Science.gov

Sample records for adjacent outer continental

  1. A geodynamic model of the evolution of the Arctic basin and adjacent territories in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic and the outer limit of the Russian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverov, N. P.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Kononov, M. V.; Dobretsov, N. L.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Sokolov, S. D.; Shipilov, E. V.

    2013-01-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Arctic Region in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic is considered with allowance for the Paleozoic stage of evolution of the ancient Arctida continent. A new geodynamic model of the evolution of the Arctic is based on the idea of the development of upper mantle convection beneath the continent caused by subduction of the Pacific lithosphere under the Eurasian and North American lithospheric plates. The structure of the Amerasia and Eurasia basins of the Arctic is shown to have formed progressively due to destruction of the ancient Arctida continent, a retained fragment of which comprises the structural units of the central segment of the Arctic Ocean, including the Lomonosov Ridge, the Alpha-Mendeleev Rise, and the Podvodnikov and Makarov basins. The proposed model is considered to be a scientific substantiation of the updated Russian territorial claim to the UN Commission on the determination of the Limits of the Continental Shelf in the Arctic Region.

  2. H.R. 73: A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to the south Florida coast. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 73, A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to south Florida. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 4, 1995.

  3. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  4. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas,...

  5. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  6. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  7. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  8. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  9. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  10. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  11. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  12. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  13. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  14. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  15. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  16. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... renewable energy, mineral, and oil and gas lease sales in the geographic areas they represent. The revised... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), Interior. ACTION: Availability of Revised North...

  17. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  18. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing/Production Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This annual report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing and Production program summarizes receipts and expenditures, and includes information on OCS safety violations as reported by the US Coast Guard. 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program: comprehensive bibliography, January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The bibliography lists reports from investigators of the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Some non-program documents are also included. More than 3600 entries are sorted by author and citation number. Cross-references are available by Alaska region, discipline and research unit number.

  20. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 5 (Friday, January 8, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 1076] [FR Doc No: 2010-119] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice summarizing review of the...

  1. 78 FR 33859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of Mexico; Correction... in the Federal Register (78 FR 27427) entitled ``Outer Continental Shelf Geological and...

  2. 76 FR 43230 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia AGENCY... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources located within...

  3. Outer Continental Shelf oil pipelines under the Interstate Commerce Act

    SciTech Connect

    Malet, E.I.

    1983-05-01

    Since Congress did not repeal the Interstate Commerce Act (ICA) when it enacted the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act of 1953, it is necessary to examine the jurisdictional provisions of the ICA to determine whether particular oil pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are subject to ICA regulation. Certain pipeline operations will fall outside the scope of the ICA because they are the operations of private carriers or because they are more closely related to extracting or producing oil and not involved in interstate transport or sale. An unresolved legal issue is whether the OCS is a territory within the meaning of the ICA. If so, then all common carrier oil pipeline transportation on the OCS is interstate within the scope of the ICA. But even if the OCS is not held to be a territory under the ICA, many OCS oil pipelines still may be subject to the ICA because they are integral parts of otherwise interstate transportation systems. 236 references.

  4. Mineral resource management of the Outer Continental Shelf : leasing procedures, evaluation of resources, and supervision of production operations on leased lands of the Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Maurice V.; John, C.B.; Kelly, R.F.; LaPointe, A.E.; Meurer, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    An important function of the Geological Survey is the evaluation and management of the mineral resources of the Outer Continental Shelf, particularly with respect to oil and gas, salt, and sulfur. Production of oil and gas from the Outer Continental Shelf of the United States has increased substantially over the past 20 years and represents an increasing percentage of total United States production. As discovery of major onshore production of oil and gas has become more difficult, the search has moved into the surrounding waters where submerged sedimentary formations are conducive to the accumulation of oil and gas. Increased energy demands of recent years have accelerated the pace of offshore operations with a corresponding improvement in technology as exploration and development have proceeded farther from shore and into deeper water. While improved technology and enforcement of more stringent regulations have made offshore operations safer, it is unrealistic to believe that completely accident-free operations can ever be achieved. Only slightly more than six percent of the world's continental terrace is adjacent to the United States, but less than one percent has been explored for oil and gas. Since the lead time for the development of offshore oil and gas resources can be as much as a decade, they do not provide an immediate energy supply but should be viewed in the light of a near-term source with a potential of becoming a medium-range source of supply pending the development of alternative energy sources. Revenues from the Outer Continental Shelf are deposited to the general fund of the United States Treasury. A major portion of these funds is allocated to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the largest Federal grant-in-aid program of assistance to States, counties, and cities for the acquisition and development of public parks, open space, and recreation lands and water.

  5. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  6. 75 FR 3392 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... 50.410. Requirements applying to Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') sources located within 25 miles of..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  7. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  8. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  9. 76 FR 37274 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations proposed in the Federal Register on February..., Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate matter, Permits, Reporting and...

  10. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  11. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  12. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, R.M.

    1991-04-01

    Continental Shelf Associates was contracted to update and expand an earlier work on a comparison of primary productivity among Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) planning areas. The update consists of four general objectives. This report addresses the fourth objective, the potential to use measures of marine secondary productivity in determining relative rankings of the OCS planning area. Ideally, comparisons of secondary productivity among diverse geographic areas would take an ecosystem perspective. However, there is not enough ecosystem-level understanding to allow a comparison on that basis. The report focuses on individual species and group of species. Zooplankton and benthic communities represent major portions of the marine ecosystems and would be the preferred subjects for comparative studies. At this time comparisons of secondary productivity among planning areas would be difficult with existing databases. It is unlikely this situation will improve in the near future.

  13. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas program: Cumulative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, W.V.; Melancon, A.; Sun, J.

    1988-09-01

    The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) (43 U.S.C. 1331-1356) requires the Secretary of the Department of the Interior to submit an annual report to Congress assessing the cumulative environmental effects of mineral leasing and operations carried out under the OCSLA. The first report which covers the period 1954-1987 for activities off the Atlantic Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, the Pacific Coast, and offshore Alaska. Although temporary and localized impacts have occurred, with the exception of some loss of wetlands in Louisiana, significant adverse cumulative impacts on the human, marine, and coastal environments have not been identified.

  14. 78 FR 48180 - Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... for all Mobile Offshore Drilling Units and Floating Outer Continental Shelf Facilities (as defined in... Commander. Vessels requiring Coast Guard inspection include Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs), Floating...

  15. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  16. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Southern California outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballantyne, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Outer Continental Shelf off Southern California are estimated to be 968 million barrels of oil and 1,851 billion cubic feet of gas as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are attributed to 14 fields. Original recoverable reserves from these fields are estimated at 1,217 million barrels of oil and 1,983 billion cubic feet of gas. The estimates for both the remaining and the original recoverable reserves of oil and gas are higher than the corresponding estimates for December 31, 1981. Reserve estimates for 12 fields were based on volumetric reservoir studies. Decline-curve and volumetric analyses were used for the remaining two fields. Six fields were on production at year's end and a gas field is scheduled to commence production in 1983. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil, condensate, and gas-plant liquids.

  17. 77 FR 24980 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  18. 77 FR 27480 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary...: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC) will meet at the Fess Parker's...

  19. 78 FR 64243 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any of the other following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  20. 75 FR 9780 - Technical Amendment to the Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Technical Amendment to the Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency... Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations for Alaska. DATES: Effective on March 22, 2010. FOR...

  1. 76 FR 67759 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  2. 77 FR 64826 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... with any entity in any of the other following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease...

  3. 78 FR 27430 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any of the other following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  4. 75 FR 51968 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts AGENCY... update to a portion of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying...

  5. 76 FR 4129 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and... any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease sales...

  6. 78 FR 25100 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary...: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC) will meet at the Marriott Downtown...

  7. 75 FR 24966 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Minerals... in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease sales to be...

  8. 76 FR 28449 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Notice on Outer Continental Shelf... with any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease...

  9. 76 FR 70156 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) for Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean...- 2017 Draft PEIS prepared by BOEM to support the Proposed Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017. BOEM concurrently requests comments and announces public hearings. DATES: Submit...

  10. 78 FR 33897 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 2 (ATLW2) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts-- Final Sale...) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts... for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Rhode Island...

  11. 75 FR 76632 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf; Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation... oil and gas exploration and development on the Outer Continental Shelf. This document contains...

  12. Depositional history of Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.; Miller, R.J.; Stelting, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A geological study was undertaken in 1981 in the Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf for the Bureau of Land Management. The study included a high-resolution seismic reflection survey, surficial sediment sampling and surface current drifter sampling. Approximately 7100 sq km of the Louisiana-Mississippi shelf and upper slope were surveyed. The sea floor of the entire area is relatively smooth except for occasional areas of uplift produced by diapiric intrusion along the upper slope. Characteristics of the topography and subsurface shelf sediments are the result of depositional sequences due to delta outbuilding over transgressive sediments with intervening periods of erosion during low sea level stands. Little evidence of structural deformation such as faults, diapirs, and shallow gas is present on the shelf and only a few minor faults and scarps are found on the slope. Minisparker seismic records in combination with air gun (40 and 5 cu in) and 3.5-kHz subbottom profile records reveal that seven major stages of shelf development have occurred since the middle Pleistocene. The shelf development has been controlled by the rise and fall of sea level. These stages are defined by four major unconformities, several depositions of transgressive sediments, sequences of river channeling and progradational delta deposits. Surficial sediment sample and seismic records indicate tat the last major depositional event was the progradation of the St. Bernard Delta lobe. This delta lobe covered the northwestern and central regions. Surficial sediments in most of the study area are the product of the reworking of the San Bernard Delta lobe and previous progradations.

  13. The speciation of marine particulate iron adjacent to active and passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We use synchrotron-based chemical-species mapping techniques to compare the speciation of suspended (1-51 μm) marine particulate iron collected in two open ocean environments adjacent to active and passive continental margins. Chemical-species mapping provides speciation information for heterogeneous environmental samples, and is especially good for detecting spectroscopically distinct trace minerals and species that could not be detectable by other methods. The average oxidation state of marine particulate iron determined by chemical-species mapping is comparable to that determined by standard bulk X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy. Using chemical-species mapping, we find that up to 43% of particulate Fe in the Northwest Pacific at the depth of the adjacent active continental margin is in the Fe(II) state, with the balance Fe(III). In contrast, particulate iron in the eastern tropical North Atlantic, which receives the highest dust deposition on Earth and is adjacent to a passive margin, is dominated by weathered and oxidized Fe compounds, with Fe(III) contributing 90% of total iron. The balance is composed primarily of Fe(II)-containing species, but we detected individual pyrite particles in some samples within an oxygen minimum zone in the upper thermocline. Several lines of evidence point to the adjacent Mauritanian continental shelf as the source of pyrite to the water column. The speciation of suspended marine particulate iron reflects the mineralogy of iron from the adjacent continental margins. Since the solubility of particulate iron has been shown to be a function of its speciation, this may have implications for the bioavailability of particulate iron adjacent to passive compared to active continental margins.

  14. 75 FR 7515 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Mineral Exploration on the Alaska Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Mineral Exploration on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the... Minerals Management Service (MMS), in accordance with Federal regulations that implement the National...

  15. 77 FR 19321 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  16. Final 5-year plan for oil and gas development in the outer continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The five year plan for oil and gas development in the outer continental shelf was discussed, considering such aspects as protecting marine, coastal, and human environments, as well as, our energy needs.

  17. 33 CFR 334.1060 - Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Oakland Army Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Oakland Army Base; restricted area. 334.1060 Section 334.1060 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1060 Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Oakland Army Base; restricted area. (a) The...

  18. Metal elements in the bottom sediments of the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent continental shelf of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Hong, Gi Hoon; Liu, Sumei

    2015-06-15

    The metal elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Ca) in the bottom sediment of the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent continental shelf of the East China Sea were studied to map their spatial distribution and to assess their potential risk to the marine biota. These metal concentrations except Ca were generally higher in the inner shelf and northeastern part, and were found to decrease from the coast to the offshore of the Changjiang Estuary. Sedimentary Ca was most abundant in the outer shelf sediments and decreased in inner shelf. Arsenic (As) appeared to be contaminated due to economic development from 1980s in the inner shelf overall, but the potential ecological risk from the selected metals was low in the coastal sea off the Changjiang.

  19. Impact of regulations - after federal leasing - on Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas development

    SciTech Connect

    Staats, E.B.

    1981-02-27

    The Outer Continental Shelf potentially can provide the nation with significant future oil and gas resources. But, the full potential will not be realized unless: various federal agencies involved issue permits and complete other authorization actions within a standard, reasonable time which GAO believes should be a maximum of 90 days; coastal states are encouraged to develop processes for local reviews and issuing permits which are more timely and uniform with federal processes; credibility of the environmental review process is more clearly established to minimize challenges and delays; and more federal leadership and agency expertise are focused on Outer Continental Shelf activities in the years ahead.

  20. 75 FR 17155 - Preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Proposed Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Minerals Management Service Preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Proposed Outer Continental...: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Preparation (NOP) of an Environmental Assessment... mailed (or hand carried) to the Regional Supervisor, Leasing and Environment (Mail Stop 5410), Minerals...

  1. 77 FR 74512 - Interim Policy Leasing for Renewable Energy Data Collection Facility on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... leases, easements and rights-of-way on the OCS for alternative energy activities. The Secretary delegated... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Interim Policy Leasing for Renewable Energy Data Collection Facility on the Outer Continental Shelf off the Coast of Georgia AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM...

  2. 76 FR 23331 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... status of the BOEMRE and its activities. There will be a presentation on Alternative Energy Programs... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and...

  3. Managing the visual effects of outer continental shelf and other petroleum-related coastal development

    Treesearch

    Philip A. Marcus; Ethan T. Smith

    1979-01-01

    Five petroleum-related facilities often sited in the coastal zone during development of Outer Continental oil and gas can change the visual appearance of coastal areas. These facilities are service bases, platform fabrication yards, marine terminals and associated storage facilities, oil and gas processing facilities, and liquified natural gas terminals. Examples of...

  4. 78 FR 64237 - Information Collection: General and Oil and Gas Production Requirements in the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ...-0140, BOEM-1123, BOEM-1832. Abstract: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lands Act, as amended (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq. and 43 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to prescribe rules...), its implementing regulations (43 CFR part 2), 30 CFR part 252, and 30 CFR 550.197, ``Data...

  5. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... identified in the document entitled, Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in...

  7. 77 FR 5560 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... project proposals on those leases) in identified Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) on the OCS offshore New Jersey... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia AGENCY:...

  8. 78 FR 4167 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Offshore Delaware. SUMMARY: BOEM has issued a commercial wind energy lease to Bluewater Wind Delaware LLC... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  9. 75 FR 10809 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee-Notice of Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of renewal of the Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee. SUMMARY: Following consultation with the General Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the...

  10. 76 FR 7230 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement,...

  11. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  12. 75 FR 20859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Policy Committee; Notice and Agenda for Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Policy Committee; Notice and Agenda for Meeting AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The OCS...

  13. 76 FR 13205 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement,...

  14. Assessment of the US Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program. 4. Lessons and opportunities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The report is the last report in a series of six reports prepared by the NRC Committee to Review the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program. The committee's conclusions and recommendations in this final report are based on its analyses of published documents and those provided by MMS; on the briefings it has received; on its earlier reports; and on its own deliberations.

  15. 77 FR 24734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for... and information on the public session can be found online at: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy... Renewable Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, HM 1328, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817, (703) 787-1340 or...

  16. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 5. Program logic manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. This volume is the Programmer's Manual. It covers: a system overview, attractiveness component of gravity model, trip-distribution component of gravity model, economic-effects model, and the consumer-surplus model. The project sought to determine the impact of Outer Continental Shelf development on recreation and tourism.

  17. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 4. User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. The project sought to determine the impact of Outer Continental Shelf development on recreation and tourism in California. This volume is the User's Guide. It includes the following topics: Introduction and Summary Guide; Input Data Files; Gravity Model Programs; Economic Effects Model Programs; Consumer Surplus Model Programs; References; and Appendices.

  18. Historic surface faulting in continental United States and adjacent parts of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonilla, M.G.

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes geometric aspects of approximately 35 instances of historic faulting of the ground surface in the continental United States and adjacent parts of Mexico. This information is of immediate importance in the selection and evaluation of sites for vital structures such as nuclear power plants. The data are presented in a table and graphs which show the quantitative relations between various aspects of the faulting. Certain items in the table that are uncertain, poorly known, or not in the published literature are briefly described in the text.

  19. 76 FR 40725 - Approval of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Permit Issued to Cape Wind Associates, LLC (EPA Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... offshore renewable wind energy project in federal waters off the coast of Massachusetts. DATES: Effective... AGENCY Approval of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Permit Issued to Cape Wind Associates, LLC (EPA Permit... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) air permit decision regarding Cape Wind Associates, LLC (Cape Wind)....

  20. 77 FR 39164 - Safety Zone; KULLUK, Outer Continental Shelf Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), Beaufort Sea, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), Beaufort Sea, AK AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... order to drill exploratory wells at various prospects located in the Beaufort Sea Outer Continental...; KULLUK, Outer Continental Shelf Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), Beaufort Sea, Alaska'' in the...

  1. Annual report on Outer Continental Shelf shut-in or flaring wells is no longer needed. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-19

    This is our third report, required annually by the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978, that examines the Department of the Interior's (DOI) methodology used to allow Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) wells to be shut-in or to flare natural gas.

  2. Adequacy of environmental information for outer continental shelf oil and gas decisions: Georges Bank. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Georges Bank, a large, shallow marine bank with important fishery resources and possibly important oil and gas resources, lies east of Massachusetts in the territorial waters of both the United States and Canada. The Department of the Interior has planned since 1974 to lease parts of the north Atlantic outer continental shelf (OCS)--including part of Georges Bank--for oil and gas exploration. As a result of public concern about the environmental impacts of oil and gas production on the U.S. OCS, Congress declared a moratorium on drilling on Georges Bank and an area to the southwest. The report--by the NRC's Committee to Review the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program and its panels on physical oceanography, ecology, and socioeconomics--reviews the adequacy of information bearing on the potential environmental impacts of OCS oil and gas activities for the Georges Bank sale area.

  3. An oilspill risk analysis for the North Atlantic outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard Allmon; Slack, James Richard; Davis, Robert K.

    1976-01-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to lease 1,172,795 acres of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands on Georges Bank off the New England Coast for oil and gas development. Estimated recoverable petroleum resources for the proposed 206 tract sale area range from 180 to 650 million barrels. Contingent upon actual discovery of this quantity of oil, production is expected to span a period of about 20 years. An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine relative environmental hazards of developing oil in the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed probability of spill occurrence, likely path of pollutants from spills, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the lease area. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. 75 FR 80717 - Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf; Availability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...In the Federal Register of October 14, 2010, BOEM published an interim final rule implementing certain safety measures recommended in the report entitled, ``Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf'' (Safety Measures Report). The President directed the Department of the Interior to develop the Safety Measures Report to identify measures necessary to improve the safety of oil and gas exploration and development on the Outer Continental Shelf in light of the Deepwater Horizon event on April 20, 2010, and resulting oil spill. To implement the practices recommended in the Safety Measures Report, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement is amending drilling regulations related to well control, including: subsea and surface blowout preventers, well casing and cementing, secondary intervention, unplanned disconnects, recordkeeping, well completion, and well plugging. This document provides the official BOEMRE notice of availability for the Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (IRFA) for that interim rule and provides opportunity for comment.

  5. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale in Bureau of Land Management memorandum 3310 #43 (722) and referred to therein as part of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 98,000 square kilometres of the continental margin seaward of the 3 mile offshore limit and within the 600 metre isobath. The designated area, offshore of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Continental Shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake Plateau. The structural framework of the U.3. South Atlantic region is dominated by the Southeast Georgia Embayment --an east-plunging depression recessed into the Atlantic Coastal Plain and shelf between Cape Fear, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida. The embayment is bounded to the north by the Cape Fear Arch and to southeast by the Peninsular Arch. Refraction data indicate a minor basement(?) ridge beneath the outer shelf between 30? and 32?N at 80?W. Drill hole data also suggest a gentle fold or accretionary structure (reef?) off the east coast of Florida. Several other structural features have been identified by refraction and reflection techniques and drilling. These are the Yamacraw Uplift, Burton High, Stone Arch, and the Suwannee Channel. Gravity and magnetic anomalies within the area probably result from emplacement of magma bodies along linear features representing fundamental crustal boundaries. Of these anomalies, the most prominent, is a segment of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly which crosses the coast at Brunswick, Georgia. This anomaly has been interpreted as representing an ancient continental boundary where two formerly separate continental plates collided and were welded together. There may be as much as 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks in the Southeast Georgia Embayment out to the 600 m isobath. Basement rocks beneath the Southeast Georgia Embayment are expected to be similar to those exposed in the

  6. Outer continental shelf, Beaufort Sea, oil and gas lease sale 170 (proposed notice of sale)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) is issuing this proposed Notice of Sale under the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331-1356, as amended) and the regulations issued thereunder (30 CFR Part 256). A `Sale Notice Package,` containing this Notice and several supporting and essential documents referenced in the Notice, is available from the MMS Alaska OCS Regional Office Public Information Unit.

  7. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1985 and 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, R.V.

    1987-10-01

    Drilling activity for 1985 was not reported previously due to the low level of activity. No exploratory drilling took place on the Atlantic outer continental shelf in 1985 or 1986. One shallow well was drilled onshore in Georgia on the Atlantic coastal plan in 1985, and 2 wells were completed in Georgia in 1986. Texaco drilled 6 core holes on the Virginia coastal plain in 1986. 2 tables.

  8. 78 FR 59632 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... comments to the Department of the Interior (DOI); Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement; Attention... operating dry tree and subsea tree production systems on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and divide...

  9. 75 FR 17156 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Western Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 215 (2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Western Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 215 (2010) Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of an environmental assessment. SUMMARY: The Minerals Management Service (MMS)...

  10. 75 FR 81950 - Flaring Versus Venting To Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Outer Continental Shelf; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Outer Continental Shelf; Public Workshop AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... focus of this workshop will be aimed at the potential reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions....

  11. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf and continental slope, December 31, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, Jack E.; Brooke, Jeff P.; Knipmeyer, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf and Continental Slope have been estimated to be about 2.98 billion barrels of oil and 39.8 trillion cubic feet of gas, as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are recoverable from 468 studied fields under the Federal submerged lands off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas. An additional 53 fields, discovered since December 31, 1980, have not been sufficiently developed to permit a reasonably accurate estimate of reserves. Original recoverable reserves are estimated to have been 8.56 billion barrels of oil and 98.1 trillion cubic feet of gas from 484 fields in the same geographic area. Included in this number are 16 fields that are depleted and were abandoned; not included are the 53 insufficiently developed fields. Estimates were made for individual reservoirs in 382 fields and on a field-wide basis for the other 102 fields. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil and condensate.

  12. Outer nuclear membrane fusion of adjacent nuclei in varicella-zoster virus-induced syncytia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Lianwei; Huang, Xiumin; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-09-11

    Syncytia formation has been considered important for cell-to-cell spread and pathogenesis of many viruses. As a syncytium forms, individual nuclei often congregate together, allowing close contact of nuclear membranes and possibly fusion to occur. However, there is currently no reported evidence of nuclear membrane fusion between adjacent nuclei in wild-type virus-induced syncytia. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one typical syncytia-inducing virus that causes chickenpox and shingles in humans. Here, we report, for the first time, an interesting observation of apparent fusion of the outer nuclear membranes from juxtaposed nuclei that comprise VZV syncytia both in ARPE-19 human epithelial cells in vitro and in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse model in vivo. This work reveals a novel aspect of VZV-related cytopathic effect in the context of multinucleated syncytia. Additionally, the information provided by this study could be helpful for future studies on interactions of viruses with host cell nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ON THE WIND-INDUCED EXCHANGE BETWEEN INDIAN RIVER BAY, DELAWARE AND THE ADJACENT CONTINENTAL SHELF. (R826945)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The structure of the wind-induced exchange between Indian River Bay, Delaware and the adjacent continental shelf is examined based on current measurements made at the Indian River Inlet which represents the only conduit of exchange between the bay and the coastal ocean. Local ...

  14. ON THE WIND-INDUCED EXCHANGE BETWEEN INDIAN RIVER BAY, DELAWARE AND THE ADJACENT CONTINENTAL SHELF. (R826945)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The structure of the wind-induced exchange between Indian River Bay, Delaware and the adjacent continental shelf is examined based on current measurements made at the Indian River Inlet which represents the only conduit of exchange between the bay and the coastal ocean. Local ...

  15. Surface current patterns suggested by suspended sediment distribution over the outer continental margin, Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Herman A.; Carlson, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of total suspended matter (TSM) were collected at the surface over the northern outer continental margin of the Bering Sea during the summers of 1980 and 1981. Volume concentrations of surface TSM averaged 0.6 and 1.1 mg l-1 for 1980 and 1981, respectively. Organic matter, largely plankton, made up about 65% of the near-surface TSM for both years. Distributions of TSM suggested that shelf circulation patterns were characterized either by meso- and large- scale eddies or by cross-shelf components of flow superimposed on a general northwesterly net drift. These patterns may be caused by large submarine canyons which dominate the physiography of this part of the Bering Sea continental margin. ?? 1987.

  16. 78 FR 44150 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 1 (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Final Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... Proposed Sale Notice (PSN) for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...

  17. Repeal of unneeded Outer Continental Shelf production rate-setting functions would cut costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-10

    Under various laws, the Department of the Interior requires operators of Outer Continental Shelf leases to submit information regarding the rate at which oil and gas can and will be produced. Three different rates of production are currently compiled by the Department's Minerals Management Service. However, GAO found that most of the data are not useful or necessary. Congressional relief for the Department from some statutory requirements and consolidating the existing data submittal requirements would allow both the Department and industry to better use their resources to serve higher priority needs.

  18. Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope, northeast Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, M.A.; Karl, Herman A.; Kenyon, Neil H.

    1989-01-01

    Sea-floor drainage features of Cascadia Basin and the adjacent continental slope include canyons, primary fan valleys, deep-sea valleys, and remnant valley segments. Long-range sidescan sonographs and associated seismic-reflection profiles indicate that the canyons may originate along a mid-slope escarpment and grow upslope by mass wasting and downslope by valley erosion or aggradation. Most canyons are partly filled with sediment, and Quillayute Canyon is almost completely filled. Under normal growth conditions, the larger canyons connect with primary fan valleys or deep-sea valleys in Cascadia Basin, but development of accretionary ridges blocks or re-routes most canyons, forcing abandonment of the associated valleys in the basin. Astoria Fan has a primary fan valley that connects with Astoria Canyon at the fan apex. The fan valley is bordered by parallel levees on the upper fan but becomes obscure on the lower fan, where a few valley segments appear on the sonographs. Apparently, Nitinat Fan does not presently have a primary fan valley; none of the numerous valleys on the fan connect with a canyon. The Willapa-Cascadia-Vancouver-Juan de Fuca deep-sea valley system bypasses the submarine fans and includes deeply incised valleys to broad shallow swales, as well as within-valley terraces and hanging-valley confluences. ?? 1989.

  19. Coral forests diversity in the outer shelf of the south Sardinian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau, Alessandro; Moccia, Davide; Follesa, Maria Cristina; Alvito, Andrea; Canese, Simonepietro; Angiolillo, Michela; Cuccu, Danila; Bo, Marzia; Cannas, Rita

    2017-04-01

    Ecological theory predicts that heterogeneous habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area, but to date, knowledge on relationships between habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity of coral forests in the outer shelf and upper slope along continental margins is rather limited. We investigated biodiversity of coral forests from 8 sites spread over two different geomorphological settings (namely, pinnacles vs. canyons) in the outer shelf along Sardinian continental margin. Using a combination of multivariate statistical analyses, we show here that differences in the composition of coral assemblages among contrasting geomorphological settings were not statistically significant, whereas significant differences emerged among sites within similar geomorphologies (i.e. among pinnacles and among canyons). Our results reveal that environmental and bathymetric factors such as sediment coverage, slope of the substrate, terrain ruggedness, bathymetric positioning index and aspect were important drivers of the observed patterns of coral biodiversity, in both settings. Spatial variability of coral forests' biodiversity is affected by environmental factors that act at the scale of each geomorphological setting (i.e. within each pinnacle and canyon) rather than by the contrasting geomorphological settings themselves. This result allows us to suggest that simple categorization of benthic communities according topographically defined habitat is unlikely to be sufficient for addressing conservation purposes.

  20. Outer continental shelf and reservoir analysis and consultant programs in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978 was established by the Congress for the orderly collection of oil and gas reserves in the federal offshore lands. Basic geologic, geophysical, and engineering data are provided to the USGS by offshore lessees and operators. An independent in-house analysis of the individual reservoirs of each field for reserves estimates is presented. Each reserve area is revised as new data are received from development wells. Oil and gas reserve estimates are expected to change as the field and reservoir analysis program continues. In 1977, an inventory program was initiated for all fields in the Gulf of Mexico. Contracts were awarded to 6 industry consultants for 64 oil and gas field reserves studies. Concerted in-house effort supplemented the consultant effort. A viable field and reservoir analysis program is an important contributory function to lease sale evaluation, development and production rate control, unitization and enhanced recovery, and the Outer Continental Shelf Information Program for the states and locally affected areas. 24 references.

  1. Late Cretaceous - Cenozoic development of outer continental margin, southwestern Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    The growth pattern for the outer continental margin of Nova Scotia during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic was studied using seismic stratigraphy and well data. Sediment accumulation was broadly controlled by temporal changes in relative sea level, but significant spatial and temporal changes in accumulation patterns were caused by changes in sediment supply rate, morphology, erosion by abyssal currents, and salt tectonics. A Jurassic-Early Cretaceous carbonate platform remained exposed until the Late Cretaceous and controlled the location and steepness of the paleoslope until the late Miocene. Local erosion of the outer shelf and slope in the late Paleocene-early Eocene produced chalky fans on the upper rise. The relationship between erosion of the shelf in the late Eocene and early Oligocene, and abyssal current erosion of the upper rise in the Oligocene, is unclear. Seaward extensions of Tertiary shelf-edge canyons are poorly defined except for the Eocene fans. In the Miocene, abyssal currents eroded a bench on the upper continental rise. Subsequently, sediments lapped onto and buried the paleoslope. The lower rise above horizon A/sup u/ (Oligocene) is composed of fans and olistostromes shed from halokinetic uplift of the upper rise. Current eroded unconformities are common in the rise sequence, but the only current deposit is a Pliocene interval (< 300 m) restricted to the lowermost rise. Pleistocene turbidity currents eroded the present canyon morphology. 15 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    PubMed

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  3. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope

    PubMed Central

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B. R.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Secchi, Eduardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  4. Modeling the number of bids received for outer continental shelf leases by Poisson-type models

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, L.A.; Nachtsheim, C.J.

    1983-07-01

    Since 1954, the U.S. federal government has held hydrocarbon lease sales for areas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The U.S. DOE is charged with developing lease sale policies designed to increase competition on the offered tracts. Increased competition has been assumed synonymous with increased number of bids (NOB). To study the influence of alternative bidding systems on the number of bids received, a mixed Poisson-type model has previously been employed. The authors show why this model is not statistically supportable. A truncated model is proposed and is shown to be statistically justified for the number of solo bids over all sales and marginally supported for the number of joint bids on sales before the joint-bidding ban.

  5. Large sand waves on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf around Wilmington Canyon, off Eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Folger, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    New seismic-reflection data show that large sand waves near the head of Wilmington Canyon on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf have a spacing of 100-650 m and a relief of 2-9 m. The bedforms trend northwest and are asymmetrical, the steeper slopes being toward the south or west. Vibracore sediments indicate that the waves apparently have formed on a substrate of relict nearshore sediments. Although the age of the original bedforms is unknown, the asymmetry is consistent with the dominant westerly to southerly drift in this area which has been determined by other methods; the asymmetry, therefore, is probably modern. Observations in the sand-wave area from a submersible during August 1975, revealed weak bottom currents, sediment bioturbation, unrippled microtopography, and lack of scour. Thus, the asymmetry may be maintained by periodic water motion, possibly associated with storms or perhaps with flow in the canyon head. ?? 1976.

  6. Environmental studies results: 1973-1992. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Environmental Studies Program was initiated in 1973 under the Bureau of Land Management by the Secretary of the Interior. The Purpose of the program was to conduct studies needed to predict, assess and manage impacts on the human, marine and coastal environments of the OCS and nearshore areas that may be affected by oil and gas activities. The narrative summary updates the version printed in 1986, which covered studies managed by the MMS in the Atlantic OCS region between 1973 and 1985. Descriptions of the study results are divided into the following categories: baseline studies and environmental inventories, biology/ecology, drill site monitoring, endangered species, geology/chemistry, oil spill studies, physical oceanography/meteorology, and social and economic studies. Results of each major type of study are subdivided into North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic, and multiregional studies in chronological sequence.

  7. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  8. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6952 ft (2119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the US-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7223 line-mi (11,625 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Framework for oil-spill response on the Alaskan OCS (Outer Continental Shelf)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.H.; Hale, D.A.; Prentki, R.T.

    1984-01-01

    OCS Report 84-0021 is a compilation of mandated Federal regulations for those responsible for an oil spill on the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). It specifies lessee responsibilities for pollution prevention and control; requirements for inspections and reports, pollution-control materials and equipment, oil-spill-contingency plans, annual drills and the training of personnel. Industry oil-spill-response organizations are discussed as well the mechanism for industry contingency planning. Federal responsibilities for oil-spill response are delineated and the contact agencies are specified. The report concludes with a discussion of cleanup policies and techniques and a final section listing Federal funds available for compensation for oil-spill damage.

  10. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 3. Detailed methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. This volume, Detailed Methodology Review, presents a discussion of the methods considered and used to estimate the impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development on coastal recreation in California. The purpose is to provide the Minerals Management Service with data and methods to improve their ability to analyze the socio-economic impacts of OCS development. Chapter II provides a review of previous attempts to evaluate the effects of OCS development and of oil spills on coastal recreation. The review also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and presents the rationale for the methodology selection made. Chapter III presents a detailed discussion of the methods actually used in the study. The volume contains the bibliography for the entire study.

  11. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The study was intended to provide the Mineral Management Service (MMS) with an analytical tool to evaluate possible economic impacts from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development. In particular, the study was designed to provide MMS staff who work on lease sale Energy Impact Statements with an objective technique for estimating the impacts to coastal communities from events that might occur as a result of lease sales: oil spills, onshore construction, and construction of platforms offshore. The project had several specific objectives: (1) provide profiles of 1982 socio-economic conditions in coastal communities, including an analysis of the relative importance of the tourist industry in each coastal county; (2) develop a methodology for determining the effects of OCS development on coastal recreation; and recommend mitigation measure that may reduce the negative effect of OCS development on coastal recreation using gravity and economic effects models.

  12. Continuous Mantle Exhumation at the Outer Continental Margin of the Santos, Campos and Espírito Santo Basins, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalan, P. V.; Severino, M. G.; Rigoti, C. A.; Magnavita, L. P.; Oliveira, J. B.; Viana, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    continental crust pinches out invariably on the flanks of exhumed mantle. This gives rise to a remarkable long (900 km along a N-S direction and 600 km in E-W direction), relatively narrow (15 to 70 km wide) and continuous belt of exhumed mantle that marks the passage from continental crust to oceanic crust in all three basins. The Santos, Campos and Espírito Santo Basins thus form a typical magma-poor passive margin. These are in sharp contrast with the adjacent basin to the south, the Pelotas Basin, that in turn is a typical volcanic passive margin displaying a long (1000 km in a N-S direction) and wide (100 to 220 km) belt of seaward-dipping reflectors at its outer margin and no exhumation of the mantle at the continent-ocean boundary.

  13. Environmental geologic studies on the southeastern United States Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, 1977-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Popenoe, Peter; Popenoe, Peter

    1981-01-01

    This report is a summary of the second year of marine environmental research activities by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on the southeaster U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin, in accordance with with Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) AA551-MU8-13 between the USGS and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The report covers studies whose fieldwork was conducted during the period from 1 October 1977 to 30 September 1978. The results of the first year of study are reported in Popenoe (1978a and b) and as U.S. Department of Commerce NTIS report PB 300-820. The purpose of these investigations is to provide basic geologic and oceanographic data to the BLM Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Marine Environmental Studies Program in support of management decisions which relate to possible development of oil and gas resources of the continental shelf. The objectives of the USGS-BLM geologic research program for fiscal year 1978 (FY-78) were 1) to determine the sedimentation rates and processes on the upper slope and inner Blake Plateau; 2) to determine the distribution, areal extent, and vertical characteristics of geological features supportive of biological communities; 3) to monitor the transport of bottom sediment across the OCS, evaluate its possible effect on pollutant transfer along the seabed and the potential of sediment as a pollutant sink, determine the implications of erosion/deposition on pipeline emplacement, and aid the interpretation of chemical, biological, and physical data; 4) to determine the concentration levels of chosen trace metals and silica in three chemically defined fractions of the suspended particulate matter (seston); 5) to study the shelf edge and slope near areas of oil and gas interest, and the northern portion of the Blake Plateau for evidence of slope instability and other geologic hazards, and 6) to determine the depth and rate of sediment mixing caused by large storms and/or by benthic organisms and where possible to estimate the rate of

  14. 75 FR 16833 - Preliminary Revised 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2007-2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Minerals Management Service Preliminary Revised 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2007-2012 AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Minerals Management Service (MMS) requests comments on the Preliminary...

  15. 76 FR 55090 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Offshore Alternative Energy Programs at (703) 787-1300 for lease questions. ADDRESSES: You may submit... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management...

  16. 78 FR 60892 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 237 (Lease Sale 237) MMAA104000 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... addressed in this Call (``Program Area'') is located offshore Alaska in the Chukchi Sea Planning Area....

  17. 76 FR 19122 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Authorizing the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources in National Aeronautics and Space... Availability (NOA) of the Record of Decision. SUMMARY: BOEMRE has issued a ROD to authorize the use of OCS sand... for the purpose of making sand available from a shoal on the OCS for placement on the beach in support...

  18. 77 FR 71612 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 2 (ATLW2) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 2 (ATLW2) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... for wind power on the Outer Continental Shelf offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts. SUMMARY: This document is the Proposed Sale Notice (PSN) for the sale of commercial wind energy leases on the...

  19. 75 FR 26091 - Safety Zone; Riser for DEEPWATER HORIZON at Mississippi Canyon 252 Outer Continental Shelf MODU...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), at Mississippi Canyon 252 in the Outer Continental Shelf... Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), which has sunk in the deepwater area of the Gulf of Mexico near....T08-849 DEEPWATER HORIZON Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Safety Zone. (a) Location. All areas within...

  20. 76 FR 30956 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  1. 75 FR 25291 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220 AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of indefinite postponement of...

  2. 75 FR 63504 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  3. 77 FR 31037 - Outer Continental Shelf, Central and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Areas, Oil and Gas Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 101 (Thursday, May 24, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 31037-31038] [FR Doc No: 2012-12664] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf, Central and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Areas, Oil and Gas Lease Sales for Years 2012-2017...

  4. 77 FR 47877 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... consist of four 3-megawatt (MW) wind turbine generators (WTG) configured for a total of 12-MW in water... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...), Interior. ACTION: Public Notice of an Unsolicited Request for a Commercial OCS Wind Lease, Request for...

  5. 77 FR 5820 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Massachusetts-Call for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    .... The American Waterways Operators expressed concerns related to the placement of wind turbines and... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf... nominations for commercial leases that would allow a lessee to propose the construction of a wind energy...

  6. 78 FR 760 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... activities, and will develop appropriate stipulations to mitigate the effects of wind turbines on these... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...), Interior. ACTION: Public notice of an unsolicited request for a commercial OCS wind lease, request for...

  7. 77 FR 7148 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ...This notice announces that EPA Region 10 has issued two final permit decisions granting Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) permit applications, one from Shell Gulf of Mexico, Inc., for operation of the Discoverer drillship in the Chukchi Sea and one from Shell Offshore, Inc. (collectively, ``Shell''), for operation of the Discoverer drillship in the Beaufort Sea.

  8. Impact of regulations--after federal leasing--on outer continental shelf oil and gas development. Report to the congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-27

    This report analyzes the impact various regulatory requirements stemming from the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978 and other legislation are having--after leases are awarded--on industry efforts to explore and develop OCS oil and gas resources.

  9. 77 FR 67394 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning... AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of the... scientific journals, available scientific data, and information from academic institutions and Federal,...

  10. 75 FR 20271 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Minerals Management Service 30 CFR Part 250 RIN 1010-AD12 Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Oil and Gas Production Requirements AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The MMS is amending the regulations regarding oil and natural gas production...

  11. 75 FR 32273 - Safety Zone; DEEPWATER HORIZON at Mississippi Canyon 252 Outer Continental Shelf MODU in the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Outer Continental Shelf MODU in the Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... area of the Gulf of Mexico in response to the sinking of the DEEPWATER HORIZON, a Mobile Offshore... types of vessels navigating in the vicinity of the proposed area, and (7) the structural configuration...

  12. 76 FR 8962 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because the current regulations governing the noncompetitive acquisition of an OCS renewable energy lease initiated by...

  13. 75 FR 72679 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because the current regulations covering noncompetitive leasing of an OCS renewable energy lease and an unsolicited...

  14. 77 FR 5529 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on.... SUMMARY: The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will use Form 0008 to issue commercial renewable..., ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf,'' BOEM stated...

  15. 76 FR 28178 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because... for an OCS renewable energy lease, where BOEMRE is required to publish only a single notice. The final...

  16. 78 FR 52562 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Central Planning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease... socioeconomic analyses in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2012-2017; Western Planning Area Lease... Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2013-2014; Western Planning Area Lease Sale 233; Central Planning Area...

  17. 77 FR 40380 - Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Western Planning Area Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales... will update the environmental and socioeconomic analyses in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease... oil and natural gas leasing, exploration, development, and production in the WPA and CPA. The...

  18. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Offshore North Carolina (Call), published on... obtaining a commercial wind lease in one or more, or any portion of, the Call Areas, postmarked by March 7...

  19. 76 FR 7228 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau...- 2017 oil and gas leasing proposals in the Western and Central Planning Areas of the GOM, off the States... Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 in the draft proposed Outer Continental Shelf Oil and...

  20. 78 FR 54417 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf--Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems Correction In proposed rule... Firefighting systems. Sec. 250.862 Fire and gas- detection systems. Sec. 250.863 Electrical equipment. Sec. 250... the fire and gas- showing a functional block diagram detection systems. of the detection...

  1. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Present-day sediment dynamics, combined with lowerings of sea level during the Pleistocene, have created a mixture of sediments on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea that was derived from the Alaskan Mainland, the Aleutian Islands, and the Pribilof ridge. Concentrations of finer-grained, higher-organic sediments in the region of the St. George basin have further modified regional distribution patterns of sediment composition. Q-mode factor analysis of 58 variables related to sediment size and composition - including content of major, minor, and trace elements, heavy and light minerals, and clay minerals - reveals three dominant associations of sediment: 1. (1) The most significant contribution, forming a coarse-grained sediment scattered over most of the shelf consists of felsic sediment derived from the generally quartz-rich rocks of the Alaskan mainland. This sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Si, Ba, Rb, quartz, garnet, epidote, metamorphic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, and illite. 2. (2) The next most important group, superimposed on the felsic group consists of andesitic sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. This more mafic sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Na, Ca, Ti, Sr, V, Mn, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Zn, Y, Yb, Ga, volcanic rock fragments, glass, clinopyroxene, smectite, and vermiculite. 3. (3) A local group of basaltic sediment, derived from rocks of the Pribilof Islands, is a subgroup of the Aleutian andesite group. Accumulation of fine-grained sediment in St. George basin has created a sediment group containing relatively high concentrations of C, S, U, Li, B, Zr, Ga, Hg, silt, and clay. Sediment of the Aleutian andesite group exhibits a strong gradient, or "plume", with concentrations decreasing away from Unimak Pass and toward St. George basin. The absence of present-day currents sufficient to move even clay-size material as well as the presence of Bering submarine canyon between the Aleutian

  2. Physiography and late Quaternary-Holocene processes of Northeastern Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf off Mississippi and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dartnell, P.; Sulak, K.J.; Calder, B.; Hellequin, L.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution multibeam mapping of the mid- and outer continental shelf and upper slope off Mississippi and Alabama reveals a complex bathymetry that reflects conditions during the last eustatic rise and the present high stand of sea level. The most prominent bathymetric features are pinnacles and hardgrounds that are scattered throughout the area. These features generally stand <10 m above the surrounding seafloor, cover large areas, and display a variety of morphologies. Almost all the reef pinnacles and hardgrounds have zones of high acoustic backscatter on their summits and on the seafloor immediately adjacent to their southwest walls. In addition, they also have erosional moats on the seafloor to the southwest. Large fields of bedforms are scattered throughout the mapped area. The asymmetries and orientations of the bedforms suggest that they were formed by excursions of the northeast-flowing Loop Current. In contrast, the pervasive ponding of sediment on the northeast sides of bathymetric highs indicates that one of the predominant directions of sediment transport has been to the south and southwest. The shelf break is a zone of numerous landslides of various sizes and complexities. The morphology of several landslide scars indicates that some of the failures occurred recently. One large reef-capped salt dome was mapped in the area, surrounded by a large field of pock-marks. Fields of pockmarks are also scattered on the shelf. The growth and demise of the reefs are related to the fluctuating transgression of eustatic sea level during the last deglaciation. Two episodes of reef drowning are correlated with the increased rates of sea-level rise during documented melt-water pulses; the first occurred from 14.8 to 14.2 ka and the second from 11.8 to 11.2 ka. Rates of sea-level rise exceeded the maximum growth rate of hermatypic corals only during these two intervals since the last glacial maximum and thus drowned the coral communities.

  3. Causes of long-term landscape evolution of "passive" margins and adjacent continental segments at the South Atlantic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; Hackspacher, Peter C.

    2013-04-01

    During the last 10 years research efforts have been devoted to understand the coupling between tectonic and surface processes in the formation of recent topography. Quantification of the rate at which landforms adapt to a changing tectonic, heat flow, and climate environment in the long term has become an important research object and uses intensively data revealed by low-temperature thermochronology, terrigenous cosmogenic nuclides, and geomorphological analyses. The influence of endogenic forces such as mantle processes as one of the causes for "Dynamic Topography Evolution" have been explored in a few studies, recently. In addition, the increased understanding how change in surface topography, and change in the amount of downward moving cold surface water caused by climate change affects warping isotherms in the uppermost crust allows further interpretation of low-temperature thermochronological data. "Passive" continental margins and adjacent continental segments especially at the South Atlantic ocean are perfect locations to quantify exhumation and uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution, and provide information on the influence of mantle processes on a longer time scale. This climate-continental margin-mantle process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenic and exogenic forces that are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - "passive" continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Furthermore, the influence of major transform faults (also called: transfer zones, Fracture Zones (FZ)) on the long-term evolution of "passive" continental margins is still very much in debate. The presentation will provide insight in possible causes for the differentiated long-term landscape evolution along the South Atlantic Ocean.

  4. Maps Showing Distribution of Heavy Minerals on the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Flores, Romeo M.

    1976-01-01

    Heavy minerals constitute a natural resource which, under proper conditions, could have potential economic significance. The purpose of this report is to describe the heavy-mineral distribution in sea-floor sediments On the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The South Texas OCS encompasses approximately 24,500 sq km extending southward from Matagorda Bay to the U.S.-Mexico border (fig. 1). In a shoreward direction, the OCS extends from the 180-m isobath to the Federal-State water boundary (16.6 km offshore); however, the mineral distribution patterns presented in these maps have been extrapolated slightly shoreward of the l5-m isobath. This work was part of a regional environmental studies program in the South Texas OCS that was conducted in conjunction with the offshore petroleum-lease sales, under the auspices of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Some previous work on heavy minerals within the OCS had been done by van Andel and Poole (1960) and van Andel (1960); the fOrIner work was based on relatively few OCS samples and was part of a broader regional study of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  5. Factors controlling heavy-mineral variations on the South Texas outer continental shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Shideler, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    Heavy-mineral distribution on the outer continental shelf off the southern coast of Texas shows regional variability induced by provenance and local variability reflecting genetic differences in sea-floor sediments. Q-mode factor analysis showed that three suites of heavy minerals are present. The southern ancestral Rio Grande delta sediments contain a distinct opaque-pyroxene-garnet suite, whereas the northern ancestral Brazes-Colorado delta sediments contain a tourmaline-green hornblende suite. An interdelta region contains a heavy mineral suite that is mixed owing to contributions from both ancestral deltas. Analysis of variance, correlation, and regression methods indicate that heavy-mineral variations in each sedimentary province have been significantly influenced by hydraulic fractionation by size, shape, and density, and by a selective chemical decomposition of unstable minerals. These factors have operated at varying degrees on the relict, palimpsest, and modern sediment populations of the sedimentary provinces since the end of Pleistocene time. The differential effects of these processes on the sediments have resulted in local variations that contribute to the total mineralogical variability. A comparison of the heavy mineral suites of the modern and relict Rio Grande delta sediments, which are derived from a common provenance, also shows mineral variations resulting from factors other than provenance.

  6. Distribution of modern benthic foraminifers on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Knebel, H. J.; Todd, R.

    1980-01-01

    We used samples from 21 stations within a 600 km2 area of the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf to assess the effects of a hydrodynamic environment on the distribution and redistribution of benthic foraminifers. These samples show that, although the predominant genera (Elphidium, Cibicides, and Saccammina) are the same as those reported by other investigators for this region, the environmental factors that control the generic distribution are more complex than were previously postulated. Generic distribution patterns derived from this study are correlated with the bottom topography and sediment distribution as well as the temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom waters. The six predominant species observed in the samples (and their phenotypic variants) are cryophilic forms known to occur in the Virginian and Nova Scotian biogeographic provinces and in Arctic waters. Species distribution patterns also correlate well with bottom topography and hydrographic factors, but may be modified by seasonal fluctuations in test production and by redistribution of dead tests. At most stations, specimens of Elphidium subarcticum were attached to quartz grains. This phenomenon, which has not been reported before, probably is an adaptation to a high-energy environment. The distribution pattern of Elphidium subarcticum along with those of the sessile species Webbinella concava and Vasiglobulina n.sp. corroborate sedimentological evidence that the accumulation of modern sediments in the area is negligible. ?? 1980.

  7. The Toms Canyon structure, New Jersey outer continental shelf: A possible late Eocene impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.; Poppe, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Toms Canyon structure [~20-22 km wide] is located on the New Jersey outer continental shelf beneath 80-100 m of water, and is buried by ~1 km of upper Eocene to Holocene sedimentary strata. The structure displays several characteristics typical of terrestrial impact craters (flat floor; upraised faulted rim: brecciated sedimentary fill), but several other characteristics are atypical (an unusually thin ejecta blanket; lack of an inner basin, peak ring, or central peak; bearing nearly completely filled with breccia). Seismostratigraphic and biostratigraphic analyses show that the structure formed during planktonic foraminiferal biochron P15 of the early to middle late Eocene. The fill unit is stratigraphically correlating with impact ejecta cored nearby at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 612 and at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 903 and 904 (22-35 km southeast of the Toms Canyon structure). The Toms Canyon fill unit also correlates with the Exmore breccia, which fills the much larger Chesapeake Bay impact crater (90-km diameter; 335 km to the southwest). On the basis of our analyses, we postulate that the Toms Canyon structure is an impact crater, formed when a cluster of relatively small meteorites approached the target site bearing ~N 50 E, and struck the sea floor obliquely.

  8. Processes controlling the characteristics of the surficial sand sheet, U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of recent data on the velocity of bottom currents, the frequency of bottom-sediment movement, the kinds and amounts of suspended sediments in near-bottom waters, and the acoustic and sedimentary features of subbottom strata indicates that the characteristics of the ubiquitous sand sheet on the Atlantic outer continental shelf of the United States have been controlled by a variety of past and present processes. Although these processes collectively have had a widespread effect on the characteristics of the sand sheet, the relative importance of each process changes geographically. On Georges Bank, late Pleistocene glaciations along with modern tidal currents and the regional circulation pattern have played a dominant role. On the Middle Atlantic shelf, ancestral rivers, former near-shore processes, and modern wind- and wave-generated currents are important factors. On the South Atlantic shelf, the sediments reflect subaerial weathering, erosion or nondeposition over or near hardgrounds, and the production of biogenic carbonate. Other processes such as the movement of water masses, bioturbation, and bottom fishing probably have affected the sediments in all areas. A knowledge of the various factors affecting the sand sheet is fundamental to an understanding of its general geologic history and to the paleoenvironmental interpretation of ancient sand strata. ?? 1981.

  9. Sea-floor features on Mississippi and Alabama outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Rezak, R.; Sager, W.W.; Laswell, J.S.; Gittings, S.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Approximately 400 mi{sup 2} were surveyed on the Alabama outer continental shelf during October 1987 and March 1988 using an Edo-Western 4 kHz High Resolution Subbottom Profiler, an EG and G Model 260 Seafloor Mapping System and Starfix Navigation. The mapping is part of a larger project, The Mississippi-Alabama Marine Ecosystems Study, funded by the US Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico Regional Office. Bathymetric maps and side-scan mosaics are being prepared from the raw data. Sea-floor features recognized on the side-scan and subbottom records include: (1) low topographic features - possibly bed-rock outcrops, and an enigmatic feature the authors are calling footprints, (2) moderate topographic features - low reefs or bed-rock outcrops, (3) major topographic features - pinnacles and large reefal masses, (4) pox - patches of closely spaced strong reflections with no relief, (5) ridges - closely spaced outcrops along clearly defined features such as shorelines and scarps (possibly truncated dunes or beach ridges), (6) patch reefs, closely spaced, which look like pox but have relief, (7) wave fields - closely spaced sand or gravel waves, and (8) wrecks - sunken rigs or platforms. Except for the wave fields, they believe that the remaining sea-floor features are relict and related to the post-Pleistocene rise of sea level.

  10. Assessment of the U. S. outer continental shelf environmental studies program. 2. Ecology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In 1986, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) requested that the National Research Council (NRC) evaluate the adequacy and applicability of studies conducted in the Environmental Studies Program (ESP), review the general state of knowledge in the appropriate disciplines, and recommend future studies. Under the auspices of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Committee to Review the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program was formed to conduct the assignment. Three panels-dealing with ecology, physical oceanography, and socioeconomics--were established to review specific aspects of the assessment. The Ecology Panel investigated the main questions of ecological relevance to OCS oil and gas activities and ecological aspects of the ESP. The panel was divided into three working groups: on marine birds, mammals, turtles, and endangered species; on benthic processes; and on fisheries and ecosystems. The panel conducted workshops on each of those topics, focused on the progress of the ESP in assessing the environmental impacts of OCS oil and gas activities, evaluated shortcomings of the ESP, and identified future information needs. The report, the second in a series, presents the findings and recommendations of the Ecology Panel.

  11. Gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban, adjacent coastal, and continental background sites of western Greece.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Eleni; Samara, Constantini

    2004-10-01

    Particle- and gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were collected from an urban, an adjacent coastal, and a continental background site located in Eordea basin, western Greece, to investigate their gas/ particle distributions. Thirteen two- to six-ring PAHs, included in the U.S. EPA priority pollutant list, were determined in 24-h integrated glass fiber filters and polyurethane foam samples. At the prevailing ambient temperature levels, the three-ringed species (phenanthrene, anthracene) and the four-ringed fluoranthene and pyrene were primarily found in the gas phase. Conversely, the five- and six-ring PAHs were mainly associated with the particle phase. Gas/particle partitioning coefficients, Kp, were calculated, and their relationship with the subcooled liquid vapor pressure p degrees L of individual PAHs was investigated. Despite the large variability among samples, a good linear relationship between log Kp and log p degrees L was obtained for all sampling sites following the equation log Kp = m(r) log p degrees L + b(r). In the majority of sampling events, particularly in the adjacent coastal and the continental background sites, slopes (m(r)) were found to be shallower than the value of -1, which has been suggested as reflecting equilibrium partitioning. The deviations from predicted aerosol behavior observed in the present study may be attributed to several reasons, such as the presence of nonexchangeable PAH fraction, nonequilibrium as well as different particle characteristics.

  12. Macrobenthic assemblages of the Changjiang River estuary (Yangtze River, China) and adjacent continental shelf relative to mild summer hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yibo; Shou, Lu; Tang, Yanbin; Zeng, Jiangning; Gao, Aigen; Chen, Quanzhen; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effects of hypoxia, macrobenthic communities along an estuarine gradient of the Changjiang estuary and adjacent continental shelf were analyzed. This revealed spatial variations in the communities and relationships with environmental variables during periods of reduced dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in summer. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in macrobenthic community composition among the three zones: estuarine zone (EZ), mildly hypoxic zone (MHZ) in the continental shelf, and normoxic zone (NZ) in the continental shelf (Global R =0.206, P =0.002). Pairwise tests showed that the macrobenthic community composition of the EZ was significantly different from the MHZ (pairwise test R =0.305, P =0.001) and the NZ (pairwise test R =0.259, P =0.001). There was no significant difference in macrobenthic communities between the MHZ and the NZ (pairwise test R =0.062, P =0.114). The taxa included small and typically opportunistic polychaetes, which made the greatest contribution to the dissimilarity between the zones. The effects of mild hypoxia on the macrobenthic communities are a result not only of reduced DO concentration but also of differences in environmental variables such as temperature, salinity, and nutrient concentrations caused by stratification.

  13. Trend and dynamic cause of sediment particle size on the adjacent continental shelf of the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yun-ping; Zhang, Ming-jin; Li, Yi-tian; Fan, Yong-yang

    2016-12-01

    Based on the measured data in recent 20 years, the variation trends of the median grain size of the surface sediment, the sand-silt boundary and the mud area on the adjacent continental shelf of the Yangtze Estuary were analyzed in depth, and the effects of natural mechanism and human activities were discussed. The results show that: (1) In recent years (2006-2013), the median grain size of sediment and the distribution pattern of grouped sediments in the adjacent continental shelf area to the Yangtze Estuary have presented no obvious change compared with those before 2006; (2) The median diameter of the surface sediment in the continental shelf area displayed a coarsening trend with the decrease of sediment discharge from the basin and the drop in suspended sediment concentration in the shore area; (3) In 2004-2007, the sand-silt boundary in the north part (31°30'N) of the continental shelf area presented no significant changes, while that in the south part (31°30'S) moved inwards; In 2008-2013, both the sand-silt boundaries in the north and south parts of the continental shelf area moved inwards, mainly due to the fact that in the dry season, a relatively enhanced hydrodynamic force of the tides was generated in the Yangtze River, as well as a decreased suspended sediment concentration and a flow along the banks in North Jiangsu; (4) The mud area where the maximum deposition rate is found in the Yangtze Estuary, tends to shrink due to the drop in sediment discharge from the basin, and the decrease in suspended sediment concentration in the shore area and erosion in the delta. Moreover, it tended to shift to the south at the same time because the implement of the training works on the deep-water channel of the North Passage changed the split ratio between the North and South Passages with an increase in the power of the discharged runoff in the South Passage.

  14. Seasonal variability of living benthic foraminifera from the outer continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, Gérald; Jorissen, Frans J.; Le Loc'h, François; Andrieux-Loyer, Françoise; Hily, Christian; Thouzeau, Gérard

    2008-08-01

    Living benthic foraminiferal faunas of six stations from the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay have been investigated during three successive seasons (spring, summer and autumn 2002). For the three investigated stations, bottom water oxygen concentration, oxygen penetration into the sediment and sediment organic carbon contents are all relatively similar. Therefore, we think that the density and the composition of the foraminiferal faunas is mainly controlled by the quantity and quality of organic input resulting from a succession of phytoplankton bloom events, occurring from late February to early September. The earliest blooms are positioned at the shelf break, late spring and early summer blooms occur off Brittany, whereas in late summer and early autumn, only coastal blooms appear, often in the vicinity of river outlets. In spring, the benthic foraminiferal faunas of central (B, C and D) and outer (E) continental shelf stations are characterised by strong dominance in the first area and strong presence in the second area of Nonionella iridea. In fact, station E does not serve as a major depocenter for the remains of phytoplankton blooms. If station E is not considered, the densities of this taxon show a clear gradient from the shelf-break, where the species dominates the assemblages, to the coast, where it attains very low densities. We explain this gradient as a response to the presence, in early spring, of an important phytoplankton bloom, mainly composed of coccolithophorids, over the shelf break. This observation is supported by the maximum particles flux values at stations close to the shelf break (18.5 g m - 2 h - 1 ) and lower values in a station closer to the coast (6.8 g m - 2 h - 1 ). In summer, the faunal density is maximum at station A, relatively close to more varied phytoplancton blooms that occur off Brittany until early June. We suggest that the dominant species, Nonion fabum, Cassidulina carinata and Bolivina ex. gr. dilatata respond to

  15. Oil-spill risk analysis: Gulf of Mexico (Proposed Lease Sales 131/135/137) Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, L.J.; LaBelle, R.P.; Lear, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 131/135/137. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  16. Arctic summary report: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Arctic and their onshore impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Slitor, D. L.; Rudolph, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Issues and developments occuring in the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf subregion are discussed. The geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Diapir Field petroleum provinces are detailed. Recent lease sales, exploration activities, and the first development proposals for offshore areas of the North slope are considered. Issues relating to transporting resources from production islands to shore and various proposals for moving Arctic hydrocarbons to market are presented. Production projects onshore and possible support bases for offshore activity are also examined.

  17. Hurricane Andrew's impact on natural gas and oil facilities on the outer continental shelf (interim report as of November 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The interim report reviews Hurricane Andrew's impact on Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) natural gas and oil drilling and production facilities. The report provides background on Hurricane Andrew's progression, discusses how OCS operators responded to the storm, summarizes the types of damage to offshore facilies caused by Hurricane Andrew, and discusses Minerals Management Service's continuing damage assessment and repair efforts. The summaries of damage estimates are presented in tables in Appendix 1. A glossary of report terminology is provided in Appendix 2.

  18. Overview of the recent sediment hydrocarbon geochemistry of Atlantic and Gulf Coast outer continental shelf environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Paul D.; Requejo, A. G.

    1986-07-01

    An overview of the hydrocarbon geochemistry of recent marine sediments from the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regions is presented. Hydrocarbon levels along the Atlantic OCS are fairly uniform, ranging between <0·1 and 20 ppm, with the higher values occurring in areas of fine-grained sediment accumulation. Elevated hydrocarbon concentrations appear to be associated with anthropogenic inputs of silt/clay-sized particles to OCS sediments via particulate resuspension and transport, as evidenced by an increase in contributions from the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) feature in gas chromatograms. Compositional characteristics of hydrocarbons in the high-carbonate sediments of the Eastern Gulf OCS indicate a primarily marine origin. Proceeding north and west along the shelf, sedimentary hydrocarbons assume a more terrestrial and/or anthropogenic character in response to a greater input of silt/clays from the Mississippi River. Highest hydrocarbon concentrations in this region (up to 70 ppm) are found in the shallow nearshore areas west of the Mississippi River discharge and in the vicinity of Galveston Bay along the South Texas OCS. In the North Atlantic, Eastern Gulf, South Texas Gulf and coastal Louisiana sediments a linear relationship exists between total hydrocarbon and total organic carbon concentrations, indicating that each area consists of a geochemical 'province' defined by a source input or depositional regime specific to the region. The use of trace parameter/bulk parameter ratios (such as total hydrocarbon or individual PAH concentrations/total organic carbon content) in defining such provinces, and thus in serving as a basis for evaluating variations in source inputs as part of future surveys, is demonstrated. This approach views the hydrocarbon content and composition of Atlantic and Gulf coast OCS sediments as points on a spectrum defined by input types (sources) and deposition patterns (sedimentation and erosion

  19. Geological and technological assessment of artificial reef sites, Louisiana outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, D.L.; Moslow, T.F.; Wagner, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the general procedures used to select sites for obsolete oil and gas platforms as artificial reefs on the Louisiana outer continental shelf (OCS). The methods employed incorporate six basic steps designed to resolve multiple-use conflicts that might otherwise arise with daily industry and commercial fishery operations, and to identify and assess both geological and technological constraints that could affect placement of the structures. These steps include: (1) exclusion mapping; (2) establishment of artificial reef planning areas; (3) database compilation; (4) assessment and interpretation of database; (5) mapping of geological and man-made features within each proposed reef site; and (6) site selection. Nautical charts, bathymetric maps, and offshore oil and gas maps were used for exclusion mapping, and to select nine regional planning areas. Pipeline maps were acquired from federal agencies and private industry to determine their general locations within each planning area, and to establish exclusion fairways along each pipeline route. Approximately 1600 line kilometers of high-resolution geophysical data collected by federal agencies and private industry was acquired for the nine planning areas. These data were interpreted to determine the nature and extent of near-surface geologic features that could affect placement of the structures. Seismic reflection patterns were also characterized to evaluate near-bottom sedimentation processes in the vicinity of each reef site. Geotechnical borings were used to determine the lithological and physical properties of the sediment, and for correlation with the geophysical data. Since 1987, five sites containing 10 obsolete production platforms have been selected on the Louisiana OCS using these procedures. Industry participants have realized a total savings of approximately US $1 500 000 in salvaging costs by converting these structures into artificial reefs. ?? 1993.

  20. Late Quaternary Paleoenvironmental History of the Peru-Chile Current System and Adjacent Continental Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, F.; Hebbeln, D.; Kaiser, J.; Mohtadi, M.; Ninnemann, U.

    2004-12-01

    A combined analysis of terrigenous and biogenic compounds in marine sediments from the Chilean continental margin allows detailed reconstructions of the paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic history of this region during the last ca. 120,000 years. Based on several sediment cores recovered during two German cruises and ODP Leg 202 (Site 1233), we found evidence for changes both in continental rainfall, most likely induced by latitudinal shifts of the Southern Westerlies, and marine productivity as well as sea surface temperature and salinity changes within the Peru-Chile Current system on time scales ranging from Milankovitch to centennial-scale. On Milankovitch time-scales, we found strong evidence for precession-controlled shifts of the Southern Westerlies implying for example generally more humid conditions during the LGM and a trend towards more arid climates during the deglaciation culminating in the early Holocene. These shifts are paralleled by paleoceanographic changes indicating generally higher productivity during the LGM mainly caused by increased advection of nutrients from the south through an enhanced Peru-Chile current. North of 33°S, these general productivity patterns are complicated by additional impacts from the tropics resulting in maximum paleoproductivity during the deglaciation and prior to the LGM. On shorter time-scales, extremely high resolution sediment cores from the southern Chilean margin provide evidence of significant short-term Holocene climate variability with bands of variability centred at ca. 900 and 1500 years, periodicities also well known from Northern Hemisphere records. Recently drilled ODP Site 1233 allowed to prolong these records into the last glacial. The available data show millennial-scale SST changes that closely follow the temperature pattern known from Antarctic ice-cores. Including other records from the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, our data suggest a quasi-hemisphere-wide response that is consistent with the

  1. Subsurface geology of upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits, coastal Louisiana and adjacent Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlan, E. Jr.; Leroy, D.O.

    1988-09-01

    Upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits thicken seaward from a feather edge on the outcrop in the uplands of southern Louisiana to more than 7000 ft (2134 m) beneath the middle continental shelf. Through a study of cores and cuttings from 100 control wells and electric-log pattern correlations from 350 water and petroleum industry wells with seismic corroboration in the offshore area, these deposits have been divided into six major time-stratigraphic units, four of which correlate to outcropping terraces. This investigation presents a regional stratigraphic framework of the major upper Tertiary and Quaternary units from their updip pinch-outs in and beneath the terraced uplands, into the subsurface, across the coastal plain to the Louisiana offshore area.

  2. Heavy metal distribution in surface sediments from the continental shelf adjacent to Nazaré canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A.; Palma, C.; Valença, M.

    2011-12-01

    The continental shelf surface sediments around the Nazaré canyon have been analyzed for heavy metal contamination. Organic carbon content and grain size were also determined. The shelf area around the Nazaré canyon shows mean concentrations of Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn within the limits recommended by OSPAR (2008). Some enrichment and human impact was found for Cr and especially Pb. Local rivers, mainly the Mondego and southern creeks seem to be the major sources of heavy metals for the Nazaré area, showing similar contamination levels. A set of reference values for non-contaminated fine surface sediments (<63 μm) in the North-Eastern Atlantic are proposed for As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn.

  3. Problem on the United States Continental Shelf - measuring the environmental {open_quotes}effectiveness{close_quotes} of the Outer Continental Shelf Act (OCSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Dubner, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    This article reviews the interplay of environmental standard with oil and gas leasing on the Outer Continental Shelf (OSC) in order to determine if the marine environment is really protected by the interplay of domestic legislation. The 1982 LOS treaty leaves environmental protection to State (domestic) regulation. There is no customary law regarding this type of domestic shelf regulation. The main problem is measuring the {open_quotes}effectiveness{close_quotes} of our domestic shelf legislation. For example, do we simply review effectiveness in terms of controlling operational damage or in terms of environmental injury caused by catastrophic accidents?

  4. Large vertical motions and basin evolution in the Outer Continental Borderland off Southern California associated with plate boundary development and continental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Sorlien, C. C.; Schindler, C. S.; De Hoogh, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Continental Borderland offshore southern California occupies a strategic position along the continental margin. It was the locus of ~75% of Pacific-North America displacement history, it helped accommodate the large-scale (>90°) tectonic rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges province, and is still accommodating potentially 20% of PAC-NAM plate motion today. As such, it represents an ideal natural laboratory to investigate plate boundary evolution and basin development associated with transform initiation, oblique continental rifting, transrotation and transpression. We have been using newly released grids of high-quality industry multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data, combined with multibeam bathymetry and offshore well data to map and construct digital 3D fault surfaces and stratigraphic reference horizons over large parts of the Outer Continental Borderland. These 3D surfaces of structure and stratigraphy can be used to better understand and evaluate regional patterns of uplift, subsidence, fault interaction and other aspects of plate boundary deformation. In the northern Outer Borderland, mapping in Santa Cruz basin, and across both Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz-Catalina ridges reveals a pattern of interacting high-and low-angle faults, fault reactivation, basin subsidence, folding, and basin inversion. Subsidence since early-Miocene time is significant (up to 4 km) and is much larger than predicted by simple thermal cooling models of continental rifting. This requires additional tectonic components to drive this regional subsidence and subsequent basin inversion. Farther south, a more en echelon pattern of ridges and basins suggests a distributed component of right-lateral shear also contributed to much of the modern Borderland seafloor topography, including major Borderland basins. Vertical motions of uplift and subsidence can be estimated from a prominent early-Miocene unconformity that likely represents a regional, paleo-horizontal, near

  5. Distribution of Pasiphaea japonica larvae in submarine canyons and adjacent continental slope areas in Toyama Bay, Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjo, Nobuaki; Katayama, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    The horizontal and vertical distribution of Pasiphaea japonica larvae, which included larval stages and postlarval or later stages, were investigated in Toyama Bay located in central Japan. The horizontal distributions in the inner part of the bay were investigated by oblique hauls from 10 m above the sea-bottom to the surface using a Remodeled NORPAC net (LNP net) in May, August, November 2005, January, March, April, July, September, December 2006, March-September, November-December 2007, and January-March 2008. The vertical distributions were investigated by concurrent horizontal hauls at the depths of 0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 m using a Motoda net (MTD net) in January, March, April, July, September, and December 2006. Mean density of larvae was higher in submarine canyons which dissect the continental shelf and run to the mouth of river, than adjacent continental slope areas. Larvae densely aggregated in the canyon head. Vertical distribution of the larval stages concentrated in the depth range of 100-150 m in both daytime and nighttime, and larvae in the postlarval or later stages showed diel vertical distribution over a wider depth range than larval stages. Our results indicate the possibility of a larval aggregation in energy-rich habitats, and indicated two important roles of submarine canyons, which were larval retention and high food supply.

  6. Oil spills, 1971-75, Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danenberger, Elmer P.

    1976-01-01

    Oil spillage connected with federally supervised drilling and production activities has been a matter of wide public concern. In its supervision of mineral-resource development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), the U.S. Geological Survey is responsible for the day-to-day inspection and monitoring of OCS oil and gas operations. During these activities, the U.S. Geological Survey records and investigates hydrocarbon discharges resulting from such operations. Beginning in 1971, all spills have been recorded, and a computer file has been maintained on all spills of 1 barrel or more. The total Gulf of Mexico OCS oil spillage recorded during January 1, 1971-December 31, 1975, amounted to 51,421 barrels. Production during that period amounted to 35,219 barrels per barrel spilled. In all, 5,857 spills were recorded, but 85.5 percent of the total spill volume was contributed by just 5 incidents. The environmental effect of these incidents apparently was minimal and of short duration. No spills of more than 50 barrels resulted from drilling operations during the period. The only spillage resulting from blowouts was caused by nondrilling incidents, including completion, production, and workover. The amount of oil discharged from spills of less than 50 barrels decreased by more than half between 1971 and 1975. The improvement reflects changes in the operating philosophy of the offshore industry, tightening of U.S. Geological Survey operating orders, and substantial increases in the inspection force. Most production-platform spills involve failures in the sump system, the separator system, or other hydrocarbon-handling equipment; improved sump-system designs and better high-low-level controls have reduced both the number and the volume of spills. Pipeline and pump spills also declined significantly, although the decline appears less attributable to revisions in OCS operating requirements. No operator consistently contributed a disproportionate amount of spillage. Most of

  7. An oilspill risk analysis for the South Atlantic (proposed sale 78) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the South Atlantic (proposed sale 78) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model ; and locations of environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid analysts in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were: (1) that oil exists in the lease area, (2) that either 0.228 billion (mean case) or 1.14 billion (high case) barrels of oil will be found and produced from tracts sold in sale 78, and (3) that all the oil will be found either in the northern or the southern portion of the lease area. On the basis of these resource estimates, it was estimated that 1 to 5 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or greater will occur over the 25 to 30-year production life of the proposed sale 78 tracts. The results also depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given the above assumptions, the estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is less than 15 percent for all cases considered; for spills 10,000 barrels or larger, the probability is less than 10 percent. These probabilities also reflect the following assumptions: oilspills remain intact for up to 30 days, do not weather, and are not cleaned up. It is noteworthy that over 80 percent of the risk of oilspill occurrence from proposed sale 78 is due to transportation rather than production of oil. In addition, the risks of oilspill occurrence from proposed sale 78 (mean resource estimate) are less than one-tenth of the risks of existing tanker transportation of crude oil imports and refined products in the South Atlantic area.

  8. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and western Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf, Lease Sales 139 and 141. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Lear, E.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 139 and 141.

  9. Geological studies of the COST GE-1 well, United States South Atlantic outer continental shelf area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1979-01-01

    The COST No. GE-1 well is the first deep stratigraphic test to be drilled in the southern part of the U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) area. The well was drilled within the Southeast Georgia Embayment to a total depth of 13,254 ft (4,040 m). It penetrated a section composed largely of chalky limestones to a depth of about 3,300 ft (1,000 m) below the drill platform. Limestones and calcareous shales with some dolomite predominate between 3,300 and 7,200 ft (1,000 and 2,200 m), whereas interbedded sandstones and shales are dominant from 7,200 to 11,000 ft (2,200 to 3,350 m). From 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to the bottom, the section consists of highly indurated to weakly metamorphosed pelitic sedimentary rocks and meta-igneous flows or intrusives. Biostratigraphic examination has shown that the section down to approximately 3,500 ft (1,060 m) is Tertiary, the interval from 3,500 to 5,900 ft (1,060 to 1,800 m) is Upper Cretaceous, and the section from 5,900 to 11,000 ft (1,800 to 3,350 m) is apparently Lower Cretaceous. The indurated to weakly metamorphosed section below 11,000 ft (3,350 m) is barren of fauna or flora but is presumed to be Paleozoic based on radiometric age determinations. Rocks deposited at upper-slope water depths were encountered in the Upper Cretaceous, Oligocene, and Miocene parts of the section. All other units were deposited in outer-shelf to terrestrial environments. Examination of cores, well cuttings, and electric logs shows that potential hydrocarbon-reservoir units are present within the chalks in the uppermost part of the section as well as in sandstone beds to a depth of at least 10,000 ft (3,000 m). Sandstones below that depth, and the metamorphic section between 11,000 and 13.250 ft (3,350 and 4,040 m) have extremely low permeabilities and are unlikely to contain potential reservoir rock. Studies of organic geochemistry, vitrinite reflectance, and color alteration of visible organic matter indicate that the chalk section down to

  10. The Alegre Lineament and its role over the tectonic evolution of the Campos Basin and adjacent continental margin, Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Salomão Silva; Neves, Mirna Aparecida; Guadagnin, Felipe; França, George Sand; Vincentelli, Maria Gabriela Castillo

    2016-08-01

    The structural framework and tectonic evolution of the sedimentary basins along the eastern margin of the South American continent are closely associated with the tectonic framework and crustal heterogeneities inherited from the Precambrian basement. However, the role of NW-SE and NNW-SSE structures observed at the outcropping basement in Southeastern Brazil and its impact over the development of those basins have not been closely investigated. In the continental region adjacent to the Campos Basin, we described a geological feature with NNW-SSE orientation, named in this paper as the Alegre Fracture Zone (AFZ), which is observed in the onshore basement and can be projected to the offshore basin. The main goal of this work was to study this structural lineament and its influence on the tectonic evolution of the central portion of the Campos Basin and adjacent mainland. The onshore area was investigated through remote sensing data joint with field observations, and the offshore area was studied through the interpretation of 2-D seismic data calibrated by geophysical well logs. We concluded that the AFZ occurs in both onshore and offshore as a brittle deformation zone formed by multiple sets of fractures that originated in the Cambrian and were reactivated mainly as normal faults during the rift phase and in the Cenozoic. In the Campos Basin, the AFZ delimitates the western side of the Corvina-Parati Low, composing a complex fault system with the NE-SW faults and the NW-SE transfer faults.

  11. The Bay of Bengal and the Statement of Understanding Concerning the Establishment of the Outer Edge of the Continental Margin: Regional Implications for Delimiting the Juridical Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, M.; Varma, H.; Macnab, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Bay of Bengal is the site of massive depositions of sediment from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river systems, which discharge an estimated 2300 million tons of material into the Indian Ocean every year. The accumulated material comprises an enormous fan that extends some 4000 km from the Mouths of the Ganges, a delta system which encompasses the entire coast of Bangladesh and a segment of the coast of India. The major tectonic elements of the Bay of Bengal and surrounding areas are: the passive eastern continental margin of India; the 85E Ridge; the Ninetyeast Ridge; the intervening basin buried beneath deep sediment; and the Sunda Arc system with the associated back-arc Andaman Basin. Except for the Nikitin Seamounts which rise above the seabed just south of the Equator, the 85E Ridge is totally covered by thick sediment. The Ninetyeast Ridge, on the other hand, protrudes above the seabed as far north as 10N, where it plunges beneath the thickening sediment and separates the deposits into the Bengal Fan and the smaller Nicobar Fan. The 85E and Ninetyeast Ridges present the most significant relief in the crystalline basement underlying the Bay of Bengal, and should therefore figure substantially in any analysis of sediment thickness pursuant to the delimitation of the outer continental shelf. In this region, the sediment thickness provision of Article 76 has been modified by a Statement of Understanding in Annex II of the Final Act of the Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea. To avoid a perceived inequity that might arise from the application of the standard one percent sediment thickness formula of Article 76, the Statement introduced a new formula: a qualified State in this region, even if it has a narrow physiographic continental shelf, may establish the outer edge of its continental margin by a line where the thickness of sedimentary rock is not less than one km. This presentation will describe the development of a joint formula line for the States that

  12. 77 FR 10707 - Safety Zone; NOBLE DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    .... SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes a 500-meter safety zone around the DRILLSHIP NOBLE DISCOVERER, while... temporary safety zone would encompass the area within 500 meters from each point on the outer edge of the... 3. The area within 500 meters (1,640.4 feet) from each point on the outer edge of the vessel...

  13. Assessment of the US Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program. 3. Social and economic studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In 1986, the Minerals Management Service requested that the National Research Council (NRC) evaluate the adequacy and applicability of studies conducted in the Environmental Studies Program (ESP), review the general state of knowledge in the appropriate disciplines, and recommend future studies. Under the auspices of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Committee to Review the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program was formed to conduct the assignment. The Socioeconomics Panel investigated the main questions of the social and economic relevance of OCS oil and gas activities and the social and economic aspects of ESP. The report presents the findings and recommendations of the Socioeconomics Panel.

  14. Oil-spill risk analysis: Outer continental shelf lease sale 158, Gulf of Alaska/Yakutat. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.M.; Johnson, W.R.; Marshall, C.F.; Lear, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Alaska/Yakutat for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. The report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis conducted for OCS Lease Sale 158, Gulf of Alaska/Yakutat. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sale.

  15. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of the mid and outer continental shelf, head of De Soto Canyon, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Meyer, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The mid to outer continental shelf off Mississippi-Alabama and off northwest Florida were the focus of US Geological Survey (USGS) multibeam echosounder (MBES) mapping cruises in 2000 and 2001, respectively. These areas were mapped to investigate the extent of "deep-water reefs" first suggested by Ludwick and Walton (1957). The reefs off Mississippi and Alabama were initially described in water depths of 60 to 120 m (Ludwick and Walton, 1957) but the 2000 mapping found reef and hardgrounds to be much more extensive than previously thought (Gardner et al., 2001). The persistent trend of reef-like features along the outer shelf of Mississippi-Alabama suggested the trend might continue along the northwest Florida mid and outer shelf so a MBES-mapping effort was mounted in 2001 to test this suggestion. It is critical to determine the accurate location, geomorphology, and types of the ridges and reefs that occur in this region to understand the Quaternary history of the area and to assess their importance as benthic habitats for fisheries. The 2001 survey found a series of shelf-depth platforms with ridges (possibly reefs) constructed on their surfaces (Gardner et al., 2002). The area known as the "head of De Soto Canyon" is the large unmapped region between the 2000 and 2001 mapped areas. The head of De Soto Canyon is an outer shelf zone with a relatively steep western wall and a much gentler eastern wall. It was unknown prior to this cruise whether the reefs of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf continue eastward into the head of De Soto Canyon and connect with the ridges and reefs mapped on the northwest Florida outer shelf. The existence of carbonate-cemented latest Quaternary to Holocene sandstones along the western wall of the head of De Soto Canyon (Shipp and Hopkins, 1978; Benson et al., 1997; W.W. Schroeder, personnel comm., 2002) is of interest because of the potential benthic habitats they may represent. Precisely georeferenced high-resolution mapping of

  16. Multichannel seismic depth sections and interval velocities over outer continental shelf and upper continental slope between Cape Hatteras and Cape Cod: rifted margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grow, John A.; Mattick, Robert E.; Schlee, John S.

    1979-01-01

    Six computer-generated seismic depth sections over the outer continental shelf and upper slope reveal that subhorizontal Lower Cretaceous reflectors continue 20 to 30 km seaward of the present shelf edge. Extensive erosion on the continental slope has occurred primarily during the Tertiary, causing major unconformities and retreat of the shelf edge to its present position. The precise age and number of erosional events is not established, but at least one major erosional event is thought to be Oligocene and related to a marine regression in response to a worldwide eustatic lowering of sea level. Velocities derived from the multichannel data reveal distinctive ranges and lateral trends as functions of sediment age, depth of burial, and distance from the coastline. Seismic units beneath the shelf and slope of inferred Tertiary age range from 1.7 to 2.7 km/sec, increasing with age and depth of burial. Units interpreted as Upper Cretaceous rocks beneath the shelf range from 2.3 to 3.6 km/sec and show a distinct lateral increase across the shelf followed by a decrease beneath the present continental slope. Inferred Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic rocks beneath the shelf increase from 3.7 to 4.8 km/sec from nearshore to offshore and indicate a change in facies from clastic units below the inner shelf to carbonate units beneath the outer shelf and upper continental slope. Both reflection and refraction data suggest that thin, high-velocity limestone units (5.0 km/sec) are present within the Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic units beneath the outermost shelf edge, but that these change lithology or pinch out before reaching the middle shelf. Although lateral changes in velocity across the shelf and local velocity inversions appear, the interval velocities along the length of the margin show excellent continuity between Cape Hatteras and Cape Cod. The high-velocity horizons within the Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic shelf-edge complex indicate the presence of a

  17. The stoichiometric ratio during biological removal of inorganic carbon and nutrient in the Mississippi River plume and adjacent continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.-J.; Cai, W.-J.; Powell, R. T.; Lohrenz, S. E.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Hopkinson, C. S.

    2012-02-01

    The stoichiometric ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and nutrients during biological removal have been widely assumed to follow the Redfield ratios (especially the C/N ratio) in large river plume ecosystems. However, this assumption has not been systematically examined and documented because DIC and nutrients are rarely studied simultaneously in a river plume area, a region in which they can be affected by strong river-ocean mixing as well as intense biological activity. We examined stoichiometric ratios of DIC, total alkalinity (TA), and nutrients (NO3, PO43- and Si(OH)4) data during biological removal in the Mississippi River plume and adjacent continental shelf in June 2003 and August 2004 with biological removals defined as the difference between measured values and values predicted on the basis of conservative mixing determined using a multi-endmember mixing model. Despite complex physical and biogeochemical influences, relationships between DIC and nutrients were strongly dependent on salinity range and geographic location, and influenced by biological removal. Lower C/Si and N/Si ratios in one nearshore area were attributed to a potential silicate source induced by water exchange with coastal salt marshes. When net biological uptake was separated from river-ocean mixing and the impact of marshes and bays excluded, stoichiometric ratios of C/N/Si were similar to the Redfield ratios, thus supporting the applicability of the Redfield-type C/N/Si ratios as a principle in river-plume biogeochemical models.

  18. Hydro-Meteorological Conditions over the Southeastern South America during ENSO years and its Impact on the Adjacent Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentini, C. A.; Arruda, W. Z.; de Almeida, R. A.; Campos, E. J.

    2005-05-01

    An investigation of the hydro-meteorological conditions during ENSO years and its impact over the adjacent continental shelf has been carried out using monthly mean time series of the la Plata river discharge, the latitude of separation of the Brazil and Malvinas current, and NCEP winds. From the ENSO composites two major results can be highlighted. First, a considerable difference in the amplitude response from one event to another for the same ENSO phase is clearly observed. Second, there is a tendency for larger amplitude anomalies during El Niño (EN) years than during La Niña (LN) years. Although the river's response to ENSO events shows the same tendency for positive (negative) anomalies along the EN (LN) composites, the largest peak of the la Plata river associated with EN occurs in January(+1) instead of December(0). The Brazil and Malvinas latitude of separation composites show positive (negative) monthly anomalies during EN (LN) events from July(0) at least until January(+1). Analysis of the NCEP alongshelf anomaly wind suggests a relationship between river runoff and the latitude of separation of the Brazil Current.

  19. Outer continental shelf environmental-assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 68

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The contents of this study include the following: biological reconnaissance of Boulder Island Shoal in western Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea, Alaska; the Chukchi Sea continental shelf: benthos-environmental interactions; ecological assessment of sublittoral plant communities in the northern Gulf of Alaska; and ecology of unconsolidated beaches in Lower Cook Inlet.

  20. The spin-off of marine data acquired for establishing the outer limits of the continental shelf of Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Harald; Sand, Morten; Løvås, Olvar; Rune Sandstå, Nils

    2017-04-01

    In 2006 and 2009, respectively, Norway made two partial submissions regarding the outer limits of the continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles. The first submission was made in respect of the northern areas, i.e. the continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean, the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea. The second submission was made in respect of the southern areas, the continental shelf in the Southern Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean. For the specific purpose of preparing these submissions, Norway carried out a ten-year program for acquiring bathymetric, geophysical and geological data. In the northern areas, this program amounted to 10 500 km of multi-channel seismic, 270 000 km2 of multi-beam bathymetry and 1000 km of icebreaker seismic data in addition to supporting scientific programs in the relevant areas. In the southern areas, the program amounted to about 8000 km of multi-channel seismic and more than 11 000 line km of multi-bema bathymetry data, as well as seabed rock samples. These data, which would not otherwise have been acquired at this stage, have proven very useful multiple purposes in addition to the mapping of the outer limits of the continental shelf. The overall effect has been to increase the geological knowledge of the continental margins in all of the ocean areas involved. To a large degree, this is because the data have been released for scientific studies and publication. In particular, the data have been the basis for a number of Master and PhD thesis at the universities. The data from the Southern Ocean has been submitted to the SDLS A major part of the results in this regard has scientific n the areas outside of the Southern Oceans, the data have been submitted to the database of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). In the areas outside of the Southern Ocean, the data has also been essential in initiating further research and in the exploration for deep sea resources. Examples of these spin-off uses of the data will be

  1. 77 FR 57572 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... proposed changes to the computer application for electronic Notice of Arrival (NOA) on the Outer...-NOAD application. DATES: Comments and related material must either be submitted to our online docket... revised e- NOAD-OCS application available for comment in this Notice so that we could ascertain the...

  2. A climatology and oceanographic analysis of the California Pacific Outer Continental Shelf region. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.; Reeves, R.W.; Godshall, F.A.; Fehler, S.W.; Pytlowany, P.J.

    1980-09-01

    The results of an environmental study of the California Pacific Offshore Continental Shelf (CPOCS) region are presented. The CPOCS region is defined as the area between the Mexican border to the Oregon State boundary and seaward to the shelf edge or 200 km. A larger region was examined in several components of the study to describe conditions upstream and downstream of potential leasing areas. Individual chapters focus on meteorological factors, ocean circulation, water masses and physical properties, nutrient chemistry and water elevations.

  3. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 45

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    Contents include: Pelagic distribution of marine birds of the north Aleutian Shelf and analysis of encounter probability; The breeding biology and feeding ecology of marine birds in the Gulf of Alaska; Feeding ecology of marine birds in the nearshore waters of Kodiak Island; Diets and food web relationships of seabirds in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent marine region.

  4. An oilspill risk analysis for the eastern Gulf of Mexico (proposed sale 65) Outer Continental Shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyant, Timothy; Slack, James R.

    1978-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed the probability of spill occurrence, likely paths of the spills, and locations in space and time of such objects as recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the proposed lease area. This risk is compared to the existing oilspill risk from existing leases in the area. The analysis implicitly includes estimates of weathering rates and slick dispersion and an indication of the possible mitigating effects of cleanups.

  5. Degrading permafrost and gas hydrate under the Beaufort Shelf and marine gas hydrate on the adjacent continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Blasco, S.; Melling, H.; Lundsten, E.; Vagle, S.; Collett, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    The sub-seafloor under the Arctic Shelf is arguably the part of the Earth that is undergoing the most dramatic warming. In the southern Beaufort Sea, the shelf area was terrestrially exposed during much of the Quaternary period when sea level was ~120m lower than present. As a consequence, many areas are underlain by >600m of ice-bonded permafrost that conditions the geothermal regime such that the base of the methane hydrate stability can be >1000m deep. Marine transgression has imposed a change in mean annual surface temperature from -15°C or lower during periods of terrestrial exposure, to mean annual sea bottom temperatures near 0°C. The thermal disturbance caused by transgression is still influencing the upper km of subsurface sediments. Decomposition of gas hydrate is inferred to be occurring at the base and the top of the gas hydrate stability zone. As gas hydrate and permafrost intervals degrade, a range of processes occur that are somewhat unique to this setting. Decomposition of gas hydrate at depth can cause sediment weakening, generate excess pore water pressure, and form free gas. Similarly, thawing permafrost can cause thaw consolidation, liberate trapped gas bubbles in ice bonded permafrost. Understanding the connection between deep subsurface processes generated by transgression, surficial sediment processes near the seafloor, and gas flux into the ocean and atmosphere is important to assessing geohazard and environmental conditions in this setting. In contrast, conditions for marine gas hydrate formation occur on the adjacent continental slope below ~270m water depths. In this paper, we present field observations of gas venting from three geologically distinct environments in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, two on the shelf and one on the slope. A complimentary paper by Dallimore et al reviews the geothermal changes conditioning this environment. Vigorous methane venting is occurring over Pingo-Like-Features (PLF) on the mid-shelf. Diffuse venting of

  6. Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act. Introduced in the Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, April 11, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This is a report on the bill (S.318) which provides for the energy security of the Nation through encouraging the production of domestic oil and gas resources in deep water on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico, and on possible amendments it.

  7. Evidence of post-Pleistocene faults on New Jersey Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Knebel, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recently obtained high-resolution seismic profiles (400-4,000-Hz band) show evidence of faults in shallow sedimentary strata near the edge of the Atlantic continental shelf off New Jersey. Apparent normal faults having a throw of about 1.5 m displace sediments to within 7 m of the sea floor. The faults appear to be overlain by undeformed horizontal beds of relatively recent age. Several faults 1 to 2 km apart strike approximately N70°E and dip northwest. The data suggest that the faults are upthrown on the southeast. Projection of the faults on the high-resolution profiles to a nearby multichannel seismic-reflection profile indicates that these shallow faults might be the near-surface expression of a more fundamental deep-seated fault. Several prominent reflectors in the multichannel records are offset by a high-angle normal fault reaching depths of 4.0 to 5.0 sec (6.0 to 6.5 km). The deep fault on the multichannel line also is upthrown on the southeast. Throws of as much as 90 m are apparent at depth, but offsets of as much as 10 m could be present in the shallower parts of the section that may not be resolved in the multichannel data. The position and strike of these faults coincide with and parallel the East Coast magnetic anomaly interpreted as the fundamental seaward basement boundary of the Baltimore Canyon trough. Recurring movements along such boundary faults are expected theoretically if the marginal basins are subsiding in response to the plate rotation of North America and seafloor spreading in the Atlantic.

  8. Geology of the head of Lydonia Canyon, U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    The geology of the part of Lydonia Canyon shoreward of the continental shelf edge on the southern side of Georges Bank was mapped using high-resolution seismic-reflection and side-scan sonar techniques and surface sediment grab samples. The head of the canyon incises Pleistocene deltaic deposits and Miocene shallow marine strata. Medium sand containing some coarse sand and gravel covers the shelf except for a belt of very fine sand containing no gravel on either side of the canyon in water depths of 125-140 m. Gravel and boulders, presumably ice-rafted debris, cover the rim of the canyon. The canyon floor and canyon wall gullies are covered by coarse silt of Holocene age which is as much as 25 m thick, and Miocene and Pleistocene strata are exposed on the spurs between gullies. The Holocene sediment is restricted to the canyon shoreward of the shelf edge and has been winnowed from the shelf. Furrows cut in the shelf sands and ripples on the shelf and in the canyon suggest that sediment continues to be moved in this area. Sediment distribution, however, is inconsistent with that expected from the inferred westward sediment transport on the shelf. Either the fine-grained deposits on the shelf to either side of the canyon head are relict or there is a significant component of offshore transport around the canyon head. In the head of Oceanographer Canyon, only 40 km west of Lydonia Canyon, present conditions are strikingly different. The floor of Oceanographer Canyon is covered by sand waves, and their presence indicates active reworking of the bottom sediments by strong currents. The close proximity of the two canyons suggests that the relative importance of processes acting in canyons can be variable over short distances. 

  9. Organic matter diagenesis and hydrocarbon generation on outer Continental Margin of northwestern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, P.A.; Snowdon, L.R.; Heggie, D.; Bent, A.

    1989-03-01

    Organic geochemical analyses of sediments and rocks obtained from drill sites on the Exmouth and Wombat Plateaus and the Argo Abyssal Plain on the northwestern margin of Australia were done onboard the JOIDES Resolution during Ocean Drilling Program Legs 122 and 123. These analyses provide information about the sources of organic matter to these offshore locations from Triassic to Holocene times and also indicate the degree of postdepositional diagenesis and maturation the organic matter has experienced. Because this margin has interest to petroleum explorationists, these data have practical as well as fundamental significance. Triassic claystones (equivalent to the onshore Mungeroo Formation) from the Wombat Plateau contain up to several percent of land-derived organic carbon. Neocomian siltstones and claystones (equivalent to the Barrow Group and Muderong Shale) from the Exmouth Plateau hold similar organic matter but at lower concentrations. Younger sediments are generally very lean in organic matter. Gas chromatographic analysis of extractable hydrocarbons shows a large and often dominant contribution of continental components, notably n-alkanes with a strong odd/even ratio and tricyclic diterpanes. Both Rock-Eval and hydrocarbon results agree in indicating low to moderate levels of thermal maturity. Locations on the Exmouth Plateau typically contain large amounts of thermogenic gaseous hydrocarbons dominated by methane. Concentrations peak in Senonian chalk sequences. In Neocomian siltstones and claystones, methane-ethane ratios diminish as concentrations decrease. The source of these hydrocarbons is likely to be the Triassic coals and coaly material below the Dingo claystone, which was not drilled during these legs but has been characterized from industry wells on this passive margin.

  10. High-resolution analysis of the deposition pattern on the Amazon sub-aquatic delta and outer continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübscher, C.; Figueiredo, A. G., Jr.; Kruse, L.; Spieß, V.

    Continental shelves off major river deltas or estuaries act as an interface between terrestrial environments and marine depo centers like the Amazon Fan. In order to understand sedimentary processes on the Amazon sub-aquatic delta and outer shelf, Late-Quaternary erosional and depositional structures have been investigated with an ultra high-resolution seismic survey system (4 kHz). The wavy morphology of the outer shelf implies the presence of tidal sand ridges or meandering channels. In the latter case, the local presence of channel fill deposits suggests several cut-off loops (ox bows). The inter-channel areas are consequently interpreted as levees, which reach their maximum height of 10 m in the area between the Amazon river mouth and the Amazon canyon. The morphology of terraces in front of the sub-aquatic delta reflect erosional processes which presumably occurred during accelerated sea level rise at the beginning and the end of the Younger Dryas. A carbonate platform is present in the northwestern survey area close to the shelf break. Its water depth of 120-130 m implies an evolution during the last glacial maximum. The asymmetric shape of the Cabo Norte Shoal on the topset of the sub-aquatic delta is typical of bottom current produced shoals. The steeper northwestern flank lies in the lee position of the northwest flowing coastal current. Southeast of the shoal the <10 m thick uppermost sequence of presumably Holocene age consists of lobes that dip with the same apparent angle as the foreset towards the offlap break. Within the area 20 km northwest of the shoal the uppermost sequence forms a smooth depression and may be erosionally truncated at the seafloor. Here, the prograding direction includes a northwest component. A shale diapir, which rises from a transparent underlying sequence, marks the transition to an area where the upper sequence is not resolved in the data.

  11. Morphology and Dynamics of Subaqueous Dunes in a Tideless Outer Shelf (murcia Continental Shelf, Western Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, R.; Rivera, J.; Guillén, J.; de Cárdenas, E.; Muñoz, A.; Acosta, J.

    2014-12-01

    During the last years, the increasing application of multibeam sonar systems for mapping the seafloor has revealed the occurrence of sedimentary bedforms on the continental shelves worldwide. In addition, repeated multibeam surveys are used to monitor and compare the temporal evolution of such morphologies providing important insights into the sedimentary processes on the continental shelf. In the Murcia continental shelf, Western Mediterranean Sea, a large filed of subaqueous dunes has been observed in the middle and outer shelf. Here, we present a detailed morphologic and sedimentological analysis of these features with the aim to discuss their possible mechanism of formation and assess their potential mobility. The findings are based on swath-bathymetry collected using a SIMRAD EM 710 and EM3000D multibeam echosounders, high-resolution seismic profiles acquired with a TOPAS 018 system and sediment samples. Dunes are widely distributed between 60 and 110 m depth, from the Cope Cape, to the north, to the Águilas submarine canyon head rim, to the south. Dunes range from 18 to 140 m in wavelength and from 0.29 to 1.28 m in height. Dunes have asymmetrical profiles (average asymmetry of 0.065) with the lee slope facing towards the southwest that indicate a net south-westward sediment transport. Seabed samples collected in the crests and troughs of individual dunes show a similar grain-size distribution curve, but differ in the content of fines, which is higher in the trough, whereas the crests are dominated by coarse particles. High resolution seismic profiles reveal the presence of a continuous strong reflector that constitutes the base of the subaqueous dunes and could likely correspond to the Holocene transgressive ravinement surface.Dune migration rates were determined from the net displacement of the crests and troughs positions deduced from repeated multibeam surveys (2003 and 2013). Results indicate that the subaqueous dunes remain stationary or migrate at low

  12. An oilspill risk analysis of the Mid-Atlantic (Proposed Sale 49) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, James Richard; Wyant, Timothy

    1978-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed the probability of spill occurrence, likely paths of the spilled oil, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources that are likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the proposed lease area. The analysis implicitly includes estimates of weathering rates and slick dispersion and an indication of the possible mitigating effects of cleanups. Assuming that economically recoverable amounts of petroleum are found in the area, the leasing of the tracts proposed for sale 49 will increase the expected number of spills by about 20-25 percent over the number expected from the existing (sale 40) leases. The probability that an object such as land will be contacted by a spill is increased by at most five percentage points. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Oil-spill risk analysis: Cook inlet outer continental shelf lease sale 149. Volume 1. The analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Marshall, C.F.; Anderson, C.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis (OSRA) conducted for the proposed lower Cook Inlet Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lease Sale 149. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative oil-spill risks associated with oil and gas production from the leasing alternatives proposed for the lease sale. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) will consider the analysis in the environmental impact statement (EIS) prepared for the lease sale. The analysis for proposed OCS Lease Sale 149 was conducted in three parts corresponding to different aspects of the overall problem. The first part dealt with the probability of oil-spill occurrence. The second dealt with trajectories of oil spills from potential spill sites to various environmental resources or land segments. The third part combined the results of the first two parts to give estimates of the overall oil-spill risk if there is oil production as a result of the lease sale. To aid the analysis, conditional risk contour maps of seasonal conditional probabilities of spill contact were generated for each environmental resource or land segment in the study area (see vol. 2).

  14. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and western Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 142 and 143. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M.; Lear, E.M.

    1992-03-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 142 and 143. The objective of the analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  15. Examples of deep-water-bottom multiple dereverberation techniques applied to seismic-reflection data from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Steven D.; Balch, A.H.; Patterson, W.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Seismic-reflection data recorded in deep water over the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf are often dominated by multiply-reflected seismic energy. This energy reverberates between the surface of the water and the seafloor (or other strong reflectors), and makes portions of the seismic data completely useless. Several different data-processing techniques can be applied to partially suppress these multiples and enhance the interpretability of the data. These techniques include (1) the three-point operator, (2) predictive deconvolution, (3) near-trace muting, (4) spatially variant bandpass filters, (5) Nth root stack, and (6) trace distance weighting. Application of these methods to several seismic lines indicates that trace distance weighting is the most useful method studied for suppressing deep-water-bottom multiples for data from the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf.

  16. Oil-Spill Analysis: Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lease Sales, Eastern Planning Area, 2003-2007 and Gulfwide OCS Program, 2003-2042

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    The Federal Government plans to offer U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands in the Eastern Planning Area of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) for oil and gas leasing. This report summarizes results of that analysis, the objective of which was to estimate the risk of oil-spill contact to sensitive offshore and onshore environmental resources and socioeconomic features from oil spills accidentally occurring from the OCS activities.

  17. Geological studies on the COST No. B-2 well, U. S. Mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1977-01-01

    The COST No. B-2 well is the first deep stratigraphic test to be drilled on the United States Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) area. The well was drilled on the eastern flank of the Baltimore Canyon trough to a total depth of 16,043 feet; it penetrated a section composed almost entirely of sand and shale with subordinate amounts of limestone, coal, and lignite. Biostratigraphic studies have shown that the uppermost 5,000 feet is of Tertiary and Quaternary age and was deposited in nonmarine to deep marine environments. The Upper Cretaceous section is about 3,000 feet thick and is of dominantly shallow marine origin. The basal 8,000 feet of sediment has been tentatively determined to be entirely of Early Cretaceous age, the basal sediments being dated as Berriasian. This Lower Cretaceous section is primarily nonmarine to very shallow marine in origin. Examination of cores, well cuttings, and electric logs shows that thick potential reservoir sands are found through much of the section. However, porosity and permeability decrease strikingly in the deeper parts of the Lower Cretaceous section as a result of compaction and cementation. Most of the sands are quite feldspathic, and progressive decomposition of feldspar stimulates authigenic clay and silica formation. Studies of color alteration of visible organic matter, organic geochemistry, and vitrinite reflectance show that although many units have high organic-carbon contents, moderately low geothermal gradients may have retarded thermal maturation. This, in conjunction with the scarcity of marine-derived organic matter in the lower part of the section, suggests a relatively low potential for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons. However, the overall combination of source beds, reservoirs, seals, structures, and thermal gradients may be favorable for the generation and entrapment of natural gas. Furthermore, the presence of reservoir rocks, seals, and trapping structures may indicate a significant potential

  18. An oilspill risk analysis for the Mid-Atlantic (proposed sale 76) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Hopkins, Dorothy

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the mid-Atlantic (proposed sale 76) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The analysis considered: the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid analysts in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that 0.879 billion barrels of oil will be found and produced from tracts sold in sale 76. On the basis of this resource estimate, it was calculated that 3 to 4 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or greater will occur over the 30-year production life of the proposed sale 76 lease tracts. The results also depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from 0CS platforms to shore. Given the above assumptions, the estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 0.36; for spills 10,000 barrels or larger, the probability is 0.22. These probabilities also reflect the following assumptions: oilspills remain intact for up to 30 days, do not weather, and are not cleaned up. It is noteworthy that over 90 percent of the risk from proposed sale 76 is due to transportation rather than production of oil. In addition, the risks from proposed sale 76 are about 1/10 to 1/15 those of existing tanker transportation of crude oil imports and refined products in the mid-Atlantic area.

  19. H.R. 1282: A Bill to provide enhanced energy security through incentives to explore and develop frontier areas of the Outer Continental Shelf and to enhance production of the domestic oil and gas resources in deep water areas of the Outer Continental Shelf. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, March 10, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The report H.R. 1282 is a bill to provide enhanced energy security through incentives to explore and develop frontier areas of the Outer Continental Shelf and to enhance production of the domestic oil and gas resources in deep water areas. The proposed legislative text is included.

  20. Evidence of low density sub-crustal underplating beneath western continental region of India and adjacent Arabian Sea: Geodynamical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, O. P.; Agrawal, P. K.; Negi, J. G.

    1996-07-01

    The known high mobility of the Indian subcontinent during the period from 80 to 53 Ma has evoked considerable interest in recent times. It appears to have played an important role in shaping the subcontinental structures of western India and the adjoining Arabian Sea. During this period, a major catastrophic event took place in the form of Deccan volcanism, which coincides with the biological mass extinction at the K-T boundary, including the death of dinosaurs. The origin of Deccan volcanism is still being debated. Geophysically, western India and its offshore regions exhibit numerous prominent anomalies which testify to the abnormal nature of the underlying crust-lithosphere. In this work, we develop a two-dimensional structural model of these areas along two long profiles extending from the eastern basin of the Arabian Sea to about 1000 km inland. The model, derived from the available gravity data in the oceanic and continental regions, is constrained by seismic and other relevant information in the area, and suggests, for the first time, the presence of an extensive low-density (2.95-3.05 g/cm 3) sub-crustal underplating. Such a layer is found to occur between depths of 11 and 20 km in the eastern basin of the Arabian Sea, and betweeen 45 and 60 km in the continental region where it is sandwiched in the lower lithosphere. The low density may have been caused as a result of serpentinization or fractionation of magma by a process related in some way to the Deccan volcanic event. Substantial depletion of both oceanic and continental lithosphere is indicated. We hypothesize that the present anatomy of the deformed lithosphere of the region at the K-T boundary is the result of substantial melt generated owing to frictional heat possibly giving rise to a hot cell like condition at the base of the lithosphere, resulting from the rapid movement of the Indian subcontinent between 80 and 53 Ma.

  1. iSIMM (Integrated Seismic Imaging and Modelling of Margins): Seismic Acquisition on the Faroes Shelf, Hatton Bank and adjacent Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, B.; Kusznir, N.; Christie, P.; Roberts, A. M.; Lunnon, Z.; Roberts, A. W.; Hurst, N.; Smith, L.; Parkin, C.; Surendra, A.; Davies, A.

    2002-12-01

    The iSIMM project is using state-of-the art seismic techniques with long-offset and wide-angle data, to image the crust formed on volcanic continental margins in parallel with developing and testing new quantitative models of rifted margin formation, incorporating heterogeneous stretching, the effects of melt generation and emplacement and varying thermal anomalies in the mantle. During June-July 2002, we used RRS Discovery to acquire wide angle and normal incidence seismic data on the Faroes Shelf and adjacent continental margin, Hatton-Rockall Basin, Hatton Bank and the adjacent oceanic crust using OBS and MCS. In August 2002, WesternGeco's Topaz used three single-sensor, Q-Marine streamers, 12km plus two 4km, to overshoot the wide-angle profiles on the Faroes Shelf and adjacent continental margin. In the Faroes region we deployed 85 4-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 5 vertical arrays along a 350km-long profile extending from the Faroes-Shetland Channel across the Faroes Shelf and continental margin into the oceanic crust of the Norwegian Sea. The entire profile was shot twice. First with a 6,300 cubic inch airgun array towed at 20 m depth and tuned to enhance the initial peak output pressure pulse. Second, with the airguns reconfigured to enhance the low-frequency bubble waveform, producing a source rich in low frequency energy (centred on 10-12 Hz), and with a broad bandwidth. Shots were spaced at either 75 m or 100 m, giving shot repetition rates in excess of 60 secs, thus avoiding contaminating with wrap-round energy from the previous shot. The Q-Marine acquisition used a 48-gun, 10,170 cu. in. airgun array, also tuned to enhance the low-frequency bubble signature, shooting at 50m/20s intervals and recorded on individual sensors for optimal grouping. The streamer configuration provides swath coverage at shorter offsets, while the long offsets record diving waves and wide-angle reflections. Shot-by-shot source signature recording will facilitate

  2. From hyperextended rift to convergent margin types: mapping the outer limit of the extended Continental Shelf of Spain in the Galicia area according UNCLOS Art. 76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoza, Luis; Medialdea, Teresa; Vázquez, Juan T.; González, Francisco J.; León, Ricardo; Palomino, Desiree; Fernández-Salas, Luis M.; Rengel, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Spain presented on 11 May 2009 a partial submission for delimiting the extended Continental Shelf in respect to the area of Galicia to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS). The Galicia margin represents an example of the transition between two different types of continental margins (CM): a western hyperpextended margin and a northern convergent margin in the Bay of Biscay. The western Galicia Margin (wGM 41° to 43° N) corresponds to a hyper-extended rifted margin as result of the poly-phase development of the Iberian-Newfoundland conjugate margin during the Mesozoic. Otherwise, the north Galicia Margin (nGM) is the western end of the Cenozoic subduction of the Bay of Biscay along the north Iberian Margin (NIM) linked to the Pyrenean-Mediterranean collisional belt Following the procedure established by the CLCS Scientific and Technical Guidelines (CLCS/11), the points of the Foot of Slope (FoS) has to be determined as the points of maximum change in gradient in the region defined as the Base of the continental Slope (BoS). Moreover, the CLCS guidelines specify that the BoS should be contained within the continental margin (CM). In this way, a full-coverage multibeam bathymetry and an extensive dataset of up 4,736 km of multichannel seismic profiles were expressly obtained during two oceanographic surveys (Breogham-2005 and Espor-2008), aboard the Spanish research vessel Hespérides, to map the outer limit of the CM.In order to follow the criteria of the CLCS guidelines, two types of models reported in the CLCS Guidelines were applied to the Galicia Margin. In passive margins, the Commission's guidelines establish that the natural prolongation is based on that "the natural process by which a continent breaks up prior to the separation by seafloor spreading involves thinning, extension and rifting of the continental crust…" (para. 7.3, CLCS/11). The seaward extension of the wGM should include crustal continental blocks and the so

  3. An oilspill risk analysis for the Beaufort Sea, Alaska (proposed sale 71)outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Hopkins, Dorothy; Lanfear, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska, (Proposed Sale 71) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The probability of spill occurrences, likely movement of oil slicks, and locations of resources vulnerable to spilled oil were analyzed. The model predicted movement of the center of spill mass and estimated the times between spill occurrence and contact with various resources, to allow a qualitative assessment of oil characteristics at the time of contact; no direct computation was made of weathering and cleanup. The model also assumed that any oil spilled under ice would remain in place, unchanged, until spring breakup. Ice movements, or travel of oil under ice, if occurring, would affect the results in a manner not directly predictable at this time. The combined results of spill occurrence and spill movement predictions yielded estimates of the overall risks associated with development of the proposed lease area. Assuming that oil exists in the lease area (a 99.3-percent chance) it is estimated that the leasing of the tracts proposed for OCS Sale 71 will result in an expected 9.2 oilspills (of 1,000 barrels or larger) over the lease lifetime of 25 years. This estimate is based on historic oilspill accident data for platforms and pipelines on the U.S. OCS (Gulf of Mexico and California). The estimated probability that land will be contacted by one or more oilspills (of 1,000 barrels or larger) that have been at sea less than 30 days (not counting any time trapped under ice) is greater than 99.5 percent. If oilspill accident data for Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, is used in the analysis, it is estimated that 5.6 oilspills (1,000 barrels or larger) will occur over the lease lifetime. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills (1,000 barrels or larger)will occur and contact land is99 percent. The results of a recent experimental cleanup operation for

  4. An oilspill risk analysis for the Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf lease area; regional environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBelle, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)lease area region. Results of the analysis can be used to determine relative risks associated with oil production in different regions to be offered in OCS Lease Sales 72, 74, and 79. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of major environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that oil will be, found and produced from tracts sold in sales 72, 74, and 79. On the basis of a most likely resource estimate of 241 million barrels of oil to be produced over an 18-year production life from sales to be held in 1983 (sales 72, 74, 79), it was calculated that approximately one oilspill of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 41-percent. For a high resource estimate case of sales to be held in 1983, 717 million barrels are estimated to be produced over an 18-year production life with an 83-percent chance of one or more spills of 1,000 barrels or larger occurring and contacting land within 30 days. These results depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given a total development scenario in which 5.6 billion barrels of oil are estimated to be present and produced, it was calculated that 18 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur over the 40-year production life of the proposed lease area. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than

  5. The role of tectonic inheritance in the morphostructural evolution of the Galicia continental margin and adjacent abyssal plains from digital bathymetric model (DBM) analysis (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, A.; Jané, G.; Llave, E.; López-Martínez, J.; Bohoyo, F.; Druet, M.

    2017-09-01

    The identification of recent major tectonic structures in the Galicia continental margin and adjacent abyssal plains was carried out by means of a quantitative analysis of the linear structures having bathymetric expression on the seabed. It was possible to identify about 5800 lineaments throughout the entire study area, of approximately 271,500 km2. Most lineaments are located in the Charcot and Coruña highs, in the western sector of the Galicia Bank, in the area of the Marginal Platforms and in the northern sector of the margin. Analysis of the lineament orientations shows a predominant NE-SW direction and three relative maximum directions: NW-SE, E-W and N-S. The total length of the lineaments identified is over 44,000 km, with a mode around 5000 m and an average length of about 7800 m. In light of different tectonic studies undertaken in the northwestern margin of the Iberian Peninsula, we establish that the lineaments obtained from analysis of the digital bathymetric model of the Galicia continental margin and adjacent abyssal plains would correspond to fracture systems. In general, the orientation of lineaments corresponds to main faults, tectonic structures following the directions of ancient faults that resulted from late stages of the Variscan orogeny and Mesozoic extension phases related to Triassic rifting and Upper Jurassic to Early Cretaceous opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. The N-S convergence between Eurasian and African plates since Palaeogene times until the Miocene, and NW-SE convergence from Neogene to present, reactivated the Variscan and Mesozoic fault systems and related physiography.

  6. The Subject of Data in Submissions to the CLCS: Documenting the outer limits of the Northern Continental Shelf of the Faroe Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vang Heinesen, Martin; Mørk, Finn

    2017-04-01

    documentation to the CLCS of the outer limits of the continental shelf to the north of the Faroe Islands.

  7. 77 FR 44671 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 229 in the Western Planning Area (WPA) in the Gulf of Mexico... 2012-2017.'' All other portions of the Notice remain unchanged. Dated: July 24, 2012. Tommy P...

  8. Analysis of hydrocarbon potential of outer continental shelf, slope, and rise of the Niger Delta, Nigeria, from seismic and geological data

    SciTech Connect

    Babalola, O.O.

    1983-03-01

    Whereas hydrocarbon potential studies of most parts of the Nigerian sedimentary regions have been documented, no similar assessment has yet been made for the outer continental shelf (OCS), slope, and rise of the Niger delta. The shelf, slope, and rise of the delta are frontier areas in which no wells have been drilled to date. On the basis of an assumed average velocity of 2.0 km/sec, the seismic data indicate a sedimentary thickness of about 2 km (1.3 mi) in the deeper portions of the rise. This thickness increases shoreward to more than 3 km (1.9 mi) at the foot of the continental slope and 5 to 7 km (3 to 4.3 mi) beneath the outer continental shelf. The distal relationship of the OCS, shelf, and rise to the sedimentary discharge of the Niger delta have made these areas of essentially deep-water marine sediments. With the high organic carbon content commonly associated with these areas, the thick shales in this distal deltaic environment would be very rich in kerogen. Coarse-grained clastics are identifiable on the seismic sections by their distinct and continuous reflection character. These potential reservoirs are common and widespread on the shelf and rise. The reservoir rocks occur as deep-sea fans, turbidites, canyon fills, and as onlap fills between diapiric intrusions, and are enclosed by shale, thus providing favorable conditions for the formation of stratigraphic traps. The diapirism in the slope and outer shelf provides favorable conditions for structural traps.

  9. Habitat use and preferences of cetaceans along the continental slope and the adjacent pelagic waters in the western Ligurian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzellino, A.; Gaspari, S.; Airoldi, S.; Nani, B.

    2008-03-01

    The physical habitat of cetaceans occurring along the continental slope in the western Ligurian Sea was investigated. Data were collected from two different sighting platforms, one of the two being a whale-watching boat. Surveys, conducted from May to October and from 1996 to 2000, covered an area of approximately 3000 km 2 with a mean effort of about 10,000 km year -1. A total of 814 sightings was reported, including all the species occurring in the area: Stenella coeruleoalba, Balaenoptera physalus, Physeter macrocephalus, Globicephala melas, Grampus griseus, Ziphius cavirostris, Tursiops truncatus, Delphinus delphis. A Geographic Information System was used to integrate sighting data to a set of environmental characteristics, which included bottom gradient, area between different isobaths, and length and linearity of the isobaths within a cell unit. Habitat use was analysed by means of a multi-dimensional scaling, MDS, analysis. Significant differences were found in the habitat preference of most of the species regularly occurring in the area. Bottlenose dolphin, Risso's dolphin, sperm whale and Cuvier's beaked whale were found strongly associated to well-defined depth and slope gradient characteristics of the shelf-edge and the upper and lower slope. The hypothesis of habitat segregation was considered for Risso's dolphin, sperm whale and Cuvier's beaked whale. Canonical discriminant functions using depth and slope as predictors outlined clear and not overlapping habitat preferences for Risso's dolphin and Cuvier's beaked whale, whereas a partial overlapping of the habitat of the other two species was observed for sperm whale. Such a partitioning of the upper and lower slope area may be the result of the common feeding habits and suggests a possible competition of these three species. A temporal segregation in the use of the slope area was also observed for sperm whales and Risso's dolphins. Fin whales, and the occasionally encountered common dolphin and long

  10. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale as modified from BLM memorandum 3310 #42 (722) and referred to therein as the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 58,300 sq km of shelf beneath water depths of less than 200 m and lies chiefly within the Georges Bank basin. The oldest sediments drilled or dredged on the bordering Continental Slope are sandstone, clay, and silt of Upper Cretaceous age. In Upper Cretaceous exposures, on Marthas Vineyard and nearby New England islands, the predominant lithology appears to be clay. About 125 km northeast of the eastern tip of Georges Bank, the Shell B-93 well penetrated clays and silts of Upper and Lower Cretaceous age above dense Jurassic carbonate rocks which overlie a basement of lower Paleozoic slate, schist, quartzite, and granite. Structurally, the Georges Bank basin is a westerly trending trough which opens to the west-southwest. Post-Paleozoic sediments are more than 8 km thick in parts of the basin. Major structural features appear to be directly related to basement structures. Local anticlines, probably caused by differential compaction over basement flexures and horst blocks or by later uplift along basement faults are reflected principally in Lower Cretaceous and older sediments, though some of these features continue upward to within 0.7 of a second (about 650 m) of the seafloor. Tertiary deposits in the Georges Bank basin are probably up to a kilometre thick and are made up of poorly consolidated sand, silt, and clay. The Cretaceous section is inferred to be up to 3.5 km thick and to be mainly clastics -- shale, siltstone, calcareous shale, changing to limestone in the lowest part of the system. Jurassic rocks in the deepest part of the basin appear to be about 3.6 to 4.0 km thick and probably consist mainly of dense carbonates. Potential source rocks in the Georges Bank basin may include organic-rich Cretaceous shale and carbonaceous Jurassic limestone. By analogy with the

  11. 76 FR 53481 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ..., Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193, Chukchi Sea, Alaska (OCS EIS/EA BOEMRE 2011-041). BOEMRE... Final EIS, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193, Chukchi Sea Planning Area (OCS EIS/EA MMS 2007-026). BOEMRE will...

  12. 77 FR 41448 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Final Five Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... availability of the Proposed Final Five Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 (PFP). This is the..., as was done in the PP. The Beaufort Sea sale date has been scheduled in 2017, in recognition of the...

  13. 78 FR 65705 - Request for Comments on the Annual Progress Report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM... (Report) on the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 (Five Year Program). The Annual Progress Report.../Five-Year-Program/2012-2017/Five-Year-Program.aspx . The Secretary of the Interior (Secretary...

  14. 77 FR 4360 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 216/222 in the Central Planning Area (CPA) in the Gulf of... Proposed Notice of Sale for Proposed Sale 216/222. SUMMARY: BOEM announces the availability of the proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for proposed Sale 216/222 in the CPA. This Notice is published pursuant to 30...

  15. 76 FR 38294 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... pollution, Penalties, Pipelines, Public lands--mineral resources, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements... Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) requires the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement... Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990 for violations of regulations governing financial responsibility (28 U.S.C. 2461...

  16. Geological studies of the COST nos. G-1 and G-2 wells, United States North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.; Wenkam, Chiye R.

    1982-01-01

    The COST Nos. G-1 and G-2 wells (fig. 1) are the second and third deep stratigraphic test wells drilled in the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf of the United States. COST No. G-1 was drilled in the Georges Bank basin to a total depth of 16,071 ft (4,898 m). G-1 bottomed in phyllite, slate, and metaquartzite overlain by weakly metamorphosed dolomite, all of Cambrian age. From approximately 15,600 to 12,400 ft (4,755 to 3,780 m) the strata are Upper Triassic(?), Lower Jurassic(?), and Middle Jurassic, predominantly red shales, sandstones, and conglomerates. Thin, gray Middle Jurassic beds of shale, sandstone, limestone, and dolomite occur from 12,400 to 9,900 ft (3,780 to 3,018 m). From 9,900 to 1,030 ft (3,018 to 314 m) are coarse-grained unconsolidated sands and loosely cemented sandstones, with beds of gray shale, lignite, and coal. The microfossils indicate the rocks are Upper Jurassic from 10,100 ft (3,078 m) up to 5,400 ft (1,646 m) and Cretaceous from that depth to 1,030 ft (314 m). No younger or shallower rocks were recovered in the drilling at the COST No. G-1 site, but an Eocene limestone is inferred to be disconformable over Santonian strata. The Jurassic strata of the COST No. G-1 well were deposited in shallow marine, marginal marine, and nonmarine environments, which changed to a dominantly shallow marine but still nearshore environment in the Cretaceous. The COST No. G-2 well was drilled 42 statute miles {68 km) east of the G-1 site, still within the Georges Bank basin, to a depth of 21,874 ft (6,667 m). The bottom 40 ft (12 m) of salt and anhydrite is overlain by approximately 7,000 ft {2,134 m) of Upper Triassic{?), Lower Jurassic{?) and Middle Jurassic dolomite, limestone, and interbedded anhydrite from 21,830 to 13,615 ft (6,654 to 4,153 m). From 13,500 to 9,700 ft (4,115 to 2,957 m) are Middle Jurassic limestones with interbedded sandstone. From 9,700 to 4,000 ft (2,957 to 1,219 m) are Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous interbedded sandstones and

  17. 76 FR 22130 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore New Jersey-Call for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... nominations for one or more commercial leases for the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the Outer... consultation with the BOEMRE/New Jersey Renewable Energy Task Force and has been identified as a Wind Energy... the Start'' offshore wind energy initiative. A detailed description of the area and its development is...

  18. 75 FR 17159 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Minerals Management Service Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for Outer... (GOM) AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of the proposed NOS... potential bidders may be obtained from the Public Information Unit, Gulf of Mexico Region,...

  19. 78 FR 76643 - Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 3 (ATLW3) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind Lease Sale 3 (ATLW3) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Proposed Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... grid) relative to the wind facility's generation at continuous full power operation at...

  20. 77 FR 71621 - Atlantic Wind One (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Atlantic Wind One (ATLW1) Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Proposed Sale Notice for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer... Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for commercial wind lease issuance and...

  1. 77 FR 43355 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer... AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of the Proposed.... Beaudreau, Director, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. BILLING CODE 4310-MR-P...

  2. Paleomagnetism of sedimentary cores from the Ross Sea outer shelf and continental slope (PNRA-ROSSLOPE II Project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrì, Patrizia; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Caricchi, Chiara; Colizza, Ester

    2016-04-01

    We carried out a paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of 4 gravity cores sampled in the Ross Sea continental slope of the area to the east of Pennell-Iselin banks. The cores (RS14-C1, C2, C3 and ANTA99-C20) consist of hemipelagic fine-grained (silty-clays) sediments with an IRD component. Rock magnetic and paleomagnetic measurements were carried out at 1-cm spacing on u-channel samples. The data indicate that the cored sediments carry a well-defined characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) and have a valuable potential to reconstruct dynamics and amplitude of the geomagnetic field variation at high southern latitudes (ca. 75°S) during the Holocene and the late Pleistocene. The paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data are integrated in a multidisciplinary context which includes previous geological, geophysical, oceanographic and morpho-bathimetric data obtained in the same area in the frame of the PNRA/ROSSLOPE (Past and present sedimentary dynamic in the ROSS Sea: a multidisciplinary approach to study the continental slope) Project. The main aim of the project is to investigate the relation between present and past water mass circulation and to provide a basis for paleoceanographic reconstructions and for the development of a depositional model of the modern processes active along the continental slope.

  3. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of the mid and outer continental shelf, head of De Soto Canyon, northeastern Gulf of Mexico: data, images, and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Mayer, Larry A.; Dartnell, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The mid to outer continental shelf off Mississippi-Alabama and off northwest Florida were the focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) multibeam echosounder (MBES) mapping cruises in 2000 and 2001, respectively. These areas were mapped to investigate the extent of "deep-water reefs" first suggested by Ludwig and Walton (1957). The reefs off Mississippi and Alabama were initially described in water depths of 60 to 120 m (Ludwig and Walton, 1957) but the 2000 mapping found reef and hardgrounds to be much more extensive than previously thought (Gardner et al., 2001). The persistent trend of reef-like features along the outer shelf of Mississippi-Alabama suggested the trend might continue along the northwest Florida mid and outer shelf so a MBES-mapping effort was mounted in 2001 to test this suggestion. It is critical to determine the accurate location, geomorphology, and types of the ridges and reefs that occur in this region to understand the Quaternary history of the area and to assess their importance as benthic habitats for fisheries. The area known as the "Head of De Soto Canyon" is the large unmapped region between the 2000 and 2001 mapped areas. It was unknown whether the reefs of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf continue eastward into the head of De Soto Canyon and connect with the ridges and reefs mapped on the northwest Florida outer shelf. The existence of carbonate-cemented Quaternary to Holocene sandstones along the western wall of the head of De Soto Canyon (Shipp and Hopkins, 1978; Benson et al., 1997; W.W. Schroeder, personal commun., 2002) is of interest because of the potential benthic habitats they may represent. In the summer of 2002, the USGS, in cooperation with Minerals Management Service (MMS), the University of New Hampshire, and the University of New Brunswick, conducted a MBES survey of the Head of De Soto Canyon Region connecting the 2000 and 2001 mapped regions.

  4. Nd isotopic variation of Paleozoic-Mesozoic granitoids from the Da Hinggan Mountains and adjacent areas, NE Asia: Implications for the architecture and growth of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qidi; Wang, Tao; Guo, Lei; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jianjun; Hou, Zengqian

    2017-02-01

    There is a long-standing controversy regarding the tectonic division, composition and structure of the continental crust in the Da Hinggan Mountains and adjacent areas, which are mainly part of the southeastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). This paper approaches these issues via neodymium isotopic mapping of Paleozoic-Mesozoic (480 to 100 Ma) granitoids. On the basis of 943 published and 8 new whole-rock Nd isotopic data, the study area can be divided into four Nd isotopic provinces (I, II, III and IV). Province I (the youngest crust, Nd model ages (TDM) = 0.8-0.2 Ga) is a remarkable region of Phanerozoic crustal growth, which may reflect a major zone for closures of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. Province II (slightly juvenile crust, TDM = 1.0-0.8 Ga), the largest Nd isotopic province in the southeastern CAOB, is considered to reflect the recycling of the initial crustal material produced during the early stage (Early Neoproterozoic) evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. Province III (slightly old crust, TDM = 1.6-1.1 Ga) is characterized by ancient crustal blocks, such as the central Mongolian, Erguna, Dariganga and Hutag Uul-Xilinhot blocks, which represent micro-continents and Precambrian basements in the southeastern CAOB. Several parts of Province III are located along the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC), which is interpreted as a destroyed cratonic margin during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. Province IV (the oldest crust, TDM = 2.9-1.6 Ga) mainly occurs within the NCC and reflects its typical Precambrian nature. These mapping results indicate that the boundary between Provinces II and III (the northern margin of the NCC) along the Solonker-Xar Moron Fault can be regarded as the lithospheric boundary between the CAOB and NCC. Provinces I and II account for 20% and 44% of the area of the southeastern CAOB, respectively, and therefore the ratio of continental growth is 64% from the Neoproterozoic to the Mesozoic, which is typical for this part of the

  5. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas moratoria. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, September 17, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Representatives of oil and gas producing states, the petroleum and mineral industry, environmental agencies and groups, and others testified on the impact which a lease moratorium affecting the Outer Continental Shelf will have, specifically on California. Among the issues raised were the current oil glut and the need to take a long view in energy production, the environmental risks of offshore drilling, and the economic impact on drilling companies and those who manufacture drilling equipment. The moratorium would affect only the proposal to expand leasing and drilling operations, not platforms already in operation in the tidelands and off the coast of California. Two appendices with additional responses and material submitted for the record follows the testimony of the 24 witnesses.

  6. Applicability of NASA contract quality management and failure mode effect analysis procedures to the USGS Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, M. K.; Little, D. G.; Hoard, E. G.; Taylor, A. C.; Campbell, R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach that might be used for determining the applicability of NASA management techniques to benefit almost any type of down-to-earth enterprise is presented. A study was made to determine the following: (1) the practicality of adopting NASA contractual quality management techniques to the U.S. Geological Survey Outer Continental Shelf lease management function; (2) the applicability of failure mode effects analysis to the drilling, production, and delivery systems in use offshore; (3) the impact on industrial offshore operations and onshore management operations required to apply recommended NASA techniques; and (4) the probable changes required in laws or regulations in order to implement recommendations. Several management activities that have been applied to space programs are identified, and their institution for improved management of offshore and onshore oil and gas operations is recommended.

  7. Summary of environmental geologic studies in the Mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf area; results of 1978-1979 field seasons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robb, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the need for knowledge of an offshore area that is undergoing exploration for oil and gas resources, since 1975 the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has funded studies of the environmental characteristics of the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. This volume briefly summarizes a final report to the BLM on the results of U.S. Geological Survey investigations stemming from data acquired during 1978 and 1979. The parent final report contains complete accounts of those investigations. The subjects of the studies range from the geologic effects of water currents and their capabilities of erosion and transportation, to delineation of potentially hazardous geologic characteristics of the area. Nine specific studies address the complexities of water currents, the nature of materials suspended in the sea waters, rates of mixing-in of material deposited on the bottom, and the sites of probable deposition of such materials, as well as sites and mechanisms of possible submarine landsliding or unstable bottom (engineering characteristics) of the Continental Slope and shelf.

  8. Movement and effects of spilled oil over the outer continental shelf; inadequacy of existent data for the Baltimore Canyon Trough area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, Harley J.

    1974-01-01

    A deductive approach to the problem of determining the movement and effects of spilled oil over the Outer Continental Shelf requires that the potential paths of oil be determined first, in order that critical subareas may be defined for later studies. The paths of spilled oil, in turn, depend primarily on the temporal and spatial variability of four factors: the thermohaline structure of the waters, the circulation of the water, the winds, and the distribution of suspended matter. A review of the existent data concerning these factors for the Baltimore Canyon Trough area (a relatively well studied segment of the Continental Shelf) reveals that the movement and dispersal of potential oil spills cannot be reliably predicted. Variations in the thermohaline structure of waters and in the distribution of suspended matter are adequately known; the uncertainty is due to insufficient wind and storm statistics and to the lack of quantitative understanding of the relationship between the nontidal drift and its basic driving mechanisms. Similar inadequacies should be anticipated for other potentially leasable areas of the shelf because an understanding of the movement of spilled oil has not been the underlying aim of most previous studies.

  9. Seabed fluid expulsion along the upper slope and outer shelf of the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, D.S.; Ruppel, C.; Kluesner, J.W.; ten Brink, U.S.; Chaytor, J.D.; Hill, J.C.; Andrews, B.D.; Flores, C.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the spatial distribution of seabed fluid expulsion features is crucial for understanding the substrate plumbing system of any continental margin. A 1100 km stretch of the U.S. Atlantic margin contains more than 5000 pockmarks at water depths of 120 m (shelf edge) to 700 m (upper slope), mostly updip of the contemporary gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Advanced attribute analyses of high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data reveal gas-charged sediment and probable fluid chimneys beneath pockmark fields. A series of enhanced reflectors, inferred to represent hydrate-bearing sediments, occur within the GHSZ. Differential sediment loading at the shelf edge and warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation along the upper slope are the proposed mechanisms that led to transient changes in substrate pore fluid overpressure, vertical fluid/gas migration, and pockmark formation.

  10. Fate and effects of nearshore discharges of OCS produced waters. Volume 2. Technical report (Final). [Outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Rabalais, N.N.; McKee, B.A.; Reed, D.J.; Means, J.C.

    1991-06-01

    While the number of facilities that discharge OCS produced waters into coastal environments of Louisiana are few in number, they account for large volumes, individually and collectively. Of the 15 facilities which discharge OCS-generated produced water into coastal environments of Louisiana (as of February 1990), 10 discharges in seven areas were studied. The discharge volumes of the study areas range from 3,000 to 106,000/bbl.d. The receiving environments for these effluents are varied, but include the shallow, nearshore continental shelf; high energy, freshwater distributaries of the Mississippi River delta; and brackish and saline coastal environments with moderately to poorly flushed waters. All study areas are within the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain. The study expanded on the initial assessment of Boesch and Rabalais (1989a) with increased temporal and spatial studies of three areas, additional study sites including an abandoned discharge, and additional analytical and field observations.

  11. 30 CFR 282.6 - Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure of data and information to an adjacent State. 282.6 Section 282.6 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND...

  12. Lithology, stratigraphy, and paleoenvironments of the Mobil 312-1 well, Georges Bank Basin, US North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W.; Stanton, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Mobil 312-1 hydrocarbon exploratory well, southeastern Georges Bank Basin penetrated a section entirely composed of sedimentary rocks that range from Middle to Pliocene age. Carbonates are the dominant lithologies in the intervals at 6096-3444 m, 2560-2096 m and 1067-887 m; siliciclastics make up most of the remaining section. Although inferred paleoenvironments range primarily from supratidal to outer neritic, thin lignitic coal beds at 2204-2195 m and 1929-1920 m record brief periods of nonmarine sedimentation. Middle and Upper Jurassic calcarenites, the drilling targets of the well, have little or no visible porosity and underwent at least three episodes of cementation. -from Authors

  13. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Supplement: An evaluation of benthic habitat primary productivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balcom, B.J.; Foster, M.A.; Fourqurean, J.J.; Heine, J.N.; Leonard, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Literature on current primary productivity was reviewed and evaluated for each of nine benthic communities or habitats, estimates of daily and annual benthic primary productivity were derived within each community, the benthic primary estimates were related to an estimate of areal extent of each community within or adjacent to each OCS planning area. Direct comparisons between habitats was difficult because of the varying measures and methodologies used. Coastal marshes were the most prevalent habitat type evaluated. Mangrove and coral reef habitats were highly productive but occur within few planning areas. Benthic diatoms and blue-green algae are less productive in terms of estimated annual productivity on a per square meter basis; these habitats have the potential to occur across wide areas of the OCS and should not be overlooked.

  14. Oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addressed oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Testimony is given by Department of Energy officials on the United States oil and gas leasing program. Congressional questions and agency responses are provided. Statements and documents prepared for the record are included.

  15. Remote-sensing evaluation of geophysical anomaly sites in the outer continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pineda, Oscar; MacDonald, Ian; Zimmer, Beate; Shedd, Bill; Roberts, Harry

    2010-11-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images obtained from satellites are a reliable tool for localizing natural hydrocarbon seeps. For this study, we used the Texture Classifier Neural Network Algorithm (TCNNA) to interpret SAR data from the RADARSAT satellite and a geostatistical clustering analysis to compare seeps detected in 579 SAR images covering the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Geostatistical analysis results indicate that, in a typical active seep formation, oil vents would be found within a seep formation ∼2.5 km in diameter. Repeated observations of slicks at a given seep formation indicate that advection of rising oil in the water column causes an offset from the vent depending on water depth. At 500 m, the radial offset is up to 1400 m; at 2000 m, it is up to 3270 m. Observations with submersibles showed that, in 100% of the cases, the calculated seep formations that are matched with active oil seeps correspond to anomalies interpreted from surface amplitude maps and migration pathways in the seismic data. However, episodically, larger releases from persistent seeps occurred, and also some other seep formations showed intermittent releases. Our analysis indicates that active oil seeps detected with SAR represent a subset of the total array of geophysical features generated by hydrocarbon migration on the northern continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Drowned shelf-edge deltas, barrier islands and related features along the outer continental shelf north of the head of De Soto Canyon, NE Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. V.; Calder, B. R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Mayer, L. A.; Elston, G.; Rzhanov, Y.

    2007-09-01

    Four drowned shelf-edge delta complexes, two drowned shelf deltas, three drowned barrier islands, large areas of "hardground", and fields of bedforms on the mid and outer continental shelf and uppermost slope north of the head of De Soto Canyon, NE Gulf of Mexico were mapped with high-resolution multibeam echosounder. Deltas formed not during the last eustatic low stand, but during one or more interstadials when eustatic sea levels were only 60 to 80 m below present sea level. The barrier islands and deltas must have been cemented prior to rapid falls of eustatic sea level that occurred during global glaciations. Cementation is necessary to have preserved the barrier islands from erosion and subsequent destruction by the rapid sea-level rise during the last deglaciation. The preservation of the relict bathymetry is so good that features that superficially resemble trough blowouts are found in association with one of the relict barrier islands. Asymmetric bedforms on the midshelf in water depths of 50 to 60 m indicate transport directions to the SW but asymmetric bedforms in water depths of the upper slope between 100 and 120 m on the S and SE flanks of the drowned shelf-edge deltas indicate a different current direction, a separate flow that is a continuation of a SW-flowing current that was previously found on the upper slope off NW Florida.

  17. A spatial correlation of the flow distribution on the outer continental shelf of Louisiana during the major hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico during the 2005 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coor, J. L.; Li, C. Y.; Rouse, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was unusually active, producing 31 named storms in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. Of these 31 storms, 11 entered the Gulf of Mexico, the most notable of which were Hurricanes Cindy, Dennis, Katrina, and Rita. Data were collected during these storms by acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) based on 58 oil and gas platforms scattered across the outer continental shelf (OCS) region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nine to 31 ADCPs were active and recording data during each major storm passage through the Gulf of Mexico. Data were recorded from depths of 60 to 70m down to 1100 to 1200m, with a few extending to depths around 2000m. From these data, the flow distribution of the OCS region was studied with the use of time series and spectrum analysis. Preliminary analysis has shown temporal variations in the vertical structure, increased diurnal oscillation current velocities (by a factor of approximately two), near-inertial oscillations, and variations in the overall direction of the flow before, during, and after the passage of the hurricanes. Methods of harmonic analysis and rotary spectra were implemented in this study. These data and results provide an estimate of the spatial extent to which a hurricane influences subsurface currents.

  18. Offshore Environmental Studies Program (1973-1989): A summary of Minerals Management Service research conducted on the U. S. Outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The report provides an overview of the first 15 years of the Environmental Studies Program (ESP), conducted initially by the Bureau of Land Management and now as part of the Minerals Management Service. From 1973 to 1988, the ESP spent nearly $500 million on studies directed to better understand the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and coastal environment and to use the information to document or predict effects of offshore oil and gas activities. The report organizes the hundreds of completed studies and thousands of resulting documents into 15 study topic chapters. Each chapter (e.g., physical oceanography) cites selected studies and provides a general discussion of program objectives and results. Where appropriate, each topic is discussed by OCS Region (Alaska, Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific). A more comprehensive listing of ESP reports and associated publications can be found in OCSEAP (1988) and Johnson et al. (1989). The goal of the report is to provide readers with a general account of the ESP's technical accomplishments and sources of detailed information. To understand the ESP, however, it is necessary to place the program in perspective with the entire OCS oil and gas program.

  19. An evaluation of the science needs to inform decisions on Outer Continental Shelf energy development in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland-Bartels, Leslie; Pierce, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    On March 31, 2010, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced a national strategy for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development. In that announcement, the Administration outlined a three-pronged approach (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2010a): Development: "...expand development and production throughout the Gulf of Mexico, including resource-rich areas of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico..." Exploration: "...expand oil and gas exploration in frontier areas, such as the Arctic Ocean and areas in the Atlantic Ocean, to gather the information necessary to develop resources in the right places and the right ways." Conservation: "...calls for the protection of special areas like Bristol Bay in Alaska...national treasure[s] that we must protect for future generations." In a companion announcement (U.S. Department of the Interior, 2010b), within the Administration's "Exploration" component, the Secretary asked the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct an initial, independent evaluation of the science needs that would inform the Administration's consideration of the right places and the right ways in which to develop oil and gas resources in the Arctic OCS, particularly focused on the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas (fig. 1).

  20. H. R. 5244: a bill providing for the orderly and timely development of critical energy resources on the United States Outer Continental Shelf. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, July 24, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Offshore Energy Security Act of 1986 provides for the orderly and timely development of critical energy resources on the Outer Continental Shelf, where estimates place 60% of US undiscovered energy resources. Current US leasing includes only 2.5% of Continental Shelf in comparison with a world figure of 30%. The legislation recognizes the impact of low oil prices on the domestic oil industry in terms of lost employment opportunities and technical expertise. The Act would stimulate exploration, development, and production to meet the economic and energy needs of the country. The Act also sets up an advisory committee to make safety recommendations.

  1. Offshore safety. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Panama Canal/Outer Continental Shelf, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on the safety of life at sea and safety on oil and gas rigs on the Outer Continental Shelf, June 16, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Representatives of diving contractors, shippers, drilling consultants, safety inspectors, and government agencies testified at a hearing on offshore safety in connection with oil and gas rigs on the Outer Continental Shelf. The committee reviewed existing safety programs and practices, focusing on drilling operations in new areas where the environment is increasingly inhospitable. Among the issues aired at the hearing were the problem of insurance coverage and the level of compensation to workers in stressful and hazardous settings. Oil companies described their procedures for preparing equipment and employees for hurricanes and other natural and manmade problems that they will experience. Various consultants offered suggestions for improving the level of safety preparedness and engineering. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 21 witnesses.

  2. Turtles, birds, and mammals in the northern Gulf of Mexico and nearby Atlantic waters: an overview based on aerial surveys of OCS (Outer Continental Shelf) areas, with emphasis on oil and gas effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, T.H.; Irvine, A.B.; Jennings, R.D.; Collum, L.A.; Hoffman, W.

    1983-07-01

    Aerial line transect surveys of marine turtles, birds, and mammals were conducted in four areas of the Gulf of Mexico and nearby Atlantic waters. Areas surveyed were 111 km by 222 km and located off Brownsville, Texas; Marsh Island, Louisiana; Naples, Florida; and Merritt Island, Florida. Data on distribution, abundance, seasonal occurrence, and habitat use are reported in accounts for each of the 88 species observed. Information on reproduction, behavior, and potential impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development are also discussed.

  3. An evaluation of the science needs to inform decisions on Outer Continental Shelf energy development in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland-Bartels, Leslie; Pierce, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to conduct an initial, independent evaluation of the science needs that would inform the Administration's consideration of the right places and the right ways in which to develop oil and gas resources in the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), particularly focused on the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Oil and gas potential is significant in Arctic Alaska. Beyond petroleum potential, this region supports unique fish and wildlife resources and ecosystems, and indigenous people who rely on these resources for subsistence. This report summarizes key existing scientific information and provides initial guidance of what new and (or) continued research could inform decision making. This report is presented in a series of topical chapters and various appendixes each written by a subset of the USGS OCS Team based on their areas of expertise. Three chapters (Chapters 2, 3, and 4) provide foundational information on geology; ecology and subsistence; and climate settings important to understanding the conditions pertinent to development in the Arctic OCS. These chapters are followed by three chapters that examine the scientific understanding, science gaps, and science sufficiency questions regarding oil-spill risk, response, and impact (Chapter 5), marine mammals and anthropogenic noise (Chapter 6), and cumulative impacts (Chapter 7). Lessons learned from the 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill are included to identify valuable "pre-positioned" science and scientific approaches to improved response and reduced uncertainty in damage assessment and restoration efforts (appendix D). An appendix on Structured Decision Making (appendix C) is included to illustrate the value of such tools that go beyond, but incorporate, science in looking at what can/should be done about policy and implementation of Arctic development. The report provides a series of findings and recommendations for consideration developed during the independent examination of

  4. Continental-Margin Processes Recorded in Shelf and Canyon Sediments. Sediment Deposition, Erosion and Accumulation on a Tidal Flat Adjacent to a River Mouth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Sequence Stratigraphy , IAS Spec. Pub. 37, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 549 pp. (2007). C.A. Nittrouer, J.A. Austin, M.E. Field, J.H. Kravitz, J.P.M...Continental Margin Sedimentation: From Sediment Transport to Sequence Stratigraphy , IAS Spec. Pub. 37, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 1-48 (2007... Stratigraphy , IAS Spec. Pub. 37, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, 157-212 (2007). L.F. Pratson, C.A. Nittrouer, P.L.Wiberg, M.S. Steckler, J.B. Swenson

  5. Crustal structure of the eastern Algerian continental margin and adjacent deep basin: implications for late Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyahiaoui, B.; Sage, F.; Abtout, A.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Yelles-Chaouche, K.; Schnürle, P.; Marok, A.; Déverchère, J.; Arab, M.; Galve, A.; Collot, J. Y.

    2015-06-01

    We determine the deep structure of the eastern Algerian basin and its southern margin in the Annaba region (easternmost Algeria), to better constrain the plate kinematic reconstruction in this region. This study is based on new geophysical data collected during the SPIRAL cruise in 2009, which included a wide-angle, 240-km-long, onshore-offshore seismic profile, multichannel seismic reflection lines and gravity and magnetic data, complemented by the available geophysical data for the study area. The analysis and modelling of the wide-angle seismic data including refracted and reflected arrival travel times, and integrated with the multichannel seismic reflection lines, reveal the detailed structure of an ocean-to-continent transition. In the deep basin, there is an ˜5.5-km-thick oceanic crust that is composed of two layers. The upper layer of the crust is defined by a high velocity gradient and P-wave velocities between 4.8 and 6.0 km s-1, from the top to the bottom. The lower crust is defined by a lower velocity gradient and P-wave velocity between 6.0 and 7.1 km s-1. The Poisson ratio in the lower crust deduced from S-wave modelling is 0.28, which indicates that the lower crust is composed mainly of gabbros. Below the continental edge, a typical continental crust with P-wave velocities between 5.2 and 7.0 km s-1, from the top to the bottom, shows a gradual seaward thinning of ˜15 km over an ˜35-km distance. This thinning is regularly distributed between the upper and lower crusts, and it characterizes a rifted margin, which has resulted from backarc extension at the rear of the Kabylian block, here represented by the Edough Massif at the shoreline. Above the continental basement, an ˜2-km-thick, pre-Messinian sediment layer with a complex internal structure is interpreted as allochthonous nappes of flysch backthrusted on the margin during the collision of Kabylia with the African margin. The crustal structure, moreover, provides evidence for Miocene

  6. Oil-spill risk analysis: Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) central and western lease sales, 1998-2002, and gulfwide OCS program, 1998-2036. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M.; Marshall, C.F.; Lear, E.M.

    1997-11-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Central and Western Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing during 1998-2002. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. This report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Central and Western Gulf of Mexico lease sales and te Gulfwide OCS Program, 1998-2036. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  7. Outer Continental Shelf leasing policies. Hearing before the Subcommittee on SBA and SBIC Authority, Minority Enterprise and General Small Business Problems of the Committee on Small Business, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 12, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Four witnesses representing minority- and women-owned businesses spoke at the hearing held to consider the September 16 Department of Interior rescission of its regulation on nondiscrimination against businesses enterprises for leasing activities on the Outer Continental Shelf. The witnesses described the need for the regulation if women and minorities are to fully participate in the free-enterprise system. The hearing focused on the conditions requiring affirmative regulations and called for documented arguments that they are not needed. The chairman noted a November 10, 1981 letter from Interior Secretary Watt on a decision to rewrite nondescriminatory regulations. (DCK)

  8. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Pacific (Southern California) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macpherson, George S.; Bernstein, Janis

    1980-01-01

    Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration and development have been under way in the Pacific (Southern California) Region since 1966. During that time, there have been four Federal lease sales: in 1966, 1968, 1975 (Sale 35), and 1979 (Sale 48). Oil and gas production from three leases has been going on since 1968. It peaked in 1971 and now averages around 31,400 barrels of oil and 15.4 million cubic feet of gas per day. Discoveries on areas leased in the 1968 and 1975 sales have led to plans for eight new platforms to begin production in the early 1980's. Five platforms are in the eastern end of Santa Barbara Channel, one is in the western Channel, and two are in San Pedro Bay, south of Long Beach. Three rigs are doing exploratory drilling in the Region. The most recent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey of remaining reserves for all identified fields in the Southern California Region are 695 million barrels of oil and 1,575 billion cubic feet of gas (January 1979). The USGS has also made risked estimates of economically recoverable oil and gas resources for all the leased tracts in the Region (March 1980). These risked estimates of economically recoverable resources are 394 billion barrels of oil and 1,295 billion cubic feet of gas. The USGS estimates of undiscovered recoverable resources for the entire Southern California OCS Region (January 1980) are 3,200 million barrels of oil and 3,400 billion cubic feet of gas. Because of the long history of oil and gas production in Southern California from wells onshore and in State waters, there are many existing facilities for the transportation, processing, and refining of oil and gas. Some of the expected new OCS production can be accommodated in these facilities. Four new onshore projects will be required. Two of these are under construction: (1) a 9.6-km (6-mi) onshore oil pipeline (capacity: 60,000 bpd) between Carpinteria (Santa Barbara County) and the existing Mobil-Rincon separation and treatment

  9. Continental Margins of the Arctic Ocean: Implications for Law of the Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, David

    2016-04-01

    A coastal State must define the outer edge of its continental margin in order to be entitled to extend the outer limits of its continental shelf beyond 200 M, according to article 76 of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. The article prescribes the methods with which to make this definition and includes such metrics as water depth, seafloor gradient and thickness of sediment. Note the distinction between the "outer edge of the continental margin", which is the extent of the margin after application of the formula of article 76, and the "outer limit of the continental shelf", which is the limit after constraint criteria of article 76 are applied. For a relatively small ocean basin, the Arctic Ocean reveals a plethora of continental margin types reflecting both its complex tectonic origins and its diverse sedimentation history. These factors play important roles in determining the extended continental shelves of Arctic coastal States. This study highlights the critical factors that might determine the outer edge of continental margins in the Arctic Ocean as prescribed by article 76. Norway is the only Arctic coastal State that has had recommendations rendered by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS). Russia and Denmark (Greenland) have made submissions to the CLCS to support their extended continental shelves in the Arctic and are awaiting recommendations. Canada has yet to make its submission and the US has not yet ratified the Convention. The various criteria that each coastal State has utilized or potentially can utilize to determine the outer edge of the continental margin are considered. Important criteria in the Arctic include, 1) morphological continuity of undersea features, such as the various ridges and spurs, with the landmass, 2) the tectonic origins and geologic affinities with the adjacent land masses of the margins and various ridges, 3) sedimentary processes, particularly along continental slopes, and 4) thickness and

  10. Summary of the 1995 assessment of conventionally recoverable hydrocarbon resources of the Gulf of Mexico and atlantic outer continental shelf as of January 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, G.L.; Brooke, J.P.; Cooke, D.W.; Klazynski, R.J.; Olson, D.L.

    1996-08-01

    The principal purpose of this report is to present estimates of the total endowment of conventionally recoverable oil and gas that may be present beneath the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic continental margin. Secondary objectives are to briefly describe the geologic and mathematical methodologies employed in the assessment, present an economic analysis of the undiscovered conventionally recoverable resources of the area, and provide a historical perspective in which to review the results.

  11. Gravity and structure of the continental margins of southwestern Mexico and northwestern Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, Richard; Woodcock, Stephen

    1981-03-01

    Geophysical measurements over the eastern end of the Tehuantepec Ridge and adjacent continental margins of southern Mexico and northern Guatemala indicate that the ridge is a fracture zone and that it marks the boundary between two different subduction provinces. A positive free-air gravity anomaly which extends northwestward along the outer continental shelf of Guatemala curves abruptly landward in the Gulf of Tehuantepec. The positive shelf anomaly is on trend with the positive anomaly of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, and suggests that rocks genetically related to Cretaceous rocks of the Nicoya Complex extend northwestward along the continental shelf to the Gulf of Tehuantepec. A crustal and subcrustal cross section of the continental margin of Guatemala, constrained by gravity, magnetic, and seismic refraction data, indicates that the rock strata causing the outer shelf gravity high dip landward, consistent with imbricate thrusting of the oceanic crust beneath and into the continental margin. A model crustal cross section of the continental margin of southern Mexico, north of the Tehuantepec Ridge, shows a markedly different margin structure with a relatively small amount of continental accretion and a continental crustal block extending to within approximately 25 km of the trench axis.

  12. Review of outer continental shelf oil and gas leasing. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, October 12, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen witnesses representing the mineral industry, local and state officials of California, health agencies, and environmental and citizen groups spoke at a field hearing in Santa Monica, California over concerns that oil drilling in the Santa Monica Bay will have negative environmental, economic, and social impacts. At issue was the expiration at the end of 1985 of a moratorium on leasing and the subsequent release of these lands to offshore leasing under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCS) unless the moratorium is extended. Those supporting energy development cited energy supply needs and a continuing trend toward reduced domestic production of oil and gas. Additional statements, letters, and other material submitted for the record follows the testimony.

  13. Outer Continental Shelf leasing activities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Supply of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, June 26, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    An oversight hearing on leasing activities on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) focused on concerns over protection of the coastal environment and fish resources from oil spills and federal compensation to affected states. A breakdown in federal and state planning because of the Coastal Zone Management Act led to a moratorium on establishing OCS areas. Several of the witnesses reported on the economic impact of these moratoria. Those opposing leasing activity questioned the need for the accelerated leasing program exposed by the administration. Among the 19 witnesses were representatives of the National Ocean Industries Association, oil companies, the fishing industry, drilling companies, environmental groups, and the senators of several affected states. An appendix with additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

  14. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and North-Atlantic US outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, January 1978-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Fitch, S.J.

    1980-09-01

    The species composition, distribution, and abundance of marine birds on continental shelf waters from Cape Hatteras to the Bay of Fundy were examined using ships-of-opportunity. Northern Fulmar, Cory's Shearwater, Greater Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater, Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Gannet, Red Phalarope, Great Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, and Black-legged Kittiwake were the most abundant and common species. These species were ecologically dominant within the bird community in numbers and biomass. Georges Bank and Gulf of Marine regions generally had greatest estimates of standing stock and biomass; whereas, in the Middle Atlantic region these estimates were consistently lowest. Species diversity throughout the study area was greatest in spring and least in fall. Oceanic fronts at the continental shelf break and at Nantucket Shoals influenced the distribution of Wilson's Storm-Petrels and Red Phalaropes. Fishing activities were particularly important to Larus gull distribution. Fishes, squids, and crustaceans were the most important groups of prey items in diets of nine bird species. An oiled bird or pollution index was developed. According to the index, frequency of oiled birds was greatest in winter and spring, and gulls made up the majority of species with oiled plumages.

  15. Beaufort Sea monitoring program: analysis of trace metals and hydrocarbons from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) activities. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, P.D.; Crecelius, E.; Steinhauer, W.; Steinhauer, M.; Tuckfield, C.

    1986-08-13

    An environmental-monitoring program, designed to detect and quantify long-term changes in sediment and tissue concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons potentially due to oil and gas exploration and development on the U.S. Beaufort Sea continental shelf, was initiated in 1984. In Year-1 of the three-year study, a series of benthic stations was established in the nearshore area between Barter Island and Cape Halkett. In Year-2 of the study, areal coverage of the Study Area was increased to 39 marine stations and 10 shoreline and river stations. Analysis of six replicate sediment samples for trace metals, and saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons revealed a wide range of concentrations. Both trace metal and hydrocarbon analyses of bivalve and crustacean tissues indicated concentrations differences between species but no apparent relationship between animal body burdens and sediment concentrations.

  16. Taxonomy and bathymetric distribution of the outer neritic/upper bathyal ostracodes (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the southernmost Brazilian continental margin.

    PubMed

    Bergue, Cristianini Trescastro; Coimbra, João Carlos; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-02-10

    Sixty-five ostracode species belonging to 41 genera and 17 families were recorded in the outer shelf and upper slope off Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states, southernmost Brazil, between 100 and 586 m water depth interval. The ostracode occurrences are hypothesized to be influenced by both, the coastal waters and the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The taxonomy of some species of Bradleya Hornibrook, 1952, Legitimocythere Coles & Whatley, 1989 and Henryhowella Puri, 1957 previously described in the same study area is revised. Bradleya gaucha sp. nov., Legitimocythere megapotamica sp. nov., Apatihowella acelos sp. nov., Apatihowella capitulum sp. nov., Apatihowella besnardi sp. nov., Apatihowella convexa sp. nov., and Aversovalva tomcronini sp. nov. are herein proposed. Trachyleberis aorata Bergue & Coimbra, 2008 is reassigned to the genus Legitimocythere and Bradleya pseudonormani Ramos et al., 2009 has its diagnosis emended. Bythocypris praerenis Brandão, 2008 is considered a junior synonym of Bythocypris kyamos Whatley et al., 1998a. Apatihowella Jellinek & Swanson, 2003 and Legitimocythere species have well-defined bathymetric distributions and are potential paleoceanographic markers for the Quaternary in the Southern Brazilian Margin.

  17. The saltwater-freshwater interface in the Tertiary limestone aquifer, southeast Atlantic outer-continental shelf of the U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrologic testing in an offshore oil well abandoned by Tenneco, Inc., determined the position of the saltwater-freshwater interface in Tertiary limestones underlying the Florida-Georgia continental shelf of the U.S.A. Previous drilling (JOIDES and U.S.G.S. AMCOR projects) established the existence of freshwater far offshore in this area. At the Tenneco well 55 mi. (???88 km) east of Fernandina Beach, Florida, drill-stem tests made in the interval 1050-1070 ft. (320-326 m) below sea level in the Ocala Limestone recovered a sample with a chloride concentration of 7000 mg l-1. Formation water probably is slightly fresher. Pressure-head measurements indicated equivalent freshwater heads of 24-29 ft. (7.3-8.8 m) above sea level. At the coast (Fernandina Beach), a relatively thin transition zone separating freshwater and saltwater occurs at a depth of 2100 ft. (640 m) below sea level. Fifty-five miles (???88 km) offshore, at the Tenneco well, the base of freshwater is ???1100 ft. (???335 m) below sea level. The difference in approximate depth to the freshwater-saltwater transition at these two locations suggests an interface with a very slight landward slope. Assuming the Hubbert interface equation applies here (because the interface and therefore freshwater flow lines are nearly horizontal) the equilibrium depth to the interface should be 40 times the freshwater head above sea level. Using present-day freshwater heads along the coast in the Hubbert equation results in depths to the interface of less than the observed 2100 ft. (640 m). Substituting predevelopment heads in the equation yields depths greater than 2100 ft. (640 m). Thus the interface appears to be in a transient position between the position that would be compatible with present-day heads and the position that would be compatible with predevelopment heads. This implies that some movement of the interface from the predevelopment position has occurred during the past hundred years. The implied movement is

  18. Age & reproduction in three reef - dwelling serranid fishes of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf: Pronotogrammus martinicensis, Hemanthias vivanus & Serranus phoebe (with preliminary observations on the Pomacentrid fish, Chromis enchrysurus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, Paul E.; McBride, Richard S.; Sulak, Kenneth J.; Dennis, George D.

    2004-01-01

    Specimens of the four study species were collected during cruises to outer-continental shelf reefs of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Age was estimated for all serranid species using whole otoliths and C. enchrysurus ages were determined from transverse sections of sagittal otoliths. Ring structure observed on otoliths was validated as having an annual periodicity for P. martinicensis using marginal increment analysis. Ring structure on remaining species was assumed to correspond to age (years). Pronotogrammus martinicensis, H. vivanus, S. phoebe, and C. enchrysurus exhibited maximum ages of 9, 8, 5, and 11, respectively. Spatial variations in size-at-age were observed in P. martinicensis populations. Individuals inhabiting reefs in the Madison-Swanson Reserve area on the West Florida Shelf edge exhibited the fastest growth rates, while the slowest growing P. martinicensis were collected from the Alabama Alps Reef, the farthest west study reef. Pronotogrammus martinicensis and H. vivanus are both protogynous hermaphrodites. Evidence of active spawning was observed in the months from February through July for P. martinicensis, and March and May for H. vivanus. Serranus phoebe was observed to be a simultaneous hermaphroditic capable of spawning year-round. Batch fecundity estimates for P. martinicensis ranged from 149-394 oocytes per fish. Size selectivity was evident in our primary sampling method, hook and line using small tandem bait hooks. Smaller size-classes of all species examined were under-represented in our samples, hindering accurate growth modeling. Due to the protogynous nature of P. martinicensis and H. vivanus, hook and line sampling also tended to select for males. Future descriptions of the reproductive biology of both protogynous species would be more complete if less selective sampling methods could be successfully employed. The data presented here contribute to a better assessment of the fish community of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Little

  19. RV Ocean Surveyor cruise O1-02-GM: bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of selected areas of the outer continental shelf, northwestern Gulf of Mexico; June 8, through June 28, 2002; Iberia, LA to Iberia, LA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaudoin, Jonathan D.; Gardner, James V.; Clarke, John E. Hughes

    2002-01-01

    Following the publication of high-resolution multibeam echosounder (MBES) images and data of the Flower Gardens area of the northwest Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf (Gardner et al., 1998), the Flower Gardens Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) have been interested in additional MBES data in the area. A coalition of FGBNMS, MMS, and the US Geological Survey (USGS) was formed to map additional areas of interest in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico in 2002. The areas were chosen by personnel of the FGBNMS and the choice of MBES was made by the USGS. MMS and FGBNMS funded the mapping and the USGS organized the ship and multibeam systems through a Cooperative Agreement between the USGS and the University of New Brunswick. The University of New Brunswick (UNB) contracted the RV Ocean Surveyor and the EM1000 MBES system from C&C Technologies, Inc., Lafayette, LA. C&C personnel oversaw data collection whereas UNB personnel conducted the cruise and processed all the data. USGS personnel were responsible for the overall cruise including the final data processing and digital map products.

  20. Geological history of the outer North West Shelf of Australia: A synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exon, N. F.; Colwell, J. B.

    This paper uses information contained in other papers in this issue of the AGSO Journal together with the scientific literature to produce a synthesis of the geological development of the outer continental margin of northwest Australia, and the adjacent plateaus and abyssal plains, with special emphasis on the northern Exmouth Plateau and Rowley Terrace. In the Palaeozoic, the outer North West Shelf formed part of the continental crust of East Gondwana. The region was stretched in the Late Palaeozoic, and subsequently subsided to form the Westralian Superbain on the southern margin of Tethys. The superbasin filled with thick Triassic sediments, and variable thicknesses of Jurassic sediments, before progressive breakup in Callovian-Valanginian time.

  1. Influences of offshore activity. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Panama Canal/Outer Continental Shelf, of the House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on offshore oil and gas activity and its socio-economic and environmental influences, October 12, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A field hearing in Humble, Texas heard testimony on the socio-economic and environmental effects of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico. These activities influence the commercial and recreational climate of the area as well as municipal services. The 20 witnesses included representatives of the petroleum, shipping, fishing, and other industries, environmental groups, and both organizations and agencies concerned with coastal management. Additional material and communications supplied for the record follows the testimony.

  2. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  3. Outer Continental Shelf Permit Processing Coordination Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2011-04-14

    05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Outer Continental Shelf Permit Processing Coordination Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2011-04-14

    Senate - 05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Outer Continental Shelf Reform Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Bingaman, Jeff [D-NM

    2011-05-09

    05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Outer Continental Shelf Reform Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Bingaman, Jeff [D-NM

    2011-05-09

    05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Outer Continental Shelf Permit Processing Coordination Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Begich, Mark [D-AK

    2011-04-14

    05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Outer Continental Shelf Reform Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Bingaman, Jeff [D-NM

    2010-06-21

    Senate - 07/28/2010 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 492. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Outer Continental Shelf Reform Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Bingaman, Jeff [D-NM

    2011-05-09

    Senate - 05/17/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 112-51. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Active diapirism and slope steepening, northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, R.G.; Bouma, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Large diapiric and nondiapiric masses of Jurassic salt and Tertiary shale underlie the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope and adjacent outer continental shelf. Local steepening of the sea floor in response to the vertical growth of these structures is a serious concern to those involved in the site selection and the construction of future oil and gas production and transportation facilities in this frontier petroleum province. The evidence given in this paper supports the conclusion that the present continental slope region of the northern Gulf of Mexico is undergoing active diapirism and consequent slope steepening. Because most of the sediment on the flanks of diapiric structures consists of underconsolidated muds, slumping will take place regularly in response to further diapiric movement.-from Authors

  11. 76 FR 11811 - Environmental Document Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... activities proposed on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  12. Transform continental margins - part 1: Concepts and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the geodynamic concepts and models related to transform continental margins, and their implications on the structure of these margins. Simple kinematic models of transform faulting associated with continental rifting and oceanic accretion allow to define three successive stages of evolution, including intra-continental transform faulting, active transform margin, and passive transform margin. Each part of the transform margin experiences these three stages, but the evolution is diachronous along the margin. Both the duration of each stage and the cumulated strike-slip deformation increase from one extremity of the margin (inner corner) to the other (outer corner). Initiation of transform faulting is related to the obliquity between the trend of the lithospheric deformed zone and the relative displacement of the lithospheric plates involved in divergence. In this oblique setting, alternating transform and divergent plate boundaries correspond to spatial partitioning of the deformation. Both obliquity and the timing of partitioning influence the shape of transform margins. Oblique margin can be defined when oblique rifting is followed by oblique oceanic accretion. In this case, no transform margin should exist in the prolongation of the oceanic fracture zones. Vertical displacements along transform margins were mainly studied to explain the formation of marginal ridges. Numerous models were proposed, one of the most used is being based on thermal exchanges between the oceanic and the continental lithospheres across the transform fault. But this model is compatible neither with numerical computation including flexural behavior of the lithosphere nor with timing of vertical displacements and the lack of heating related to the passing of the oceanic accretion axis as recorded by the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana marginal ridge. Enhanced models are still needed. They should better take into account the erosion on the continental slope, and the level of coupling

  13. 76 FR 52006 - Information Collection Activity: Leasing of Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf, Extension of a Collection... Leasing of Minerals Other than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf (OMB No. 1010- 0082... Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf. OMB Control Number: 1010-0082. Abstract...

  14. Wildlife Densities and Habitat Use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final Report to the Department of Energy EERE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kathryn A.; Stenhouse, Iain J.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Connelly, Emily E.

    2015-10-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project helped address environmental barriers to offshore wind energy development in the mid-Atlantic region by providing regulators, developers, and other stakeholders with comprehensive baseline ecological data and analyses. Project funders and collaborators from a range of academic institutions, non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, foundations, and private companies came together to study bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal distributions, densities, and movements on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf between 2012 and 2014. Specific project activities and goals included the following: (1) Conduct standardized surveys to quantify bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal densities seasonally and annually throughout the study region and identify important habitat use or aggregation areas. (2) Develop statistical models to help understand the drivers of wildlife distribution and abundance patterns. (3) Use individual tracking data for several focal bird species to provide information on population connectivity and individual movements that is complementary to survey data. (4) Identify species that are likely to be exposed to offshore wind energy development activities in the mid-Atlantic study area. (5) Develop U.S.-based technological resources and assessment methods for future monitoring efforts, including a comparison of high resolution digital video aerial surveys to boat-based surveys. (6) Help meet data needs associated with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Marine Mammal Protection Act, and Endangered Species Act requirements, by contributing several years of data and analysis towards future Environmental Impact Statements. This report consists of six parts: Project overview (executive summary and Chapters 1-2); Examining wildlife distributions and relative abundance from a digital video aerial survey platform (Chapters 3-6); Examining wildlife distributions and abundance using boat-based surveys

  15. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  16. Continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, H.; Zijlstra

    1987-01-01

    Continental shelves form a relatively narrow fringe, of varying width, around the continents. Altogether they take up only about 7% of the ocean's surface and less than 0.2% if its volume. Nevertheless, their specific biological characteristics and economical importance justify a separate discussion in this series. Ecosystems of the World. The specific biological characteristics are due to the position of continental shelves between the land masses on one side and the oceans on the other, to their relative shallowness and variable sea-floor texture and to the fact that, besides residual currents, tidal streams exert a great influence on the movements of water bodies.

  17. Coastal zone and Continental Shelf conflict resolution: improving ocean use and resource dispute management

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhart, J.D.; Harding, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    Contents include: An overview of coastal zone and continental shelf conflicts; Experience in coastal zone management conflict; Future coastal zone conflicts; Outer continental shelf conflicts; Georges Bank and Gulf of Maine; and Future considerations.

  18. Phytoplankton Communities in Louisiana coastal waters and the continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Louisiana coastal waters and the adjacent continental shelf receive large freshwater and nutrient inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, creating favorable conditions for increased phytoplankton productivity. To examine inshore-offshore patterns in phytoplankton comm...

  19. Phytoplankton Communities in Louisiana coastal waters and the continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Louisiana coastal waters and the adjacent continental shelf receive large freshwater and nutrient inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, creating favorable conditions for increased phytoplankton productivity. To examine inshore-offshore patterns in phytoplankton comm...

  20. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  1. Subduction-driven recycling of continental margin lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Levander, A; Bezada, M J; Niu, F; Humphreys, E D; Palomeras, I; Thurner, S M; Masy, J; Schmitz, M; Gallart, J; Carbonell, R; Miller, M S

    2014-11-13

    Whereas subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere is one of the central themes of plate tectonics, the recycling of continental lithosphere appears to be far more complicated and less well understood. Delamination and convective downwelling are two widely recognized processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. Here we relate oceanic plate subduction to removal of adjacent continental lithosphere in certain plate tectonic settings. We have developed teleseismic body wave images from dense broadband seismic experiments that show higher than expected volumes of anomalously fast mantle associated with the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern South America and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc region; the anomalies are under, and are aligned with, the continental margins at depths greater than 200 kilometres. Rayleigh wave analysis finds that the lithospheric mantle under the continental margins is significantly thinner than expected, and that thin lithosphere extends from the orogens adjacent to the subduction zones inland to the edges of nearby cratonic cores. Taking these data together, here we describe a process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone. Subducting oceanic plates can viscously entrain and remove the bottom of the continental thermal boundary layer lithosphere from adjacent continental margins. This drives surface tectonics and pre-conditions the margins for further deformation by creating topography along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. This can lead to development of secondary downwellings under the continental interior, probably under both South America and the Gibraltar arc, and to delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle, as around the Gibraltar arc. This process reconciles numerous, sometimes mutually exclusive, geodynamic models proposed to explain the complex oceanic-continental tectonics of these subduction zones.

  2. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2010-05-11

    05/25/2010 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 111-679, pt. 3. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Safety Information and Management on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C. 1984 ~ JUL 2 6 1984 - " . SAFTY NFRMAIO ANMNAGMETr...safety (National Research Council, 1981), studies of safety in the nuclear power industry (Miller, 1980), an analysis of the costs and benefits of...for other skills on the part of MMS personnel. Some regula- tory agencies, notably the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have adopted an audit approach

  4. 75 FR 71734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... vacancies in the following disciplines: Biological oceanography/marine biology; social science; marine...) and environmental aspects of the offshore energy and marine minerals programs. The ESP, initiated to... of field and laboratory studies in biology, chemistry, and physical oceanography, as well as...

  5. Outer Continental Shelf Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreements Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Duncan, Jeff [R-SC-3

    2013-04-18

    Senate - 10/01/2013 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 113-104. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Outer Continental Shelf Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreements Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Duncan, Jeff [R-SC-3

    2013-04-18

    10/01/2013 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 113-104. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Outer Continental Shelf Transboundary Hydrocarbon Agreements Authorization Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Duncan, Jeff [R-SC-3

    2013-04-18

    10/01/2013 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 113-104. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Whitehouse, Sheldon [D-RI

    2010-05-11

    Senate - 05/25/2010 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 111-679, pt. 3. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Spatial features and volume of seamounts in the continental slope of northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chaoyan; Xia, Shaohong; Zhao, Fang; Sun, Jinlong; Cao, Jinghe; Xu, Huilong; Wan, Kuiyuan

    2017-04-01

    The distribution, volume, and origin of seamounts in the continental slope of northern South China Sea (SCS) are not well understood, which greatly hinders our understanding of magmatism in the SCS. Based on high-resolution bathymetric data and 147 seismic profiles, together with gravity and magnetic data, we first identify 46 seamounts in the continental slope of northern SCS. These seamounts are characterized by: high amplitude outer seismic reflections; low amplitude disrupted internal seismic reflections; obvious uplift of the adjacent strata at the flanks; higher positive free-air gravity anomalies; and higher magnetic anomalies. We simulated their shape with elliptical cones and accordingly calculated their volume, height, length and the azimuths of their major and minor axes. The total volume of these 46 seamounts above seafloor is estimated at 2060.27-3324.23 km3 and the total volume of intrusive magma above Moho is about 0.16 Mkm3, close to the estimates for classic large igneous provinces across the world. These seamounts are mostly located on the continental slope with thin crust (approximately 12-18 km), suggesting that thinned continental crust could reduce the overlying pressure and shorten the path of magmatic upwelling. The dominant azimuth of elliptical major axis in seamounts is consistent with the synrift and synspreading fault strikes (NE-NEE orientation), indicating that these pre-existing faults provide magmatic conduits for the subsequent postrift seamounts. Based on three existing clues, i.e., (1) the seamounts, high velocity layer and Hainan mantle plume are contiguous in 3-D space, (2) the high-velocity layer is thicker beneath the continental shelf but thinner beneath the slope and (3) the basalts dredged from certain seamounts show OIB-type geochemical features, we propose a new magmatic upwelling pattern to explain the spatial and morphological features of these seamounts. The eastern branch of the Hainan mantle plume underplated the

  10. Morphology, origin and evolution of Pleistocene submarine canyons, New Jersey continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, T.; Mountain, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine canyons serve as important conduits for transport of detrital sediments from nearshore and shelf environments to adjacent deep marine basins. However, the processes controlling the formation, maintenance, and fill of these sediment pathways are complex. This study presents an investigation of these systems at the New Jersey continental margin using a grid of high-resolution, 48-channel seismic reflection data collected in 1995 on the R/V Oceanus cruise Oc270 as a part of the STRATAFORM initiative. The aim is to shed new light on the origin and role of submarine canyons in Pleistocene sedimentation beneath the outer shelf and upper continental slope. Preliminary investigation of the Pleistocene interval reveals prominent unconformities tied to and dated with published studies at 7 sites drilled by ODP Legs 150 and 174A. The profiles of the continental slope unveil a series of abandoned and now buried submarine canyons that have influenced the development of modern canyons. Mapping these systems has revealed a range of canyon geometries, including U, V-shaped and flat-bottomed cross sections, each suggesting different histories. At least three types of seismic facies constitute the canyon fills: parallel onlap, interpreted as infilling by alternating coarser turbidites and finer hemipelagic sediments, chaotic infill, signifying structureless, massive debris flow deposition, and lateral accretion infill by both turbidity and bottom currents. Canyon formation and development appear to be strongly influenced by variations in sediment supply, grain size, and currents on the continental slope. One goal of our research is to establish if the canyons were initiated by failures at the base of the slope followed by upslope erosion, or by erosion at the shelf slope transition, and then downslope extension by erosive events. No single model accounts for all canyons. The history of these canyons may elucidate the extent to which the shelf was exposed during sea

  11. French Extended Continental Shelf Mapping: example of new continental margin understanding offshore French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, Walter; Loubrieu, Benoit; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Graindorge, David; Shipboard Party, Guyaplac

    2017-04-01

    Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, Coastal States can extend sovereign rights over the natural resources of the Continental Shelf beyond 200 nautical miles (M) if they can demonstrate that their continental margin extends beyond this distance from the coast. Article 76 of the Convention defines the continental shelf and includes geomorphological and geological criteria to claim such a shelf beyond 200 M. Since 2006, France has filed 7 submissions for a total of 10 distinct geographic regions to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf that was established by the Convention to examine those claims, and make recommendations with respect to the justification of the outer limits of the continental shelf. To support the French submissions, a significant effort was employed in acquiring new marine geophysical and geological data and compiling existing data along the deep water parts of the continental margins offshore all the French overseas territories. In this presentation, we will discuss the example of French Guiana, where the data collected for the purpose of fulfilling the obligation under the Convention to submit data and information to the Commission within a 10 year time frame have led to new understanding of the transform continental margin and the Demerara Plateau located to the north of French Guiana and Surinam. In addition, the data collected for this purpose have led to new scientific questions and have encouraged new and enhanced scientific collaboration between French government organizations and the academic community. Follow up research and scientific cruises that will be presented in separate communications have addressed sedimentary processes including contourites, giant comet tail like depressions probably associated with the strong bottom currents observed along the continental slope and potentially related to pockmarks, as well as giant submarine landslides. Most recently, multichannel reflection and wide angle

  12. The Outer Limits: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Barbara R.; Biesekerski, Joan

    The Quinmester course "The Outer Limits" involves an exploration of unknown worlds, mental and physical, through fiction and nonfiction. Its purpose is to focus attention on the ongoing conquest of the frontiers of the mind, the physical world, and outer space. The subject matter includes identification and investigation of unknown…

  13. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... 14, 1986, the date of the 8(g) lease escrow settlement.'' The ``Note'' for SOBDs that are offshore of... effective retroactively to October 1, 1986, the date of the 8(g) lease escrow settlement.'' The ``Note'' for... erroneously removed.'' The date of 8(g) lease escrow settlement is noted because all state claims to 8(g...

  14. Preliminary report on geology along Atlantic Continental Margin of northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minard, J.P.; Perry, W.J.; Weed, E.G.A.; Rhodehamel, E.C.; Robbins, E.I.; Mixon, R.B.

    1974-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a geologic and geophysical study of the northeastern United States outer continental shelf and the adjacent slope from Georges Bank to Cape Hatteras. The study also includes the adjacent coastal plain because it is a more accessible extension of the shelf. The total study area is about 324,000 sq km, of which the shelf and slope constitute about 181,000 sq km and the coastal plain constitutes 143,000 sq km. The shelf width ranges from about 30 km at Cape Hatteras to about 195 km off Raritan Bay and on Georges Bank. Analyses of bottom samples make it possible to construct a preliminary geologic map of the shelf and slope to a water depth of 2,000 m. The oldest beds cropping out in the submarine canyons and on the slope are of early ate Cretaceous age. Beds of Early Cretaceous and Jurassic age are present in deep wells onshore and probably are present beneath the shelf in the area of this study. Such beds are reported beneath the Scotian shelf on the northeast where they include limestone, salt, and anhydrite. Preliminary conclusions suggest a considerably thicker Mesozoic sedimentary sequence than has been described previously. The region is large; the sedimentary wedge is thick; structures seem favorable; and the hydrocarbon potential may be considerable.

  15. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  16. The Continental Margins of the Western North Atlantic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, John S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an interpretation of geological and geophysical data, which provides a summary of the structural and sedimentary history of the United States Atlantic Margin. The importance of an understanding of the development of the outer continental shelf to future hydrocarbon exploration is detailed. (BT)

  17. The Continental Margins of the Western North Atlantic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlee, John S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an interpretation of geological and geophysical data, which provides a summary of the structural and sedimentary history of the United States Atlantic Margin. The importance of an understanding of the development of the outer continental shelf to future hydrocarbon exploration is detailed. (BT)

  18. Outer B Ring Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-12-03

    This image NASA Cassini spacecraft shows subtle, wavelike patterns, hundreds of narrow features resembling a record grooves in Saturn outer B-ring, and a noticeable abrupt change in overall brightness beyond the dark gap near the right.

  19. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  20. A numerical investigation of continental collision styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-06-01

    Continental collision after closure of an ocean can lead to different deformation styles: subduction of continental crust and lithosphere, lithospheric thickening, folding of the unsubducted continents, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities and/or slab break-off. We use 2-D thermomechanical models of oceanic subduction followed by continental collision to investigate the sensitivity of these collision styles to driving velocity, crustal and lithospheric temperature, continental rheology and the initial density difference between the oceanic lithosphere and the asthenosphere. We find that these parameters influence the collision system, but that driving velocity, rheology and lithospheric (rather than Moho and mantle) temperature can be classified as important controls, whereas reasonable variations in the initial density contrast between oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere are not necessarily important. Stable continental subduction occurs over a relatively large range of values of driving velocity and lithospheric temperature. Fast and cold systems are more likely to show folding, whereas slow and warm systems can experience RT-type dripping. Our results show that a continent with a strong upper crust can experience subduction of the entire crust and is more likely to fold. Accretion of the upper crust at the trench is feasible when the upper crust has a moderate to weak strength, whereas the entire crust can be scraped-off in the case of a weak lower crust. We also illustrate that weakening of the lithospheric mantle promotes RT-type of dripping in a collision system. We use a dynamic collision model, in which collision is driven by slab pull only, to illustrate that adjacent plates can play an important role in continental collision systems. In dynamic collision models, exhumation of subducted continental material and sediments is triggered by slab retreat and opening of a subduction channel, which allows upward flow of buoyant materials. Exhumation continues

  1. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  2. Geology and petroleum potential of Shumagin continental margin, western Gulf of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, T.R.; Von Huene, R.; Culotta, R.D.; Lewis, S.D.; Ladd, J.W.

    1986-07-01

    Interpretations of multichannel seismic reflection data indicate that the Shumagin continental margin seaward of the Border Ranges fault is underlain by two major seismic sequences, separated by an erosional unconformity beneath the shelf and by the time-correlative conformity seaward. Rocks above the unconformity are late Miocene and younger. Rocks below the unconformity can be as young as middle Miocene beneath the outer shelf and slope, seaward of a paleoshelf break. However, beneath the shelf they are primarily Late Cretaceous turbidites of the Shumagin Formation and Paleocene granodiorite. Late Miocene and younger structures of the Shumagin margin include Shumagin, Sanak, and Unimak basins and Unimak Ridge, a midslope structural high. Strata in Sanak and Unimak basins were deposited on a subsiding outer shelf and slope, and trapped behind Unimak Ridge and its now-buried structural continuation. Sanak and Unimak basins are in part bounded by northwest-trending extensional faults that parallel both the early Tertiary Beringian margin and a transverse tectonic boundary that segments the fore-arc. These faults may have developed during collapse and extension along the southeastward continuation of the old Beringian margin, analogous to the processes that created the Bering Shelf basins. The most promising areas of the Shumagin margin for petroleum potential are Sanak, and Unimak basins, which contain strata 8 and 4.5 km thick, respectively, and beneath the outer shelf and slope. Paleogene source rocks like those on the adjacent Alaska Peninsula may be preserved offshore, seaward of the inferred paleoshelf break. Reservoir rocks might have formed from granitic-rich erosional products derived during Oligocene and Miocene erosion of the shelf plutons.

  3. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  4. Main features of the Eurasian continental margin morphological structure in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poselov, Victor; Savin, Vasily; Zinchenko, Anna; Ivanov, Michail

    2017-04-01

    The Eurasian continental margin including adjacent parts of the Lomonosov Ridge, Podvodnikov Basin, Mendeleev Rise, Nansen and Amundsen basins is characterized by complicated seabed surface. The main morphological features of the Arctic Ocean bathymetry have been generalized in the geomorphological map 1:5000000 scale. The map is based on the IBCAO v.3.0 grid adjusted with the results of Russian multi-beam and single-beam surveys. The boundaries of the morphological elements were delineated mainly along the maximum changes of the surface profile gradient of the seabed, regardless of absolute inclination. Map legend is divided into two major sections: the continental margin and ocean floor. The first one includes shelfs, slopes and rises; the second includes abyssal plains and mid-oceanic ridge. Main positive and negative elements of the bathymetry are shown on the shelf plains: the rises include plateaus, banks, hills and the depressions include troughs, basins. The morphological structure of the continental slopes has been studied in detail for defining the outer limit of the shelf. Two types of slope were indicated: simple and complex. The slopes of simple structure stretch along the shelf edge in the Barents, Kara and Laptev seas. They begin at the shelf edge and without significant complication of bathymetry are traced down to the rise, and in its absence - to the abyssal plains. The inclination angles of the simple slopes are usually more than 0.7°, though in some cases may be less. Submarine valleys and shelf troughs are observed on the slopes of simple structure. The width of the slopes of this type is relatively short and typically reaches 70-150 km. The slopes of complex structure extend along the East Siberian and Chukchi shelves. They are characterized by a variety of forms complicating the bathymetry: plateaus, terraces, hills, ridges, saddles, valleys, troughs, channels. The inclined surfaces of these forms facing the direction of depth increase are

  5. Identifying the "Foot of the Continental Slope" of high-latitude continental margins influenced by trough mouth fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The continental slope of high-latitude margins often include trough mouth fans, which are sediment fans situated in front of large troughs crossing the continental shelf. The troughs acted as corridors for paleo-ice streams, sectors of fast-flowing ice within the large ice sheets of the last glacial maximum as well as previous glacials. The paleo-ice streams were highly efficient erosional agents, eroding and transporting large volumes of sediments to the continental shelf edge. Here, these sediments were released to move downslope as large debris flows, the "building blocks" of these fans. Due to the very large sediment volume included within these fans, they represent prominent depocenters forming low-gradient sectors (axial gradient often being as low as 1 degree or less) with no clear morphological distinction of the continental slope including its lower limit. Under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, the criteria provided in Article 76 includes the lower limit or "foot" of the continental slope as one important parameter in the extended Continental Shelf delineation (i.e. beyond the 200 M exclusive economic zone). Because of this, the Norwegian submission regarding the outer limits of the continental shelf in the Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Ocean argued that the origin of the sub-sea floor sediments on the slope needed to be considered when identifying the location of the foot of the continental slope. This was done by mapping the outer limits of the large debris flow deposits of the trough mouth fans, deposits that without doubt have their origin from the continental shelf. Thus, in these cases, the foot of the continental slope coincide with the downslope termination of the large debris flow deposits and the outer limit of the continental shelf lies 60 M beyond this point. The data used for mapping includes swath bathymetry, sub-bottom profiles and short sediment samples (< 10 m), and we present and discuss examples from the Bear Island Trough Mouth

  6. Glaciated terrains on the inner continental shelves of Newfoundland, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John

    2013-04-01

    Recently-collected data from multibeam sonars and other sources are used to describe some of the Late-Wisconsinan glacial terrains on the Newfoundland inner continental shelves. The inner shelves exhibit a great variety of glacigenic terrains, in contrast with shallow middle- and outer-shelf settings where glacigenic landforms have been modified or effaced during and after postglacial sea-level lowstands. Four types of terrain are described: 1) Suites of convergent, streamlined landforms in southern, eastern, and northeastern Newfoundland, formed when fast-moving ice flowed towards adjacent shelf troughs; 2) Moraines at fjord mouths in western and southwestern Newfoundland, formed when ice margins became established following rapid retreat. Moraine architecture can be correlated with catchment size, coastal physiography, and inner shelf depth: the numerous small-medium-sized, arcuate, submarine moraines along the southwest coast pass laterally into deep-water stratified sediments (till tongues) whereas the relatively large, arcuate submarine moraines off the west coast (Gulf of St. Lawrence) terminate in shallow water and do not pass laterally into stratified sediments. The latter have been modified by wave action to varying degrees during and after the early-Holocene sea-level lowstand, creating fjord-mouth littoral platforms terminating in systems of submarine fans that transport sand into fjord basins. 3) The deep (~600 m) fjords of northeast Newfoundland (Notre Dame Bay) lack fjord-mouth moraines, but contain transverse moraines that formed at constrictions during ice retreat. 4) Unique pitted terrains in two fjords in Bonavista Bay were probably created by the decay of stagnant glacial ice during deglaciation. In general the recently collected multibeam sonar data support a proposed conceptual model in which the island was drained by ice streams in shelf-crossing troughs, and in which retreating glaciers reached modern coasts c. 14 ka BP.

  7. Hydrocarbon prospectivity of the Argentine Continental Slope

    SciTech Connect

    Light, M.P.R.; Keeley M.L.; Maslanyj, M.P.; Urien, C.M.; Hoggs, S.L.

    1993-02-01

    A rift basin containing stratigraphic and structural closures is developed along the Argentine slope over a distance of some 1000 km and area of 50,000 km[sup 2] in potentially exploitable water depths of 200 to 1500 m. No wells exist on this part of the continental margin. Rifting began during the Late Triassic/Jurassic and ended in Early Cretaceous. The first marine seaways flooded the Rift alluvial plains and lake. In Hauterian-Barrenian time, low circulation marine conditions with oxygen deficiency prevailed up to Rio Grande/Walvis Ridge flooding in part the coastal pull-apart basins. A major marine transgression in the Maastrichtian formed a widespread seal over the entire shelf and slope area. Four play types were identified: (1) a major north-east trending elongate delta system sourced inland from the San Julien (N. Malvinas) Basin and deposited on the southern Patagonian shelf and rise, (2) reworked deltaic barrier sands accumulated along the crest of the Outer Basement Ridge, (3) The Outer Basement Ridge, a major structural closure 400 km long, and (4) a series of margin-parallel rift systems in the offshore region between the 200 m and 1500 m isobaths. Regional seismic data and geological correlations suggest that oil prone source rocks are likely in the Middle and Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous formations. Source rocks are probably mature east and west of the Outer Basement Ridge and in the easterndepocenter of the Colorado Basin. Eastward migration from Jurassic age lacustrine source rocks in the Colorado Basin may have charged traps along the crest of the Outer Basement Ridge. Westward directed migration from deeply buried Aptian age marine source rocks in the Atlantic basins has probably charged prospective stratigraphic and structural traps in a suite of coast-parallel grabens developed on the Argentine continental shelf and slope. The Argentine offshore region, therefore, offers significant encouragement as a productive hydrocarbon province.

  8. Synchronous oceanic spreading and continental rifting in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, F. J.; Granot, R.; Cande, S. C.; Stock, J. M.; Selvans, M.; Ferraccioli, F.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic anomalies associated with new ocean crust formation in the Adare Basin off north-western Ross Sea (43-26 Ma) can be traced directly into the Northern Basin that underlies the adjacent morphological continental shelf, implying a continuity in the emplacement of oceanic crust. Steep gravity gradients along the margins of the Northern Basin, particularly in the east, suggest that little extension and thinning of continental crust occurred before it ruptured and the new oceanic crust formed, unlike most other continental rifts and the Victoria Land Basin further south. A preexisting weak crust and localization of strain by strike-slip faulting are proposed as the factors allowing the rapid rupture of continental crust.

  9. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  10. Outer Planet Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, B.

    1994-01-01

    An outer planet icy satellite is any one of the celestial bodies in orbit around Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, or Pluto. They range from large, planet-like geologically active worlds with significant atmospheres to tiny irregular objects tens of kilometers in diameter. These bodies are all believed to have some type of frozen volatile, existing alone or in combination with other volatiles.

  11. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  12. Raising the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ian H.; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2017-02-01

    The changes that occur at the boundary between the Archean and Proterozoic eons are arguably the most fundamental to affect the evolution of Earth's continental crust. The principal component of Archean continental crust is Granite-Greenstone Terranes (GGTs), with granites always dominant. The greenstones consist of a lower sequence of submarine komatiites and basalts, which erupted onto a pre-existing Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) crust. These basaltic rocks pass upwards initially into evolved volcanic rocks, such as andesites and dacites and, subsequently, into reworked felsic pyroclastic material and immature sediments. This transition coincides with widespread emplacement of granitoids, which stabilised (cratonised) the continental crust. Proterozoic supra-crustal rocks, on the other hand, are dominated by extensive flat-lying platform sequences of mature sediments, which were deposited on stable cratonic basements, with basaltic rocks appreciably less abundant. The siliceous TTGs cannot be produced by direct melting of the mantle, with most hypotheses for their origin requiring them to be underlain by a complimentary dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite root, which we suggest acted as ballast to the early continents. Ubiquitous continental pillow basalts in Archean lower greenstone sequences require the early continental crust to have been sub-marine, whereas the appearance of abundant clastic sediments, at higher stratigraphic levels, shows that it had emerged above sea level by the time of sedimentation. We hypothesise that the production of komatiites and associated basalts, the rise of the continental crust, widespread melting of the continental crust, the onset of sedimentation and subsequent cratonisation form a continuum that is the direct result of removal of the continent's dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite roots, triggered at a regional scale by the arrival of a mantle plume at the base of the lithosphere. Our idealised calculations suggest

  13. Surficial sediments on the western Canadian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhold, Brian D.; Barrie, J. Vaughn

    1991-08-01

    The active continental margin off western Canada is characterized in the south by convergence between the Explorer and Juan de Fuca Plates and the America Plate, and in the north by transform fault motion between the Pacific and America Plates along the Queen Charlotte Fault. Except in some of the deepest troughs and basins shelf sediments are dominated by immature lithic arenites reflecting this tectonic setting. The Vancouver Island shelf is from 5 to 75 km wide and displays complex topography on the inner shelf and a relatively featureless mid- and outer shelf. An exception is the area off southwestern Vancouver Island where large basins bounded by morainal deposits extend more than two-thirds of the distance across the shelf. The shelf edge varies from 180 to 225 m depth and is indented by numerous canyons. Nearshore sediments consist mainly of gravels and boulders and become finer offshore such that muds are slowly accumulating in depths greater than 100 m. Off northwestern Vancouver Island calcareous sediments are abundant with carbonate values often exceeding 75%. High wave and current energies and efficient sediment trapping in coastal fiords have resulted in low rates of accumulation. Olive, glauconitic, Holocene muds and muddy sands are generally less than 0.3 m thick and accumulate only on the outer shelf over an extensive stiff, gray, glaciomarine sandy mud. Queen Charlotte Sound exhibits three broad, shallow, glacially scoured troughs, filled mainly with clayey silts and fine sands and separated by sand and gravel covered banks. Hecate Strait, between the Queen Charlotte Islands and the mainland, consists of a prominent southward-opening trough along the east side of the Strait bounded by Dogfish and Laskeek Banks on the west adjacent to Graham and Moresby Islands, respectively. The trough below 200 m is filled by silts. The banks are covered by discontinuous sands and gravels of variable calcareous content. The bank edges often display megaripples and

  14. Outer planets probe testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Grote, M. G.; Edwards, T. M.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric entry Probe is being developed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) to conduct in situ scientific investigations of the outer planets' atmospheres. A full scale engineering model of an MDAC-E Probe configuration, was fabricated by NASA ARC. Proof-of-concept test validation of the structural and thermal design is being obtained at NASA ARC. The model was successfully tested for shock and dynamic loading and is currently in thermal vacuum testing.

  15. Exploring the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Initial, current and planned United States projects for the spacecraft exploration of the outer planets of the solar system are presented. Initial plans were developed in the mid-1960's for the exploration of the outer planets by utilizing the gravity-assist technique during a fortuitous alignment of the outer planets in the Grand Tour Project, however although state-of-the-art space technology could have supported the project, it was considered too expensive, therefore politically infeasible. Subsequently, the Pioneer Project was undertaken to explore the asteroid belt and the environment around Jupiter and the Voyager Project was undertaken to send two spacecraft to fly by Jupiter and utilize its gravity assist to reach Saturn. The successful Pioneer 10 and 11 missions have provided important information on the effects of the asteroid belt and the severe radiation environment around Jupiter, and Voyager 1 has collected information about Jupiter, its magnetic fields and radiation zones, and its satellites. Project Galileo is intended to be launched in January 1982 to conduct an intensive investigation of Jupiter, its satellites and immediate environment and a Saturn Orbiter dual probe mission and a Uranus orbiter are also under consideration.

  16. Seismic reflection characteristics of glacial and glacimarine sediment in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent fjords

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    Glaciation together with tectonism have been dominant factors affecting sedimentation in the Gulf of Alaska area from at least the late Miocene throughout the Quaternary. The effects of tectonism are apparent in high mountains that border the gulf, raised terraces of Middleton Island and the eastern gulf coastal zone, and numerous active faults and related earthquakes. Glacial evidence includes magnificent glaciers and their onshore deposits, spectacular fjords, large sea valleys incised in the continental shelf, submarine morainal ridges at mouths of bays and sea valleys, and thick glacimarine sedimentary sequences (diamicts) that are exposed onshore and at the sea floor along the outer shelf. Seismic-reflection profiling and sampling of the uppermost marine sedimentary sequences in the Gulf of Alaska and adjacent fjords and bays have allowed identification of three discrete glacially related stratigraphic units. These units were delineated on the basis of seismic signature, geometry, physiographic location, stratigraphic position, and sedimentologic characteristics. The oldest unit, a Quaternary diamict, is portrayed on seismic profiles by irregular, discontinuous reflections. This unit probably includes till, outwash and glacimarine sediment. A geographically restricted unit, one incorporating Holocene end moraines at bay mouths and associated with some sea valleys, consists of jumbled masses of discontinuous reflections and very irregular surface morphology. The youngest unit, a blanket of Holocene sand to clayey silt prograding as a sediment wedge across the shelf, contains nearly horizontal, parallel reflections except where disrupted by mass movement. Although seismic-reflection data alone cannot provide definitive proof of the presence of glacial sediment, when combined with sea-floor sampling, seismic profiling is a powerful tool for determining the continuity of marine sedimentary units and relationships to past and modern glaciers. ?? 1989.

  17. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  18. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  19. Map of Distribution of Bottom Sediments on the Continental Shelf, Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Kevin R.; Carlson, Paul R.; Hampton, Monty A.; Marlow, Michael S.; Barnes, Peter W.

    2000-01-01

    floor structures. Sea-floor sediment on shallow banks is eroded by seasonal wave-generated currents. The winnowing action of the large storm waves results in concentrations of gravel over broad segments of the Kodiak shelf. Northeastern Gulf of Alaska -- Tectonic framework studies demonstrate that rocks of distant origin (Yakutat terrane) are currently attached to and moving with the Pacific Plate, as it collides with and is subducted beneath southern Alaska. This collision process has led to pronounced structural deformation of the continental margin and adjacent southern Alaska. Consequences include rapidly rising mountains and high fluvial and glacial sedimentation rates on the adjacent margin and ocean floor. The northeastern Gulf of Alaska shelf also has concentrations of winnowed (lag) gravel on Tarr Bank and on the outer shelf southeast of Yakutat Bay. Between Kayak Island and Yakutat Bay the outer shelf consists of pebbly mud (diamict). This diamict is a product of glacial marine sedimentation during the Pleistocene and is present today as a relict sediment. A prograding wedge of Holocene sediment consisting of nearshore sand grading seaward into clayey silt and silty clay covers the relict pebbly mud to mid-shelf and beyond. Shelf and slope channel systems transport glacially derived sediment across the continental margin into Surveyor Channel, an abyssal fan and channel system that reaches over 1,000 km to the Aleutian Trench.

  20. Convective Removal of Continental Margin Lithosphere at the Edges of Subducting Oceanic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Palomeras, I.; Masy, J.; Humphreys, E.; Niu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Although oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled to the deeper mantle by subduction, the rates and manner in which different types of continental lithospheric mantle are recycled is unclear. Cratonic mantle can be chemically reworked and essentially decratonized, although the frequency of decratonization is unclear. Lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts can be lost to the deeper mantle by convective downwellings and delamination phenomena. Here we describe how subduction related processes at the edges of oceanic plates adjacent to passive continental margins removes the mantle lithosphere from beneath the margin and from the continental interior. This appears to be a widespread means of recycling non-cratonic continental mantle. Lithospheric removal requires the edge of a subducting oceanic plate to be at a relatively high angle to an adjacent passive continental margin. From Rayleigh wave and body wave tomography, and receiver function images from the BOLIVAR and PICASSO experiments, we infer large-scale removal of continental margin lithospheric mantle from beneath 1) the northern South American plate margin due to Atlantic subduction, and 2) the Iberian and North African margins due to Alboran plate subduction. In both cases lithospheric mantle appears to have been removed several hundred kilometers inland from the subduction zones. This type of ';plate-edge' tectonics either accompanies or pre-conditions continental margins for orogenic activity by thinning and weakening the lithosphere. These processes show the importance of relatively small convective structures, i.e. small subducting plates, in formation of orogenic belts.

  1. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  2. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.

    1998-01-01

    The Principal Investigator's responsibilities on this grant fell into two categories according to his participation. In the nomenclature work of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Owen is chair of the Task Group for the Outer Solar System. He is also a member of the IAU's Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) which is composed of the chairs of the several Task Groups plus the presidents of two IAU Commissions and several outside consultants. The WGPSN is presided over by its President, Professor Kaare Aksnes from the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.

  3. Outer planets satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation takes into account the published literature on outer planet satellites for 1979-1982. It is pointed out that all but three (the moon and the two Martian satellites) of the known planetary satellites are found in the outer solar system. Most of these are associated with the three regular satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The largest satellites are Titan in the Saturn system and Ganymede and Callisto in the Jupiter system. Intermediate in size between Mercury and Mars, each has a diameter of about 5000 km. Presumably each has an internal composition about 60 percent rock and 40 ice, and each is differentiated with a dense core extending out about 75 percent of the distance to the surface, with a mantle of high-pressure ice and a crust of ordinary ice perhaps 100 km thick. Attention is also given to Io, Europa, the icy satellites of Saturn, the satellites of Uranus, the small satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, Triton and the Pluto system, and plans for future studies.

  4. Percent Agriculture Adjacent to Streams

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The type of vegetation along a stream influences the water quality in the stream. Intact buffer strips of natural vegetation along streams tend to intercept pollutants before they reach the stream. High percentages of agriculture along streams increase the likelihood of elevated nutrient, pesticide and sediment levels in the stream. Agricultural land cover along streams (RIPAG) is the percent of total stream length adjacent to agriculture. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  5. 20 CFR 704.301 - Administration; compensation districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EXTENSIONS Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act § 704.301 Administration; compensation districts. For the... Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to the State or States in such districts having adjacent shelf areas....

  6. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  7. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  8. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  9. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  10. Brazilian continental cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Setembrino; Campanha, Vilma A.

    1981-04-01

    Cretaceous deposits in Brazil are very well developed, chiefly in continental facies and in thick sequences. Sedimentation occurred essentially in rift-valleys inland and along the coast. Three different sequences can be distinguished: (1) a lower clastic non-marine section, (2) a middle evaporitic section, (3) an upper marine section with non-marine regressive lithosomes. Continental deposits have been laid down chiefly between the latest Jurassic and Albian. The lower lithostratigraphic unit is represented by red shales with occasional evaporites and fresh-water limestones, dated by ostracods. A series of thick sandstone lithosomes accumulated in the inland rift-valleys. In the coastal basins these sequences are often incompletely preserved. Uplift in the beginning of the Aptian produced a widespread unconformity. In many of the inland rift-valleys sedimentation ceased at that time. A later transgression penetrated far into northeastern Brazil, but shortly after continental sedimentation continued, with the deposition of fluvial sandstones which once covered large areas of the country and which have been preserved in many places. The continental Cretaceous sediments have been laid down in fluvial and lacustrine environments, under warm climatic conditions which were dry from time to time. The fossil record is fairly rich, including besides plants and invertebrates, also reptiles and fishes. As faulting tectonism was rather strong, chiefly during the beginning of the Cretaceous, intercalations of igneous rocks are frequent in some places. Irregular uplift and erosion caused sediments belonging to the remainder of this period to be preserved only in tectonic basins scattered across the country.

  11. Pleistocene tectonic accretion of the continental slope off Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silver, E.A.

    1972-01-01

    Interpretation of reflection profiles across the Washington continental margin suggests deformation of Cascadia basin strata against the continental slope. Individual reflecting horizons can be traced across the slope-basin boundary. The sense of offset along faults on the continental slope is predominantly, but not entirely, west side up. Two faults of small displacement are seen to be west-dipping reverse faults. Magnetic anomalies on the Juan de Fuca plate can be traced 40-100 km eastward under the slope, and structural interpretation combined with calculated rates of subduction suggests that approximately 50 km of the outer continental slope may have been formed in Pleistocene time. Rocks of Pleistocene age dredge from a ridge exposing acoustic "basement" on the slope, plus the results of deep-sea drilling off northern Oregon, are consistent with this interpretation. The question of whether or not subduction is occurring at present is unresolved because significant strain has not affected the upper 200 m of section in the Cascadia basin. However, deformation of the outer part of the slope has been episodic and may reflect episodic yield, deposition rate, subduction rate, or some combination of these factors. ?? 1972.

  12. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  13. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by natural...

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by natural...

  15. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  16. Strategy for outer planets exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Programs Office formed a number of scientific working groups to study in depth the potential scientific return from the various candidate missions to the outer solar system. The results of these working group studies were brought together in a series of symposia to evaluate the potential outer planet missions and to discuss strategies for exploration of the outer solar system that were consistent with fiscal constraints and with anticipated spacecraft and launch vehicle capabilities. A logical, scientifically sound, and cost effective approach to exploration of the outer solar system is presented.

  17. Converting your Continental

    SciTech Connect

    Wirz, B.M.

    1981-07-01

    Inflation and higher fuel and environmental costs make conventional-generated power as unaffordable (as a Lincoln Continental in the automobile market) for retail and industrial customers, many of whom are looking for alternatives to purchase electric power. The loss of revenue from competing energy sources eliminates the monopoly status that utilities have enjoyed and is forcing utilities to provide what customers want and do it better than the competition. Utilities have only research and development or fuel switching to improve efficiency unless they rethink their approach and come up with new alternatives. 1 table. (DCK)

  18. The Continental Distillery: Building Thick Continental Crust in the Central Andes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.; Biryol, C. B.; Bishop, B.; Eakin, C. M.; Franca, G.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kumar, A.; Ryan, J. C.; Scire, A. C.; Ward, K. M.; Young, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of stable continental crust and the associated development and destruction of mantle lithospheric roots is central to our understanding of plate tectonics, both at its inception and as an ongoing process today. Subduction zones play an important role in the creation and refinement of continental crust, and also serve as a possible mechanism for the removal of residual mantle material. The central Andes provide an intriguing laboratory for the study of these processes. Up to 400 km wide, 1500 km long, and with an average elevation of 4 km, the Altiplano Plateau is the largest orogen on earth associated with an ocean-continent subduction zone. This is much larger than adjacent 'normal' sections of the Andes, raising the question of why this portion of South American crust became so much more substantial than surrounding areas. Over the past several years, new seismic data have made it possible for us to develop a more complete picture of the lithospheric and asthenospheric processes involved in the development of the Altiplano Plateau and the adjacent narrower orogen further to the north. The 'Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography' (CAUGHT) comprises in part a broadband deployment of 50 stations across the northern flank of the Altiplano Plateau in southern Peru and northern Bolivia. The adjacent 'PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment' (PULSE) includes 40 broadband stations that cover the region directly north of the CAUGHT deployment, encompassing the northern edge of the Altiplano, the transition to 'normal' width orogen, and the transition in slab geometry from normal to flat from south to north across the study area. Uplift of the Altiplano Plateau is likely due to some combination shortening, isostasy due to lithospheric destruction or changes in crustal density, magmatic addition to the crust, and/or flow within the thickened crust. Our studies indicate pervasive low velocities across the Altiplano consistent with a

  19. 33 CFR 334.1060 - Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Oakland Army Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA.... Within 100 feet of the wharves, piers or shore. (b) The regulations. No persons and no vessels or...

  20. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  1. 75 FR 3915 - Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Sand and Gravel Activities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Sand and Gravel Activities on... for three sand and gravel activities proposed on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and described in... noncompetitive basis, the rights to OCS sand, gravel, or shell resources for shore protection, beach or wetlands...

  2. 75 FR 54369 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ...: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer Continental Shelf Sand, Gravel, and Shell... paperwork requirements that respondents will submit to BOEMRE to obtain OCS sand, gravel, and shell...-1275. Marine Minerals Program information and procedures for obtaining sand, gravel, and shell...

  3. 76 FR 3152 - Agency Information Collection Activity: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ...: 1010-NEW, Upcoming Projects Considering the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand, Gravel, and... respondents will submit to BOEMRE to obtain OCS sand, gravel, and shell resources for use in shore protection... obtaining sand, gravel, and shell resources can be found on the BOEMRE Web site http://www.boemre.gov...

  4. 76 FR 4244 - Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Regulation and Enforcement; Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf--Acquire a Lease... renewable energy regulatory provisions that pertain to noncompetitive acquisition of leases, published on...

  5. Ancient impact structures on modern continental shelves: The Chesapeake Bay, Montagnais, and Toms Canyon craters, Atlantic margin of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Plescia, J.B.; Molzer, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Three ancient impact craters (Chesapeake Bay - 35.7 Ma; Toms Canyon - 35.7 Ma; Montagnais - 51 Ma) and one multiring impact basin (Chicxulub - 65 Ma) are currently known to be buried beneath modern continental shelves. All occur on the passive Atlantic margin of North America in regions extensively explored by seismic reflection surveys in the search for oil and gas reserves. We limit our discussion herein to the three youngest structures. These craters were created by submarine impacts, which produced many structural and morphological features similar in construction, composition, and variability to those documented in well-preserved subaerial and planetary impact craters. The subcircular Chesapeake Bay (diameter 85 km) and ovate Montagnais (diameter 45-50 km) structures display outer-rim scarps, annular troughs, peak rings, inner basins, and central peaks similar to those incorporated in the widely cited conceptual model of complex impact craters. These craters differ in several respects from the model, however. For example, the Montagnais crater lacks a raised lip on the outer rim, the Chesapeake Bay crater displays only small remnants of a raised lip, and both craters contain an unusually thick body of impact breccia. The subtriangular Toms Canyon crater (diameter 20-22 km), on the other hand, contains none of the internal features of a complex crater, nor is it typical of a simple crater. It displays a prominent raised lip on the outer rim, but the lip is present only on the western side of the crater. In addition, each of these craters contains some distinct features, which are not present in one or both of the others. For example, the central peak at Montagnais rises well above the elevation of the outer rim, whereas at Chesapeake Bay, the outer rim is higher than the central peak. The floor of the Toms Canyon crater is marked by parallel deep troughs and linear ridges formed of sedimentary rocks, whereas at Chesapeake Bay, the crater floor contains

  6. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  7. Multilayer Article Characterized by Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Outer Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer article comprises a substrate comprising a ceramic or a silicon-containing metal alloy. The ceramic is a Si-containing ceramic or an oxide ceramic with or without silicon. An outer layer overlies the substrate and at least one intermediate layer is located between the outer layer and thc substrate. An optional bond layer is disposed between thc 1 least one intermediate layer and thc substrate. The at least one intermediate layer may comprise an optional chemical barrier layer adjacent the outer layer, a mullite-containing layer and an optional chemical barrier layer adjacent to the bond layer or substrate. The outer layer comprises a compound having a low coefficient of thermal expansion selected from one of the following systems: rare earth (RE) silicates; at least one of hafnia and hafnia-containing composite oxides; zirconia-containing composite oxides and combinations thereof.

  8. Multilayer Article Characterized by Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Outer Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer article comprises a substrate comprising a ceramic or a silicon-containing metal alloy. The ceramic is a Si-containing ceramic or an oxide ceramic with or without silicon. An outer layer overlies the substrate and at least one intermediate layer is located between the outer layer and thc substrate. An optional bond layer is disposed between thc 1 least one intermediate layer and thc substrate. The at least one intermediate layer may comprise an optional chemical barrier layer adjacent the outer layer, a mullite-containing layer and an optional chemical barrier layer adjacent to the bond layer or substrate. The outer layer comprises a compound having a low coefficient of thermal expansion selected from one of the following systems: rare earth (RE) silicates; at least one of hafnia and hafnia-containing composite oxides; zirconia-containing composite oxides and combinations thereof.

  9. NSF Continental Lithosphere Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhew, Michael; MacGregor, Ian

    For several months the Continental Lithosphere Program (CL) of the National Science Foundation has been subject to a major review. The process was stimulated by a series of budget setbacks over the past few years. Although Presidential budget requests have been very favorable for the Division of Earth Sciences (EAR), and there has been strong support within the National Science Foundation and Congress, actual appropriations by Congress have been disappointing.In each year the final allocation to EAR has been affected by external factors beyond the control of the Foundation. In the four fiscal years from 1986 through 1989 the factors include reductions tied to the Gramm-Rudman deficit reduction measures, congressional reaction to the October 1987 stock market crash, and two years of protection for the Ocean Sciences part of the NSF budget that was paid for from the budgets of the Atmospheric and Earth Sciences divisions.

  10. Phytoplankton assemblages within the Chesapeake Bay plume and adjacent waters of the continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay plume was identified and plotted in relation to the presence and high concentrations of phytoplankton assemblages. Seasonal differences occurred within the plume during the collection period, with Skeletonema costatum and an ultraplankton component the dominant forms. Patchiness was found along the transects, with variations in composition and concentrations common on consecutive day sampling within the plume in its movement along the shelf. The presence of 236 species is noted, with their presence indicated for plume and shelf stations during the March, June, and October 1980 collections.

  11. Contrasts Between Precipitation over Mediterranean Sea and Adjacent Continental Areas Based on Decadal Scale Satellite Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    Most knowledge concerning the last century's climatology and climate dynamics of precipitation over the Mediterranean Sea basin is based on observations taken from rain gauges surrounding the sea itself. In turn, most of the observations come from Southern Europe, with many fewer measurements taken from widely scattered sites situated over North Africa, the Middle East, and the Balkans. This aspect of research on the Mediterranean Sea basin is apparent in a recent compilation of studies presented in book form concerning climate variability of the Mediterranean region [Lionello, P., P. Malanotte-Rizzoli, and R. Boscolo (eds.), 2006: Mediterranean Climate Variability. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 9 chapters.] In light of this missing link to over-water observations, this study (in conjunction with four companion studies by Z. Haddad, A. Mugnai, T. Nakazawa, and G. Stephens) will contrast the nature of precipitation variability directly over the Mediterranean Sea to precipitation variability over the surrounding land areas based on three decades of satellite-based precipitation estimates which have stood up well to validation scrutiny. The satellite observations are drawn from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) dataset extending back to 1979 and the TRMM Merged Algorithm 3b42 dataset extending back to 1998. Both datasets are mostly produced from microwave measurements, excepting the period from 1979 to mid-1987 when only infrared satellite measurements were available for the GPCP estimates. The purpose of this study is to emphasize how the salient properties of precipitation variability over land and sea across a hierarchy of space and time scales, and the salient differences in these properties, might be used in guiding short-term climate models to better predictions of future climate states under different regional temperature-change scenarios.

  12. Contrasts Between Precipitation over Mediterranean Sea and Adjacent Continental Areas Based on Decadal Scale Satellite Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    Most knowledge concerning the last century's climatology and climate dynamics of precipitation over the Mediterranean Sea basin is based on observations taken from rain gauges surrounding the sea itself. In turn, most of the observations come from Southern Europe, with many fewer measurements taken from widely scattered sites situated over North Africa, the Middle East, and the Balkans. This aspect of research on the Mediterranean Sea basin is apparent in a recent compilation of studies presented in book form concerning climate variability of the Mediterranean region [Lionello, P., P. Malanotte-Rizzoli, and R. Boscolo (eds.), 2006: Mediterranean Climate Variability. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 9 chapters.] In light of this missing link to over-water observations, this study (in conjunction with four companion studies by Z. Haddad, A. Mugnai, T. Nakazawa, and G. Stephens) will contrast the nature of precipitation variability directly over the Mediterranean Sea to precipitation variability over the surrounding land areas based on three decades of satellite-based precipitation estimates which have stood up well to validation scrutiny. The satellite observations are drawn from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) dataset extending back to 1979 and the TRMM Merged Algorithm 3b42 dataset extending back to 1998. Both datasets are mostly produced from microwave measurements, excepting the period from 1979 to mid-1987 when only infrared satellite measurements were available for the GPCP estimates. The purpose of this study is to emphasize how the salient properties of precipitation variability over land and sea across a hierarchy of space and time scales, and the salient differences in these properties, might be used in guiding short-term climate models to better predictions of future climate states under different regional temperature-change scenarios.

  13. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  14. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  15. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off...

  16. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off...

  17. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off...

  18. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off...

  19. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of off...

  20. Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

  1. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  2. Dynamics of continental accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  3. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  4. Geomorphic characterization of the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel S.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing volume of multibeam bathymetry data collected along continental margins is providing new opportunities to study the feedbacks between sedimentary and oceanographic processes and seafloor morphology. Attempts to develop simple guidelines that describe the relationships between form and process often overlook the importance of inherited physiography in slope depositional systems. Here, we use multibeam bathymetry data and seismic reflection profiles spanning the U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf, slope and rise from Cape Hatteras to New England to quantify the broad-scale, across-margin morphological variation. Morphometric analyses suggest the margin can be divided into four basic categories that roughly align with Quaternary sedimentary provinces. Within each category, Quaternary sedimentary processes exerted heavy modification of submarine canyons, landslide complexes and the broad-scale morphology of the continental rise, but they appear to have preserved much of the pre-Quaternary, across-margin shape of the continental slope. Without detailed constraints on the substrate structure, first-order morphological categorization the U.S. Atlantic margin does not provide a reliable framework for predicting relationships between form and process.

  5. Geodynamic settings of microcontinents, non-volcanic islands and submerged continental marginal plateau formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey; Makushkina, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Complex process of continental lithosphere breakup is often accompanied by full or semi isolation of small continental blocks from the parent continent such as microcontinents or submerged marginal plateaus. We present different types of continental blocks formed in various geodynamic settings. The process depends on thermo-mechanical properties of rifting. 1) The continental blocks fully isolated from the parent continent. This kind of blocks exist in submerged form (Elan Bank, the Jan-Mayen Ridge, Zenith Plateau, Gulden Draak Knoll, Batavia Knoll) and in non-submerged form in case of large block size. Most of listed submerged blocks are formed in proximity of hot-spot or plume. 2) The continental blocks semi-isolated from the parent continent. Exmouth Plateau, Vøring, Agulhas, Naturaliste are submerged continental plateaus of the indicated category; Sri Lanka, Tasmania, Socotra are islands adjacent to continent here. Nowadays illustration of this setting is the Sinai block located between the two continental rifts. 3) The submerged linear continental blocks formed by the continental rifting along margin (the Lomonosov Ridge). Suggested evolution of this paragraph is the rift propagation along existing transtensional (or another type) transform fault. Future example of this type might be the California Peninsula block, detached from the North American plate by the rifting within San-Andreas fault. 4) The submerged continental blocks formed by extensional processes as the result of asthenosphere flow and shear deformations. Examples are submerged blocks in the central and southern Scotia Sea (Terror Bank, Protector Basin, Discovery Bank, Bruce Bank etc.). 5) The continental blocks formed in the transform fault systems originated in setting of contradict rifts propagation in presence of structure barriers, rifts are shifted by several hundreds kilometers from each other. Examples of this geodynamic setting are Equatorial Atlantic at the initial development stage

  6. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  7. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  8. Decadal changes in carbon fluxes at the East Siberian continental margin: interactions of ice cover, ocean productivity, particle sedimentation and benthic life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boetius, A.; Bienhold, C.; Felden, J.; Fernandez Mendez, M.; Gusky, M.; Rossel, P. E.; Vedenin, A.; Wenzhoefer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The observed and predicted Climate-Carbon-Cryosphere interactions in the Arctic Ocean are likely to alter productivity and carbon fluxes of the Siberian continental margin and adjacent basins. Here, we compare field observations and samples obtained in the nineties, and recently in 2012 during the sea ice minimum, to assess decadal changes in the productivity, export and recycling of organic matter at the outer East Siberian margin. In the 90s, the Laptev Sea margin was still largely ice-covered throughout the year, and the samples and measurements obtained represent an ecological baseline against which current and future ecosystem shifts can be assessed. The POLARSTERN expedition IceArc (ARK-XXVII/3) returned in September 2012 to resample the same transects between 60 and 3400 m water depth as well as stations in the adjacent deep basins. Our results suggest that environmental changes in the past two decades, foremost sea ice thinning and retreat, have led to a substantial increase in phytodetritus sedimentation to the seafloor, especially at the lower margin and adjacent basins. This is reflected in increased benthic microbial activities, leading to higher carbon remineralization rates, especially deeper than 3000 m. Besides a relative increase in typical particle degrading bacterial types in surface sediments, bacterial community composition showed little variation between the two years, suggesting that local microbial communities can cope with changing food input. First assessments of faunal abundances suggest an increase in polychaetes,holothurians and bivalves at depth, which fits the prediction of higher productivity and particle deposition rates upon sea ice retreat. The presentation also discusses the controversial issue whether there is evidence for an Arctic-wide increase in carbon flux, or whether we are looking at a spatial shift of the productive marginal ice zone as the main factor to enhance carbon flux to the deep Siberian margin.

  9. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; ( 2 ) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; ( 5 ) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  10. Modes of continental decretion in western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Between the Archean Slave Province and the Pacific Ocean, the North American continent in Canada appears to have ‘grown’ westward during Paleoproterozoic (Wopmay) and Paleozoic-Mesozoic (Cordilleran) orogenesis. However, results from geological observations combined with regional geophysical surveys lead to interpretations in which pre-orogenic basement in both the Wopmay and the Cordillera projects far beneath proposed ‘accreted’ terranes. In the Wopmay orogen (1.89-1.84 Ga), deep geophysical images indicate that Archean Slave basement projects in the subsurface up to 50 km west of the Medial zone (formerly Wopmay fault), a boundary that was previously interpreted as the transition from Slave basement to accreted terrane basement. The Slave basement appears as a west-tapering tectonic wedge into accreted(?) rocks, consistent with an interpretation by Hildebrand and Bowring (Geology, 1999) that the Archean lithosphere that was formerly west of the wedge broke off and was recycled. In the Cordillera, cross sections of the lithosphere illustrate that lower crustal and upper mantle rocks as much as 2/3 of the distance across the orogen can be stratigraphically, geologically and seismically correlated to the ancient cratonic margin. Retrodeformation of rocks that were deposited on or adjacent to the craton leads to the conclusion that, prior to the onset of terrane accretion, the North American margin and associated rocks projected even farther west (today’s coordinates) - at least as far as the modern margin. Apparently, as flakes of terranes were added to the surface in the western regions of the Cordillera, the North American lithosphere, which may have been foreshortened during contraction, was tectonically and/or thermally eroded from below. As a result, terrane accretion in the Cordillera apparently resulted in a net decretion of continental lithosphere. Together, these observations lead to the interpretation that the processes responsible for

  11. Exhumation and continental strike-slip fault systems: Introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeske, S.M.; Till, A.B.; Foster, D.A.; Sample, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Metamorphic rocks adjacent to and within strike-slip faultsystems occur in a wide range of tectonic settings. Detailed studies show that for a number of these locales a significant part of the exhumation occurred during strike-slip fault motion, but the specific processes involved are often cryptic. Although some sites share characteristic features, such as metamorphic rocks exhumed in extensional step-overs within overall transtensional systems, no one common theme emerges from all of the studies. Our understanding of the variables that control continental strike-slip faults' interaction with mid- to lower-crustal structures is still primitive.

  12. The Double Chooz Outer Veto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toups, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Measuring a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle θ13 sets the scale for future precision measurements in the lepton sector such as CP violation. The Double Chooz experiment will begin taking data later this year with a sensitivity to 2̂(2θ13) in the 0.02 - 0.03 range, improving on the CHOOZ bound by about an order of magnitude. Efficient rejection of backgrounds induced by cosmic muons is essential to achieving this sensitivity. The Double Chooz Outer Veto plays a crucial role in vetoing and tagging these muons. An update on the status of the Double Chooz Outer Veto will be presented.

  13. Processes on the continental slope off North Carolina with special reference to the Cape Hatteras region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Donald C.; Hecker, Barbara

    the position of Cape Hatteras relative to the adjacent narrow shelf. The Cape extends outward almost to the shelf edge topographically diverting sediment and primary production seaward that is moving southward along the outer shelf (the 'funnel' hypothesis). Transport of outer shelf sands to the slope may take place by the impingement of Gulf Stream eddies on the outer shelf and upper slope as well as by storm-generated waves. Once shelf sediment is deposited on the upper slope, it is apparently redistributed, as no strong on-shore to off-shore or depth-related gradients are observed in any of the measured sedimentary parameters. The Hatteras slope apparently represents an estuarine type of sedimentary/nutrient regime that is displaced to an otherwise oceanic deep-sea environment by outwelling and funnelling of nutrients and sediments from the shelf to the slope.

  14. Sediment dynamics and post-glacial evolution of the continental shelf around the Blanes submarine canyon head (NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, Ruth; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Micallef, Aaron; Amblas, David; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Sanz, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    The Blanes submarine canyon (BC) deeply incises the Catalan continental shelf in the NW Mediterranean Sea. As a consequence of the closeness (only 4 km) of its head to the coastline and the mouth of the Tordera River, the canyon has a direct influence on the shelf dispersal system as it collects large amounts of sediment, mainly during high-energy events. Multibeam bathymetry, backscatter imagery and very-high resolution seismic reflection profiles have allowed characterizing the morphology of the continental shelf around the canyon head, also identifying sediment sources and transport pathways into the canyon. The morphological data have also been used to reconstruct the evolution of the continental shelf during the last sea-level transgression so that the current understanding of shelf-to-canyon sediment exchanges through time could be improved. The continental shelf surrounding the BC consists of both depositional and erosional or non-depositional areas. Depositional areas display prominent sediment bodies, a generally smooth bathymetry and variable backscatter. These include: (i) an area of modern coarse-grained sediment accumulation that comprises the inner shelf; (ii) a modern fine-grained sedimentation area on the middle shelf offshore Tossa de Mar; and (iii) a modern sediment depleted area that covers most of the middle and outer shelf to the west of the canyon head. Erosional and non-depositional areas display a rough topography and high backscatter, and occur primarily to the east of the canyon head, where the arrival of river-fed inputs is very small. In agreement with this pattern, the continental shelf north and west of the canyon head likely is the main source of shelf sediment into the canyon. To the north, a pattern of very high backscatter extends from the coastline to the canyon head, suggesting the remobilization and off-shelf export of fines. Additionally, relict near-shore sand bodies developed over the Barcelona shelf that extend to the canyon

  15. Magnetosphere of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Scaling laws for possible outer planet magnetospheres are derived. These suggest that convection and its associated auroral effects will play a relatively smaller role than at earth, and that there is a possibility that they could have significant radiation belts of energetic trapped particles.

  16. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  17. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  18. 75 FR 70021 - Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Environmental Documents Prepared in Support of Oil and Gas Activities on the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... Location Project purpose FONSI Shell Exploration & Production, Beaufort Sea, Alaska...... Conduct Ancillary...

  19. 77 FR 40080 - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Proposed Final Five-Year Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Proposed Final Five-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 AGENCY... 2012- 2017 Final PEIS prepared by BOEM to support the Proposed Final 5-Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Headquarters...

  20. Effects of unisegmental disc compression on adjacent segments: an in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Unglaub, Frank; Guehring, Thorsten; Lorenz, Helga; Carstens, Claus; Kroeber, Markus W

    2005-12-01

    It is controversial whether fusion of discs in the spine leads to increased degeneration on the remaining discs or whether the degenerative changes are merely a part of the inevitable natural history process. To determine the effects of unisegmental compression and subsequent recovery on adjacent segments, we studied histology, radiology and intradiscal pressure using an in vivo rabbit model. Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were divided in to three groups of five. In the first group, the intervertebral disc L4-L5 of the lumbar spine was axially loaded for 28 days with an external loading device. In the second group, the intervertebral disc was compressed for 28 days and allowed to recover for an equal amount of time, with the loading device removed. Five animals underwent a sham operation, in which the external loading device was situated, but their discs remained unloaded for 28 days. The intradiscal pressure was determined in the loaded discs as well as in the cranial and caudal adjacent discs. Lateral radiographs were taken from each subjected intervertebral disc with adjacent vertebral bodies and the cranial and caudal adjacent segments. The compressed discs showed lower intradiscal pressure in comparison with the control group, which remained unloaded. In the cranial and caudal discs adjacent to the loaded discs the average intradiscal pressure was similar to the unloaded controls. The loaded discs demonstrated a significant decrease in disc space. No discs adjacent to the loaded discs changed in height. The lamellar architecture of the inner, middle, and outer annulus became more disorganized in the loaded discs. The nucleus pulposus showed increase of mucoid degeneration and increased cell death. Intervertebral discs from the control group and the adjacent discs to the compressed discs maintained their normal morphology. This study shows that mechanical loading of discs in the spine can cause rapid degeneration. Adjacent discs, however, did not change in terms

  1. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  2. Weighing the deep continental biosphere.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean; Parnell, John

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence for widespread microbial activity in deep continental fractures and aquifers, with important implications for biogeochemical cycling on Earth and the habitability of other planetary bodies. Whitman et al. (P Natl Acad Sci USA, 95, 1998, 6578) estimated a continental subsurface biomass on the order of 10(16) -10(17) g C. We reassess this value in the light of more recent data including over 100 microbial population density measurements from groundwater around the world. Making conservative assumptions about cell carbon content and the ratio of attached and free-living microorganisms, we find that the evidence continues to support a deep continental biomass estimate of 10(16) -10(17) g C, or 2-19% of Earth's total biomass. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Late Neogene and Quaternary evolution of the northern Albemarle Embayment (mid-Atlantic continental margin, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallinson, D.; Riggs, S.; Thieler, E.R.; Culver, S.; Farrell, K.; Foster, D.S.; Corbett, D.R.; Horton, B.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic surveys in the eastern Albemarle Sound, adjacent tributaries and the inner continental shelf define the regional geologic framework and provide insight into the sedimentary evolution of the northern North Carolina coastal system. Litho- and chronostratigraphic data are derived from eight drill sites on the Outer Banks barrier islands, and the Mobil #1 well in eastern Albemarle Sound. Within the study area, parallel-bedded, gently dipping Miocene beds occur at 95 to > 160 m below sea level (m bsl), and are overlain by a southward-thickening Pliocene unit characterized by steeply inclined, southward-prograding beds. The lower Pliocene unit consists of three seismic sequences. The 55–60 m thick Quaternary section unconformably overlies the Pliocene unit, and consists of 18 seismic sequences exhibiting numerous incised channel-fill facies. Shallow stratigraphy (< 40 m bsl) is dominated by complex fill patterns within the incised paleo-Roanoke River valley. Radiocarbon and amino-acid racemization (AAR) ages indicate that the valley-fill is latest Pleistocene to Holocene in age. At least six distinct valley-fill units are identified in the seismic data. Cores in the valley-fill contain a 3–6 m thick basal fluvial channel deposit that is overlain by a 15 m thick unit of interlaminated muds and sands of brackish water origin that exhibit increasing marine influence upwards. Organic materials within the interlaminated deposits have ages of 13–11 cal. ka. The interlaminated deposits within the valley are overlain by several units that comprise shallow marine sediments (bay-mouth and shoreface environments) that consist of silty, fine- to medium-grained sands containing open neritic foraminifera, suggesting that this area lacked a fronting barrier island system and was an open embayment from ∼10 ka to ∼4.5 ka. Seismic data show that initial infilling of the paleo-Roanoke River valley occurred from the north and west during the late Pleistocene and early

  4. Continental rifts and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, K. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Continental rifts are widespread and range in age from the present to 3 b.y. Individual rifts may form parts of complex systems as in E. Africa and the Basin and Range. Rifts have originated in diverse environments such as arc-crests, sites of continental collision, collapsing mountain belts and on continents at rest over the mantle circulation pattern. Continental rift resources can be classified by depth of origin: For example, in the Great Dike, Norilsk and Mwadui magma from the mantle is the host. At shallower depths continental crust partly melted above mafic magma hosts ore (Climax, Henderson). Rift volcanics are linked to local hydrothermal systems and to extensive zeolite deposits (Basin and Range, East Africa). Copper (Zambia, Belt), zinc (Red Dog) and lead ores (Benue) are related to hydrothermal systems which involve hot rock and water flow through both pre-rift basement and sedimentary and volcanic rift fill. Economically significant sediments in rifts include coals (the Gondwana of Inida), marine evaporites (Lou Ann of the Gulf of Mexico) and non-marine evaporites (East Africa). Oil and gas in rifts relate to a variety of source, reservoir and trap relations (North Sea, Libya), but rift-lake sediment sources are important (Sung Liao, Bo Hai, Mina, Cabinda). Some ancient iron ores (Hammersley) may have formed in rift lakes but Algoman ores and greenstone belt mineral deposits in general are linked to oceanic and island arc environments. To the extent that continental environments are represented in such areas as the Archean of the Superior and Slave they are Andean Arc environments which today have locally rifted crests (Ecuador, N. Peru). The Pongola, on Kaapvaal craton may, on the other hand represent the world's oldest preserved, little deformed, continental rift.

  5. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    PubMed

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  6. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  7. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  8. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming.

    PubMed

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise.

  9. Antarctic glacial history from numerical models and continental margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, P.F.; Barrett, P.J.; Cooper, A. K.; Huybrechts, P.

    1999-01-01

    The climate record of glacially transported sediments in prograded wedges around the Antarctic outer continental shelf, and their derivatives in continental rise drifts, may be combined to produce an Antarctic ice sheet history, using numerical models of ice sheet response to temperature and sea-level change. Examination of published models suggests several preliminary conclusions about ice sheet history. The ice sheet's present high sensitivity to sea-level change at short (orbital) periods was developed gradually as its size increased, replacing a declining sensitivity to temperature. Models suggest that the ice sheet grew abruptly to 40% (or possibly more) of its present size at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, mainly as a result of its own temperature sensitivity. A large but more gradual middle Miocene change was externally driven, probably by development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and Polar Front, provided that a few million years' delay can be explained. The Oligocene ice sheet varied considerably in size and areal extent, but the late Miocene ice sheet was more stable, though significantly warmer than today's. This difference probably relates to the confining effect of the Antarctic continental margin. Present-day numerical models of ice sheet development are sufficient to guide current sampling plans, but sea-ice formation, polar wander, basal topography and ice streaming can be identified as factors meriting additional modelling effort in the future.

  10. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Boyce, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We feel that at the present moment the available theoretical models of the Kuiper belt are still in advance of the data, and thus our main task has been to conduct observational work guided by theoretical motivations. Our efforts over the past year can be divided into four categories: A) Wide-field Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; B) Pencil-beam Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; C) Wide-field Searches for Moons of the Outer Planets; D) Pencil-beam Searches for Faint Uranian and Neptunian Moons; E) Recovery Observations. As of April 2002, we have conducted several searches for Kuiper belt objects using large-format mosaic CCD camera on 4-meter class telescopes. In May 1999, we used the Kitt Peak 4-meter with the NOAO Mosaic camera we attempted a search for KBOs at a range of ecliptic latitudes. In addition to our wide-field searches, we have conducted three 'pencil-beam' searches in the past year. In a pencil-beam search we take repeated integrations of the same field throughout a night. After preprocessing the resulting images we shift and recombine them along a range of rates and directions consistent with the motion of KBOs. Stationary objects then smear out, while objects moving at near the shift rate appear as point sources. In addition to our searches for Kuiper belt objects, we are completing the inventory of the outer solar system by search for faint satellites of the outer planets. In August 2001 we conducted pencil beam searches for faint Uranian and Neptunian satellites at CFHT and CTIO. These searches resulted in the discover of two Neptunian and four Uranian satellite candidates. The discovery of Kuiper belt objects and outer planet satellites is of little use if the discoveries are not followed by systematic, repeated astrometric observations that permit reliable estimates of their orbits.

  11. Physics of the outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gazis, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in the physics of the outer heliosphere are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time frame. Emphasis is placed on five broad topics: the detailed structure of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances, the global structure of the interplanetary field, latidudinal variations and meridional flows, radial and temporal variations, and the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. 122 refs.

  12. Outer Space Traffic Safety Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2013-09-01

    Management of traffic in outer space is a major safety problem. Traffic is increasing. Most satellites are navigable but they have to co-exist with space debris which is not navigable. We need minimum safety rules for outer space traffic. We have the possible beginnings of international safety standards in the form of national space object tracking; Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) standardization through ICAO and the International Committee on GNSS (ICG); the IADC space debris guidelines; and the proposed Code of Conduct. However, safety could be improved by standards for such activities as licensing launches of satellites into outer space; standards for accident investigation and search and rescue: operational safety zones around space objects such as the International Space Station. This paper describes legal authority for minimum safety standards. It considers safety standards established by private agreements among commercial operators. Finally it examines a number of options for an international forum to establish safety standards, including self-regulation, COPUOS, ICAO, ITU, a space code of conduct, and a new space organization.

  13. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  14. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  15. Evolution of the continental crust.

    PubMed

    Hawkesworth, C J; Kemp, A I S

    2006-10-19

    The continental crust covers nearly a third of the Earth's surface. It is buoyant--being less dense than the crust under the surrounding oceans--and is compositionally evolved, dominating the Earth's budget for those elements that preferentially partition into silicate liquid during mantle melting. Models for the differentiation of the continental crust can provide insights into how and when it was formed, and can be used to show that the composition of the basaltic protolith to the continental crust is similar to that of the average lower crust. From the late Archaean to late Proterozoic eras (some 3-1 billion years ago), much of the continental crust appears to have been generated in pulses of relatively rapid growth. Reconciling the sedimentary and igneous records for crustal evolution indicates that it may take up to one billion years for new crust to dominate the sedimentary record. Combining models for the differentiation of the crust and the residence time of elements in the upper crust indicates that the average rate of crust formation is some 2-3 times higher than most previous estimates.

  16. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-02

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  17. Geometrical interpretation for the outer SU(3) outer multiplicity label

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draayer, Jerry P.; Troltenier, D.

    1995-01-01

    A geometrical interpretation for the outer multiplicity rho that occurs in a reduction of the product of two SU(3) representations, (lambda(sub pi), mu(sub pi)) x (lambda(sub nu), mu(sub nu)) approaches sigma(sub rho)(lambda, mu)(sub rho), is introduced. This coupling of proton (pi) and neutron (nu) representations arises, for example, in both boson and fermion descriptions of heavy deformed nuclei. Attributing a geometry to the coupling raises the possibility of introducing a simple interaction that provides a physically meaningful way for distinguishing multiple occurrences of (lambda, mu) values that can arise in such products.

  18. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ventilation or by ventilation equipment safe for use in an explosive gas atmosphere. (b) Each space adjacent... gas atmosphere must be de-energized at a location outside of that space. This location must be labeled to prohibit reenergizing until the atmosphere in the space is tested and found to be less than 30...

  19. 77 FR 72744 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... 333 Control of Emissions From Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (Adopted 06/19/08) Rule 342 Control of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) From Boilers, Steam Generators and Process Heaters) (Adopted 04/17... Large Water Heaters and Small Boilers (Adopted 10/17/02) Rule 361 Small Boilers, Steam Generators,...

  20. 77 FR 52630 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Control of Emissions from Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (Adopted 06/19/08) Rule 342 Control of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) from Boilers, Steam Generators and Process Heaters) (Adopted 04/17/97) Rule... Heaters and Small Boilers (Adopted 10/17/02) Rule 361 Small Boilers, Steam Generators, and Process...

  1. 75 FR 55277 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... 476 Steam Generating Equipment (Adopted 10/08/76) Rule 480 Natural Gas Fired Control Devices (Adopted... (Adopted 08/05/88) Rule 1110 Emissions from Stationary Internal Combustion Engines (Demonstration) (Repealed 11/14/97) Rule 1110.1 Emissions from Stationary Internal Combustion Engines (Rescinded...

  2. 78 FR 59263 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... 333 Control of Emissions from Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (Adopted 06/19/08) Rule 342 Control of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) from Boilers, Steam Generators and Process Heaters) (Adopted 04/17... Large Water Heaters and Small Boilers (Adopted 10/17/02) Rule 361 Small Boilers, Steam Generators,...

  3. 76 FR 15898 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Combustion Engines (Adopted 06/19/08) Rule 342 Control of Oxides of Nitrogen (NO X ) from Boilers, Steam... Heaters and Small Boilers (Adopted 10/17/02) Rule 361 Small Boilers, Steam Generators, and Process...

  4. 76 FR 7226 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Characterization Activities; Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Office of Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, MS 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817... Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Energy Development and Production and Alternate Use... ``Comments on Mid Atlantic WEA Regional EA'' to Program Manager, Office of Offshore Alternative Energy...

  5. 75 FR 82055 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Massachusetts...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Office of Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden... of Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, Mail Stop 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170...: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Office of Offshore Alternative Energy...

  6. 76 FR 14681 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Massachusetts...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... address: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Office of Offshore Alternative... Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Office of Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the...

  7. 76 FR 20367 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Off Delaware...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Offshore Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, Mail Stop 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the... Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This...

  8. 76 FR 30184 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Interim Policy Leasing for Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Alternative Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, MS 4090, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817, (703) 787-1340 or... the OCS for alternative energy activities. This authority has been delegated to BOEMRE. In a Request... authorizing alternative energy resource assessment, data collection, and technology testing activities on the...

  9. 77 FR 5545 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    .../Virginia.aspx Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes On July 19... stewardship of the ocean, our coasts and the Great Lakes. Where BOEM actions affect the ocean, the Order... based on available information. These areas are described below. Fish Haven/Artificial Reef Site An...

  10. 77 FR 75656 - Research Lease for Renewable Energy on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Energy (DMME) to acquire an OCS lease for wind energy research activities; (2) solicit public input... collection of resource data, including wind velocities, water levels, waves, and bird and bat activities, to support the future production of renewable energy within and around the Wind Energy Area (WEA) offshore...

  11. 77 FR 30551 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... megawatt (MW) offshore wind energy project located in Rhode Island State waters off Block Island to the.... BOEM has coordinated with the Task Force on potential commercial wind energy development within an Area... 30 MW offshore wind energy project located in Rhode Island State waters approximately 2.5 nautical...

  12. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 67

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The contents of this study include the following: distribution, abundance, and biology of blue king and Korean hair crabs around the Pribilof Islands; distribution, abundance, and diversity of the epifaunal benthic organisms in Alitak and Ugak bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska; distribution and abundance of some epibenthic invertebrates of the northeastern Gulf of Alaska with notes on the feeding biology of selected species; reproductive success in Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) during long-term exposures to oil-contaminated sediments; and distribution and abundance of decapod larvae of the Kodiak shelf.

  13. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 53

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Contents include: Baffin Island experimental oil spill and dispersant studies. Hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and histopathological and biochemical responses in marine bivalve molluscs; Feeding ecology of juvenile king and Tanner crab in the southeastern Bering Sea; Distribution of larval and juvenile red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschatica) in Bristol Bay; Distribution and abundance of decapod crustacean larvae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphasis on commercial species.

  14. 76 FR 1389 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Pollution Control District (``Santa Barbara APCD'' or ``District'') is the designated COA. The intended... requirements to control air pollution from OCS sources in order to attain and maintain Federal and State... establish requirements to control air pollution from OCS sources located within 25 miles of States'...

  15. 76 FR 58273 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... chapter 15. Section 176(c) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) requires that all federal actions...,024. Estimated Total Annual Costs: $1,857,950, which includes $0 annualized capital startup costs, $17... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement to obtain detailed estimates of offshore...

  16. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 34

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The report is a compilation of three final reports dealing with geologic processes and hazards of the Beaufort and Chukchi Sea Shelf and coastal regions: Beaufort and Chukchi, seacoast permafrost studies; and the environmental geology and geomorphology of the Barrier Island-lagoon system along the Beaufort Sea coastal plain from Prudhoe Bay to the Colville River. Fifteen oversized maps are included.

  17. 76 FR 29156 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... Transfer of Gasoline (Adopted 01/15/09). Rule 317 Organic Solvents (Adopted 10/23/78). Rule 318 Vacuum... (Adopted 09/ 20/10). Rule 322 Metal Surface Coating Thinner and Reducer (Adopted 10/23/78). Rule 323 Architectural Coatings (Adopted 11/15/ 01). Rule 324 Disposal and Evaporation of Solvents (Adopted 10/23/78...

  18. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... environmental impacts and socioeconomic effects of issuing renewable energy leases and subsequent site... comments on the EA. The EA can be found online at http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy-Program/Smart-from... to 43 CFR 46.305. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Morin, BOEM Office of Renewable Energy...

  19. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...) considering the reasonably foreseeable environmental and socioeconomic impacts of issuing renewable energy... availability of the revised EA and FONSI, which can be accessed online at: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Morin, BOEM Office of Renewable Energy Programs, 381 Elden...

  20. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 43

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the northern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Project rationale, design, summary; Distribution, production, and ecology of gray whale prey species; Distribution and abundance of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin; Investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska, 1982-1983: marking and tracking of whales in Bristol Bay; Belukha whale responses to industrial noise in Nushagak Bay, Alaska.

  1. 75 FR 51950 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... (Effective 4/2/2010) Section 7.04: U Fossil Fuel Utilization Facilities (Effective 4/2/ 2010) Section 7.05: U Fuels All Districts (Effective 4/2/2010) Section 7.06: U Visible Emissions (Effective 4/2/2010) Section...

  2. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assesment program. Final reports of principal investigators. volume 37

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A compilation of seven final reports dealing with seal/sea lion and walrus surveys of the Navarin Basin; potential impacts of man-made noise on ringed seals; modern populations, migrations, demography, trophics, and historical status of the Pacific Walrus; distribution of marine mammals in the coastal zone of the eastern Chukchi Sea during summer and autumn; and early spring distribution, density and abundance of the Pacific Walrus in 1976.

  3. 78 FR 5836 - Adjustment of Service Fees for Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... BOEM fees are being adjusted for inflation, as provided for in BOEM regulations at 30 CFR Sec. 550.125... fees to reflect inflation since the last update. This notice informs all relevant parties that the fees... is based on inflation from 2007 through 2011. The inflation rate between any two years is...

  4. 76 FR 65521 - Information Collection; Geological and Geophysical Explorations of the Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... costs. BOEM uses information collected to understand the G&G characteristics of oil- and gas-bearing... environmental damage, the discovery of oil and gas, and adverse impacts on affected coastal states. Information... oil, gas, or sulphur lessees and holders of pipeline rights-of-way. Estimated Reporting...

  5. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

  6. 76 FR 79206 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Mid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...) transmission line that would collect power generated by wind power generation facilities on the OCS and deliver... System Operator, LLC (NYISO). When the wind power generation facilities are not functioning at full..., New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. When wind power generation is not functioning at...

  7. 76 FR 79705 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ..., gas, and sulphur to qualified parties. This regulation governs mining operations within the OCS and...) facilitate participation by States directly affected by OCS mining activities; (c) provide opportunities for... complying with the regulations that implement the mining operations program for minerals other than oil, gas...

  8. 78 FR 27427 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... your search terms.) Click on the ``Comment Now!'' button to the right of the document link. Enter your... to http://www.regulations.gov and search for ``Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities on... permits for G&G seismic activities and provides authorization for non-commercial sand search (marine...

  9. Rare, threatened, and endangered vertebrates of southwest Florida and potential OCS (outer continental shelf) activity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfender, G.E.

    1983-02-01

    The eight southwestern Florida counties include populations of 68 vertebrates considered in this report as rare, threatened, or endangered. The terrestrial and near-shore habitats of the study area and the habitat preferences of each of the 68 vertebrates are described. Each vertebrate is listed in the habitats it occupies, and information about reproduction, feeding, and where available, population estimates, is given under the habitat considered most important for each species. The distributions of the rare, threatened and endangered vertebrates by county and habitat demonstrate the relative importance of the southernmost counties (Monroe and Collier) and wetland and coastal habitats. Activities contributing to the decline of these 68 vertebrates are assessed and habitat loss is overwhelmingly more important for all.

  10. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 40

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Interaction of oil with sea ice; Physical oceanographic investigations in the Bering Sea marginal ice zone; The movement and decay of ice edge bands in the winter Bering Sea; On some possible interactions between internal waves and sea ice in the marginal ice zone; The Bering Sea ice cover during March 1979: Comparison of surface and satellite data with the Nimbus-7, SMMR; Persistence of spilled oil along the Beaufort Sea coast; Potential oiled ice trajectories in the Beaufort Sea; Interaction of oil with artic sea ice; Activity-directed fractionation of petroleum samples.

  11. 77 FR 15382 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Renewal. SUMMARY: Following consultation with the General Services Administration, notice is hereby given that the Secretary of the Interior is revising and renewing...

  12. 76 FR 2254 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... VI. Regulatory Analyses A. Regulatory Planning and Review B. Small Entities C. Assistance for Small... SAFE Port Act. As noted, maintaining situational awareness is the foundation of a comprehensive... 146.405). VI. Regulatory Analyses We developed this rule after considering numerous statutes and...

  13. 77 FR 5561 - Information Collection Activities: Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Appropriations Bill (Pub. L. 104-133, 110 Stat. 1321, April 26, 1996), and OMB Circular A-25, authorize Federal... assumed that respondents perform certain requirements in the normal course of their activities....

  14. 75 FR 18404 - Safety Zone; FRONTIER DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ..., while anchored or deploying and recovering moorings on location in order to drill exploratory wells at... drilling season. The purpose of the temporary safety zone is to protect the DRILLSHIP from vessels... temporary safety zone around the DRILLSHIP FRONTIER DISCOVERER while on location in order to drill...

  15. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Assessment Activities on the OCS Offshore North Carolina. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michelle Morin...-1340 or Michelle.Morin@boem.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background: On December 13, 2012, BOEM...

  16. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 73

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The volume contains information on the following: Subsea permafrost: probing, thermal regime, and data analyses, 1975-81 and a geographic based information management system for permafrost prediction in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Part I contains: Submarine permafrost on the Alaskan shelf and a geographic based information management system for permafrost prediction in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Part II contains: Submarine permafrost on the Arctic shelf of Eurasia and the development of the Arctic in the Pleistocene. Each paper is in reference to offshore drilling of oil and gas.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 69

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This article includes the following: trace contaminants in surface sediment of the northern Bering Sea: a statistical review; trace contaminants in the greater St. George Basin: a statistical review; mercury in Alaska marine surface sediments: a review of the regional data; and natural distribution and environmental background of trace heavy metals in Alaskan shelf and estuarine areas.

  18. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This final report of a study of the environmental characterization of the North Aleutian Shelf nearshore region includes: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development; and annotated bibliography and keyword index.

  19. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Contents include: seal, sea lion, walrus and beluga whale surveys of the Bering Sea, 1979 and 1982-1983; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. i. distribution, abundance, and movements; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. ii. biology and ecology; investigations of belukha whales in coastal water of western and northern Alaska. iii. food habits; behavioral responses of gray whales to industrial noise: feeding observations and predictive modeling.

  20. 77 FR 15118 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ..., conserve the natural resources of the OCS, and to protect the environment, human life, and correlative... will result in orderly resource recovery, development, and the protection of the human, marine,...

  1. 76 FR 5189 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activities: 1010-0081, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... prevent waste, conserve the natural resources of the OCS, and to protect the environment, human life, and... manner that will result in orderly resource recovery, development, and the protection of the...

  2. 75 FR 52546 - Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Committee will meet in discipline breakout sessions (i.e., biology/ecology, physical sciences, and social... Thursday, September 16, the Committee will meet in plenary session for reports of the individual...

  3. Accidents associated with oil and gas operations: Outer continental shelf, 1956-1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, L.M.

    1992-10-01

    The report is a compilation of descriptions of all blowouts, explosions and fires, pipeline breaks or leaks, significant pollution incidents, and major accidents that occurred on federally leased offshore lands from 1956 through 1990. The report identifies accidents by area, block number, lease number, platform number, well number, and operator. It describes the type of accident, corrective action taken, and the amount of pollution. It provides figures on fatalities, injuries, and property and environmental damage.

  4. 75 FR 3617 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Update To Include New Jersey State Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ..., Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Sulfur oxides. Dated: December 30, 2009. Judith A. Enck, Regional.... Variances N.J.A.C. 7:27-6.7. Exceptions Chapter 27 Subchapter 7--Sulfur (Effective 3/1/67) N.J.A.C. 7:27-7.1. Definitions N.J.A.C. 7:27-7.2. Control and prohibition of air pollution from sulfur compounds Chapter 27...

  5. 78 FR 14917 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... and recordkeeping requirements, Sulfur oxides. Dated: November 21, 2012. Jared Blumenfeld, Regional... 04/13/04) Rule 53 Particulate Matter--Process Weight (Adopted 04/13/04) Rule 54 Sulfur Compounds.../78) Rule 64 Sulfur Content of Fuels (Adopted 04/13/99) Rule 67 Vacuum Producing Devices (Adopted 07...

  6. 77 FR 61308 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... and recordkeeping requirements, Sulfur oxides. Dated: September 13, 2012. Jared Blumenfeld, Regional...) Rule 53 Particulate Matter-Process Weight (Adopted 04/13/04) Rule 54 Sulfur Compounds (Adopted 06/14/94... Sulfur Content of Fuels (Adopted 04/13/99) Rule 67 Vacuum Producing Devices (Adopted 07/05/83) Rule 68...

  7. 77 FR 4056 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: The OCS Scientific Committee will meet at the Sheraton Reston Hotel in Reston, Virginia..., from 8:30 to 5 p.m.; Thursday, February 9, 2012, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Reston Sheraton Hotel...

  8. 75 FR 3423 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... direct effect on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal Government and Indian... OCS sources operating off of the State of Alaska. The intended effect of approving the OCS..., and special arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information. Please see the...

  9. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 25

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This compilation of includes final reports on the following subjects: ice edge ecosystems, primary productivity, nutrient cycling and organic matter transfer; analysis of Harrison Bay zooplankton samples; Beaufort Sea plankton studies, winter-spring studies in Stefansson Sound and off Narwhal Island; foodweb and nutrient dynamics in nearshore Beaufort Sea waters.

  10. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ..., large-scale planning processes, and expedited review procedures within these areas to achieve an.../Renewable-Energy-Program/State-Activities/Massachusetts.aspx A large-scale map of the Call Area showing...

  11. Benthic habitat and geologic mapping of the outer continental shelf of north-central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anima, Roberto J.; Chin, John L.; Conrad, James E.; Golden, Nadine E.

    2006-01-01

    The Fanny Shoal area is located between North Farallon Island and Cordell Bank approximately 40 miles west of San Francisco, California. The area lies within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) which is located just a few miles from San Francisco. The waters within the GFNMS are part of a nationally significant marine ecosystem encompassing a diversity of highly productive marine habitats. Protection of the living and cultural resources at the sites are administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) and NOAA, including the GFNMS, and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS), collected side-scanning sonar, and underwater video data over three cruises in July of 2003, and April of 2004. The data are consolidated into a geographic information system (GIS) to produce benthic habitat and geologic maps that provide researchers and those involved in decision making with crucial, georeferenced geologic information that will aid in preserving the area's environment.

  12. 75 FR 61511 - Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement: Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... evaluated the potential effects of exploration seismic surveying and drilling; oil development, production... OCS Region, homepage; and (3) in the local media. Public hearings will be held following release...

  13. The North American Atlantic outer continental margin landslides data base: Summary and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.S.; O'Leary, D.W. )

    1990-06-01

    A compilation of published data from 179 Quaternary mass movement features was analyzed to determine the common attributes of the slides, to reveal general trends, and to classify and compare slide types. The data set was derived primarily from high-resolution, seismic-reflection data and sidescan-sonar images. In general, evidence of slope failure is found throughout the length of the margin and in all water depths. Slides have occurred on slope angles ranging from 1{degree} to 30{degree} (avg.{approximately}5{degree}); they vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (avg. {approximately}4 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (avg. {approximately}10 km) and have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. They are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings (e.g., canyons, ridges, spurs) and more commonly translational than rotational (i.e., slumps). The slides show no striking affinity for a particular depth range, either in the data set as a whole or when analyzed in terms of physiographic setting, size, slope angle, or other basis for classification. Comparison of slides found on the open slope with those found within canyons shows that the average open slope slide tends to occur at lower slope angles and is much larger (by an order of magnitude) than the average canyon slide. Regardless of the physiographic setting or other characteristic, large-scale slides (area >100 km{sup 2}) rather than small-scale slides (area <10 km{sup 2}) tend to be associated with gentle slopes ({approximately}3-4{degree}) Similarly, slides generated on steep slopes ({>=}10{degree}), regardless of other attributes, tend to be small (avg. area <5 km{sup 2}). With few exceptions, comparisons between slide categories show only minor differences.

  14. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 23

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This compilation includes 9 final reports on the following subjects: ecological studies of benthos and sea ice fauna in the southwestern Beaufort Sea; geographical and biological reconnaissance of rock habitats in Eastern Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea; temperature preference of juvenile arctic cod in relation to salinity and temperature acclimation; an assessment of the Beaufort Sea stock of Arctic Cisco; modeling movements and distribution of Arctic Cisco near the Waterflood Causeway; shorebird littoral zone ecology of the Alaskan Beaufort Coast; pelagic and nearshore birds of the Beaufort Sea; prey selection by Oldsquaws; continuing investigations of Oldsquaws during the molt period.

  15. 75 FR 803 - Safety Zone; FRONTIER DISCOVERER, Outer Continental Shelf Drillship, Chukchi and Beaufort Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... around the DRILLSHIP will significantly reduce the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases of... safety zone. The proposed regulation would reduce significantly the threat of allisions, oil spills,...

  16. 78 FR 42902 - Safety Zone; Olympus Tension Leg Platform, Mississippi Canyon Block 807, Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... will significantly reduce the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases of natural gas, and thereby... zone around the facility will significantly reduce the threat of allisions, oil spills, and releases of... facility. The proposed regulation would reduce significantly the threat of allisions, oil spills,...

  17. Regional Patterns in Invertebrate Assemblages on Offshore Oil Platforms Along the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, S.; Page, H. M.; Miller, R. J.; Doheny, B.; Dugan, J. E.; Schroeder, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-seven oil and gas platforms are arrayed offshore California from north of Point Conception south to San Pedro Bay (a coastline distance of >300 km). To test the hypothesis that variability in the structure of sessile invertebrate communities on the platforms is associated with regional differences in sea surface temperature, we sampled space-holding invertebrate taxa photographically on 23 platforms and compared the composition and cover of invertebrates among and within regions using multivariate analyses. To explore temporal variability in invertebrate assemblages, we also compared the cover and composition of invertebrates on a subset of platforms in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) where data were collected over ten years previously. The composition of invertebrate assemblages differed significantly among regions, and was driven by variation in the relative abundance of certain anemone, bryozoan, tubiferous annelid, sponge, and bivalve taxa. The presence of non-native bryozoan and anemone taxa on some platforms in the south (San Pedro Bay) and southeast SBC contributed to the distinction of these assemblages from the others. Comparison of survey data on the subset of platforms in the SBC surveyed over ten years apart revealed little change in the cover of major space-holding taxa (e.g., anemones Metridium, Corynactis) across platforms, although there was an increase in cover of the non-native bryozoan Watersipora subtorquata between surveys. The existence of geographical patterns in the composition of platform invertebrate assemblages suggests that these assemblages may be useful as barometers of short and longer-term environmental change. For biogeographic transition zones, such as the SBC, monitoring of platform invertebrate assemblages could permit an evaluation of the concept that these zones are particularly susceptible to shifts in the composition of marine species driven by ocean climate.

  18. 78 FR 45965 - Research Lease on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Virginia, Request for Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ..., Atlantic Grid Holdings LLC submitted an unsolicited application for a ROW grant, for a buried offshore electrical transmission cable and infrastructure. A segment of the proposed cable project that is intended to... communication cables; (5) Department of Defense operational, training and testing activities (surface and...

  19. Observed Oceanic Response over the Upper Continental Slope and Outer Shelf during Hurricane Ivan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    nsaldpesos.I diin nenlattd ( pitch / roll ) sensors contained in the ADCPs fluctuated by several degrees during the passage of Ivan but re- 7. Bottom scour...category-4 storm, Ivan veered to the east and wind speeds greater than 33 m s- .The maximum wind passed directly over 14 ADCPs deployed in the Missis...nondimensional storm speed (S), Burger number (B), Mach number (C), and 3. Data Rossby number (Q) that characterize the response for Fourteen ADCPs were

  20. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.; Carpenter, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic Coastal Plain region declined slightly in 1982. Five wells were spudded, 4 on Georges Bank and 1 in south-central coastal New Jersey. Eight wells were completed in 1982; all were announced to be dry. There were no wells actively drilling at year end. Three hundred and eighty-seven tracts were offered for lease as part of Sale RS-2. Bids of $7,209,300 were received on 28 tracts, and 26 tracts were actually leased. The level of seismic data acquisition increased 50% over 1981 to 36,820 line-mi.

  1. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer continental shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Giordana, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank Basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the S. Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-miles of seismic data.

  2. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  3. Oil-spill risk analysis, northern California (Proposed Sale 91) Outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.M.; Notario, J.J.; LaBelle, R.P.; Lucas, A.D.

    1987-08-01

    Contents include: summary of the proposed action and cumulative case; environmental resources; estimated oil resources; probability of oil spills occurring; oil-spill trajectory simulations; combined analysis of oil-spill occurrence and oil-spill trajectory simulations; and discussion and conclusions.

  4. Oil-spill risk analysis: Beaufort Sea outer continental shelf lease sale 170. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.M.; Johnson, W.R.; Marshall, C.F.; Lear, E.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report summarizes results of an oil-spill risk analysis conducted for OCS Lease Sale 170, Beaufort Sea. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sale.

  5. 76 FR 43185 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... located in the Gulf of Mexico west of 87.5 degrees longitude. Section 328 of the CAA requires that for.... Applicability. 9VAC5-80-2010. Definitions. 9VAC5-80-2020. General. 9VAC5-80-2030. Applications. 9VAC5-80-2040...

  6. 75 FR 3387 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... CFR part 55,\\1\\ which established requirements to control air pollution from OCS sources in order to... procedural rules. Section 328(a) of the Act requires that EPA establish requirements to control air pollution... existing requirements for controlling air pollution from OCS sources to make them consistent with rules in...

  7. Photoemission EXAFS on outer core levels

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, K.M.; Rothberg, G.M.; denBoer, M.L.; Williams, G.P.; Hecht, M.H.; Lindau, I.

    1984-01-01

    The first definitive measurements of EXAFS by monitoring the direct photoelectron emission as a function of photon energy have been made using the Mn 3p and F 2s core levels in evaporated films of MnF/sub 2/. Good agreement is found with bulk transmission EXAFS obtained with the Mn 1s level. This development is important because: (1) almost all elements have suitable core levels of low binding energy; (2) since photopeaks from adjacent core levels do not cross as the photon energy is varied, the limitation imposed on other EXAFS techniques by this interference is removed. Auger electrons, which have fixed kinetic energies and so can cross photopeaks, will generally have low energies if they originate from the outer core levels and be unlikely to appear in the EXAFS region of kinetic energies, i.e., in excess of about 50 eV; (3) vuv light is used, which greatly extends the useable range of photon energies; and (4) more than one element in a solid may be studied with the same monochromator. In this work all diffraction effects except the backscattering that gives rise to the EXAFS were eliminated by using a polycrystalline evaporated thin film and by making use of the 2..pi.. azimuthal acceptance angle of a cylindrical mirror analyzer. Previously MARGARITONDO and coworkers observed EXAFS-like oscillations in photopeaks as a function of photon energy when a CMA was used; however, their data did not extend over a sufficient photon energy range to prove conclusively that EXAFS was involved.

  8. Large-scale subduction of continental crust implied by India-Asia mass-balance calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, Miquela; Rowley, David B.; Currie, Brian; Colman, Albert S.

    2016-11-01

    Continental crust is buoyant compared with its oceanic counterpart and resists subduction into the mantle. When two continents collide, the mass balance for the continental crust is therefore assumed to be maintained. Here we use estimates of pre-collisional crustal thickness and convergence history derived from plate kinematic models to calculate the crustal mass balance in the India-Asia collisional system. Using the current best estimates for the timing of the diachronous onset of collision between India and Eurasia, we find that about 50% of the pre-collisional continental crustal mass cannot be accounted for in the crustal reservoir preserved at Earth's surface today--represented by the mass preserved in the thickened crust that makes up the Himalaya, Tibet and much of adjacent Asia, as well as southeast Asian tectonic escape and exported eroded sediments. This implies large-scale subduction of continental crust during the collision, with a mass equivalent to about 15% of the total oceanic crustal subduction flux since 56 million years ago. We suggest that similar contamination of the mantle by direct input of radiogenic continental crustal materials during past continent-continent collisions is reflected in some ocean crust and ocean island basalt geochemistry. The subduction of continental crust may therefore contribute significantly to the evolution of mantle geochemistry.

  9. Illustrations of the importance of mass wasting in the evolution of continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, L.; Ryan, W. ); Twichell, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Side-looking sonar imagery and swath bathymetry from a variety of contemporary continental slopes all display erosional scars and debris aprons, illustrating the importance of mass wasting in the evolution of continental margins. The continental slopes examined include slopes fed directly from the fronts of ice sheets, slopes adjacent to continental shelves that were the sites of glacial outwash, slopes supplied exclusively by fluvial drainage, slopes at carbonate platforms, and slopes on accretionary prisms. Examples are drawn from the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Mediterranean Sea in both passive and active continental margin settings. The sonar imagery and bathymetry used in this study indicate that continental slopes in different tectonic and climatic environments show similar forms of mass wasting. However, in some cases the dominant mode of erosion and/or the overall degree of mass wasting appears to be distinct to particular sedimentary environments. Timing of both recent and older exhumed erosional surfaces identified in the imagery and in seismic reflection profiles is obtained by ground truth observations using submersibles, towed camera sleds, drilling, and coring. These observations suggest that eustatic fluctuations common to all the margins examined do not explain the range in magnitude and areal density of the observed mass wasting. More localized factors such as lithology, diagenesis, pore fluid conditions, sediment supply rates, and seismic ground motion appear to have a major influence in the evolution of erosional scars and their corresponding unconformities.

  10. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  11. Quaternary seismic stratigraphy and paleoenvironments on the continental shelf of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Xia; Berne, Serge; Saito, Yoshiki; Lericolais, G.; Marsset, T.

    2000-08-01

    Paleoenvironments and stratigraphy have been interpreted from 4380 km of seismic profiling collected during a geological and geophysical cruise on the continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS) undertaken in 1996. The geophysical data are correlated with a borehole situated on the outer shelf obtained by Shanghai Marine Geology Bureau, indicating that six seismic units have been preserved since oxygen-isotope stage 6, including four regressive-transgressive cycles. Seismic units U2, U3+U4+U5, U6, and U7 are interpreted to correspond respectively to oxygen-isotope stages 1, 3, 5, and 6, implying that sediment partitioning and sequence architecture in the ECS have been controlled by glacio-eustasy and global climate changes. Alternating continental and marine strata corresponding to glaciation and interglaciation are well preserved on the outer shelf of the ECS. Most of the cold environment strata, which formed on the outer shelf during oxygen-isotope stages 2 and 4, are too thin to be recognized on SIG 600J because of resolution, but corresponding erosion surfaces exist. Seismic unit U7 is widespread over the shelf, extending to the continental edge and showing little variation in thickness, as the regression was pronounced and lasted a long time. Thus, U7 can be used as a marker layer for correlation of Quaternary strata on the shelf of the ECS. Post-glacial transgression is obvious in the ECS. Marine strata with varied thickness were developed in the shallow sea of the inner shelf, thinning toward the outer shelf. The continental shelf of the ECS has been influenced by Pacific tide-wave systems for a long time, forming tidal sand-ridge sequences, developed during transgressions, corresponding to oxygen-isotope stages 7 (or 9), 5, 3 and 1.

  12. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  13. The CDF Central Outer Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    We describe the CDF Central Outer Tracker (COT), an open-cell drift chamber currently being constructed for the CDF detector to run at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron collider. This detector will provide central tracking with excellent momentum resolution in the high- density environment of a hadron collider. It will be able to resolve 132 ns beam crossings and provide tracking trigger information to the Level 1 trigger. The design is based upon the existing and successful CDF Central Tracking Chamber. The preliminary mechanical and electrical designs are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  15. Influence of submarine morphology on bottom water flow across the western Ross Sea continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davey, F.J.; Jacobs, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Multibeam sonar bathymetry documents a lack of significant channels crossing outer continental shelf and slope of the western Ross Sea. This indicates that movement of bottom water across the shelf break into the deep ocean in this area is mainly by laminar or sheet flow. Subtle, ~20 m deep and up to 1000 m wide channels extend down the continental slope, into tributary drainage patterns on the upper rise, and then major erosional submarine canyons. These down-slope channels may have been formed by episodic pulses of rapid down slope water flow, some recorded on bottom current meters, or by sub-ice melt water erosion from an icesheet grounded at the margin. Narrow, mostly linear furrows on the continental shelf thought to be caused by iceberg scouring are randomly oriented, have widths generally less than 400 m and depths less than 30m, and extend to water depths in excess of 600 m.

  16. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  17. Physical oceanography of continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.S.; Beardlsey, R.C.; Blanton, J.O.; Boicourt, W.C.; Butman, B.; Coachman, L.K.; Huyer, A.; Kinder, T.H.; Royer, T.C.; Schumacher, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    Knowledge of the physical oceanography of continental shelves has increased tremendously in recent years, primarily as a result of new current and hydrographic measurements made in locations where no comparable measurements existed previously. In general, observations from geographically distinct continental shelves have shown that the nature of the flow may vary considerably from region to region. Although some characteristics, such as the response of currents to wind forcing, are common to many shelves, the relative importance of various physical processes in influencing the shelf flow field frequently is different. In the last several years, the scientific literature on shelf studies has expanded rapidly, with that for separate regions, to some extent, developing independently because of the variable role played by different physical effects. Consequently, it seems that a simultaneous review of progress in physical oceanographic research in different shelf regions would be especially useful at this time in order to help assess the overall progress in the field. This multi-author report has been compiled as a result. Included are sections on the physical oceanography of continental shelves, in or off of, the eastern Bering Sea, northern Gulf of Alaska, Pacific Northwest, southern California, west Florida, southeastern US, Middle Atlantic Bight, Georges Bank and Peru. These discussions clearly point to the diverse nature of the dominant physics in several of the regions, as well as to some of the dynamical features they share in common. 390 references, 23 figures.

  18. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  19. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume.

  20. Surface heat flow measurements from the East Siberian continental slope and southern Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Matt; Preto, Pedro; Stranne, Christian; Jakobsson, Martin; Koshurnikov, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    Surface heat flow data in the Arctic Ocean are needed to assess hydrocarbon and methane hydrate distributions, and provide constraints into the tectonic origins and nature of underlying crust. However, across broad areas of the Arctic, few published measurements exist. This is true for the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea, and the adjoining deep water ridges and basins. Here we present 21 new surface heat flow measurements from this region of the Arctic Ocean. On the Southern Lomonosov Ridge, the average measured heat flow, uncorrected for effects of sedimentation and topography, is 57 ± 4 mW/m2 (n = 4). On the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea (ESS), the average is 57 ± 10 mW/m2 (n = 16). An anomalously high heat flow of 203 ± 28 mW/m2 was measured at a single station in the Herald Canyon. With the exception of this high heat flow, the new data from the ESS are consistent with predictions for thermally equilibrated lithosphere of continental origin that was last affected by thermotectonic processes in the Cretaceous to early Cenozoic. Variability within the data likely arises from differences in radiogenic heat production within the continental crust and overlying sediments. This can be further explored by comparing the data with geophysical constraints on sediment and crustal thicknesses.

  1. EAGLE CAP WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilsgaard, Thor H.; Tuchek, Ernest T.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey of the Eagle Cap Wilderness and adjacent areas a probable mineral-resources potential was identified in five areas in the eastern part of the wilderness. Mineral resources are most likely to occur in tactite deposits in sedimentary rocks at or near contacts with intrusive granitic rocks that could contain copper and small amounts of other metals; however, there is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  2. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  3. Enteroenteroanastomosis near adjacent ileocecal valve in infants

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Qun; Geng, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Huan; Lv, Xiao-Feng; Lu, Chang-Gui; Tang, Wei-Bing

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and the effectiveness of ileoileostomy in the region adjacent to the ileocecal valve, which can retain the ileocecal valve in infants. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of 48 patients who underwent ileoileostomy in the region adjacent to the ileocecal valve (group 1) and 34 patients who underwent ileocecal resections and ileotransversanastomosis (group 2). Patients were monitored for the time to flatus, resumption of eating, length of hospital stay after surgery, serum total bile acid, vitamin B12 and postoperative complications. RESULTS: The time to flatus, time until resumption of eating and post-operative length of hospital stay showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Serum total bile acid and vitamin B12 were not significantly different between the two groups at post-operative day 1 and day 3, but were significantly decreased at 1 wk after operation in group 2. None of the patients died or suffered from stomal leak in these two groups. However, the incidence of diarrhea, intestinal infection, disturbance of acid-base balance and water-electrolytes in group 1 was lower than in group 2. CONCLUSION: Ileoileostomy in the region adjacent to the ileocecal valve is safe and results in fewer complications than ileotransversanastomosis in infants. PMID:23326139

  4. [Atmospheric adjacency effect correction of ETM images].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-yu; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Shu-qing; Gao, Ji-yue

    2010-09-01

    It is an important precondition to retrieve the ground surface reflectance exactly for improving the subsequent product of remote sensing images and the quantitative application of remote sensing. However, because the electromagnetic wave is scattered by the atmosphere during its transmission from the ground surface to the sensor, the electromagnetic wave signal of the target received by the sensor contained the signal of the background. The adjacency effect emerges. Because of the adjacency effect, the remote sensing images become blurry, and their contrast reduces. So the ground surface reflectance retrieved from the remote sensing images is also inaccurate. Finally, the quality of subsequent product of remote sensing images and the accuracy of quantitative application of remote sensing might decrease. In the present paper, according to the radiative transfer equation, the atmospheric adjacency effect correction experiment of ETM images was carried out by using the point spread function method. The result of the experiment indicated that the contrast of the corrected ETM images increased, and the ground surface reflectance retrieved from those images was more accurate.

  5. Composition of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Gao, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Earth is an unusual planet in our solar system in having a bimodal topography that reflects the two distinct types of crust found on our planet. The low-lying oceanic crust is thin (˜7 km on average), composed of relatively dense rock types such as basalt and is young (≤200 Ma old) (see Chapter 3.13). In contrast, the high-standing continental crust is thick (˜40 km on average), is composed of highly diverse lithologies (virtually every rock type known on Earth) that yield an average intermediate or "andesitic" bulk composition (Taylor and McLennan (1985) and references therein), and contains the oldest rocks and minerals yet observed on Earth (currently the 4.0 Ga Acasta gneisses (Bowring and Williams, 1999) and 4.4 Ga detrital zircons from the Yilgarn Block, Western Australia (Wilde et al., 2001)), respectively. Thus, the continents preserve a rich geological history of our planet's evolution and understanding their origin is critical for understanding the origin and differentiation of the Earth.The origin of the continents has received wide attention within the geological community, with hundreds of papers and several books devoted to the topic (the reader is referred to the following general references for further reading: Taylor and McLennan (1985), Windley (1995), and Condie (1997). Knowledge of the age and composition of the continental crust is essential for understanding its origin. Patchett and Samson (Chapter 3.10) review the present-day age distribution of the continental crust and Kemp and Hawkesworth (Chapter 3.11) review secular evolution of crust composition. Moreover, to understand fully the origin and evolution of continents requires an understanding of not only the crust, but also the mantle lithosphere that formed more-or-less contemporaneously with the crust and translates with it as the continents move across the Earth's surface. The latter topic is reviewed in Chapter 2.05.This chapter reviews the present-day composition of the

  6. THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, Todd M.; Song Limin

    2012-02-20

    Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc adjacent outer-Galaxy HVCs, including high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

  7. Tectonics of China: Continental scale cataclastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John J., Jr.

    Stratigraphic, structural, and earthquake evidence indicates that cataclastic flow, that is, flow by brittle mechanisms (e.g., fracture and slip), was dominant in China from late Paleozoic. This process has operated over a range of scales including the continental scale. China is made up of large brittle basement elements immersed in ductile zones which are analogous to porphyroclasts (large, often brittle fragments) surrounded by fluxion (foliation or flow) structures in cataclastic rocks, respectively. This basement fabric for China is seen on Landsat imagery and on tectonic maps and is comparable to cataclastic rock fabrics seen in fault zones, on outcrops, and in thin sections. Brittle basement elements are broken into two or more large rigid blocks, and the dimensions of elements and blocks are within 1 order of magnitude of each other. Ductile zones are made up of fragments which are many orders of magnitude smaller than the ductile zones. Rigid blocks and fragments are identified, and their dimensions are measured through earthquake, fault, and fracture patterns. Rigid basement blocks are surrounded by earthquakes. The sedimentary rocks over the basement faults at the block boundaries seem to be affected by fault movements because they are characterized by facies changes, thickness changes, high-angle faults, and forced folds. Ductile basement zones are earthquake prone, and deformation of the ductile basement affects the overlying sedimentary rocks, as is demonstrated by unconformities and by a wide variety of structures. Thrust faults, buckle folds, and strike slip faults are common in and adjacent to western ductile zones. Structures are most intensely developed where ductile zones abut brittle elements. Both brittle elements and ductile zones are rifted and cut by strike slip faults in eastern China. The mechanical fabric of China and the boundary conditions acting on China are now and always have been determined by its plate tectonic history. This

  8. Outer Appearances Can Be Deceiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the chemical composition of the rock at Gusev Crater dubbed 'Mazatzal' after it was brushed and ground by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The data, taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer over the last few sols, show that the amount of chlorine and sulfur tri-oxide in Mazatzal first increased after brushing, then diminished after grinding. The interior of the rock appears to have the same chemical make-up as other volcanic or basalt rocks studied in the Gusev Crater area ('Adirondack' and 'Humphrey'). Its outer coating or rind, on the other hand, appears to be of a different constitution. Scientists are still puzzling out the implications of these data.

    The larger symbols on the graph represent inferred rock compositions, while the smaller symbols are actual data points. Observations were made at the target dubbed 'New York' on Mazatzal.

  9. Outer Appearances Can Be Deceiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the chemical composition of the rock at Gusev Crater dubbed 'Mazatzal' after it was brushed and ground by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The data, taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer over the last few sols, show that the amount of chlorine and sulfur tri-oxide in Mazatzal first increased after brushing, then diminished after grinding. The interior of the rock appears to have the same chemical make-up as other volcanic or basalt rocks studied in the Gusev Crater area ('Adirondack' and 'Humphrey'). Its outer coating or rind, on the other hand, appears to be of a different constitution. Scientists are still puzzling out the implications of these data.

    The larger symbols on the graph represent inferred rock compositions, while the smaller symbols are actual data points. Observations were made at the target dubbed 'New York' on Mazatzal.

  10. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  11. Chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  12. Geologic framework of the northern North Carolina, USA inner continental shelf and its influence on coastal evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E. Robert; Foster, David S.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Mallinson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The inner continental shelf off the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina was mapped using sidescan sonar, interferometric swath bathymetry, and high-resolution chirp and boomer subbottom profiling systems. We use this information to describe the shallow stratigraphy, reinterpret formation mechanisms of some shoal features, evaluate local relative sea-levels during the Late Pleistocene, and provide new constraints, via recent bedform evolution, on regional sediment transport patterns. The study area is approximately 290 km long by 11 km wide, extending from False Cape, Virginia to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, in water depths ranging from 6 to 34 m. Late Pleistocene sedimentary units comprise the shallow geologic framework of this region and determine both the morphology of the inner shelf and the distribution of sediment sources and sinks. We identify Pleistocene sedimentary units beneath Diamond Shoals that may have provided a geologic template for the location of modern Cape Hatteras and earlier paleo-capes during the Late Pleistocene. These units indicate shallow marine deposition 15–25 m below present sea-level. The uppermost Pleistocene unit may have been deposited as recently as Marine Isotope Stage 3, although some apparent ages for this timing may be suspect. Paleofluvial valleys incised during the Last Glacial Maximum traverse the inner shelf throughout the study area and dissect the Late Pleistocene units. Sediments deposited in the valleys record the Holocene transgression and provide insight into the evolutionary history of the barrier-estuary system in this region. The relationship between these valleys and adjacent shoal complexes suggests that the paleo-Roanoke River did not form the Albemarle Shelf Valley complex as previously proposed; a major fluvial system is absent and thus makes the formation of this feature enigmatic. Major shoal features in the study area show mobility at decadal to centennial timescales, including nearly a kilometer of

  13. Outer trapped surfaces are dense near MOTSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chruściel, Piotr T.; Galloway, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    We show that any vacuum initial data set containing a marginally outer trapped surface S and satisfying a ‘no KIDs’ condition can be perturbed near S so that S becomes strictly outer trapped in the new vacuum initial data set. This, together with the results in Eichmair et al (2012), gives a precise sense in which generic initial data containing marginally outer trapped surfaces lead to geodesically incomplete spacetimes.

  14. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  16. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  17. Hydrates of nat­ural gas in continental margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Barnard, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates in continental margin sediment can be inferred from the widespread occurrence of an anomalous seismic reflector which coincides with the predicted transition boundary at the base of the gas hydrate zone. Direct evidence of gas hydrates is provided by visual observations of sediments from the landward wall of the Mid-America Trench off Mexico and Guatemala, from the Blake Outer Ridge off the southeastern United States, and from the Black Sea in the U.S.S.R. Where solid gas hydrates have been sampled, the gas is composed mainly of methane accompanied by CO2 and low concentrations of ethane and hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight. The molecular and isotopic composition of hydrocarbons indicates that most of the methane is of biolog cal origin. The gas was probably produced by the bacterial alteration of organic matter buried in the sediment. Organic carbon contents of the sediment containing sampled gas hydrates are higher than the average organic carbon content of marine sediments. The main economic importance of gas hydrates may reside in their ability to serve as a cap under which free gas can collect. To be producible, however, such trapped gas must occur in porous and permeable reservoirs. Although gas hydrates are common along continental margins, the degree to which they are associated with significant reservoirs remains to be investigated.

  18. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins. PMID:24301173

  19. Postcollisional mafic igneous rocks record crust-mantle interaction during continental deep subduction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2013-12-04

    Findings of coesite and microdiamond in metamorphic rocks of supracrustal protolith led to the recognition of continental subduction to mantle depths. The crust-mantle interaction is expected to take place during subduction of the continental crust beneath the subcontinental lithospheric mantle wedge. This is recorded by postcollisional mafic igneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its adjacent continental margin in the North China Block. These rocks exhibit the geochemical inheritance of whole-rock trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes from felsic melts derived from the subducted continental crust. Reaction of such melts with the overlying wedge peridotite would transfer the crustal signatures to the mantle sources for postcollisional mafic magmatism. Therefore, postcollisonal mafic igneous rocks above continental subduction zones are an analog to arc volcanics above oceanic subduction zones, providing an additional laboratory for the study of crust-mantle interaction at convergent plate margins.

  20. Thickening the outer margins of the Tibetan Plateau: The role of crustal shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lease, R. O.; Burbank, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    restorations that remove Cenozoic shortening suggest that the northeastern Tibetan crust was 45 ± 5 km thick prior to India-Asia continental collision. This pre-collision thickness estimate is equivalent to average continental crustal thicknesses both adjacent to the Tibetan plateau (44 ± 4 km) and globally (41 ± 6 km) and suggests that pure shear alone may account for Cenozoic crustal thickening in northeastern Tibet, obviating the need for lower crustal flow. Furthermore, a growing number of balanced cross sections across the margins of the Tibetan Plateau document Cenozoic shortening sufficient to generate modern crustal thicknesses: in northern Tibet [Yin et al., 2007; 2008a; 2008b], eastern Tibet [Hubbard et al., 2009; 2010], and northeastern Tibet [this work]. Collectively, these similar findings suggest that lower crustal flow is either unnecessary to account for Cenozoic crustal thickening beneath the outer margins of the Tibetan Plateau or, alternatively, has a more restricted role than originally proposed.