raman microspectroscopy provides potentially a rapid and effective method for differentiating SRC and MAC from TAC or PAC. PMID:27472385

  17. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua; Forier, Katrien; Remaut, Katrien; Stremersch, Stephan; Guimarães, Nuno; Fontenete, Sílvia; Wengel, Jesper; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Braeckmans, Kevin; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe) have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical barriers—the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus, while remaining capable of diffusing through the mucus and delivering these nucleic acid mimics directly into the bacteria. PMID:26645765

  18. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew F G

    2015-12-01

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as "the gastric precancerous cascade". This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context. PMID:26668499

  19. Hypomanic episode during recurrent gastric cancer treatment: report of a rare case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Miwa, Keisuke; Araki, Kazuhiro; Kaneta, Toshikado; Sunakawa, Yu; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Shimada, Ken; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2012-10-01

    S-1 plus cisplatin is the standard chemotherapy for recurrent gastric cancer. While depression and delirium are frequent in cancer patients, hypomania during chemotherapy is rare. We describe a rare case of hypomania during S-1 plus cisplatin treatment for recurrent gastric cancer. A 66-year-old woman, with no previous psychiatric disorder, received S-1 plus cisplatin for recurrent gastric cancer. She showed peculiar behavior. Physical examination, urine, blood and imaging findings were normal. There was no gastric cancer progression. During psychiatric consultation, she behaved inappropriately. However, she behaved normally while performing daily activities. She manifested a persistently elevated, expansive or irritable mood, clearly different from her usual non-depressed state, meeting hypomania diagnostic criteria. Her condition did not require chemotherapy discontinuation or additional medication. During the second and subsequent S-1 plus cisplatin cycles, symptoms were stable. Cancer patients often have adjustment disorders, depression and delirium, but rarely hypomania. Our patient showed no significant changes in blood biochemistry and brain and whole body imaging. While S-1 plus cisplatin-induced hypomania cannot be excluded, hypomanic symptoms did not improve during the chemotherapy rest period, nor was there deterioration during subsequent cycles, suggesting drug-induced mania to be unlikely. Possible onset mechanisms include manic defense phenomena, common with stressful life events. There are no reports of recurrent gastric cancer patients experiencing hypomania during S-1 or S-1 plus cisplatin therapy, i.e. our patient represents a rare course. Clinicians should recognize psychosis or mood disorders during gastric cancer treatment. Further accumulation of such rare cases might elucidate pathological mechanisms underlying hypomania in cancer patients.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection induced gastric cancer; advance in gastric stem cell research and the remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastric cancer, which remains an important health care challenge. Recent investigation in gastric stem cell or progenitor cell biology has uncovered valuable information in understanding the gastric gland renewal and maintenance of homeostasis, they also provide clues for further defining the mechanisms by which gastric cancer may originate and progress. Lgr5, Villin-promoter, TFF2-mRNA and Mist have recently been identified as gastric stem/progenitor cell markers; their identification enriched our understanding on the gastric stem cell pathobiology during chronic inflammation and metaplasia. In addition, advance in gastric cancer stem cell markers such as CD44, CD90, CD133, Musashi-1 reveal novel information on tumor cell behavior and disease progression implicated for therapeutics. However, two critical questions remain to be of considerable challenges for future exploration; one is how H. pylori or chronic inflammation affects gastric stem cell or their progenitors, which give rise to mucus-, acid-, pepsinogen-, and hormone-secreting cell lineages. Another one is how bacterial infection or inflammation induces oncogenic transformation and propagates into tumors. Focus on the interactions of H. pylori with gastric stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment will be instrumental to decipher the initiation and origin of gastric cancer. Future studies in these areas will be critical to uncover molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation-mediated oncogenic transformation and provide options for cancer prevention and intervention. We review recent progress and discuss future research directions in these important research fields. PMID:23217022

  1. Current Perspectives on Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Lespier, Juan M; González-Pons, María; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is third leading cause of cancer-related death. Only 28.3% of new GC cases survive more than 5 years. Although incidence has declined in the United States, an increase is estimated for 2016. Risk factors include sex (risk is higher in men), Helicobacter pylori infection, heredity, and lifestyle. GC is usually diagnosed between the ages of 60-80 years. Prognosis of GC is largely dependent on the tumor stage at diagnosis and classification as intestinal or diffuse type; diffuse-type GC has worse prognosis. Chemoprevention has been shown to decrease risk, but is currently not used clinically. PMID:27546840

  2. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  3. Gastritis, nitrosamines, and gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemmermann, G.N.; Mower, H.

    1981-01-01

    Gastritis is associated with peptic ulcer, gastroenterostomy, pernicious anemia, and exposure to nitrosamines. Once established, the process may be self-perpetuating, resulting in atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and neoplasia. This can be explained by the process of endogenous nitrosation of amines in the inflamed gastric mucosa. Evidence is presented to support this hypothesis. Several drugs given parenterally have been identified as mutagenic nitroso compounds in homogenates of human and canine antral mucosa. Nitrite for this process is apparently derived from the inflamed mucosa. Different amines appear to be nitrosated at different places in the antrum, suggesting the presence of site-specific enzymes that control these reactions.

  4. Molecular events in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mahu, C; Purcarea, AP; Gheorghe, CM; Purcarea, MR

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer represents an important problem for the public health, being one of the main causes of mortality. At present, it represents the second cause of mortality due to cancer, after the bronchopulmonary cancer in men and the fourth cause of mortality in women. Important progresses have been made in the last couple of years in determining the neoplastic etiopathogenesis, but it cannot be affirmed that the genetic mutations chain, which leads to the appearance of the malignant cell, has been fully understood. PMID:25408758

  5. Phagocytosis of cells in the gastric surface epithelium of the rat.

    PubMed

    Morris, G P; Harding, R K

    1979-02-28

    Gastric surface epithelial cells (SEC) from fed rats, from rats fasted for 16 h and from mucosae exposed in an ex-vivo chamber to 16 mM aspirin for 5 min were examined by transmission electron microscopy. SEC have the capability to phagocytose adjacent epithelial cells and parietal cells. Phagocytosis is rare in mucosae from fasted animals but common in fed animals or after brief exposure to aspirin. Phagocytic capabilities are not restricted to the progenitor zone but exist throughout the surface epithelium. Phagocytosis may provide a mechanism for the removal of damaged or senescent cells from the surface epithelium.

  6. JWA reverses cisplatin resistance via the CK2—XRCC1 pathway in human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Chen, Q; Wang, Q; Sun, Y; Wang, S; Li, A; Xu, S; Røe, O D; Wang, M; Zhang, R; Yang, L; Zhou, J

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy in China, with a median 5-year survival of only 20%. Cisplatin has been used in first-line cancer treatment for several types of cancer including gastric cancer. However, patients are often primary resistant or develop acquired resistance resulting in relapse of the cancer and reduced survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the reduced expression of base excision repair protein XRCC1 and its upstream regulator JWA in gastric cancerous tissues correlated with a significant survival benefit of adjuvant first-line platinum-based chemotherapy as well as XRCC1 playing an important role in the DNA repair of cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated the role of JWA in cisplatin-induced DNA lesions and aquired cisplatin resistance in five cell-culture models: gastric epithelial cells GES-1, cisplatin-sensitive gastric cancer cell lines BGC823 and SGC7901, and the cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cell lines BGC823/DDP and SGC7901/DDP. Our results indicated that JWA is required for DNA repair following cisplatin-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) via XRCC1 in normal gastric epithelial cells. However, in gastric cancer cells, JWA enhanced cisplatin-induced cell death through regulation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. The protein expression of JWA was significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant cells and contributed to cisplatin resistance. Interestingly, as JWA upregulated XRCC1 expression in normal cells, JWA downregulated XRCC1 expression through promoting the degradation of XRCC1 in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the negative regulation of JWA to XRCC1 was blocked due to the mutation of 518S/519T/523T residues of XRCC1, and indicating that the CK2 activated 518S/519T/523T phosphorylation is a key point in the regulation of JWA to XRCC1. In conclusion, we report for the first time that JWA regulated cisplatin-induced DNA damage and apoptosis through the

  7. Aberrant gene expression in mucosa adjacent to tumor reveals a molecular crosstalk in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A colorectal tumor is not an isolated entity growing in a restricted location of the body. The patient’s gut environment constitutes the framework where the tumor evolves and this relationship promotes and includes a complex and tight correlation of the tumor with inflammation, blood vessels formation, nutrition, and gut microbiome composition. The tumor influence in the environment could both promote an anti-tumor or a pro-tumor response. Methods A set of 98 paired adjacent mucosa and tumor tissues from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 50 colon mucosa from healthy donors (246 samples in total) were included in this work. RNA extracted from each sample was hybridized in Affymetrix chips Human Genome U219. Functional relationships between genes were inferred by means of systems biology using both transcriptional regulation networks (ARACNe algorithm) and protein-protein interaction networks (BIANA software). Results Here we report a transcriptomic analysis revealing a number of genes activated in adjacent mucosa from CRC patients, not activated in mucosa from healthy donors. A functional analysis of these genes suggested that this active reaction of the adjacent mucosa was related to the presence of the tumor. Transcriptional and protein-interaction networks were used to further elucidate this response of normal gut in front of the tumor, revealing a crosstalk between proteins secreted by the tumor and receptors activated in the adjacent colon tissue; and vice versa. Remarkably, Slit family of proteins activated ROBO receptors in tumor whereas tumor-secreted proteins transduced a cellular signal finally activating AP-1 in adjacent tissue. Conclusions The systems-level approach provides new insights into the micro-ecology of colorectal tumorogenesis. Disrupting this intricate molecular network of cell-cell communication and pro-inflammatory microenvironment could be a therapeutic target in CRC patients. PMID:24597571

  8. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  9. Mechanisms of Gastroprotective Effects of Ethanolic Leaf Extract of Jasminum sambac against HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    AlRashdi, Ahmed S.; Salama, Suzy M.; Alkiyumi, Salim S.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Abdelwahab, Siddig I.; Taha, Manal M.; Hussiani, Jamal; Asykin, Nur

    2012-01-01

    Jasminum sambac is used in folk medicine as the treatment of many diseases. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extracts of J. sambac leaves against acidified ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Seven groups of rats were orally pre-treated with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) as normal group, CMC as ulcer group, 20 mg/kg of omeprazole as positive group, 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of extract as the experimental groups, respectively. An hour later, CMC was given orally to normal group and acidified ethanol solution was given orally to the ulcer control, positive control, and the experimental groups. The rats were sacrificed after an hour later. Acidity of gastric content, the gastric wall mucus, ulcer areas, and histology and immunohistochemistry of the gastric wall were assessed. Gastric homogenates were determined for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), superoxide dismutase (SOD), andmalondialdehyde (MDA) content. Ulcer group exhibited significantly severe mucosal injury as compared with omeprazole or extract which shows significant protection towards gastric mucosal injury the plant promotes ulcer protection as it shows significant reduction of ulcer area grossly, and histology showed marked reduction of edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer compared with ulcer group. Immunohistochemistry showed overexpression of Hsp70 protein and downexpression of Bax protein in rats pretreated with extract. Significant increased in the pH, mucus of gastric content and high levels of PGE2, SOD and reduced amount of MDA was observed. PMID:22550543

  10. Gastroprotective Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Leaf against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Nurhidayah Ab.; Tayyab, Saad

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines appeared promising in prevention of many diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the gastroprotective effect of Curcuma xanthorrhiza leaf in the rats induced gastric ulcer by ethanol. Normal and ulcer control received carboxymethycellulose (5 mL/kg) orally, positive control was administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole (reference drug) and 2 groups were received 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of the leaf extract, respectively. To induce of gastric ulcers formation, ethanol (5 mL/kg) was given orally to all groups except normal control. Gross ulcer areas, histology, and amount of prostaglandin E2, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were assessed to determine the potentiality of extract in prevention against gastric ulcers. Oral administration of extract showed significant gastric protection effect as the ulcer areas was remarkably decreased. Histology observation showed less edema and leucocytes infiltration as compared with the ulcer control which exhibited severe gastric mucosa injury. Furthermore, the leaf extract elevated the mucus weight, level of prostaglandin E2 and superoxide dismutase. The extract also reduced malondialdehyde amount significantly. Results showed leaf extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza can enhanced the gastric protection and sustained the integrity of gastric mucosa structure. Acute toxicity test did not showed any sign of toxicity (2 g/kg and 5 g/kg). PMID:24783203

  11. Gastroprotective effect of ethanolic extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza leaf against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Nurhidayah Ab; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Golbabapour, Shahram; Ismail, Salmah; Tayyab, Saad; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines appeared promising in prevention of many diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the gastroprotective effect of Curcuma xanthorrhiza leaf in the rats induced gastric ulcer by ethanol. Normal and ulcer control received carboxymethycellulose (5 mL/kg) orally, positive control was administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole (reference drug) and 2 groups were received 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of the leaf extract, respectively. To induce of gastric ulcers formation, ethanol (5 mL/kg) was given orally to all groups except normal control. Gross ulcer areas, histology, and amount of prostaglandin E2, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were assessed to determine the potentiality of extract in prevention against gastric ulcers. Oral administration of extract showed significant gastric protection effect as the ulcer areas was remarkably decreased. Histology observation showed less edema and leucocytes infiltration as compared with the ulcer control which exhibited severe gastric mucosa injury. Furthermore, the leaf extract elevated the mucus weight, level of prostaglandin E2 and superoxide dismutase. The extract also reduced malondialdehyde amount significantly. Results showed leaf extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza can enhanced the gastric protection and sustained the integrity of gastric mucosa structure. Acute toxicity test did not showed any sign of toxicity (2 g/kg and 5 g/kg).

  12. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium. PMID:24587625

  13. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium.

  14. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Asahiro; Gong, Jian; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutic agents are constantly being developed and have been shown to be effective in various clinical trials. One group of representative targeted oncogenic kinases, the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), has been associated with gastric cancer development. Trastuzumab, an inhibitor of ERBB2, has been approved for the treatment of gastric cancer, although other receptor tyrosine kinases, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, c-Met, IGF-1R and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, are also activated in gastric cancer. The promising results of the trastuzumab clinical trial for gastric cancer resulted in the approval of trastuzumab-based therapy as a first-line treatment for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive patients. On the other hand, the trial examining bevacizumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy did not meet its primary goal of increasing the overall survival time of gastric cancer patients; however, a significantly higher response rate and a longer progression-free survival were observed in the bevacizumab arm of the trial. Other clinical trials, especially phase III trials that have tested drugs targeting RTKs, such as cetuximab, panitumumab, gefitinib, erlotinib, figitumumab, sorafenib, sunitinib and lapatinib, have shown that these drugs have modest effects against gastric cancer. This review summarizes the recent results from the clinical trials of molecularly targeted drugs and suggests that further improvements in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer can be achieved through the combination of conventional drugs with the new molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:24782606

  15. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme aconitase (ACO2) is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Mai, Cong; Wei, Yong-li; Zhao, Jing-jing; Hu, Yu-min; Zeng, Zhao-lei; Yang, Jing; Lu, Wen-hua; Xu, Rui-hua; Huang, Peng

    2013-06-01

    Alterations in energy metabolism play a major role in cancer development. Aconitase (ACO2) is an essential enzyme located in the mitochondria and catalyzes the interconversion of citrate and isocitrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Recent studies suggest that the expression of ACO2 may be altered in certain types of cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine ACO2 expression in clinical tumor specimens from patients with gastric cancer and to evaluate the clinical relevance of ACO2 expression in gastric cancer. A total of 456 paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and 30 pairs of freshly frozen tissues were used in this study. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to measure ACO2 expression in tumor tissues and matched adjacent non-tumorous tissues. The results showed that the expression of ACO2 was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with matched adjacent nontumorous tissues and was associated with clinical stage (p = 0.001), T classification (p = 0.027), N classification (p = 0.012), M classification (p = 0.002), and pathological differentiation states (p = 0.036). Patients with lower ACO2 expression had a shorter survival time than those with higher ACO2 expression. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that ACO2 expression functions as an independent prognostic factor (p < 0.001). Our data suggested that ACO2 could play an important role in gastric cancer and may potentially serve as a prognostic biomarker. PMID:23550275

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion and gastric motility in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Danquechin Dorval, E.; Mueller, G.P.; Eng, R.R.; Durakovic, A.; Conklin, J.J.; Dubois, A.

    1985-08-01

    The prodromal syndrome of radiation sickness is characterized by nausea and vomiting but the pathophysiology and the treatment of this entity is largely unknown. The authors investigated this problem by determining the effects of ionizing radiation on gastric function with and without administration of the dopamine antagonist domperidone. They measured gastric electrical control activity (waves per minute), fractional emptying rate (percent per minute), acid output (microequivalents per minute), and plasma levels of immunoreactive beta-endorphin. Twelve conscious, chair-adapted rhesus monkeys were studied twice before, once immediately after, and once 2 days after a single 800-cGy (800 rads) /sup 60/Co total body irradiation. In addition to causing vomiting, total body irradiation transiently suppressed gastric electrical control activity, gastric emptying and gastric secretion, while increasing plasma levels of immunoreactive beta-endorphin. Domperidone had no effect on vomiting or gastric function either before or after irradiation, but it significantly increased plasma immunoreactive beta-endorphin.

  17. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  18. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  19. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  20. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI