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Sample records for adjacent normal prostate

  1. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  2. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  3. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  4. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  5. Characterization of Notch Signalling Pathway Members in Normal Prostate, Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Hakan; Acar, Nuray; Ozbey, Ozlem; Unal, Betul; Koksal, Ismail Turker; Bassorgun, Ibrahim; Ciftcioglu, Akif; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) holds the second place in terms of cancer-related mortality rate among men. The Notch signalling pathway regulates the proliferation and differentiation in embryonic and adult tissues and determines the cell fate. The body of knowledge in the present literature is currently controversial about the effect of the Notch pathway on prostatic cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the immunolocalization and expression levels of Notch1-4, Jagged1-2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 from among the members of the Notch signalling pathway in tissues of normal, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and malignant prostate. The current study included a sample of 20 patients with localised prostatic adenocarcinoma, 18 patients with high grade PIN (H-PIN) and 18 normal prostatic tissue. Immunolocalisations of Notch1, 2, 3, 4, Jagged1, 2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 were identified through the immunohistochemical method. The findings of the present study showed that all in-scope members of the Notch signalling pathway were localised in PIN structures to a greater extent than in other tissues and from amongst these members, specifically Notch1, Notch4, Jagged1 and HES1 were at more significant levels. Consequently, the findings of the present study may indicate that the Notch signalling pathway can play a role especially in the formation of PIN structures.

  6. Frequency analysis of multispectral photoacoustic images for differentiating malignant region from normal region in excised human prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Saugata; Rao, Navalgund A.; Valluru, Keerthi S.; Chinni, Bhargava K.; Dogra, Vikram S.; Helguera, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Frequency domain analysis of the photoacoustic (PA) radio frequency signals can potentially be used as a tool for characterizing microstructure of absorbers in tissue. This study investigates the feasibility of analyzing the spectrum of multiwavelength PA signals generated by excised human prostate tissue samples to differentiate between malignant and normal prostate regions. Photoacoustic imaging at five different wavelengths, corresponding to peak absorption coefficients of deoxyhemoglobin, whole blood, oxyhemoglobin, water and lipid in the near infrared (NIR) (700 nm - 1000 nm) region, was performed on freshly excised prostate specimens taken from patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. The PA images were co-registered with the histopathology images of the prostate specimens to determine the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant and normal tissue. The calibrated power spectrum of each PA signal from a selected ROI was fit to a linear model to extract the corresponding slope, midband fit and intercept parameters. The mean value of each parameter corresponding to malignant and adjacent normal prostate ROI was calculated for each of the five wavelengths. The results obtained for 9 different human prostate specimens, show that the mean values of midband fit and intercept are significantly different between malignant and normal regions. In addition, the average midband fit and intercept values show a decreasing trend with increasing wavelength. These preliminary results suggest that frequency analysis of multispectral PA signals can be used to differentiate malignant region from the adjacent normal region in human prostate tissue.

  7. Tookad-mediated photodynamic effects on the prostate and its adjacent tissues: in vivo study in canine models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Luck, David; Beckers, Jill; Blanc, Dominique; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad (pd-bacteriopheophorbide), was investigated as an alternative treatment modality for prostate cancer. Tookad photodynamic effects on the prostate and its adjacent tissues were evaluated in canine models. Interstitial prostate PDT was performed by irradiating individual lobes with a diode laser (763 nm) and 1-cm cylindrical diffuser fibers at various light doses to activate the IV administered photosensitizer Tookad (1 - 2 mg/kg). The sensitivity of the adjacent tissues to Tookad-PDT was determined by superficially irradiating the surfaces of the bladder, colon, abdominal muscle and pelvic plexus with a microlens fiber at various drug/light doses. PDT effect on the prostatic urethra was evaluated by transurethral irradiation. The prostate and adjacent tissues were harvested one-week after the treatment and subjected to histopathologic examination. At one-week post interstitial prostate PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. The bladder, colon, abdominal muscle and pelvic plexus, appeared to also be sensitive to Tookad-PDT at light dose levels greater than 40 Jcm2. Urethral mucosa appeared less sensitive to Tookad-PDT. In conclusion, Tookad-mediated PDT demonstrates very strong vascular effects and can provide an effective alternative for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Protection of the adjacent tissues should be taken into consideration in the total prostate ablation process due to their sensitivity to the Tookad-mediated PDT.

  8. Elucidating the Role of Translocator Protein in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    4.8/6) compared to normal donor (2.0/6), normal tissue adjacent to tumor (2.1/6), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (1.8/6). Furthermore, TSPO...immunohistochemistry (IHC) in normal donor prostate (donor), normal prostate tissue adjacent to tumor (NAT), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH

  9. Discovery and Classification of Fusion Transcripts in Prostate Cancer and Normal Prostate Tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Silvia; Zuo, Ze-Hua; Chen, Rui; Tseng, George C; Yu, Yan P

    2015-07-01

    Fusion transcript formation is one of the fundamental mechanisms that drives the development of prostate cancer. Because of the advance of high-throughput parallel sequencing, many fusion transcripts have been discovered. However, the discovery rate of fusion transcripts specific for prostate cancer is lagging behind the discoveries made on chromosome abnormalities of prostate cancer. Recent analyses suggest that many fusion transcripts are present in both benign and cancerous tissues. Some of these fusion transcripts likely represent important components of normal gene expression in cells. It is necessary to identify the criteria and features of fusion transcripts that are specific for cancer. In this review, we discuss optimization of RNA sequencing depth for fusion transcript discovery and the characteristics of fusion transcripts in normal prostate tissues and prostate cancer. We also propose a new classification of cancer-specific fusion transcripts on the basis of their tail gene fusion protein product and the roles that these fusions may play in cancer development.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels were differentially expressed in human normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Dong, Mei; Tang, He; Wang, Na; Zhang, Jin; Yan, Changqing; Jiao, Xiaocui; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are expressed not only in excitable cells but also in numerous metastatic cells, particularly in certain types of cancer cells. In some types of cancer, including prostate cancer, the expression of VGSCs is associated with cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. However, the detailed expression profiles of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic cancer remain controversial. In the present study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to systematically detect all subtypes of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer cells. The expression profile of VGSC α subunits was observed to differ between these cell types. Nav1.5 was the major isoform expressed in normal human prostate tissue, while Nav1.5 and Nav1.2 were the predominant isoforms in BPH tissue. However, in PC-3 and LNCaP cells, two typical prostate cancer cell lines, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were abundantly expressed. By comparing the relative expression levels of Nav1.5, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 in these cells, the mRNA levels of Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were identified to be 6- to 27-fold higher in PC-3 and LNCaP cells than in either normal or BPH samples (P<0.05); however, Nav1.5 mRNA levels were relatively lower compared with those of Nav1.6 or Nav1.7 in all cells analyzed. To confirm whether Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 expression in cancer cells was functional, a patch-clamp technique was used to record whole-cell currents. A tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current was successfully recorded in PC-3 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. It was concluded that although all types of VGSC α subunits exhibited low expression levels in normal prostate and BPH cells, both Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were significantly upregulated in the prostate cancer cell lines, suggesting these subtypes may be potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for certain types of prostate cancer in humans.

  11. Role of ART-27, a Novel Androgen Receptor Coactivator, in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    tion by phorbol esters and hormones. EMBO J 20: 607 1-6083 34. Nemethy G, G1bson KD, Palmer KA, Yoon CN, Paterl in i G, Zagar ! A, Rumsey S , Scherag...Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ...NORMAL PROSTATE AND PROSTATE CANCER 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0103 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Wenhui Li

  12. Prostate Field Cancerization: Deregulated Expression of Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and Platelet Derived Growth Factor A (PDGF-A) in Tumor Adjacent Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Shoshan, Dor S.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prostate field cancerization denotes molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Such alterations include deregulated protein expression, as we have previously shown for the key transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Here we add the two secreted factors macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) to the growing list of protein markers of prostate field cancerization. Expression of MIC-1 and PDGF-A was measured quantitatively by immunofluorescence and comprehensively analyzed using two methods of signal capture and several groupings of data generated in human cancerous (n = 25), histologically normal adjacent (n = 22), and disease-free (n = 6) prostate tissues. A total of 208 digitized images were analyzed. MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in tumor tissues were elevated 7.1x to 23.4x and 1.7x to 3.7x compared to disease-free tissues, respectively (p<0.0001 to p = 0.08 and p<0.01 to p = 0.23, respectively). In support of field cancerization, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in adjacent tissues were elevated 7.4x to 38.4x and 1.4x to 2.7x, respectively (p<0.0001 to p<0.05 and p<0.05 to p = 0.51, respectively). Also, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression were similar in tumor and adjacent tissues (0.3x to 1.0x; p<0.001 to p = 0.98 for MIC-1; 0.9x to 2.6x; p<0.01 to p = 1.00 for PDGF-A). All analyses indicated a high level of inter- and intra-tissue heterogeneity across all types of tissues (mean coefficient of variation of 86.0%). Our data shows that MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression is elevated in both prostate tumors and structurally intact adjacent tissues when compared to disease-free specimens, defining field cancerization. These secreted factors could promote tumorigenesis in histologically normal tissues and lead to tumor multifocality. Among several clinical applications, they could also be exploited as indicators of disease in false negative

  13. Prostate field cancerization: deregulated expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) in tumor adjacent tissue.

    PubMed

    Jones, Anna C; Antillon, Kresta S; Jenkins, Shannon M; Janos, Sara N; Overton, Heidi N; Shoshan, Dor S; Fischer, Edgar G; Trujillo, Kristina A; Bisoffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prostate field cancerization denotes molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Such alterations include deregulated protein expression, as we have previously shown for the key transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Here we add the two secreted factors macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) to the growing list of protein markers of prostate field cancerization. Expression of MIC-1 and PDGF-A was measured quantitatively by immunofluorescence and comprehensively analyzed using two methods of signal capture and several groupings of data generated in human cancerous (n = 25), histologically normal adjacent (n = 22), and disease-free (n = 6) prostate tissues. A total of 208 digitized images were analyzed. MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in tumor tissues were elevated 7.1x to 23.4x and 1.7x to 3.7x compared to disease-free tissues, respectively (p<0.0001 to p = 0.08 and p<0.01 to p = 0.23, respectively). In support of field cancerization, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in adjacent tissues were elevated 7.4x to 38.4x and 1.4x to 2.7x, respectively (p<0.0001 to p<0.05 and p<0.05 to p = 0.51, respectively). Also, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression were similar in tumor and adjacent tissues (0.3x to 1.0x; p<0.001 to p = 0.98 for MIC-1; 0.9x to 2.6x; p<0.01 to p = 1.00 for PDGF-A). All analyses indicated a high level of inter- and intra-tissue heterogeneity across all types of tissues (mean coefficient of variation of 86.0%). Our data shows that MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression is elevated in both prostate tumors and structurally intact adjacent tissues when compared to disease-free specimens, defining field cancerization. These secreted factors could promote tumorigenesis in histologically normal tissues and lead to tumor multifocality. Among several clinical applications, they could also be exploited as indicators of disease in false negative

  14. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation.

  15. EXPRESSION MECHANISM AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF NOB1 IN GASTRIC CANCER TISSUE AND ADJACENT NORMAL TISSUE.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W-P; Liu, X; Yang, Y; Liu, Y-F

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the effect and relationship of NOB1 in the development of gastric cancer, based on an analysis of NOB1expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent tissue. Thirty gastric cancer tissue samples taken during surgery with complete pathological data and their related adjacent normal tissue were examined in this study. NOB1 protein expression in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Real-time PCR was used to detect NOB1 mRNA expression, which provided a basis on which to explore the clinical pathological characteristics for patients with gastric cancer. Results show that NOB1 protein in gastric cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue were diffusely expressed both in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The positive expression rate in gastric cancer tissue was 73%, higher than that in adjacent normal tissue (47%). Both the reference NAPDH and NOB1 amplification are reflected in the amplification curve in standard S-shape and the unimodal solubility curve which was not altered by non-specific amplification and primer dimer. NOB1 mRNA relative expression in cancer tissue was 4.899∓1.412. NOB1 expression had no direct relationship with the patients’ age, gender, tumor differentiation or infiltration degree, lymphatic metastasis, distant metastasis nor pTNM periodization, but was directly related to the size of the tumor. All the findings in this paper suggest that NOB1 can be one of the focuses for diagnosing and treating gastric cancer and that its protein expression is likely to increase with the growth of tumor, thus playing a great role in the incidence and development of gastric cancer.

  16. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (P<0.01). This expression was found to increase approximately 3.5 and 2.1 fold for mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Spearman test indicated a significant correlation between DDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients.

  17. Quantification of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor in colonic carcinoma and normal adjacent colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, H; Bohe, M; Jönsson, P; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To measure the content of immunoreactive human pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (irPSTI) in colonic carcinoma and adjacent normal colonic mucosa. METHODS: From a stable hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibodies specific for human PSTI, a specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human PSTI was developed. In a precipitation assay system these antibodies bound human PSTI in a dose-dependent manner. The specimens were obtained from resectional surgery. RESULTS: The content of irPSTI was 19.9 micrograms/g protein (0.55 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) in colonic carcinoma. In adjacent normal colonic mucosa 43.6 micrograms/g protein (1.12 micrograms/g tissue wet weight) was shown. CONCLUSIONS: The enzymatic degradation of surrounding tissue necessary for tumour cell invasion could be facilitated by this relative deficit of the inhibitor in infiltrative carcinoma. PMID:1479031

  18. Importance of HOX genes in normal prostate gland formation, prostate cancer development and its early detection.

    PubMed

    Javed, Saqib; Langley, Stephen E M

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this paper were to review the published literature on the role of HOX genes in the development of the normal prostate gland and in prostate cancer and to discuss the potential role of the HOX family member, Engrailed-2 (EN2), as a diagnostic test of PCa. Hox genes were first described in the fruit fly Drosphila melanogaster, where they specify the body plan and control the formation of body segments. They belong to a family of homeodomain-containing transcription factors that determine cell and tissue identity during normal embryonic development. They have been shown to be re-expressed by several different types of cancers. Studies have shown that different Hox genes are responsible for the development of the separate lobes of the prostate gland, the seminal vesicles and the epididymis. All HOX13 paralogues are expressed in the adult human prostate, suggesting the possibility of similarities between the function and expression of HOX genes within urological structures at similar anterior-posterior positions. The oncogenic and tumour suppressor signalling pathways associated with PCa converge on the HOX gene network, which ultimately controls gene expression, affecting tumour formation and metastatic progression. The Engrailed genes (EN1 and EN2) from the HOX gene family show a very high degree of functional conservation during embryonic development. Urinary EN2 is being investigated as a potential diagnostic marker of early PCa. It is secreted into the urine by PCa cells but not by normal prostatic tissue. A recent study has shown an association between urinary EN2 levels and cancer volume in radical prostatectomy specimens. The ability to predict tumour volume could inform the treatment decision-making process for patients with localized PCa choosing between active surveillance and radical treatment options.

  19. Screening of the residual normal ovarian tissue adjacent to orthotopic epithelial ovarian carcinomas in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G H; Wang, S T; Yao, M Z; Cai, J H; Chen, C Y; Yang, Z X; Hong, L; Yang, S Y

    2014-04-16

    The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility and methods of screening the residual normal ovarian tissue adjacent to orthotopic ovarian carcinomas in nude mice. Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR3) were subcutaneously implanted for a tumor source and ovarian orthotopic transplantation. The cancer tissue, proximal paraneoplastic tissue, middle paraneoplastic tissue, remote paraneoplastic tissue, and normal ovarian tissue were removed. CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 expression was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We obtained 35 paraneoplastic residual ovarian tissues with normal biopsies from 40 cases of an orthotopic epithelial ovarian carcinoma model (87.5%). CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 expression was lower in proximal paraneoplastic tissue than in cancer tissue (P < 0.05) and higher than in middle and remote paraneoplastic tissue (P < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the expression of these genes in middle and proximal paraneoplastic tissue as well as among residual normal ovarian tissues with different severity (P > 0.05). In ovarian tissues of 20 normal nude mice, the expression of CK- 7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, and TIMP-2 was negative. Overall, the expression levels of CK-7, CA125, p53, survivin, MMP-2, TIMP-2, and other molecular markers showed a decreasing trend in the non-cancer tissue direction. The expression levels can be used as standards to screen residual normal ovarian tissue. We can obtain relatively safe normal ovarian tissues adjacent to epithelial ovarian cancer.

  20. PATE, a gene expressed in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis, identified by a functional genomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Tapan K.; Maitra, Rangan; Iavarone, Carlo; Salvatore, Giuliana; Kumar, Vasantha; Vincent, James J.; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; Duray, Paul; Lee, B. K.; Pastan, Ira

    2002-03-01

    To identify target antigens for prostate cancer therapy, we have combined computer-based screening of the human expressed sequence tag database and experimental expression analysis to identify genes that are expressed in normal prostate and prostate cancer but not in essential human tissues. Using this approach, we identified a gene that is expressed specifically in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis. The gene has a 1.5-kb transcript that encodes a protein of 14 kDa. We named this gene PATE (expressed in prostate and testis). In situ hybridization shows that PATE mRNA is expressed in the epithelial cells of prostate cancers and in normal prostate. Transfection of the PATE cDNA with a Myc epitope tag into NIH 3T3 cells and subsequent cell fractionation analysis shows that the PATE protein is localized in the membrane fraction of the cell. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of PATE shows that it has structural similarities to a group of proteins known as three-finger toxins, which includes the extracellular domain of the type transforming growth factor receptor. Restricted expression of PATE makes it a potential candidate for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  1. Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Protein Expression in Normal and Neoplastic Prostatic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, M.; Galia, A.; Fraggetta, F.; La Corte, C.; Pepe, P.; La Vignera, S.; Improta, G.; Bosco, P.; Calogero, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    A genetic background has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Protein microarrays have enabled the identification of proteins, some of which associated with apoptosis, that may play a role in the development of such a tumor. Inhibition of apoptosis is a co-factor that contributes to the onset and progression of prostate cancer, though the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene is required for translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Hence, it is involved in programmed cell death. Different PARP-1 gene expression has been observed in various tumors such as glioblastoma, lung, ovarian, endometrial, and skin cancers. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in prostatic cancer and normal prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry in 40 men with prostate cancer and in 37 normal men. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples (normal prostate and prostate cancer tissues). No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. PARP-1-positive cells resulted significantly higher in patients with prostate carcinoma compared with controls (P<0.001). PARP-1 over-expression in prostate cancer tissue compared with normal prostate suggests a greater activity of PARP-1 in these tumors. These findings suggest that PARP-1 expression in prostate cancer is an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this type of tumor similarly to what reported in other cancers. PMID:23807292

  2. Characterization of Desmoglein Expression in the Normal Prostatic Gland. Desmoglein 2 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Alison G.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Christiano, Angela M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The expression of desmogleins (DSGs), which are known to be crucial for establishing and maintaining the cell-cell adhesion required for tissue integrity, has been well characterized in the epidermis and hair follicle; however, their expression in other epithelial tissues such as prostate is poorly understood. Although downregulation of classical cadherins, such as E-cadherin, has been described in prostate cancer tissue samples, the expression of desmogleins has only been previously reported in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study we characterized desmoglein expression in normal prostate tissues, and further investigated whether Desmoglein 2 (DSG2) expression specifically can serve as a potential clinical prognostic factor for patients diagnosed with primary prostate cancer. Experimental Design We utilized immunofluorescence to examine DSG2 expression in normal prostate (n = 50) and in a clinically well-characterized cohort of prostate cancer patients (n = 414). Correlation of DSG2 expression with clinico-pathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence was analyzed to assess its clinical significance. Results These studies revealed that DSG2 and DSG4 were specifically expressed in prostatic luminal cells, whereas basal cells lack their expression. In contrast, DSG1 and DSG3 were not expressed in normal prostate epithelium. Further analyses of DSG2 expression in prostate cancer revealed that reduced levels of this biomarker were a significant independent marker of poor clinical outcome. Conclusion Here we report for the first time that a low DSG2 expression phenotype is a useful prognostic biomarker of tumor aggressiveness and may serve as an aid in identifying patients with clinically significant prostate cancer. PMID:24896103

  3. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J.; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication

  4. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antczak, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  5. Prostate size correlates with fasting blood glucose in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok Joong; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2011-09-01

    We evaluated the correlations between BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, testosterone level, insulin resistance, and prostate size in non-diabetic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with normal testosterone levels. Data from 212 non-diabetic BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) due to medical treatment failure, were evaluated retrospectively. Patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels of ≥ 3 ng/mL underwent multicore transrectal prostate biopsy before TURP to rule out prostate cancer. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) or serum testosterone levels of < 3.50 ng/mL were excluded from analysis. Correlations between clinical and laboratory parameters were determined. Prostate size correlated positively with age (r = 0.227, P < 0.001), PSA (r = 0.510, P < 0.001), and fasting glucose level (r = 0.186, P = 0.007), but not with BMI, testosterone, insulin level, or insulin resistance (each P > 0.05). Testosterone level inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.327, P < 0.001), insulin level (r = -0.207, P = 0.003), and insulin resistance (r = -0.221, P = 0.001), but not with age, prostate size, PSA, or fasting glucose level (each P > 0.05). Upon multiple adjusted linear regression analysis, prostate size correlated with elevated PSA (P < 0.001) and increased fasting glucose levels (P = 0.023). In non-DM BPH patients with normal testosterone levels, fasting glucose level is an independent risk factor for prostate hyperplasia.

  6. Heterogeneous patterns of DNA methylation-based field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Mia; Strand, Siri Hundtofte; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Haldrup, Christa; Borre, Michael; Høyer, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis is based on histological evaluation of prostate needle biopsies, which have high false negative rates. Here, we investigated if cancer-associated epigenetic field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue may be used to increase sensitivity for PC. We focused on nine genes (AOX1, CCDC181 (C1orf114), GABRE, GAS6, HAPLN3, KLF8, MOB3B, SLC18A2, and GSTP1) known to be hypermethylated in PC. Using quantitative methylation-specific PCR, we analysed 66 malignant and 134 non-malignant tissue samples from 107 patients, who underwent ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (67 patients had at least one cancer-positive biopsy, 40 had exclusively cancer-negative biopsies). Hypermethylation was detectable for all genes in malignant needle biopsy samples (AUC: 0.80 to 0.98), confirming previous findings in prostatectomy specimens. Furthermore, we identified a four-gene methylation signature (AOX1xGSTP1xHAPLN3xSLC18A2) that distinguished histologically non-malignant biopsies from patients with vs. without PC in other biopsies (AUC = 0.65; sensitivity = 30.8%; specificity = 100%). This signature was validated in an independent patient set (59 PC, 36 adjacent non-malignant, and 9 normal prostate tissue samples) analysed on Illumina 450 K methylation arrays (AUC = 0.70; sensitivity = 40.6%; specificity = 100%). Our results suggest that a novel four-gene signature may be used to increase sensitivity for PC diagnosis through detection of epigenetic field effects in histologically non-malignant prostate tissue samples. PMID:28084441

  7. Heterogeneous patterns of DNA methylation-based field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Møller, Mia; Strand, Siri Hundtofte; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Haldrup, Christa; Borre, Michael; Høyer, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard

    2017-01-13

    Prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis is based on histological evaluation of prostate needle biopsies, which have high false negative rates. Here, we investigated if cancer-associated epigenetic field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue may be used to increase sensitivity for PC. We focused on nine genes (AOX1, CCDC181 (C1orf114), GABRE, GAS6, HAPLN3, KLF8, MOB3B, SLC18A2, and GSTP1) known to be hypermethylated in PC. Using quantitative methylation-specific PCR, we analysed 66 malignant and 134 non-malignant tissue samples from 107 patients, who underwent ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (67 patients had at least one cancer-positive biopsy, 40 had exclusively cancer-negative biopsies). Hypermethylation was detectable for all genes in malignant needle biopsy samples (AUC: 0.80 to 0.98), confirming previous findings in prostatectomy specimens. Furthermore, we identified a four-gene methylation signature (AOX1xGSTP1xHAPLN3xSLC18A2) that distinguished histologically non-malignant biopsies from patients with vs. without PC in other biopsies (AUC = 0.65; sensitivity = 30.8%; specificity = 100%). This signature was validated in an independent patient set (59 PC, 36 adjacent non-malignant, and 9 normal prostate tissue samples) analysed on Illumina 450 K methylation arrays (AUC = 0.70; sensitivity = 40.6%; specificity = 100%). Our results suggest that a novel four-gene signature may be used to increase sensitivity for PC diagnosis through detection of epigenetic field effects in histologically non-malignant prostate tissue samples.

  8. Identification of structural and secretory lectin-binding glycoproteins of normal and cancerous human prostate.

    PubMed

    Lad, P M; Cooper, J F; Learn, D B; Olson, C V

    1984-12-07

    We have utilized the technique of lectin-loading of SDS gels with iodinated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin to identify glycoproteins in prostatic and seminal fluids as well as in prostate tissue fractions. The following subunits which bound both lectins were detected: (a) 50, 43 and 38 kDa subunits common to prostatic and seminal fluids, and an additional 55 kDa subunit which predominates only in prostatic fluid; (b) 78, 55, 50 and 43 kDa subunits in prostatic tissue cytosol and (c) 195, 170, 135, 116 and 95 kDa subunits present in the particulate fractions of prostatic tissue. Immunoblotting using specific rabbit antibodies revealed the 50 kDa band to be prostatic acid phosphatase and the 38 kDa band to be prostate-specific antigen. Interestingly, antibodies directed toward prostatic acid phosphatase were found to cross-react with the 43 kDa band. Fractionation on sucrose gradients showed that several of these particulate glycoproteins were associated with a vesicle fraction enriched in adenylate cyclase activity, implying that they are plasma membrane glycoproteins. Comparison of soluble and particulate fractions of normal and cancerous tissue homogenates was made by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms of lectin-loaded gels. Similar relative intensities of lectin-binding were obtained for corresponding proteins in normal and cancerous tissue fractions. Also, immunoblotting showed no differences in prostatic acid phosphatase or prostate-specific antigen between normal and cancerous soluble homogenate fractions. Our results suggest that major lectin-binding proteins are conserved in the transition from normal to cancerous tissue. These results may be useful in developing a multiple-marker profile of metastatic prostate cancer and for the design of imaging agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, to prominent soluble and particulate prostate glycoproteins.

  9. Notch signaling is required for normal prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-De; Leow, Ching Ching; Zha, Jiping; Tang, Zhijun; Modrusan, Zora; Radtke, Freddy; Aguet, Michel; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Notch pathway is crucial for stem/progenitor cell maintenance, growth and differentiation in a variety of tissues. Using a transgenic cell ablation approach, we found in our previous study that cells expressing Notch1 are crucial for prostate early development and re-growth. Here, we further define the role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic epithelial cell growth and differentiation using biochemical and genetic approaches in ex vivo or in vivo systems. Treatment of developing prostate grown in culture with inhibitors of gamma-secretase/presenilin, which is required for Notch cleavage and activation, caused a robust increase in proliferation of epithelial cells co-expressing cytokeratin 8 and 14, lack of luminal/basal layer segregation and dramatically reduced branching morphogenesis. Using conditional Notch1 gene deletion mouse models, we found that inactivation of Notch1 signaling resulted in profound prostatic alterations, including increased tufting, bridging and enhanced epithelial proliferation. Cells within these lesions co-expressed both luminal and basal cell markers, a feature of prostatic epithelial cells in predifferentiation developmental stages. Microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression in a number of genetic networks was altered following Notch1 gene deletion in prostate. Furthermore, expression of Notch1 and its effector Hey-1 gene in human prostate adenocarcinomas were found significantly down-regulated compared to normal control tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Notch signaling is critical for normal cell proliferation and differentiation in the prostate, and deregulation of this pathway may facilitate prostatic tumorigenesis.

  10. Differential expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) messenger RNAs and proteins in normal human prostate and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Langat, Daudi K; Sue Platt, J; Tawfik, Ossama; Fazleabas, Asgerally T; Hunt, Joan S

    2006-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a major histocompatibility complex class Ib gene expressed in normal organs and in some tumors. The glycoproteins encoded by this gene are best known for their immunosuppressive properties. Because isoform-specific expression of HLA-G in male reproductive organs has not been reported, we investigated HLA-G1, -G2, -G5, -G6 mRNAs and proteins in four-to-five samples of normal prostate glands, prostates with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate adenocarcinomas using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. All tissues contained HLA-G1, -G2, -G5 and -G6 specific mRNAs, but only HLA-G5 protein was detectable. In normal prostate glands, HLA-G5 protein was prominent in the cytoplasm of tubuloglandular epithelia and in glandular secretions. Staining was reduced in samples of benign prostatic hyperplasia but remained localized to the cytoplasm of glandular epithelia and secretions. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, HLA-G5 protein was detectable mainly in the secretions. Thus, HLA-G5 but not HLA-G1, -G2 or -G6 is produced in the normal prostate and is present in prostatic secretions. In addition, normal cellular localization is disturbed in benign and malignant prostatic adenocarcinomas. The results are consistent with this molecule may influencing female immune receptivity to sperm and suggest that such immunosuppression could be disturbed in men with prostatic adenocarcinomas.

  11. Expression Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) in tumor adjacent normal breast tissue and breast tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Zárate, Alejandro; Harshfield, Benjamin J; Hu, Rong; Knoblauch, Nick; Beck, Andrew H; Hankinson, Susan E; Carey, Vincent; Tamimi, Rulla M; Hunter, David J; Quackenbush, John; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer, the majority of which are located in intergenic or intronic regions. To explore regulatory impacts of these variants we conducted expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analyses on tissue samples from 376 invasive postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) diagnosed from 1990-2004. Expression analysis was conducted on all formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (and on 264 adjacent normal samples) using the Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array. Significance and ranking of associations between tumor receptor status and expression variation was preserved between NHS FFPE and TCGA fresh-frozen sample sets (Spearman r = 0.85, p<10^-10 for 17 of the 21 Oncotype DX recurrence signature genes). At an FDR threshold of 10%, we identified 27 trans-eQTLs associated with expression variation in 217 distinct genes. SNP-gene associations can be explored using an open-source interactive browser distributed in a Bioconductor package. Using a new a procedure for testing hypotheses relating SNP content to expression patterns in gene sets, defined as molecular function pathways, we find that loci on 6q14 and 6q25 affect various gene sets and molecular pathways (FDR < 10%). Although the ultimate biological interpretation of the GWAS-identified variants remains to be uncovered, this study validates the utility of expression analysis of this FFPE expression set for more detailed integrative analyses.

  12. Expression Quantitative Trait loci (QTL) in tumor adjacent normal breast tissue and breast tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Zárate, Alejandro; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Hu, Rong; Knoblauch, Nick; Beck, Andrew H.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Carey, Vincent; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Hunter, David J.; Quackenbush, John; Hazra, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate 71 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer, the majority of which are located in intergenic or intronic regions. To explore regulatory impacts of these variants we conducted expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analyses on tissue samples from 376 invasive postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) diagnosed from 1990–2004. Expression analysis was conducted on all formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (and on 264 adjacent normal samples) using the Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array. Significance and ranking of associations between tumor receptor status and expression variation was preserved between NHS FFPE and TCGA fresh-frozen sample sets (Spearman r = 0.85, p<10^-10 for 17 of the 21 Oncotype DX recurrence signature genes). At an FDR threshold of 10%, we identified 27 trans-eQTLs associated with expression variation in 217 distinct genes. SNP-gene associations can be explored using an open-source interactive browser distributed in a Bioconductor package. Using a new a procedure for testing hypotheses relating SNP content to expression patterns in gene sets, defined as molecular function pathways, we find that loci on 6q14 and 6q25 affect various gene sets and molecular pathways (FDR < 10%). Although the ultimate biological interpretation of the GWAS-identified variants remains to be uncovered, this study validates the utility of expression analysis of this FFPE expression set for more detailed integrative analyses. PMID:28152060

  13. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  14. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  15. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  16. Low-Molecular-Weight Hydrophilic and Lipophilic Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Carcinomas and Adjacent Normal-Looking Skin.

    PubMed

    Grammenandi, Konstantina; Kyriazi, Maria; Katsarou-Katsari, Alexandra; Papadopoulos, Othon; Anastassopoulou, Ioanna; Papaioannou, Georgios T; Sagriotis, Alexandros; Rallis, Michail; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight antioxidants are some of the most efficient agents of the skin defense mechanism against environmental factors, such as cosmic rays, smoke, and pollutants. The total skin concentrations of hydrophilic ascorbic and uric acids, as well as lipophilic α-tocopherol, β-carotene, and ubiquinol-10 antioxidants were determined by an HPLC-EC detector from 18 biopsies of human nonmelanoma skin carcinomas and 18 biopsies from skin areas adjacent to carcinomas. No significant differences in the concentrations of lipophilic antioxidants in both carcinomas and normal-looking skin areas adjacent to carcinomas were observed. On the contrary, ascorbic and uric acid concentrations were found to be 18 and 36% lower in carcinomas than in normal-looking skin areas, respectively. No statistical significance was observed between antioxidant concentrations and age, sex, phototype, profession, site of tumor, frequency, and time of UV light exposure either. Accordingly the antioxidant concentrations in both cancerous skin and adjacent normal-looking areas were found to be much higher than in normal skin, in contrast to literature data.

  17. Determination of optical coefficients and fractal dimensional parameters of cancerous and normal prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Al-Rubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, Swapan Kumar; Xu, Min

    2012-07-01

    Optical extinction and diffuse reflection spectra of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in the 750 to 860 nm spectral range were measured. Optical extinction measurements using thin ex vivo prostate tissue samples were used to determine the scattering coefficient (μ(s)), while diffuse reflection measurements using thick prostate tissue samples were used to extract the absorption coefficient (μ(a)) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ'(s)). The anisotropy factor (g) was obtained using the extracted values of μ(s) and μ'(s). The values of fractal dimension (D(f)) of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were obtained by fitting to the wavelength dependence of μ'(s). The number of scattering particles contributing to μ(s) as a function of particle size and the cutoff diameter d(max) as a function of g were investigated using the fractal soft tissue model and Mie theory. Results show that d(max) of the normal tissue is larger than that of the cancerous tissue. The cutoff diameter d(max) is observed to agree with the nuclear size for the normal tissues and the nucleolar size for the cancerous tissues. Transmission spectral polarization imaging measurements were performed that could distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue samples from the normal tissue samples based on the differences between their absorption and scattering parameters.

  18. Profiling of differential expression of messenger RNA in normal, benign, and metastatic prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Robles, Liza D; Gibson, Jane; Muroski, Megan

    2002-12-01

    To understand the phenotypic changes associated with prostate cancer development and metastasis, we investigated differential gene expression in primary and established prostate cell lines used as models. We have used a differential display of messenger RNA (DDRT-PCR) technique using 168 primer combinations and total RNA from BPH-1, LNCaP, and PC3 cells to identify filter-based cDNA microarrays containing 18,376 nonredundant clones of genes and expressed sequence tags (EST) using mRNA from PrEC and MDAPCa2a cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed in normal, benign, and cancerous prostate cell lines. Twenty-five cDNA with a significant difference in expression of 76 candidate cDNA, as identified by DDRT-PCR and confirmed by slot-blot analysis, were selected for sequence analysis. Of these, 14 cDNA were further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data showed that a variety of genes/EST were up- or down-regulated in the metastatic prostate tumor cells and a majority of these genes encode cytoskeletal proteins and proteins with regulatory function. Expression profile of two EST was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We also have identified a number of genes exhibiting differential expression in prostate cancer cells, which were not known earlier to be involved in prostate cancer. This report provides a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and a foundation to facilitate in-depth studies on the mechanism of prostate cancer development and metastasis.

  19. Role of IAPs in prostate cancer progression: immunohistochemical study in normal and pathological (benign hyperplastic, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer) human prostate

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In this study was investigate IAPs in normal human prostate (NP), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostatic carcinoma (PC), and their involvement in apoptosis/proliferation via NF-kB (TNF-α, IL-1) stimulation. Methods Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed in 10 samples of normal prostates, 35 samples of BPH, 27 samples diagnosis of PIN (with low-grade PIN or high-grade PIN) and 95 samples of PC (with low, medium or high Gleason grades). Results In NP, cytoplasm of epithelial cells were positive to c-IAP1/2 (80% of samples), c-IAP-2 (60%), ILP (20%), XIAP (20%); negative to NAIP and survivin. In BPH, epithelial cells were immunostained to c-IAP1/2 (57.57%), c-IAP-2 (57.57%), ILP (66.6%), NAIP (60.6%), XIAP (27.27%), survivin (9.1%). Whereas low-grade PIN showed intermediate results between NP and BPH; results in high-grade PIN were similar to those found in PC. In PC, epithelial cells were immunostained to c-IAP1/2, c-IAP-2, ILP, NAIP, XIAP (no Gleason variation) and survivin (increasing with Gleason). Conclusions IAPs could be involved in prostate disorder (BPH, PIN and PC) development since might be provoke inhibition of apoptosis and subsequently cell proliferation. At the same time, different transduction pathway such as IL-1/NIK/NF-kB or TNF/NF-kB (NIK or p38) also promotes proliferation. Inhibitions of IAPs, IL-1α and TNFα might be a possible target for PC treatment since IAPs are the proteins that inhibited apoptosis (favour proliferation) and IL-1α and TNFα would affect all the transduction pathway involucrate in the activation of transcription factors related to survival or proliferation (NF-kB, Elk-1 or ATF-2). PMID:20078866

  20. Near-infrared optical coefficients of tumors and adjacent normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan G.

    2001-06-01

    The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of tumours of the human breast, liver and kidney and their normal surrounding tissue have been measured in vitro for the near-infrared wavelengths between 600 and 1000 nm as well as 1064 nm. The Monte Carlo inversion technique (Simpson et al) was used to determine the optical coefficients of tissue samples from measurements of the diffuse transmittance and reflectance. The measurements of the diffusely transmitted and reflected intensities were performed using a single integrating sphere 'comparison' method. Four post-mortem samples of both liver adenocarcinoma and normal liver tissue were obtained from one subject and four samples of both tumour and normal kidney tissue were obtained from another subject. Four samples of both breast tumour and normal tissue were obtained from two patients. The scattering coefficient of tumours was found in each case to be significantly higher than that of nondiseased tissue. The absorption coefficient of tumours was generally much smaller than those of normal tissue. The scattering coefficient of tumours was 20% to 200% higher depending on the type of cancer and the wavelength, while the absorption coefficient of tumours was as much as twenty times smaller compared to normal tissue.

  1. Normal Variations of Sphenoid Sinus and the Adjacent Structures Detected in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Azadeh; Ghafari, Roshanak; AnjomShoa, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The sphenoid sinus is a common target of paranasal surgery. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is likely to endanger the anatomic variations of vital structures adjacent to the sphenoid sinus. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the variations of sphenoid sinus and the related structures by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method In this descriptive-analytic study, CBCT images of 103 patients aged above 20-years were selected (206 sides). Degree of pneumatization of sphenoid sinus, pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process, pterygoid process, protrusion of optic canal, vidian canal, and foramen rotundum, as well as prevalence of sinus septa were recorded. Examinations were performed using On-Demand software (Version 1); data were analyzed by using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant correlation between the pterygoid pneumatization and vidian canal protrusion (p< 0.001), and foramen rotundum protrusion (p< 0.001). The optic canal protrusion was found to be significantly associated with the anterior clinoid pneumatization and pterygoid process (p< 0.001). Statistically significant relationship was also observed between the carotid canal protrusion and pterygoid process pneumatization (p< 0.001). Conclusion The anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus tend to give rise to a complexity of symptoms and potentially serious complications. This variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the regional sphenoid sinus anatomy by a detailed CBCT sinus examination. PMID:26966706

  2. Evaluation of prostatic cancer prevalence in patients with prostatic-specific antigen between 4 and 10 and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Tadayon, Farhad; Arezegar, Hamid Reza; Khorrami, Mohammad Hatef; Hashemi Juzdani, Rasoul; Shahdoost, Amir Abbas; Mellat, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers. The prevalence of prostate cancer is different due to genetic and environmental factors. Diagnosis of prostate cancer is by biopsy due to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Digital Rectal Examination (DRE). Controversy about decision making for prostate biopsy in PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, is one of the problems in this time. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of prostate cancer in males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE. We also evaluated the PSA density and percent of free PSA in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, were evaluated. Then, transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) andprostate biopsy from 12 points of peripheral zone, was done. These data were analyzed by Chi-square, t-test and ANOVA and Roc curve. Results: In this study, the prevalence of prostate cancer in PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, was evaluated, 29.8%. With use of Roc curve, PSA density cutoff point was calculated 0.12 and percent of free PSA cutoff point, was calculated, 18%. Conclusion: In males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, PSA density smaller than 0.12-0.15, and percent of free PSA greater than 18%, the prevalence of prostate cancer is very few and we can safely ignore the TRUS and prostate biopsy in these males and eliminate its costs and side effects. PMID:27403407

  3. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  4. Identification of candidate genes for prostate cancer-risk SNPs utilizing a normal prostate tissue eQTL data set

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, S. N.; French, A. J.; McDonnell, S. K.; Cheville, J.; Middha, S.; Tillmans, L.; Riska, S.; Baheti, S.; Larson, M. C.; Fogarty, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Larson, N.; Nair, A.; O'Brien, D.; Wang, L.; Schaid, D J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified loci associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer but the associated genes are not well studied. Here we create a normal prostate tissue-specific eQTL data set and apply this data set to previously identified prostate cancer (PrCa)-risk SNPs in an effort to identify candidate target genes. The eQTL data set is constructed by the genotyping and RNA sequencing of 471 samples. We focus on 146 PrCa-risk SNPs, including all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with each risk SNP, resulting in 100 unique risk intervals. We analyse cis-acting associations where the transcript is located within 2 Mb (±1 Mb) of the risk SNP interval. Of all SNP–gene combinations tested, 41.7% of SNPs demonstrate a significant eQTL signal after adjustment for sample histology and 14 expression principal component covariates. Of the 100 PrCa-risk intervals, 51 have a significant eQTL signal and these are associated with 88 genes. This study provides a rich resource to study biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk to PrCa. PMID:26611117

  5. Normalization of T2W-MRI prostate images using Rician a priori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Guillaume; Rastgoo, Mojdeh; Massich, Joan; Vilanova, Joan C.; Walker, Paul M.; Freixenet, Jordi; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Mériaudeau, Fabrice; Martí, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is reported to be the second most frequently diagnosed cancer of men in the world. In practise, diagnosis can be affected by multiple factors which reduces the chance to detect the potential lesions. In the last decades, new imaging techniques mainly based on MRI are developed in conjunction with Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems to help radiologists for such diagnosis. CAD systems are usually designed as a sequential process consisting of four stages: pre-processing, segmentation, registration and classification. As a pre-processing, image normalization is a critical and important step of the chain in order to design a robust classifier and overcome the inter-patients intensity variations. However, little attention has been dedicated to the normalization of T2W-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) prostate images. In this paper, we propose two methods to normalize T2W-MRI prostate images: (i) based on a Rician a priori and (ii) based on a Square-Root Slope Function (SRSF) representation which does not make any assumption regarding the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the data. A comparison with the state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The normalization of the data is assessed by comparing the alignment of the patient PDFs in both qualitative and quantitative manners. In both evaluation, the normalization using Rician a priori outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  7. Comparative proteome analysis of human esophageal cancer and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yazdian–Robati, Rezvan; Ahmadi, Homa; Riahi, Maryam Matbou; Lari, Parisa; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ranking as the sixth commonest cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) represents one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. One of the main reasons for the low survival of patients with esophageal cancer is its late diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We used proteomics approach to analyze ESCC tissues with the aim of a better understanding of the malignant mechanism and searching candidate protein biomarkers for early diagnosis of esophageal cancer. The differential protein expression between cancerous and normal esophageal tissues was investigated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). Then proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) and MASCOT web based search engine. Results: We reported 4 differentially expressed proteins involved in the pathological process of esophageal cancer, such as annexinA1 (ANXA1), peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2), transgelin (TAGLN) andactin-aortic smooth muscle (ACTA2). Conclusion: In this report we have introduced new potential biomarker (ACTA2). Moreover, our data confirmed some already known markers for EC in our region. PMID:28392898

  8. Analysis of spatial heterogeneity in normal epithelium and preneoplastic alterations in mouse prostate tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, Mira; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kartasalo, Kimmo; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2017-01-01

    Cancer involves histological changes in tissue, which is of primary importance in pathological diagnosis and research. Automated histological analysis requires ability to computationally separate pathological alterations from normal tissue with all its variables. On the other hand, understanding connections between genetic alterations and histological attributes requires development of enhanced analysis methods suitable also for small sample sizes. Here, we set out to develop computational methods for early detection and distinction of prostate cancer-related pathological alterations. We use analysis of features from HE stained histological images of normal mouse prostate epithelium, distinguishing the descriptors for variability between ventral, lateral, and dorsal lobes. In addition, we use two common prostate cancer models, Hi-Myc and Pten+/− mice, to build a feature-based machine learning model separating the early pathological lesions provoked by these genetic alterations. This work offers a set of computational methods for separation of early neoplastic lesions in the prostates of model mice, and provides proof-of-principle for linking specific tumor genotypes to quantitative histological characteristics. The results obtained show that separation between different spatial locations within the organ, as well as classification between histologies linked to different genetic backgrounds, can be performed with very high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:28317907

  9. The identification of trans-associations between prostate cancer GWAS SNPs and RNA expression differences in tumor-adjacent stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; McClelland, Michael; Jia, Zhenyu; Rahmatpanah, Farah B.; Sawyers, Anne; Trent, Jeffrey; Duggan, David; Mercola, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Here we tested the hypothesis that SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk, might differentially affect RNA expression in prostate cancer stroma. The most significant 35 SNP loci were selected from Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies of ~40,000 patients. We also selected 4030 transcripts previously associated with prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. eQTL analysis was carried out by a modified BAYES method to analyze the associations between the risk variants and expressed transcripts jointly in a single model. We observed 47 significant associations between eight risk variants and the expression patterns of 46 genes. This is the first study to identify associations between multiple SNPs and multiple in trans gene expression differences in cancer stroma. Potentially, a combination of SNPs and associated expression differences in prostate stroma may increase the power of risk assessment for individuals, and for cancer progression. PMID:25638161

  10. Proteolytic cleavage and truncation of NDRG1 in human prostate cancer cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghalayini, Mohammad K.; Dong, Qihan; Richardson, Des R.; Assinder, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    NDRG1 (N-myc downstream regulated gene-1) is a metastasis suppressor that is down-regulated in prostate cancer. NDRG1 phosphorylation is associated with inhibition of metastasis and Western blots indicate two bands at ~41 and ~46 kDa. Previous investigations by others suggest the higher band is due to NDRG1 phosphorylation. However, the current study using a dephosphorylation assay and the Phos-tag (phosphate-binding tag) SDS/PAGE assay, demonstrated that the 46 kDa NDRG1 protein band was not due to phosphorylation. Further experiments showed that the NDRG1 protein bands were not affected upon glycosidase treatment, despite marked effects of these enzymes on the glycosylated protein, fetuin. Analysis using RT–PCR (reverse transcriptase–PCR) demonstrated only a single amplicon, and thus, the two bands could not result from an alternatively spliced NDRG1 transcript. Western-blot analysis of prostate cancer cell lysates identified the 41 kDa band to be a truncated form of NDRG1, with MS confirming the full and truncated proteins to be NDRG1. Significantly, this truncated protein was not present in normal human PrECs (prostate epithelial cells). Western-blot analysis using anti-NDRG1 raised to its N-terminal sequence failed to detect the truncated protein, suggesting that it lacked N-terminus amino acids (residues 1–49). Sequence analysis predicted a pseudotrypsin protease cleavage site between Cys49–Gly50. Such cleavage of NDRG1 in cancer cells may result in loss of NDRG1 tumour suppressive activity. PMID:23634903

  11. Proteolytic cleavage and truncation of NDRG1 in human prostate cancer cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghalayini, Mohammad K; Dong, Qihan; Richardson, Des R; Assinder, Stephen J

    2013-06-11

    NDRG1 (N-myc downstream regulated gene-1) is a metastasis suppressor that is down-regulated in prostate cancer. NDRG1 phosphorylation is associated with inhibition of metastasis and Western blots indicate two bands at ~41 and ~46 kDa. Previous investigations by others suggest the higher band is due to NDRG1 phosphorylation. However, the current study using a dephosphorylation assay and the Phos-tag (phosphate-binding tag) SDS/PAGE assay, demonstrated that the 46 kDa NDRG1 protein band was not due to phosphorylation. Further experiments showed that the NDRG1 protein bands were not affected upon glycosidase treatment, despite marked effects of these enzymes on the glycosylated protein, fetuin. Analysis using RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-PCR) demonstrated only a single amplicon, and thus, the two bands could not result from an alternatively spliced NDRG1 transcript. Western-blot analysis of prostate cancer cell lysates identified the 41 kDa band to be a truncated form of NDRG1, with MS confirming the full and truncated proteins to be NDRG1. Significantly, this truncated protein was not present in normal human PrECs (prostate epithelial cells). Western-blot analysis using anti-NDRG1 raised to its N-terminal sequence failed to detect the truncated protein, suggesting that it lacked N-terminus amino acids (residues 1-49). Sequence analysis predicted a pseudotrypsin protease cleavage site between Cys49-Gly50. Such cleavage of NDRG1 in cancer cells may result in loss of NDRG1 tumour suppressive activity.

  12. Comparison study of distinguishing cancerous and normal prostate epithelial cells by confocal and polarization diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenhuan; Lu, Jun Qing; Yang, Li V.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Accurate classification of malignant cells from benign ones can significantly enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis by detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We have investigated two approaches of quantitative morphology and polarization diffraction imaging on two prostate cell types to evaluate their feasibility as single-cell assay methods toward CTC detection after cell enrichment. The two cell types have been measured by a confocal imaging method to obtain their three-dimensional morphology parameters and by a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method to obtain image texture parameters. The support vector machine algorithm was applied to examine the accuracy of cell classification with the morphology and diffraction image parameters. Despite larger mean values of cell and nuclear sizes of the cancerous prostate cells than the normal ones, it has been shown that the morphologic parameters cannot serve as effective classifiers. In contrast, accurate classification of the two prostate cell types can be achieved with high classification accuracies on measured data acquired separately in three measurements. These results provide strong evidence that the p-DIFC method has the potential to yield morphology-related "fingerprints" for accurate and label-free classification of the two prostate cell types.

  13. In vitro synthesis of immunoglobulins, secretory component and complement in normal and pathological skin and the adjacent mucous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai A Fat, R. F. M.; Suurmond, D.; Van Furth, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study on the synthesis of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, and IgE), secretory component and complement in normal and pathological skin and in the adjacent mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal, oral and vaginal mucosa) is reported. The results are based on the culture of tissue samples in a medium with two radioactive amino acids and the detection of synthesized proteins by autoradiography of the immunoelectrophoretic pattern of the culture fluid, except in the case of IgE for which the Ouchterlony technique was used. The results indicate that the normal skin does not synthesize immunoglobulins, whereas normal mucous membranes produce IgG and IgA. In the lesions of various skin diseases immunoglobulins are synthesized, mainly IgG but sometimes also IgA and IgE. The cells responsible for the production of immunoglobulins are plasma cells and lymphoid cells present in the skin lesions and mucous membranes. Synthesis of the free secretory component could be demonstrated only in certain mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal mucosa, and oral mucosa). Complement (C3) synthesis was found in normal skin, mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal and oral mucosa), and in the lesions of such skin diseases as discoid lupus erythematosus, (bullous) pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis, malignant reticulosis, eczema and lichen planus. Complement production was also demonstrated in allergic skin reactions (i.e. tissue from allergic-positive patch tests, positive Mantoux tests and drug eruptions), but no immunoglobulin synthesis was detected in these lesions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4199092

  14. Viscoelastic properties of normal and cancerous human breast cells are affected differently by contact to adjacent cells.

    PubMed

    Schierbaum, Nicolas; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2017-04-07

    Malignant transformation drastically alters the mechanical properties of the cell and its response to the surrounding cellular environment. We studied the influence of the physical contact between adjacent cells in an epithelial monolayer on the viscoelastic behavior of normal MCF10A, non-invasive cancerous MCF7, and invasive cancerous MDA-MB-231 human breast cells. Using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging technique termed force clamp force mapping (FCFM) to record images of the viscoelastic material properties of sparse and confluent cells, we found that normal MCF10A cells are stiffer and have a lower fluidity when at confluent than at sparse density. Contrarily, cancerous MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells do not stiffen and do not decrease their fluidity when progressing from sparse to confluent density. The behavior of normal MCF10A cells appears to be governed by the formation of stable cell-cell contacts, because their disruption with a calcium-chelator (EGTA) causes the stiffness and fluidity values to return to those at sparse density. In contrast, EGTA-treatment of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells does not change their viscoelastic properties. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the change of the viscoelastic behavior in MCF10A cells when going from sparse to confluent density is accompanied by a remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton into thick stress fiber bundles, while in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells the actin cytoskeleton is only composed of thin and short fibers, regardless of cell density. While the observed behavior of normal MCF10A cells might be crucial for providing mechanical stability and thus in turn integrity of the epithelial monolayer, the dysregulation of this behavior in cancerous MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is possibly a central aspect of cancer progression in the epithelium.

  15. Markers of fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Mai, Minh; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Vo, Phung; Butler, Kimberly S.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a field of genetically altered but histologically normal tissue extends 1 cm or more from the margins of human breast tumors. The extent, composition and biological significance of this field are only partially understood, but the molecular alterations in affected cells could provide mechanisms for limitless replicative capacity, genomic instability and a microenvironment that supports tumor initiation and progression. We demonstrate by microarray, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry a signature of differential gene expression that discriminates between patient-matched, tumor-adjacent histologically normal breast tissues located 1 cm and 5 cm from the margins of breast adenocarcinomas (TAHN-1 and TAHN-5, respectively). The signature includes genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, wound healing, fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts, which are mediators of wound healing and fibrosis, and intra-lobular fibroblasts expressing MMP2, SPARC, TGF-β3, which are inducers of EMT, were both prevalent in TAHN-1 tissues, sparse in TAHN-5 tissues, and absent in normal tissues from reduction mammoplasty. Accordingly, EMT markers S100A4 and vimentin were elevated in both luminal and myoepithelial cells, and EMT markers α-smooth muscle actin and SNAIL were elevated in luminal epithelial cells of TAHN-1 tissues. These results identify cellular processes that are differentially activated between TAHN-1 and TAHN-5 breast tissues, implicate myofibroblasts as likely mediators of these processes, provide evidence that EMT is occurring in histologically normal tissues within the affected field and identify candidate biomarkers to investigate whether or how field cancerization contributes to the development of primary or recurrent breast tumors. PMID:21105047

  16. Iterative normalization method for improved prostate cancer localization with multispectral magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Samil Yetik, Imam

    2012-04-01

    Use of multispectral magnetic resonance imaging has received a great interest for prostate cancer localization in research and clinical studies. Manual extraction of prostate tumors from multispectral magnetic resonance imaging is inefficient and subjective, while automated segmentation is objective and reproducible. For supervised, automated segmentation approaches, learning is essential to obtain the information from training dataset. However, in this procedure, all patients are assumed to have similar properties for the tumor and normal tissues, and the segmentation performance suffers since the variations across patients are ignored. To conquer this difficulty, we propose a new iterative normalization method based on relative intensity values of tumor and normal tissues to normalize multispectral magnetic resonance images and improve segmentation performance. The idea of relative intensity mimics the manual segmentation performed by human readers, who compare the contrast between regions without knowing the actual intensity values. We compare the segmentation performance of the proposed method with that of z-score normalization followed by support vector machine, local active contours, and fuzzy Markov random field. Our experimental results demonstrate that our method outperforms the three other state-of-the-art algorithms, and was found to have specificity of 0.73, sensitivity of 0.69, and accuracy of 0.79, significantly better than alternative methods.

  17. Equivalent normalized total dose estimates in cyberknife radiotherapy dose delivery in prostate cancer hypofractionation regimens.

    PubMed

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Mahadev, P; Velmurugan, J

    2012-04-01

    As the α/β value of prostate is very small and lower than the surrounding critical organs, hypofractionated radiotherapy became a vital mode of treatment of prostate cancer. Cyberknife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) treatment for localized prostate cancer is performed in hypofractionated dose regimen alone. Effective dose escalation in the hypofractionated regimen can be estimated if the corresponding conventional 2 Gy per fraction equivalent normalized total dose (NTD) distribution is known. The present study aims to analyze the hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of equivalent NTD. Randomly selected 12 localized prostate cases treated in cyberknife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. The 2 Gy per fraction equivalent NTDs were calculated using the formula derived from the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Dose distributions were analyzed with the corresponding NTDs. The conformity index for the prescribed target dose of 36.25 Gy equivalent to the NTD dose of 90.63 Gy (α/β = 1.5) or 74.31 Gy (α/β = 3) was ranging between 1.15 and 1.73 with a mean value of 1.32 ± 0.15. The D5% of the target was 111.41 ± 8.66 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 90.15 ± 6.57 Gy for α/β = 3. Similarly, the D95% was 91.98 ± 3.77 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 75.35 ± 2.88 Gy for α/β = 3. The mean values of bladder and rectal volume receiving the prescribed dose of 36.25 Gy were 0.83 cm3 and 0.086 cm3, respectively. NTD dose analysis shows an escalated dose distribution within the target for low α/β (1.5 Gy) with reasonable sparing of organs at risk. However, the higher α/β of prostate (3 Gy) is not encouraging the fact of dose escalation in cyberknife hypofractionated dose regimen of localized prostate cancer.

  18. Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (controversial) leukocytes or bacteria in the expressed prostatic secretions. Despite these diagnostic criteria, the etiology of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is unknown. While this review covers the entire spectrum of microbially caused acute prostatitis (including common and uncommon bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) and microbially associated chronic prostatitis, a special focus has been given to chronic idiopathic prostatitis. The idiopathic syndrome is commonly diagnosed in men but is poorly treated. Recent data convincingly suggests a possible bacterial etiology for the condition. Provocative molecular studies have been published reporting the presence of 16S rRNA bacterial sequences in prostate biopsy tissue that is negative for ordinary bacteria by routine culture in men with chronic idiopathic prostatitis. Additionally, special culture methods have indicated that difficult-to-culture coryneforms and coagulase-negative staphylococci are present in expressed prostatic secretions found to be negative by routine culture techniques. Treatment failures are not uncommon in chronic prostatitis. Literature reports suggest that antimicrobial treatment failures in chronic idiopathic prostatitis caused by organisms producing extracellular slime might result from the virulent properties of coagulase-negative staphylococci or other bacteria. While it is difficult to definitively extrapolate from animal models, antibiotic pharmokinetic studies with a murine model have

  19. Breast Field Cancerization: Isolation and Comparison of Telomerase-Expressing Cells in Tumor and Tumor Adjacent, Histologically Normal Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Hines, William C.; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase stabilizes chromosomes by maintaining telomere length, immortalizes mammalian cells, and is expressed in more than 90% of human tumors. However, the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is not restricted to tumor cells. We have previously shown that a subpopulation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in tumor-adjacent, histologically normal (TAHN) breast tissues expresses hTERT mRNA at levels comparable with levels in breast tumors. In the current study, we first validated a reporter for measuring levels of hTERT promoter activity in early-passage HMECs and then used this reporter to compare hTERT promoter activity in HMECs derived from tumor and paired TAHN tissues 1, 3, and 5 cm from the tumor (TAHN-1, TAHN-3, and TAHN-5, respectively). Cell sorting, quantitative real-time PCR, and microarray analyses showed that the 10% of HMECs with the highest hTERT promoter activity in both tumor and TAHN-1 tissues contain more than 95% of hTERT mRNA and overexpress many genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. The percentage of HMECs within this subpopulation showing high hTERT promoter activity was significantly reduced or absent in TAHN-3 and TAHN-5 tissues. We conclude that the field of normal tissue proximal to the breast tumors contains a population of HMECs similar in hTERT expression levels and in gene expression to the HMECs within the tumor mass and that this population is significantly reduced in tissues more distal to the tumor. PMID:21775421

  20. Fully automated prostate segmentation in 3D MR based on normalized gradient fields cross-correlation initialization and LOGISMOS refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yin; Fotin, Sergei V.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Cornud, François; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Manual delineation of the prostate is a challenging task for a clinician due to its complex and irregular shape. Furthermore, the need for precisely targeting the prostate boundary continues to grow. Planning for radiation therapy, MR-ultrasound fusion for image-guided biopsy, multi-parametric MRI tissue characterization, and context-based organ retrieval are examples where accurate prostate delineation can play a critical role in a successful patient outcome. Therefore, a robust automated full prostate segmentation system is desired. In this paper, we present an automated prostate segmentation system for 3D MR images. In this system, the prostate is segmented in two steps: the prostate displacement and size are first detected, and then the boundary is refined by a shape model. The detection approach is based on normalized gradient fields cross-correlation. This approach is fast, robust to intensity variation and provides good accuracy to initialize a prostate mean shape model. The refinement model is based on a graph-search based framework, which contains both shape and topology information during deformation. We generated the graph cost using trained classifiers and used coarse-to-fine search and region-specific classifier training. The proposed algorithm was developed using 261 training images and tested on another 290 cases. The segmentation performance using mean DSC ranging from 0.89 to 0.91 depending on the evaluation subset demonstrates state of the art performance. Running time for the system is about 20 to 40 seconds depending on image size and resolution.

  1. Investigation of scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues using Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Wang, Wubao

    2014-02-01

    The scattering coefficient, μs, the anisotropy factor, g, the scattering phase function, p(θ), and the angular dependence of scattering intensity distributions of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues were systematically investigated as a function of wavelength, scattering angle and scattering particle size using Mie theory and experimental parameters. The Matlab-based codes using Mie theory for both spherical and cylindrical models were developed and applied for studying the light propagation and the key scattering properties of the prostate tissues. The optical and structural parameters of tissue such as the index of refraction of cytoplasm, size of nuclei, and the diameter of the nucleoli for cancerous and normal human prostate tissues obtained from the previous biological, biomedical and bio-optic studies were used for Mie theory simulation and calculation. The wavelength dependence of scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor were investigated in the wide spectral range from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The scattering particle size dependence of μs, g, and scattering angular distributions were studied for cancerous and normal prostate tissues. The results show that cancerous prostate tissue containing larger size scattering particles has more contribution to the forward scattering in comparison with the normal prostate tissue. In addition to the conventional simulation model that approximately considers the scattering particle as sphere, the cylinder model which is more suitable for fiber-like tissue frame components such as collagen and elastin was used for developing a computation code to study angular dependence of scattering in prostate tissues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to deal with both spherical and cylindrical scattering particles in prostate tissues.

  2. Normal canine prostate gland: repeatability, reproducibility, observer-dependent variability of ultrasonographic measurements of the prostate in healthy intact beagles.

    PubMed

    Leroy, C; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Deviers, A; Sautet, J; Concordet, D; Mogicato, G

    2013-10-01

    Most prostatic diseases in dogs are associated with prostatomegaly, and transabdominal ultrasonography has become the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of the prostate gland in the dog. The aim of the present study was to assess the reproducibility, the repeatability and interobserver variations of sonographic measurements of prostate and to determine which measurement had the lowest variability. Length and height of prostate gland were measured on longitudinal views, width of the prostate gland and height of left and right lobes of the gland on transversal views. The within-day and between-day variabilities of the prostatic parameters were determined by performing 1350 (270 length, 270 height, 270 width, 270 height of right lobe and 270 height of left lobe) examinations on ten healthy intact beagle dogs on six different days, in a two-week period (three days for the five dogs, three different days for the five others). Three observers with different levels of experience in ultrasonography performed the examinations. The lowest within-day and between-day standard deviation and coefficient of variation values were observed for the width of the prostate. The width of the gland measured on transverse frozen images seems to be the most reliable measurement for evaluating size of prostate glands in healthy dogs, although the shape, position, outline, and echogenicity of the prostate should also be assessed.

  3. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Wilder, Richard B.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and Methods One hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results Median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions Dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. PMID:26200536

  4. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  5. Analysis of the Genetic Phylogeny of Multifocal Prostate Cancer Identifies Multiple Independent Clonal Expansions in Neoplastic and Morphologically Normal Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; O’Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of on-going abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field-effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissue or between different ERG-lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases. PMID:25730763

  6. Analysis of the genetic phylogeny of multifocal prostate cancer identifies multiple independent clonal expansions in neoplastic and morphologically normal prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Colin S; Eeles, Rosalind; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Ramakrishna, Manasa; O'Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Warren, Anne Y; Foster, Christopher S; Stratton, Michael R; Whitaker, Hayley C; McDermott, Ultan; Brewer, Daniel S; Neal, David E

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer, reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of ongoing abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing, as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissues or between different ERG lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases.

  7. Widespread telomere instability in prostatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tu, LiRen; Huda, Nazmul; Grimes, Brenda R; Slee, Roger B; Bates, Alison M; Cheng, Liang; Gilley, David

    2016-05-01

    A critical function of the telomere is to disguise chromosome ends from cellular recognition as double strand breaks, thereby preventing aberrant chromosome fusion events. Such chromosome end-to-end fusions are known to initiate genomic instability via breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Telomere dysfunction and other forms of genomic assault likely result in misregulation of genes involved in growth control, cell death, and senescence pathways, lowering the threshold to malignancy and likely drive disease progression. Shortened telomeres and anaphase bridges have been reported in a wide variety of early precursor and malignant cancer lesions including those of the prostate. These findings are being extended using methods for the analysis of telomere fusions (decisive genetic markers for telomere dysfunction) specifically within human tissue DNA. Here we report that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and prostate cancer (PCa) prostate lesions all contain similarly high frequencies of telomere fusions and anaphase bridges. Tumor-adjacent, histologically normal prostate tissue generally did not contain telomere fusions or anaphase bridges as compared to matched PCa tissues. However, we found relatively high levels of telomerase activity in this histologically normal tumor-adjacent tissue that was reduced but closely correlated with telomerase levels in corresponding PCa samples. Thus, we present evidence of high levels of telomere dysfunction in BPH, an established early precursor (PIN) and prostate cancer lesions but not generally in tumor adjacent normal tissue. Our results suggest that telomere dysfunction may be a common gateway event leading to genomic instability in prostate tumorigenesis. .

  8. Altered glycosylation pattern allows the distinction between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from normal and tumor origins.

    PubMed

    Peracaula, Rosa; Tabarés, Glòria; Royle, Louise; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Rudd, Pauline M; de Llorens, Rafael

    2003-06-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a glycoprotein secreted by prostate epithelial cells. PSA is currently used as a marker of prostate carcinoma because high levels of PSA are indicative of a tumor situation. However, PSA tests still suffer from a lack of specificity to distinguish between benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer. To determine whether PSA glycosylation could provide a means of differentiating between PSA from normal and tumor origins, N-glycan characterization of PSA from seminal fluid and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP cell line) by sequencing analysis and mass spectrometry was carried out. Glycans from normal PSA (that correspond to low and high pI PSA fractions) were sialylated biantennary complex structures, half of them being disialylated in the low pI PSA fraction and mostly monosialylated in the high pI PSA. PSA from LNCaP cells was purified to homogeneity, and its glycan analysis showed a significantly different pattern, especially in the outer ends of the biantennary complex structures. In contrast to normal PSA glycans, which were sialylated, LNCaP PSA oligosaccharides were all neutral and contained a higher fucose content. In 10-15% of the structures fucose was linked alpha1-2 to galactose, forming the H2 epitope absent in normal PSA. GalNAc was increased in LNCaP glycans to 65%, whereas in normal PSA it was only present in 25% of the structures. These carbohydrate differences allow a distinction to be made between PSA from normal and tumor origins and suggest a valuable biochemical tool for diagnosis and follow-up purposes.

  9. Identification of reliable reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in oral squamous cell carcinomas compared to adjacent normal tissues in the F344 rat model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; McCormick, David L

    2016-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) induced in F344 rats by 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) demonstrate considerable phenotypic similarity to human oral cancers and the model has been widely used for carcinogenesis and chemoprevention studies. Molecular characterization of this model needs reliable reference genes (RGs) to avoid false- positive and -negative results for proper interpretation of gene expression data between tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Microarray analysis of 11 pairs of OSCC and site-matched phenotypically normal oral tissues from 4-NQO-treated rats identified 10 stably expressed genes in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p>0.5, CV<15%) that could serve as potential RGs in this model. The commonly used 27 RGs in the rat were also analyzed based on microarray data and most of them were found unsuitable for RGs in this model. Traditional RGs such as ACTB and GAPDH were significantly altered in OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues (p<0.01, n=11); however, the Hsp90ab1 was ranked as the best RG candidate and the combination of Hsp90ab1 and HPRT1 was identified by NormFinder to be a superior reference for gene normalization among the commonly used RGs. This result was also validated by RT-PCR based on the selected top RG candidate pool. These data suggest that there are no common RGs suitable for different models and RG(s) should be identified before gene expression analysis. We successfully identified Hsp90ab1 as a stable RG in 4-NQO-induced OSCC compared to adjacent normal tissues in F344 rats. The combination of two stably expressed genes may be a better option for gene normalization in tissue samples.

  10. Expression of TAK1/TAB1 expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma and adjacent normal tissues and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Li, Qiang; He, Jin-Tao; Liu, Guang-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and its activation ligand, TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1), in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and adjacent normal tissues and to analyze the relevance between TAK1 and TAB1 protein expression and the pathological features of NSCLC patients. Surgical resection NSCLC specimens were collected from 74 patients undergoing surgery in our hospital from September 2003 to July 2008; tumor-adjacent normal tissue specimens were collected as controls. All cases were pathologically confirmed after surgery, and pathological data were complete for all patients. The expression of TAK1/TAB1 proteins in NSCLC and adjacent cancer tissues was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. The correlation between TAK1/TAB1 protein expression and the clinicopathological features and outcome of NSCLC was assessed. The positive expression ratio of TAK1 in NSCLC tissue was 63.5%, which was significantly higher than that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue (31.1%). The positive expression ratio of TAB1 in NSCLC tissue was 51.4%, which was significantly higher than that in tumor-adjacent normal tissue (24.3%). Further analysis showed that positive protein expression of TAK1 and TAB1 was unrelated to patient gender, age, tumor size, degree of differentiation, and history of smoking (P>0.05) but was significantly related to clinical stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). Additionally, the expression of TAK1 as well as TAB1 was negatively related to NSCLC patient prognosis, and patients with positive protein expression had a significantly lower 5-year survival rate than those with negative protein expression (P<0.05). TAK1/TAB1 expression in NSCLC tissue is significantly increased and closely associated with patient clinical prognosis. These two proteins are likely to become new therapeutic targets for the treatment of NSCLC.

  11. Magnetization transfer and T2 quantitation in normal appearing cortical gray matter and white matter adjacent to focal abnormality in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Rakesh K; Rao, Sajja B; Chawla, Sanjeev; Husain, Mazhar; Rathore, Ram K S

    2003-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the commonest causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries with posttraumatic epilepsy and functional disability being its major sequelae. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis whether the normal appearing adjacent gray and white matter regions on T2 and T1 weighted magnetization transfer (MT) weighted images show any abnormality on quantitative imaging in patients with TBI. A total of 51 patients with TBI and 10 normal subjects were included in this study. There were significant differences in T2 and MT ratio values of T2 weighted and T1 weighted MT normal appearing gray matter regions adjacent to focal image abnormality compared to normal gray matter regions in the normal individuals as corresponding contralateral regions of the TBI patient's group (p < 0.05). However the adjoining normal appearing white matter quantitative values did not show any significant change compared to the corresponding contralateral normal white matter values. We conclude that quantitative T2 and MT ratio values provide additional abnormality in patients with TBI that is not discernable on conventional T2 weighted and T1 weighted MT imaging especially in gray matter. This additional information may be of value in overall management of these patients with TBI.

  12. Combined affinity labelling and mass spectrometry analysis of differential cell surface protein expression in normal and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Claire; Saxton, Malcolm; Akpan, Akunna; Cramer, Rainer; Masters, John R; Naaby-Hansen, Soren

    2005-09-01

    Differences in the expression of cell surface proteins between a normal prostate epithelial (1542-NP2TX) and a prostate cancer cell line (1542-CP3TX) derived from the same patient were investigated. A combination of affinity chromatographic purification of biotin-tagged surface proteins with mass spectrometry analysis identified 26 integral membrane proteins and 14 peripheral surface proteins. The findings confirm earlier reports of altered expression in prostate cancer for several cell surface proteins, including ALCAM/CD166, the Ephrin type A receptor, EGFR and the prostaglandin F2 receptor regulatory protein. In addition, several novel findings of differential expression were made, including the voltage-dependent anion selective channel proteins Porin 1 and 2, ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) and Scavenger receptor B1. Cell surface protein expression changed both qualitatively and quantitatively when the cells were grown in the presence of either or both interferon INFalpha and INFgamma. Costimulation with type I and II interferons had additive or synergistic effects on the membrane density of several, mainly peripherally attached surface proteins. Concerted upregulation of surface exposed antigens may be of benefit in immuno-adjuvant-based treatment of interferon-responsive prostate cancer. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that differences in the expression of membrane proteins between normal and prostate cancer cells are reproducibly detectable following vectorial labelling with biotin, and that detailed analysis of extracellular-induced surface changes can be achieved by combining surface-specific labelling with high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

  13. Identifying DNA Methylation Features that Underlie Prostate Cancer Disparities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In the U.S., African Americans ( AA ) are more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than European American (EA), and...after diagnosis, AA men are more likely to die from prostate cancer than EA men. We hypothesize that differences in DNA methylation patterns across...and adjacent normal tissue derived from both AA and EA individuals. We will determine if DNA methylation patterns in prostate tissue (both cancerous

  14. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  15. Cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells irradiated out-of-field.

    PubMed

    Shields, L; Vega-Carrascal, I; Singleton, S; Lyng, F M; McClean, B

    2014-11-01

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells is not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  17. Extended use of Prostate Health Index and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen in Chinese men with prostate specific antigen 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter Ka-Fung; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen-Chun; Lee, Wai-Man; Yee, Chi-Hang; Chan, Eddie Shu-Yin; Hou, See-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the extended use of Prostate Health Index (PHI) and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen (%p2PSA) in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination (DRE). Materials and Methods All consecutive Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE who agreed for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 10-core prostate biopsy were recruited. Blood samples were taken immediately before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. The performances of total PSA (tPSA), %free-to-total PSA (%fPSA), %p2PSA, and PHI were compared using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic, and decision curve analyses (DCA). Results From 2008 to 2015, 312 consecutive Chinese men were included. Among them, 53 out of 312 (17.0%) men were diagnosed to have prostate cancer on biopsy. The proportions of men with positive biopsies were 6.7% in PHI<35, 22.8% in PHI 35–55, and 54.5% in PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). The area under curves (AUC) of the base model including age, tPSA and status of initial/repeated biopsy was 0.64. Adding %p2PSA and PHI to the base model improved the AUC to 0.79 (p<0.001) and 0.78 (p<0.001), respectively, and provided net clinical benefit in DCA. The positive biopsy rates of Gleason 7 or above prostate cancers were 2.2% for PHI<35, 7.9% for PHI 35–55, and 36.4% for PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). By utilizing the PHI cutoff of 35 to men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE, 57.1% (178 of 312) biopsies could be avoided. Conclusions Both PHI and %p2PSA performed well in predicting prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. The use of PHI and %p2PSA should be extended to Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE. PMID:27617315

  18. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ELASTOGRAPHY OF THE LIVER, SPLEEN, KIDNEYS, AND PROSTATE IN CLINICALLY NOR-MAL BEAGLE DOGS [corrected].

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Gahyun; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Standard ultrasonography is often insensitive for distinguishing normal vs. diseased states for canine abdominal organs. Ultrasonographic elastography is a new technique that is becoming increasingly available and may help to improve sensitivity. This study evaluated the feasibility, repeatability, and reproducibility of strain elastography of the liver, spleen, kidneys, and prostate in healthy dogs and described the elasticity of each organ using strain values and strain ratios. The reproducibility of strain elastography was excellent, and intraobserver repeatability was moderate to excellent. The strain value of each organ was not significantly different among dogs (liver = 143.38 ± 7.41, spleen = 141.04 ± 9.03, left renal cortex = 141.26 ± 7.50, right renal cortex = 145.80 ± 7.79, and prostate = 135.46 ± 5.80), except for the renal medulla (left = 51.19 ± 4.54 and right = 51.93 ± 5.09) (P < 0.05). The strain ratios for the liver, spleen, renal cortex, and prostate were similar with no significant difference (liver = 10.20 ± 1.47, spleen = 8.40 ± 1.53, left renal cortex = 9.62 ± 1.56, right renal cortex = 8.29 ± 1.63, and prostate = 8.20 ± 1.21), except for the renal medulla (left = 3.48 ± 0.68 and right = 2.95 ± 0.63) (P < 0.05). Our results indicated that strain elastography was feasible for estimating tissue stiffness in the canine liver, spleen, kidneys, and prostate. This study provides basic information for strain values and strain ratios for the liver, spleen, kidneys, and prostate in clinically normal dogs.

  19. Influence of Melatonin on the Proliferative and Apoptotic Responses of the Prostate under Normal and Hyperglycemic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Marina G.; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Bertilsson, Per-Anders; Masitéli, Viviane Sanches; Pytlowanciv, Eloisa Zanin; Taboga, Sebastião R.; Góes, Rejane M.

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor properties of melatonin (MLT) are known for prostate cancer cells. This study investigated whether MLT affects prostate maturation and interferes with tissue injuries induced by diabetes. MLT was administered to Wistar rats from 5 weeks of age in the drinking water (10 μg/kg b.w.), and diabetes was induced at the 13th week by streptozotocin (4.5 mg/100g b.w., i.p.). The animals were euthanized in the 14th and 21st weeks. MLT reduced the immunostained cells for androgen receptor (AR) by 10% in younger rats. Diabetes decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. MLT treatment impeded apoptosis (p = 0.02) and augmented proliferation (p = 0.0008) and PCNA content in prostate following long-term diabetes due to restoration of testosterone levels and expression of melatonin receptor type 1B. The effect of MLT (500 µM, 5 mM, and 10 mM) on androgen-dependent (22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) cancer cells and human prostate epithelial cells (PNTA1) under normal and hyperglycemic conditions (HG, 450 mg/dL) was analyzed. Contrary to PNTA1 and 22Rv1 cells, MLT improved the proliferation of PC3 cells in hyperglycemic medium. The combined data indicated that MLT had proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in prostate cells subjected to HG levels and it seems to involve specific MLT pathways rather than AR. PMID:26295055

  20. Computational imaging reveals shape differences between normal and malignant prostates on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Mirabela; Purysko, Andrei S.; Verma, Sadhna; Kiechle, Jonathan; Gollamudi, Jay; Ghose, Soumya; Herrmann, Karin; Gulani, Vikas; Paspulati, Raj; Ponsky, Lee; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Moses, Daniel; Shnier, Ron; Delprado, Warick; Thompson, James; Stricker, Phillip; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-01-01

    We seek to characterize differences in the shape of the prostate and the central gland (combined central and transitional zones) between men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer and men who were identified as not having prostate cancer either on account of a negative biopsy or had pelvic imaging done for a non-prostate malignancy. T2w MRI from 70 men were acquired at three institutions. The cancer positive group (PCa+) comprised 35 biopsy positive (Bx+) subjects from three institutions (Gleason scores: 6–9, Stage: T1–T3). The negative group (PCa−) combined 24 biopsy negative (Bx−) from two institutions and 11 subjects diagnosed with rectal cancer but with no clinical or MRI indications of prostate cancer (Cl−). The boundaries of the prostate and central gland were delineated on T2w MRI by two expert raters and were used to construct statistical shape atlases for the PCa+, Bx− and Cl− prostates. An atlas comparison was performed via per-voxel statistical tests to localize shape differences (significance assessed at p < 0.05). The atlas comparison revealed central gland hypertrophy in the Bx− subpopulation, resulting in significant volume and posterior side shape differences relative to PCa+ group. Significant differences in the corresponding prostate shapes were noted at the apex when comparing the Cl− and PCa+ prostates. PMID:28145532

  1. Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal Cadaveric Tissue.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Mahmoud; Elsobky, Emad; Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elhameed, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahim, Mona; Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir

    2016-12-01

    The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC) specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers. All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead, selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel, selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further work-up is needed to support this

  2. HOXC5 as a Biomarker of Disease Presence in Tumor-Associated Normal Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    cystoprostatectomies, donors, and from surgeries for BPH, benign prostatic hyperplasia . The goal of this work was to develop technologies to prepare RNA...derived from donors, from cystoprostatectomies, or from surgeries for benign prostatic hyperplasia . Taqman analysis was performed on the samples

  3. Hypoxia primes human normal prostate epithelial cells and cancer cell lines for the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) remain largely unknown. Because hypoxia stimulates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, which “primes” cells for inflammasome activation by inducing the expression of NLRP3 or AIM2 receptor and pro-IL-1β, we investigated whether hypoxia could activate the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and cancer cell lines. Here we report that hypoxia (1% O2) treatment of PrECs, prostate cell lines, and a macrophage cell line (THP-1) increased the levels of NLRP3, AIM2, and pro-IL-1β. Further, hypoxia in cells potentiated activation of the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activity. Notably, hypoxia “primed” cells for NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation through stimulation of the NF-κB activity. Our observations support the idea that hypoxia in human prostatic tumors contributes to PCI, in part, by priming cells for the activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome. PMID:27058421

  4. Immunohistochemical quantification of the cobalamin transport protein, cell surface receptor and Ki-67 in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors and in adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sysel, Annette M.; Valli, Victor E.; Bauer, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an obligate need for cobalamin (vitamin B12) to enable DNA synthesis necessary for cellular replication. This study quantified the immunohistochemical expression of the cobalamin transport protein (transcobalamin II; TCII), cell surface receptor (transcobalamin II-R; TCII-R) and proliferation protein (Ki-67) in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors, and compared these results to expression in corresponding adjacent normal tissues. All malignant tumor tissues stained positively for TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 proteins; expression varied both within and between tumor types. Expression of TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 was significantly higher in malignant tumor tissues than in corresponding adjacent normal tissues in both species. There was a strong correlation between TCII and TCII-R expression, and a modest correlation between TCII-R and Ki-67 expression in both species; a modest association between TCII and Ki-67 expression was present in canine tissues only. These results demonstrate a quantifiable, synchronous up-regulation of TCII and TCII-R expression by proliferating canine and feline malignant tumors. The potential to utilize these proteins as biomarkers to identify neoplastic tissues, streamline therapeutic options, evaluate response to anti-tumor therapy and monitor for recurrent disease has important implications in the advancement of cancer management for both human and companion animal patients. PMID:25633912

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) triggers apoptosis in normal prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexandre; Ivashchenko, Yuri; Kraft, Andrew S

    2002-02-07

    TRAIL is a pro-apoptotic cytokine believed to selectively kill cancer cells without harming normal ones. However, we found that in normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) TRAIL is capable of inducing apoptosis as efficiently as in some tumor cell lines. At the same time, TRAIL did not cause apoptosis in several other human primary cell lines: aorta smooth muscle cells, foreskin fibroblasts, and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Compared to these primary cells, PrEC were found to contain significantly fewer TRAIL receptors DcR1 and DcR2 which are not capable of conducting the apoptotic signal. This result suggests that the unusual sensitivity of PrEC to TRAIL may result from their deficiency in anti-apoptotic decoy receptors. The protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide significantly enhanced TRAIL toxicity toward PrEC as measured by tetrazolium conversion but had little or no effect on other TRAIL-induced apoptotic responses. Although cycloheximide did not further accelerate the processing of caspases 3 and 8, it significantly enhanced cleavage of the caspase 3 substrate gelsolin, indicating that in PrEC a protein(s) with a short half-life may inhibit the activity of the executioner caspases toward specific substrates. As the majority of prostate cancers are derived from epithelial cells, our data suggest the possibility that TRAIL could be a useful treatment for the early stages of prostate cancer.

  6. Loss of annexin A1 disrupts normal prostate glandular structure by inducing autocrine IL-6 signaling.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Junichi; Lau, Alice; Tyson, Darren R; Ornstein, David K

    2009-07-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) expression is commonly reduced in premalignant lesions and prostate cancer, but a causal relationship of ANAX1 loss with carcinogenesis has not been established. ANXA1 levels have been shown to inversely correlate with interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression in other cell types and IL-6 has been suggested to enhance prostate cancer initiation and promotion. To investigate whether loss of ANXA1 may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis, ANXA1 expression was reduced using RNA interference in non-tumorigenic human prostatic epithelial cells (RWPE-1/rA1). No effect on morphology, apoptosis, migration or anchorage-dependent or -independent growth was detected. However, IL-6 mRNA and secreted protein levels were elevated in RWPE-1/rA1 cells. In addition, re-expression of ANXA1 in these cells suppressed IL-6 secretion, and altering ANXA1 levels in prostate cancer cells had similar effects on IL-6. The effects of ANXA1 loss and increased IL-6 expression on prostate epithelium were examined using an assay of acinar morphogenesis in vitro. Acini formed by RWPE-1/rA1 cells had delayed luminal clearing and larger mean diameters than control cells. The RWPE-1/rA1 phenotype was recapitulated by treating control cells with recombinant IL-6 and was reversed in RWPE-1/rA1 cells by blocking IL-6 bioactivity. Taken together, these data support a direct role for decreased ANXA1 expression in prostate carcinogenesis and enhancing tumor aggressiveness via the upregulation of IL-6 expression and activity.

  7. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  8. Studies of a novel photosensitizer palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) for the treatment of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-06-01

    In this study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a novel, second generation photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide, WST09, STEBA Biotech, France), is investigated as an alternative modality in the treatment of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate and spontaneous advanced prostate cancer are used as the animal model. PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the i.v. infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug concentration, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on the PDT efficacy were studied. The prostates and adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. During the one-week to 3-month period post PDT treatment, the dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. Light irradiation delivered during drug infusion or within 15 min post drug infusion induced the similar extend of damages. PDT induced prostate lesions in both normal and cancerous prostate were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis and atrophy. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single 1-cm interstitial treatment, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating cancerous prostatic tissue. In conclusion, the second generation photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  9. Characterization of normal and malignant prostate tissue by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pezzei, Christine; Pallua, Johannes D; Schaefer, Georg; Seifarth, Christof; Huck-Pezzei, Verena; Bittner, Lukas K; Klocker, Helmut; Bartsch, Georg; Bonn, Guenther K; Huck, Christian W

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer has become one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Morphological and histomorphological evaluation of this disease is a well established technique for the cancer classification and has remained relatively unchanged since several decades, although it remains a time consuming and subjective technique, with unsatisfactory levels of inter- and intra-observer discrepancy. Novel approaches for histological recognition are necessary to identify and to investigate cancer in detail. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging has become an essential tool for the detection, identification and characterization of the molecular components of biological processes, such as those responsible for the dynamic properties of cancer progression. Major advantage of this new technique is the acquisition of local molecular expression profiles while maintaining the topographic integrity of the tissue and avoiding time-consuming extraction, purification and separation steps. By using this method it is possible to investigate the spatial distribution of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, cholesterols, nucleic acids, phospholipids and small molecules within biological systems by in situ analysis of tissue sections. We applied this technique on prostate cancer patients radical prostatectomy specimens in order to develop new tools for histomorphological analysis and the characterization of snap frozen prostate cancer tissues. As a first step, an optimization of sample preparation, tissue section thickness and IR slide material was performed. Special preparation methods for FTIR imaging are the essential requirements to maintain the spatial arrangement of compounds and avoid delocalization and degradation of the analytes. Subsequently, selected cancer samples were characterized with the prior optimized parameters and analyzed by univariate and cluster analysis. For the interpretation and calibration of the system we correlated the FTIR-images with the

  10. A PSCA Promoter Based Avian Retroviral Transgene Model of Normal and Malignant Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    found that 50 % of mice developed large hemangiomas (Figure 5). Parallel experiments with middle T injection into bladder resulted in the same large... hemangiomas . It turns out that endothelial cells are exquisitely sensitive to transformation by middle T antigen leading to hemangioma formation...very low-level expression of PSCA/TVA by prostatic endothelium resulted in hemangioma formation. We performed in situ hybridization on these tissues

  11. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  12. Changes of collagen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in human cancerous and normal prostate tissues studied using native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Tang, Guichen; Alfano, Robert R.

    2010-07-01

    The fluorescence spectra of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues obtained by the selective excitation wavelength of 340 nm were measured. The contributions of principle biochemical components to tissue fluorescence spectra were investigated using the method of multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares. The results show that there is a reduced contribution from the emission of collagen and increased contribution from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in cancerous tissues as compared with normal tissue. This difference is attributed to the changes of relative contents of NADH and collagen during cancer development. This research may present a potential native biomarker for prostate cancer detection.

  13. Immunohistochemical Expression of CD105 and TGF-β1 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adjacent Apparently Normal Oral Mucosa and its Correlation With Clinicopathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sindhu; Nayak, Ramakant; Bhat, Kishore; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Babji, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) is essential for its growth, invasion, and metastasis. This entails a shift in the balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors. CD105 and TGF-β1 are 2 such proangiogenic factors wherein CD105 exerts its angiogenic effect by binding to and modulating the TGF-β1 pathway. A total of 50 resected specimens of OSCC were considered. One tissue specimen was taken from tumor proper and another specimen from adjacent apparently normal mucosa (AANM). Both tissues were immunohistochemically stained using CD105 and TGF-β1 antibodies. The expression of each antibody was individually assessed and then compared. Pearson χ test was used for statistical comparison of expression. CD105 was significantly expressed in OSCC as compared with AANM and also correlated with increasing TNM stage. The mean microvessel density was higher in OSCC. TGF-β1 was significantly expressed in epithelium of OSCC as compared with AANM. On comparing expression of TGF-β1 and CD105, 79.54% of endothelial cells expressed positivity for both molecules. Both CD105 and TGF-β1 were increased in OSCC, although based on our results CD105 alone can be used as a prognostic marker. On the basis of immunohistochemical expression of CD105 and TGF-β1 in endothelial cells, our results demonstrate that CD105 acts as one of the receptors of TGF-β1 on endothelial cells and induces the angiogenic pathway in OSCC.

  14. Differential gene expression profiling in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma compared to the adjacent microscopically normal urothelium by microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ma, F L; Ma, X B; Han, R F; Zhang, Y B; Chang, J W

    2006-01-01

    Identifying novel and known genes that are differentially expressed in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) has important implications in understanding the biology of bladder tumorigenesis and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study we identified the differential gene expression profiles comparing tumor to the adjacent microscopically normal mucosa by manual microdissection on frozen sections. The RNAs extracted from microdissected tissues were amplified by SMART cDNA PCR technology to generate forward subtractive cDNA library by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). We obtained 376 positive clones, one hundred clones of aggressive BTCC subtracted cDNA library were selected at random and inserts were reamplified by PCR. After differential screening by reverse dot blotting, 73 positive clones, that contend inserts putatively upregulated in aggressive BTCC, were further analysed by DNA sequencing, GenBank and EST database searching. Sequencing results showed that 66 clones stand for 23 known genes and 7 clones for three new EST (Genbank number: DN236875, DN236874 and DN236873). In conclusion, microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH allowed for an efficient way to identify aggressive BTCC-specific differential expressed genes that may potentially be involved in the carcinogenesis and/or progression of aggressive BTCC. These differentially expressed genes may be of potential utility as therapeutic and diagnostic targets for aggressive BTCC.

  15. Exploring the spatial dimension of estrogen and progesterone signaling: detection of nuclear labeling in lobular epithelial cells in normal mammary glands adjacent to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comprehensive spatial assessment of hormone receptor immunohistochemistry staining in digital whole slide images of breast cancer requires accurate detection of positive nuclei within biologically relevant regions of interest. Herein, we propose a combination of automated region labeling at low resolution and subsequent detailed tissue evaluation of subcellular structures in lobular structures adjacent to breast cancer, as a proof of concept for the approach to analyze estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the spatial context of surrounding tissue. Methods Routinely processed paraffin sections of hormone receptor-negative ductal invasive breast cancer were stained for estrogen and progesterone receptor by immunohistochemistry. Digital whole slides were analyzed using commercially available image analysis software for advanced object-based analysis, applying textural, relational, and geometrical features. Mammary gland lobules were targeted as regions of interest for analysis at subcellular level in relation to their distance from coherent tumor as neighboring relevant tissue compartment. Lobule detection quality was evaluated visually by a pathologist. Results After rule set optimization in an estrogen receptor-stained training set, independent test sets (progesterone and estrogen receptor) showed acceptable detection quality in 33% of cases. Presence of disrupted lobular structures, either by brisk inflammatory infiltrate, or diffuse tumor infiltration, was common in cases with lower detection accuracy. Hormone receptor detection tended towards higher percentage of positively stained nuclei in lobules distant from the tumor border as compared to areas adjacent to the tumor. After adaptations of image analysis, corresponding evaluations were also feasible in hormone receptor positive breast cancer, with some limitations of automated separation of mammary epithelial cells from hormone receptor-positive tumor cells. Conclusions As a proof of

  16. Stem cells and the role of ETS transcription factors in the differentiation hierarchy of normal and malignant prostate epithelium.

    PubMed

    Archer, Leanne K; Frame, Fiona M; Maitland, Norman J

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer of men in the UK and accounts for a quarter of all new cases. Although treatment of localised cancer can be successful, there is no cure for patients presenting with invasive prostate cancer and there are less treatment options. They are generally treated with androgen-ablation therapies but eventually the tumours become hormone resistant and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) for which there are no further successful or curative treatments. This highlights the need for new treatment strategies. In order to prevent prostate cancer recurrence and treatment resistance, all the cell populations in a heterogeneous prostate tumour must be targeted, including the rare cancer stem cell (CSC) population. The ETS transcription factor family members are now recognised as a common feature in multiple cancers including prostate cancer; with aberrant expression, loss of tumour suppressor function, inactivating mutations and the formation of fusion genes observed. Most notably, the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is present in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and in prostate CSCs. However, the role of other ETS transcription factors in prostate cancer is less well understood. This review will describe the prostate epithelial cell hierarchy and discuss the evidence behind prostate CSCs and their inherent resistance to conventional cancer therapies. The known and proposed roles of the ETS family of transcription factors in prostate epithelial cell differentiation and regulation of the CSC phenotype will be discussed, as well as how they might be targeted for therapy.

  17. Dual-modality probe intended for prostate cancer detection combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology--discrimination of normal human prostate tissues ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, M; Jalkanen, V; Ramser, K; Ljungberg, B; Bergh, A; Lindahl, O A

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the western world. For the first time, a dual-modality probe, combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology, has been used for assessment of fresh human prostate tissue. The study investigates the potential of the dual-modality probe by testing its ability to differentiate prostate tissue types ex vivo. Measurements on four prostates show that the tactile resonance modality was able to discriminate soft epithelial tissue and stiff stroma (p < 0.05). The Raman spectra exhibited a strong fluorescent background at the current experimental settings. However, stroma could be discerned from epithelia by integrating the value of the spectral background. Combining both parameters by a stepwise analysis resulted in 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Although no cancer tissue was analysed, the results are promising for further development of the instrument and method for discriminating prostate tissues and cancer.

  18. Differential expression of metallothioneins (MTs) 1, 2, and 3 in response to zinc treatment in human prostate normal and malignant cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Lin, Shufei; Xiao, Dakai; Franklin, Renty B; Feng, Pei

    2008-01-01

    Background The disturbance of zinc homeostasis featured with a significant decrease of cellular zinc level was well documented to associate with the development and progression of human prostate malignancy. We have previously reported that zinc treatment induces prostate malignant cell apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway. Metallothionein (MT) is a major receptor/donor of zinc in the cells. However, the studies on the expression of MT in association with the prostate pathological and malignant status are very limited, and the zinc regulation of MT isoform expression in prostate cells remains elusive. The goals of this study were to define the expression of endogenous MTs, the isoforms of MT 1, 2, 3 at both messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein levels; and to investigate the zinc effect on MT expression in normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and malignant PC-3 cells, and in relevant human tissues. Cellular MT proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry, fluorescence staining and Western blot analysis; reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the MT isoform-specific mRNAs. Results Our results demonstrated a significant suppression of endogenous levels of MT1/2 in malignant PC-3 cells (95% reduction compared to the normal prostate cells) and in human adenocarcinoma tissues (73% MT1/2 negative). A moderate reduction of MT1/2 expression was observed in BPH. Zinc treatment remarkably induced MT1/2 expression in PC-3 and BPH cells, which was accordant with the restored cellular zinc level. MT 3, as a growth inhibitory factor, was detected and up-regulated by zinc mainly in BPH cells. Conclusion This study provided evidence of the association of attenuated MT1/2 with prostate tumor progression, and the zinc induction of MT1/2 expression resulting in cellular zinc restoration. The results suggest the potential of MT1/2 as a candidate biomarker for prostate cancer and the utilization of zinc in prostate

  19. Proof of Concept for Systematic Collection of Optimal Molecular Quality Anatomically Oriented Normal Prostate From Diverse Age and Race Transplant Donors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    microarray slides containing the normal prostate tissue samples were released to Drs. David Berman, Dr. Vasan Yegnasubramanian, Dr. Alan Meeker, and Dr...Ben Casero , for immunohistochemistry studies of important new potential molecular markers, with the proviso that images of each spot of the stained

  20. Preclinical studies of vascular acting photosensitizer bacteriopheophorbide for the treatment of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Luck, David; Beckers, Jill; Huang, Zheng

    2004-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with vascular acting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad), is investigated as an alternative modality for the total ablation of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate is used as the animal model. Interstitial PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer drug. The prostate and its adjacent tissues were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. At one-week post PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. Prostate lesions could be detected by MRI scan as early as 48 h post PDT. Maximum lesion size of 1.5 cm3 and 2.9 cm3 could be achieved at 50 J/cm and 100 J/cm, respectively, with interstitial treatment using a single 1-cm diffuser fiber, suggesting the Tookad-PDT is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. Pharmacokinetic studies show that the photosensitizer is cleared rapidly from the circulation. In conclusion, the novel photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat localized prostate cancer.

  1. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Oorschot, Bregje van; Hovingh, Suzanne E.; Moerland, Perry D.; Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Vrieling, Harry; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  2. Contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound for prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness: The role of normal peripheral zone time-intensity curves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Ling-Shan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Hong-Bo; Yin, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of time-intensity curves (TICs) of the normal peripheral zone (PZ) in the identification of biopsy-proven prostate nodules using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS). This study included 132 patients with 134 prostate PZ nodules. Arrival time (AT), peak intensity (PI), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC), time from peak to one half (TPH), wash in slope (WIS) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed using multivariate linear logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess whether combining nodule TICs with normal PZ TICs improved the prediction of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. The PI, AUC (p < 0.001 for both), MTT and TPH (p = 0.011 and 0.040 respectively) values of the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those of the benign nodules. Incorporating the PI and AUC values (both, p < 0.001) of the normal PZ TIC, but not the MTT and TPH values (p = 0.076 and 0.159 respectively), significantly improved the AUC for prediction of malignancy (PI: 0.784–0.923; AUC: 0.758–0.891) and assessment of cancer aggressiveness (p < 0.001). Thus, all these findings indicate that incorporating normal PZ TICs with nodule TICs in CETRUS readings can improve the diagnostic accuracy for PCa and cancer aggressiveness assessment. PMID:27929134

  3. Gene expression relationship between prostate cancer cells of Gleason 3, 4 and normal epithelial cells as revealed by cell type-specific transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer cells in primary tumors have been typed CD10-/CD13-/CD24hi/CD26+/CD38lo/CD44-/CD104-. This CD phenotype suggests a lineage relationship between cancer cells and luminal cells. The Gleason grade of tumors is a descriptive of tumor glandular differentiation. Higher Gleason scores are associated with treatment failure. Methods CD26+ cancer cells were isolated from Gleason 3+3 (G3) and Gleason 4+4 (G4) tumors by cell sorting, and their gene expression or transcriptome was determined by Affymetrix DNA array analysis. Dataset analysis was used to determine gene expression similarities and differences between G3 and G4 as well as to prostate cancer cell lines and histologically normal prostate luminal cells. Results The G3 and G4 transcriptomes were compared to those of prostatic cell types of non-cancer, which included luminal, basal, stromal fibromuscular, and endothelial. A principal components analysis of the various transcriptome datasets indicated a closer relationship between luminal and G3 than luminal and G4. Dataset comparison also showed that the cancer transcriptomes differed substantially from those of prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions Genes differentially expressed in cancer are potential biomarkers for cancer detection, and those differentially expressed between G3 and G4 are potential biomarkers for disease stratification given that G4 cancer is associated with poor outcomes. Differentially expressed genes likely contribute to the prostate cancer phenotype and constitute the signatures of these particular cancer cell types. PMID:20021671

  4. Multivariate normal tissue complication probability modeling of gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of radio-induced gastrointestinal (GI) complications is affected by several factors other than the dose to the rectum such as patient characteristics, hormonal or antihypertensive therapy, and acute rectal toxicity. Purpose of this work is to study clinical and dosimetric parameters impacting on late GI toxicity after prostate external beam radiotherapy (RT) and to establish multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced GI complications. Methods A total of 57 men who had undergone definitive RT for prostate cancer were evaluated for GI events classified using the RTOG/EORTC scoring system. Their median age was 73 years (range 53–85). The patients were assessed for GI toxicity before, during, and periodically after RT completion. Several clinical variables along with rectum dose-volume parameters (Vx) were collected and their correlation to GI toxicity was analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (Rs). Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques was applied to select model order and parameters for NTCP modeling. Model performance was evaluated through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results At a median follow-up of 30 months, 37% (21/57) patients developed G1-2 acute GI events while 33% (19/57) were diagnosed with G1-2 late GI events. An NTCP model for late mild/moderate GI toxicity based on three variables including V65 (OR = 1.03), antihypertensive and/or anticoagulant (AH/AC) drugs (OR = 0.24), and acute GI toxicity (OR = 4.3) was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.47, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.79). This three-variable model outperforms the logistic model based on V65 only (Rs = 0.28, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.69). Conclusions We propose a logistic NTCP model for late GI toxicity considering not only rectal irradiation dose but also clinical patient-specific factors. Accordingly, the risk of G1

  5. Assessment of normal tissue complications following prostate cancer irradiation: Comparison of radiation treatment modalities using NTCP models

    SciTech Connect

    Takam, Rungdham; Bezak, Eva; Yeoh, Eric E.; Marcu, Loredana

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads following several techniques for radiation treatment of prostate cancer were evaluated applying the relative seriality and Lyman models. Methods: Model parameters from literature were used in this evaluation. The treatment techniques included external (standard fractionated, hypofractionated, and dose-escalated) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy (I-125 seeds), and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (Ir-192 source). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum, bladder, and urethra retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to biological effective dose-based and equivalent dose-based DVHs, respectively, in order to account for differences in radiation treatment modality and fractionation schedule. Results: Results indicated that with hypofractionated 3D-CRT (20 fractions of 2.75 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 55 Gy), NTCP of the rectum, bladder, and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 3D-CRT using a four-field technique (32 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 3D-CRT. Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%, respectively) following the dose-escalated four-field 3D-CRT (2 Gy/fraction to total dose of 74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed treatment techniques. The average NTCP for the rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDR-BT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. Conclusions: Although brachytherapy techniques resulted in delivering larger equivalent doses to normal tissues, the corresponding NTCPs were lower than those of external beam techniques other than the urethra because of much smaller volumes irradiated to higher doses. Among analyzed normal tissues, the femoral heads were found to have the lowest probability of complications as most of their volume was irradiated to lower

  6. TRPM8 Ion Channels Differentially Modulate Proliferation and Cell Cycle Distribution of Normal and Cancer Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valero, María Ll.; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Stühmer, Walter; Viana, Félix; Pardo, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells. PMID:23251635

  7. Studies of a novel photosensitizer Pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) for the prostate cancer PDT in canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with vascular acting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad), is investigated as an alternative modality for the total ablation of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate is used as the animal model. Interstitial PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the i.v. infused photosensitizer drug. The effects of two-session PDT were evaluated. The prostate and its adjacent tissues were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. At one-week, post second-session PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. Two-session PDT or one single session PDT induced a similar extent of damage. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single 1-cm interstitial treatment, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. Pharmacokinetic studies show that the photosensitizer is cleared rapidly from the circulation. In conclusion, the novel photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  8. Annexin-A7 protects normal prostate cells and induces distinct patterns of RB-associated cytotoxicity in androgen-sensitive and -resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torosyan, Yelizaveta; Simakova, Olga; Naga, Shanmugam; Mezhevaya, Katerina; Leighton, Ximena; Diaz, Juan; Huang, Wei; Pollard, Harvey; Srivastava, Meera

    2009-12-01

    The tumor suppressor role of annexin-A7 (ANXA7) was previously demonstrated by cancer susceptibility in Anxa7(+/-)-mice and by ANXA7 loss in human cancers, especially in hormone-resistant prostate tumors. To gain mechanistic insights into ANXA7 tumor suppression, we undertook an in vitro study in which we compared wild-type (WT)-ANXA7 and dominant-negative (DN)-ANXA7 effects to a conventional tumor suppressor p53 in prostate cancer cells with different androgen sensitivity. Unlike p53 (which caused cell growth arrest and apoptosis to a noticeable extent in benign PrEC), WT-ANXA7 demonstrated profound cytotoxicityin androgen-sensitive LNCaP as well as in the androgen-resistant DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells, but not in PrEC. In androgen-sensitive LNCaP, WT-ANXA7 decreased low-molecular-weight (LMW) AR protein forms and maintained higher retinoblastoma 1 (RB1)/phospho-RB1 ratio. In contrast, DN-ANXA7 (which lacks phosphatidylserine liposome aggregation properties) increased LMW-AR forms and hyperphosphorylated RB1 that was consistent with the lack of DN-ANXA7 cytotoxicity. According to the microarray-based Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, a major WT-ANXA7 effect in androgen-sensitive LNCaP constituted of upregulation of the RB1-binding transcription factor E2F1 along with its downstream proapoptotic targets such as ASK1 and ASPP2. These results suggested a reversal of the RBdependent repression of the proapoptotic E2F-mediated transcription. However, DN-ANXA7 increased RB1/2 (but not E2F1) expression and induced the proliferation-promoting ERK5, thereby maintaining the RB-dependent repression of E2F-mediated apoptosis in LNcaP. On the other hand, in androgen-resistant cells, WT-ANXA7 tumor suppressor effects involved PTEN and NFkB pathways. Thus, ANXA7 revived the RB-associated cell survival control and overcame androgen resistance and dysfunctional status of major tumor suppressors commonly mutated in prostate cancer. Published 2009 UICC.

  9. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  10. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  11. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2–8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A.; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I.; Meech, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2–8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE). PMID:28035996

  12. The role of alpha 6 beta 1 integrin and EGF in normal and malignant acinar morphogenesis of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bello-DeOcampo, D; Kleinman, H K; Webber, M M

    2001-09-01

    Complex multiple interactions between cells and extracellular matrix occur during acinar morphogenesis involving integrin receptors and growth factors. Changes in these interactions occur during carcinogenesis as cells progress from a normal to a malignant, invasive phenotype. We have developed human prostatic epithelial cell lines of the same lineage, which represent multiple steps in carcinogenesis, similar to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and subsequent tumor progression. The non-tumorigenic, RWPE-1 and the tumorigenic WPE1-NB27 and WPE1-NB26 cell lines were used to examine their ability to undergo acinar morphogenesis in a 3-D cell culture model and its relationship to invasion, integrin expression and EGF presence. An inverse relationship between the degree of acinar formation and invasive ability was observed. The non-tumorigenic, non-invasive RWPE-1 and the low tumorigenic, low invasive, WPE1-NB27 cells show high and decreased acinar forming ability, respectively, while the more invasive WPE1-NB26 cells show a loss of acinar formation. While RWPE-1 acini show basal expression of alpha 6 beta 1 integrin, which correlates with their ability to polarize and form acini, WPE1-NB27 cells lack alpha 6 but show basal, but weaker expression of beta 1 integrin. WPE1-NB26 cells show loss alpha 6 and abnormal, diffused beta 1 integrin expression. A dose-dependent decrease in acinar formation was observed in RWPE-1 cells when cell proliferation was induced by EGF. Anti-functional antibody to EGF caused an increase in acinar formation in RWPE-1 cells. These results suggest that malignant cells lose the ability to undergo acinar morphogenesis and that the degree of this loss appears to be related to invasive ability, EGF levels and alterations in laminin-specific integrin expression. This model system mimics different steps in prostate carcinogenesis and has applications in the secondary and tertiary prevention of prostate cancer.

  13. Novel Nine-Exon AR Transcripts (Exon 1/Exon 1b/Exons 2-8) in Normal and Cancerous Breast and Prostate Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; McKinnon, Ross A; Hulin, Julie-Ann; Mackenzie, Peter I; Meech, Robyn

    2016-12-27

    Nearly 20 different transcripts of the human androgen receptor (AR) are reported with two currently listed as Refseq isoforms in the NCBI database. Isoform 1 encodes wild-type AR (type 1 AR) and isoform 2 encodes the variant AR45 (type 2 AR). Both variants contain eight exons: they share common exons 2-8 but differ in exon 1 with the canonical exon 1 in isoform 1 and the variant exon 1b in isoform 2. Splicing of exon 1 or exon 1b is reported to be mutually exclusive. In this study, we identified a novel exon 1b (1b/TAG) that contains an additional TAG trinucleotide upstream of exon 1b. Moreover, we identified AR transcripts in both normal and cancerous breast and prostate cells that contained either exon 1b or 1b/TAG spliced between the canonical exon 1 and exon 2, generating nine-exon AR transcripts that we have named isoforms 3a and 3b. The proteins encoded by these new AR variants could regulate androgen-responsive reporters in breast and prostate cancer cells under androgen-depleted conditions. Analysis of type 3 AR-GFP fusion proteins showed partial nuclear localization in PC3 cells under androgen-depleted conditions, supporting androgen-independent activation of the AR. Type 3 AR proteins inhibited androgen-induced growth of LNCaP cells. Microarray analysis identified a small set of type 3a AR target genes in LNCaP cells, including genes known to modulate growth and proliferation of prostate cancer (PCGEM1, PEG3, EPHA3, and EFNB2) or other types of human cancers (TOX3, ST8SIA4, and SLITRK3), and genes that are diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of prostate cancer (GRINA3, and BCHE).

  14. Proton radiation for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Coen, John J; Zietman, Anthony L

    2009-06-01

    Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized prostate cancer that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications; the Bragg peak allows for deposition of dose at a well-defined depth with essentially no exit dose. Thus, high doses can be delivered to a target while largely sparing adjacent normal tissue. Proton radiation has proven effective in dose escalation for prostate cancer. This is important, as high-dose conformal radiation is now the standard form of external radiation for this disease. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which uses X-rays, is another means of delivering high radiation doses to the prostate and is currently the most widely used form of external radiation in the US. At present prices, it is probably more cost-effective than proton radiation; this could change. Clear dosimetric superiority of protons in the high-dose region has not yet been demonstrated. A dosimetric advantage may emerge as pencil-beam scanning replaces passive scanning, and intensity-modulated proton therapy becomes possible. This technique would be particularly well suited to partial prostate 'boosts', hypofractionation regimens and stereotactic delivery of radiation, all new approaches to prostate cancer that are being investigated.

  15. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Algan, Ozer; Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically 'negated' the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 {+-} 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 {+-} 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 {+-} 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p < 0.002), respectively, and for the planning target volume (PTV8100) was 8089 and 7303 cGy (p < 0.001), respectively. The mean V95 values when patient setup was corrected and uncorrected were 99.9% and 87.3%, respectively, for the PTV8100 volume (p < 0.0001). At an individual patient level, the difference in the D95 value for the prostate volume could be >1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35 parameter

  16. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 02: Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; El Naqa, I

    2014-08-15

    Inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability has recently been shown to have a genetic component. This genetic component may play a key role in explaining the fluctuating rates of radiation-induced toxicities (RITs). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have thus far yielded inconsistent results in delineating RITs while copy number variations (CNVs) have not yet been investigated for such purposes. We explore a radiogenomic modeling approach to investigate the association of CNVs and SNPs, along with clinical and dosimetric variables, in radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) in prostate cancer patients treated with curative hypofractionated irradiation. A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) between 2002 to 2010 were retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs5489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Late toxicity rates for RB grade 2 and 3 and grade 3 alone were 29.0% and 12.9%, respectively. ED toxicity was found to be 62.9%. Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) and resampling by cross-validation. Binary variables were evaluated using Chi-squared contingency table analysis and multivariate models by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ{sup 2}=14.6, p<0.001 and ED: χ{sup 2}=4.88, p=0.0272) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ{sup 2}=0.278, p=0.599 and ED: χ{sup 2}=0.112, p=0.732). Radiogenomic modeling yielded significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (AUC=0.665) and ED (AUC=0.754). These results indicate that CNVs may be potential predictive biomarkers of both late ED and RB.

  17. [Abberant methylation of p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 genes in tumor epitelium and tumor-associated stromal cells of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Alekseev, B Ia; Adnreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2007-01-01

    The methylation status of four genes significant in prostate carcinogenesis p16, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1, were evaluated using quantitative methylationsensitive polymerase chain reaction. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma, normal epithelia, foci of PIN and benign prostate hyperplasia, and stroma adjacent to tumor tissues were isolated from whole-mount prostatectomy specimens of patients with localized prostate cancer by using laser capture microdissection. We found high levels of gene methylation in the tumor epithelium and tumor-associated stromal cells and some methylation in both hyperplastic epithelium and stromal cells in normal-appearing tissues located adjacent to tumors. Promoter methylation in the non-neoplastic cells of the prostate tumor microenvironment may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We examined the promoter methylation status of pl6, HIC1, N33 and GSTP1 in prostate biopsy fragments and prostate tissues after radical prostatectomy from patients with adenocarcinoma without laser capture microdissection. Methylation frequencies of all genes in tumor samples were considerably lower than frequencies in microdissected tumour samples (HIC1, 71 versus 89%; p16, 22 versus 78%; GSTP1, 32 versus 100%; N33, 20 versus 33%). The laser capture microdissection is required procedure in methylation studies taking into account multifocality and heterogenity of prostate cancer tissue.

  18. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia from multiple patients were significantly higher than those in prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and normal prostate glandular...prostate cancer cell invasion. 3. We showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were significantly...inhibitors of MMP-26 block prostate cancer invasion. We have showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were

  19. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  20. Hyperspectral Raman imaging of human prostatic cells: An attempt to differentiate normal and malignant cell lines by univariate and multivariate data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musto, P.; Calarco, A.; Pannico, M.; La Manna, P.; Margarucci, S.; Tafuri, A.; Peluso, G.

    2017-02-01

    Hyperspectral Raman images of human prostatic cells have been collected and analysed with several approaches to reveal differences among normal and tumor cell lines. The objective of the study was to test the potential of different chemometric methods in providing diagnostic responses. We focused our analysis on the ν(Csbnd H) region (2800-3100 cm- 1) owing to its optimal Signal-to-Noise ratio and because the main differences between the spectra of the two cell lines were observed in this frequency range. Multivariate analysis identified two principal components, which were positively recognized as due to the protein and the lipid fractions, respectively. The tumor cells exhibited a modified distribution of the cytoplasmatic lipid fraction (mainly localized alongside the cell boundary) which may result very useful for a preliminary screening. Principal Component analysis was found to provide high contrast and to be well suited for image-processing purposes. Self-Modelling Curve Resolution made available meaningful spectra and relative-concentration values; it revealed a 97% increase of the lipid fraction in the tumor cell with respect to the control. Finally, a univariate approach confirmed significant and reproducible differences between normal and tumor cells.

  1. Gene expression and epigenetic discovery screen reveal methylation of SFRP2 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Perry, Antoinette S; O'Hurley, Gillian; Raheem, Omer A; Brennan, Kevin; Wong, Simon; O'Grady, Anthony; Kennedy, Anne-Marie; Marignol, Laure; Murphy, Therese M; Sullivan, Linda; Barrett, Ciara; Loftus, Barbara; Thornhill, John; Hewitt, Stephen M; Lawler, Mark; Kay, Elaine; Lynch, Thomas; Hollywood, Donal

    2013-04-15

    Aberrant activation of Wnts is common in human cancers, including prostate. Hypermethylation associated transcriptional silencing of Wnt antagonist genes SFRPs (Secreted Frizzled-Related Proteins) is a frequent oncogenic event. The significance of this is not known in prostate cancer. The objectives of our study were to (i) profile Wnt signaling related gene expression and (ii) investigate methylation of Wnt antagonist genes in prostate cancer. Using TaqMan Low Density Arrays, we identified 15 Wnt signaling related genes with significantly altered expression in prostate cancer; the majority of which were upregulated in tumors. Notably, histologically benign tissue from men with prostate cancer appeared more similar to tumor (r = 0.76) than to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; r = 0.57, p < 0.001). Overall, the expression profile was highly similar between tumors of high (≥ 7) and low (≤ 6) Gleason scores. Pharmacological demethylation of PC-3 cells with 5-Aza-CdR reactivated 39 genes (≥ 2-fold); 40% of which inhibit Wnt signaling. Methylation frequencies in prostate cancer were 10% (2/20) (SFRP1), 64.86% (48/74) (SFRP2), 0% (0/20) (SFRP4) and 60% (12/20) (SFRP5). SFRP2 methylation was detected at significantly lower frequencies in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN; 30%, (6/20), p = 0.0096), tumor adjacent benign areas (8.82%, (7/69), p < 0.0001) and BPH (11.43% (4/35), p < 0.0001). The quantitative level of SFRP2 methylation (normalized index of methylation) was also significantly higher in tumors (116) than in the other samples (HGPIN = 7.45, HB = 0.47, and BPH = 0.12). We show that SFRP2 hypermethylation is a common event in prostate cancer. SFRP2 methylation in combination with other epigenetic markers may be a useful biomarker of prostate cancer.

  2. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    PubMed

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P < 0.01) compared with PC and prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P < 0.05). Men (33%) with BPH had PSA antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. These discoveries may find clinical application in differential diagnosis among prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis.

  3. Prognostic Relevance of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Victor C.; Lu, Te-Ling; Yin, Hsin-Ling; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Lee, Yung-Chin; Liu, Chia-Chu; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Folate metabolism has been associated with cancers via alterations in nucleotide synthesis, DNA methylation, and DNA repair. We hypothesized that genetic variants in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a key enzyme of folate metabolism, would affect the prognosis of prostate cancer. Three haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the MTHFR gene region were genotyped in a cohort of 458 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. One SNP, rs9651118, was associated with disease recurrence, and the association persisted after multivariate analyses adjusting for known risk factors. Public dataset analyses suggested that rs9651118 affects MTHFR expression. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that MTHFR expression is significantly upregulated in prostate tumor tissues when compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of MTHFR correlates with cancer recurrence and death in two independent publicly available prostate cancer datasets. In conclusion, our data provide rationale to further validate the clinical utility of MTHFR rs9651118 as a biomarker for prognosis in prostate cancer. PMID:27916838

  4. Fibronectin and androgen receptor expression data in prostate cancer obtained from a RNA-sequencing bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Das, Dibash K; Ali, Thahmina; Krampis, Konstantinos; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed male cancer in the world. The molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are still unclear. Here we show analysis of a prostate cancer RNA-sequencing dataset that was originally generated by Ren et al. [3] from the prostate tumor and adjacent normal tissues of 14 patients. The data presented here was analyzed using our RNA-sequencing bioinformatics analysis pipeline implemented on the bioinformatics web platform, Galaxy. The relative expression of fibronectin (FN1) and the androgen receptor (AR) were calculated in fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped reads, and represented in FPKM unit. A subanalysis is also shown for data from three patients, that includes the relative expression of FN1 and AR and their fold change. For interpretation and discussion, please refer to the article, "miR-1207-3p regulates the androgen receptor in prostate cancer via FNDC1/fibronectin" [1] by Das et al.

  5. Arginase: A Novel Proliferative Determinant in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Figure 6. Tissue microarray spots stained with AII; (A) normal prostate with low levels of AII staining, (B) malignant prostate with high AII...laboratory, we unexpectedly discovered that is expressed at high levels in the normal prostate and even higher in neoplastic prostate samples. The...pivotal role in the synthesis of polyamines, chemicals involved in cell growth and regulation that are found in high levels in normal prostate tissue

  6. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  7. The Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  8. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  9. Stress-Related Signaling Pathways in Lethal and Non-Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Fang, Fang; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Lambe, Mats; Sesso, Howard D.; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent data suggest that neuroendocrine signaling may influence progression in some cancers. We aimed to determine whether genes within the five major stress-related signaling pathways are differentially expressed in tumor tissue when comparing prostate cancer patients with lethal and non-lethal disease. Experimental Design We measured mRNA expression of 51 selected genes involved in predetermined stress-related signaling pathways (adrenergic, glucocorticoid, dopaminergic, serotoninergic, and muscarinic systems) in tumor tissue and normal prostate tissue collected from prostate cancer patients in the Physicians’ Health Study (n=150; n=82 with normal) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n=254; n=120 with normal). We assessed differences in pathway expression in relation to prostate cancer lethality as the primary outcome, and to biomarkers as secondary outcomes. Results Differential mRNA expression of genes within the adrenergic (p=0.001), glucocorticoid (p<0.0001), serotoninergic (p=0.0019), and muscarinic (p=0.0045) pathways in tumor tissue was associated with the risk of lethality. The adrenergic pathway was also statistically significant (p=0.001) when comparing against differential expression of genes not involved in the pathways. In adjacent normal prostate tissue, none of the pathways was clearly differentially expressed between lethal and non-lethal prostate cancer. The glucocorticoid and adrenergic pathways were associated with cell proliferation, while the glucocorticoid pathway was additionally associated with angiogenesis and perineural invasion. Conclusions Our study suggests that stress-related signaling pathways, particularly the adrenergic and glucocorticoid, may be dysregulated in the tumors of men whose prostate cancer proves to be lethal, and motivates further investigation of these pathways in functional studies. PMID:26490316

  10. Overexpression and knock-down studies highlight that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28 controls proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Caroline; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Okada, Yasunori; McLaughlin, Claire; Leedman, Peter J.; Stuart, Lisa; Epis, Michael; Hoyne, Gerard; Boulos, Sherif; Johnson, Liam; Schlaich, Markus; Matthews, Vance

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in men. It is critical to identify and characterize oncogenes that drive the pathogenesis of human prostate cancer. The current study builds upon previous research showing that a disintegrin and metallproteinase (ADAM)28 is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. Our novel study used overexpression, pharmacological, and molecular approaches to investigate the biological function of ADAM28 in human prostate cancer cells, with a focus on cell proliferation and migration. The results of this study provide important insights into the role of metalloproteinases in human prostate cancer. The expression of ADAM28 protein levels was assessed within human prostate tumors and normal adjacent tissue by immunohistochemistry. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to assess ADAM28 protein expression in human prostate cancer cell lines. Functional assays were conducted to assess proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer cells in which ADAM28 protein expression or activity had been altered by overexpression, pharmacological inhibition, or by siRNA gene knockdown. The membrane bound ADAM28 was increased in human tumor biopsies and prostate cancer cell lines. Pharmacological inhibition of ADAM28 activity and/or knockdown of ADAM28 significantly reduced proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells, while overexpression of ADAM28 significantly increased proliferation and migration. ADAM28 is overexpressed in primary human prostate tumor biopsies, and it promotes human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration. This study supports the notion that inhibition of ADAM28 may be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for human prostate cancer. PMID:27749584

  11. Overexpression and knock-down studies highlight that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28 controls proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rudnicka, Caroline; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Okada, Yasunori; McLaughlin, Claire; Leedman, Peter J; Stuart, Lisa; Epis, Michael; Hoyne, Gerard; Boulos, Sherif; Johnson, Liam; Schlaich, Markus; Matthews, Vance

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in men. It is critical to identify and characterize oncogenes that drive the pathogenesis of human prostate cancer. The current study builds upon previous research showing that a disintegrin and metallproteinase (ADAM)28 is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. Our novel study used overexpression, pharmacological, and molecular approaches to investigate the biological function of ADAM28 in human prostate cancer cells, with a focus on cell proliferation and migration. The results of this study provide important insights into the role of metalloproteinases in human prostate cancer.The expression of ADAM28 protein levels was assessed within human prostate tumors and normal adjacent tissue by immunohistochemistry. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting were used to assess ADAM28 protein expression in human prostate cancer cell lines. Functional assays were conducted to assess proliferation and migration in human prostate cancer cells in which ADAM28 protein expression or activity had been altered by overexpression, pharmacological inhibition, or by siRNA gene knockdown.The membrane bound ADAM28 was increased in human tumor biopsies and prostate cancer cell lines. Pharmacological inhibition of ADAM28 activity and/or knockdown of ADAM28 significantly reduced proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells, while overexpression of ADAM28 significantly increased proliferation and migration.ADAM28 is overexpressed in primary human prostate tumor biopsies, and it promotes human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration. This study supports the notion that inhibition of ADAM28 may be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for human prostate cancer.

  12. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  13. [Prostate cancer: papillomaviruses as a possible cause].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality are steadily increasing. Causation of PC is not clearly understood; in particular, role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) is still disputable. The review contains analysis of literature data on possible participation of HPV powerful biological carcinogens, in PC genesis. PC incidence increase in persons with immunodeficiency indicates involvement of some infectious agent in the disease etiology. Several research groups communicated HPV DNA finding including that of oncogenic types in PC specimens (transrectal biopsies). There are limited data on the occurrence of oncogenic HPV 16 oncoprotein E7 in such specimens and on its unfavorable effect on disease prognosis. The successful attempt is known to transfect normal human prostate cells with oncogenic HPVDNA in vitro. Epidemiological data on associations of PC with HPV are controversial. It may result from the considered in the present review certain technical peculiarities of these studies. Controlfor serum antibodies to HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins recognized to indicate HPV-positive tumor growth in an organism has not been performed yet in PC patients. DNA of oncogenic HPV is rather commonly found in organs adjacent to prostate--urethra, rectum, urinary bladder. In the study held in Russia on a group of healthy men examined for sexually transmitted diseases genitourinary HPVinfection was found in every second person; 42% of them harbored oncogenic HPV. Possible participation of oncogenic HPV in PC genesis deserves close attention and further study.

  14. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The main function of the prostate is to ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. What causes prostatitis? The causes of prostatitis differ ...

  15. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Radiation Dosimetry for (177)Lu-PSMA I&T in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Absorbed Dose in Normal Organs and Tumor Lesions.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shozo; Thieme, Anne; Allmann, Jakob; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Maurer, Tobias; Retz, Margitta; Tauber, Robert; Heck, Matthias M; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Tamaki, Nagara; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Herrmann, Ken; Pfob, Christian H; Scheidhauer, Klemens; Schwaiger, Markus; Ziegler, Sibylle; Eiber, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radioligand therapy is increasingly used in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We aimed to estimate the absorbed doses for normal organs and tumor lesions using (177)Lu-PSMA I&T (I&T is imaging and therapy) in patients undergoing up to 4 cycles of radioligand therapy. Results were compared with pretherapeutic Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[(68)Ga(HBEDCC)] ((68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) PET. Methods: A total of 34 cycles in 18 patients were analyzed retrospectively. In 15 patients the first, in 9 the second, in 5 the third, and in 5 the fourth cycle was analyzed, respectively. Whole-body scintigraphy was performed at least between 30-120 min, 24 h, and 6-8 d after administration. Regions of interest covering the whole body, organs, and up to 4 tumor lesions were drawn. Organ and tumor masses were derived from pretherapeutic (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. Absorbed doses for individual cycles were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. SUVs from pretherapeutic PET were compared with absorbed doses and with change of SUV. Results: The mean whole-body effective dose for all cycles was 0.06 ± 0.03 Sv/GBq. The mean absorbed organ doses were 0.72 ± 0.21 Gy/GBq for the kidneys; 0.12 ± 0.06 Gy/GBq for the liver; and 0.55 ± 0.14 Gy/GBq for the parotid, 0.64 ± 0.40 Gy/GBq for the submandibular, and 3.8 ± 1.4 Gy/GBq for the lacrimal glands. Absorbed organ doses were relatively constant among the 4 different cycles. Tumor lesions received a mean absorbed dose per cycle of 3.2 ± 2.6 Gy/GBq (range, 0.22-12 Gy/GBq). Doses to tumor lesions gradually decreased, with 3.5 ± 2.9 Gy/GBq for the first, 3.3 ± 2.5 Gy/GBq for the second, 2.7 ± 2.3 Gy/GBq for the third, and 2.4 ± 2.2 Gy/GBq for the fourth cycle. SUVs of pretherapeutic PET moderately correlated with absorbed dose (r = 0.44, P < 0.001 for SUVmax; r = 0.43, P < 0.001 for SUVmean) and moderately correlated with the change of SUV (r = 0.478, P < 0.001 for SUVmax, and r = 0.50, P < 0

  17. Association and regulation of protein factors of field effect in prostate tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Kristin N.; Jones, Anna C.; Nguyen, Julie P.T.; Antillon, Kresta S.; Janos, Sara N.; Overton, Heidi N.; Jenkins, Shannon M.; Frisch, Emily H.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Field effect or field cancerization denotes the presence of molecular aberrations in structurally intact cells residing in histologically normal tissues adjacent to solid tumors. Currently, the etiology of prostate field-effect formation is unknown and there is a prominent lack of knowledge of the underlying cellular and molecular pathways. We have previously identified an upregulated expression of several protein factors representative of prostate field effect, i.e., early growth response-1 (EGR-1), platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A), macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), and fatty acid synthase (FASN) in tissues at a distance of 1 cm from the visible margin of intracapsule prostate adenocarcinomas. We have hypothesized that the transcription factor EGR-1 could be a key regulator of prostate field-effect formation by controlling the expression of PDGF-A, MIC-1, and FASN. Taking advantage of our extensive quantitative immunofluorescence data specific for EGR-1, PDGF-A, MIC-1, and FASN generated in disease-free, tumor-adjacent, and cancerous human prostate tissues, we chose comprehensive correlation as our major approach to test this hypothesis. Despite the static nature and sample heterogeneity of association studies, we show here that sophisticated data generation, such as by spectral image acquisition, linear unmixing, and digital quantitative imaging, can provide meaningful indications of molecular regulations in a physiologically relevant in situ environment. Our data suggest that EGR-1 acts as a key regulator of prostate field effect through induction of pro-proliferative (PDGF-A and FASN), and suppression of pro-apoptotic (MIC-1) factors. These findings were corroborated by computational promoter analyses and cell transfection experiments in non-cancerous prostate epithelial cells with ectopically induced and suppressed EGR-1 expression. Among several clinical applications, a detailed knowledge of pathways of field effect may lead to the

  18. Role of RUNX3 in suppressing metastasis and angiogenesis of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feifei; Wang, Meng; Bai, Jin; Liu, Qinghua; Xi, Yaguang; Li, Wang; Zheng, Junnian

    2014-01-01

    RUNX3 (runt-related transcription factor-3) has been reported to suppress tumor tumorigenesis and metastasis in different human cancers. In this study, we used tissue microarray (TMA) to determine the significance of RUNX3 in prostate cancer progession. Our results showed ectopic expression of RUNX3 in prostate cancer tissues when compared with tumor adjacent normal prostate tissues, and reduced RUNX3 staining was significantly correlated with TNM stage. Moreover, we demonstrated that RUNX3 overexpression inhibited prostate cancer cell migration and invasion resulting from the elevated upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), which subsequently inhibited metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression and activity in vitro. Knock down of RUNX3 expression broke up the balance of TIMP-2/MMP-2, whereas silence of TIMP-2 resulted in the inhibition of MMP-2 expression in prostate cells. We also showed that restoration of RUNX3 decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and suppressed endothelial cell growth and tube formation. Strikingly, RUNX3 was demonstrated to inhibit tumor metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo. Altogether, our results support the tumor suppressive role of RUNX3 in human prostate cancer, and provide insights into development of targeted therapy for this disease.

  19. Stokes polarimetry imaging of dog prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Johnston, William K., III; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. Radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate) is the most common treatment for prostate cancer, however, differentiating prostate tissue from adjacent bladder, nerves, and muscle is difficult. Improved visualization could improve oncologic outcomes and decrease damage to adjacent nerves and muscle important for preservation of potency and continence. A novel Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system was developed and evaluated using a dog prostate specimen in order to examine the feasibility of the system to differentiate prostate from bladder. The degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination at different visible wavelengths (475, 510, and 650 nm) were constructed. The SPI system used the polarization property of the prostate tissue. The DOLP images allowed advanced differentiation by distinguishing glandular tissue of prostate from the muscular-stromal tissue in the bladder. The DOLP image at 650 nm effectively differentiated prostate and bladder by strong DOLP in bladder. SPI system has the potential to improve surgical outcomes in open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic removal of the prostate. Further in vivo testing is warranted.

  20. Humanin: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; n=107), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN; n=41) and invasive prostate cancer (Cancer; n=574). Both cytoplasmic...expression was significantly higher in cancer (ProsCa) compared to normal (NL; p=0028), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; p=0.0017). Humanin expression

  1. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  2. Stromal prostatic sarcoma: a rare tumor with rare clinical and imaging presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Jiménez, Anamaría; Otero-Garcia, Milagros; Mateos-Martin, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Adult prostatic stromal sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor. The main presenting symptom is urinary retention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Prostatic Specific Antigen level can be normal. Imaging features show a prostate mass with or without pelvic organ invasion depending on the aggressiveness of the tumor. We present a patient with prostatic stromal sarcoma who debuted with urinary obstruction, leukocytosis and neutrophilia, prostate enlargement, and hypodense prostate areas on CT images, simulating prostatitis with abscess formation. PMID:24421945

  3. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  4. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  5. Prostatic Leiomyoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made. PMID:23198266

  6. Prostatic leiomyoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made.

  7. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  8. Association of HLA class I antigen abnormalities with disease progression and early recurrence in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Barbara; Stoehr, Robert; Handke, Diana; Mueller, Anja; Ferrone, Soldano; Wullich, Bernd; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Hartmann, Arndt

    2010-04-01

    Defects in HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) component expression often have a negative impact on the clinical course of tumors and on the response to T cell-based immunotherapy. Since only scant information is available about the frequency and clinical significance of HLA class I APM component abnormalities in prostate cancer, the APM component expression pattern was analyzed in 59 primary prostate carcinoma, adjacent normal tissues, as well as in prostate carcinoma cell lines. The IFN-gamma inducible proteasome subunits LMP2 and LMP7, TAP1, TAP2, calnexin, calreticulin, ERp57, and tapasin are strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of normal prostate cells, whereas HLA class I heavy chain (HC) and beta(2)-microglobulin are expressed on the cell surface. Most of the APM components were downregulated in a substantial number of prostate cancers. With the exception of HLA class I HC, TAP2 and ERp57 not detectable in about 0.5% of tumor lesions, all other APM components were not detected in at least 21% of lesions analyzed. These APM component defects were associated with a higher Gleason grade of tumors and an early disease recurrence. Prostate carcinoma cell lines also exhibit a heterogeneous, but reduced constitutive APM component expression pattern associated with lack or reduced HLA class I surface antigens, which could be upregulated by IFN-gamma. Our results suggest that HLA class I APM component abnormalities are mainly due to regulatory mechanisms, play a role in the clinical course of prostate cancer and on the outcome of T cell-based immunotherapies.

  9. Diffuse bone metastases on (68)Ga-PSMA PET-CT in a patient with prostate cancer and normal bone scan.

    PubMed

    Lavalaye, J; Kaldeway, P; van Melick, H H E

    2016-07-01

    A 75-year-old patient was diagnosed with a Gleason 9 prostate carcinoma. His PSA level was 50.4 ng/ml. Routine bone scintigraphy was negative for metastasis (a). Due to the high tumour grading and relatively high PSA level, (68)Ga-PSMA PET-CT was ordered to rule out distant metastases. This scan showed numerous skeletal lesions with high tracer accumulation as sign of diffuse osseous metastases (b). On low-dose CT there were no signs of sclerosis (c). (68)Ga-PSMA PET-CT also showed high uptake in the prostate and in para-iliac and para-aortal lymph nodes, without lymph node enlargement. No bone biopsy was obtained to confirm the metastases. Due to this result, the treatment plan was changed to systemic therapy, instead of local therapy.

  10. MicroRNAs 221/222 and Genistein mediated regulation of ARHI tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Deng, Guoren; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Shranjot; Liu, Jan; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ARHI, an imprinted tumor suppressor gene, is expressed in normal immortalized prostate epithelial cells, but is dramatically down-regulated in prostate cancer cell lines. Here we investigated the mechanisms of ARHI silencing in prostate cancer through miRNA and genistein mediated pathways. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE We evaluated ARHI mRNA and protein levels by real time PCR and immunostaining of prostate tissue array. Then, ARHI was over-expressed in prostate cancer PC-3 cells followed by functional studies. Finally, miRNA inhibitor studies and dual luciferase pMIR-REPORT assay were performed to prove the direct target of miR-221&222 to ARHI. RESULTS Both ARHI mRNA and protein levels were down regulated in prostate cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. Over-expression of ARHI can inhibit cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and induced apoptosis. Further studies on a new mechanism of ARHI down regulation showed a significant inverse relationship between ARHI and miR-221 & 222 which were up-regulated in cancer cell lines. Transfection of miR-221 & 222 inhibitors into PC-3 cells caused a significant induction of ARHI expression. A direct interaction of miR-221 or 222 with a target site on the 3’UTR of ARHI was confirmed by a dual luciferase pMIR-REPORT assay. CONCLUSIONS ARHI is a tumor suppressor gene down regulated in prostate cancer and over-expression of ARHI can inhibit cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. This study demonstrates for the first time that prostate cancer cells have decreased level of ARHI which could be caused by direct targeting of 3’UTR of ARHI by miR221/222. PMID:21071579

  11. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  12. Prostatitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are more ... 2012:chap 11. Read More Bladder outlet obstruction Chlamydia Enlarged prostate Epididymitis Urethritis Urinary tract infection - adults ...

  13. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, you will be ...

  14. Estrogen signaling is not required for prostatic bud patterning or for its disruption by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Allgeier, Sarah Hicks; Vezina, Chad M.; Lin, T.-M.; Moore, Robert W.; Silverstone, Allen E.; Mukai, Motoko; Gavalchin, Jerrie; Cooke, Paul S.; Peterson, Richard E.

    2009-08-15

    Estrogens play an important role in prostatic development, health, and disease. While estrogen signaling is essential for normal postnatal prostate development, little is known about its prenatal role in control animals. We tested the hypothesis that estrogen signaling is needed for normal male prostatic bud patterning. Budding patterns were examined by scanning electron microscopy of urogenital sinus epithelium from wild-type mice, mice lacking estrogen receptor (ER){alpha}, ER{beta}, or both, and wild-type mice exposed to the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Budding phenotypes did not detectably differ among any of these groups, strongly suggesting that estrogen signaling is not needed to establish the prototypical prostatic budding pattern seen in control males. This finding contributes to our understanding of the effects of low-level estrogen exposure on early prostate development. In utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can greatly alter the pattern in which prostatic buds form and reduce their number. For several reasons, including a prior observation that inhibitory effects of TCDD on prostatic budding in rats depend heavily on the sex of adjacent fetuses, we tested the hypothesis that estrogen signaling is needed for TCDD to disrupt prostatic budding. However, budding did not detectably differ among wild-type mice, or mice lacking ER{alpha}, ER{beta}, or both, that were exposed prenatally to TCDD (5 {mu}g/kg on embryonic day 13.5). Nor did ICI 182,780 detectably affect the response to TCDD. These results strongly suggest that estrogen signaling is not needed for TCDD to inhibit prostatic epithelial budding.

  15. Long noncoding RNA LINC01296 is associated with poor prognosis in prostate cancer and promotes cancer-cell proliferation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Cheng; Zheng, Yuxiao; Xu, Haoxiang; Yang, Haiwei; Hua, Lixin

    2017-01-01

    Background/purpose Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators and biomarkers of tumor development and progression. This study investigated the clinical significance, biological functions, and underlying mechanisms of long intergenic non-protein-coding RNA 1296 (LINC01296) in prostate cancer. Materials and methods LINC01296 expression in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The correlation between LINC01296 expression and clinicopathologic characteristics of prostate cancer was analyzed using Kaplan–Meier analysis and the Cox proportional-hazard model. Small interfering RNA was used to suppress LINC01296, and knockdown efficiency was examined by qRT-PCR. Cell Counting Kit 8 assay, colony-formation assay, migration and invasion assays, and Western blot assay were used to explore the role of LINC01296 in tumor progression further. Results LINC01296-expression level was higher in prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells than in adjacent nontumor tissues and immortalized normal prostate stromal WPMY1 cells. LINC01296 expression was correlated with preoperative prostate specific antigen (P=0.002), lymph-node metastasis (P=0.035), Gleason score (P<0.001), and tumor stage (P=0.036). Patients with higher LINC01296 expression displayed advanced clinical features and shorter biochemical recurrence-free survival time than those with lower LINC01296 expression. Multivariate analysis showed that LINC01296 expression was an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence-free survival in prostate cancer. Additionally, LINC01296 knockdown inhibited prostate cancer-cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, demonstrated in an in vitro study involving regulation of PI3K–Akt–mTOR signaling and epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Conclusion The results demonstrated that LINC01296 is a novel molecule involved in prostate cancer development and progression, and thus is

  16. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  17. Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor-Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    samples and in all human prostate cancer cell lines, but not in normal or benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues (1-5). The inhibition of telomerase by...clinical implications. Telomerase activation has been reported in >90% of prostate cancer samples, but not in normal or benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues

  18. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  19. Identification of specific DNA methylation sites on the Y-chromosome as biomarker in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fengxia; Zhu, Yasheng; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Chenyu; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Liu, Huixian; Wang, Dong; Meng, Hao; Chang, Shuang; Han, Xiao; Sun, Yinghao; Sun, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    As a diagnostic biomarker, prostate special antigen (PSA) tests always generate false positive results and lead to unnecessary and/or repeat biopsies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing more sensitive, specific diagnostic biomarkers. We epigenotyped methylated sites in cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues from 66 patients. In comparation with normal adjacent tissues, we observed that there were 6 aberrant methylation sites in prostate cancer tissues on the Y-chromosome. We further performed pyrosequencing using urine of PCa patients and we identified one methylated site (cg05163709) as a potential biomarker. We evaluated the predictive capacity of the aberrant methylated sites using the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The ROC analysis showed a higher AUC for cg05163709 (0.915) than prostate-specific antigen (PSA, 0.769). These results indicated that aberrant DNA methylation of cg05163709 on the Y-chromosome could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26485765

  20. Correlation of contrast-enhanced MR images with the histopathology of minimally invasive thermal and cryoablation cancer treatments in normal dog prostates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouley, D. M.; Daniel, B.; Butts Pauly, K.; Liu, E.; Kinsey, A.; Nau, W.; Diederich, C. J.; Sommer, G.

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool for visualizing the delivery of minimally invasive cancer treatments such as high intensity ultrasound (HUS) and cryoablation. We use an acute dog prostate model to correlate lesion histopathology with contrast-enhanced (CE) T1 weighted MR images, to aid the radiologists in real time interpretation of in vivo lesion boundaries and pre-existing lesions. Following thermal or cryo treatments, prostate glands are removed, sliced, stained with the vital dye triphenyl tetrazolium chloride, photographed, fixed and processed in oversized blocks for routine microscopy. Slides are scanned by Trestle Corporation at .32 microns/pixel resolution, the various lesions traced using annotation software, and digital images compared to CE MR images. Histologically, HUS results in discrete lesions characterized by a "heat-fixed" zone, in which glands subjected to the highest temperatures are minimally altered, surrounded by a rim or "transition zone" composed of severely fragmented, necrotic glands, interstitial edema and vascular congestion. The "heat-fixed" zone is non-enhancing on CE MRI while the "transition zone" appears as a bright, enhancing rim. Likewise, the CE MR images for cryo lesions appear similar to thermally induced lesions, yet the histopathology is significantly different. Glands subjected to prolonged freezing appear totally disrupted, coagulated and hemorrhagic, while less intensely frozen glands along the lesion edge are partially fragmented and contain apoptotic cells. In conclusion, thermal and cryo-induced lesions, as well as certain pre-existing lesions (cystic hyperplasia - non-enhancing, chronic prostatitis - enhancing) have particular MRI profiles, useful for treatment and diagnostic purposes.

  1. Prominin-1 (CD133) Expression in the Prostate and Prostate Cancer: A Marker for Quiescent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pellacani, Davide; Oldridge, Emma E; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2013-01-01

    The origin and phenotype of stem cells in human prostate cancer remains a subject of much conjecture. In this scenario, CD133 has been successfully used as a stem cell marker in both normal prostate and prostate cancer. However, cancer stem cells have been identified without the use of this marker, opening up the possibility of a CD133 negative cancer stem cell. In this chapter, we review the current literature regarding prostate cancer stem cells, with specific reference to the expression of CD133 as a stem cell marker to identify and purify stem cells in normal prostate epithelium and prostate cancer.

  2. Co-expression and impact of prostate specific membrane antigen and prostate specific antigen in prostatic pathologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to relate the co-expression of prostate-associated antigens, PSMA and PSA, with the degree of vascularization in normal and pathologic (hyperplasia and cancer) prostate tissues to elucidate their possible role in tumor progression. Methods The study was carried out in 6 normal, 44 benign prostatic hyperplastic and 39 cancerous human prostates. Immunohistochemical analysis were performed using the monoclonal antibody CD34 to determine the angiogenic activity, and the monoclonal antibodies 3E6 and ER-PR8 to assess PSMA and PSA expression, respectively. Results In our study we found that in normal prostate tissue, PSMA and PSA were equally expressed (3.7 ± 0.18 and 3.07 ± 0.11). A significant difference in their expression was see in hyperplastic and neoplastic prostates tissues (16.14 ± 0.17 and 30.72 ± 0.85, respectively) for PSMA and (34.39 ± 0.53 and 17.85 ± 1.21, respectively) for PSA. Study of prostate tumor profiles showed that the profile (PSA+, PSMA-) expression levels decreased between normal prostate, benign prostatic tissue and primary prostate cancer. In the other hand, the profile (PSA-, PSMA+) expression levels increased from normal to prostate tumor tissues. PSMA overexpression was associated with high intratumoral angiogenesis activity. By contrast, high PSA expression was associated with low angiogenesis activity. Conclusion These data suggest that these markers are regulated differentially and the difference in their expression showed a correlation with malignant transformation. With regard to the duality PSMA-PSA, this implies the significance of their investigation together in normal and pathologic prostate tissues. PMID:21189143

  3. PlncRNA-1 induces apoptosis through the Her-2 pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Cui, Zi-Lian; Wang, Qin; Jin, Xun-Bo; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Mu-Wen; Song, Wei; Qu, Hua-Wei; Kang, Wei-Ting

    2016-05-27

    To determine whether PlncRNA-1 induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through the Her-2 pathway. The expression of PlncRNA-1, Her-2, and related cyclin proteins in 23 cases of prostate cancer and adjacent normal tissues was analyzed and compared. LNCaP cells were divided into a control group and an LNCaP-PlncRNA-1-siRNA experimental group. Normal prostate RWPE-1 cells were divided into an RWPE-1 control group and an RWPE-1-PlncRNA-1 experimental group. After PlncRNA-1 silencing and overexpression, changes in Her-2 and cyclinD1 expression levels were detected both in vivo and in vitro. In prostate cancer tissues, Her-2 and PlncRNA-1 were highly expressed and significantly correlated. In LNCaP cells, the expression of Her-2 and cyclinD1 decreased following the downregulation of PlncRNA-1 as assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. In RWPE-1 cells, the expression of Her-2 and cyclinD1 increased following PlncRNA-1 overexpression. Flow cytometry revealed that the proportion of LNCaP cells in G2/M phase was significantly increased after PlncRNA-1 silencing and that the proportion of RWPE-1 cells in G2/M phase was significantly decreased after PlncRNA-1 overexpression. Furthermore, animal experiments validated these results. In conclusion, in prostate cancer, PlncRNA-1 regulates the cell cycle and cyclinD1 levels and can also regulate proliferation and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through the Her-2 pathway.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    18-29. 5. Garraway, I.P., et al., Human prostate sphere-forming cells represent a subset of basal epithelial cells capable of glandular regeneration...guidelines. Adjacent prostate tissue was snap frozen in liquid Nitrogen or fixed in formalin and paraffin-embedded to evaluate anatomy and glandular ...forming cells represent a subset of basal epithelial cells capable of glandular regeneration in vivo. Prostate 70: 491–501. 5. Collins AT, Habib FK

  5. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  6. PIXE analysis of elements in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qixin; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Lingnuo; Xu, Yongling; Ye, Simao

    1990-04-01

    The elemental regional distributions in 20 resected human stomach tissues were obtained using PIXE analysis. The samples were pathologically divided into four types: normal, adjacent mucosa A, adjacent mucosa B and cancer. The targets for PIXE analysis were prepared by wet digestion with a pressure bomb system. P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se were measured and statistically analysed. We found significantly higher concentrations of P, K, Cu, Zn and a higher ratio of Cu compared to Zn in cancer tissue as compared with normal tissue, but statistically no significant difference between adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue was found.

  7. Cryptococcal prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hinchey, W W; Someren, A

    1981-02-01

    A case of granulomatous prostatitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans is reported. The patient, who had a history of diabetes mellitus and chronic active hepatitis, had symptoms of prostatic hypertrophy. Tissue obtained from surgery showed granulomatous prostatitis, and a cryptococcal organism was identified by special stains. Postoperative cultures grew Cryptococcus neoformans, and the patient was treated successfully with surgery and a short course of amphotericin B. After nine months of follow-up, there is no evidence of systemic infection.

  8. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  9. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs), have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq) now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal samples and 9 lung cancer

  10. WE-D-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; Naqa, I El

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It has been realized that inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability is a multifactorial process involving dosimetric, clinical, and genetic factors. Therefore, we explore a new framework to integrate physical, clinical, and biological data denoted as radiogenomic modeling. In demonstrating the feasibility of this work, we investigate the association of genetic variants (copy number variations [CNVs] and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) with radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) while taking into account dosimetric and clinical variables in prostate cancer patients treated with curative irradiation. Methods: A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) was retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs25489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Dosevolume metrics were extracted from treatment plans of 54 patients who had complete dosimetric profiles. Treatment outcomes were considered to be a Result of functional mapping of radiogenomic input variables according to a logit transformation. Model orders were estimated using resampling by leave-one out cross-validation (LOO-CV). Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and LOO-CV. For continuous univariate dosimetric and clinical variables, Spearmans rank coefficients were calculated and p-values reported accordingly. In the case of binary variables, Chi-squared statistics and contingency table calculations were used. Results: Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ2=14.6 [p<0.001] and ED: χ2=4.88[p=0.0272]) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ2=0.278[p=0.599] and ED: χ2=0.112[p=0.732]). LOO-CV identified penile bulb D60 as the only significant QUANTEC predictor (rs=0.312 [p=0.0145]) for ED. Radiogenomic modeling yielded statistically significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (rs=0.243[p=0.0443], AUC=0.665) and ED (rs=0.276[p=0

  11. Optical characters of prostate using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoman; Wang, Yunxia; Peng, Dongqing

    2012-12-01

    The incidence rate of the prostatic hyperplasia is increasing in near decade, early detection is important for preventing the prostatic cancer (PCa). In this study, the images of prostate and cavernous nerves were carried out using intrinsic fluorescence and scattering properties of the tissues without any exogenous dye or contrast agent based on nonlinear optical microscope. The texture feature and optical property of the interfibrillar substance in prostate tissue were extracted and analyzed for charactering the prostate structure. It will be the feature parameter to differentiate the normal, the inflammation or cancer of prostate tissue in clinical with the application of miniature endoscope nonlinear optical microscope in vivo.

  12. Helical Tomotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Whole Pelvis Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: Dosimetric, Normal Tissue Complication Probability, and Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto; Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Lomax, Antony J.; Amichetti, Maurizio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Soukup, Martin; Schneider, Ralf; Hug, Eugen; Di Muzio, Nadia; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPCa) patients. Methods and Materials: The plans of 8 patients with HRPCa treated with HT were compared with IMPT plans with two quasilateral fields set up (-100{sup o}; 100{sup o}) and optimized with the Hyperion treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 74.2 Gy/Gy relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) in 28 fractions on planning target volumes (PTVs)3-4 (P + proximal seminal vesicles), 65.5 Gy/Gy(RBE) on PTV2 (distal seminal vesicles and rectum/prostate overlapping), and 51.8 Gy/Gy(RBE) to PTV1 (pelvic lymph nodes). Normal tissue calculation probability (NTCP) calculations were performed for the rectum, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was estimated for the bowel cavity, penile bulb and bladder. Results: A slightly better PTV coverage and homogeneity of target dose distribution with IMPT was found: the percentage of PTV volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%}) was on average >97% in HT and >99% in IMPT. The conformity indexes were significantly lower for protons than for photons, and there was a statistically significant reduction of the IMPT dosimetric parameters, up to 50 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the rectum and bowel and 60 Gy/Gy(RBE) for the bladder. The NTCP values for the rectum were higher in HT for all the sets of parameters, but the gain was small and in only a few cases statistically significant. Conclusions: Comparable PTV coverage was observed. Based on NTCP calculation, IMPT is expected to allow a small reduction in rectal toxicity, and a significant dosimetric gain with IMPT, both in medium-dose and in low-dose range in all OARs, was observed.

  13. Exome enrichment and SOLiD sequencing of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study's aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing.

  14. Exome Enrichment and SOLiD Sequencing of Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) Prostate Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study’s aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing. PMID:22942743

  15. Increased cancer cell proliferation in prostate cancer patients with high levels of serum folate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A recent clinical trial revealed that folic acid supplementation is associated with an increased incidence of prostate cancer (1). The present study evaluates serum and prostate tissue folate levels in men with prostate cancer, compared to histologically normal prostate glands from can...

  16. Prostatic aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Abbas, F; Kamal, M K; Talati, J

    1995-03-01

    Prostatic aspergillosis is rare with only 3 cases reported previously. We report a case of localized invasive aspergillosis of the prostate in a nonimmunocompromised patient with chronic urinary retention and recurrent urinary tract infections. Transurethral resection followed by open prostatectomy was performed for massive prostatomegaly. No systemic antifungal therapy was required for cure. The literature is reviewed, and diagnostic and management options are discussed.

  17. Tracking Origins of Prostate Cancer: An Innovative in Vivo Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    could express specifically in prostate under PB- Cre4 control, and could label normal, hyperplasic, neoplastic and malignant carcinoma cells . More...propose to develop an innovative and hitherto not attempted in vivo prostate cancer model that will delineate the exact cell of origin through...different stages of prostate cancer development and progression. We propose to study possible cell (s) of origin for prostate cancer by combinatorial

  18. Role of Human Polyomavirus Bkv in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    been surgically removed due to prostate cancer diagnosis . A normal prostate is defined as prostate that has been removed either during autopsy or by...immunosuppressed transplant patients, in whom it is associated with haemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus nephropathy (5, 35, 58, 70). BKV transforms rodent cells...cystoprostatectomy specimens from bladder cancer patients with the diagnosis of muscle invasive high grade urothelial carcinoma, with no prostate cancer histology

  19. Dose Gradient Near Target-Normal Structure Interface for Nonisocentric CyberKnife and Isocentric Intensity-Modulated Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Sabbir; Xia Ping; Huang, Kim; Descovich, Martina; Chuang, Cynthia; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack; Ma Lijun

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The treatment planning quality between nonisocentric CyberKnife (CK) and isocentric intensity modulation treatment was studied for hypofractionated prostate body radiotherapy. In particular, the dose gradient across the target and the critical structures such as the rectum and bladder was characterized. Methods and Materials: In the present study, patients treated with CK underwent repeat planning for nine fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using identical contour sets and dose-volume constraints. To calculate the dose falloff, the clinical target volume contours were expanded 30 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 50 mm uniformly in other directions for all patients in the CK and IMRT plans. Results: We found that all the plans satisfied the dose-volume constraints, with the CK plans showing significantly better conformity than the IMRT plans at a relative greater dose inhomogeneity. The rectal and bladder volumes receiving a low dose were also lower for CK than for IMRT. The average conformity index, the ratio of the prescription isodose volume and clinical target volume, was 1.18 {+-} 0.08 for the CK plans vs. 1.44 {+-} 0.11 for the IMRT plans. The average homogeneity index, the ratio of the maximal dose and the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume, was 1.45 {+-} 0.12 for the CK plans vs. 1.28 {+-} 0.06 for the IMRT plans. The average percentage of dose falloff was 2.9% {+-} 0.8%/mm for CK and 3.1% {+-} 1.0%/mm for IMRT in the anterior direction, 3.8% {+-} 1.6%/mm for CK and 3.2% {+-} 1.9%/mm for IMRT in the posterior direction, and 3.6% {+-} 0.4% for CK and 3.6% {+-} 0.4% for IMRT in all directions. Conclusion: Nonisocentric CK was as capable of producing equivalent fast dose falloff as high-number fixed-field IMRT delivery.

  20. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  1. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  2. Exploring the Presence of microDNAs in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue, and Sera of Prostate Cancer Patients and its Possible Application as Biomarker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0088 TITLE: Exploring the Presence of microDNAs in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue , and Sera of Prostate Cancer...the Presence of microDNAs in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue , and Sera of Prostate Cancer Patients and its Possible Application as Biomarker 5c...extra chromosomal circular DNA present in normal mammalian somatic cells. To find the prostate tissue -specific microDNA a panel of human prostrate

  3. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  4. Thermal and histological effects of bipolar and monopolar electrosurgical resection of the prostate in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Raymond; Chew, Ben H.; Tan, Andrew H. H.; Rowe, Elaine; Razvi, Hassan

    2007-02-01

    Bipolar transurethral resection (TUR) is an alternative to monopolar TUR in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and offers the major advantage of utilizing 0.9% sodium chloride for irrigation. Claims have been made that bipolar electrosurgery in clinical use causes less thermal damage to adjacent tissues. We sought to assess tissue thermometry and histopathologic thermal effects of a bipolar system in comparison to standard monopolar TUR in an animal model. Eight male beagles were studied. A lower midline incision was used to access the prostate. Fiber-optic thermosensors were placed within the prostate. A midline cystotomy was used to perform antegrade resection of the prostate using a bipolar TUR system (VISTA CTR) with normal saline or a monopolar device using glycine. Resection of a 1cm cavity was performed in each lateral lobe. Animals were sacrificed acutely and the prostates excised for histopathological assessment of thermal damage. In both groups, prostatic temperature rises were transient and fell with increasing distance from the resection site. The greatest temperature increase occurred in the monopolar group (24.2 +/- 3.9°C) compared to the bipolar group (6.8 +/- 1.8°C, p<0.0001). The depth of thermal damage was greatest in the monopolar group (0.59 +/- 0.27mm vs 0.15 +/-0.02mm in the bipolar arm, p<0.0001). Bipolar TUR generated significantly less heat and produced less histopathological thermal damage compared to monopolar prostatic resection in a canine model. The clinical benefits of these findings remain to be determined.

  5. Identification of Genes Required for the Survival of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    cancer lines ( PrCa ) versus the normal prostate epithelial line RWPE-1. Identifying PCL genes that are either common across all prostate cancer...marked differences between the PrCa cell lines and the normal prostate epithelial line RWPE-1. Many of these differences likely represent the sought...after PCL genes. Of the highest ranking PCL hairpins, based on absolute differences between PrCa and normal prostate epithelial cells (Δlog2

  6. Identification of novel tumor markers in prostate, colon and breast cancer by unbiased methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woonbok; Kwabi-Addo, Bernard; Ittmann, Michael; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Shen, Lanlan; Yu, Yinhua; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2008-04-30

    DNA hypermethylation is a common epigenetic abnormality in cancer and may serve as a useful marker to clone cancer-related genes as well as a marker of clinical disease activity. To identify CpG islands methylated in prostate cancer, we used methylated CpG island amplification (MCA) coupled with representational difference analysis (RDA) on prostate cancer cell lines. We isolated 34 clones that corresponded to promoter CpG islands, including 5 reported targets of hypermethylation in cancer. We confirmed the data for 17 CpG islands by COBRA and/or pyrosequencing. All 17 genes were methylated in at least 2 cell lines of a 21-cancer cell line panel containing prostate cancer, colon cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer. Based on methylation in primary tumors compared to normal adjacent tissues, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS and NSE1 are candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer (methylation range 50%-85%). The combination of NSE1 or SPOCK2 hypermethylation showed a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 95% in differentiating cancer from normal. Similarly NKX2-5, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS and GALR2 are candidate biomarkers for colon cancer (methylation range 60%-95%) and GALR2 hypermethylation showed a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 95%. Finally, SLC16A12, GALR2, TOX, SPOCK2, EGFR5 and DPYS are candidate biomarkers for breast cancer (methylation range 33%-79%) with the combination of EGFR5 or TOX hypermethylation showing a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 92%. Expression analysis for eight genes that had the most hypermethylation confirmed the methylation associated silencing and reactivation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment. Our data identify new targets of transcriptional silencing in cancer, and provide new biomarkers that could be useful in screening for prostate cancer and other cancers.

  7. Disruption of Prostate Epithelial Differentiation Pathways and Prostate Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sander B.; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost problems in the prostate cancer (PCa) field is the inability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease, which leads to difficult prognoses and thousands of unnecessary surgeries. This limitation stems from the fact that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the prostate are poorly understood. Some genetic alterations are commonly reported in prostate tumors, including upregulation of Myc, fusion of Ets genes to androgen-regulated promoters, and loss of Pten. However, the specific roles of these aberrations in tumor initiation and progression are poorly understood. Likewise, the cell of origin for PCa remains controversial and may be linked to the aggressive potential of the tumor. One important clue is that prostate tumors co-express basal and luminal protein markers that are restricted to their distinct cell types in normal tissue. Prostate epithelium contains layer-specific stem cells as well as rare bipotent cells, which can differentiate into basal or luminal cells. We hypothesize that the primary oncogenic cell of origin is a transient-differentiating bipotent cell. Such a cell must maintain tight temporal and spatial control of differentiation pathways, thus increasing its susceptibility for oncogenic disruption. In support of this hypothesis, many of the pathways known to be involved in prostate differentiation can be linked to genes commonly altered in PCa. In this article, we review what is known about important differentiation pathways (Myc, p38MAPK, Notch, PI3K/Pten) in the prostate and how their misregulation could lead to oncogenesis. Better understanding of normal differentiation will offer new insights into tumor initiation and may help explain the functional significance of common genetic alterations seen in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new methods for classifying prostate tumors based on their differentiation status and may aid in identifying more aggressive tumors. PMID:24199173

  8. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  9. SU-F-BRB-10: A Statistical Voxel Based Normal Organ Dose Prediction Model for Coplanar and Non-Coplanar Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, A; Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Woods, K; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Knowledge learned from previous plans can be used to guide future treatment planning. Existing knowledge-based treatment planning methods study the correlation between organ geometry and dose volume histogram (DVH), which is a lossy representation of the complete dose distribution. A statistical voxel dose learning (SVDL) model was developed that includes the complete dose volume information. Its accuracy of predicting volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar 4π radiotherapy was quantified. SVDL provided more isotropic dose gradients and may improve knowledge-based planning. Methods: 12 prostate SBRT patients originally treated using two full-arc VMAT techniques were re-planned with 4π using 20 intensity-modulated non-coplanar fields to a prescription dose of 40 Gy. The bladder and rectum voxels were binned based on their distances to the PTV. The dose distribution in each bin was resampled by convolving to a Gaussian kernel, resulting in 1000 data points in each bin that predicted the statistical dose information of a voxel with unknown dose in a new patient without triaging information that may be collectively important to a particular patient. We used this method to predict the DVHs, mean and max doses in a leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) test and compared its performance against lossy estimators including mean, median, mode, Poisson and Rayleigh of the voxelized dose distributions. Results: SVDL predicted the bladder and rectum doses more accurately than other estimators, giving mean percentile errors ranging from 13.35–19.46%, 4.81–19.47%, 22.49–28.69%, 23.35–30.5%, 21.05–53.93% for predicting mean, max dose, V20, V35, and V40 respectively, to OARs in both planning techniques. The prediction errors were generally lower for 4π than VMAT. Conclusion: By employing all dose volume information in the SVDL model, the OAR doses were more accurately predicted. 4π plans are better suited for knowledge-based planning than

  10. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Alejandro; Gil, José Fernando; Lujano, Heriberto; Piñon, Omar; Muñoz, Gabriel; Michel, José Manuel; Garcia, Jorge; Valdez, Jorge; Morales, Omar

    2017-01-01

    There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  11. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  12. Do We Know What Causes Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... account for a small number of prostate cancers. DNA mismatch repair genes (such as MSH2 and MLH1 ): These genes normally help fix mistakes (mismatches) in DNA that are made when a cell is preparing ...

  13. Chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, allopurinol, alpha-blockers, biofeedback, local injections of antimicrobial drugs, mepartricin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral antimicrobial drugs, pentosan polysulfate, prostatic massage, quercetin, radical prostatectomy, sitz baths, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, and transurethral resection. PMID:21736764

  14. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Disparity of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    is selectively upregulated in prostate tumors men as opposed to normal glands or BPH regardless of race (Fig 8). Further analysis revealed higher...ethnicity-based TMA-4 (n=150 tumor cores from AA and CA men) was analyzed by IHC. A representative normal prostate (A, B and C) and BPH (D, E and F...differentially expressed in freshly procured prostate tumor cells of age- and tumor grade- matched AA and CA men. Laser capture microdissected (LCM

  15. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Disparity of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    representative normal prostate (A, B and C) and BPH (D, E and F) tissue cores demonstrating weak nuclear immunoreactivity (arrow) in epithelial... prostate tumor cells of age- and tumor grade- matched AA and CA men. Laser capture microdissected (LCM)-procured in vivo-derived genetic materials of...0.05) increase in hnRNP H1 transcript levels in AA and CA prostate tumors, respectively, when compared to the matched normal epithelium in each

  16. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  17. Stromal Response to Prostate Cancer: Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein Partners Distinguishes Prostate Cancer Associated Stroma from That of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S. Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  18. Stromal response to prostate cancer: nanotechnology-based detection of thioredoxin-interacting protein partners distinguishes prostate cancer associated stroma from that of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  19. Minority issues in prostate disease.

    PubMed

    French, Dan B; Jones, LeRoy A

    2005-07-01

    age 40. Proper screening consists of both a digital rectal examination to assess for asymmetry or nodules of the prostate and a serum PSA. Current recommendations are that individuals with a serum PSA greater than 4 ng/mL ora prostate nodule or asymmetric prostate should be referred to an urologist,where a biopsy can be performed easily in the office setting.The PSA cutoff of 4 has recently been questioned. A study by Thompson et al [31] evaluated 2950 men with a PSA of 4 or less with prostate biopsy.They found that the risk of prostate cancer in men with a PSA between 3.1 and 4 was 26.9% and that 25% of these men with prostate cancer had high-grade disease. All men found to have cancer had T1 disease. The clinical relevance of this surprisingly high rate of prostate cancer in men with a normal PSA is yet to be determined and is pending in studies on the ultimate effect of screening on mortality from prostate cancer. This information is not intended to confuse the issue, but intended to provide the most up-to-date information and allow for the best clinical decision making by the primary care physician. What can currently be recommended is if a patient is concerned about his possibility of having prostate cancer despite a normal PSA, a referral to an urologist to at least further discuss the issue may be in order. This may be especially true if the patient is African American or has a family history of prostate cancer at an early age.

  20. Stratified epithelium in prostatic adenocarcinoma: a mimic of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Omar; Humphrey, Peter A

    2006-07-01

    Typically glands of prostatic adenocarcinoma have a single cell lining, although stratification can be seen in invasive carcinomas with a cribriform architecture, including ductal carcinoma. The presence and diagnostic significance of stratified cells within non-cribriform carcinomatous prostatic glands has not been well addressed. The histomorphological features and immunohistochemical profile of cases of non-cribriform prostatic adenocarcinoma with stratified malignant glandular epithelium were analyzed. These cases were identified from needle biopsy cases from the consultation files of one of the authors and from a review of 150 consecutive in-house needle biopsy cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was performed utilizing antibodies reactive against high molecular weight cytokeratin (34betaE12), p63 and alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme-A racemase (AMACR). A total of 8 cases were identified, including 2 from the 150 consecutive in-house cases (1.3%). In 4 cases, the focus with glands having stratified epithelium was the sole carcinomatous component in the biopsy, while such a component represented 5-30% of the invasive carcinoma seen elsewhere in the remaining cases. The main attribute in all these foci was the presence of glandular profiles lined by several layers of epithelial cells with cytological and architectural features resembling flat or tufted high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but lacking basal cells as confirmed by negative 34betaE12 and/or p63 immunostains in all cases. The AMACR staining profile of the stratified foci was variable, with 4 foci showing positivity, and 3 foci being negative, including two cases that displayed AMACR positivity in adjacent non-stratified prostatic adenocarcinoma. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with stratified malignant glandular epithelium can be identified in prostate needle biopsy samples harboring non-cribriform prostatic adenocarcinoma and resembles glands with high-grade prostatic

  1. AB133. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anxi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To improve the level of diagnosis and treatment of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis. Methods The clinical data of a case of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis were analyzed retrospectively and discussed with relative literature review. Results A 56-year-old man presented with a 1 month history of difficult urination, which was exacerbated for 10 days. The patient was confirmed with xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with chronic suppurative inflammation and abscess by pathologic diagnosis after plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP). The patient achieved smooth voiding and was discharged after operation for one week. Urination was normal during two months follow up. Conclusions Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is rare clinical disease, which should be excluded from prostate cancer and can be confirmed by pathobiology. According to the degree of lower urinary tract obstruction, it is treated by medicine or surgical operation. Examination of PSA regularly and long-term follow-up must be performed.

  2. Validation of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Progression by the Combination of Bioinformatics, Clinical and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Väänänen, Riina-Minna; Mattsson, Jesse; Li, Yifeng; Tallgrén, Terhi; Tong Ochoa, Natalia; Bjartell, Anders; Åkerfelt, Malin; Taimen, Pekka; Boström, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and validation of biomarkers for clinical applications remains an important issue for improving diagnostics and therapy in many diseases, including prostate cancer. Gene expression profiles are routinely applied to identify diagnostic and predictive biomarkers or novel targets for cancer. However, only few predictive markers identified in silico have also been validated for clinical, functional or mechanistic relevance in disease progression. In this study, we have used a broad, bioinformatics-based approach to identify such biomarkers across a spectrum of progression stages, including normal and tumor-adjacent, premalignant, primary and late stage lesions. Bioinformatics data mining combined with clinical validation of biomarkers by sensitive, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), followed by functional evaluation of candidate genes in disease-relevant processes, such as cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion. From 300 initial candidates, eight genes were selected for validation by several layers of data mining and filtering. For clinical validation, differential mRNA expression of selected genes was measured by qRT-PCR in 197 clinical prostate tissue samples including normal prostate, compared against histologically benign and cancerous tissues. Based on the qRT-PCR results, significantly different mRNA expression was confirmed in normal prostate versus malignant PCa samples (for all eight genes), but also in cancer-adjacent tissues, even in the absence of detectable cancer cells, thus pointing to the possibility of pronounced field effects in prostate lesions. For the validation of the functional properties of these genes, and to demonstrate their putative relevance for disease-relevant processes, siRNA knock-down studies were performed in both 2D and 3D organotypic cell culture models. Silencing of three genes (DLX1, PLA2G7 and RHOU) in the prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and VCaP by siRNA resulted in marked growth arrest

  3. Validation of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Progression by the Combination of Bioinformatics, Clinical and Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Alinezhad, Saeid; Väänänen, Riina-Minna; Mattsson, Jesse; Li, Yifeng; Tallgrén, Terhi; Tong Ochoa, Natalia; Bjartell, Anders; Åkerfelt, Malin; Taimen, Pekka; Boström, Peter J; Pettersson, Kim; Nees, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The identification and validation of biomarkers for clinical applications remains an important issue for improving diagnostics and therapy in many diseases, including prostate cancer. Gene expression profiles are routinely applied to identify diagnostic and predictive biomarkers or novel targets for cancer. However, only few predictive markers identified in silico have also been validated for clinical, functional or mechanistic relevance in disease progression. In this study, we have used a broad, bioinformatics-based approach to identify such biomarkers across a spectrum of progression stages, including normal and tumor-adjacent, premalignant, primary and late stage lesions. Bioinformatics data mining combined with clinical validation of biomarkers by sensitive, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), followed by functional evaluation of candidate genes in disease-relevant processes, such as cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion. From 300 initial candidates, eight genes were selected for validation by several layers of data mining and filtering. For clinical validation, differential mRNA expression of selected genes was measured by qRT-PCR in 197 clinical prostate tissue samples including normal prostate, compared against histologically benign and cancerous tissues. Based on the qRT-PCR results, significantly different mRNA expression was confirmed in normal prostate versus malignant PCa samples (for all eight genes), but also in cancer-adjacent tissues, even in the absence of detectable cancer cells, thus pointing to the possibility of pronounced field effects in prostate lesions. For the validation of the functional properties of these genes, and to demonstrate their putative relevance for disease-relevant processes, siRNA knock-down studies were performed in both 2D and 3D organotypic cell culture models. Silencing of three genes (DLX1, PLA2G7 and RHOU) in the prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and VCaP by siRNA resulted in marked growth arrest

  4. Genomic “Dark Matter” in Prostate Cancer: Exploring the Clinical Utility of ncRNA as Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Ismael A.; Erho, Nicholas; Triche, Timothy J.; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Crisan, Anamaria; Sierocinski, Thomas; Black, Peter C.; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer among men in the United States. While the majority of patients who undergo surgery (prostatectomy) will essentially be cured, about 30–40% men remain at risk for disease progression and recurrence. Currently, patients are deemed at risk by evaluation of clinical factors, but these do not resolve whether adjuvant therapy will significantly attenuate or delay disease progression for a patient at risk. Numerous efforts using mRNA-based biomarkers have been described for this purpose, but none have successfully reached widespread clinical practice in helping to make an adjuvant therapy decision. Here, we assess the utility of non-coding RNAs as biomarkers for prostate cancer recurrence based on high-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis of surgical tissue specimens from normal adjacent prostate, primary tumors, and metastases. We identify differentially expressed non-coding RNAs that distinguish between the different prostate tissue types and show that these non-coding RNAs can predict clinical outcomes in primary tumors. Together, these results suggest that non-coding RNAs are emerging from the “dark matter” of the genome as a new source of biomarkers for characterizing disease recurrence and progression. While this study shows that non-coding RNA biomarkers can be highly informative, future studies will be needed to further characterize the specific roles of these non-coding RNA biomarkers in the development of aggressive disease. PMID:22371711

  5. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Masina, M. H.; Eichelberger, Lillian; Wharton, James D.

    1939-01-01

    A simple isolation of the prostate enabled quantitative collection of prostatic secretion in dogs over periods of months. The secretory stimulant was pilocarpine and 2 similar amounts injected with a 6 hour interval gave smaller amounts at the second testing, suggesting a fatigue effect. The prostate was not absolutely refractory since doubling the amount of alkaloid injected at the second test increased the volume to equal or exceed the preliminary secretion. The depression effect had disappeared at 24 hours. In normal dogs the secretory curves were essentially regular, with occasional prolonged rises or depressions. The amount of secretion did not bear a direct relationship to the weight of the gland in adult dogs. The germinal epithelium of the testis underwent atrophy during the first few weeks of cage life while the prostatic secretion was maintained, showing that the atrophy was differential and did not involve the cells producing the androgenic hormone. The atrophy was reversible and all dogs kept for more than 4 months showed restoration of the germ cells. A few dogs developed atrophy of the germinal cells with cessation of prostatic secretion for many weeks but with final recovery. Removal of the suprarenal glands with suprarenal insufficiency did not produce sterility. The distribution of electrolytes in the prostatic secretion differed from that in the serum-transudate system, although the concentration of osmotically active substances was the same, being made up almost entirely of sodium and chloride. The distribution was not affected by the different physiological procedures used in this study. Protein concentrations were less than 1 per cent. The rate of prostatic atrophy following castration was determined, and cessation of secretion occurred in 7 to 23 days. The restoration of prostatic fluid in castrate dogs following daily injections of testosterone propionate followed a smooth curve to form a plateau which was interrupted occasionally by

  6. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  7. Human PDE4D isoform composition is deregulated in primary prostate cancer and indicative for disease progression and development of distant metastases

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, René; Dulla, Kalyan; van Strijp, Dianne; Dits, Natasja; Verhoef, Esther I.; Baillie, George S.; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Houslay, Miles D.; Jenster, Guido; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4D7 was recently shown to be specifically over-expressed in localized prostate cancer, raising the question as to which regulatory mechanisms are involved and whether other isoforms of this gene family (PDE4D) are affected under the same conditions. We investigated PDE4D isoform composition in prostatic tissues using a total of seven independent expression datasets and also included data on DNA methylation, copy number and AR and ERG binding in PDE4D promoters to gain insight into their effect on PDE4D transcription. We show that expression of PDE4D isoforms is consistently altered in primary human prostate cancer compared to benign tissue, with PDE4D7 being up-regulated while PDE4D5 and PDE4D9 are down-regulated. Disease progression is marked by an overall down-regulation of long PDE4D isoforms, while short isoforms (PDE4D1/2) appear to be relatively unaffected. While these alterations seem to be independent of copy number alterations in the PDE4D locus and driven by AR and ERG binding, we also observed increased DNA methylation in the promoter region of PDE4D5, indicating a long lasting alteration of the isoform composition in prostate cancer tissues. We propose two independent metrics that may serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers for prostate disease: (PDE4D7 - PDE4D5) provides an effective means for distinguishing PCa from normal adjacent prostate, whereas PDE4D1/2 - (PDE4D5 + PDE4D7 + PDE4D9) offers strong prognostic potential to detect aggressive forms of PCa and is associated with metastasis free survival. Overall, our findings highlight the relevance of PDE4D as prostate cancer biomarker and potential drug target. PMID:27683107

  8. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  9. Subcellular concentrations of calcium, zinc, and magnesium in benign nodular hyperplasia of the human prostate: X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections

    SciTech Connect

    Tvedt, K.E.; Kopstad, G.; Haugen, O.A.; Halgunset, J.

    1987-01-01

    Biopsies from human prostates were obtained from normal and hyperplastic glands. The intracellular concentrations of calcium, zinc, and magnesium were analyzed using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Two prostate biopsies were obtained from kidney donors, ages 19 and 50 years, without any sign of benign nodular hyperplasia. The normal tissues were frozen within 15 min after circulatory arrest. The central part of biopsies from eight elderly men suffering from benign nodular hyperplasia were frozen within 30 s after excision. Adjacent tissue was processed for light microscopy and histopathological diagnosis. All samples were fresh-frozen using liquid nitrogen cooled pliers, without the use of any freeze-protection, fixation, or staining. In both the normal and the hyperplastic prostates high concentrations (up to above 100 mmol/kg dry weight) of zinc were present in electron dense bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Together with zinc, about equal concentrations of magnesium were found. Calcium was detected in 4 to 8 times the concentration of zinc. Significant, positive correlation between calcium and zinc as well as between calcium and magnesium in the cytoplasm was a typical finding in both normal and hyperplastic glands. In six of eight patients, older than 60 years of age, high levels of calcium (17.0-38.8 mmol/kg dry weight) were observed in the nuclei of the epithelial cells, while very low values were found in the remaining two. In the two younger cases (19 and 50 years of age), the nuclear calcium level in prostatic epithelium was relatively low (about 10 mmol/kg dry weight). These observations suggest that an increase of intranuclear calcium with advancing age may be of pathogenetic significance to growth disturbances in the prostate.

  10. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  11. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  12. About the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer growth or as a result of treatments. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living with Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment Options Side Effects Recurrence Advanced ...

  13. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  14. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  15. High Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) in the Non-Malignant Prostate Epithelium Predicts a Poor Outcome in Prostate Cancer Patient Managed by Watchful Waiting.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Maria; Hägglöf, Christina; Hammarsten, Peter; Thysell, Elin; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Jernberg, Emma; Wikstrom, Pernilla; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) has been shown to both promote and suppress tumor progression, but its role in prostate cancer is largely unknown. LOX immunoreactivity was scored in prostate tumor epithelium, tumor stroma and in the tumor-adjacent non-malignant prostate epithelium and stroma. LOX scores in tumor and non-malignant prostate tissues were then examined for possible associations with clinical characteristics and survival in a historical cohort of men that were diagnosed with prostate cancer at transurethral resection and followed by watchful waiting. Men with a low LOX score in the non-malignant prostate epithelium had significantly longer cancer specific survival than men with a high score. Furthermore, LOX score in non-malignant prostate epithelium remained prognostic in a multivariable analysis including Gleason score. LOX score in prostate tumor epithelium positively correlated to Gleason score and metastases but was not associated with cancer survival. LOX score in tumor and non-malignant prostate stroma appeared unrelated to these tumor characteristics. In radical prostatectomy specimens, LOX immune-staining corresponded to LOX in-situ hybridization and LOX mRNA levels were found to be similar between tumor and adjacent non-malignant areas, but significantly increased in bone metastases samples. LOX levels both in tumors and in the surrounding tumor-bearing organ are apparently related to prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  16. Frequent HLA class I alterations in human prostate cancer: molecular mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Francisco Javier; Del Campo, Ana Belen; Flores-Martín, Jose Francisco; Mendez, Rosa; García-Lopez, Cesar; Cozar, Jose Manuel; Adams, Victoria; Ward, Stephen; Cabrera, Teresa; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Garrido, Federico; Aptsiauri, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression of HLA class I is an important immune escape mechanism from cytotoxic T cells described in various types of malignancy. It often correlates with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. However, current knowledge about the frequency, underlying molecular mechanisms, and prognostic value of HLA class I and II alterations in prostate cancer (PC) is limited. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that 88 % of the 42 studied cryopreserved prostate tumors have at least one type of HLA alteration as compared to adjacent normal prostate epithelium or benign hyperplasia. Total loss of HLA-I expression found in 50 % of tumors showed an association with increased incidence of tumor relapse, perineural invasion, and high D'Amico risk. The remaining HLA-I-positive tumors demonstrated locus and allelic losses detected in 26 and 12 % of samples, respectively. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 6 was detected in 32 % of the studied tumors. Molecular analysis revealed a reduced expression of B2M, TAP2, tapasin and NLRC5 mRNA in microdissected HLA-I-negative tumors. Analysis of twelve previously unreported cell lines derived from neoplastic and normal epithelium of cancerous prostate revealed different types of HLA-I aberration, ranging from locus and/or allelic downregulation to a total absence of HLA-I expression. The high incidence of HLA-I loss observed in PC, caused by both regulatory and structural defects, is associated with more aggressive disease development and may pose a real threat to patient health by increasing cancer progression and resistance to T-cell-based immunotherapy.

  17. Spermine and Citrate as Metabolic Biomarkers for Assessing Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Giskeødegård, Guro F.; Bertilsson, Helena; Selnæs, Kirsten M.; Wright, Alan J.; Bathen, Tone F.; Viset, Trond; Halgunset, Jostein; Angelsen, Anders; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Tessem, May-Britt

    2013-01-01

    Separating indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is an important clinical challenge for identifying patients eligible for active surveillance, thereby reducing the risk of overtreatment. The purpose of this study was to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness by metabolic profiling of prostatectomy tissue and to identify specific metabolites as biomarkers for aggressiveness. Prostate tissue samples (n = 158, 48 patients) with a high cancer content (mean: 61.8%) were obtained using a new harvesting method, and metabolic profiles of samples representing different Gleason scores (GS) were acquired by high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS). Multivariate analysis (PLS, PLS-DA) and absolute quantification (LCModel) were used to examine the ability to predict cancer aggressiveness by comparing low grade (GS = 6, n = 30) and high grade (GS≥7, n = 81) cancer with normal adjacent tissue (n = 47). High grade cancer tissue was distinguished from low grade cancer tissue by decreased concentrations of spermine (p = 0.0044) and citrate (p = 7.73·10−4), and an increase in the clinically applied (total choline+creatine+polyamines)/citrate (CCP/C) ratio (p = 2.17·10−4). The metabolic profiles were significantly correlated to the GS obtained from each tissue sample (r = 0.71), and cancer tissue could be distinguished from normal tissue with sensitivity 86.9% and specificity 85.2%. Overall, our findings show that metabolic profiling can separate aggressive from indolent prostate cancer. This holds promise for the benefit of applying in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within clinical MR imaging investigations, and HR-MAS analysis of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies has a potential as an additional diagnostic tool. PMID:23626811

  18. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Tools & Tips ...

  19. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  20. Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional tests your urine sample at your doctor’s office or ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional sends ... may want to test your blood sample for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). ...

  1. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, depending ...

  2. Inflammation in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Timothy; Livas, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to the onset and progression of human cancer, via modifications in the tumor microenvironment by remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) and initiating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). At the biological level, chronically inflamed cells release cytokines that are functionally dictating a constitutively active stroma, promoting tumor growth and metastasis. In prostate cancer, inflammation correlates with increased development of “risk factor” lesions or proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA). Chronic inflammation in benign prostate biopsy specimens can be associated with high-grade prostate tumors in adjacent areas. In this article, we discuss the current understanding of the incidence of inflammation in prostate cancer progression and the significance of the process in therapeutic targeting of specific inflammatory signaling pathways and critical effectors during tumor progression. Further understanding of the process of chronic inflammation in prostate tumor progression to metastasis will enable development and optimization of novel therapeutic modalities for the treatment of high-risk patients with advanced disease. PMID:26816843

  3. New gene expressed in prostate: a potential target for T cell-mediated prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Vittore; Poole, Diane J; Palena, Claudia; Das, Sudipto; Bera, Tapan K; Remondo, Cinzia; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Yokokawa, Junko; Pastan, Ira; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tsang, Kwong Y

    2010-01-01

    New gene expressed in prostate (NGEP) is a prostate-specific gene encoding either a small cytoplasmic protein (NGEP-S) or a larger polytopic membrane protein (NGEP-L). NGEP-L expression is detectable only in prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and normal prostate. We have identified an HLA-A2 binding NGEP epitope (designated P703) which was used to generate T cell lines from several patients with localized and metastatic prostate cancer. These T cell lines were able to specifically lyse HLA-A2 and NGEP-expressing human tumor cells. NGEP-P703 tetramer binding assays demonstrated that metastatic prostate cancer patients had a higher frequency of NGEP-specific T cells when compared with healthy donors. Moreover, an increased frequency of NGEP-specific T cells was detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of prostate cancer patients post-vaccination with a PSA-based vaccine, further indicating the immunogenicity of NGEP. These studies thus identify NGEP as a potential target for T cell-mediated immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  4. Cytoprotective Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 As a Novel Molecular Target in Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leav, Irwin; Plescia, Janet; Goel, Hira Lal; Li, Jing; Jiang, Zhong; Cohen, Ronald J.; Languino, Lucia R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) family promote cell survival, but the molecular requirements of this pathway in tumor progression are not understood. Here, we show that a mitochondria-localized Hsp90 chaperone, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1 (TRAP-1), is abundantly and ubiquitously expressed in human high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Gleason grades 3 through 5 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and metastatic prostate cancer, but largely undetectable in normal prostate or benign prostatic hyperplasia in vivo. Prostate lesions formed in genetic models of the disease, including the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate and mice carrying prostate-specific deletion of the phosphatase tensin homolog tumor suppressor (Ptenpc−/−), also exhibit high levels of TRAP-1. Expression of TRAP-1 in nontransformed prostatic epithelial BPH-1 cells inhibited cell death, whereas silencing of TRAP-1 in androgen-independent PC3 or DU145 prostate cancer cells by small interfering RNA enhanced apoptosis. Targeting TRAP-1 with a novel class of mitochondria-directed Hsp90 inhibitors, ie, Gamitrinibs, caused rapid and complete killing of androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancer, but not BPH-1 cells, whereas reintroduction of TRAP-1 in BPH-1 cells conferred sensitivity to Gamitrinib-induced cell death. These data identify TRAP-1 as a novel mitochondrial survival factor differentially expressed in localized and metastatic prostate cancer compared with normal prostate. Targeting this pathway with Gamitrinibs could be explored as novel molecular therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:19948822

  5. Incorporating Androgen Deprivation With Dose-Escalated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dosoretz, Arie P; Yu, James B

    2016-05-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 71-year-old man was seen by his primary care physician for routine evaluation in early 2015. On digital rectal examination, his prostate was moderately enlarged, although he had no obvious areas of palpable disease. His prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 7.1 ng/mL. A standard ultrasound-guided biopsy of his prostate revealed a 60-mL prostate volume and a single core (out of 12) of Gleason 3 + 3 disease. He chose to undergo surveillance. Six months later, his PSA level had risen to 10.0 ng/mL; there was still no palpable disease on digital rectal examination. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of his prostate and pelvis revealed two suspicious intraprostatic lesions with restricted diffusion, focal and earlier enhancement with contrast than adjacent normal prostate, and hypointense features on T2-weighted imaging; these findings were highly suspicious for high-grade prostate cancer (Fig 1). Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy of each lesion yielded a total of four positive biopsy cores of Gleason 4 + 3 = 7, involving 50% to 80% of each core, with perineural invasion noted. The patient's medical history is notable for overweight (but not morbidly obese), hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, cataract surgeries, and inguinal hernia repair, but the patient is otherwise healthy. He has decided against prostatectomy and brachytherapy because of strong personal preference. In particular, he wanted to avoid anesthesia, and

  6. Characterization of SPINK1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    rearrangement by FISH. A TMPRSS2:ERG rearrangement through intrachromosomal deletion is indicated by loss of one 50 ( green ) ERG signal. (B) Contingency tables...pancreatic juice, its normal function is thought to be the inhibition of serine proteases such as trypsin ( Greene et al., 1976; Haverback et al., 1960; Kazal...lesions to function in prostate cancer, we assayed prostate cancer cell lines by quan- titative PCR for SPINK1 (yellow), ERG (blue), and ETV1 ( green

  7. Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur as a result of alcohol consumption, cold temperatures, or a long period of inactivity. What are ... to heat selected portions of the prostate. The temperature becomes high enough inside the prostate to destroy ...

  8. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    target for therapy of prostate cancer , but approaches aimed at Ras itself, or its critical signaling pathways, which are required in normal tissues...Impact: Current therapies for prostate cancer are inadequate, and aberrant activation of Ras or Ras pathways are common. A novel therapeutic modality...to Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas V. Faller, PhD, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Trustees of Boston University

  9. Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, L. Chinsoo; Timmerman, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There are radiobiological rationales supporting hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The recent advancements in treatment planning and delivery allow sophisticated radiation treatments to take advantage of the differences in radiobiology of prostate cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. The preliminary results from clinical studies indicate that abbreviated fractionation programs can result in successful treatment of localized prostate cancer without escalation of late toxicity. PMID:23533777

  10. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  11. [Using AELTIS-synchro-02 device in the therapy of chronic bacterial prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V N; Kozboda, A S; Kravchenko, V V; Kalinina, S A

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis combined antibacterial drugs and physiotherapy (low-energy laser radiation, electrostimulation of the prostate). Treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis with medication and complex two-channel bio-synchronized electrolaser therapy with application of the unit AELTIS-synchro-02 raises efficacy of treatment with chronic bacterial prostatitis due to combined effect of antibacterial drugs and bacteriostatic and immunomodulating actions of the physical factors applied. These normalize microcirculation in the region of the prostatic gland, improve a draining function of the prostatic ducts, allows achievement of good results in 88.2% patients.

  12. Baltimore City Faith-Based Prostate Cancer Prevention and Control Coalition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatitis are not cancer Signs and Symptoms of a Problem • Need to urinate frequently, especially an night...blocking normal urine flow • Symptoms of enlarged prostate in >59% of men ages 60-7-, 90% in men ages 70-90 • Non-cancerous changes such as benign

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  15. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  16. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  17. Knockout AR in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    enlarged ventral prostates, we evaluated fertility. We found that there were no significant differences in litter-size when either WT or pes-ARKO males...prostate (DLP), ventral prostate (VP) all lobes of prostate (Pr), testes (T), glans penis (Pe); *Pɘ.05, ***Pɘ.001. PI: Chang, Chawnshang 7

  18. Immunocytochemistry of epithelial markers in citral-induced prostate hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Massas, R; Servadio, C; Sandbank, U; Abramovici, A

    1991-04-01

    Immunocytochemical characterization of several epithelial markers using the PAP technique was analyzed during different stages of induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Intact adolescent rats (42 days old) were treated with citral (3,7 dimethyl-2,6 octadienal) for 10, 30 and 100 days and their ventral prostate compared to untreated, matched-age animals. Among the epithelial markers studied the prostatic specific acid phosphatase was present in hyperplastic prostates of rats. The immunoreaction showed a fair correlation with the severity of lesion and duration of treatment. The prostatic specific antigen showed equally immunoreactive in both control and treated rats. The hyperplastic and normal rat prostates did not show immunoreactivity towards the other epithelial cell markers such as epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembrionic antingen and alpha-fetoprotein antisera. It is concluded that prostatic specific acid phosphatase, and to a lesser extent prostatic specific antigen, might represent valuable markers for comparative studies of prostatic hyperplasia in rodents.

  19. Analysis of Urinary Prostate-Specific Antigen Glycoforms in Samples of Prostate Cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Jen; Tzai, Tzong-Shin; Chen, Chein-Hung; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Glycans of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer were found to be different from that in benign disease. It is difficult to analyze heterogeneous PSA glycoforms in each individual specimen because of low protein abundance and the limitation of detection sensitivity. We developed a method for prostate cancer diagnosis based on PSA glycoforms. Specific glycoforms were screened in each clinical sample based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with ion accumulation. To look for potential biomarkers, normalized abundance of each glycoform in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and in prostate cancer was evaluated. The PSA glycoform, Hex5HexNAc4NeuAc1dHex1, and monosialylated, sialylated, and unfucosylated glycoforms differed significantly between the prostate cancer and BPH samples. The detection sensitivity (87.5%) and specificity (60%) for prostate cancer identification are higher than those of the serum PSA marker. As low as 100 amol PSA could be detected with the ion accumulation method which has not been reported before. The improved detection specificity can help reduce unnecessary examinations. PMID:27065039

  20. Unique G-Rich Oligonucleotides Which Inhibit the Growth of Prostatic Carcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    Prostate Cancer) MDA-MB-231 (Breast Cancer) HeLa ( Cervical Cancer ) HS27 (Normal Skin) Nuclear nucleolin staining. (A) Phase contrast (upper panel) and...stained nucleoli in normal HS27 cells. Surface nucleolin staining. DU145 (Prostate Cancer) MDA-MB-231 (Breast Cancer) HeLa ( Cervical Cancer ) HS27 (Normal

  1. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells As a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer” 5b. GRANT NUMBER...form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell

  2. Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Roderick T Hori, Ph.D...July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer ...such as MeCP2, MBD1, MBD2 and MBD4, in malignant prostate cancer cells and matched normal or benign prostate cells using Chromatin

  3. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  4. Medical Tests for Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... than age 50 is inflammation, called prostatitis. Prostate enlargement, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is another common ... cannot distinguish between cancerous tumors and noncancerous prostate enlargement. Once a biopsy has confirmed cancer, these imaging ...

  5. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  6. In vivo cryoablation of prostate tissue with temperature monitoring by optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena V.; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2016-03-01

    Cryoablation of prostate cancer is an FDA approved clinical procedure, which involves repetitive rapid cooling of a lesion to lethal temperatures of -40°C and below. The major drawback of the technique is the insufficient control over the fast thermal processes that may result in severe complications (impotence, incontinence, perforation of the rectal wall) and morbidity. The developed optoacoustic imaging technique provides non-invasive real-time temperature mapping of tissue adjacent to prostate and enables more efficient control over the procedure, which is necessary to reduce side effects and accelerate the physician's learning curve. In these studies we successfully demonstrated real-time transrectal optoacoustic imaging during prostate cryoablation in live canine model focused on optoacoustic thermography of the rectal wall within the depth of 1cm. Our method utilized previously discovered universal thermal dependence of the normalized optoacoustic response of blood. Nanosecond-pulse radiation of Ti-Sapphire laser tuned to the isosbestic point of hemoglobin (802+/-3 nm) was delivered via fiberoptic illuminators assembled on both sides of the linear array of the 128-channel transrectal ultrasound probe. Temperature readouts at discrete locations inside and nearby prostate were also performed using standard transperineal needle sensors. The effect of homeostasis on optoacoustic imaging in live tissue was examined during cooling and shown to be significant only within the range of +/-1.5°C in respect to the body temperature. Accuracy of in vivo optoacoustic temperature measurements was determined as +/-2°C for the range of temperature from +35 to -15°C, which is more than sufficient for tracking the essential isotherms in the course of clinical procedures.

  7. Combination of Autoantibody Signature with PSA Level Enables a Highly Accurate Blood-Based Differentiation of Prostate Cancer Patients from Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Leidinger, Petra; Keller, Andreas; Milchram, Lisa; Harz, Christian; Hart, Martin; Werth, Angelika; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Although an increased level of the prostate-specific antigen can be an indication for prostate cancer, other reasons often lead to a high rate of false positive results. Therefore, an additional serological screening of autoantibodies in patients’ sera could improve the detection of prostate cancer. We performed protein macroarray screening with sera from 49 prostate cancer patients, 70 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 28 healthy controls and compared the autoimmune response in those groups. We were able to distinguish prostate cancer patients from normal controls with an accuracy of 83.2%, patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia from normal controls with an accuracy of 86.0% and prostate cancer patients from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia with an accuracy of 70.3%. Combining seroreactivity pattern with a PSA level of higher than 4.0 ng/ml this classification could be improved to an accuracy of 84.1%. For selected proteins we were able to confirm the differential expression by using luminex on 84 samples. We provide a minimally invasive serological method to reduce false positive results in detection of prostate cancer and according to PSA screening to distinguish men with prostate cancer from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:26039628

  8. Combination of Autoantibody Signature with PSA Level Enables a Highly Accurate Blood-Based Differentiation of Prostate Cancer Patients from Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Petra; Keller, Andreas; Milchram, Lisa; Harz, Christian; Hart, Martin; Werth, Angelika; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Keck, Bastian; Wullich, Bernd; Ludwig, Nicole; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Although an increased level of the prostate-specific antigen can be an indication for prostate cancer, other reasons often lead to a high rate of false positive results. Therefore, an additional serological screening of autoantibodies in patients' sera could improve the detection of prostate cancer. We performed protein macroarray screening with sera from 49 prostate cancer patients, 70 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 28 healthy controls and compared the autoimmune response in those groups. We were able to distinguish prostate cancer patients from normal controls with an accuracy of 83.2%, patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia from normal controls with an accuracy of 86.0% and prostate cancer patients from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia with an accuracy of 70.3%. Combining seroreactivity pattern with a PSA level of higher than 4.0 ng/ml this classification could be improved to an accuracy of 84.1%. For selected proteins we were able to confirm the differential expression by using luminex on 84 samples. We provide a minimally invasive serological method to reduce false positive results in detection of prostate cancer and according to PSA screening to distinguish men with prostate cancer from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  9. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: unusual subtype of prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazumasa; Inamoto, Teruo; Tsuji, Motomu; Ibuki, Naokazu; Koyama, Kohei; Ubai, Takanobu; Azuma, Haruhito; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2010-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate, which has been generally considered to be indolent, is an unusual histological type of prostatic carcinoma and is extremely rare. This tumor has been classified according to the prevalent pattern of growth as adenoid cystic carcinoma or basaloid cell carcinoma (BCC), with the former growth pattern being considered to be the main feature of this entity. A 67-year-old Japanese man was admitted to a general hospital with obstructive urinary symptoms. His prostate was slightly enlarged, stony hard, and with a rough surface on digital rectal examination, while serum prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase concentrations were within the normal ranges (0.007 and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively). 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) exhibited multiple accumulations suspicious for cancer metastases. Specimens obtained by prostatic needle biopsy showed immunohistochemical reactivity for cytokeratin 34βE12 and P63, findings that were identical to those seen in basal cell carcinoma. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare tumor, reported in 56 cases so far, and among all these, the pure form of BCC is extremely rare. Immunohistochemistry is indispensable to distinguish this neoplasm from other unusual histological types of prostatic carcinomas. Our findings reveal that tumors with a basaloid cell-predominant pattern have significant potential for a poor prognosis, in contrast with the conventional understanding regarding this neoplasm.

  10. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  11. Immunohistochemistry of the cytoskeleton of human prostatic epithelium. Evidence for disturbed organization in neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, D. M.; Heatfield, B. M.; Anthony, R. L.; Trump, B. F.

    1987-01-01

    An indirect immunoperoxidase technique was used to evaluate keratin, actin, tubulin, and calmodulin immunoreactivity in histologic sections of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic human prostate. Polyclonal as well as monoclonal keratin antibodies produced equivalent and intense staining of normal epithelium. The immunoreactivity of normal prostate with keratin antibodies was more pronounced than with antibodies to the other components of the cytoskeleton. Variation in staining for components of the cytoskeleton was minimal. The same findings applied to hyperplastic prostate. The immunoreactivity of prostate tumors with antibodies to these cytoskeletal proteins differed markedly from normal prostate. Prostatic carcinomas showed reduced keratin immunoreactivity with a panepithelial antibody, but unaltered or enhanced immunoreactivity with tubulin, actin, and calmodulin antibodies. Many tumors were unreactive with a monoclonal keratin antibody that was strongly reactive with tissues that contained cytokeratin 18 (45-kd) and which intensely stained normal and hyperplastic prostate. In addition, prostate carcinomas often yielded heterogeneous patterns of staining with actin, tubulin, and calmodulin antibodies in contrast to normal and hyperplastic prostate, which showed uniform staining. The results suggest that a disturbance in the organization of the cytoskeleton may accompany neoplastic transformation of human prostate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2435158

  12. [Prostate-specific antigen. The role in the prostate cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Luis Carlos; Paredes-Solís, César Armando; Hernández-Ordóñez, Octavio Francisco; Sánchez-Ruvalcaba, Itzel Rigel

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a common malignant neoplasia in males over 50 years. The serum level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a tool in the diagnosis of PC and benign prostatic hyperplasia patients that improves the efficiency obtained with the digital rectal examination. The use of PSA increases the detection rates of organ-confined PC. The PSA must be requested by the primary care physician in male population over 45 years and if the result is above the normal levels, the patient must be send to an urologist.

  13. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  14. Actions of estrogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals on human prostate stem/progenitor cells and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Nelles, Jason L; Prins, Gail S

    2012-05-06

    Estrogen reprogramming of the prostate gland as a function of developmental exposures (aka developmental estrogenization) results in permanent alterations in structure and gene expression that lead to an increased incidence of prostatic lesions with aging. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic activity have been similarly linked to an increased prostate cancer risk. Since it has been suggested that stem cells and cancer stem cells are potential targets of cancer initiation and disease management, it is highly possible that estrogens and EDCs influence the development and progression of prostate cancer through reprogramming and transforming the prostate stem and early stage progenitor cells. In this article, we review recent literature highlighting the effects of estrogens and EDCs on prostate cancer risk and discuss recent advances in prostate stem/progenitor cell research. Our laboratory has recently developed a novel prostasphere model using normal human prostate stem/progenitor cells and established that these cells express estrogen receptors (ERs) and are direct targets of estrogen action. Further, using a chimeric in vivo prostate model derived from these normal human prostate progenitor cells, we demonstrated for the first time that estrogens initiate and promote prostatic carcinogenesis in an androgen-supported environment. We herein discuss these findings and highlight new evidence using our in vitro human prostasphere assay for perturbations in human prostate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by natural steroids as well as EDCs. These findings support the hypothesis that tissue stem cells may be direct EDC targets which may underlie life-long reprogramming as a consequence of developmental and/or transient adult exposures.

  15. Role of ProstaScint for brachytherapy in localized prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Rodney J; Kim, Edward; Foor, Ryan

    2004-07-01

    ProstaScint (CYT-356 or capromab pendetide, Cytogen) is an 111In-labeled monoclonal mouse antibody specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen, a prostate transmembrane glycoprotein that is upregulated in prostate adenocarcinoma. ProstaScint scans are US Food and Drug Administration approved for pretreatment evaluation of metastatic disease in high-risk patients. They are also approved for post-prostatectomy assessment of recurrent disease in patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen level. This review explores the literature on ProstaScint and its use in guiding the treatment of prostate cancer. A novel technique for identifying areas of cancer within the prostate using ProstaScint images fused with pelvic computed tomography scans is also described. The identification of areas of high antibody signal provides targets for radiotherapeutic dose escalation, with the overall goals of improving treatment outcome while preserving adjacent tissue structures and decreasing treatment morbidity.

  16. A comprehensive repertoire of tRNA-derived fragments in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Youri

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer among men in developed countries. Although its genetic background is thoroughly investigated, rather little is known about the role of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) in this disease. tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs) represent a new class of sncRNAs, which are present in a broad range of species and have been reported to play a role in several cellular processes. Here, we analyzed the expression of tRFs in fresh frozen patient samples derived from normal adjacent prostate and different stages of PCa by RNA-sequencing. We identified 598 unique tRFs, many of which are deregulated in cancer samples when compared to normal adjacent tissue. Most of the identified tRFs are derived from the 5’- and 3’-ends of mature cytosolic tRNAs, but we also found tRFs produced from other parts of tRNAs, including pre-tRNA trailers and leaders, as well as tRFs from mitochondrial tRNAs. The 5’-derived tRFs comprise the most abundant class of tRFs in general and represent the major class among upregulated tRFs. The 3’-derived tRFs types are dominant among downregulated tRFs in PCa. We validated the expression of three tRFs using qPCR. The ratio of tRFs derived from tRNALysCTT and tRNAPheGAA emerged as a good indicator of progression-free survival and a candidate prognostic marker. This study provides a systematic catalogue of tRFs and their dysregulation in PCa and can serve as the basis for further research on the biomarker potential and functional roles of tRFs in this disease. PMID:27015120

  17. A comprehensive repertoire of tRNA-derived fragments in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Olvedy, Michael; Scaravilli, Mauro; Hoogstrate, Youri; Visakorpi, Tapio; Jenster, Guido; Martens-Uzunova, Elena S

    2016-04-26

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer among men in developed countries. Although its genetic background is thoroughly investigated, rather little is known about the role of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) in this disease. tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs) represent a new class of sncRNAs, which are present in a broad range of species and have been reported to play a role in several cellular processes. Here, we analyzed the expression of tRFs in fresh frozen patient samples derived from normal adjacent prostate and different stages of PCa by RNA-sequencing. We identified 598 unique tRFs, many of which are deregulated in cancer samples when compared to normal adjacent tissue. Most of the identified tRFs are derived from the 5'- and 3'-ends of mature cytosolic tRNAs, but we also found tRFs produced from other parts of tRNAs, including pre-tRNA trailers and leaders, as well as tRFs from mitochondrial tRNAs. The 5'-derived tRFs comprise the most abundant class of tRFs in general and represent the major class among upregulated tRFs. The 3'-derived tRFs types are dominant among downregulated tRFs in PCa. We validated the expression of three tRFs using qPCR. The ratio of tRFs derived from tRNALysCTT and tRNAPheGAA emerged as a good indicator of progression-free survival and a candidate prognostic marker. This study provides a systematic catalogue of tRFs and their dysregulation in PCa and can serve as the basis for further research on the biomarker potential and functional roles of tRFs in this disease.

  18. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  19. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  20. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  1. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  2. PROSTATE REGULATION: MODELING ENDOGENOUS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS. ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS.

  3. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  4. Prostate development and growth in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Timms, Barry G; Hofkamp, Luke E

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia [BPH] in elderly men has intrigued anatomists, pathologists and scientists for centuries. Studies of morbid anatomy, clinical observations and contemporary cellular biology have contributed to an evolving interpretation of the causality of the disease. Insights into the detailed microanatomy and ductal architecture of the prostate during stages of fetal and early postnatal development suggest that mechanisms involved in the early growth period become aberrantly expressed in elderly men. Age, hormones and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are all contributing factors to the pathogenesis of BPH. Control of the microenvironment in normal and abnormal growth is a multifactorial process. Susceptibility to the disease may include clinical comorbid diseases, region-specific changes in cell-cell interactions and a variety of signaling pathways including a novel hypothesis regarding the role of the primary cilium as a regulator of signal transduction mechanisms. Recent work in animal models has shown that there are region-specific differences within the prostate that may be significant because of the dynamic and intricate interplay between the epithelium and mesenchyme. Because of the focal nature of BPH a closer examination of normal morphogenesis patterns, which defines the gland's architecture, may facilitate a detailed understanding of the atypical growth patterns.

  5. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  6. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  7. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  8. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  9. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  10. Functional anatomy of the prostate: Implications for treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Patrick W. . E-mail: mclaughb@umich.edu; Troyer, Sara; Berri, Sally; Narayana, Vrinda; Meirowitz, Amichay; Roberson, Peter L.; Montie, James

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To summarize the functional anatomy relevant to prostate cancer treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Coronal, axial, and sagittal T2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI angiography were fused by mutual information and registered with computed tomography (CT) scan data sets to improve definition of zonal anatomy of the prostate and critical adjacent structures. Results: The three major prostate zones (inner, outer, and anterior fibromuscular) are visible by T2 MRI imaging. The bladder, bladder neck, and internal (preprostatic) sphincter are a continuous muscular structure and clear definition of the preprostatic sphincter is difficult by MRI. Transition zone hypertrophy may efface the bladder neck and internal sphincter. The external 'lower' sphincter is clearly visible by T2 MRI with wide variations in length. The critical erectile structures are the internal pudendal artery (defined by MRI angiogram or T2 MRI), corpus cavernosum, and neurovascular bundle. The neurovascular bundle is visible along the posterior lateral surface of the prostate on CT and MRI, but its terminal branches (cavernosal nerves) are not visible and must be defined by their relationship to the urethra within the genitourinary diaphragm. Visualization of the ejaculatory ducts within the prostate is possible on sagittal MRI. The anatomy of the prostate-rectum interface is clarified by MRI, as is the potentially important distinction of rectal muscle and rectal mucosa. Conclusion: Improved understanding of functional anatomy and imaging of the prostate and critical adjacent structures will improve prostate radiation therapy by improvement of dose and toxicity correlation, limitation of dose to critical structures, and potential improvement in post therapy quality of life.

  11. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Gao-Feng; Hou, Xiu-Yu; Gao, Hong; Xu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer, which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction. IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field, step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n = 12) or VMAT (n = 12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015. Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator. Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study. Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner. Results: Compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs. 7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy, P < 0.001). VMAT reduced the rectal D25 (P < 0.001), D35 (P < 0.001), and D50 (P < 0.001), bladder V50 (P < 0.001), D25 (P = 0.002), D35 (P = 0.028), and D50 (P = 0.029). However, VMAT did not statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50, compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs. 27.43 ± 8.79%, P = 0.087). Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation

  12. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  13. Distribution of the AQP4 water channel in normal human tissues: protein and tissue microarrays reveal expression in several new anatomical locations, including the prostate gland and seminal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Marples, David; Young, Iain S; Floyd, Rachel V; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Frigeri, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Aquaporins facilitate osmotically driven water movement across cell membranes. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a major water channel in the central nervous system where it participates in cerebral water balance. AQP4 is also present in basolateral membranes of lower respiratory tract airway and renal collecting duct epithelial cells, gastric parietal cells and skeletal muscle cells. However, the distribution of AQP4 in many other tissues is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and relative abundance of AQP4 in human Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) and human protein microarrays by immunohistochemistry and chemiluminescence. In the central nervous system AQP4 was abundantly expressed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex (purkinje/granular layer), ependymal cell layer, hippocampus and spinal cord. Lower levels were detected in choroid plexus, white matter and meninges. In the musculoskeletal system AQP4 was highly expressed in the sarcolemma of skeletal muscle from the chest and neck. In the male genital system AQP4 was moderately expressed in seminiferous tubules, seminal vesicles, prostate and epidiymis. In the respiratory system AQP4 was moderately expressed in lung and bronchus. AQP expression was abundant in the kidney. In the gastrointestinal system AQP4 was moderately present in basolateral membranes of parietal cells at the base of gastric glands. AQP4 was also detected in salivary glands, adrenals, anterior pituitary, prostate and seminal vesicles. Human protein microarrays verified the TMA data. Our findings suggest that AQP4 is expressed more widely than previously thought in human organs and may be involved in prostatic and seminal fluid formation.

  14. Altered expression of p53, but not Rb, is involved in canine prostatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pagliarone, Simone; Frattone, Luca; Pirocchi, Valeria; Della Salda, Leonardo; Palmieri, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Abnormalities in the retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 tumour suppressor gene have been frequently detected in human and canine cancers, but never investigated in canine prostate cancer, considered a good model for the advanced and aggressive androgen-resistant prostate cancer in men. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Rb and p53 in 6 normal canine prostates, 15 canine prostates with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 10 prostatic carcinomas (PCs). In all normal samples, p53 was expressed in low number of epithelial cells, while a greater number of positive cells were observed in BPH and PC. The mean number of positive cells was statistically significantly higher in PCs than normal and hyperplastic prostates. A cytoplasmic or nucleo-cytoplasmic staining was observed in 5 out of 10 PCs. Rb protein was expressed in high number of normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic cells without a statistically significant differences. Considering that Rb is frequently lost in human prostate cancer, we suggest that Rb is not involved in canine prostatic carcinogenesis. On the other hand, the increased expression of p53 that corresponds to genetic defects in the p53 gene may be associated with the malignant growth of canine prostate cancer, conferring an apoptosis-resistant phenotype.

  15. In vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma with antibodies against prostatic acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    De Land, F.H.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Serum prostatic acid phosphates (PAP) immunoassay is used to evaluate patients with prostatic carcinoma; however, as with other tumor markers, the enzyme levels do not necessarily reflect the presence or extent of tumor. The authors investigated the use of radiolabeled PAP antibodies for the in vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma by external scintillation imaging. Nine patients with prostatic carcinoma were entered into the study. Each received from 2.0 to 2.5 mCi of I-131 labeled antibody to PAP, administered i.v. The immunogen (PAP) was purified from normal human seminal fluid. Antiserum was prepared in rabbits by injecting the purified PAP. The antibodies were labeled with I-131 by chloramine-T method (10 to 20 Ci/g of IgG). Total body images were obtained at 24 and 48 hrs following administration of the labeled antibody. Nontarget I-131 activity was diminished by computer processing. Tumor sites detected by I-131 antibodies were correlated with other diagnostic procedures. In 7 of 9 patients primary and metastatic sites of cancer were detected by antibody imaging, however, no bone lesions were detected (6 cases). In 3 patients with concomitant pulmonary tumors, one was identified as of prostate origin. The serum PAP was normal in 4 patients; however, the primary tumor was identified in 3 of these. These findings suggest that the localization of prostatic carcinoma by means of in-vivo imaging of labeled antibodies to PAP is feasible and offers diagnostic opportunities based upon the functional characteristics.

  16. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  17. Studies of vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad for the photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Blanc, Dominique; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2005-01-01

    In this pre-clinical study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide) is investigated as an alternative treatment modality for the ablation of prostate cancer. Canine prostate was used as the animal model. PDT was performed by interstitially irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug dose, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on PDT efficacy were evaluated. The prostates and adjacent tissues were harvested at one-week post PDT and subjected to histopathological examination. The dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Urinalysis showed trace blood. Histological examination showed minimal damage to the prostatic urethra. These indicated that the urethra was well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis with a clear demarcation. Maximum lesion volume of ~3 cm3 could be achieved with a single 1-cm diffuser fiber at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 200 J/cm, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. PDT induced lesion could reach the capsule layers but adjacent tissues were well preserved. The novel photosensitizer is a vascular drug and cleared rapidly from the circulation. Light irradiation can be performed during drug infusion thereby eliminating waiting time. The novel vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad-mediated PDT could provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  18. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing to find ... Health Care Team About Prostate Cancer? More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  19. Genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene as predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Fang-Ning; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Sun, Li-Jiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Clinically localized prostate cancer is curative. Nevertheless many patients suffered from biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Mounting evidence suggest that estrogen and xenobiotic carcinogens play an essential role in progression of prostate cancervia oxidative estrogen metabolism. CYP1B1 is an enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of estrogens, a reaction of key relevance in estrogen metabolism. Given the role of CYP1B1 in the oxidative metabolism of endogenous/exogenous estrogen and compounds, CYP1B1 polymorphisms have the potential to modify its expression and subsequently lead to progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene may influence clinical outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer patients. In this cohort study, we genotyped 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the CYP1B1 gene in 312 patients treated with RP. For replication, these SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 426 patients. The expression level of CYP1B1 in the adjacent normal prostate tissues was quantified by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify SNPs that correlated with BCR. CYP1B1 rs1056836 was significantly associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40-0.89, P = 0.002) and relative CYP1B1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the CYP1B1 gene may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer.

  20. Genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene as predictors of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Cheng-Yuan; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Fang-Ning; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Sun, Li-Jiang; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically localized prostate cancer is curative. Nevertheless many patients suffered from biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Mounting evidence suggest that estrogen and xenobiotic carcinogens play an essential role in progression of prostate cancervia oxidative estrogen metabolism. CYP1B1 is an enzyme involved in the hydroxylation of estrogens, a reaction of key relevance in estrogen metabolism. Given the role of CYP1B1 in the oxidative metabolism of endogenous/exogenous estrogen and compounds, CYP1B1 polymorphisms have the potential to modify its expression and subsequently lead to progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the CYP1B1 gene may influence clinical outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer patients. In this cohort study, we genotyped 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the CYP1B1 gene in 312 patients treated with RP. For replication, these SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 426 patients. The expression level of CYP1B1 in the adjacent normal prostate tissues was quantified by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify SNPs that correlated with BCR. CYP1B1 rs1056836 was significantly associated with BCR (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40–0.89, P = 0.002) and relative CYP1B1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the CYP1B1 gene may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. PMID:27399092

  1. Dysregulated expression of cell surface glycoprotein CDCP1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lifang; Dutta, Sucharita M.; Troyer, Dean A.; Lin, Jefferson B.; Lance, Raymond A.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Drake, Richard R; Semmes, O. John

    2015-01-01

    CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is a trans-membrane protein regulator of cell adhesion with a potent pro-migratory function in tumors. Given that proteolytic cleavage of the ectodomain correlates with outside-in oncogenic signaling, we characterized glycosylation in the context of cellular processing and expression of CDCP1 in prostate cancer. We detected 135 kDa full-length and proteolytic processed 70 kDa species in a panel of PCa cell models. The relative expression of full-length CDCP1 correlated with the metastatic potential of syngeneic cell models and an increase in surface membrane expression of CDCP1 was observed in tumor compared to adjacent normal prostate tissues. We demonstrated that glycosylation of CDCP1 is a prerequisite for protein stability and plasma membrane localization, and that the expression level and extent of N-glycosylation of CDCP1 correlated with metastatic status. Interestingly, complex N-linked glycans with sialic acid chains were restricted to the N-terminal half of the ectodomain and absent in the truncated species. Characterization of the extracellular expression of CDCP1 identified novel circulating forms and revealed that extracellular vesicles provide additional processing pathways. Employing immunoaffinity mass spectrometry, we detected elevated levels of circulating CDCP1 in patient urine with high-risk disease. Our results establish that differential glycosylation, cell surface presentation and extracellular expression of CDCP1 are hallmarks of PCa progression. PMID:26497208

  2. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency among patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Donald L.; Chadha, Manpreet K.; Sunga, Annette Y.; Fakih, Marwan G.; Ashraf, Umeer; Silliman, Carrie G.; Hollis, Bruce W.; Nesline, Mary K.; Tian, Lili; Tan, Wei; Johnson, Candace S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the frequency of vitamin D deficiency among men with prostate cancer, as considerable epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical data support an association between vitamin D deficiency and prostate cancer outcome. Patients, subjects and methods The study included 120 ambulatory men with recurrent prostate cancer and 50 with clinically localized prostate cancer who were evaluated and serum samples assayed for 25-OH vitamin D levels. Then 100 controls (both sexes), matched for age and season of serum sample, were chosen from a prospective serum banking protocol. The relationship between age, body mass index, disease stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, season and previous therapy on vitamin D status were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The mean 25-OH vitamin D level was 25.9 ng/mL in those with recurrent disease, 27.5 ng/mL in men with clinically localized prostate cancer and 24.5 ng/mL in controls. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency (< 20 ng/mL) and insufficiency (20–31 ng/mL) was 40% and 32% in men with recurrent prostate; 28% had vitamin D levels that were normal (32–100 ng/mL). Among men with localized prostate cancer, 18% were deficient, 50% were insufficient and 32% were normal. Among controls, 31% were deficient, 40% were insufficient and 29% were normal. Metastatic disease (P = 0.005) and season of blood sampling (winter/spring; P = 0.01) were associated with vitamin D deficiency in patients with prostate cancer, while age, race, performance status and body mass index were not. Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were common among men with prostate cancer and apparently normal controls in the western New York region. PMID:19426195

  3. MicroRNA-181b expression in prostate cancer tissues and its influence on the biological behavior of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3.

    PubMed

    He, L; Yao, H; Fan, L H; Liu, L; Qiu, S; Li, X; Gao, J P; Hao, C Q

    2013-04-02

    We examined microRNA-181b (miRNA) expression in prostate cancer tissues and its effect on the prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Tissues from 27 cases of prostate cancer and 30 samples of normal human prostate were collected by surgical removal. Total miRNA was extracted, and the relative expression of miR-181b was quantified using RT-PCR. miR-181b ASO was transfected into prostate cancer PC-3 cells. miR-181b expression in transfected and non-transfected cells was measured using RT-PCR. Changes in cell apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. MTT and cell growth curve methods were used to assess the influence of miR-181b expression on cell proliferation. The changes in cell invasive ability in vitro were detected using the Transwell chamber method. miR-181b was up-regulated in the prostate cancer tissues compared with the normal prostate samples. It was down-regulated after miR-181b ASO transfection into the prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Down-regulation of miR-181b in the PC-3 cell induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, and depressed invasion of PC-3 cells in vitro. As miR-181b is over-expressed in prostate cancer, its down-regulation could have potential as gene therapy for prostate cancer by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation and depressing invasion by cancer cells.

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  5. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  7. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  8. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  9. Isolation, cultivation, and characterization of adult murine prostate stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Rita U.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lawson, Devon A.; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT/SUMMARY The successful isolation and cultivation of prostate stem cells will allow us to study their unique biological properties and their application in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the harvesting of primary prostate cells from adolescent male mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the isolation of an enriched population of prostate stem cells through cell sorting; the cultivation of prostate stem cells in vitro; and characterization of these cells and their stem-like activity, including in vivo tubule regeneration. Normally it will take approximately 8 hours to harvest prostate cells, isolate the stem cell enriched population, and set up the in vitro sphere assay. It will take up to 8 weeks to analyze the unique properties of the stem cells, including their regenerative capacity in vivo. PMID:20360765

  10. Isolation, cultivation and characterization of adult murine prostate stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Rita U; Goldstein, Andrew S; Lawson, Devon A; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N

    2010-04-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of prostate stem cells will allow us to study their unique biological properties and their application in therapeutic approaches. Here we describe step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for the harvesting of primary prostate cells from adolescent male mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the isolation of an enriched population of prostate stem cells through cell sorting; and the cultivation of prostate stem cells in vitro and characterization of these cells and their stem-like activity, including in vivo tubule regeneration. Normally, it will take approximately 8 h to harvest prostate cells, isolate the stem cell-enriched population and set up the in vitro sphere assay. It will take up to 8 weeks to analyze the unique properties of the stem cells, including their regenerative capacity in vivo.

  11. Defective DNA strand break repair after DNA damage in prostate cancer cells: implications for genetic instability and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Kumaravel, Tirukalikundram S; Jalali, Farid; Marrano, Paula; Squire, Jeremy A; Bristow, Robert G

    2004-12-01

    Together with cell cycle checkpoint control, DNA repair plays a pivotal role in protecting the genome from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. Although increased genetic instability has been associated with prostate cancer progression, the relative role of DNA double-strand break repair in malignant versus normal prostate epithelial cells is not known. In this study, we determined the RNA and protein expression of a series of DNA double-strand break repair genes in both normal (PrEC-epithelial and PrSC-stromal) and malignant (LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3) prostate cultures. Expression of genes downstream of ATM after ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage reflected the p53 status of the cell lines. In the malignant prostate cell lines, mRNA and protein levels of the Rad51, Xrcc3, Rad52, and Rad54 genes involved in homologous recombination were elevated approximately 2- to 5-fold in comparison to normal PrEC cells. The XRCC1, DNA polymerase-beta and -delta proteins were also elevated. There were no consistent differences in gene expression relating to the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Despite increased expression of DNA repair genes, malignant prostate cancer cells had defective repair of DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative base damage. Furthermore, after ionizing radiation and mitomycin C treatment, chromosomal aberration assays confirmed that malignant prostate cells had defective DNA repair. This discordance between expression and function of DNA repair genes in malignant prostate cancer cells supports the hypothesis that prostate tumor progression may reflect aberrant DNA repair. Our findings support the development of novel treatment strategies designed to reinstate normal DNA repair in prostate cancer cells.

  12. RNA splicing and splicing regulator changes in prostate cancer pathology.

    PubMed

    Munkley, Jennifer; Livermore, Karen; Rajan, Prabhakar; Elliott, David J

    2017-04-05

    Changes in mRNA splice patterns have been associated with key pathological mechanisms in prostate cancer progression. The androgen receptor (abbreviated AR) transcription factor is a major driver of prostate cancer pathology and activated by androgen steroid hormones. Selection of alternative promoters by the activated AR can critically alter gene function by switching mRNA isoform production, including creating a pro-oncogenic isoform of the normally tumour suppressor gene TSC2. A number of androgen-regulated genes generate alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, including a prostate-specific splice isoform of ST6GALNAC1 mRNA. ST6GALNAC1 encodes a sialyltransferase that catalyses the synthesis of the cancer-associated sTn antigen important for cell mobility. Genetic rearrangements occurring early in prostate cancer development place ERG oncogene expression under the control of the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to hijack cell behaviour. This TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene shows different patterns of alternative splicing in invasive versus localised prostate cancer. Alternative AR mRNA isoforms play a key role in the generation of prostate cancer drug resistance, by providing a mechanism through which prostate cancer cells can grow in limited serum androgen concentrations. A number of splicing regulator proteins change expression patterns in prostate cancer and may help drive key stages of disease progression. Up-regulation of SRRM4 establishes neuronal splicing patterns in neuroendocrine prostate cancer. The splicing regulators Sam68 and Tra2β increase expression in prostate cancer. The SR protein kinase SRPK1 that modulates the activity of SR proteins is up-regulated in prostate cancer and has already given encouraging results as a potential therapeutic target in mouse models.

  13. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  14. Protons or megavoltage X-rays as boost therapy for patients irradiated for localized prostatic carcinoma. An early phase I/II comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Duttenhaver, J.R.; Shipley, W.U.; Perrone, T.; Verhey, L.J.; Goitein, M.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Prout, G.R.; Parkhurst, E.C.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    A total of 180 patients with carcinoma of the prostate limited to the pelvis were treated with one of two external beam irradiation techniques between 1972 and 1979. One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with conventional pelvic megavoltage x-ray therapy. Sixty-four patients were treated with combined pelvic x-ray therapy plus a perineal proton beam boost to a carefully defined prostatic tumor volume. A 160 MeV proton beam has been modified to irradiate patients with localized tumors by using conventional treatment schedules. This proton beam has the physical advantage over megavoltage x-rays of reducing the dose to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor volume. By using the proton beam boost we have delivered an increased prostatic tumor dose of 500 to 700 cGy without increasing treatment morbidity at all. The two groups are actuarially analyzed for patient survival, disease-free survival and local recurrence-free survival, and thus far, no significant differences have been noted. Because of the minimal complications observed in the proton group despite a 10% increase in dose, a randomized clinical trial comparing these two treatment techniques is studied.

  15. Proton Therapy Coverage for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Wagner, Marcus; Mahajan, Chaitali; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Falchook, Aaron; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig C.; Lawlor, Paula C.; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of prostate motion on dose coverage in proton therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 prostate positions were analyzed on 10 treatment plans for 10 prostate patients treated using our low-risk proton therapy prostate protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin-echo scans were registered for all cases. The planning target volume included the prostate with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior expansion. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm one-dimensional vectors and 10-mm multidimensional vectors (Points A-D). The beam was realigned for the 5- and 10-mm displacements. The prescription dose was 78 Gy equivalent (GE). Results: The mean percentage of rectum receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}) was 7.9%, the bladder V{sub 70} was 14.0%, and the femoral head/neck V{sub 50} was 0.1%, and the mean pelvic dose was 4.6 GE. The percentage of prostate receiving 78 Gy (V{sub 78}) with the 5-mm movements changed by -0.2% (range, 0.006-0.5%, p > 0.7). However, the prostate V{sub 78} after a 10-mm displacement changed significantly (p < 0.003) with different movements: 3.4% (superior), -5.6% (inferior), and -10.2% (posterior). The corresponding minimal doses were also reduced: 4.5 GE, -4.7 GE, and -11.7 GE (p {<=} 0.003). For displacement points A-D, the clinical target volume V{sub 78} coverage had a large and significant reduction of 17.4% (range, 13.5-17.4%, p < 0.001) in V{sub 78} coverage of the clinical target volume. The minimal prostate dose was reduced 33% (25.8 GE), on average, for Points A-D. The prostate minimal dose improved from 69.3 GE to 78.2 GE (p < 0.001) with realignment for 10-mm movements. Conclusion: The good dose coverage and low normal doses achieved for the initial plan was maintained with movements of {<=}5 mm. Beam realignment improved coverage for 10-mm displacements.

  16. Use of shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Rus, G.; Saffari, N.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains as a major healthcare issue. Limitations in current diagnosis and treatment monitoring techniques imply that there is still a need for improvements. The efficacy of prostate cancer diagnosis is still low, generating under and over diagnoses. High intensity focused ultrasound ablation is an emerging treatment modality, which enables the noninvasive ablation of pathogenic tissue. Clinical trials are being carried out to evaluate its longterm efficacy as a focal treatment for prostate cancer. Successful treatment of prostate cancer using non-invasive modalities is critically dependent on accurate diagnostic means and is greatly benefited by a real-time monitoring system. While magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for prostate imaging, its wider implementation for prostate cancer diagnosis remains prohibitively expensive. Conventional ultrasound is currently limited to guiding biopsy. Elastography techniques are emerging as a promising real-time imaging method, as cancer nodules are usually stiffer than adjacent healthy prostatic tissue. In this paper, a new transurethral approach is proposed, using shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer. A finite-difference time domain model is developed for studying the feasibility of the method, and an inverse problem technique based on genetic algorithms is proposed for reconstructing the location, size and stiffness parameters of the tumour. Preliminary results indicate that the use of shear waves for diagnosis and monitoring ablation of prostate cancer is feasible.

  17. Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis in Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Treatments for Prostate Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil

    2009-05-01

    Studies have shown that as many as 8 out of 10 men had prostate cancer by age 80.Prostate cancer begins with small changes (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia(PIN)) in size and shape of prostate gland cells,known as prostate adenocarcinoma.With advent in technology, prostate cancer has been the most widely used application of IMRT with the longest follow-up periods.Prostate cancer fits the ideal target criteria for IMRT of adjacent sensitive dose-limiting tissue (rectal, bladder).A retrospective study was performed on 10 prostate cancer patients treated with radiation to a limited pelvic field with a standard 4 field arrangements at dose 45 Gy, and an IMRT boost field to a total isocenter dose of 75 Gy.Plans were simulated for 4 field and the supplementary IMRT treatments with proposed dose delivery at 1.5 Gy/fraction in BID basis.An automated DVH analysis software, HART (S. Jang et al., 2008,Med Phys 35,p.2812)was used to perform DVH assessments in IMRT plans.A statistical analysis of dose coverage at targets in prostate gland and neighboring critical organs,and the plan indices(homogeneity, conformality etc) evaluations were also performed using HART extracted DVH statistics.Analyzed results showed a better correlation with the proposed outcomes (TCP, NTCP) of the treatments.

  18. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of estrogen receptors in prostate and clinical correlation in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gangkak, Goto; Mittal, Alka; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Ajay; Mehta, Jayanti

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Estrogens act through interaction with 2 receptor subtypes, ER alpha (ERα) and ER beta (ERβ), in human prostate. The aim of the present study was to semiquantitatively assess the differential expression of ER subtypes in human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by use of immunocytochemistry (IHC) methods and to explore their relationship with various measures of BPH. Materials and Methods A total of 45 patients with BPH undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate and 22 patients with bladder cancer with normal prostate undergoing surveillance cystoscopy were studied as cases and controls, respectively. Quantitative immunolabeling of ER subtypes was scored by use of a semiquantitative scale. Also, correlations were assessed between ER levels in prostate and various measures of BPH. Results Overall, we found strong immunostaining for ERα in stroma and for ERβ in epithelium, respectively. The IHC score for ERα differed significantly between BPH patients and controls in both stroma (p≤0.001) and epithelium (p=0.008), respectively. The ERβ IHC score was also significantly higher in the epithelium of BPH patients (p=0.01). Also, we found a significant correlation between prostatic ER levels and various clinical measures of BPH. Conclusions ERs may play an important role in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:28261681

  20. TREK-1 is a novel molecular target in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Voloshyna, Iryna; Besana, Alessandra; Castillo, Mireia; Matos, Tulio; Weinstein, I Bernard; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Robinson, Richard B; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Feinmark, Steven J

    2008-02-15

    TREK-1 is a two-pore domain (K(2P)) potassium channel that carries a leak current that is time- and voltage-independent. Recently, potassium channels have been related to cell proliferation and some K(2P) family channels, such as TASK-3, have been shown to be overexpressed in specific neoplasms. In this study, we addressed the expression of TREK-1 in prostatic tissues and cell lines, and we have found that this potassium channel is highly expressed in prostate cancer but is not expressed in normal prostate nor in benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, expression of TREK-1 correlates strongly with the grade and the stage of the disease, suggesting a causal link between channel expression and abnormal cell proliferation. In vitro studies showed that TREK-1 is highly expressed in PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines but is not detectable in normal prostate epithelial cells (NPE). In this report, we show that overexpression of TREK-1 in NPE and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells leads to a significant increase in proliferation. Moreover, the increased cell proliferation rate of PC3 cells and TREK-1 overexpressing CHO cells could be reduced when TREK-1 current was reduced by overexpression of a dominant-negative TREK-1 mutant or when cells were exposed to a TREK-1 inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that TREK-1 expression is associated with abnormal cell proliferation and may be a novel marker for and a molecular target in prostate cancer.

  1. [Tuberculosis of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Streltsova, O S; Krupin, V N; Yunusova, K E; Mamonov, M V

    2016-12-01

    Genitourinary tract is the second most common site where extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) occurs. Genitourinary TB is notable for a latent clinical course and difficult diagnosis. The paper presents clinical observations of two patients treated in a urology department of a general public hospital. One of them was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the prostate, MTB+. In the other, TB of the prostate was suspected based on pathologic assessment of the surgical specimen after surgery for prostate cancer.

  2. Association of multiparametric MRI quantitative imaging features with prostate cancer gene expression in MRI-targeted prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Radka; Pollack, Alan; Takhar, Mandeep; Lynne, Charles; Parra, Nestor; Lam, Lucia L.C.; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Buerki, Christine; Castillo, Rosa; Jorda, Merce; Ashab, Hussam Al-deen; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Punnen, Sanoj; Parekh, Dipen J.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Gillies, Robert J.; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Ishkanian, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Standard clinicopathological variables are inadequate for optimal management of prostate cancer patients. While genomic classifiers have improved patient risk classification, the multifocality and heterogeneity of prostate cancer can confound pre-treatment assessment. The objective was to investigate the association of multiparametric (mp)MRI quantitative features with prostate cancer risk gene expression profiles in mpMRI-guided biopsies tissues. Global gene expression profiles were generated from 17 mpMRI-directed diagnostic prostate biopsies using an Affimetrix platform. Spatially distinct imaging areas (‘habitats’) were identified on MRI/3D-Ultrasound fusion. Radiomic features were extracted from biopsy regions and normal appearing tissues. We correlated 49 radiomic features with three clinically available gene signatures associated with adverse outcome. The signatures contain genes that are over-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers and genes that are under-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers. There were significant correlations between these genes and quantitative imaging features, indicating the presence of prostate cancer prognostic signal in the radiomic features. Strong associations were also found between the radiomic features and significantly expressed genes. Gene ontology analysis identified specific radiomic features associated with immune/inflammatory response, metabolism, cell and biological adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate radiogenomic parameters with prostate cancer in men with MRI-guided biopsy. PMID:27438142

  3. Development of a Nanotechnology Platform for Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Development of a Nanotechnology Platform for Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0303 5c... nanoparticles were used to deliver reporter genes (pEGFP) to target PC-3 prostate cancer cells and RWPE-1 normal epithelial prostate cells. The induction of...this method have previously been published [1]. We did not observe any vector related toxicity in PC-3 cancer cells at any NP ratio tested (Fig. 4). At

  4. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  5. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  6. Effect of AQP9 Expression in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell PC3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwei; Zhu, Liang; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Jinliang; Song, Xishuang; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    It is known that aquaporin 9 (AQP9) in the prostate was strictly upregulated by androgen and may represent a novel therapeutic target for several cancers, but whether AQP9 plays a role in the regulation of androgen-independent prostate cancer still remains unclear. In the present study, AQP9 was determined in prostate cancer and adjacent cancer tissues; AQP9-siRNA was applied to silencing AQP9 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell PC3 cell line. Western blot and flow cytometry analysis were employed to detect changes in related-function of control and AQP9-siRNA groups. The results showed that AQP9 is significantly induced in cancer tissues than that in adjacent cancer tissues. Moreover, knockdown of AQP9 in PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cell prostate cancer cells increased inhibition rates of proliferation. In addition, knockdown of AQP9 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Bcl-2 and with a notable increase in the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, indicated that AQP9 knockdown promoted apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. From wound healing assay and matrigel invasion, we suggested that AQP9 expression affects the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, In order to explore the pathway may be involved in AQP9-mediated motility and invasion of prostate cancer cells, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significant suppressed in AQP9 siRNA-transfected cells compared with that in control cells, suggesting that AQP9 is involved in the activation of the ERK pathway in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PMID:27187384

  7. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Disparity of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    differentially expressed in freshly procured prostate tumor cells of age- and tumor grade-matched AA and CA men. Laser capture microdissected (LCM...mainstay therapy for locally advanced and CRPC, we sought to examine whether modulation of endogenous hnRNP H1 levels would impact the sensitivity...based TMA-4 (n=150 tumor cores from AA and CA men) was analyzed by IHC. A representative normal prostate (A, B and C) and BPH (D, E and F) tissue

  8. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths (Cooperberg et al. 2004). Normal prostate epithelium contains luminal...www.endocrinology-journals.org including glandular formation and expression of androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA...adenocarcinoma, which usually shows glandular formation, SCNC has a solid, sheet-like growth pattern but no glandular formation. Tumor cells are small with

  9. Structure and Function of the Splice Variants of TMPRSS2-ERG, a Prevalent Genomic Alteration in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    the two main tumor foci in this section, one tumor focus was ERG positive. In ERG positive tumor focus, malignant epithelium or normal endotheials...ERG was not expressed in normal mouse prostate epithelium (Mohamed et al., 2010). Similar findings were noted for human prostate (Furusato et al...2010). These observations highlight the cancer-specific aberrant expression and function of ERG in the prostate epithelium . Figure 10

  10. Molecular Mechanism for Prostate Cancer Resistance to the Anti-Tumor Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    chemotherapy and radio-sensitization of prostate cancer Consultant-Curator (March 2004 – August 2005) Huaiyu Mi, MD., Ph.D. Celera Genomics , Protein...and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any...would be effected downstream of 1αOH bioactivation of vitamin D. Using normal human prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cell lines, we

  11. Dual-Targeting of AR and Akt Pathways by Berberine in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Berberine in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Haitao Zhang CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Tulane University...Resistant Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Haitao Zhang 5e. TASK NUMBER...had no adverse effects on normal organs. Since Pten loss or inactivation is common in prostate cancer , these results provide support for the use

  12. Novel Nuclear Localization of Fatty Acid Synthase Correlates with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Allison A.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Datiri, Yeipyeng J.; Basudan, Ahmed M.; Sobek, Kathryn M.; Cummings, Jessica L.; Basse, Per H.; Bacich, Dean J.; O'Keefe, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase not only increases production of fatty acids in tumors but also contributes to the transformed phenotype by conferring growth and survival advantages. In addition, increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs are not completely understood. Because fatty acid synthase is expressed at low levels in normal cells, it is currently a major target for anticancer drug design. Fatty acid synthase is normally found in the cytosol; however, we have discovered that it also localizes to the nucleus in a subset of prostate cancer cells. Analysis of the fatty acid synthase protein sequence indicated the presence of a nuclear localization signal, and subcellular fractionation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of patient prostate tumor tissue and LNCaPs confirmed nuclear localization of this protein. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue indicated that nuclear localization of fatty acid synthase correlates with Gleason grade, implicating a potentially novel role in prostate cancer progression. Possible clinical implications include improving the accuracy of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of low- versus intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the uncovering of novel metabolic pathways for the therapeutic targeting of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:24907642

  13. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goals of this study were to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR and ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR and ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH.

  14. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Tristan M.; Sehgal, Priyanka D.; Drew, Sally A.; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goal of this study was to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR & ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR & ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH. PMID:23792768

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Jiajia; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiujun; Hu, Fen

    2015-05-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  17. Stromal-epithelial measurements of prostate cancer in native Japanese and Japanese-American men.

    PubMed

    Veltri, R W; Park, J; Miller, M C; Marks, L; Kojima, M; van Rootselaar, C; Khan, M A; Partin, A W

    2004-01-01

    We measured the histologic stromal and epithelial tissue components of the benign (normal) and malignant tissue compartments of Japanese-Americans (J-A) and native Japanese (NJ) men living in Japan. The patient cohort included 25 NJ men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in Nagoya, Japan and 25 J-A (second or third generation US born). We conducted tissue image quantitation (in-house image software) of the stromal and epithelial compartments in malignant and adjacent normal tissue areas from a tissue microarray (TMA) selected from radical prostatectomy (RP) blocks. Stromal-epithelial (S-E) areas were determined using immunohistochemical stains for CAM-5.2 epithelial cytokeratin marker and the Masson trichrome stain to measure the stroma component. We observed differences in the volumes of normal and cancer epithelium and stroma within both the J-A and NJ study populations (P<0.01). Only the individual average cancer epithelium (CE) volume (JA=24.1 vs NJ=29.9) differed significantly between the NJ and J-A study populations (P=0.03). Consequently, the S-E ratio in NJ group was significantly different from that of J-A population (P=0.05). The decrease in S-E ratio noted in the malignant tissues of NJ prostate tissue may provide a biological marker for differentiation of the two groups and suggests a need for further investigations into the molecular basis for these histologic differences.

  18. Primary malignant melanoma of prostate.

    PubMed

    Doublali, M; Chouaib, A; Khallouk, A; Tazi, M F; El Fassi, M J; Farih, My H; Elfatmi, H; Bendahou, M; Benlemlih, A; Lamarti, O

    2010-05-01

    Primary genitourinary melanoma accounts for less than one per cent of all cases of melanoma. Most cases attributed to the prostate actually originate from the prostatic urethra. Due to its infrequency, primary malignant melanoma of the genitourinary tract presents a difficult diagnostic and management challenge. We report a case of primary malignant melanoma of the prostate found during transurethral resection of the prostate.

  19. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  20. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  1. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  2. The Prostate Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Frederico R.; Romero, Antonio W.; Filho, Thadeu Brenny; Kulysz, David; Oliveira, Fernando C., Jr.; Filho, Renato Tambara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To help students, residents, and general practitioners to improve the technique, skills, and reproducibility of their prostate examination. Methods: We developed a comprehensive guideline outlining prostate anatomy, indications, patient preparation, positioning, technique, findings, and limitations of this ancient art of urological…

  3. PROSTATE REGULATION: MODELING ENDOGENOUS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Prostate function is an important indicator of androgen status in toxicological studies making predictive modeling of the relevant pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics desirable. Prostate function is an important indicator of androgen status in toxicological studies making predictive modeling of the relevant pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics desirable.

  4. Preliminary study of verteporfin photodynamic therapy in a canine prostate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Hetzel, Fred; Dole, Ken; Luck, David; Beckers, Jill; Maul, Don

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with verteporfin was investigated as an alternative modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Vertoporfin-mediated photodynamic effects on the prostate and its adjacent structures (underlying colon and bladder) were evaluated in a healthy canine model. Interstitial prostate PDT was performed by irradiating individual lobes with a diode laser (689 nm) and 1-cm cylindrical diffuser fibers at various light doses and drug-light intervals (DLI) to activate the IV administrated photosensitizer (0.5 or 2 mg/kg). The sensitivity of the adjacent tissues to Vertoporfin-PDT was determined by superficially irradiating the serosal surface of the bladder and colon with a microlens fiber. The prostate and adjacent tissues were harvested one-week after the treatment and subjected to histopathological examination. Results: Histopathological examinations confirmed that verteporfin PDT could destroy a clinically significant volume of prostatic tissue in the animal model. At the drug dose of 0.5 mg/kg, the light irradiation of 100 J/cm could induce a lesion diameter of 2 cm at DLI of 15 min and 1.2 cm at DLI of 3 hrs, respectively. This implies a strong influence of DLI on the lesion volume. The shorter DLI might produce stronger vascular effect and therefore more severe tissue damage. The colon was more sensitive to verteporfin PDT than the bladder. At the possible light dose level caused by light scattering during intra-prostate irradiation, the damage to the bladder and colon were superficial and minimal. Conclusions: The preliminary results clearly demonstrate that verteporfin PDT could be an effective means to destroy prostate gland and its usefulness for the treatment of prostate cancer is worth further investigation.

  5. An MR Contrast Agent for Intra-Prostatic Imaging of Prostatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra-prostatic distribution of...develop a magnetic nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra...the receptor in a convenient animal model, the normal mouse. The GRP receptor is expressed at high levels in the normal rodent pancreas. I. Synthesis

  6. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  7. Complications of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Zapała, Lukasz; Cordeiro, Ernesto; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dimitriadis, Georgios; De Reijke, Theo

    2013-07-01

    Biopsy of the prostate is a common procedure with minor complications that are usually self-limited. However, if one considers that millions of men undergo biopsy worldwide, one realizes that although complication rate is low, the number of patients suffering from biopsy complications should not be underestimated and can be a clinically relevant problem for healthcare professionals. In this review, the authors present diagnosis and management of postbiopsy of prostate complications. Bleeding is the most common complication observed after prostate biopsy, but the use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not an absolute contraindication to prostate biopsy. Emerging resistance to ciprofloxacin is the most probable cause of the increasing risk of infectious complications after prostate biopsy. Even though extremely rare, fatal complications are possible and were described in case reports.

  8. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  9. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  10. Expression of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin receptors claudin-3 and claudin-4 in prostate cancer epithelium.

    PubMed

    Long, H; Crean, C D; Lee, W H; Cummings, O W; Gabig, T G

    2001-11-01

    The mRNA for Rvp.1 (rat ventral prostate) increases in abundance before gland involution after androgen deprivation. Rvp.1 is homologous to CPE-R, the high-affinity intestinal epithelial receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and is sufficient to mediate CPE binding and trigger subsequent toxin-mediated cytolysis. Rvp.1 (claudin-3) and CPE-R (claudin-4) are members of a larger family of transmembrane tissue-specific claudin proteins that are essential components of intercellular tight junction structures regulating paracellular ion flux. However, claudin-3 and claudin-4 are the only family members capable of mediating CPE binding and cytolysis. The present study was designed to study the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 in human prostate tissue as potential targets for CPE toxin-mediated therapy for prostate cancer. On human multiple-tissue Northern blot analysis, mRNAs for both claudin-3 and claudin-4 were expressed at high levels in prostate tissue. In normal prostate tissue, expression of claudin-3 was localized exclusively within acinar epithelial cells by in situ mRNA hybridization. Compared with expression within prostate epithelial cells in surrounding normal glandular tissue, expression of claudin-3 mRNA remained high in the epithelium of prostate adenocarcinoma (10 of 10) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (five of five). Prostate adenocarcinoma cells metastatic to bone were obtained from a patient with disease progression during antiandrogen therapy. These metastatic cells were prostate-specific antigen-positive by immunohistochemical staining and also expressed functional CPE receptors as measured by sensitivity to CPE-induced cell lysis. The persistent high level of claudin-3 expression in prostate adenocarcinoma and functional cytotoxicity of CPE in metastatic androgen-independent prostate adenocarcinoma suggests a new potential therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer.

  11. Epithelial defect in prostates of Stat5a-null mice.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, M T; Ahonen, T J; Yamashita, H; Chandrashekar, V; Bartke, A; Grimley, P M; Robinson, G W; Hennighausen, L; Rui, H

    2000-07-01

    The transcription factor Stat5a critically mediates prolactin (PRL)-induced mammary gland development and lactogenesis. PRL also stimulates growth and differentiation of prostate tissue. Specifically, hyperprolactinemia gives rise to prostate hyperplasia, and prostate size is reduced in PRL-deficient mice. We therefore investigated the importance of Stat5a for prostate development and function by examining Stat5a-null mice. The absence of Stat5a in mice was associated with a distinct prostate morphology characterized by an increased prevalence of local disorganization within acinar epithelium of ventral prostates. Affected acini were typically filled with desquamated, granular epithelial cells that had become embedded in dense, coagulated secretory material. These features were reminiscent of acinar cyst formation and degeneration frequently observed in human benign prostate hyperplasia, however, cystic changes in prostate acini of Stat5a-deficient mice were not associated with increased prostate size or morphologic hallmarks of epithelial hyperplasia. Instead, immunohistochemistry of the prostate-specific secretory marker, probasin, suggested that hypersecretory function of the epithelium could underlie local congestion and cyst formation in prostates of Stat5a-null mice. Serum testosterone and PRL levels were normal in Stat5a knockout mice, but prostate PRL receptor expression was reduced as determined by immunohistochemistry. Expression levels or activation states of other PRL signal transduction proteins, including Stat5b, Stat3, Stat1, ERK1, and ERK2 were not altered. The present study offers the first evidence for a direct role of Stat5a in the maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function of the mouse prostate.

  12. [Prostate localization systems for prostate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Lagrange, J-L; Messai, T; M'Barek, B; Lefkopoulos, D

    2006-11-01

    The development of sophisticated conformal radiation therapy techniques for prostate cancer, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, implies precise and accurate targeting. Inter- and intrafraction prostate motion can be significant and should be characterized, unless the target volume may occasionally be missed. Indeed, bony landmark-based portal imaging does not provide the positional information for soft-tissue targets (prostate and seminal vesicles) or critical organs (rectum and bladder). In this article, we describe various prostate localization systems used before or during the fraction: rectal balloon, intraprostatic fiducials, ultrasound-based localization, integrated CT/linear accelerator system, megavoltage or kilovoltage cone-beam CT, Calypso 4D localization system tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Exactrac X-Ray 6D. The clinical benefit in using such prostate localization tools is not proven by randomized studies and the feasibility has just been established for some of these techniques. Nevertheless, these systems should improve local control by a more accurate delivery of an increased prescribed dose in a reduced planning target volume.

  13. Curvilinear transurethral ultrasound applicator for selective prostate thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Anthony B; Diederich, Chris J; Nau, William H; Rieke, Viola; Butts, R Kim; Sommer, Graham; Gill, Harcharan; Bouley, Donna M

    2005-06-01

    Thermal therapy offers a minimally invasive option for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and localized prostate cancer. In this study we investigated a transurethral ultrasound applicator design utilizing curvilinear, or slightly focused, transducers to heat prostatic tissue rapidly and controllably. The applicator was constructed with two independently powered transducer segments operating at 6.5 MHz and measuring 3.5 mm x 10 mm with a 15 mm radius of curvature across the short axis. The curvilinear applicator was characterized by acoustic efficiency measurements, acoustic beam plots, biothermal simulations of human prostate, ex vivo heating trials in bovine liver, and in vivo heating trials in canine prostate (n=3). Each transducer segment was found to emit a narrow acoustic beam (max width <3 mm), which extended the length of the transducer, with deeper penetration than previously developed planar or sectored tubular transurethral ultrasound applicators. Acoustic and biothermal simulations of human prostate demonstrated three treatment schemes for the curvilinear applicator: single shot (10 W, 60 s) schemes to generate narrow ablation zones (13 x 4 mm, 52 degrees C at the lesion boundary), incremental rotation (10 W, 10 degrees/45 s) to generate larger sector-shaped ablation zones (16 mm x 180 degrees sector), and rotation with variable sonication times (10 W, 10 degrees/15-90 s) to conform the ablation zone to a predefined boundary (9-17 mm x 180 degrees sector, 13 min total treatment time). During in vivo canine prostate experiments, guided by MR temperature imaging, single shot sonications (6 W/transducer, 2-3 min) with the curvilinear applicator ablated 20 degree sections of tissue to the prostate boundary (9-15 mm). Multiple adjacent sonications ("sweeping") ablated large sections of the prostate (180 degrees) by using the MR temperature imaging to adjust the power (4-6.4 W/transducer) and sonication time (30-180 s) at each 10 degrees rotation

  14. Inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside on benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Nan; Xu, Yuan; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside (GTW) against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into five groups: Group I, vehicle control group (sham-operated and treated with vehicle); Group II, BPH group; Group III, BPH rats treated with finasteride at a dose of 5 mg·kg(-1); and Groups IV and V, BPH rats treated with GTW at dose levels of 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The drugs were administered orally once a day for 14 days. Prostate weight, prostatic index, and the testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum and prostate, and the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were measured; prostate tissues were taken for histopathological examination; and serum biochemical analysis was also performed. The BPH rats displayed an increase in prostate weight, prostatic index with increased testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and increased serum PSA levels. GTW treatment at both doses resulted in significant reductions in prostate weight, prostatic index, testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and serum PSA levels, compared with BPH group. Histopathological examination also indicated that GTW treatment at both doses inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. Serum biochemical analysis showed that the liver and renal functions were normal. In conclusion, GTW inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats, without host toxicity, providing a basis for the development of GTW as a novel therapy for BPH.

  15. The Thermomagnetic Instability in Superconducting Films with Adjacent Metal Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgården, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dendritic flux avalanches is a frequently encountered consequence of the thermomagnetic instability in type-II superconducting films. The avalanches, which are potentially harmful for superconductor-based devices, can be suppressed by an adjacent normal metal layer, even when the two layers are not in thermal contact. The suppression of the avalanches in this case is due to so-called magnetic braking, caused by eddy currents generated in the metal layer by propagating magnetic flux. We develop a theory of magnetic braking by analyzing coupled electrodynamics and heat flow in a superconductor-normal metal bilayer. The equations are solved by linearization and by numerical simulation of the avalanche dynamics. We find that in an uncoated superconductor, even a uniform thermomagnetic instability can develop into a dendritic flux avalanche. The mechanism is that a small non-uniformity caused by the electromagnetic non-locality induces a flux-flow hot spot at a random position. The hot spot quickly develops into a finger, which at high speeds penetrates into the superconductor, forming a branching structure. Magnetic braking slows the avalanches, and if the normal metal conductivity is sufficiently high, it can suppress the formation of the dendritic structure. During avalanches, the braking by the normal metal layer prevents the temperature from exceeding the transition temperature of the superconductor. Analytical criteria for the instability threshold are developed using the linear stability analysis. The criteria are found to match quantitatively the instability onsets obtained in simulations.

  16. Random Walk Based Segmentation for the Prostate on 3D Transrectal Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj V; Schuster, David M; Fei, Baowei

    2016-02-27

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37±0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications.

  17. Random walk based segmentation for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37+/-0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications.

  18. Random Walk Based Segmentation for the Prostate on 3D Transrectal Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj V.; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic segmentation method for the prostate on 3D transrectal ultrasound images (TRUS) by combining the region and classification information. We use a random walk algorithm to express the region information efficiently and flexibly because it can avoid segmentation leakage and shrinking bias. We further use the decision tree as the classifier to distinguish the prostate from the non-prostate tissue because of its fast speed and superior performance, especially for a binary classification problem. Our segmentation algorithm is initialized with the user roughly marking the prostate and non-prostate points on the mid-gland slice which are fitted into an ellipse for obtaining more points. Based on these fitted seed points, we run the random walk algorithm to segment the prostate on the mid-gland slice. The segmented contour and the information from the decision tree classification are combined to determine the initial seed points for the other slices. The random walk algorithm is then used to segment the prostate on the adjacent slice. We propagate the process until all slices are segmented. The segmentation method was tested in 32 3D transrectal ultrasound images. Manual segmentation by a radiologist serves as the gold standard for the validation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 91.37±0.05%. The segmentation method can be applied to 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and other applications. PMID:27660383

  19. Targeted prodrug approaches for hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aloysius, Herve; Hu, Longqin

    2015-05-01

    Due to the propensity of relapse and resistance with prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), there is a growing interest in developing non-hormonal therapeutic approaches as alternative treatment modalities for hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Although the standard treatment for HRPC consists of a combination of ADT with taxanes and anthracyclines, the clinical use of chemotherapeutics is limited by systemic toxicity stemming from nondiscriminatory drug exposure to normal tissues. In order to improve the tumor selectivity of chemotherapeutics, various targeted prodrug approaches have been explored. Antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategies leverage tumor-specific antigens and transcription factors for the specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents using various prodrug-activating enzymes. In prostate cancer, overexpression of tumor-specific proteases such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is being exploited for selective activation of anticancer prodrugs designed to be activated through proteolysis by these prostate cancer-specific enzymes. PSMA- and PSA-activated prodrugs typically comprise an engineered high-specificity protease peptide substrate coupled to a potent cytotoxic agent via a linker for rapid release of cytotoxic species in the vicinity of prostate cancer cells following proteolytic cleavage. Over the past two decades, various such prodrugs have been developed and they were effective at inhibiting prostate tumor growth in rodent models; several of these prodrug approaches have been advanced to clinical trials and may be developed into effective therapies for HRPC.

  20. Boosting antitumor responses of T lymphocytes infiltrating human prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Kasic, Tihana; Gri, Giorgia; Gallana, Keti; Borsellino, Giovanna; Marigo, Ilaria; Battistini, Luca; Iafrate, Massimo; Prayer-Galetti, Tommaso; Pagano, Francesco; Viola, Antonella

    2005-04-18

    Immunotherapy may provide valid alternative therapy for patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. However, if the tumor environment exerts a suppressive action on antigen-specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), immunotherapy will achieve little, if any, success. In this study, we analyzed the modulation of TIL responses by the tumor environment using collagen gel matrix-supported organ cultures of human prostate carcinomas. Our results indicate that human prostatic adenocarcinomas are infiltrated by terminally differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes that are, however, in an unresponsive status. We demonstrate the presence of high levels of nitrotyrosines in prostatic TIL, suggesting a local production of peroxynitrites. By inhibiting the activity of arginase and nitric oxide synthase, key enzymes of L-arginine metabolism that are highly expressed in malignant but not in normal prostates, reduced tyrosine nitration and restoration of TIL responsiveness to tumor were achieved. The metabolic control exerted by the tumor on TIL function was confirmed in a transgenic mouse prostate model, which exhibits similarities with human prostate cancer. These results identify a novel and dominant mechanism by which cancers induce immunosuppression in situ and suggest novel strategies for tumor immunotherapy.

  1. The influence of isotope and prostate volume on urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Niehaus, Angela; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of isotope and prostate size on International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) normalization, catheter dependency, and the need for surgical intervention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2003, 976 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Seven hundred eighty-nine (80.8%) were implanted with {sup 103}Pd and 187 (19.2%) with {sup 125}I. The median follow-up was 41.2 months. Patients were stratified into size cohorts {<=}25 cm{sup 3}, 25.1-35 cm{sup 3}, 35.1-45 cm{sup 3}, and >45 cm{sup 3}. Four hundred eighteen patients (42.8%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Four hundred eighty-six patients (49.7%) received supplemental external-beam radiation therapy (XRT). In all patients, an alpha blocker was initiated before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. IPSS resolution was defined as a return to within one point of baseline. The median number of IPSS determinations per patient was 21. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, percent positive biopsies, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, planning volume, isotope, V{sub 100/150/20}, D{sub 9}, urethral dose (average and maximum), supplemental XRT, ADT, and the duration of ADT ({<=}6 months vs. >6 months). Catheter dependency and the need for postsurgical intervention were also evaluated. Results: For both isotopes and all prostate size cohorts, IPSS peaked 1 month after implantation and returned to baseline at a mean of 1.9 months. Stratification of prostate size cohorts by isotope demonstrated no significant differences in prolonged catheter dependency ({>=}5 days), IPSS resolution, or postimplant surgical intervention. In Cox regression analysis, IPSS normalization was best

  2. Identification of Pathogen Signatures in Prostate Cancer Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunqin; Wei, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Infections of the prostate by bacteria, human papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related gammaretroviruses, human cytomegaloviruses and other members of the herpesvirus family have been widely researched. However, many studies have yielded conflicting and controversial results. In this study, we systematically investigated the transcriptomes of human prostate samples for the unique genomic signatures of these pathogens using RNA-seq data from both western and Chinese patients. Human and nonhuman RNA-seq reads were mapped onto human and pathogen reference genomes respectively using alignment tools Bowtie and BLAT. Pathogen infections and integrations were analyzed in adherence with the standards from published studies. Among the nine pathogens (Propionibacterium acnes, HPV, HCMV, XMRV, BKV, JCV, SV40, EBV, and HBV) we analyzed, Propionibacterium acnes genes were detected in all prostate tumor samples and all adjacent samples, but not in prostate samples from healthy individuals. SV40, HCMV, EBV and low-risk HPVs transcripts were detected in one tumor sample and two adjacent samples from Chinese prostate cancer patients, but not in any samples of western prostate cancer patients; XMRV, BKV and JCV sequences were not identified in our work; HBV, as a negative control, was absent from any samples. Moreover, no pathogen integration was identified in our study. While further validation is required, our analysis provides evidence of Propionibacterium acnes infections in human prostate tumors. Noted differences in viral infections across ethnicity remain to be confirmed with other large prostate cancer data sets. The effects of bacterial and viral infections and their contributions to prostate cancer pathogenesis will require continuous research on associated pathogens.

  3. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  4. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  5. D-GPCR: a novel putative G protein-coupled receptor overexpressed in prostate cancer and prostate.

    PubMed

    Weigle, Bernd; Fuessel, Susanne; Ebner, Reinhard; Temme, Achim; Schmitz, Marc; Schwind, Sandra; Kiessling, Andrea; Rieger, Michael A; Meye, Axel; Bachmann, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P; Rieber, E Peter

    2004-09-10

    The use of molecular targets in novel strategies of tumor treatment largely depends on the identification of proteins with a tumor- or tissue-restricted expression. We identified the novel protein D-GPCR that is selectively overexpressed in human prostate cancer and prostate and belongs to the subfamily of odorant-like orphan G protein-coupled receptors. Quantification of D-GPCR transcripts in different human tissues by real-time PCR demonstrated 27-fold overexpression in prostate compared to skeletal muscle, the organ with second highest transcript numbers in males. Investigation of tumor/normal cDNA pairs obtained from 241 cancer patients including four prostate tumors confirmed the preferential expression in prostate. When comparing the mean transcript level of 15 prostate cancer tissues to their non-tumorous counterparts, D-GPCR was almost 6-fold upregulated. Coupled in vitro transcription and translation of D-GPCR cDNA produced a protein band of approximately 28 kDa. Recombinant, His-tagged protein was expressed in transfected HEK293 cells and gave rise to a 30 kDa band specifically detected by anti-His antibody. These data provide the basis for future studies evaluating the diagnostic potential of D-GPCR and its utility as a novel target in immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  6. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  7. Involvement of human papillomavirus infections in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2008-08-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are sexually transmitted and have been associated with several human carcinomas especially cervical and colorectal. On the other hand, a small number of studies have examined the presence of high-risk HPV in human prostate cancer tissues. Currently, the presence and role of high-risk HPV infections in prostate carcinogenesis remain unclear because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question whether high-risk HPV infections play any role in human prostate cancer development. However, other investigators and our group were able to immortalize normal and cancer prostate epithelial cells in vitro by E6/E7 of HPV type 16. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that normal and cancer prostate epithelial cells are susceptible to persistent HPV infections; therefore, high-risk HPV infections play an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. We believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological studies and more molecular biology investigations are necessary to answer these important questions.

  8. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Ravinal, R C; Costa, R S; Lima, M S; Tucci, S; Muglia, V F; Reis, R B dos; Silva, G E B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic characteristics of the diseased canine prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Alessandro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Bargellini, Paolo; Menchetti, Laura; Borges, Paulo; Zelli, Riccardo; Polisca, Angela

    2015-11-01

    The work was carried out on a total of 26 male dogs that on the basis of clinical examination, prostate ultrasound and prostate biopsy, were divided prospectively into four groups: (1) normal dogs (control group; n = 8); (2) dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (group BPH; n = 8); (3) dogs suffering from prostatitis (group prostatitis; n = 4); (4) dogs with prostatic tumors (group tumors; n = 6). The examination of the prostate by means of contrast medium and dedicated ultrasound system allowed a detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostatic vessels in normal and diseased conditions, enabling the detection and characterization of different disease states, and quantification of parameters such as peak intensity of perfusion (%), arrival time of the contrast medium to its maximum value of video intensity (time to peak [TTP; seconds]), regional blood volume, regional blood flow, and mean transit time (MTT [seconds]). The hemodynamic indices TTP (P < 0.01) and MTT (P < 0.001) of diseased prostate groups were significantly lower than those in the normal prostate group although there were no differences among diseases. Optimal cutoff values were 31 seconds (Sensitivity: 72%; Specificity: 88%) and 47 seconds (Sensitivity: 100%; Specificity: 88%) while area under receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.86 (P < 0.01) and 0.97 (P < 0.01) for TTP and MTT, respectively. The qualitative evaluation of vascular patterns showed differences between normal and diseased prostate glands. The latter were characterized by an alteration of the normal vascular appearance consisting of loss of the subcapsular arterioles and lack of a centripetal vascular pattern. The qualitative aspect of the study highlighted the different vascular architecture between BPH, prostatitis, adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. This study shows how contrast-enhanced ultrasound represents a valid and noninvasive method for highlighting and characterizing prostatic vasculature

  10. Pilot Study to Assess Safety and Clinical Outcomes of Irreversible Electroporation for Partial Gland Ablation in Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie S.; Ehdaie, Behfar; Musser, John; Mashni, Joseph; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Durack, Jeremy C.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Coleman, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Partial prostate gland ablation is a strategy to manage localized prostate cancer. Irreversible electroporation can ablate localized soft tissues. We sought to describe 30- and 90-day complications and intermediate-term functional outcomes in men undergoing prostate gland ablation using irreversible electroporation. Materials and Methods We reviewed the charts of 25 patients with prostate cancer who underwent prostate gland ablation using irreversible electroporation as a primary procedure and who were followed for at least 6 months. Results Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Grade 3 complications occurred in 2 patients including epididymitis (1) and urinary tract infection (1). Fourteen patients experienced grade ≤ 2 complications, mainly transient urinary symptoms, hematuria, and urinary tract infections. Of 25 patients, 4 (16%) had cancer in the zone of ablation on routine follow-up biopsy at 6 months. Of those with normal urinary function at baseline, 88% and 94% reported normal urinary function at 6 and 12 months after prostate gland ablation, respectively. By 12 months, only 1 patient with normal erectile function at baseline reported new difficulty with potency and only 2 patients (8%) required a pad for urinary incontinence. Conclusions Prostate gland ablation with irreversible electroporation is feasible and safe in selected men with localized prostate cancer. Intermediate-term urinary and erectile function outcomes appear reasonable. Irreversible electroporation is effective in ablation of tumor-bearing prostate tissue, as a majority of men had no evidence of residual cancer on biopsy 6 months after prostate gland ablation. PMID:27113966

  11. Expression and initial promoter characterization of PCAN1 in retinal tissue and prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cross, D; Reding, D J; Salzman, S A; Zhang, K Q; Catalona, W J; Burke, J; Burmester, J K

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasia in men and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in men over 60. In an effort to understand the molecular events leading to prostate cancer, we have identified PCAN1 (prostate cancer gene 1) (also known as GDEP), a gene that is highly expressed in prostate epithelial tissue and frequently mutated in prostate tumors. Here we demonstrate its expression in neural retina, and retinoblastoma cell culture but not retinal pigment epithelial cell culture. We further characterize PCAN1 expression in the prostate cell lines RWPE1, RWPE2, and LnCAP FGC. We demonstrate an increase in expression when the cells are grown in the presence of Matrigel, an artificial extracellular basement membrane. Expression was time dependent, with expression observed on d 6 and little or no expression on d 12. Testosterone was not found to increase PCAN1 expression in this culture system. In addition, normal prostate epithelial cells co-cultured with normal prostate stromal cells did not exhibit PCAN1 expression at any time. To definitively locate the transcription initiation sites, we performed restriction-ligase-mediated 5' RACE, to selectively amplify only mRNA with a 5' cap. An initial characterization of the sequence upstream of the initiation sites determined six possible binding sites for the prostate specific regulatory protein NKX3.1 and four potential binding sites for the PPAR/RXR heterodimer that is involved in the control of cell differentiation and apoptosis.

  12. Activation of nuclear factor-κB in human prostate carcinogenesis and association to biochemical relapse

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Domenech, J; Mellado, B; Ferrer, B; Truan, D; Codony-Servat, J; Sauleda, S; Alcover, J; Campo, E; Gascon, P; Rovira, A; Ross, J S; Fernández, P L; Albanell, J

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB/p65 regulates the transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in cell survival, invasion and metastasis. We characterised by immunohistochemistry the expression of NF-κB/p65 protein in six histologically normal prostate, 13 high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and 86 prostate adenocarcinoma specimens. Nuclear localisation of p65 was used as a measure of NF-κB active state. Nuclear localisation of NF-κB was only seen in scattered basal cells in normal prostate glands. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias exhibited diffuse and strong cytoplasmic staining but no nuclear staining. In prostate adenocarcinomas, cytoplasmic NF-κB was detected in 57 (66.3%) specimens, and nuclear NF-κB (activated) in 47 (54.7%). Nuclear and cytoplasmic NF-κB staining was not correlated (P=0.19). By univariate analysis, nuclear localisation of NF-κB was associated with biochemical relapse (P=0.0009; log-rank test) while cytoplasmic expression did not. On multivariate analysis, serum preoperative prostate specific antigen (P=0.02), Gleason score (P=0.03) and nuclear NF-κB (P=0.002) were independent predictors of biochemical relapse. These results provide novel evidence for NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation in the transition from PIN to prostate cancer. Our findings also indicate that nuclear localisation of NF-κB is an independent prognostic factor of biochemical relapse in prostate cancer. PMID:16278667

  13. Monoallelic expression of TMPRSS2/ERG in prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Polson, Euan S; Lewis, John L; Celik, Hamza; Mann, Vincent M; Stower, Michael J; Simms, Matthew S; Rodrigues, Greta; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2013-01-01

    While chromosomal translocations have a fundamental role in the development of several human leukaemias, their role in solid tumour development has been somewhat more controversial. Recently, it was shown that up to 80% of prostate tumours harbour at least one such gene fusion, and that the most common fusion event, between the prostate-specific TMPRSS2 gene and the ERG oncogene, is a critical, and probably early factor in prostate cancer development. Here we demonstrate the presence and expression of this significant chromosomal rearrangement in prostate cancer stem cells. Moreover, we show that in the prostate epithelial hierarchy from both normal and tumour tissues, TMPRSS2 transcription is subjected to tight monoallelic regulation, which is retained upon asymmetric division and relaxed during epithelial cell differentiation. The presence and expression of TMPRSS2/ERG in prostate stem cells would provide ERG-driven survival advantages, allowing maintenance of this mutated genotype.

  14. The epigenome as a therapeutic target in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Perry, Antoinette S; Watson, R William G; Lawler, Mark; Hollywood, Donal

    2010-12-01

    During cancer development and progression, tumor cells undergo abnormal epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and nucleosome remodeling. Collectively, these aberrations promote genomic instability and lead to silencing of tumor-suppressor genes and reactivation of oncogenic retroviruses. Epigenetic modifications, therefore, provide exciting new avenues for prostate cancer research. Promoter hypermethylation is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, which suggests that restoration of a 'normal' epigenome through treatment with inhibitors of the enzymes involved could be clinically beneficial. Global patterns of histone modifications are also being defined and have been associated with clinical and pathologic predictors of prostate cancer outcome. Although treatment for localized prostate cancer can be curative, the development of successful therapies for the management of castration-resistant metastatic disease is urgently needed. Reactivation of tumor-suppressor genes by demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors could be a potential treatment option for patients with advanced disease.

  15. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence.

  16. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen DNA Vaccination Breaks Tolerance to Self-antigen and Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Casey, Garrett; Sweeney, Paul; Tangney, Mark; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2009-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell surface antigen expressed in normal human prostate and over expressed in prostate cancer. Elevated levels of PSCA protein in prostate cancer correlate with increased tumor stage/grade, with androgen independence and have higher expression in bone metastases. In this study, the PSCA gene was isolated from the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate cell line (TRAMPC1), and a vaccine plasmid construct was generated. This plasmid PSCA (pmPSCA) was delivered by intramuscular electroporation (EP) and induced effective antitumor immune responses against subcutaneous TRAMPC1 tumors in male C57 BL/6 mice. The pmPSCA vaccination inhibited tumor growth, resulting in cure or prolongation in survival. Similarly, the vaccine inhibited metastases in PSCA expressing B16 F10 tumors. There was activation of Th-1 type immunity against PSCA, indicating the breaking of tolerance to a self-antigen. This immunity was tumor specific and was transferable by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. The mice remained healthy and there was no evidence of collateral autoimmune responses in normal tissues. EP-assisted delivery of the pmPSCA evoked strong specific responses and could, in neoadjuvant or adjuvant settings, provide a safe and effective immune control of prostate cancer, given that there is significant homology between human and mouse PSCA. PMID:19337234

  17. Association of anti-sperm antibodies with chronic prostatitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yumei; Cui, Dong; Du, Yuefeng; Lu, Jun; Yang, Lin; Li, Jinmei; Zhang, Jing; Bai, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Chronic prostatitis is a risk factor for impaired male fertility potential, and anti-sperm antibodies (ASAs) cause the autoimmune disease immune infertility, which has a negative effect on semen parameters. Current studies have investigated the ASA-positive relationship between chronic prostatitis versus normal controls, but have shown inconsistent results. Hence, we systematic searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct/Elsevier, Medline, and the Cochrane Library up to October 2015 for case-control studies that involved the ASA-positive relationship between chronic prostatitis patients versus normal controls. The meta-analysis was performed with Review Manager and Stata software. After literature search, six studies were identified, including 721 cases of chronic prostatitis and 160 normal controls. Our results illustrated a significant correlation of the ASA-positive relationship between chronic prostatitis patients versus normal controls. The combined odds ratio of the ASA-positive rate in chronic prostatitis patients and normal controls was 3.26 (1.86-5.71). There was also a significant correlation of the ASA-positive relationship between National Institutes of Health (NIH) III versus normal controls, and the combined OR was 2.46 (1.10-5.51). However, there was no significant correlation of the ASA-positive relationship between National Institutes of Health (NIH) II versus normal controls. The present study illustrates that the positive rate of ASAs in chronic prostatitis patients was significantly higher than in the control group, suggesting that chronic prostatitis has a negative effect on male reproductive function. However, studies with larger samples are needed to better illuminate the correlation between ASAs and chronic prostatitis.

  18. Histological Evaluation of Prostate Tissue Response to Image-Guided Transurethral Thermal Therapy After a 48h Recovery Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyes, Aaron; Tang, Kee; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Image-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy shows strong potential for sparing of critical adjacent structures during prostate cancer treatment. Preclinical experiments were conducted to provide further information on the extent of the treatment margin. Four experiments were carried out in a canine model to investigate the pathology of this margin during the early stages of recovery and were compared to previous results obtained immediately post-treatment. Sedated animals were placed in a 1.5T clinical MRI, and the heating device was positioned accurately within the prostatic urethra with image guidance. Using an MRI-compatible system, the ultrasound device was rotated 365° treating a prescribed volume contained within the gland. Quantitative temperature maps were acquired throughout the treatment, providing feedback information for device control. Animals were allowed to recover and, after 48h, an imaging protocol including T2 and contrast enhanced (CE) MRI was repeated before the animals were sacrificed. Prostate sections were stained with H&E. Careful slice alignment methods during histological procedures and image registration were employed to ensure good correspondence between MR images and microscopy. Although T2 MRI revealed no lesion acutely, a hypo-intense region was clearly visible 2 days post-treatment. The lesion volume defined by CE-MRI increased appreciably during this time. Whole-mount H&E sections showed that the margin between coagulated and normal-appearing cells narrowed during recovery, typically to a width of under 1mm compared to 3mm acutely. These results illustrate the high level of precision achievable with transurethral thermal therapy and suggest methods to monitor the physiological response non-invasively.

  19. Red maca (Lepidium meyenii) reduced prostate size in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Miranda, Sara; Nieto, Jessica; Fernández, Gilma; Yucra, Sandra; Rubio, Julio; Yi, Pedro; Gasco, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Red Maca, a cruciferous plant from the highland of Peru, reduced ventral prostate size in normal and TE treated rats. PMID:15661081

  20. Decreased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 and 5 during progression of prostate transformation in transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Ju-Hee; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Park, Jae-Hak; Kim, Dong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been considered an important risk factor for development of prostate cancer. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial moieties or endogenous molecules and play an important role in the triggering and promotion of inflammation. In this study, we examined whether expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was associated with progression of prostate transformation in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The expression of TLR4 and TLR5 was evaluated by immunohistochemisty in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate tissue from wild-type (WT) and TRAMP mice. Normal prostate tissue from WT mice showed strong expression of TLR4 and TLR5. However, TLR4 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice gradually decreased as pathologic grade became more aggressive. TLR5 expression in the prostate tissue from TRAMP mice also decreased in low-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), high-grade PIN and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Overall, our results suggest that decreased expression of TLR4 and TLR5 may contribute to prostate tumorigenesis.

  1. Vitamin D, intermediary metabolism and prostate cancer tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Lin W.; Tenniswood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological data have demonstrated an inverse association between serum vitamin D3 levels, cancer incidence and related mortality. However, the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer biology and its utility for prevention of prostate cancer progression are not as well-defined. The data are often conflicting: some reports suggest that vitamin D3 induces apoptosis in androgen dependent prostate cancer cell lines, while others suggest that vitamin D3 only induces cell cycle arrest. Recent molecular studies have identified an extensive synergistic crosstalk between the vitamin D- and androgen-mediated mRNA and miRNA expression, adding an additional layer of post-transcriptional regulation to the known VDR- and AR-regulated gene activation. The Warburg effect, the inefficient metabolic pathway that converts glucose to lactate for rapid energy generation, is a phenomenon common to many different types of cancer. This process supports cell proliferation and promotes cancer progression via alteration of glucose, glutamine and lipid metabolism. Prostate cancer is a notable exception to this general process since the metabolic switch that occurs early during malignancy is the reverse of the Warburg effect. This “anti-Warburg effect” is due to the unique biology of normal prostate cells that harbor a truncated TCA cycle that is required to produce and secret citrate. In prostate cancer cells, the TCA cycle activity is restored and citrate oxidation is used to produce energy for cancer cell proliferation. 1,25(OH)2D3 and androgen together modulates the TCA cycle via transcriptional regulation of zinc transporters, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3 and androgen maintain normal prostate metabolism by blocking citrate oxidation. These data demonstrate the importance of androgens in the anti-proliferative effect of vitamin D in prostate cancer and highlight the importance of understanding the crosstalk between these two signaling pathways. PMID:24860512

  2. Overcoming Resistance of Prostate Cancer to TRAIL - Mediated Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    DR5 receptor in prostate cancer cell lines. We used histidine-tagged TRAIL prepared in E . coli added to lysed cells at 1 ug/ml for 20 min on ice...normal ones. However, we found that in normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) TRAIL is capable of inducing apoptosis as e �ciently as in some tumor...measured by tetrazolium conversion but had little or no e �ect on other TRAIL-induced apoptotic responses. Although cycloheximide did not further accelerate

  3. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  4. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gene Mapped To X Chromosome 1998 Researchers Link Gene to Hereditary Form of Prostate Cancer 2002 Get Email Updates Advancing human health through genomics research Privacy Copyright Contact Accessibility Plug-ins Site Map Staff Search FOIA Share Top

  5. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  6. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for prostate cancer. It concluded that the expected harms of PSA screening are greater than the potential ... exam or other screening tests. Potential Benefits and Harms The main goal of a cancer screening test ...

  7. Prostate Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali

    2017-03-30

    Prostate ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a rare subtype of prostate adenocarcinoma that shows more aggressive behavior than conventional prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. PDA demonstrates similar clinical and paraclinical features such as prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma; therefore, clinical distinction of the 2 entities is very difficult (if not impossible) and histopathology plays an important role in the diagnosis of the disease. This review discusses all the necessary information needed for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDA including the morphologic features of PDA, an introduction about the known variants of PDA with helpful hints in grading of each variant, tips on differential diagnosis of PDA from the common morphologic mimickers, a detailed discussion on the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of PDA, and pathologic features that are helpful in determining the outcome.

  8. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  9. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive - discharge Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge Review Date 6/29/2015 Updated by: Jennifer Sobol, ... the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  10. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  11. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  12. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  13. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  14. Knockout AR in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    significance. By week 24 and thereafter, this difference was significant. To determine if pes-ARKO mice contain abnormalities other than enlarged ventral...earlier studies by Donjacour and colleagues (15). To determine whether pes-ARKO mice contain abnormalities other than enlarged VPs, we evaluated...Kid, kidney; U, ureter; AP, anterior prostate; Pr, all lobes of prostate; T, testes; Pe, glans penis . *, P 0.05; ***, P 0.001. Fig. 1

  15. Bilateral sphenoid wing metastases of prostate cancer presenting with extensive brain edema.

    PubMed

    Lindsberg, P J; Tatlisumak, T; Tienari, J; Brander, A

    1999-05-01

    A 76-year-old man insidiously developed diffuse neurological symptoms: cognitive decline, dysphagia, dysphasia and mental disturbance. Computed tomography of the cranium revealed widespread bilateral brain edema and symmetrical bilateral sphenoid wing hyperostosis. Adjacent to the hyperostosis that resembled skull base meningiomas, two separate parenchymatous temporal lobe lesions enhancing with contrast medium were observed. The patient had earlier been diagnosed to have prostatic carcinoma. Dexamethasone therapy resulted in discontinuation of the neurological symptoms. The diagnosis of metastasized adenocarcinoma of the prostate was confirmed histologically on autopsy after a sudden death from pneumonia. Intracranial metastases of prostate cancer may have a predilection site at the sphenoid wing, and can mimic a skull base meningioma. Intracranial spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma should be considered in elderly men as a treatable cause of gradual neurological deterioration, especially if cranial malignancy or hyperostosis is found.

  16. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  17. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  18. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  19. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  20. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non- skin carcinoma, and one of the leading causes of cancerrelated deaths in North American men. Presently...primary and metastatic cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus which is able to replicate in...capable of selectively infecting and killing malignant prostate cells while sparing normal cells. This cancer-specific cell death was not due to

  1. Constitutive Activation of NF-kappaB in Prostate Carcinoma Cells Through a Positive Feedback Loop: Implication of Inducible IKK-Related Kinase (IKKi)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    strongly suggests that GR is constitutively active in both normal and hyperplastic prostate glands. In contrast, GR levels were low or below detection... BPH ; (b) PC (Gleason score 7); (c) HGPIN and (d) prostate stroma. Note: Low GR expression in PC (B1) and high GR expression in apparently normal...was increased in human prostate carcinomas in comparison to BPH samples (see progress report for FY02), these recent results suggest an important

  2. Primary malignant melanoma of prostate

    PubMed Central

    Doublali, M.; Chouaib, A.; Khallouk, A.; Tazi, M. F.; El Fassi, M. J.; Farih, My. H.; Elfatmi, H.; Bendahou, M.; Benlemlih, A.; Lamarti, O.

    2010-01-01

    Primary genitourinary melanoma accounts for less than one per cent of all cases of melanoma. Most cases attributed to the prostate actually originate from the prostatic urethra. Due to its infrequency, primary malignant melanoma of the genitourinary tract presents a difficult diagnostic and management challenge. We report a case of primary malignant melanoma of the prostate found during transurethral resection of the prostate. PMID:20882159

  3. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27294569

  4. EpCAM Expression in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Carcinoma: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Anna K.; Hoving, Hilde D.; Rosati, Stefano; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; de Jong, Igle J.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new imaging modalities in prostate carcinoma staging. A non-invasive modality that can assess lymph node and bone metastases simultaneously is preferred. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membranous protein of interest as an imaging target since it is overexpressed in prostatic carcinoma compared with benign prostate epithelium and compared with stroma. However, EpCAM expression in lymph node metastases is sparsely available in the literature and EpCAM expression in bone metastases is yet unknown. The current study evaluates the expression of EpCAM in prostate carcinoma lymph nodes, in matched normal lymph nodes, in prostate carcinoma bone metastases, and in normal bone by immunohistochemistry. EpCAM was expressed in 100% of lymph node metastases (21 out of 21), in 0% of normal lymph nodes (0 out of 21), in 95% of bone metastases (19 out of 20), and in 0% of normal bone (0 out of 14). Based on these results, EpCAM may be a feasible imaging target in prostate carcinoma lymph node and bone metastases. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm current results. Preoperative visualization of prostate carcinoma metastases will improve disease staging and will prevent unnecessary invasive surgery. PMID:27690012

  5. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

  6. Cholesterol and Benign Prostate Disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael R.; Solomon, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association bet ween BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemi, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  7. Prostate tumor grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  8. Physical activity and its mechanistic effects on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wekesa, A; Harrison, M; Watson, R W

    2015-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity have been illustrated in numerous aspects of health. With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer and changes in physical activity of men, understanding the link between the two has important implications for changing this cancer burden. Both positive and negative associations between physical activity and prostate cancer have been previously demonstrated in observational epidemiological studies. Elucidating the biological mechanisms would lead to a better understanding of how physical activity influences the progression of prostate cancer. This review was undertaken to: (1) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the effects of physical activity on skeletal muscle secretomes, (2) indicate the plausible signaling pathways these proteins might activate, and (3) identify evidence in literature that demonstrates the roles of the signaling pathways in prostate cancer progression and regression. We also discuss proposed biological mechanisms and signaling pathways by which physical activity may prevent the development and progression of prostate cancer. We discuss proteins involved in the normal and aberrant growth and development of the prostate gland that may be affected by physical activity. We further identify future directions for research, including a better understanding of the biological mechanisms, the need to standardize physical activity and identify mechanistic end points of physical activity that can then be correlated with outcomes.

  9. Feasibility of monitoring HIFU prostate cancer therapy using elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchon, Remi; Chapelon, Jean Y.; Bertrand, Michel J.; Kallel, Faouzi; Ophir, Jonathan

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of elastographic monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Elastography is an imaging technique based on strain estimation in soft tissues under quasi-static compression. Since pathological tissues and HIFU-induced lesions exhibit different elastic properties than normal tissues, elastography is potentially able to achieve these goals. An ultrasound scanner was connected to a PC to acquire RF images. This setup is compatible with a HIFU device used for prostate cancer therapy by transrectal route. The therapy transducer and the biplane-imaging probe are covered with a balloon filled with a coupling liquid. Compression of the prostate is applied by inflating the balloon, while imaging sector scans of the prostate. In-vivo elastograms of the prostate were acquired before HIFU treatment. Problems inherent to in-vivo acquisitions are reported, such as undesired tangential displacements during the radial compression. This study shows the potential for in-vivo elastogram acquisition of HIFU-induced lesions in the human prostate.

  10. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  11. Proteomic analysis of patient tissue reveals PSA protein in the stroma of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Katherine J.; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E.; Parwani, Anil V.; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Graham, Lara; Hrebinko, Katherine; Acquafondata, Marie; Stewart, Nicolas A.; Nelson, Joel B.; Yoshimura, Naoki; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease frequently associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) that involves hyperplasia of both epithelial and stromal cells. Stromal fibrosis is a distinctive feature of BPH, but the exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. METHODS In the current study, proteomics analyses were utilized to identify proteins altered in the BPH stromal compartment from patients with symptomatic BPH. Stromal cells were isolated from histological nodules of BPH by laser capture microdissection (LCM) and subjected to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. RESULTS Proteins identified included several stromal-specific proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, focal adhesion and cellular junctions. Additionally, the proteomics array identified the presence of luminal epithelial secretory protein PSA. Immunostaining, ELISA, and in situ hybridization analyses of BPH tissues verified the presence of PSA protein but absence of PSA mRNA in the stromal compartment. E-cadherin was down-regulated in BPH epithelial cells compared to normal adjacent tissues, suggesting that alteration of cellular junctions could contribute to the presence of luminal epithelial secreted proteins PSA and KLK2 in the stromal compartment. CONCLUSIONS The above findings suggest that the presence of secreted proteins PSA and KLK2 from prostate luminal epithelial cells in BPH stroma is a hallmark of BPH nodules which could in part be due to alterations in cellular junction proteins and/or increased epithelial barrier permeability. Elucidating the cause and consequence of these secreted proteins in the stromal compartment of BPH may lead to new understanding of BPH pathogenesis as well as approaches to prevent and/or treat this common disease. PMID:24711254

  12. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  13. Prostate Cryotherapy Monitoring Using Vibroacoustography: Preliminary Results of an Ex Vivo Study and Technical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian J.; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James F.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Mynderse, Lance A.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research is to prospectively evaluate the feasibility of vibroacoustography (VA) imaging in monitoring prostate cryotherapy in an ex vivo model. Baseline scanning of an excised human prostate is accomplished by a VA system apparatus in a tank of degassed water. Alcohol and dry ice mixture are used to freeze two prostate tissue samples. The frozen prostates are subsequently placed within the water tank at 27°C and rescanned. VA images were acquired at prescribed time intervals to characterize the acoustic properties of the partially frozen tissue. The frozen prostate tissue appears in the images as hypoemitting signal. Once the tissue thaws, previously frozen regions show coarser texture than prior to freezing. The margin of the frozen tissue is delineated with a well-defined rim. The thawed cryolesions show a different contrast compared with normal unfrozen prostate. In conclusion, this pilot study shows that VA produces clear images of a frozen prostate at different temperature stages. The frozen tissue appears as a uniform region with well-defined borders that are readily identified. These characteristic images should allow safer and more efficient application of prostatic cryosurgery. These results provide substantial motivation to further investigate VA as a potential modality to monitor prostate cryotherapy intraoperatively. PMID:18990628

  14. Long term organ culture of human prostate tissue in a NASA-designed rotating wall bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, L.; Hatfill, S.; Chuaqui, R.; Vocke, C.; Emmert-Buck, M.; Linehan, W. M.; Duray, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To maintain ex vivo integral prostatic tissue including intact stromal and ductal elements using the NASA-designed Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) which maintains colocalized cells in an environment that promotes both three-dimensional cellular interactions together with the uniform mass transfer of nutrients and metabolic wastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Samples of normal prostate were obtained as a byproduct of transurethral prostatectomy or needle biopsy. Prostatic tissue dissected into small 1 x 1 mm. blocks was cultured in the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor for various time periods and analyzed using histological, immunochemical, and total cell RNA assays. RESULTS: We report the long term maintenance of benign explanted human prostate tissue grown in simple culture medium, under the simulated microgravity conditions afforded by the RWV bioreactor. Mesenchymal stromal elements including blood vessels and architecturally preserved tubuloglandular acini were maintained for a minimum of 28 days. Cytokeratins, vimentin and TGF-beta2 receptor and ligand were preserved through the entire culture period as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was continuously expressed during the culture period, although somewhat decreased. Prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and its transcript were down regulated over time of culture. Prostatic carcinoma cells from the TSU cell line were able to invade RWV-cultured benign prostate tissue explants. CONCLUSIONS: The RWV bioreactor represents an additional new technology for culturing prostate tissue for further investigations concerning the basic physiology and pathobiology of this clinically important tissue.

  15. Alteration of Loperamide-Induced Prostate Relaxation in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sheng-Lung; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Chen, I-Hung; Tong, Yat-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the change of loperamide-induced prostate relaxation in rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Materials and Methods. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: (1) control rats fed with normal chow and (2) rats fed with HFD for 6 months. The prostate was removed for histology study. Isolated prostate strips were hung in organ bath and precontracted with 1 μmol/L phenylephrine or 50 mmol/L KCl. The relaxation responses to loperamide 0.1 to 10 μmol/L were recorded. Western blotting analyses were performed for prostate μ-opioid receptors (MOR) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel proteins: sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) and inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir) 6.2 subunits. Results. Body weight, prostate weight, plasma levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and cholesterol, as well as systolic blood pressure, were significantly increased in the HFD rats. Histology showed prostatic hyperplasia in the HFD rat prostate. Prostatic relaxation induced by loperamide was markedly reduced in HFD when compared to the control. Protein expressions of MOR, SUR, and Kir 6.2 were decreased in HFD-fed rats. Conclusion. Loperamide-induced prostate relaxation is decreased in HFD rats due to reduced MOR and KATP channel expressions. PMID:25506071

  16. A novel shape similarity based elastography system for prostate cancer assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haisu; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Samani, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer among men worldwide and remains the second leading cancer-related cause of death in mature men. The disease can be cured if it is detected at early stage. This implies that prostate cancer detection at early stage is very critical for desirable treatment outcome. Conventional techniques of prostate cancer screening and detection, such as Digital Rectal Examination (DRE), Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) and Trans Rectal Ultra-Sonography (TRUS), are known to have low sensitivity and specificity. Elastography is an imaging technique that uses tissue stiffness as contrast mechanism. As the association between the degree of prostate tissue stiffness alteration and its pathology is well established, elastography can potentially detect prostate cancer with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a novel elastography technique which, unlike other elastography techniques, does not require displacement data acquisition system. This technique requires the prostate's pre-compression and postcompression transrectal ultrasound images. The conceptual foundation of reconstructing the prostate's normal and pathological tissues elastic moduli is to determine these moduli such that the similarity between calculated and observed shape features of the post compression prostate image is maximized. Results indicate that this technique is highly accurate and robust.

  17. Prostatic adenocarcinoma presenting with metastases to the testis and epididymis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIN; DONG, MEI; HU, XIAOLEI; LIU, LIN; LI, SHEN; LI, CHAO; YANG, LIJUN; XIAO, YONGQIANG; PANG, SHUJIAN; WANG, CHUAN

    2016-01-01

    Few cases of testicular metastases from prostate carcinoma have been reported, and asymptomatic metastases of prostate carcinoma to both the testis and epididymis are extremely rare. The current study presents the case of a 69-year-old male with testicular and epididymal metastases from prostate carcinoma. The patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Shijiazhuang with a 2-year history of lower urinary tract symptoms. Digital rectal examination revealed an enlarged multinodular prostate, and the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was >100 ng/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging showed prostate carcinoma with seminal vesicle involvement. A prostate biopsy showed prostate gland adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 3+3. The immunohistochemistry results were as follows: Prostatic acid phosphatase (+++), PSA (+++), P504s (+++), p63 (−) and cytokeratin 34βE12 (−), with a Ki-67 of ~5%. The patient was treated with a bilateral orchiectomy. The testicular pathology showed that the right testis and epididymis were invaded with metastatic adenocarcinoma. The left testis and epididymis were normal. The patient was treated with conventional flutamide endocrine therapy. At present the patient remains in a stable condition after 24 months of follow-up. PMID:26870285

  18. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  19. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  20. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  1. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  2. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Androgen-independent Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Reveals a Role for Protein S during the Development of High Grade and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Musrap, Natasha; Cretu, Daniela; Karagiannis, George S.; Batruch, Ihor; Smith, Chris; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Trudel, Dominique; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation constitutes the principal therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancers. However, this therapeutic intervention usually results in the transition to a more aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer. The elucidation of molecular alterations during the progression to androgen independence is an integral step toward discovering more effective targeted therapies. With respect to identifying crucial mediators of this transition, we compared the proteomes of androgen-independent (PC3, DU145, PPC1, LNCaP-SF, and 22Rv1) and androgen-dependent (LNCaP and VCaP) and/or normal prostate epithelial (RWPE) cell lines using mass spectrometry. We identified more than 100 proteins that were differentially secreted in the androgen-independent cell lines. Of these, Protein S (PROS1) was elevated in the secretomes of all of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, with no detectable secretion in normal and androgen-dependent cell lines. Using quantitative PCR, we observed significantly higher (p < 0.05) tissue expression levels of PROS1 in prostate cancer samples, further indicating its importance in prostate cancer progression. Similarly, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed elevation of PROS1 in high grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥8), and further elevation in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer lesions. We also observed its significant (p < 0.05) elevation in high grade prostate cancer seminal plasma samples. Taken together, these results show that PROS1 is elevated in high grade and castration-resistant prostate cancer and could serve as a potential biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:22908226

  8. SU-E-J-181: Effect of Prostate Motion On Combined Brachytherapy and External Beam Dose Based On Daily Motion of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, V; McLaughlin, P; Ealbaj, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, the adequacy of target expansions on the combined external beam and implant dose was examined based on the measured daily motion of the prostate. Methods: Thirty patients received an I–125 prostate implant prescribed to dose of 90Gy. This was followed by external beam to deliver a dose of 90Gyeq (external beam equivalent) to the prostate over 25 to 30 fractions. An ideal IMRT plan was developed by optimizing the external beam dose based on the delivered implant dose. The implant dose was converted to an equivalent external beam dose using the linear quadratic model. Patients were set up on the treatment table by daily orthogonal imaging and aligning the marker seeds in the prostate. Orthogonal images were obtained at the end of treatment to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Based on the observed motion of the markers between the initial and final images, 5 individual plans showing the actual dose delivered to the patient were calculated. A final true dose distribution was established based on summing the implant dose and the 5 external beam plans. Dose to the prostate, seminal vesicles, lymphnodes and normal tissues, rectal wall, urethra and lower sphincter were calculated and compared to ideal. On 18 patients who were sexually active, dose to the corpus cavernosum and internal pudendal artery was also calculated. Results: The average prostate motion in 3 orthogonal directions was less than 1 mm with a standard deviation of less than +2 mm. Dose and volume parameters showed that there was no decrease in dose to the targets and a marginal decrease in dose to in normal tissues. Conclusion: Dose delivered by seed implant moves with the prostate, decreasing the impact of intrafractions dose movement on actual dose delivered. Combined brachytherapy and external beam dose delivered to the prostate was not sensitive to prostate motion.

  9. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Hua; Zou, Yanmei; Xu, Sanpeng; Quan, Lanping; Yuan, Xianglin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-associated mortality for males worldwide. Although dysregulation of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) pathway has been previously reported in prostate cancer, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 (FRAT1) functions as a positive regulator of the β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular association between FRAT1 and the β-catenin/TCF pathway in prostate cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, FRAT1 expression was analyzed in normal prostate tissues and prostate adenocarcinoma samples using publicly available databases, a commercial tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry techniques. In addition, FRAT1 expression levels were altered by overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion in prostate cancer cells. The effects of FRAT1 expression on tumor growth were determined using cell growth curves in vitro and xenografts in nude mice in vivo. The effects of FRAT1 on β-catenin/TCF activity were measured using the TOPFLASH reporter assay. FRAT1 was expressed exclusively in the nuclei of normal prostate basal cells, and nuclear FRAT1 was detected in 68% (40/59) of prostate adenocarcinoma samples. In addition, FRAT1 activated the TCF luciferase reporter gene promoter in prostate cancer cells, and was observed to promote the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, FRAT1 expression was sufficient to transform NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and lead to tumor formation in vivo. These results suggest that FRAT1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer, potentially by suppressing the inhibitory effect of nuclear glycogen synthase 3β against β-catenin/TCF activity, thus activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and promoting cell growth. PMID:27599661

  10. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  11. Optical coherence tomography of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab

    Preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. These microscopic nerves course along the surface of the prostate within a few millimeters of the prostate capsule, and they vary in size and location from one patient to another, making preservation of the nerves difficult during dissection and removal of a cancerous prostate gland. These observations may explain in part the wide variability in reported sexual potency rates (9--86%) following prostate cancer surgery. Any technology capable of providing improved identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery would be of great assistance in improving sexual function after surgery, and result in direct patient benefit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique capable of performing high-resolution cross-sectional in vivo and in situ imaging of microstructures in biological tissues. OCT imaging of the cavernous nerves in the rat and human prostate has recently been demonstrated. However, improvements in the OCT system and the quality of the images for identification of the cavernous nerves is necessary before clinical use. The following chapters describe complementary approaches to improving identification and imaging of the cavernous nerves during OCT of the prostate gland. After the introduction to OCT imaging of the prostate gland, the optimal wavelength for deep imaging of the prostate is studied in Chapter 2. An oblique-incidence single point measurement technique using a normal-detector scanning system was implemented to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, mua and m's , of fresh canine prostate tissue, ex vivo, from the diffuse reflectance profile of near-IR light as a function of source-detector distance. The effective attenuation coefficient, mueff, and the Optical Penetration Depth (OPD) were

  12. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  13. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  14. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a method for identifying benign and malignant prostate biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Ling, Yuting; Lang, Stephen; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Objectives. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. Digital rectal examination (DRE) - a known clinical tool based on alteration in the mechanical properties of tissues due to cancer has traditionally been used for screening prostate cancer. Essentially, DRE estimates relative stiffness of cancerous and normal prostate tissue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) are new optical imaging techniques capable of providing cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure as well as elastogram in vivo and in real time. In this preliminary study, OCE was used in the setting of the human prostate biopsies ex vivo, and the images acquired were compared with those obtained using standard histopathologic methods. Methods. 120 prostate biopsies were obtained by TRUS guided needle biopsy procedures from 9 patients with clinically suspected cancer of the prostate. The biopsies were approximately 0.8mm in diameter and 12mm in length, and prepared in Formalin solution. Quantitative assessment of biopsy samples using OCE was obtained in kilopascals (kPa) before histopathologic evaluation. The results obtained from OCE and standard histopathologic evaluation were compared provided the cross-validation. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for OCE (histopathology was a reference standard). Results. OCE could provide quantitative elasticity properties of prostate biopsies within benign prostate tissue, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical hyperplasia and malignant prostate cancer. Data analysed showed that the sensitivity and specificity of OCE for PCa detection were 1 and 0.91, respectively. PCa had significantly higher stiffness values compared to benign tissues, with a trend of increasing in stiffness with increasing of malignancy. Conclusions. Using OCE, microscopic resolution elastogram is promising in diagnosis of human prostatic diseases. Further studies using this technique to improve the

  15. Irradiation of the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes with an adaptive algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, A. B.; Chen, J.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gottschalk, A. G.; Roach, M. R. III; Pouliot, J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The simultaneous treatment of pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate in radiotherapy for prostate cancer is complicated by the independent motion of these two target volumes. In this work, the authors study a method to adapt intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans so as to compensate for this motion by adaptively morphing the multileaf collimator apertures and adjusting the segment weights. Methods: The study used CT images, tumor volumes, and normal tissue contours from patients treated in our institution. An IMRT treatment plan was then created using direct aperture optimization to deliver 45 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes and 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prostate target volume was then shifted in either the anterior-posterior direction or in the superior-inferior direction. The treatment plan was adapted by adjusting the aperture shapes with or without re-optimizing the segment weighting. The dose to the target volumes was then determined for the adapted plan. Results: Without compensation for prostate motion, 1 cm shifts of the prostate resulted in an average decrease of 14% in D-95%. If the isocenter is simply shifted to match the prostate motion, the prostate receives the correct dose but the pelvic lymph nodes are underdosed by 14% {+-} 6%. The use of adaptive morphing (with or without segment weight optimization) reduces the average change in D-95% to less than 5% for both the pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate. Conclusions: Adaptive morphing with and without segment weight optimization can be used to compensate for the independent motion of the prostate and lymph nodes when combined with daily imaging or other methods to track the prostate motion. This method allows the delivery of the correct dose to both the prostate and lymph nodes with only small changes to the dose delivered to the target volumes.

  16. Interleukin-17 promotes prostate cancer via MMP7-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q; Liu, S; Parajuli, KR; Zhang, W; Zhang, K; Mo, Z; Liu, J; Chen, Z; Yang, S; Wang, AR; Myers, L; You, Z

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with a variety of human cancers including prostate cancer. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a critical pro-inflammatory cytokine, which has been demonstrated to promote development of prostate cancer, colon cancer, skin cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, and pancreas cancer. IL-17 promotes prostate adenocarcinoma with a concurrent increase of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) expression in mouse prostate. Whether MMP7 mediates IL-17’s action and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We generated Mmp7 and Pten double knockout (Mmp7−/− in abbreviation) mouse model and demonstrated that MMP7 promotes prostate adenocarcinoma through induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Pten-null mice. MMP7 disrupted E-cadherin/β-catenin complex to up-regulate EMT transcription factors in mouse prostate tumors. IL-17 receptor C and Pten double knockout mice recapitulated the weak EMT characteristics observed in Mmp7−/− mice. IL-17 induced MMP7 and EMT in human prostate cancer LNCaP, C4-2B, and PC-3 cell lines, while siRNA knockdown of MMP7 inhibited IL-17-induced EMT. Compound III, a selective MMP7 inhibitor, decreased development of invasive prostate cancer in Pten single knockout mice. In human normal prostates and prostate tumors, IL-17 mRNA levels were positively correlated with MMP7 mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate that MMP7 mediates IL-17’s function in promoting prostate carcinogenesis through induction of EMT, indicating IL-17-MMP7-EMT axis as potential targets for developing new strategies in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27375020

  17. Sox2 Is an Androgen Receptor-Repressed Gene That Promotes Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kregel, Steven; Kiriluk, Kyle J.; Rosen, Alex M.; Cai, Yi; Reyes, Edwin E.; Otto, Kristen B.; Tom, Westin; Paner, Gladell P.; Szmulewitz, Russell Z.; Vander Griend, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR), has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5) expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways. PMID:23326489

  18. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H; Lechevallier, E; Rambeaud, J-J; Alimi, J-C; Faix, A; Gravis, G; Hannoun-Levi, J-M; Quintens, H; Rébillard, X; Droupy, S

    2012-09-01

    All treatments of prostate cancer have a negative effect on both sexuality and male fertility. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of quality of life, sexual, urinary, bowel and vitality according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintain a satisfying sex is the main concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatment. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before diagnosis of prostate cancer in order to deliver complete information and to consider early and appropriate treatment options at the request of the couple. Forms of sexuality sexual preference settings stored (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, be an alternative to the couple to maintain intimacy and complicity. In all cases, a specific management and networking will in many cases to find a satisfactory sexuality. Consequences of the treatment on male fertility should be part of the information of patients with prostate cancer and their partners. The choice of treatment must take into account the desire of paternity of the couple. A semen analysis with sperm cryopreservation before any therapy should be routinely offered in men with prostate cancer, particularly among men under 55, with a partner under 43 years old or without children. If the desire for parenthood among couples, sperm cryopreservation before treatment and medical assisted reproduction are recommended.

  19. Expectant Management (Watchful Waiting) and Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Watchful Waiting or Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer Because prostate cancer often grows very slowly, some ... Away or Comes Back After Treatment More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  20. What Are the Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer How common is prostate cancer? ... at some point are still alive today. For statistics related to survival, see Survival Rates for Prostate ...

  1. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  2. Immunotherapy and gene therapy in prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grozescu, T; Popa, F

    2017-01-01

    There are few methods bringing several relatively recent advances in therapy of certain types of prostate cancer. Belonging to personalized therapies, they use cells (normal or pathologic) from the patient, modify and reintroduce them in the patient’s body, leading to an increased efficiency against the neoplastic tissue, proving to increase the patient’s lifespan and/ or tumor progression. PMID:28255378

  3. Computational Models of Anti-VEGF Therapies in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    individualized prostate cancer whole-body multicompartment PK/PD models. Each dot represents one individual from the TCGA PrCa dataset. Red = tumor; blue...represents one individual from the TCGA PrCa dataset. Red = tumor; blue = normal. The same data is plotted in each column, sorted using the expression of

  4. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  5. The evolution and state of modern technology for prostate cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Saliken, John C; Donnelly, Bryan J; Rewcastle, John C

    2002-08-01

    Cryosurgery is the in situ ablation of a target tissue by application of extreme cold temperature. The ability of cryosurgery to ablate tissue is unquestioned. It is the controlled application of a cryoinjury in a manner to minimize morbidity that is problematic. Prostate cryosurgery is complicated by the proximity of the prostate to adjacent structures that are sensitive to a freeze injury, namely the urethra, rectal wall, and neurovascular bundles. Several recent technological advances have led to the development of an effective treatment protocol with acceptable morbidity. These include the advent of real-time transrectal ultrasound, cryomachines with almost instant freeze-thaw control through the use of the Joule-Thompson effect, and warming catheters to effectively preserve the integrity of the urethra and external sphincter. Further, temperature monitoring at the posterior margin of the prostate sometimes combined with an injection of saline solution into Denonvilliers fascia has reduced the occurrence of urethrorectal fistula formation to 0% to 0.5% in modern series. We review the key innovations of prostate cryosurgery that differentiate this state-of-the-art procedure from that used by early investigators to even that of the early 1990s. Potential future innovations, specifically related to image guidance of the procedure, are also addressed.

  6. Promoter Hypermethylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. It is well known that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. Methods This review discusses current information on methylated genes associated with prostate cancer development and progression. Results Over 30 genes have been investigated for promoter methylation in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is reviewed. Conclusions These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Certain epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:20861812

  7. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  8. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia reflects a complex interplay between benign prostatic enlargement, which will affect almost all men by the age of 80, and the resulting outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease is now known to adversely affect the quality of life of around one man in three over the age of 50. New medical treatments and new surgical interventions are challenging the previous standard treatment of transurethral resection of prostate, which continues to have a morbidity of 17% and some mortality. Primary care will be increasingly involved in shared care with particular emphasis on monitoring of patients on watchful waiting medical therapy- and following operative intervention. PMID:9196969

  9. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2/MnSOD)/catalase and SOD2/GPx1 ratios as biomarkers for tumor progression and metastasis in prostate, colon, and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miar, Ana; Hevia, David; Muñoz-Cimadevilla, Henar; Astudillo, Aurora; Velasco, Julio; Sainz, Rosa M; Mayo, Juan C

    2015-08-01

    The role of manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD2/MnSOD) during tumor progression has been studied for several decades with controversial results. While SOD2 downregulation was initially associated with tumor initiation and was proposed as a tumor suppressor gene, recent studies have reported that SOD2 might favor tumor progression and dissemination. To our knowledge this is the first time that changes in SOD2 expression in three different types of tumors, i.e., prostate, lung, and colon cancer, are studied by analyzing both SOD2 mRNA and protein levels in a total of 246 patients' samples. In prostate samples, SOD2 protein levels were also increased, especially in middle stage tumors. In the case of colon and lung tumors both mRNA and protein SOD2 levels were increased in malignant tissues compared to those in nontumor samples. More importantly, all metastases analyzed showed increased levels of SOD2 when compared to those of normal primary tissue and healthy adjacent tissue. Together, these results suggest that a common redox imbalance in these three types of tumor occurs at intermediate stages which then might favor migration and invasion, leading to a more aggressive cancer type. Consequently, the ratios SOD2/catalase and SOD2/Gpx1 could be considered as potential markers during progression from tumor growth to metastasis.

  10. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  11. Identification of FISH biomarkers to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with prostate adenocarcinoma in tumour and field effect environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To reduce sampling error associated with cancer detection in prostate needle biopsies, we explored the possibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the histologically benign prostate tissue from patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate. Methods Tumour specimens from 33 radical prostatectomy (RP) cases, histologically benign tissue from 17 of the 33 RP cases, and 26 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) control cases were evaluated with Locus Specific Identifier (LSI) probes MYC (8q24), LPL (8p21.22), and PTEN (10q23), as well as with centromere enumerator probes CEP8, CEP10, and CEP7. A distribution of FISH signals in the tumour and histologically benign adjacent tissue was compared to that in BPH specimens using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results The combination of MYC gain, CEP8 Abnormal, PTEN loss or chromosome 7 aneusomy was positive in the tumour area of all of the 33 specimens from patients with adenocarcinomas, and in 88% of adjacent histologically benign regions (15 out of 17) but in only 15% (4 out of 26) of the benign prostatic hyperplasia control specimens. Conclusions A panel of FISH markers may allow detection of genomic abnormalities that associate with adenocarcinoma in the field adjacent to and surrounding the tumour, and thus could potentially indicate the presence of cancer in the specimen even if the cancer focus itself was missed by biopsy and histology review. PMID:24568597

  12. Association of Diet With Prostate Specific Antigen and Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Ariafar, Ali; Zeyghami, Shahryar; Hosseini, Mohammad Mehdi; Khezri, Abdol Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate is an important male reproductive system gland and its disorders can affect men's quality of life and health. Prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate adenocarcinoma are major disorders that can be found in all men in different ages. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of diet with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level as well as prostate volume. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 950 men older than 40 years of age who had attended our clinic for a screening program for prostate cancer were enrolled. Data was extracted from the program database. The eligible cases included all noncancerous subjects with available data concerning serum PSA level and prostate volume; the patients had completed a 50-item self-administered food frequency questionnaire about their diet during the preceding two year. Results: No overall association was found between the consumption of foods and prostate volume as well as serum PSA level. There was a significant correlations between age and serum PSA level (r = 0.24) as well as with prostate volume (r = 0.22) (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between serum PSA level and prostate volume (r = 0.41 and P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the previous reports regarding the serum PSA level correlation with prostate volume. There was no evidence that dietary patterns might have any important effect on prostate volume and serum PSA in this Iranian population. PMID:25695023

  13. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  14. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  15. Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    TURP - discharge; Prostate resection - transurethral - discharge ... You had transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) surgery to treat an enlarged prostate. Your surgeon inserted a tube-like tool called a cystoscope (or endoscope) through your urethra ( ...

  16. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... as men get older. This is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). An enlarged prostate may cause you problems ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234640 . Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  18. Unusual Cushing's Syndrome and Hypercalcitoninaemia due to a Small Cell Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Elena; Nuzzo, Fiorella

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was hospitalized because of severe hypokalaemia due to ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome. Total body computed tomography (TBCT) and 68 Gallium DOTATATE PET/CT localized a voluminous prostate tumour. A subsequent transurethral prostate biopsy documented a small cell carcinoma positive for ACTH and calcitonin and negative for prostatic specific antigen (PSA) at immunocytochemical study; serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA) was normal. Despite medical treatments, Cushing's syndrome was not controlled and the patient's clinical condition progressively worsened. Surgical resection was excluded; the patient underwent a cycle of chemotherapy followed by febrile neutropenia and fatal intestinal perforation. This case report describes a rare case of Cushing's syndrome and hypercalcitoninaemia due to a small cell carcinoma of the prostate, a rare tumour with very few therapeutic options and negative prognosis. PMID:28044110

  19. CK2 abrogates the inhibitory effects of PRH/HHEX on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion and acts through PRH to control cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Y H; Kershaw, R M; Humphreys, E H; Assis Junior, E M; Chaudhri, S; Jayaraman, P-S; Gaston, K

    2017-01-01

    PRH/HHEX (proline-rich homeodomain protein/haematopoietically expressed homeobox protein) is a transcription factor that controls cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell migration. Our previous work has shown that in haematopoietic cells, Protein Kinase CK2-dependent phosphorylation of PRH results in the inhibition of PRH DNA-binding activity, increased cleavage of PRH by the proteasome and the misregulation of PRH target genes. Here we show that PRH and hyper-phosphorylated PRH are present in normal prostate epithelial cells, and that hyper-phosphorylated PRH levels are elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and prostate cancer cell lines. A reduction in PRH protein levels increases the motility of normal prostate epithelial cells and conversely, PRH over-expression inhibits prostate cancer cell migration and blocks the ability of these cells to invade an extracellular matrix. We show that CK2 over-expression blocks the repression of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion by PRH. In addition, we show that PRH knockdown in normal immortalised prostate cells results in an increase in the population of cells capable of colony formation in Matrigel, as well as increased cell invasion and decreased E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of CK2 reduces PRH phosphorylation and reduces prostate cell proliferation but the effects of CK2 inhibition on cell proliferation are abrogated in PRH knockdown cells. These data suggest that the increased phosphorylation of PRH in prostate cancer cells increases both cell proliferation and tumour cell migration/invasion. PMID:28134934

  20. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  1. A DNA methylation microarray-based study identifies ERG as a gene commonly methylated in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, Jacob; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Corless, Christopher L; Jin, Jennifer; Zarour, Luai; Higano, Celestia; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert L; Wilmot, Beth; Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Bova, G. Steven; Partin, Alan W; Mori, Motomi

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation of promoter regions is a common event in prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men worldwide. Because prior reports demonstrating that DNA methylation is important in prostate cancer studied a limited number of genes, we systematically quantified the DNA methylation status of 1,505 CpG dinucleotides for 807 genes in 78 paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples and three normal prostate samples. The ERG gene, commonly repressed in prostate cells in the absence of an oncogenic fusion to the TMPRSS2 gene, was one of the most commonly methylated genes, occurring in 74% of prostate cancer specimens. In an independent group of patient samples, we confirmed that ERG DNA methylation was common, occurring in 57% of specimens, and cancer-specific. The ERG promoter is marked by repressive chromatin marks mediated by polycomb proteins in both normal prostate cells and prostate cancer cells, which may explain ERG's predisposition to DNA methylation and the fact that tumors with ERG DNA methylation were more methylated, in general. These results demonstrate that bead arrays offer a high-throughput method to discover novel genes with promoter DNA methylation such as ERG, whose measurement may improve our ability to more accurately detect prostate cancer. PMID:21946329

  2. Canine prostatic disease--comparison of radiographic appearance with morphologic and microbiologic findings: 30 cases (1981-1985).

    PubMed

    Feeney, D A; Johnston, G R; Klausner, J S; Perman, V; Leininger, J R; Tomlinson, M J

    1987-04-15

    A retrospective analysis was made of radiographs from 24 clinically normal young adult male Beagles used in previously reported base-line research on the distal male urinary tract. The ventrodorsal and craniocaudal prostate gland dimensions were measured, as visualized on the lateral radiographic view, and expressed as a ratio of the distance between the cranial aspect of the public bone and the sacral promontory. In 17 of these 24 dogs, there was sufficient image clarity to permit confident measurement of prostatic dimensions. From these data, the largest acceptable prostatic dimension, as visualized on the lateral radiographic view, was 70% of the public-promontory distance. A retrospective analysis was made of 30 cases of canine prostatic disease, with the objective of identifying the radiographic (survey and distention retrograde urethrocystogram) appearance most often associated with the various spontaneous prostatic diseases. Prostatomegaly was not specific for the cause of prostatic disease, except if the apparent parenchymal dimensions were greater than or equal to 90% of the public-promontory distance wherein neoplasia, abscess, and paraprostatic cysts (readily differentiated from diffuse intraparenchymal disease by ultrasonography) were the principle considerations. Multifocal, irregularly shaped, parenchymal mineral densities were observed only in dogs with prostatic carcinoma (4/7 cases) or prostatitis (1 case of chronic prostatitis). Narrowing of the prostatic portion of the urethra was observed only in association with abscess, neoplasm, or noninflammatory nonneoplastic disease (possibly benign hypertrophy/hyperplasia), whereas widening of this part of the urethra was not observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Local Anesthesia During Interstitial Laser Coagulation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kedia, Kalish R

    2005-01-01

    With the emergence of minimally invasive therapies for the management of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), as well as the reality of a changing medical economic environment, there is a need for a reliable local anesthesia protocol. The protocol described here for prostate anesthetic block is a safe, economical, and effective way to perform interstitial laser coagulation and other minor endoscopic urologic procedures in the office setting. Most patients experience little discomfort and recover quickly, with prompt return to normal activities. Urologists should be aware of and comfortable with these techniques. PMID:16985900

  4. Origin and Properties of Prostatic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . prostate 6 integrin Bcl-2 S tem cell biology and tumorigenesis may be closely linked...In addition to being a source of carcinomas, stem cells may also give rise to benign prostatic hyperplasia (7). The isolation and characterization of...expression may contribute to the etiology of prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (48), proliferative inflam- matory atrophy, which

  5. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  6. Common Questions About Chronic Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Holt, James D; Garrett, W Allan; McCurry, Tyler K; Teichman, Joel M H

    2016-02-15

    Chronic prostatitis is relatively common, with a lifetime prevalence of 1.8% to 8.2%. Risk factors include conditions that facilitate introduction of bacteria into the urethra and prostate (which also predispose the patient to urinary tract infections) and conditions that can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic prostatitis must be differentiated from other causes of chronic pelvic pain, such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction; prostate and bladder cancers; benign prostatic hyperplasia; urolithiasis; and other causes of dysuria, urinary frequency, and nocturia. The National Institutes of Health divides prostatitis into four syndromes: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. CBP and CNP/CPPS both lead to pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. CBP presents as recurrent urinary tract infections with the same organism identified on repeated cultures; it responds to a prolonged course of an antibiotic that adequately penetrates the prostate, if the urine culture suggests sensitivity. If four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy is effective but symptoms recur, another course may be prescribed, perhaps in combination with alpha blockers or nonopioid analgesics. CNP/CPPS, accounting for more than 90% of chronic prostatitis cases, presents as prostatic pain lasting at least three months without consistent culture results. Weak evidence supports the use of alpha blockers, pain medications, and a four- to six-week course of antibiotics for the treatment of CNP/CPPS. Patients may also be referred to a psychologist experienced in managing chronic pain. Experts on this condition recommend a combination of treatments tailored to the patient's phenotypic presentation. Urology referral should be considered when appropriate treatment is ineffective. Additional treatments include pelvic

  7. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Cone-Beam CT in Conjunction with DSA for Identifying Prostatic Arterial Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao Qiang; Duan, Feng; Yuan, Kai; Zhang, Guo Dong; Yan, Jieyu; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To describe findings in prostatic arteries (PAs) at digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) that allow identification of benign prostatic hyperplasia and to determine the value added with the use of cone-beam CT. Materials and Methods This retrospective single-institution study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement for written informed consent was waived. From February 2009 to December 2014, a total of 148 patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 70.5 years ± 14.5) underwent DSA of the internal iliac arteries and cone-beam CT with a flat-detector angiographic system before they underwent prostate artery embolization. Both the DSA and cone-beam CT images were evaluated by two interventional radiologists to determine the number of independent PAs and their origins and anastomoses with adjacent arteries. The exact McNemar test was used to compare the detection rate of the PAs and the anastomoses with DSA and with cone-beam CT. Results The PA anatomy was evaluated successfully by means of cone-beam CT in conjunction with DSA in all patients. Of the 296 pelvic sides, 274 (92.6%) had only one PA. The most frequent PA origin was the common gluteal-pudendal trunk with the superior vesicular artery in 118 (37.1%), followed by the anterior division of the internal iliac artery in 99 (31.1%), and the internal pudendal artery in 77 (24.2%) pelvic sides. In 67 (22.6%) pelvic sides, anastomoses to adjacent arteries were documented. The numbers of PA origins and anastomoses, respectively, that could be identified were significantly higher with cone-beam CT (301 of 318 [94.7%] and 65 of 67 [97.0%]) than with DSA (237 [74.5%] and 39 [58.2%], P < .05). Cone-beam CT provided essential information that was not available with DSA in 90 of 148 (60.8%) patients. Conclusion Cone-beam CT is a useful adjunctive technique to DSA for identification of the PA anatomy and provides information to help treatment planning

  8. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of prostate cancer using heptamethine carbocyanine dyes

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JIANLIN; YI, XIAOMIN; YAN, FEI; WANG, FULI; QIN, WEIJUN; WU, GUOJUN; YANG, XIAOJIAN; SHAO, CHEN; CHUNG, LELAND W.K.

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive novel modality for the detection of cancer. A previous study defined two organic polymethine cyanine dyes as ideal NIRF probes, IR-783 and its derivative MHI-148, which have excellent optical characteristics, superior biocompatibility and cancer targeting abilities. To investigate the feasibility of NIRF dye-mediated prostate cancer imaging, dye uptake and subcellular co-localization were investigated in PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and RWPE-1 normal prostate epithelial cells. Different organic anion transporting peptide (OATP) inhibitors were utilized to explore the potential role of the OATP subtype, including the nonspecific OATP inhibitor bromosulfophthalein, the OATP1 inhibitor 17β-estradiol, the selective OATP1B1 inhibitor rifampicin and the selective OATP1B3 inhibitor cholecystokinin octapeptide. NIRF dyes were also used for the simulated detection of circulating tumor cells and the rapid detection of prostate cancer in human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer xenografts in mouse models. The results revealed that the cancer-specific uptake of these organic dyes in prostate cancer cells occurred primarily via OATP1B3. A strong NIRF signal was detected in prostate cancer tissues, but not in normal tissues that were stained with IR-783. Prostate cancer cells were recognized with particular NIR fluorescence in isolated mononuclear cell mixtures. The results of the present study demonstrated that NIRF dye-mediated imaging is a feasible and practicable method for prostate cancer detection, although further investigative studies are required before clinical translation. PMID:25354708

  9. Aberrant DNA Methylation and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sunipa; Buckles, Eric; Estrada, John; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer, a significant contributor to morbidity and a leading cause of cancer-related death in men in Western industrialized countries. In contrast to genetic changes that vary among individual cases, somatic epigenetic alterations are early and highly consistent events. Epigenetics encompasses several different phenomena, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, RNA interference, and genomic imprinting. Epigenetic processes regulate gene expression and can change malignancy-associated phenotypes such as growth, migration, invasion, or angiogenesis. Methylations of certain genes are associated with PCa progression. Compared to normal prostate tissues, several hypermethylated genes have also been identified in benign prostate hyperplasia, which suggests a role for aberrant methylation in this growth dysfunction. Global and gene-specific DNA methylation could be affected by environmental and dietary factors. Among other epigenetic changes, aberrant DNA methylation might have a great potential as diagnostic or prognostic marker for PCa and could be tested in tumor tissues and various body fluids (e.g., serum, urine). The DNA methylation markers are simple in nature, have high sensitivity, and could be detected either quantitatively or qualitatively. Availability of genome-wide screening methodologies also allows the identification of epigenetic signatures in high throughput population studies. Unlike irreversible genetic changes, epigenetic alterations are reversible and could be used for PCa targeted therapies. PMID:22547956

  10. Proton-beam therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kagan, A Robert; Schulz, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    The treatment options for prostate cancer include prostatectomy, external-beam irradiation, brachytherapy, cryosurgery, focused ultrasound, hormonal therapy, watchful waiting, and various combinations of these modalities. Because the prostate abuts the bladder and rectum, the dose distributions of external-beam irradiations and the accuracy of their placement play crucial roles in the probability of tumor cure and the incidence of posttreatment complications. Principal among the newer radiation technologies is proton-beam therapy (PBT), whose dose distributions make it possible to deliver higher tumor doses and smaller doses to surrounding normal tissues than from x-ray systems. However, as the 10-year cause-specific survival for early-stage disease treated by radiation therapy now exceeds 90%, and with severe late toxicities in the range of 2% to 3%, randomized clinical trials provide the only means to demonstrate improved outcomes from PBT. Short of the data provided by such trials, the efficacy of PBT can be gleaned only from reports in the clinical literature, and, to date, these reports are equivocal. In view of the current health care crisis and the higher costs of PBT for prostate cancer, it is reasonable to assess the viability of this in-vogue but not-so-new technology.

  11. Elevated expression of HIF-lα in actively growing prostate tissues is associated with clinical features of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Haihu; Bi, Dongbin; Ding, Kejia; Lu, Jiaju

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-age or older men. Increasing evidence has shown that BPH is associated with hypoxia microenvironment. Methods We retrospectively collected patient data and tissue samples from fetal prostates(FP), normal prostates(NP), intra-acinar of BPH, peri-acinar of BPH, prostate cancers and sarcomas of prostate. The expression of HIF-1α, as well as VEGF was visualized by immunohistochemistry and statistically analyzed with clinical parameters. Results Expression of HIF-lα was observed in intra-acinar of BPH (69.5%), prostate cancer (85.7%) and all FPs, while NP and peri-acinar of BPH tissues were all stained negative. HIF-lα levels in FPs and the malignant tumors were higher than BPH tissues(p < 0.05), and the expression of HIF-lα in intra-acinar of BPH was higher than NP and peri-acinar of BPH (p < 0.05). The expression of HIF-lα was correlated with the weight of intra-acinar of prostate (p < 0.05). And patients with prostate weight larger that 72.45g were prone to have HIF-lα moderate-positive expression, according to the ROC curve (AUC = 0.734, 95%CI = 0.630-0.838). Moreover, the risk of acute urine retention (AUR) for HIF-lα moderate-positive patients increased significantly (OR=5.517, 95%CI = 2.434-12.504). Conclusions HIF-lα expression is increased in highly proliferative prostate tissues and correlated with the weight of intra-acinar prostate. Moreover, HIF-lα is also an independent risk factor for AUR occurrence in BPH patients. PMID:26919249

  12. Prostate cancer metastatic to bone has higher expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) than primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Bo; Brown, Edward; Farris, Alton B.; Sun, Shi-Yong; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is the principal regulator of the secretion of parathyroid hormone and plays key roles in extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) homeostasis. It is also thought to participate in the development of cancer, especially bony metastases of breast and prostate cancer. However, the expression of CaSR has not been systematically analyzed in prostate cancer from patients with or without bony metastases. By comparing human prostate cancer tissue sections in microarrays, we found that the CaSR was expressed in both normal prostate and primary prostate cancer as assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We used two methods to analyze the expression level of CaSR. One was the pathological score read by a pathologist, the other was the positivity% obtained from the Aperio positive pixel count algorithm. Both of the methods gave consistent results. Metastatic prostate cancer tissue obtained from bone had higher CaSR expression than primary prostate cancer (P <0.05). The expression of CaSR in primary prostate cancers of patients with metastases to tissues other than bone was not different from that in primary prostate cancer of patients with or without bony metastases (P >0.05). The expression of CaSR in cancer tissue was not associated with the stage or status of differentiation of the cancer. These results suggest that CaSR may have a role in promoting bony metastasis of prostate cancer, hence raising the possibility of reducing the risk of such metastases with CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:26065011

  13. Bisphenol A Promotes Human Prostate Stem-Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Increases In Vivo Carcinogenesis in Human Prostate Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Majumdar, Shyama; Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nelles, Jason L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in rodent models have shown that early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the prostate and enhances its susceptibility to hormonal carcinogenesis with aging. To determine whether the human prostate is similarly sensitive to BPA, the current study used human prostate epithelial stem-like cells cultured from prostates of young, disease-free donors. Similar to estradiol-17β (E2), BPA increased stem-progenitor cell self-renewal and expression of stem-related genes in a dose-dependent manner. Further, 10 nM BPA and E2 possessed equimolar membrane-initiated signaling with robust induction of p-Akt and p-Erk at 15 minutes. To assess in vivo carcinogenicity, human prostate stem-progenitor cells combined with rat mesenchyme were grown as renal grafts in nude mice, forming normal human prostate epithelium at 1 month. Developmental BPA exposure was achieved through oral administration of 100 or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight to hosts for 2 weeks after grafting, producing free BPA levels of 0.39 and 1.35 ng/mL serum, respectively. Carcinogenesis was driven by testosterone plus E2 treatment for 2 to 4 months to model rising E2 levels in aging men. The incidence of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma markedly increased from 13% in oil-fed controls to 33% to 36% in grafts exposed in vivo to BPA (P < .05). Continuous developmental BPA exposure through in vitro (200 nM) plus in vivo (250 μg/kg body weight) treatments increased high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia/cancer incidence to 45% (P < .01). Together, the present findings demonstrate that human prostate stem-progenitor cells are direct BPA targets and that developmental exposure to BPA at low doses increases hormone-dependent cancer risk in the human prostate epithelium. PMID:24424067

  14. Disruption of Prostate Microvasculature by Combining Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound and Prothrombin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongliang; Qiao, Lu; Gao, Wenhong; Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a unique method to disrupt tumor vasculature using pulsed, high-pressure amplitude therapeutic ultrasound combined with microbubbles. In this study, we attempted to destroy the prostate vasculature of canine prostates using microbubble-enhanced ultrasound (MEUS) and prothrombin. The prostates of 43 male mongrel canines were surgically exposed. Twenty-two prostates were treated using MEUS (n = 11) or MEUS and prothrombin (PMEUS, n = 11). The other 21 prostates, which were treated using microbubbles (n = 7), ultrasound (n = 7) or prothrombin (n = 7) only, served as the controls. Prothrombin was intravenously infused at 20 IU/kg. MEUS was induced using a therapeutic ultrasound device at a peak negative pressure of 4.47 MPa and a microbubble injection. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed to assess the blood perfusion of the prostates. Then, the prostate tissue was harvested immediately after treatment and at 48 hours later for pathological examination. The contrast-enhanced ultrasound peak value of the prostate decreased significantly from 36.2 ± 5.6 to 27.1 ± 6.3 after treatment in the PMEUS group, but it remained unchanged in the other groups. Histological examination found severe microvascular rupture, hemorrhage and thrombosis in both MEUS- and PMEUS-treated prostates immediately after treatment, while disruption in the PMEUS group was more severe than in the MEUS group. Forty-eight hours after treatment, massive necrosis and infiltration of white blood cells occurred in the PMEUS group. This study demonstrated that PMEUS disrupted the normal microvasculature of canine prostates and induced massive necrosis. PMEUS could potentially become a new noninvasive method used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:27643992

  15. Optical biopsy of the prostate: can we TRUST (trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-03-01

    Needle-based core-biopsy to locate prostate cancer relies heavily upon trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging guidance. Ultrasonographic findings of classic hypoechoic peripheral zone lesions have a low specificity of ~28%, a low positive predictive value of ~29%, and an overall accuracy of ~43%, in prostate cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of isoechoic or nearly invisible prostate cancers on ultrasonography ranges from 25 to 42%. As a result, TRUS is useful and convenient to direct the needle trajectory following a systematic biopsy sampling template rather than to target only the potentially malignant lesion for focal-biopsy. To address this deficiency in the first-line of prostate cancer imaging, a trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography (TRUST) approach is being developed to non-invasively resolve the likely optical signatures of prostate malignancy. The approach has evolved from using one NIR wavelength to two NIR bands, and recently to three bands of NIR spectrum information. The concept has been evaluated on one normal canine prostate and three dogs with implanted prostate tumor developed as a model. The initial results implementing TRUST on the canine prostate tumor model includes: (1) quantifying substantially increased total hemoglobin concentration over the time-course of imaging in a rapidly growing prostate tumor; (2) confirming hypoxia in a prostatic cystic lesion; and (3) imaging hypoxic changes of a necrotic prostate tumor. Despite these interesting results, intensive technologic development is necessary for translating the approach to benefiting clinical practice, wherein the ultimate utility is not possibly to eliminate needle-biopsy but to perform focal-biopsy that is only necessary to confirm the cancer, as well as to monitor and predict treatment responses.

  16. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol is a neutral lipid that accumulates in liquid-ordered, detergent-resistant membrane domains called lipid rafts. Lipid rafts serve as membrane platforms for signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cell growth, survival, and a variety of other processes relevant to cancer. A number of studies, going back many years, demonstrate that cholesterol accumulates in solid tumors and that cholesterol homeostasis breaks down in the prostate with aging and with the transition to the malignant state. This review summarizes the established links between cholesterol and prostate cancer (PCa), with a focus on how accumulation of cholesterol within the lipid raft component of the plasma membrane may stimulate signaling pathways that promote progression to hormone refractory disease. We propose that increases in cholesterol in prostate tumor cell membranes, resulting from increases in circulating levels or from dysregulation of endogenous synthesis, results in the coalescence of raft domains. This would have the effect of sequestering positive regulators of oncogenic signaling within rafts, while maintaining negative regulators in the liquid-disordered membrane fraction. This approach toward examining the function of lipid rafts in prostate cancer cells may provide insight into the role of circulating cholesterol in malignant growth and on the potential relationship between diet and aggressive disease. Large-scale characterization of proteins that localize to cholesterol-rich domains may help unveil signaling networks and pathways that will lead to identification of new biomarkers for disease progression and potentially to novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  18. [Prostate cancer brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Guérif, S; Peiffert, D; Créhange, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy techniques are described, concerning both Iodine 125 high dose rate brachytherapy. The following parts are presented: brachytherapy indications, technical description, immediate postoperative management and post-treatment evaluation, and 4 to 6 weeks as well as long-term follow-up.

  19. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Panis, C.; Victorino, V. J.; Herrera, A. C. S. A.; Cecchini, A. L.; Simão, A. N. C.; Tomita, L. Y.; Cecchini, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  20. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  1. An observational Study of the Association between Androgenetic Alopecia and Size of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ramsamy, Kanagaraj; Subramaniyan, Radhakrishnan; Patra, Anjan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by miniaturization of the hair follicle, leading to vellus transformation of the terminal hair follicle. It is caused by interactions between androgens, several genes, and environmental factors with hair follicles. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is highly prevalent among elderly men but infrequent in those younger than 40 years. Because both entities share a common pathogenesis and AGA manifests before the onset of BPH, there could be an association between AGA and BPH. Aim: To study the possible association between AGA and the size of prostate. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five consecutive male patients, 35–65 years of age with AGA of Hamilton–Norwood classification Grades 3–7, were included in the study. AGA of Grades 1 and 2 patients on treatment with minoxidil, finasteride, or other treatments for AGA with history of prostate cancer or prostate disease were excluded from the study. Prostate size was measured through transabdominal ultrasonography. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS software. Results: Of the 65 AGA patients, the mean age was 47.18 years. Grade 4 AGA was the most common grade seen in 19 patients (29.2%), out of which, most (47.4%) were in the 56–65 years age group. 52.3% patients had normal prostate volume, and 47.7% had an enlarged prostate. The percentage of patients with the normal and enlarged prostate in moderate Grade 3 AGA was 68.8% and 31.2%, and in severe Grade 6 AGA, it was 33.3% and 66.7%, respectively. Prostate enlargement was more likely to occur in severe AGA than in moderate AGA(odds ratio 3.311; P = 0.025, which is significant). Conclusion: This study revealed an increase in prostate size with increasing age, with higher prevalence of Grade 1 prostate enlargement in younger individuals, and with higher prevalence of Grade 3 prostate enlargement in elderly men. The study also found a positive correlation between AGA and prostate size, with higher grades of

  2. Targeting stromal androgen receptor suppresses prolactin-driven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-10-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy.

  3. Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 regulates adhesion and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YE, LIN; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; SUN, PING-HUI; MASON, MALCOLM D.; JIANG, WEN G.

    2014-01-01

    Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2), also known as anthrax toxin receptor 2, has been indicated in the formation of new vasculature and in the internalisation of the anthrax toxin. Anti-angiogenesis therapy that targets this molecule has been investigated. However, our recent studies of this molecule have indicated that this gene may also play certain roles in cancer cells. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CMG2 in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines, and also its impact on cellular functions. The expression of CMG2 was detectable in normal and prostate cancer tissues. The prostate cancer cell lines appeared to have relatively high expression compared with the prostatic epithelial cells. Knockdown of CMG2 impaired the adherence of the prostate cancer cells. CMG2 overexpression resulted in decreasing invasiveness, while the knockdown of CMG2 contrastingly enhanced this ability. The altered expression of CMG2 in the prostate cancer cells did not affect the in vitro or in vivo growth of the cells. Taken together, these results show that CMG2 is expressed in prostatic epithelia and cancer cells. In addition to its role in the angiogenesis and the internalisation of anthrax toxin, CMG2 also plays an important role in regulating the adhesion and invasion of prostate cancer cells. PMID:24932305

  4. Altered expression patterns of syndecan-1 and -2 predict biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Rodrigo; Cifuentes, Federico; Gallegos, Iván; Fullá, Juan; Ossandon, Enrique; Castellon, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2011-05-01

    The clinical features of prostate cancer do not provide an accurate determination of patients undergoing biochemical relapse and are therefore not suitable as indicators of prognosis for recurrence. New molecular markers are needed for proper pre-treatment risk stratification of patients. Our aim was to assess the value of altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 as a marker for predicting biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 was examined by immunohistochemical staining in a series of 60 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients with localized prostate cancer. Ten specimens from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were used as non-malignant controls. Semiquantitative analysis was performed to evaluate the staining patterns. To investigate the prognostic value, Kaplan-Meier survival curves were performed and compared by a log-rank test. In benign samples, syndecan-1 was expressed in basal and secretory epithelial cells with basolateral membrane localisation, whereas syndecan-2 was expressed preferentially in basal cells. In prostate cancer samples, the expression patterns of both syndecans shifted to granular-cytoplasmic localisation. Survival analysis showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) between normal and altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 in free prostate-specific antigen recurrence survival curves. These data suggest that the expression of syndecan-1 and -2 can be used as a prognostic marker for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, improving the prostate-specific antigen recurrence risk stratification.

  5. Altered expression patterns of syndecan-1 and -2 predict biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ledezma, Rodrigo; Cifuentes, Federico; Gallegos, Iván; Fullá, Juan; Ossandon, Enrique; Castellon, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2011-01-01

    The clinical features of prostate cancer do not provide an accurate determination of patients undergoing biochemical relapse and are therefore not suitable as indicators of prognosis for recurrence. New molecular markers are needed for proper pre-treatment risk stratification of patients. Our aim was to assess the value of altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 as a marker for predicting biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 was examined by immunohistochemical staining in a series of 60 paraffin-embedded tissue samples from patients with localized prostate cancer. Ten specimens from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were used as non-malignant controls. Semiquantitative analysis was performed to evaluate the staining patterns. To investigate the prognostic value, Kaplan–Meier survival curves were performed and compared by a log-rank test. In benign samples, syndecan-1 was expressed in basal and secretory epithelial cells with basolateral membrane localisation, whereas syndecan-2 was expressed preferentially in basal cells. In prostate cancer samples, the expression patterns of both syndecans shifted to granular-cytoplasmic localisation. Survival analysis showed a significant difference (P<0.05) between normal and altered expression of syndecan-1 and -2 in free prostate-specific antigen recurrence survival curves. These data suggest that the expression of syndecan-1 and -2 can be used as a prognostic marker for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, improving the prostate-specific antigen recurrence risk stratification. PMID:21317913

  6. Fluorescence of prostate-specific antigen as measured with a portable 1D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong C.; Jeong, Jin H.; Jeong, Dong S.; Kim, Young M.; Oh, Sang W.; Choi, Eui Y.; Kim, Jae H.; Nahm, Kie B.

    2005-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an androgen-dependent glycoprotein protease (M.W. 33 kDa) and a member of kallikrein super-family of serine protease, and has chymotrypsin-like enzymatic activity. It is synthesized by the prostate epithelial cells and found in the prostate gland and seminal plasma as a major protein. It is widely used as a clinical marker for diagnosis, screening, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer. In normal male adults, the concentration of PSA in the blood is below 4 ng/ml and this value increases in patients with the prostate cancer or the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) due to its leakage into the circulatory system. As such, systematic monitoring of the PSA level in the blood can provide critical information about the progress of the prostatic disease. We have developed a compact integral system that can quantitatively measure the concentration of total PSA in human blood. This system utilizes the fluorescence emitted from the dye molecules attached to PSA molecules after appropriate immunoassay-based processing. Developed for the purpose of providing an affordable means of fast point-of-care testing of the prostate cancer, this system proved to be able to detect the presence of the PSA at the level of 0.18 ng/ml in less than 12 minutes, with the actual measurement taking less than 2 minutes. The design concept for this system is presented together with the result for a few representative samples.

  7. Quantitative GSTP1 methylation and the detection of prostate adenocarcinoma in sextant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Harden, Susan V; Sanderson, Harriette; Goodman, Steven N; Partin, Alan A W; Walsh, Patrick C; Epstein, Jonathan I; Sidransky, David

    2003-11-05

    Hypermethylation of the 5' promoter region of the glutathione S-transferase pi gene (GSTP1) occurs at a very high frequency in prostate adenocarcinoma. We compared the results of blinded histologic review of sextant biopsy samples from 72 excised prostates with those obtained using a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (QMSP) for GSTP1. Formal surgical pathologic review of the resected prostates was used to determine the number of patients with (n = 61) and without (n = 11) prostate cancer. Histology alone detected prostate carcinoma with 64% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 51% to 76%) and 100% specificity (95% CI = 72% to 100%), whereas the combination of histology and GSTP1 QMSP at an assay threshold greater than 10 detected prostate carcinoma with 75% sensitivity (95% CI = 63% to 86%) and 100% specificity (95% CI = 72% to 100%), an 11% improvement (95% CI = 5% to 22%) in sensitivity over histology alone. The combination of histology and GSTP1 QMSP at an assay threshold greater than 5 detected prostate adenocarcinoma with 79% sensitivity (95% CI = 68% to 89%), a 15% improvement (95% CI = 7% to 26%) over histology alone. Thus, GSTP1 QMSP improved the sensitivity of histologic review of random needle biopsies for prostate cancer diagnosis. Further studies should determine whether detection of GSTP1 hypermethylation in a biopsy sample with normal histology indicates the need for an early repeat biopsy at the same site.

  8. Oncogenic herpesvirus HHV-8 promotes androgen-independent prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Mygatt, Justin G; Singhal, Adit; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Dalgard, Clifton L; Kaleeba, Johnan A R

    2013-09-15

    Mechanisms underlying progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer following radical ablation therapy remain poorly defined. Although intraprostatic infections have been highlighted as potential cofactors, pathogen influences on pathways that support tumor regrowth are not known. To explore this provocative concept, we derived androgen-sensitive and -insensitive prostate epithelial cells persistently infected with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that has been detected in normal prostate epithelium, prostate adenocarcinoma, and biologic fluids of patients with prostate cancer, to explore its effects on transition to hormone-refractory disease. Strikingly, we found that HHV-8 infection of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells conferred the capacity for androgen-independent growth. This effect was associated with altered expression and transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR). However, HHV-8 infection bypassed AR signaling by promoting enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-mediated epigenetic silencing of tumor-suppressor genes, including MSMB and DAB2IP that are often inactivated in advanced disease. Furthermore, we found that HHV-8 triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Although HHV-8 has not been linked etiologically to prostate cancer, virologic outcomes revealed by our study provide mechanistic insight into how intraprostatic infections could constitute risk for progression to androgen-independent metastatic disease where EZH2 has been implicated. Taken together, our findings prompt further evaluations of the relationship between HHV-8 infections and risk of advanced prostate cancer.

  9. ZFP91-a newly described gene potentially involved in prostate pathology.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Lukasz; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Zemleduch, Tomasz; Malendowicz, Witold; Kwias, Zbigniew; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-04-01

    In search for novel molecular targets in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), a PCR Array based screening of 84 genes was performed. Of those, expression of ZFP91 (ZFP91 zinc finger protein) was notably upregulated. Limited data concerning the function of ZFP91 product show that it is a potential transcription factor upregulated in human acute myelogenous leukemia and most recently found to be the non-canonical NF-κB pathway regulator. In order to test this finding on a larger number of samples, prostate specimens were obtained from patients undergoing adenomectomy for BPH (n = 21), and as a control, from patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer (prostates unchanged pathologically, n = 18). Similar studies were performed on cultured human prostate cancer cell lines: LNCaP, DU145, 22Rv1, PC-3; as well as normal prostate epithelial cells-PrEC. Methods employed included: Human Obesity PCR Array (Qiagen), QPCR and Western blotting. QPCR studies confirmed significant overexpression of ZFP91 in BPH samples. On a protein level, however, comparison between normal and BPH prostates revealed insignificant differences. As for prostate cell lines examined, all expressed ZFP91 mRNA. Western blotting analysis showed markedly higher protein levels of ZFP91 in all cancer cell lines in comparison with normal (PrEC) cells. In conclusion, the upregulated ZFP91 mRNA in BPH, not accompanied by parallel changes in ZFP91 protein levels, together with ZFP91 protein abundance in prostate cancer cell lines suggest ZFP91 involvement in these prostate diseases.

  10. Molecular Determinants of Radioresponse in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    PK) and homologous(ie rad50/51/ XRCC3 ) proteins are upregulated at the transcriptional level in the malignant prostate cells compared to normal...including XRCC3 and RAD51 proteins. This result was also recently reported in a publication early in 2002 by Haaf and co-workers (7). However, more...in Figure 2. RAD51 37 KD LNCap PC-3 DU145 PREC PRSC XRCC3 38KD Ku70 70KD Tubulin 60KD Figure 3a Positive control for irradiation

  11. Dual tumor suppressing and promoting function of Notch1 signaling in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Karine; Ostano, Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Calpini, Valérie; Scatolini, Maria; Farsetti, Antonella; Dotto, G Paolo; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2016-07-26

    Adenocarcinomas of the prostate arise as multifocal heterogeneous lesions as the likely result of genetic and epigenetic alterations and deranged cell-cell communication. Notch signaling is an important form of intercellular communication with a role in growth/differentiation control and tumorigenesis. Contrasting reports exist in the literature on the role of this pathway in prostate cancer (PCa) development. We show here that i) compared to normal prostate tissue, Notch1 expression is significantly reduced in a substantial fraction of human PCas while it is unaffected or even increased in others; ii) acute Notch activation both inhibits and induces process networks associated with prostatic neoplasms; iii) down-modulation of Notch1 expression and activity in immortalized normal prostate epithelial cells increases their proliferation potential, while increased Notch1 activity in PCa cells suppresses growth and tumorigenicity through a Smad3-dependent mechanism involving p21WAF1/CIP1; iv) prostate cancer cells resistant to Notch growth inhibitory effects retain Notch1-induced upregulation of pro-oncogenic genes, like EPAS1 and CXCL6, also overexpressed in human PCas with high Notch1 levels. Taken together, these results reconcile conflicting data on the role of Notch1 in prostate cancer.

  12. Dual tumor suppressing and promoting function of Notch1 signaling in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Karine; Ostano, Gian Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Calpini, Valérie; Scatolini, Maria; Farsetti, Antonella; Dotto, Gian Paolo; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas of the prostate arise as multifocal heterogeneous lesions as the likely result of genetic and epigenetic alterations and deranged cell-cell communication. Notch signaling is an important form of intercellular communication with a role in growth/differentiation control and tumorigenesis. Contrasting reports exist in the literature on the role of this pathway in prostate cancer (PCa) development. We show here that i) compared to normal prostate tissue, Notch1 expression is significantly reduced in a substantial fraction of human PCas while it is unaffected or even increased in others; ii) acute Notch activation both inhibits and induces process networks associated with prostatic neoplasms; iii) down-modulation of Notch1 expression and activity in immortalized normal prostate epithelial cells increases their proliferation potential, while increased Notch1 activity in PCa cells suppresses growth and tumorigenicity through a Smad3-dependent mechanism involving p21WAF1/CIP1; iv) prostate cancer cells resistant to Notch growth inhibitory effects retain Notch1-induced upregulation of pro-oncogenic genes, like EPAS1 and CXCL6, also overexpressed in human PCas with high Notch1 levels. Taken together, these results reconcile conflicting data on the role of Notch1 in prostate cancer. PMID:27384993

  13. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  14. Cancer Targeting Potential of (99m)Tc-Finasteride in Experimental Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jan, Gowsia; Passi, Neelima D; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Chadha, Vijayta Dani

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to radiolabel finasteride, a novel 5α-reductase inhibitor, to evaluate its cancer targeting potential in experimental model of prostate carcinogenesis. Finasteride was effectively radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and showed >90% labeling efficiency. The radiopharmaceutical was found to be stable up to 6 hours in rat serum at 37°C. The blood kinetics of the (99m)Tc-finasteride followed a biphasic release pattern, whereby fast-release phase was observed at 15 seconds and a slow-release phase was observed after 30 minutes of administration. The plasma protein binding of the radio complex observed was 83.89%. For biodistribution studies, the rats were divided into two groups. Group I served as normal controls, while group II was subjected to carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and hormone testosterone propionate (T) for induction of prostate carcinogenesis, which was confirmed histopathologically. The biodistribution studies on control and carcinogen-treated rats revealed a significant percent-specific uptake in prostate, which was found to be increased significantly as a function of time. The most significant finding of the study was an increase in the percent-specific uptake in prostate of carcinogen-treated animals when compared to the percent-specific uptake in prostate of normal rats after 2 and 4 hours postinjection. The study concludes that (99m)Tc-finasteride possesses selectively toward prostate cancer tissue and can be explored further for its role in detection of prostate cancer.

  15. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) expression and metastatic potential in prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; Ten Kate, J; Kirch, J A; Tanke, H J; Van der Linden, E P; Van den Ingh, H F; Van Steenbrugge, G J; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1990-03-01

    The expression of the adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the normal and hyperplastic human prostate, in 30 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and in seven human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell lines grown as xenografts in athymic nude mice. In the normal and hyperplastic prostate, ADCP was localized exclusively in the apical membrane and the apical cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, four distinct ADCP expression patterns were observed: diffuse cytoplasmic, membranous, both cytoplasmic and membranous, and no ADCP expression. The expression patterns were compared with the presence of metastases. We found an inverse correlation between membranous ADCP immunoreactivity and metastatic propensity. Exclusively membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurred only in non-metastatic tumours. In contrast, the metastatic tumours showed no or diffuse cytoplasmic ADCP immunoreactivity. This suggests that immunohistochemical detection of ADCP might predict the biological behaviour of prostatic cancer. However, the occurrence of membranous ADCP immunoreactivity in the xenograft of a cell line (PC-EW), derived from a prostatic carcinoma metastasis, indicates that not only the tendency to metastasize modulates ADCP expression.

  16. The transcriptional programme of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Alastair D; Massie, Charlie E; Neal, David E

    2014-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal prostate and prostate cancer cell growth. AR transcriptional activity is almost always maintained even in hormone relapsed prostate cancer (HRPC) in the absence of normal levels of circulating testosterone. Current molecular techniques, such as chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), have permitted identification of direct AR-binding sites in cell lines and human tissue with a distinct coordinate network evident in HRPC. The effectiveness of novel agents, such as abiraterone acetate (suppresses adrenal androgens) or enzalutamide (MDV3100, potent AR antagonist), in treating advanced prostate cancer underlines the on-going critical role of the AR throughout all stages of the disease. Persistent AR activity in advanced disease regulates cell cycle activity, steroid biosynthesis and anabolic metabolism in conjunction with regulatory co-factors, such as the E2F family, c-Myc and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) transcription factors. Further treatment approaches must target these other factors.

  17. Metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Arroyo Mühr, L Sara; Bzhalava, Davit; Brown, Lyndon J; Komyakov, Boris; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    To investigate which microorganisms may be present in expressed prostate secretions (EPS) metagenomic sequencing (MGS) was applied to prostate secretion samples from five men with prostatitis and five matched control men as well as to combined expressed prostate secretion and urine from six patients with prostate cancer and six matched control men. The prostate secretion samples contained a variety of bacterial sequences, mostly belonging to the Proteobacteria phylum. The combined prostate secretion and urine samples were dominated by abundant presence of the JC polyomavirus, representing >20% of all detected metagenomic sequence reads. There were also other viruses detected, for example, human papillomavirus type 81. All combined prostate secretion and urine samples were also positive for Proteobacteria. In summary, MGS of expressed prostate secretion is informative for detecting a variety of bacteria and viruses, suggesting that a more large-scale use of MGS of prostate secretions may be useful in medical and epidemiological studies of prostate infections.

  18. Risk of prostate cancer and thrombosis-related factor polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    GHASEMI, SOMAYEHSADAT; TAVAKOLI, AYDIN; MOGHADAM, MOHAMAD; ZARGAR, MOHAMAD ALI; ABBASPOUR, MARYAM; HATAMNEJADIAN, NASIM; EBRAHIMI, AHMAD

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication commonly encountered in cancer patients and is considered to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The genetic polymorphisms of thrombophilic factors in cancer patients have been focused on during the last few years. However, the number of available studies on the association between prostate cancer and thromboembolic diseases is limited. Prostate cancer is one of the four major types of cancer and its development is affected by a variety of environmental and genetic factors. In the present study we aimed to focus on the effects of thromboembolic factor gene variations on the risk of prostate cancer. In order to conduct our prospective study, we used amplification-refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction to investigate three polymorphisms [factor V Leiden (FVL) G1691A, factor II (prothrombin, PTH) G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T] in prostate cancer patients, via comparison with normal individuals. The results demonstrated no significant differences in FVL and PTH gene variations between cases and controls (P>0.05). Although some cases with the T allele of MTHFR 677 were identified, no significant solidarity was established by statistical analysis (P>0.05). Therefore, non-genetic factors that may disturb homeostatic balance should also be considered in future studies, in order to determine the exact association between VTE and prostate cancer. PMID:24649068

  19. Tomographic needles and catheters for optical imaging of prostatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Motamedi, Massoud

    1995-05-01

    Early detection of prostatic cancer currently depends on Prostate Serum Antigen or TransRectal UltraSound. Unfortunately, these techniques are not always reliable indicators for early small lesions still localized within the prostate. This paper presents a feasibility study on the use of `tomographic needles and catheters' for optical imaging of early lesions. Three needles are inserted perianeally into the prostate or two catheters are inserted into the rectal and urethral passages. Each contains a set of optical fibers which terminate at evenly spaced positions along the needle. Each termination serves as either a source or collector for light transmission as each fiber is sequentially illuminated. Application of a tomographic algorithm based on diffuse light transmission between each source/collector pair yields a fuzzy but spectrally informative image of the prostate. This paper addresses the issue of feasibility by asking whether such a technique can distinguish a large zone of slightly alter optical properties (essentially a region of normal tissue) from a small zone of strongly altered optical properties (a tumor). The paper simulates both steady-state and 3-GHz frequency-domain optical measurements.

  20. Prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells: identification, characterization, and implications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dean G; Patrawala, Lubna; Calhoun, Tammy; Bhatia, Bobby; Choy, Grace; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Jeter, Collene

    2007-01-01

    Several solid tumors have now been shown to contain stem cell-like cells called cancer stem cells (CSC). These cells, although generally rare, appear to be highly tumorigenic and may be the cells that drive tumor formation, maintain tumor homeostasis, and mediate tumor metastasis. In this Perspective, we first provide our insight on how a CSC should be defined. We then summarize our current knowledge of stem/progenitor cells in the normal human prostate (NHP), an organ highly susceptible to hyperproliferative diseases such as benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). We further review the evidence that cultured PCa cells, xenograft prostate tumors, and patient tumors may contain stem/progenitor cells. Along with our discussion, we present several methodologies that can be potentially used to identify putative tumor-reinitiating CSC. Finally, we present a hypothetical model for the hierarchical organization of human PCa cells and discuss the implications of this model in helping understand prostate carcinogenesis and design novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches.

  1. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  2. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Ross, Ashley E; Sokoll, Lori J; Partin, Alan W; Pavlovich, Christian P

    2016-02-01

    In light of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with widespread prostate-specific antigen-based screening, controversy persists surrounding the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Given its anatomic proximity to the prostate, urine has been proposed as a noninvasive substrate for prostatic biomarkers. With greater understanding of the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis and significant technological advances, the breadth of potential biomarkers is substantial. In this review, the authors aim to provide an evidence-based assessment of current and emerging urinary biomarkers used in the detection and prognostication of PCa and high-grade PCa, with particular attention on clinically relevant findings.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    most widely used marker of prostate cancer - and prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated...Vigneron, D.B., Konety, B., Nelson, S.J., Narayan, P., and Hricak, H. Citrate as in vivo marker to discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and

  4. Magnetic Resonance-Based Electrical Property Tomography (MR- EPT) for Prostate Cancer Grade Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    inclusion gelatin phantom. Top row shows T1 MR images along the axis of phantom; two playdough inclusions at different planes show up as low intensity ...new data published in The Prostate [6] in which we demonstrated significant electrical property differences between high- and low -grade prostate...have hypothesize that it is possible to use these properties to discriminate between normal, low -grade, and high-grade malignant formations in a

  5. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor and that hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy could be employed to study real-time metabolism of normal and malignant tissues. The...function of prostate tissue slice cultures (TCSs) in an nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-compatible, 3-dimensional tissue culture bioreactor , (2) to use...the TSC/NMR bioreactor model to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness, and (3) to use the TSC

  6. Monoamine Oxidase A: A Novel Target for Progression and Metastasis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    de-differentiation of the glandular epithelial phenotype. We demonstrated the ability of MAOA to induce morphological transformation, invasion and...pharmacological inhibition of MAOA in PCa cells kept basal prostatic epithelial cells from differentiating into matured glandular structures by...Figure Legends Figure 1. MAOA and EMT in PCa. (A) Clinical specimens of normal prostatic epithelium and Gleason grade 3 and 5 PCa were stained for E

  7. Quantification of Protein Signatures in Archived Human Prostate Tissues Using Shotgun Proteomic Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    proteins were subsequently incubated with wheat - germ agglutinin (WGA) and con canavalin- A (ConA) beads, washed, and el uted with sol uble n-acetyl...prostate radial prostatectomies and have focused on optimizing protocols to extract and profile proteins in matched normal and dise ased tissue s...human prostate cancer using label-free, quantitative mass spectrometry. Last year we were able to extract up to 1 00 micrograms of total protein

  8. Signal Transduction Pathway in Maspin-induced Tumor Suppression of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    tissue epithelial cells is membrane- A, detergent phase separation and PI- PLC treatment. Human prostate bound by GPI anchorage as well. We selected a panel...are mainly membrane-anchored (pre- PLC , detergent phase or Pro. The human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and normal D). Soluble prostasin is detected...D). The PC-3/Vec cells showed negative results and after PI- PLC digestion as described under "Experimental in all fractions tested. Because of a

  9. Activation of Hh Signaling: A Critical Biological Consequence of ETS Gene Anomalies in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    consequence of ETS gene overexpression in prostate cells is increased expression and activity of Gli transcription factors that are normally induced by...Additionally, we identified Gli overexpression induces androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells and this action is mediated by...interaction between GLIs and androgen receptor (AR) which leads to activation of AR signaling under androgen-deprived conditions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS