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Sample records for adjacent quantum point

  1. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  2. 49 CFR 236.404 - Signals at adjacent control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Traffic Control Systems Standards § 236.404 Signals at adjacent control points. Signals at adjacent controlled... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signals at adjacent control points....

  3. Quantum Change Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentís, Gael; Bagan, Emilio; Calsamiglia, John; Chiribella, Giulio; Muñoz-Tapia, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Sudden changes are ubiquitous in nature. Identifying them is crucial for a number of applications in biology, medicine, and social sciences. Here we take the problem of detecting sudden changes to the quantum domain. We consider a source that emits quantum particles in a default state, until a point where a mutation occurs that causes the source to switch to another state. The problem is then to find out where the change occurred. We determine the maximum probability of correctly identifying the change point, allowing for collective measurements on the whole sequence of particles emitted by the source. Then, we devise online strategies where the particles are measured individually and an answer is provided as soon as a new particle is received. We show that these online strategies substantially underperform the optimal quantum measurement, indicating that quantum sudden changes, although happening locally, are better detected globally.

  4. Quantum Change Point.

    PubMed

    Sentís, Gael; Bagan, Emilio; Calsamiglia, John; Chiribella, Giulio; Muñoz-Tapia, Ramon

    2016-10-07

    Sudden changes are ubiquitous in nature. Identifying them is crucial for a number of applications in biology, medicine, and social sciences. Here we take the problem of detecting sudden changes to the quantum domain. We consider a source that emits quantum particles in a default state, until a point where a mutation occurs that causes the source to switch to another state. The problem is then to find out where the change occurred. We determine the maximum probability of correctly identifying the change point, allowing for collective measurements on the whole sequence of particles emitted by the source. Then, we devise online strategies where the particles are measured individually and an answer is provided as soon as a new particle is received. We show that these online strategies substantially underperform the optimal quantum measurement, indicating that quantum sudden changes, although happening locally, are better detected globally.

  5. Deconfined Quantum Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthi, T.; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    The theory of second-order phase transitions is one of the foundations of modern statistical mechanics and condensed-matter theory. A central concept is the observable order parameter, whose nonzero average value characterizes one or more phases. At large distances and long times, fluctuations of the order parameter(s) are described by a continuum field theory, and these dominate the physics near such phase transitions. We show that near second-order quantum phase transitions, subtle quantum interference effects can invalidate this paradigm, and we present a theory of quantum critical points in a variety of experimentally relevant two-dimensional antiferromagnets. The critical points separate phases characterized by conventional "confining" order parameters. Nevertheless, the critical theory contains an emergent gauge field and "deconfined" degrees of freedom associated with fractionalization of the order parameters. We propose that this paradigm for quantum criticality may be the key to resolving a number of experimental puzzles in correlated electron systems and offer a new perspective on the properties of complex materials.

  6. Laplacian versus adjacency matrix in quantum walk search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Tarrataca, Luís; Nahimov, Nikolay

    2016-10-01

    A quantum particle evolving by Schrödinger's equation contains, from the kinetic energy of the particle, a term in its Hamiltonian proportional to Laplace's operator. In discrete space, this is replaced by the discrete or graph Laplacian, which gives rise to a continuous-time quantum walk. Besides this natural definition, some quantum walk algorithms instead use the adjacency matrix to effect the walk. While this is equivalent to the Laplacian for regular graphs, it is different for non-regular graphs and is thus an inequivalent quantum walk. We algorithmically explore this distinction by analyzing search on the complete bipartite graph with multiple marked vertices, using both the Laplacian and adjacency matrix. The two walks differ qualitatively and quantitatively in their required jumping rate, runtime, sampling of marked vertices, and in what constitutes a natural initial state. Thus the choice of the Laplacian or adjacency matrix to effect the walk has important algorithmic consequences.

  7. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  8. Local feature point extraction for quantum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Xu, Kai; Gao, Yinghui; Wilson, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Quantum image processing has been a hot issue in the last decade. However, the lack of the quantum feature extraction method leads to the limitation of quantum image understanding. In this paper, a quantum feature extraction framework is proposed based on the novel enhanced quantum representation of digital images. Based on the design of quantum image addition and subtraction operations and some quantum image transformations, the feature points could be extracted by comparing and thresholding the gradients of the pixels. Different methods of computing the pixel gradient and different thresholds can be realized under this quantum framework. The feature points extracted from quantum image can be used to construct quantum graph. Our work bridges the gap between quantum image processing and graph analysis based on quantum mechanics.

  9. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  10. Fixed-point quantum search.

    PubMed

    Grover, Lov K

    2005-10-07

    The quantum search algorithm consists of an iterative sequence of selective inversions and diffusion type operations, as a result of which it is able to find a state with desired properties (target state) in an unsorted database of size N in only sqrt[N] queries. This is achieved by designing the iterative transformations in a way that each iteration results in a small rotation of the state vector in a two-dimensional Hilbert space that includes the target state; if we choose the right number of iterative steps, we will stop just at the target state. This Letter shows that by replacing the selective inversions by selective phase shifts of pi/3, the algorithm preferentially converges to the target state irrespective of the step size or number of iterations. This feature leads to robust search algorithms and also to new schemes for quantum control and error correction.

  11. Detecting quantum critical points using bipartite fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rachel, Stephan; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Song, H Francis; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-03-16

    We show that the concept of bipartite fluctuations F provides a very efficient tool to detect quantum phase transitions in strongly correlated systems. Using state-of-the-art numerical techniques complemented with analytical arguments, we investigate paradigmatic examples for both quantum spins and bosons. As compared to the von Neumann entanglement entropy, we observe that F allows us to find quantum critical points with much better accuracy in one dimension. We further demonstrate that F can be successfully applied to the detection of quantum criticality in higher dimensions with no prior knowledge of the universality class of the transition. Promising approaches to experimentally access fluctuations are discussed for quantum antiferromagnets and cold gases.

  12. 33 CFR 334.880 - San Diego Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area adjacent to Point Loma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Commander, Naval Base, San Diego, Calif. (3) The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, Calif.; naval....880 San Diego Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area adjacent to Point Loma. (a) The area. That...

  13. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    DOE PAGES

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transitionmore » from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d+zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T)ε[0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T=0) = 1 and Λ(T →∞) = 0. Lastly, our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.« less

  14. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d + zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T) ∈ [0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T = 0) = 1 and Λ(T → ∞) = 0. Our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover. PMID:26688102

  15. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d+zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T)ε[0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T=0) = 1 and Λ(T →∞) = 0. Lastly, our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.

  16. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Vasin, M; Ryzhov, V; Vinokur, V M

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d + zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T) ∈ [0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T = 0) = 1 and Λ(T → ∞) = 0. Our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.

  17. Nonlinear peltier effect in quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachek, E. N.; Scherbakov, A. G.; Landman, Uzi

    1998-11-01

    A theoretical analysis of the Peltier effect in two-dimensional quantum point contacts, in field-free conditions and under the influence of applied magnetic fields, is presented. It is shown that in the nonlinear regime (finite applied voltage) new peaks in the Peltier coefficient appear leading to violation of Onsager's relation. Oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in a magnetic field are demonstrated.

  18. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  19. Dynamical Response near Quantum Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew; Gazit, Snir; Podolsky, Daniel; Witczak-Krempa, William

    2017-02-01

    We study high-frequency response functions, notably the optical conductivity, in the vicinity of quantum critical points (QCPs) by allowing for both detuning from the critical coupling and finite temperature. We consider general dimensions and dynamical exponents. This leads to a unified understanding of sum rules. In systems with emergent Lorentz invariance, powerful methods from quantum field theory allow us to fix the high-frequency response in terms of universal coefficients. We test our predictions analytically in the large-N O (N ) model and using the gauge-gravity duality and numerically via quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a lattice model hosting the interacting superfluid-insulator QCP. In superfluid phases, interacting Goldstone bosons qualitatively change the high-frequency optical conductivity and the corresponding sum rule.

  20. Pseudogap state near a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, K. B.; Meier, H.; Pépin, C.

    2013-07-01

    In the standard picture of a quantum phase transition, a single quantum critical point separates the phases at zero temperature. Here we show that the two-dimensional case is considerably more complex. Instead of the single point separating the antiferromagnet from the normal metal, we have discovered a broad region between these two phases where the magnetic order is destroyed but certain areas of the Fermi surface are closed by a large gap. This gap reflects the formation of a quantum state characterized by a superposition of d-wave superconductivity and a quadrupole density wave, which builds a chequerboard pattern with a period incommensurate with that of the original spin-density wave. At moderate temperatures both orders coexist over comparatively large distances but thermal fluctuations destroy the long-range order. Below a critical temperature the fluctuations are less essential and superconductivity becomes stable. This phenomenon may help to explain the origin of the mysterious pseudogap state and of the high-temperature transition into the superconducting state in the cuprates. In particular, we show that spectroscopic probes on the oxygen and copper sites reveal chequerboard order.

  1. Nonequilibrium conductivity at quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, A. M.; Green, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum criticality provides an important route to revealing universal nonequilibrium behavior. A canonical example of a critical point is the Bose-Hubbard model, which we study under the application of an electric field. A Boltzmann transport formalism and ɛ expansion are used to obtain the nonequilibrium conductivity and current noise. This approach allows us to explicitly identify how a universal nonequilibrium steady state is maintained, by identifying the rate-limiting step in balancing Joule heating and dissipation to a heat bath. It also reveals that the nonequilibrium distribution function is very far from a thermal distribution.

  2. Navigated Pin-Point Approach to Osteoid Osteoma Adjacent to the Facet Joint of Spine

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Masashi; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Nishizawa, Kazuya; Imai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign osteoblastic tumor. Its curative treatment is complete removal of the nidus, where intraoperative localization of the nidus governs clinical results. However, treatment can be difficult since the lesion is often invisible over the bony surface. Accordingly, establishment of an ideal less invasive surgical strategy for spinal OO remains yet unsettled. We illustrate the efficacy of a computed tomography (CT)-based navigation system in excising OO located adjacent to the facet joint of spine. In our 2 cases, complete and pin-point removal of the nidus located close to the facet joint was successfully achieved, without excessive removal of the bone potentially leading to spinal instability and possible damage of nearby neurovascular structures. We advocate a less invasive approach to spinal OO, particularly in an environment with an available CT-based navigation system. PMID:26949472

  3. Multiple energy scales at a quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Gegenwart, P; Westerkamp, T; Krellner, C; Tokiwa, Y; Paschen, S; Geibel, C; Steglich, F; Abrahams, E; Si, Q

    2007-02-16

    We report thermodynamic measurements in a magnetic-field-driven quantum critical point of a heavy fermion metal, YbRh2Si2. The data provide evidence for an energy scale in the equilibrium excitation spectrum that is in addition to the one expected from the slow fluctuations of the order parameter. Both energy scales approach zero as the quantum critical point is reached, thereby providing evidence for a new class of quantum criticality.

  4. Neural network simulation of the atmospheric point spread function for the adjacency effect research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoshan; Wang, Haidong; Li, Ligang; Yang, Zhen; Meng, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Adjacency effect could be regarded as the convolution of the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) and the surface leaving radiance. Monte Carlo is a common method to simulate the atmospheric PSF. But it can't obtain analytic expression and the meaningful results can be only acquired by statistical analysis of millions of data. A backward Monte Carlo algorithm was employed to simulate photon emitting and propagating in the atmosphere under different conditions. The PSF was determined by recording the photon-receiving numbers in fixed bin at different position. A multilayer feed-forward neural network with a single hidden layer was designed to learn the relationship between the PSF's and the input condition parameters. The neural network used the back-propagation learning rule for training. Its input parameters involved atmosphere condition, spectrum range, observing geometry. The outputs of the network were photon-receiving numbers in the corresponding bin. Because the output units were too many to be allowed by neural network, the large network was divided into a collection of smaller ones. These small networks could be ran simultaneously on many workstations and/or PCs to speed up the training. It is important to note that the simulated PSF's by Monte Carlo technique in non-nadir viewing angles are more complicated than that in nadir conditions which brings difficulties in the design of the neural network. The results obtained show that the neural network approach could be very useful to compute the atmospheric PSF based on the simulated data generated by Monte Carlo method.

  5. Stability of Branched Flow from a Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Heller, Eric J.

    2013-12-01

    In classically chaotic systems, small differences in initial conditions are exponentially magnified over time. However, it was observed experimentally that the (necessarily quantum) “branched flow” pattern of electron flux from a quantum point contact (QPC) traveling over a random background potential in two-dimensional electron gases remains substantially invariant to large changes in initial conditions. Since such a potential is classically chaotic and unstable to changes in initial conditions, it was conjectured that the origin of the observed stability is purely quantum mechanical, with no classical analog. In this Letter, we show that the observed stability is a result of the physics of the quantum point contact and the nature of the experiment. We show that the same stability can indeed be reproduced classically, or quantum mechanically. In addition, we explore the stability of the branched flow with regards to changes in the eigenmodes of the quantum point contact.

  6. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  7. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  8. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  9. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  10. 33 CFR 334.412 - Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound... REGULATIONS § 334.412 Albemarle Sound, Pamlico Sound, Harvey Point and adjacent waters, NC; restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning on the north shore of Albemarle Sound and the easternmost tip of Harvey...

  11. Order parameter fluctuations at a buried quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yejun; Wang, Jiyang; Jaramillo, R.; van Wezel, Jasper; Haravifard, S.; Srajer, G.; Liu, Y.; Xu, Z.-A.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an X-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe2 at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase; and in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the long-standing expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low-dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface. PMID:22529348

  12. Order parameter fluctuations at a buried quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yejun; Wang, Jiyang; Jaramillo, R; van Wezel, Jasper; Haravifard, S; Srajer, G; Liu, Y; Xu, Z-A; Littlewood, P B; Rosenbaum, T F

    2012-05-08

    Quantum criticality is a central concept in condensed matter physics, but the direct observation of quantum critical fluctuations has remained elusive. Here we present an X-ray diffraction study of the charge density wave (CDW) in 2H-NbSe(2) at high pressure and low temperature, where we observe a broad regime of order parameter fluctuations that are controlled by proximity to a quantum critical point. X-rays can track the CDW despite the fact that the quantum critical regime is shrouded inside a superconducting phase; and in contrast to transport probes, allow direct measurement of the critical fluctuations of the charge order. Concurrent measurements of the crystal lattice point to a critical transition that is continuous in nature. Our results confirm the long-standing expectations of enhanced quantum fluctuations in low-dimensional systems, and may help to constrain theories of the quantum critical Fermi surface.

  13. Quantum state measurement in double quantum dots with a radio-frequency quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Hai-Xia; Yin, Wen; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2014-02-01

    We study the dynamics of two electron spins in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) monitored by a quantum point contact (QPC) detector. Their quantum state can be measured by embedding the QPC in an LC circuit. We derive the Bloch-type rate equations of the reduced density matrix for CQDs. Special attention is paid to the numerical results for the weak measurement condintion under a strong Coulomb interaction. It is shown that the evolution of QPC current always follows that of electron occupation in the right dot. In addition, we find that the output voltage of the circuit can reflect the evolution of QPC current when the circuit and QPC are approximately equal in frequency. In particular, the wave shape of the output voltage can be improved by adjusting the circuit resonance frequency and bandwidth.

  14. Unconventional quantum critical points in systems of strongly interacting bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, T. A.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2014-09-01

    Using the combined Bogoliubov method and the quantum rotor approach, we map the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian of strongly interacting bosons onto U(1) phase action. By unraveling consequences of the nontrivial topology of the U(1) gauge group and the associated ground state degeneracy we found a close kinship of the zero-temperature divergence of the compressibility and the topological susceptibility at degeneracy points, which marks a novel quantum criticality governed by topological features rather than the Landau principle of the symmetry breaking. We argue that the existence of this new type of the criticality may be instrumental in explaining unconventional quantum critical points observed in superconducting cuprates.

  15. Black holes as critical point of quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar

    We reformulate the quantum black hole portrait in the language of modern condensed matter physics. We show that black holes can be understood as a graviton Bose-Einstein condensate at the critical point of a quantum phase transition, identical to what has been observed in systems of cold atoms. The Bogoliubov modes that become degenerate and nearly gapless at this point are the holographic quantum degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy and the information storage. They have no (semi)classical counterparts and become inaccessible in this limit. These findings indicate a deep connection between the seemingly remote systems and suggest a new quantum foundation of holography. They also open an intriguing possibility of simulating black hole information processing in table-top labs.

  16. Black holes as critical point of quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar

    2014-02-01

    We reformulate the quantum black hole portrait in the language of modern condensed matter physics. We show that black holes can be understood as a graviton Bose-Einstein condensate at the critical point of a quantum phase transition, identical to what has been observed in systems of cold atoms. The Bogoliubov modes that become degenerate and nearly gapless at this point are the holographic quantum degrees of freedom responsible for the black hole entropy and the information storage. They have no (semi)classical counterparts and become inaccessible in this limit. These findings indicate a deep connection between the seemingly remote systems and suggest a new quantum foundation of holography. They also open an intriguing possibility of simulating black hole information processing in table-top labs.

  17. Electron transport through magnetic quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Timothy Ellis

    Spin-based electronics, or spintronics, has generated a great deal of interest as a possible next-generation integrated circuit technology. Recent experimental and theoretical work has shown that these devices could exhibit increased processing speed, decreased power consumption, and increased integration densities as compared with conventional semiconductor devices. The spintronic device that was designed, fabricated, and tested throughout the course of this work aimed to study the generation of spin-polarized currents in semiconductors using magnetic fringe fields. The device scheme relied on the Zeeman effect in combination with a quantum mechanical barrier to generate spin-polarized currents. The Zeeman effect was used to break the degeneracy of spin-up and spin-down electrons and the quantum mechanical potential to transmit one while rejecting the other. The design was dictated by the drive to maximize the strength of the magnetic fringe field and in turn maximize the energy separation of the two spin species. The device was fabricated using advanced techniques in semiconductor processing including electron beam lithography and DC magnetron sputtering. Measurements were performed in a 3He cryostat equipped with a superconducting magnet at temperatures below 300 mK. Preliminary characterization of the device revealed magnetoconductance oscillations produced by the effect of the transverse confining potential on the density of states and the mobility. Evidence of the effect of the magnetic fringe fields on the transport properties of electrons in the device were observed in multiple device measurements. An abrupt washout of the quantized conductance steps was observed over a minute range of the applied magnetic field. The washout was again observed as electrons were shifted closer to the magnetic gates. In addition, bias spectroscopy demonstrated that the washout occurred despite stronger electron confinement, as compared to a non-magnetic split-gate. Thus, the

  18. Multicritical point in a diluted bilayer Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Anders W

    2002-10-21

    The S=1/2 Heisenberg bilayer antiferromagnet with randomly removed interlayer dimers is studied using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. A zero-temperature multicritical point (p(*),g(*)) at the classical percolation density p=p(*) and interlayer coupling g(*) approximately equal 0.16 is demonstrated. The quantum critical exponents of the percolating cluster are determined using finite-size scaling. It is argued that the associated finite-temperature quantum critical regime extends to zero interlayer coupling and could be relevant for antiferromagnetic cuprates doped with nonmagnetic impurities.

  19. Pairing correlations near a Kondo-destruction quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Deng, Lili; Ingersent, Kevin; Si, Qimiao

    2015-05-01

    Motivated by the unconventional superconductivity observed in heavy-fermion metals, we investigate pairing susceptibilities near a continuous quantum phase transition of the Kondo-destruction type. We solve two-impurity Bose-Fermi Anderson models with Ising and Heisenberg forms of the interimpurity exchange interaction using continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo and numerical renormalization-group methods. Each model exhibits a Kondo-destruction quantum critical point separating Kondo-screened and local-moment phases. For antiferromagnetic interimpurity exchange interactions, singlet pairing is found to be enhanced in the vicinity of the transition. Implications of this result for heavy-fermion superconductivity are discussed.

  20. Floating point representations in quantum circuit synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Kliuchnikov, Vadym

    2013-09-01

    We provide a non-deterministic quantum protocol that approximates the single qubit rotations Rx(2ϕ21ϕ22) using Rx(2ϕ1) and Rx(2ϕ2) and a constant number of Clifford and T operations. We then use this method to construct a ‘floating point’ implementation of a small rotation wherein we use the aforementioned method to construct the exponent part of the rotation and also to combine it with a mantissa. This causes the cost of the synthesis to depend more strongly on the relative (rather than absolute) precision required. We analyze the mean and variance of the T-count required to use our techniques and provide new lower bounds for the T-count for ancilla free synthesis of small single-qubit axial rotations. We further show that our techniques can use ancillas to beat these lower bounds with high probability. We also discuss the T-depth of our method and see that the vast majority of the cost of the resultant circuits can be shifted to parallel computation paths.

  1. Universal Postquench Prethermalization at a Quantum Critical Point.

    PubMed

    Gagel, Pia; Orth, Peter P; Schmalian, Jörg

    2014-11-28

    We consider an open system near a quantum critical point that is suddenly moved towards the critical point. The bath-dominated diffusive nonequilibrium dynamics after the quench is shown to follow scaling behavior, governed by a critical exponent that emerges in addition to the known equilibrium critical exponents. We determine this exponent and show that it describes universal prethermalized coarsening dynamics of the order parameter in an intermediate time regime. Implications of this quantum critical prethermalization are: (i) a power law rise of order and correlations after an initial collapse of the equilibrium state and (ii) a crossover to thermalization that occurs arbitrarily late for sufficiently shallow quenches.

  2. Resummation of fluctuations near ferromagnetic quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, C. J.; Krüger, F.; Green, A. G.

    2013-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the nonanalytic structure of the free energy for the itinerant ferromagnet near the quantum critical point in two and three dimensions. We analyze a model of electrons with an isotropic dispersion interacting through a contact repulsion. A fermionic version of the quantum order-by-disorder mechanism allows us to calculate the free energy as a functional of the dispersion in the presence of homogeneous and spiraling magnetic order. We resum the leading divergent contributions to derive an algebraic expression for the nonanalytic contribution to free energy from quantum fluctuations. Using a recursion which relates subleading divergences to the leading term, we calculate the full T=0 contribution in d=3. We propose an interpolating functional form, which allows us to track phase transition lines at temperatures far below the tricritical point and down to T=0. In d=2, quantum fluctuations are stronger, and nonanalyticities are more severe. Using a similar resummation approach, we find that despite the different nonanalytic structures, the phase diagrams in two and three dimensions are remarkably similar, exhibiting an incommensurate spiral phase near the avoided quantum critical point.

  3. Exotic quantum holonomy and higher-order exceptional points in quantum kicked tops.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atushi; Kim, Sang Wook; Cheon, Taksu

    2014-04-01

    The correspondence between exotic quantum holonomy, which occurs in families of Hermitian cycles, and exceptional points (EPs) for non-Hermitian quantum theory is examined in quantum kicked tops. Under a suitable condition, an explicit expression of the adiabatic parameter dependencies of quasienergies and stationary states, which exhibit anholonomies, is obtained. It is also shown that the quantum kicked tops with the complexified adiabatic parameter have a higher-order EP, which is broken into lower-order EPs with the application of small perturbations. The stability of exotic holonomy against such bifurcation is demonstrated.

  4. Partial dynamical symmetry at critical points of quantum phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, A

    2007-06-15

    We show that partial dynamical symmetries can occur at critical points of quantum phase transitions, in which case underlying competing symmetries are conserved exactly by a subset of states, and mix strongly in other states. Several types of partial dynamical symmetries are demonstrated with the example of critical-point Hamiltonians for first- and second-order transitions in the framework of the interacting boson model, whose dynamical symmetries correspond to different shape phases in nuclei.

  5. Stochastic approximation of dynamical exponent at quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Shinya; Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a unified finite-size scaling method for quantum phase transitions that requires no prior knowledge of the dynamical exponent z . During a quantum Monte Carlo simulation, the temperature is automatically tuned by the Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation method, being proportional to the lowest gap of the finite-size system. The dynamical exponent is estimated in a straightforward way from the system-size dependence of the temperature. As a demonstration of our novel method, the two-dimensional S =1 /2 quantum X Y model in uniform and staggered magnetic fields is investigated in the combination of the world-line quantum Monte Carlo worm algorithm. In the absence of a uniform magnetic field, we obtain the fully consistent result with the Lorentz invariance at the quantum critical point, z =1 , i.e., the three-dimensional classical X Y universality class. Under a finite uniform magnetic field, on the other hand, the dynamical exponent becomes two, and the mean-field universality with effective dimension (2 +2 ) governs the quantum phase transition.

  6. Stochastic Approximation of Dynamical Exponent at Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Hidemaro; Yasuda, Shinya; Todo, Synge

    We have developed a unified finite-size scaling method for quantum phase transitions that requires no prior knowledge of the dynamical exponent z. During a quantum Monte Carlo simulation, the temperature is automatically tuned by the Robbins-Monro stochastic approximation method, being proportional to the lowest gap of the finite-size system. The dynamical exponent is estimated in a straightforward way from the system-size dependence of the temperature. As a demonstration of our novel method, the two-dimensional S = 1 / 2 quantum XY model, or equivalently the hard-core boson system, in uniform and staggered magnetic fields is investigated in the combination of the world-line quantum Monte Carlo worm algorithm. In the absence of a uniform magnetic field, we obtain the fully consistent result with the Lorentz invariance at the quantum critical point, z = 1 . Under a finite uniform magnetic field, on the other hand, the dynamical exponent becomes two, and the mean-field universality with effective dimension (2+2) governs the quantum phase transition. We will discuss also the system with random magnetic fields, or the dirty boson system, bearing a non-trivial dynamical exponent.Reference: S. Yasuda, H. Suwa, and S. Todo Phys. Rev. B 92, 104411 (2015); arXiv:1506.04837

  7. Reprint of : Quantum point contacts as heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgram, Sebastian; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of macroscopic heat engines is restricted by the second law of thermodynamics. They can reach at most the efficiency of a Carnot engine. In contrast, heat currents in mesoscopic heat engines show fluctuations. Thus, there is a small probability that a mesoscopic heat engine exceeds Carnot's maximum value during a short measurement time. We illustrate this effect using a quantum point contact as a heat engine. When a temperature difference is applied to a quantum point contact, the system may be utilized as a source of electrical power under steady state conditions. We first discuss the optimal working point of such a heat engine that maximizes the generated electrical power and subsequently calculate the statistics for deviations of the efficiency from its most likely value. We find that deviations surpassing the Carnot limit are possible, but unlikely.

  8. Valleys in a silicon/silicon-germanium quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Lisa M.

    This thesis develops a method for performing spectroscopy on a quantum point contact and extracting the energies that contribute to the spectrum, most notably in this case, the valley splitting. Valleys in silicon are of interest from a materials point of view when implementing quantum computing in silicon, because quantum computing relies on the existence of two well defined states, and the presence of valleys possibly interferes with that requirement. While silicon is of great interest for this application due to its low spin-orbit coupling and the abundance of an isotope with zero nuclear spin, two of the main sources for decoherence, silicon also has a near degeneracy in the conduction band minimum (valley), possibly leading to another source of decoherence. Recent measurements have shown the valley splitting to be acceptably large in the presence of confinement. This thesis builds on those results by investigating the fundamental mechanisms of valley splitting by taking into account the coupling of the valleys in different transverse confinement modes of a quantum point contact and the dependence of valley splitting on the relevant properties of the substrate and material, namely the miscut angle and device orientation. Also included are estimates of the uncertainty and explanation of how we defined the uncertainty and the methods we used to calculate it. A comparison between previously published results and those presented in this thesis shows that they are consistent with each other and the valley splitting is indeed larger than the spin splitting.

  9. Entanglement entropy near Kondo-destruction quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Chowdhury, Tathagata; Miecnikowski, M. T.; Stephens, Jaimie; Wagner, Christopher; Ingersent, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    We study the impurity entanglement entropy Se in quantum impurity models that feature a Kondo-destruction quantum critical point (QCP) arising from a pseudogap in the conduction-band density of states or from coupling to a bosonic bath. On the local-moment (Kondo-destroyed) side of the QCP, the entanglement entropy contains a critical component that can be related to the order parameter characterizing the quantum phase transition. In Kondo models describing a spin-Simp,Se assumes its maximal value of ln(2 Simp+1 ) at the QCP and throughout the Kondo phase, independent of features such as particle-hole symmetry and under- or overscreening. In Anderson models, Se is nonuniversal at the QCP and, at particle-hole symmetry, rises monotonically on passage from the local-moment phase to the Kondo phase; breaking this symmetry can lead to a cusp peak in Se due to a divergent charge susceptibility at the QCP. Implications of these results for quantum critical systems and quantum dots are discussed.

  10. Quantum Fluctuation Theorem in an Interacting Setup: Point Contacts in Fractional Quantum Hall Edge State Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komnik, A.; Saleur, H.

    2011-09-01

    We verify the validity of the Cohen-Gallavotti fluctuation theorem for the strongly correlated problem of charge transfer through an impurity in a chiral Luttinger liquid, which is realizable experimentally as a quantum point contact in a fractional quantum Hall edge state device. This is accomplished via the development of an analytical method to calculate the full counting statistics of the problem in all the parameter regimes involving the temperature, the Hall voltage, and the gate voltage.

  11. Quantum fluctuation theorem in an interacting setup: point contacts in fractional quantum Hall edge state devices.

    PubMed

    Komnik, A; Saleur, H

    2011-09-02

    We verify the validity of the Cohen-Gallavotti fluctuation theorem for the strongly correlated problem of charge transfer through an impurity in a chiral Luttinger liquid, which is realizable experimentally as a quantum point contact in a fractional quantum Hall edge state device. This is accomplished via the development of an analytical method to calculate the full counting statistics of the problem in all the parameter regimes involving the temperature, the Hall voltage, and the gate voltage.

  12. Connecting strongly correlated superfluids by a quantum point contact.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Dominik; Uchino, Shun; Krinner, Sebastian; Lebrat, Martin; Giamarchi, Thierry; Esslinger, Tilman; Brantut, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-18

    Point contacts provide simple connections between macroscopic particle reservoirs. In electric circuits, strong links between metals, semiconductors, or superconductors have applications for fundamental condensed-matter physics as well as quantum information processing. However, for complex, strongly correlated materials, links have been largely restricted to weak tunnel junctions. We studied resonantly interacting Fermi gases connected by a tunable, ballistic quantum point contact, finding a nonlinear current-bias relation. At low temperature, our observations agree quantitatively with a theoretical model in which the current originates from multiple Andreev reflections. In a wide contact geometry, the competition between superfluidity and thermally activated transport leads to a conductance minimum. Our system offers a controllable platform for the study of mesoscopic devices based on strongly interacting matter.

  13. Gate-defined graphene quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Nakaharai, S; Williams, J R; Marcus, C M

    2011-07-15

    We investigate transport in a gate-defined graphene quantum point contact in the quantum Hall regime. Edge states confined to the interface of p and n regions in the graphene sheet are controllably brought together from opposite sides of the sample and allowed to mix in this split-gate geometry. Among the expected quantum Hall features, an unexpected additional plateau at 0.5h/e2 is observed. We propose that chaotic mixing of edge channels gives rise to the extra plateau.

  14. Scanning gate imaging of a disordered quantum point contact.

    PubMed

    Aoki, N; da Cunha, C R; Akis, R; Ferry, D K; Ochiai, Y

    2014-05-14

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is a novel technique that has been used to image characteristic features related to the coherent electron flow in mesoscopic structures. For instance, SGM has successfully been applied to study peculiar electron transport properties that arise due to small levels of disorder in a system. The particular case of an InGaAs quantum well layer in a heterostructure, which is dominated by a quasi-ballistic regime, was analyzed. A quantum point contact fabricated onto this material exhibits conduction fluctuations that are not expected in typical high-mobility heterostructures such as AlGaAs/GaAs. SGM revealed not only interference patterns corresponding to specific conductance fluctuations but also mode-dependent resistance peaks corresponding to the first and second quantum levels of conductance (2e(2)/h) at zero magnetic field. On the other hand, clear conductance plateaus originating from the integer quantum Hall effect were observed at high magnetic fields. The physical size of incompressible edge channels was estimated from cross-sectional analysis of these images.

  15. Quantum percolation and transition point of a directed discrete-time quantum walk

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, C. M.; Busch, Th.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum percolation describes the problem of a quantum particle moving through a disordered system. While certain similarities to classical percolation exist, the quantum case has additional complexity due to the possibility of Anderson localisation. Here, we consider a directed discrete-time quantum walk as a model to study quantum percolation of a two-state particle on a two-dimensional lattice. Using numerical analysis we determine the fraction of connected edges required (transition point) in the lattice for the two-state particle to percolate with finite (non-zero) probability for three fundamental lattice geometries, finite square lattice, honeycomb lattice, and nanotube structure and show that it tends towards unity for increasing lattice sizes. To support the numerical results we also use a continuum approximation to analytically derive the expression for the percolation probability for the case of the square lattice and show that it agrees with the numerically obtained results for the discrete case. Beyond the fundamental interest to understand the dynamics of a two-state particle on a lattice (network) with disconnected vertices, our study has the potential to shed light on the transport dynamics in various quantum condensed matter systems and the construction of quantum information processing and communication protocols. PMID:25301394

  16. Impurities near an antiferromagnetic-singlet quantum critical point

    DOE PAGES

    Mendes-Santos, T.; Costa, N. C.; Batrouni, G.; ...

    2017-02-15

    Heavy-fermion systems and other strongly correlated electron materials often exhibit a competition between antiferromagnetic (AF) and singlet ground states. We examine the effect of impurities in the vicinity of such an AF-singlet quantum critical point (QCP), through an appropriately defined “impurity susceptibility” χimp, using exact quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Our key finding is a connection within a single calculational framework between AF domains induced on the singlet side of the transition and the behavior of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rate 1/T1. Furthermore, we show that local NMR measurements provide a diagnostic for the location of the QCP, whichmore » agrees remarkably well with the vanishing of the AF order parameter and large values of χimp.« less

  17. Impurities near an antiferromagnetic-singlet quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Santos, T.; Costa, N. C.; Batrouni, G.; Curro, N.; dos Santos, R. R.; Paiva, T.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    Heavy-fermion systems and other strongly correlated electron materials often exhibit a competition between antiferromagnetic (AF) and singlet ground states. Using exact quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we examine the effect of impurities in the vicinity of such an AF-singlet quantum critical point (QCP), through an appropriately defined "impurity susceptibility" χimp. Our key finding is a connection within a single calculational framework between AF domains induced on the singlet side of the transition and the behavior of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rate 1 /T1 . We show that local NMR measurements provide a diagnostic for the location of the QCP, which agrees remarkably well with the vanishing of the AF order parameter and large values of χimp.

  18. Point form relativistic quantum mechanics and relativistic SU(6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klink, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The point form is used as a framework for formulating a relativistic quantum mechanics, with the mass operator carrying the interactions of underlying constituents. A symplectic Lie algebra of mass operators is introduced from which a relativistic harmonic oscillator mass operator is formed. Mass splittings within the degenerate harmonic oscillator levels arise from relativistically invariant spin-spin, spin-orbit, and tensor mass operators. Internal flavor (and color) symmetries are introduced which make it possible to formulate a relativistic SU(6) model of baryons (and mesons). Careful attention is paid to the permutation symmetry properties of the hadronic wave functions, which are written as polynomials in Bargmann spaces.

  19. Effects of dissipation on a quantum critical point with disorder.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, José A; Kotabage, Chetan; Vojta, Thomas

    2007-12-07

    We study the effects of dissipation on a disordered quantum phase transition with O(N) order-parameter symmetry by applying a strong-disorder renormalization group to the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson field theory of the problem. We find that Ohmic dissipation results in a nonperturbative infinite-randomness critical point with unconventional activated dynamical scaling while super-Ohmic damping leads to conventional behavior. We discuss applications to the superconductor-metal transition in nanowires and to the Hertz theory of the itinerant antiferromagnetic transition.

  20. Ubiquity of quantum zero-point fluctuations in dislocation glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeiro Dos Reis, Marie; Choudhury, Anshuman; Proville, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    Modeling the dislocation glide through atomic scale simulations in Al, Cu, and Ni and in solid solution alloys Al(Mg) and Cu(Ag), we show that in the course of the plastic deformation the variation of the crystal zero-point energy (ZPE) and the dislocation potential energy barriers are of opposite sign. The multiplicity of situations where we have observed the same trend allows us to conclude that quantum fluctuations, giving rise to the crystal ZPE, make easier the dislocation glide in most materials, even those constituted of atoms heavier than H and He.

  1. Nonlinear Seebeck and Peltier effects in quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çipilolu, M. A.; Turgut, S.; Tomak, M.

    2004-09-01

    The charge and entropy currents across a quantum point contact are expanded as a series in powers of the applied bias voltage and the temperature difference. After that, the expansions of the Seebeck voltage in temperature difference and the Peltier heat in current are obtained. With a suitable choice of the average temperature and chemical potential, the lowest order nonlinear term in both cases appear to be of third order. The behavior of the third-order coefficients in both cases are then investigated for different contact parameters.

  2. Detection of Majorana Kramers Pairs Using a Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Pan, Wei; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a setup that integrates a quantum point contact (QPC) and a Josephson junction on a quantum spin Hall sample, experimentally realizable in InAs/GaSb quantum wells. The confinement due to both the QPC and the superconductor results in a Kramers pair of Majorana zero-energy bound states when the superconducting phases in the two arms differ by an odd multiple of π across the Josephson junction. We investigate the detection of these Majorana pairs with the integrated QPC, and find a robust switching from normal to Andreev scattering across the edges due to the presence of Majorana Kramers pairs. Such a switching of the current represents a qualitative signature where multiterminal differential conductances oscillate with alternating signs when the external magnetic field is tuned. We show that this qualitative signature is also present in current cross-correlations. Thus, the change of the backscattering current nature affects both conductance and shot noise, the measurement of which offers a significant advantage over quantitative signatures such as conductance quantization in realistic measurements.

  3. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; Flicker, Felix; Silevitch, D. M.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-10-01

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviour of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.

  4. Scanning gate spectroscopy of a quantum Hall island near a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackens, Benoit; Martins, Frederico; Faniel, Sebastien; Bayot, Vincent; Rosenow, Bernd; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wallart, Xavier; Pala, Marco; Sellier, Hermann; Huant, Serge

    2013-03-01

    We report on low temperature (100 mK) scanning gate experiments performed at high magnetic field (around 10 T) on a mesoscopic device patterned in an InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure. Magnetotransport measurements yield signatures of ultra-small Quantum Hall Islands (QHI) formed by closed quantum Hall edge states and connected to propagating edge channels through tunnel barriers. Scanning gate microscopy and scanning gate spectroscopy are used to locate and probe a single QHI near a quantum point contact. The presence of Coulomb diamonds in the local spectroscopy confirms that Coulomb blockade governs transport across the QHI. Varying the microscope tip bias as well as current bias across the device, we uncover the QHI discrete energy spectrum arising from electronic confinement and we extract estimates of the gradient of the confining potential and of the edge state velocity.

  5. Critical integer quantum Hall topology and the integrable Maryland model as a topological quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshan, Sriram; Kechedzhi, K.; Das Sarma, S.

    2014-07-01

    One-dimensional tight binding models such as the Aubry-André-Harper (AAH) model (with an on-site cosine potential) and the integrable Maryland model (with an on-site tangent potential) have been the subject of extensive theoretical research in localization studies. AAH can be directly mapped onto the two-dimensional (2D) Hofstadter model which manifests the integer quantum Hall topology on a lattice. However, such a connection needs to be made for the Maryland model (MM). Here we describe a generalized model that contains AAH and MM as the limiting cases with the MM lying precisely at a topological quantum phase transition (TQPT) point. A remarkable feature of this critical point is that the one-dimensional MM retains well defined energy gaps whereas the equivalent 2D model becomes gapless, signifying the 2D nature of the TQPT.

  6. Assisted finite-rate adiabatic passage across a quantum critical point: exact solution for the quantum Ising model.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Adolfo; Rams, Marek M; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2012-09-14

    The dynamics of a quantum phase transition is inextricably woven with the formation of excitations, as a result of critical slowing down in the neighborhood of the critical point. We design a transitionless quantum driving through a quantum critical point, allowing one to access the ground state of the broken-symmetry phase by a finite-rate quench of the control parameter. The method is illustrated in the one-dimensional quantum Ising model in a transverse field. Driving through the critical point is assisted by an auxiliary Hamiltonian, for which the interplay between the range of the interaction and the modes where excitations are suppressed is elucidated.

  7. Entanglement entropy near Kondo-destruction quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Tathagata; Wagner, Christopher; Ingersent, Kevin; Pixley, Jedediah

    Entanglement entropy is a measure of quantum-mechanical entanglement across the boundary created by partitioning a system into two subsystems. We study this quantity in Kondo impurity models that feature Kondo-destruction quantum critical points (QCPs). Recent work has shown that the entanglement entropy between a Kondo impurity of spin Simp and its environment is pinned at its maximum possible value Se = ln (2Simp + 1) throughout the Kondo phase. In the Kondo-destroyed phase, where the impurity spin acquires a nonzero expectation value Mloc, Se = ln (2Simp + 1) - a (Simp) Mloc2 irrespective of the properties of the host. Here, we report numerical renormalization-group results for Kondo models with a pseudogapped density of states under a different partition that separates the impurity and on-site conduction electrons from the rest of the system. Now, the entanglement entropy is affected by the nature of the environment beyond the information contained in Mloc, but Se still contains a critical part that exhibits power-law behavior in the vicinity of the Kondo-destruction QCP

  8. Observation of conductance doubling in an Andreev quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjaergaard, M.; Nichele, F.; Suominen, H.; Nowak, M.; Wimmer, M.; Akhmerov, A.; Folk, J.; Flensberg, K.; Shabani, J.; Palmstrom, C.; Marcus, C.

    One route to study the non-Abelian nature of excitations in topological superconductors is to realise gateable two dimensional (2D) semiconducting systems, with spin-orbit coupling in proximity to an s-wave superconductor. Previous work on coupling 2D electron gases (2DEG) with superconductors has been hindered by a non-ideal interface and unstable gateability. We report measurements on a gateable 2DEG coupled to superconductors through a pristine interface, and use aluminum grown in situ epitaxially on an InGaAs/InAs electron gas. We demonstrate quantization in units of 4e2 / h in a quantum point contact (QPC) in such hybrid systems. Operating the QPC as a tunnel probe, we observe a hard superconducting gap, overcoming the soft-gap problem in 2D superconductor/semiconductor systems. Our work paves way for a new and highly scalable system in which to pursue topological quantum information processing. Research supported by Microsoft Project Q and the Danish National Research Foundation.

  9. Approaching Collimation with a Graphene-based Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Grace; Lee, Menyoung; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    Quantum point contacts (QPCs) are narrow constrictions on the order of the Fermi wavelength that bridge together two electrically conducting regions. QPCs display sensitive conductance quantization and are a classic playing field to illustrate clean, ballistic transport in low-dimensional materials. However, graphene-based QPCs are challenging to fabricate, in part due to two reasons: edge disorder that suppresses conductance quantization and imperfect gate depletion leading to charge puddles. Using graphene-boron nitride heterostructures, we demonstrate improvements over a simple etch and Au-gating method by introducing a protective alumina dielectric layer. We use this method to create two QPCs in series and explore potential electron-beam collimation at low magnetic field, in the spirit of Molenkamp (1990).

  10. Giant acoustoelectric current in suspended quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Dustin J.; Mourokh, Lev G.; Shin, Hyuncheol; Bichler, Max; Wegscheider, Werner; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-12-01

    We present results on the acoustoelectric current driven through a quantum point contact (QPC) placed on a suspended nanobridge, which is subject to surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The magnitude of this current is much larger than that of a two-dimensional gas, and the system has enhanced sensitivity to perturbations. In particular, the current oscillations as a function of magnetic field exhibit additional features associated with the spin splitting. Furthermore, the negative voltage applied to the QPC gates induces the oscillations revealing the subband structure not seen in transport measurements at the elevated temperatures of our experiment. Near the pinch off conditions, the acoustoelectric current becomes negative which we attribute to the enhanced backscattering caused by the SAW-phonons' absorption and emission.

  11. Tunneling spectroscopy of 5/2 fractional quantum Hall excitations in etch defined quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalakulam, Madhu; Pan, Wei; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L.

    2012-02-01

    Ever since its discovery the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state at the even denominator filling fraction v=5/2 has generated immense interests among researchers. 5/2 FQH excitations are believed to obey non-Abelian statistics and posses topological properties making them an ideal candidate for the proposed fault tolerant topological quantum computation. Theoretical proposals to characterize the topological properties of the5/2 state are usually based on confined geometries. In this work we report the characterization of the 5/2 state using quasiparticle tunneling experiments in quantum point contacts (QPC). We have successfully fabricated QPCs on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using conventional photolithography followed by etching and evaporation of Cr/Au depletion gates. Our samples show very stable FQH plateaus at v = 7/3, 5/2 and 8/3 filling fractions. Tunneling experiments are performed in the QPCs at various temperatures and also at various pinch-off voltages to characterize the effective charge and Coulomb interaction parameters of the quasiparticles. (Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  12. Quantum Hall effect in a quantum point contact at Landau filling fraction ν=52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jeffrey; Radu, Iuliana; Zumbühl, Dominik; Levenson-Falk, Eli; Kastner, Marc; Marcus, Charles; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2007-03-01

    We study the transport properties of quantum point contacts (QPC) fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron gas that exhibits excellent bulk fractional quantum Hall effect, including a strong plateau in the Hall resistance at Landau level filling fraction ν= 52. We find that the ν=52 plateau is identifiable in point contacts with lithographic separations as small as 0.8 microns, but is not present in a 0.5 micron QPC. We study the temperature and dc-current-bias dependence of the ν=52 plateau---as well as neighboring fractional and integer plateaus---in the QPC. We also discuss our method to study the QPC at one filling fraction while the bulk remains at a higher filling fraction. Research supported in part by Microsoft Corporation, Project Q, and HCRP at Harvard University, and ARO (W911NF-05-1-0062), the NSEC program of the NSF (PHY-0117795) and NSF (DMR-0353209) at MIT.

  13. Universal Entanglement Entropy in 2D Conformal Quantum Critical Points

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Benjamin; Mulligan, Michael; Fradkin, Eduardo; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2008-12-05

    We study the scaling behavior of the entanglement entropy of two dimensional conformal quantum critical systems, i.e. systems with scale invariant wave functions. They include two-dimensional generalized quantum dimer models on bipartite lattices and quantum loop models, as well as the quantum Lifshitz model and related gauge theories. We show that, under quite general conditions, the entanglement entropy of a large and simply connected sub-system of an infinite system with a smooth boundary has a universal finite contribution, as well as scale-invariant terms for special geometries. The universal finite contribution to the entanglement entropy is computable in terms of the properties of the conformal structure of the wave function of these quantum critical systems. The calculation of the universal term reduces to a problem in boundary conformal field theory.

  14. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  15. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo; Mireles, Francisco

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  16. Nonlinear I-V Curve at a Quantum Impurity Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranger, Harold; Chung, Chung-Hou; Lin, Chao-Yun; Zhang, Gu; Ke, Chung-Ting; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The nonlinear I-V curve at an interacting quantum critical point (QCP) is typically out of reach theoretically. Here, however, we provide a striking example of an analytical calculation of the full nonlinear I-V curve at the QCP. The system that we consider is a quantum dot coupled to resistive leads - a spinless resonant level interacting with an ohmic EM environment in which a QCP similar to the two-channel Kondo QCP occurs. Recent experiments studied this criticality via transport measurements: the transmission approaches unity at low temperature and applied bias when tuned exactly to the QCP (on resonance and symmetric tunnel barriers) and approaches zero in all other cases. To obtain the current at finite temperature and arbitrary bias, we write the problem as a one-dimensional field theory and transform from electrons in the left/right leads to right-going and left-going channels between which there is weak two-body backscattering. Drawing on dynamical Coulomb blockade theory, we thus obtain an analytical expression for the full I-V curve. The agreement with the experimental result is remarkable.

  17. Fermi-surface collapse and dynamical scaling near a quantum-critical point

    PubMed Central

    Friedemann, Sven; Oeschler, Niels; Wirth, Steffen; Krellner, Cornelius; Geibel, Christoph; Steglich, Frank; Paschen, Silke; Kirchner, Stefan; Si, Qimiao

    2010-01-01

    Quantum criticality arises when a macroscopic phase of matter undergoes a continuous transformation at zero temperature. While the collective fluctuations at quantum-critical points are being increasingly recognized as playing an important role in a wide range of quantum materials, the nature of the underlying quantum-critical excitations remains poorly understood. Here we report in-depth measurements of the Hall effect in the heavy-fermion metal YbRh2Si2, a prototypical system for quantum criticality. We isolate a rapid crossover of the isothermal Hall coefficient clearly connected to the quantum-critical point from a smooth background contribution; the latter exists away from the quantum-critical point and is detectable through our studies only over a wide range of magnetic field. Importantly, the width of the critical crossover is proportional to temperature, which violates the predictions of conventional theory and is instead consistent with an energy over temperature, E/T, scaling of the quantum-critical single-electron fluctuation spectrum. Our results provide evidence that the quantum-dynamical scaling and a critical Kondo breakdown simultaneously operate in the same material. Correspondingly, we infer that macroscopic scale-invariant fluctuations emerge from the microscopic many-body excitations associated with a collapsing Fermi-surface. This insight is expected to be relevant to the unconventional finite-temperature behavior in a broad range of strongly correlated quantum systems. PMID:20668246

  18. Fermi-surface collapse and dynamical scaling near a quantum-critical point.

    PubMed

    Friedemann, Sven; Oeschler, Niels; Wirth, Steffen; Krellner, Cornelius; Geibel, Christoph; Steglich, Frank; Paschen, Silke; Kirchner, Stefan; Si, Qimiao

    2010-08-17

    Quantum criticality arises when a macroscopic phase of matter undergoes a continuous transformation at zero temperature. While the collective fluctuations at quantum-critical points are being increasingly recognized as playing an important role in a wide range of quantum materials, the nature of the underlying quantum-critical excitations remains poorly understood. Here we report in-depth measurements of the Hall effect in the heavy-fermion metal YbRh(2)Si(2), a prototypical system for quantum criticality. We isolate a rapid crossover of the isothermal Hall coefficient clearly connected to the quantum-critical point from a smooth background contribution; the latter exists away from the quantum-critical point and is detectable through our studies only over a wide range of magnetic field. Importantly, the width of the critical crossover is proportional to temperature, which violates the predictions of conventional theory and is instead consistent with an energy over temperature, E/T, scaling of the quantum-critical single-electron fluctuation spectrum. Our results provide evidence that the quantum-dynamical scaling and a critical Kondo breakdown simultaneously operate in the same material. Correspondingly, we infer that macroscopic scale-invariant fluctuations emerge from the microscopic many-body excitations associated with a collapsing Fermi-surface. This insight is expected to be relevant to the unconventional finite-temperature behavior in a broad range of strongly correlated quantum systems.

  19. Water-quality, water-level, and lake-bottom-sediment data collected from the defense fuel supply point and adjacent properties, Hanahan, South Carolina, 1990-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petkewich, M.D.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Robertson, J.F.; Bradley, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    A 9-year scientific investigation to determine the potential for biore-mediation of ground-water contamination and to monitor the effectiveness of an engineered bioremediation system located at the Defense Fuel Supply Point and adjacent properties in Hanahan, S.C., has culminated in the collection of abundant water-quality and water-level data.This report presents the analytical results of the study that monitored the changes in surface- and ground-water quality and water-table elevations in the study area from December 1990 to January 1996. This report also presents analytical results of lake-bottom sediments collected in the study area.

  20. Non-Equilibrium Conductivity at Quantum Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Andrew; Bhaseen, M. J.; Green, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The behaviour of quantum systems driven out of equilibrium is a field in which we are still searching for general principles and universal results. Quantum critical systems are useful in this search as their out of equilibrium steady states may inherit universal features from equilibrium. While this has been shown in some cases, the calculational techniques used often involve simplified models or calculational tricks, which can obscure some of the underlying physical processes. Here we use a Boltzmann transport approach to study the steady-state non-equilibrium properties - conductivity and current noise, of the Bose-Hubbard model head-on. We must explicitly consider heat-flow and rate limiting processes in the establishment of the steady-state to show that it can indeed be universal. Our analysis reveals the importance of the hydrodynamic limit and the limitations of current approaches.

  1. Confinement of spin-orbit induced Dirac states in quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The quantum transmission problem for a particle moving in a quantum point contact in the presence of a Rashba spin-orbit interaction and applied magnetic field is solved semiclassically. A strong Rashba interaction and parallel magnetic field form emergent Dirac states at the center of the constriction, leading to the appearance of resonances which carry spin current and become bound at high magnetic fields. These states can be controlled in situ by modulation of external electric and magnetic fields, and can be used to turn the channel into a spin pump which operates at zero bias. It is shown that this effect is currently experimentally accessible in p -type quantum point contacts.

  2. Theory of finite-entanglement scaling at one-dimensional quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Frank; Mukerjee, Subroto; Turner, Ari M; Moore, Joel E

    2009-06-26

    Studies of entanglement in many-particle systems suggest that most quantum critical ground states have infinitely more entanglement than noncritical states. Standard algorithms for one-dimensional systems construct model states with limited entanglement, which are a worse approximation to quantum critical states than to others. We give a quantitative theory of previously observed scaling behavior resulting from finite entanglement at quantum criticality. Finite-entanglement scaling in one-dimensional systems is governed not by the scaling dimension of an operator but by the "central charge" of the critical point. An important ingredient is the universal distribution of density-matrix eigenvalues at a critical point [P. Calabrese and A. Lefevre, Phys. Rev. A 78, 032329 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevA.78.032329]. The parameter-free theory is checked against numerical scaling at several quantum critical points.

  3. Area law for fixed points of rapidly mixing dissipative quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Cubitt, Toby S.; Lucia, Angelo; Michalakis, Spyridon; Perez-Garcia, David

    2015-10-15

    We prove an area law with a logarithmic correction for the mutual information for fixed points of local dissipative quantum system satisfying a rapid mixing condition, under either of the following assumptions: the fixed point is pure or the system is frustration free.

  4. Some Quantum Experiments from the Point of View of Stochastic Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špička, V.; Mareš, J. J.; Hubík, P.; Krištofik, J.

    2007-09-01

    Stochastic electrodynamics (SED), an alternative theory to quantum phenomena based on laws of classical physics is shortly reviewed and compared with quantum electrodynamics. Experiments supporting the existence of zero-point fluctuating radiation field, the key concept of SED, are discussed. Relation between measurements of the black-body radiation spectrum and noise is analysed to define conditions under which the zero-point component of radiation or noise can be observed. Further, it is shown that stability of weakly localized orbits, measured in disordered solid state systems, can be explained by the presence of zero-point fluctuations of vacuum.

  5. Tuning inter-dot tunnel coupling of an etched graphene double quantum dot by adjacent metal gates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Da; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Luo, Gang; Zheng, Zhi-Xiong; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Graphene double quantum dots (DQDs) open to use charge or spin degrees of freedom for storing and manipulating quantum information in this new electronic material. However, impurities and edge disorders in etched graphene nano-structures hinder the ability to control the inter-dot tunnel coupling, tC, the most important property of the artificial molecule. Here we report measurements of tC in an all-metal-side-gated graphene DQD. We find that tC can be controlled continuously about a factor of four by employing a single gate. Furthermore, tC, can be changed monotonically about another factor of four as electrons are gate-pumped into the dot one by one. The results suggest that the strength of tunnel coupling in etched graphene DQDs can be varied in a rather broad range and in a controllable manner, which improves the outlook to use graphene as a base material for qubit applications. PMID:24213723

  6. Isotope quantum effects in water around the freezing point.

    PubMed

    Hart, R T; Mei, Q; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J C; Turner, J F C; Dolgos, M; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2006-04-07

    We have measured the difference in electronic structure factors between liquid H(2)O and D(2)O at temperatures of 268 and 273 K with high energy x-ray diffraction. These are compared to our previously published data measured from 279 to 318 K. We find that the total structural isotope effect increases by a factor of 3.5 over the entire range, as the temperature is decreased. Structural isochoric temperature differential and isothermal density differential functions have been used to compare these data to a thermodynamic model based upon a simple offset in the state function. The model works well in describing the magnitude of the structural differences above approximately 310 K, but fails at lower temperatures. The experimental results are discussed in light of several quantum molecular dynamics simulations and are in good qualitative agreement with recent temperature dependent, rotationally quantized rigid molecule simulations.

  7. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point.

  8. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point. PMID:26880041

  9. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-02-16

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point.

  10. Zero-field quantum critical point in CeCoIn5.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Y; Bauer, E D; Gegenwart, P

    2013-09-06

    Quantum criticality in the normal and superconducting states of the heavy-fermion metal CeCoIn5 is studied by measurements of the magnetic Grüneisen ratio ΓH and specific heat in different field orientations and temperatures down to 50 mK. A universal temperature over magnetic field scaling of ΓH in the normal state indicates a hidden quantum critical point at zero field. Within the superconducting state, the quasiparticle entropy at constant temperature increases upon reducing the field towards zero, providing additional evidence for zero-field quantum criticality.

  11. Quantum transport of disordered Weyl semimetals at the nodal point.

    PubMed

    Sbierski, Björn; Pohl, Gregor; Bergholtz, Emil J; Brouwer, Piet W

    2014-07-11

    Weyl semimetals are paradigmatic topological gapless phases in three dimensions. We here address the effect of disorder on charge transport in Weyl semimetals. For a single Weyl node with energy at the degeneracy point and without interactions, theory predicts the existence of a critical disorder strength beyond which the density of states takes on a nonzero value. Predictions for the conductivity are divergent, however. In this work, we present a numerical study of transport properties for a disordered Weyl cone at zero energy. For weak disorder, our results are consistent with a renormalization group flow towards an attractive pseudoballistic fixed point with zero conductivity and a scale-independent conductance; for stronger disorder, diffusive behavior is reached. We identify the Fano factor as a signature that discriminates between these two regimes.

  12. Supergravity instabilities of non-supersymmetric quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobev, Nikolay; Halmagyi, Nick; Pilch, Krzysztof; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the recent use of certain consistent truncations of M-theory to study condensed matter physics using holographic techniques, we study the SU(3)-invariant sector of four-dimensional, {\\cal N}=8 gauged supergravity and compute the complete scalar spectrum at each of the five non-trivial critical points. We demonstrate that the smaller SU(4)- sector is equivalent to a consistent truncation studied recently by various authors and find that the critical point in this sector, which has been proposed as the ground state of a holographic superconductor, is unstable due to a family of scalars that violate the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We also derive the origin of this instability in 11 dimensions and comment on the generalization to other embeddings of this critical point which involve arbitrary Sasaki-Einstein seven manifolds. In the spirit of a resurging interest in consistent truncations, we present a formal treatment of the SU(3)-invariant sector as a U(1) × U(1) gauged {\\cal N}=2 supergravity theory coupled to one hypermultiplet.

  13. Electron Phase Shift at the Zero-Bias Anomaly of Quantum Point Contacts.

    PubMed

    Brun, B; Martins, F; Faniel, S; Hackens, B; Cavanna, A; Ulysse, C; Ouerghi, A; Gennser, U; Mailly, D; Simon, P; Huant, S; Bayot, V; Sanquer, M; Sellier, H

    2016-04-01

    The Kondo effect is the many-body screening of a local spin by a cloud of electrons at very low temperature. It has been proposed as an explanation of the zero-bias anomaly in quantum point contacts where interactions drive a spontaneous charge localization. However, the Kondo origin of this anomaly remains under debate, and additional experimental evidence is necessary. Here we report on the first phase-sensitive measurement of the zero-bias anomaly in quantum point contacts using a scanning gate microscope to create an electronic interferometer. We observe an abrupt shift of the interference fringes by half a period in the bias range of the zero-bias anomaly, a behavior which cannot be reproduced by single-particle models. We instead relate it to the phase shift experienced by electrons scattering off a Kondo system. Our experiment therefore provides new evidence of this many-body effect in quantum point contacts.

  14. A circuit analysis of an in situ tunable radio-frequency quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Choi, T.; Hellmüller, S.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.; Schön, S.

    2013-08-01

    A detailed analysis of the tunability of a radio-frequency quantum point contact setup using a C - LCR circuit is presented. We calculate how the series capacitance influences resonance frequency and charge-detector resistance for which matching is achieved as well as the voltage and power delivered to the load. Furthermore, we compute the noise contributions in the system and compare our findings with measurements taken with an etched quantum point contact. While our considerations mostly focus on our specific choice of matching circuit, the discussion of the influence of source-to-load power transfer on the signal-to-noise ratio is valid generally.

  15. Zero-point energies, the uncertainty principle, and positivity of the quantum Brownian density operator.

    PubMed

    Tameshtit, Allan

    2012-04-01

    High-temperature and white-noise approximations are frequently invoked when deriving the quantum Brownian equation for an oscillator. Even if this white-noise approximation is avoided, it is shown that if the zero-point energies of the environment are neglected, as they often are, the resultant equation will violate not only the basic tenet of quantum mechanics that requires the density operator to be positive, but also the uncertainty principle. When the zero-point energies are included, asymptotic results describing the evolution of the oscillator are obtained that preserve positivity and, therefore, the uncertainty principle.

  16. Nonthermal fixed points in quantum field theory beyond the weak-coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jürgen; Wallisch, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit universal behavior far from equilibrium associated to nonthermal fixed points with a wide range of topical applications from early-Universe inflaton dynamics and heavy-ion collisions to strong quenches in ultracold quantum gases. So far, most studies have relied on a mapping of the quantum dynamics onto a classical-statistical theory that can be simulated on a computer. However, the mapping is based on a weak-coupling limit, while phenomenological applications often require moderate interaction strengths. We report on the observation of nonthermal fixed points directly in quantum field theory beyond the weak-coupling limit. For the example of a relativistic scalar O (N )-symmetric quantum field theory, we numerically solve the nonequilibrium dynamics employing a 1 /N expansion to next-to-leading order, which does not rely on a small coupling parameter. Starting from two different sets of overoccupied and of strong-field initial conditions, we find that nonthermal fixed points are not restricted to parameter ranges suitable for classical-statistical simulations but extend also to couplings of order 1. While the infrared behavior is found to be insensitive to the differences in the initial conditions, we demonstrate that transport phenomena to higher momenta depend on the presence or absence of a symmetry-breaking field expectation value.

  17. Visualising Berry phase and diabolical points in a quantum exciton-polariton billiard

    PubMed Central

    Estrecho, E.; Gao, T.; Brodbeck, S.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Truscott, A. G.; Ostrovskaya, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabolical points (spectral degeneracies) can naturally occur in spectra of two-dimensional quantum systems and classical wave resonators due to simple symmetries. Geometric Berry phase is associated with these spectral degeneracies. Here, we demonstrate a diabolical point and the corresponding Berry phase in the spectrum of hybrid light-matter quasiparticles—exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. It is well known that sufficiently strong optical pumping can drive exciton-polaritons to quantum degeneracy, whereby they form a macroscopically populated quantum coherent state similar to a Bose-Einstein condensate. By pumping a microcavity with a spatially structured light beam, we create a two-dimensional quantum billiard for the exciton-polariton condensate and demonstrate a diabolical point in the spectrum of the billiard eigenstates. The fully reconfigurable geometry of the potential walls controlled by the optical pump enables a striking experimental visualization of the Berry phase associated with the diabolical point. The Berry phase is observed and measured by direct imaging of the macroscopic exciton-polariton probability densities. PMID:27886222

  18. Spin current source based on a quantum point contact with local spin-orbit interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, M. P.; Szafran, B.

    2013-11-11

    Proposal for construction of a source of spin-polarized current based on quantum point contact (QPC) with local spin-orbit interaction is presented. We show that spin-orbit interaction present within the narrowing acts like a spin filter. The spin polarization of the current is discussed as a function of the Fermi energy and the width of the QPC.

  19. Peltier Coefficient and Photon-Assisted Tunnelling in Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Aly, Arafa

    2008-12-01

    We present the Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures. Also we obtain the oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in external fields. Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes and temperatures. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature.

  20. Conductance oscillations in quantum point contacts of InAs/GaSb heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaj, Michał; Cywiński, Łukasz; Wróbel, Jerzy; Dietl, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    We study quantum point contacts in two-dimensional topological insulators by means of quantum transport simulations for InAs/GaSb heterostructures and HgTe/(Hg,Cd)Te quantum wells. In InAs/GaSb, the density of edge states shows an oscillatory decay as a function of the distance to the edge. This is in contrast to the behavior of the edge states in HgTe quantum wells, which decay into the bulk in a simple exponential manner. The difference between the two materials is brought about by spatial separation of electrons and holes in InAs/GaSb, which affects the magnitudes of the parameters describing the particle-hole asymmetry and the strength of intersubband coupling within the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. We show that the character of the wave-function decay impacts directly the dependence of the point contact conductance on the constriction width and the Fermi energy, which can be verified experimentally and serves to accurately determine the values of the relevant parameters. In the case of InAs/GaSb heterostructures, the conductance magnitude oscillates as a function of the constriction width following the oscillations of the edge state penetration, whereas in HgTe/(Hg,Cd)Te quantum wells a single switching from transmitting to reflecting contact is predicted.

  1. Zero-point term and quantum effects in the Johnson noise of resistors: a critical appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2016-05-01

    There is a longstanding debate about the zero-point term in the Johnson noise voltage of a resistor. This term originates from a quantum-theoretical treatment of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Is the zero-point term really there, or is it only an experimental artifact, due to the uncertainty principle, for phase-sensitive amplifiers? Could it be removed by renormalization of theories? We discuss some historical measurement schemes that do not lead to the effect predicted by the FDT, and we analyse new features that emerge when the consequences of the zero-point term are measured via the mean energy and force in a capacitor shunting the resistor. If these measurements verify the existence of a zero-point term in the noise, then two types of perpetual motion machines can be constructed. Further investigation with the same approach shows that, in the quantum limit, the Johnson-Nyquist formula is also invalid under general conditions even though it is valid for a resistor-antenna system. Therefore we conclude that in a satisfactory quantum theory of the Johnson noise, the FDT must, as a minimum, include also the measurement system used to evaluate the observed quantities. Issues concerning the zero-point term may also have implications for phenomena in advanced nanotechnology.

  2. Fate of the one-dimensional Ising quantum critical point coupled to a gapless boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberton, Ori; Ruhman, Jonathan; Berg, Erez; Altman, Ehud

    2017-02-01

    The problem of a quantum Ising degree of freedom coupled to a gapless bosonic mode appears naturally in many one-dimensional systems, yet surprisingly little is known how such a coupling affects the Ising quantum critical point. We investigate the fate of the critical point in a regime, where the weak coupling renormalization group (RG) indicates a flow toward strong coupling. Using a renormalization group analysis and numerical density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations we show that, depending on the ratio of velocities of the gapless bosonic mode and the Ising critical fluctuations, the transition may remain continuous or become fluctuation-driven first order. The two regimes are separated by a tricritical point of a novel type.

  3. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables

    PubMed Central

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems. PMID:27910915

  4. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems.

  5. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables.

    PubMed

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-12-02

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems.

  6. Influence of the ferroelectric quantum critical point on SrTiO3 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. A.; Lafleur, P.; Raslan, A.

    2017-02-01

    We study a model SrTiO3 interface in which conduction t2 g electrons couple to the ferroelectric (FE) phonon mode. We treat the FE mode within a self-consistent phonon theory that captures its quantum critical behavior and show that proximity to the quantum critical point leads to universal tails in the electron density of the form n (z ) ˜(λ+z ) -2 , where λ ˜T2 -d /z , with d =3 the dimensionality and z =1 the dynamical critical exponent. Implications for the metal-insulator transition at low electron density are discussed.

  7. The Unicellular State as a Point Source in a Quantum Biological System.

    PubMed

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-05-27

    A point source is the central and most important point or place for any group of cohering phenomena. Evolutionary development presumes that biological processes are sequentially linked, but neither directed from, nor centralized within, any specific biologic structure or stage. However, such an epigenomic entity exists and its transforming effects can be understood through the obligatory recapitulation of all eukaryotic lifeforms through a zygotic unicellular phase. This requisite biological conjunction can now be properly assessed as the focal point of reconciliation between biology and quantum phenomena, illustrated by deconvoluting complex physiologic traits back to their unicellular origins.

  8. The Unicellular State as a Point Source in a Quantum Biological System

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.; Miller, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A point source is the central and most important point or place for any group of cohering phenomena. Evolutionary development presumes that biological processes are sequentially linked, but neither directed from, nor centralized within, any specific biologic structure or stage. However, such an epigenomic entity exists and its transforming effects can be understood through the obligatory recapitulation of all eukaryotic lifeforms through a zygotic unicellular phase. This requisite biological conjunction can now be properly assessed as the focal point of reconciliation between biology and quantum phenomena, illustrated by deconvoluting complex physiologic traits back to their unicellular origins. PMID:27240413

  9. Quantized Conductance and Large g-Factor Anisotropy in InSb Quantum Point Contacts.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fanming; van Veen, Jasper; de Vries, Folkert K; Beukman, Arjan J A; Wimmer, Michael; Yi, Wei; Kiselev, Andrey A; Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Sokolich, Marko; Manfra, Michael J; Nichele, Fabrizio; Marcus, Charles M; Kouwenhoven, Leo P

    2016-12-14

    Because of a strong spin-orbit interaction and a large Landé g-factor, InSb plays an important role in research on Majorana fermions. To further explore novel properties of Majorana fermions, hybrid devices based on quantum wells are conceived as an alternative approach to nanowires. In this work, we report a pronounced conductance quantization of quantum point contact devices in InSb/InAlSb quantum wells. Using a rotating magnetic field, we observe a large in-plane (|g1| = 26) and out-of-plane (|g1| = 52) g-factor anisotropy. Additionally, we investigate crossings of subbands with opposite spins and extract the electron effective mass from magnetic depopulation of one-dimensional subbands.

  10. Theory of the nematic quantum critical point in a nodal superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Ah

    2008-03-01

    In the last several years, experimental evidence has accumulated in a variety of highly correlated electronic systems of new quantum phases which (for purely electronic reasons) spontaneously break the rotational (point group) symmetry of the underlying crystal. Such electron ``nematic'' phases have been seen in quantum Hall systems[1], in the metamagnetic metal Sr3Ru2O7[2], and more recently in magnetic neutron scattering studies of the high temperature superconductor, YBCO[3]. In the case of a high Tc superconductor, the quantum dynamics of nematic order parameter naturally couples strongly to quasiparticle (qp) excitations. In this talk, I will discuss our recent results on the effects of the coupling between quantum critical nematic fluctuations and the nodal qp's of a d-wave superconductor in the vicinity of a putative quantum critical point inside the superconducting phase. We solve a model system with N flavors of quasiparticles in the large N limit[4]. To leading order in 1/N, quantum fluctuations enhance the dispersion anisotropy of the nodal excitations, and cause strong scattering which critically broadens the quasiparticle peaks in the spectral function, except in the vicinity of ``the tips of the banana,'' where the qp's remain sharp. We will discuss the possible implications of our results to ARPES and STM experiments. [1] M.P. Lilly, K.B. Cooper, J.P. Eisenstein, L.N. Pfeiffer, and K.W. West, PRL 83, 824 (1999). [2] R. A. Borzi and S. A. Grigera and J. Farrell and R. S. Perry and S. J. S. Lister and S. L. Lee and D. A. Tennant and Y. Maeno and A. P. Mackenzie, Science 315, 214 (2007). [3] V. Hinkov, D. Haug, B. Fauqu'e, P. Bourges, Y. Sidis, A. Ivanov, C. Bernhard, C. T. Lin, B. Keimer, unpublished. [4] E.-A. Kim, M. Lawler, P. Oreto, E. Fradkin, S. Kivelson, cond-mat/0705.4099.

  11. Universal Scaling in the Fan of an Unconventional Quantum Critical Point

    SciTech Connect

    Melko, Roger G; Kaul, Ribhu

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of extensive finite-temperature Quantum Monte Carlo simulati ons on a SU(2) symmetric, $S=1/2$ quantum antiferromagnet with a frustrating four-s pin interaction -- the so-called 'JQ' model~[Sandvik, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 98}, 22 7202 (2007)]. Our simulations, which are unbiased, free of the sign-problem and car ried out on lattice sizes containing in excess of $1.6\\times 10^4$ spins, indicate that N\\'eel order is destroyed through a continuous quantum transition at a critica l value of the frustrating interaction. At larger values of this coupling the param agnetic state obtained has valence-bond solid order. The scaling behavior in the 'q uantum critical fan' above the putative critical point confirms a $z=1$ quantum pha se transition that is not in the conventional $O(3)$ universality class. Our result s are consistent with the predictions of the 'deconfined quantum criticality' scena rio.

  12. Gate-tunable superconducting weak link and quantum point contact spectroscopy on a strontium titanate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Patrick; Lee, Menyoung; Williams, James R.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional electron systems in gallium arsenide and graphene have enabled ground-breaking discoveries in condensed-matter physics, in part because they are easily modulated by voltages on nanopatterned gate electrodes. Electron systems at oxide interfaces hold a similarly large potential for fundamental studies of correlated electrons and novel device technologies, but typically have carrier densities too large to control by conventional gating techniques. Here we present a quantum transport study of a superconducting strontium titanate (STO) interface, enabled by a combination of electrolyte and metal-oxide gating. Our structure consists of two superconducting STO banks flanking a nanoscale STO weak link, which is tunable at low temperatures from insulating to superconducting behaviour by a local metallic gate. At low gate voltages, our device behaves as a quantum point contact that exhibits a minimum conductance plateau of e2/h in zero applied magnetic field, half the expected value for spin-degenerate electrons, but consistent with predictions and experimental signatures of a magnetically ordered ground state. The quantum point contact mediates tunnelling between normal and superconducting regions, enabling lateral tunnelling spectroscopy of the local superconducting state. Our work provides a generic scheme for quantum transport studies of STO and other surface electron liquids.

  13. Quantum and classical statistics of the electromagnetic zero-point field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibison, Michael; Haisch, Bernhard

    1996-10-01

    A classical electromagnetic zero-point field (ZPF) analog of the vacuum of quantum field theory has formed the basis for theoretical investigations in the discipline known as random or stochastic electrodynamics (SED). In SED the statistical character of quantum measurements is imitated by the introduction of a stochastic classical background electromagnetic field. Random electromagnetic fluctuations are assumed to provide perturbations which can mimic certain quantum phenomena while retaining a purely classical basis, e.g., the Casimir force, the van der Waals force, the Lamb shift, spontaneous emission, the rms radius of a quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator, and the radius of the Bohr atom. This classical ZPF is represented as a homogeneous, isotropic ensemble of plane electromagnetic waves whose amplitude is exactly equivalent to an excitation energy of hν/2 of the corresponding quantized harmonic oscillator, this being the state of zero excitation of such an oscillator. There is thus no randomness in the classical electric-field amplitudes: Randomness is introduced entirely in the phases of the waves, which are normally distributed. Averaging over the random phases is assumed to be equivalent to taking the ground-state expectation values of the corresponding quantum operator. We demonstrate that this is not precisely correct by examining the statistics of the classical ZPF in contrast to that of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. Starting with a general technique for the calculation of classical probability distributions for quantum state operators, we derive the distribution for the individual modes of the electric-field amplitude in the ground state as predicted by quantum field theory. We carry out the same calculation for the classical ZPF analog, and show that the distributions are only in approximate agreement, diverging as the density of k states decreases. We then introduce an alternative classical ZPF with a different stochastic character, and

  14. Detecting the quantum zero-point motion of vortices in the cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosch, Lorenz; Balents, Leon; Sachdev, Subir

    2006-07-01

    We explore the experimental implications of a recent theory of the quantum dynamics of vortices in two-dimensional superfluids proximate to Mott insulators. The theory predicts modulations in the local density of states in the regions over which the vortices execute their quantum zero-point motion. We use the spatial extent of such modulations in scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements [J.E. Hoffman, E.W. Hudson, K.M. Lang, V. Madhavan, S.H. Pan, H. Eisaki, S. Uchida, J.C. Davis, Science 295 (2002) 466] on the vortex lattice of Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ δ to estimate the inertial mass of a point vortex. We discuss other, more direct, experimental signatures of the vortex dynamics.

  15. Anomalous conductance of a strongly interacting Fermi gas through a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyang; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Shizhong

    2017-01-01

    In this work we study the particle conductance of a strongly interacting Fermi gas through a quantum point contact. With an atom-molecule two-channel model, we compute the contribution to particle conductance by both the fermionic atoms and the bosonic molecules using the Keldysh formalism. Focusing on the regime above the Fermi superfluid transition temperature, we find that the fermionic contribution to the conductance is reduced by interaction compared with the quantized value for the noninteracting case; while the bosonic contribution to the conductance exhibits a plateau with nonuniversal values that is larger than the quantized conductance. This feature is particularly profound at temperature close to the superfluid transition. We emphasize that the enhanced conductance arises because of the bosonic nature of closed channel molecules and the low dimensionality of the quantum point contact.

  16. Influence of super-ohmic dissipation on a disordered quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A; Mohan, Priyanka; Narayanan, Rajesh

    2011-03-09

    We investigate the combined influence of quenched randomness and dissipation on a quantum critical point with O(N) order-parameter symmetry. Utilizing a strong-disorder renormalization group, we determine the critical behavior in one space dimension exactly. For super-ohmic dissipation, we find a Kosterlitz-Thouless type transition with conventional (power-law) dynamical scaling. The dynamical critical exponent depends on the spectral density of the dissipative baths. We also discuss the Griffiths singularities, and we determine observables.

  17. On the existence of point spectrum for branching strips quantum graph

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, I. Yu. Skorynina, A. N.; Blinova, I. V.

    2014-03-15

    The quantum graph having the form of branching strips with hexagonal (honeycomb) structure is considered. The Hamiltonian is determined as free 1D Schrödinger operator on each edge and some “boundary” conditions at each vertex. We obtain the conditions ensuring the point spectrum's existence for the Schrödinger operator of the system and relations that give us the eigenvalues.

  18. Ion Coulomb crystals: from quantum technology to chemistry close to the absolute zero point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, O.; Willitsch, S.

    2017-03-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals are ordered structures of atomic or molecular ions stored in ion traps at temperatures close to the absolute zero point. These unusual "crystals" form the basis of extremely accurate clocks, provide an environment for precise studies of chemical reactions and enable advanced implementations of the technology for a quantum computer. In this article, we discuss the techniques for generating atomic and molecular Coulomb crystals and highlight some of their applications.

  19. Enhancement of superconductivity near the ferromagnetic quantum critical point in UCoGe.

    PubMed

    Slooten, E; Naka, T; Gasparini, A; Huang, Y K; de Visser, A

    2009-08-28

    We report a high-pressure single crystal study of the superconducting ferromagnet UCoGe. Measurements of the ac susceptibility and resistivity under pressures up to 2.2 GPa show ferromagnetism is smoothly depressed and vanishes at a critical pressure p(c) = 1.4 GPa. Near the ferromagnetic critical point superconductivity is enhanced. Upper-critical field measurements under pressure show B(c2)(0) attains remarkably large values, which provides solid evidence for spin-triplet superconductivity over the whole pressure range. The obtained p-T phase diagram reveals superconductivity is closely connected to a ferromagnetic quantum-critical point hidden under the superconducting "dome."

  20. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  1. A Novel Quantum Dots–Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots–based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91–100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68–91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91–100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot–based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold–based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening. PMID:20672123

  2. Magnetic Signatures of Quantum Critical Points of the Ferrimagnetic Mixed Spin-(1/2, S) Heisenberg Chains at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strečka, Jozef; Verkholyak, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic mixed spin-(1/2,S) Heisenberg chains are examined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations for two different quantum spin numbers S=1 and 3/2. The calculated magnetization curves at finite temperatures are confronted with zero-temperature magnetization data obtained within the density matrix renormalization group method, which imply an existence of two quantum critical points determining a breakdown of the gapped Lieb-Mattis ferrimagnetic phase and Tomonaga-Luttinger spin-liquid phase, respectively. While a square root behavior of the magnetization accompanying each quantum critical point is gradually smoothed upon rising temperature, the susceptibility and isothermal entropy change data at low temperatures provide a stronger evidence of the zero-temperature quantum critical points through marked local maxima and minima, respectively.

  3. Scaling in driven dynamics starting in the vicinity of a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuai; Lo, Chung-Yu; Chen, Pochung

    2016-08-01

    Driven dynamics across a quantum critical point is usually described by the Kibble-Zurek scaling. Although the original Kibble-Zurek scaling requires an adiabatic initial state, it has been shown that scaling behaviors exist even when the driven dynamics is triggered from a thermal equilibrium state exactly at the critical point, in spite of the breakdown of the initial adiabaticity. In this paper, we show that the existence of the scaling behavior can be generalized to the case of the initial state being a thermal equilibrium state near the critical point. We propose a scaling theory in which the initial parameters are included as additional scaling variables due to the breakdown of the initial adiabaticity. In particular, we demonstrate that for the driven critical dynamics in a closed system, the nontrivial thermal effects are closely related to the initial distance to the critical point. We numerically confirm the scaling theory by simulating the real-time dynamics of the one-dimensional quantum Ising model at both zero and finite temperatures.

  4. Electrically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs/AlGaAs-based quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Zachary; Godfrey, Matthew; Burke, Adam; Chen, Jason; Fricke, Sebastian; Klochan, Oleh; Micolich, Adam; Beere, Harvey; Ritchie, Dave; Trunov, Kirill; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas; Hamilton, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-known technique with widespread applications in physics, chemistry and medicine. Conventional NMR studies use inductive coils to detect the magnetic field produced by precessing nuclear spins; this approach requires on the order of 1012 spins for detection. Recently, resistive detection of NMR through the hyperfine interaction has been demonstrated with electrons in mesoscopic 2- and 1-dimensional devices based on high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. These studies are typically sensitive to 108 spins, enabling NMR on much smaller sample volumes. Holes are predicted to have much weaker nuclear spin coupling than electrons, which could be relevant to the emerging fields of spintronics and quantum information processing. We present a preliminary comparison between the magnitude of the NMR signal in electron and hole quantum point contacts.

  5. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  6. Phase reconstruction near to the two-dimensional ferromagnetic quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedder, Chris; Karahasanovic, Una; Kruger, Frank; Green, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We study the formation of new phases in two dimensions near to the putative quantum critical point of the itinerant ferromagnet to paramagnet phase transition. In addition to the first order and helimagnetic behaviour found in non-analytic extensions to Hertz-Millis theory [1] and in the quantum order-by-disorder approach [2], we find a small region of spin nematic order. Our approach also admits a concurrent formation of superconducting order. We further study the effect of small deformations from quadratic electron dispersion -- as previously found in three dimensions, these enlarge the region of spin nematic order at the expense of spiral order.[4pt] [1] D. Belitz, T.R. Kirkpatrick and T. Vojta, Rev. Mod. Phys. 77, 579 (2005),. V. Efremov, J.J. Betouras, A.V. Chubukov Phys. Rev. B 77, 220401(R), (2008)[0pt] [2] G. J. Conduit Phys. Rev. A 82, 043604 (2010)

  7. Weak phase stiffness and nature of the quantum critical point in underdoped cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Yildirim, Yucel; Ku, Wei

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate that the zero-temperature superconducting phase diagram of underdoped cuprates can be quantitatively understood in the strong binding limit, using only the experimental spectral function of the “normal” pseudogap phase without any free parameter. In the prototypical (La1–xSrx)2CuO4, a kinetics-driven d-wave superconductivity is obtained above the critical doping δc ~ 5.2%, below which complete loss of superfluidity results from local quantum fluctuation involving local p-wave pairs. Near the critical doping, an enormous mass enhancement of the local pairs is found responsible for the observed rapid decrease of phase stiffness. Lastly, a striking mass divergence is predicted at δc that dictates the occurrence of the observed quantum critical point and the abrupt suppression of the Nernst effects in the nearby region.

  8. Weak phase stiffness and nature of the quantum critical point in underdoped cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Yildirim, Yucel; Ku, Wei

    2015-11-02

    We demonstrate that the zero-temperature superconducting phase diagram of underdoped cuprates can be quantitatively understood in the strong binding limit, using only the experimental spectral function of the “normal” pseudogap phase without any free parameter. In the prototypical (La1–xSrx)2CuO4, a kinetics-driven d-wave superconductivity is obtained above the critical doping δc ~ 5.2%, below which complete loss of superfluidity results from local quantum fluctuation involving local p-wave pairs. Near the critical doping, an enormous mass enhancement of the local pairs is found responsible for the observed rapid decrease of phase stiffness. Lastly, a striking mass divergence is predicted at δc thatmore » dictates the occurrence of the observed quantum critical point and the abrupt suppression of the Nernst effects in the nearby region.« less

  9. Superconductivity near a Quantum-Critical Point: The Special Role of the First Matsubara Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Abanov, Artem; Altshuler, Boris L.; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2016-10-01

    Near a quantum-critical point in a metal strong fermion-fermion interaction mediated by a soft collective boson gives rise to incoherent, non-Fermi liquid behavior. It also often gives rise to superconductivity which masks the non-Fermi liquid behavior. We analyze the interplay between the tendency to pairing and fermionic incoherence for a set of quantum-critical models with effective dynamical interaction between low-energy fermions. We argue that superconducting Tc is nonzero even for strong incoherence and/or weak interaction due to the fact that the self-energy from dynamic critical fluctuations vanishes for the two lowest fermionic Matsubara frequencies ωm=±π T . We obtain the analytic formula for Tc, which reproduces well earlier numerical results for the electron-phonon model at vanishing Debye frequency.

  10. Metal-insulator quantum critical point beneath the high Tc superconducting dome

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Suchitra E.; Harrison, N.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Hardy, W. N.

    2010-01-01

    An enduring question in correlated systems concerns whether superconductivity is favored at a quantum critical point (QCP) characterized by a divergent quasiparticle effective mass. Despite such a scenario being widely postulated in high Tc cuprates and invoked to explain non-Fermi liquid transport signatures, experimental evidence is lacking for a critical divergence under the superconducting dome. We use ultrastrong magnetic fields to measure quantum oscillations in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x, revealing a dramatic doping-dependent upturn in quasiparticle effective mass at a critical metal-insulator transition beneath the superconducting dome. Given the location of this QCP under a plateau in Tc in addition to a postulated QCP at optimal doping, we discuss the intriguing possibility of two intersecting superconducting subdomes, each centered at a critical Fermi surface instability. PMID:20304800

  11. Superconductivity near a Quantum-Critical Point: The Special Role of the First Matsubara Frequency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxuan; Abanov, Artem; Altshuler, Boris L; Yuzbashyan, Emil A; Chubukov, Andrey V

    2016-10-07

    Near a quantum-critical point in a metal strong fermion-fermion interaction mediated by a soft collective boson gives rise to incoherent, non-Fermi liquid behavior. It also often gives rise to superconductivity which masks the non-Fermi liquid behavior. We analyze the interplay between the tendency to pairing and fermionic incoherence for a set of quantum-critical models with effective dynamical interaction between low-energy fermions. We argue that superconducting T_{c} is nonzero even for strong incoherence and/or weak interaction due to the fact that the self-energy from dynamic critical fluctuations vanishes for the two lowest fermionic Matsubara frequencies ω_{m}=±πT. We obtain the analytic formula for T_{c}, which reproduces well earlier numerical results for the electron-phonon model at vanishing Debye frequency.

  12. The resolution of point sources of light as analyzed by quantum detection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The resolvability of point sources of incoherent light is analyzed by quantum detection theory in terms of two hypothesis-testing problems. In the first, the observer must decide whether there are two sources of equal radiant power at given locations, or whether there is only one source of twice the power located midway between them. In the second problem, either one, but not both, of two point sources is radiating, and the observer must decide which it is. The decisions are based on optimum processing of the electromagnetic field at the aperture of an optical instrument. In both problems the density operators of the field under the two hypotheses do not commute. The error probabilities, determined as functions of the separation of the points and the mean number of received photons, characterize the ultimate resolvability of the sources.

  13. Resolution of point sources of light as analyzed by quantum detection theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    The resolvability of point sources of incoherent thermal light is analyzed by quantum detection theory in terms of two hypothesis-testing problems. In the first, the observer must decide whether there are two sources of equal radiant power at given locations, or whether there is only one source of twice the power located midway between them. In the second problem, either one, but not both, of two point sources is radiating, and the observer must decide which it is. The decisions are based on optimum processing of the electromagnetic field at the aperture of an optical instrument. In both problems the density operators of the field under the two hypotheses do not commute. The error probabilities, determined as functions of the separation of the points and the mean number of received photons, characterize the ultimate resolvability of the sources.

  14. Magneto-acoustic study near the quantum critical point of the frustrated quantum antiferromagnet Cs2CuCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, P. T.; Postulka, L.; Wolf, B.; van Well, N.; Ritter, F.; Assmus, W.; Krellner, C.; Lang, M.

    2016-10-01

    Magneto-acoustic investigations of the frustrated triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuCl4 were performed for the longitudinal modes c11 and c33 in magnetic fields along the a-axis. The temperature dependence of the sound velocity at zero field shows a mild softening at low temperature and displays a small kink-like anomaly at TN. Isothermal measurements at T < TN of the sound attenuation α reveal two closely spaced features of different characters on approaching the material's quantum-critical point (QCP) at Bs ≈ 8.5 T for B || a. The peak at slightly lower fields remains sharp down to the lowest temperature and can be attributed to the ordering temperature TN(B). The second anomaly, which is rounded and which becomes reduced in size upon cooling, is assigned to the material's spin-liquid properties preceding the long-range antiferromagnetic ordering with decreasing temperature. These two features merge upon cooling suggesting a coincidence at the QCP. The elastic constant at lowest temperatures of our experiment at 32 mK can be well described by a Landau free energy model with a very small magnetoelastic coupling constant G/kB ≈ 2.8 K. The applicability of this classical model indicates the existence of a small gap in the magnetic excitation spectrum which drives the system away from quantum criticality.

  15. Formation of a protected sub-band for conduction in quantum point contacts under extreme biasing.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Han, J E; Xiao, S; Song, J; Reno, J L; Bird, J P

    2014-02-01

    Managing energy dissipation is critical to the scaling of current microelectronics and to the development of novel devices that use quantum coherence to achieve enhanced functionality. To this end, strategies are needed to tailor the electron-phonon interaction, which is the dominant mechanism for cooling non-equilibrium ('hot') carriers. In experiments aimed at controlling the quantum state, this interaction causes decoherence that fundamentally disrupts device operation. Here, we show a contrasting behaviour, in which strong electron-phonon scattering can instead be used to generate a robust mode for electrical conduction in GaAs quantum point contacts, driven into extreme non-equilibrium by nanosecond voltage pulses. When the amplitude of these pulses is much larger than all other relevant energy scales, strong electron-phonon scattering induces an attraction between electrons in the quantum-point-contact channel, which leads to the spontaneous formation of a narrow current filament and to a renormalization of the electronic states responsible for transport. The lowest of these states coalesce to form a sub-band separated from all others by an energy gap larger than the source voltage. Evidence for this renormalization is provided by a suppression of heating-related signatures in the transient conductance, which becomes pinned near 2e(2)/h (e, electron charge; h, Planck constant) for a broad range of source and gate voltages. This collective non-equilibrium mode is observed over a wide range of temperature (4.2-300 K) and may provide an effective means to manage electron-phonon scattering in nanoscale devices.

  16. Measurement of gamma quantum interaction point in plastic scintillator with WLS strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrski, J.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Dulski, K.; Gajos, A.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Jasińska, B.; Kajetanowicz, M.; Kamińska, D.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Silarski, M.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Wojnarska, J.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2017-04-01

    The feasibility of measuring the aśxial coordinate of a gamma quantum interaction point in a plastic scintillator bar via the detection of scintillation photons escaping from the scintillator with an array of wavelength-shifting (WLS) strips is demonstrated. Using a test set-up comprising a BC-420 scintillator bar and an array of sixteen BC-482A WLS strips we achieved a spatial resolution of 5 mm (σ) for annihilation photons from a 22Na isotope. The studied method can be used to improve the spatial resolution of a plastic-scintillator-based PET scanner which is being developed by the J-PET collaboration.

  17. Shot noise at the quantum point contact in InGaAs heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihara, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Shuji; Ono, Teruo; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kohda, Makoto; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-12-04

    We study the shot noise at a quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated in an InGaAs/InGaAsP heterostructure, whose conductance can be electrically tuned by the gate voltages. Shot noise suppression is observed at the conductance plateau of N(2e{sup 2}/h) (N = 4,5,and 6), which indicates the coherent quantized channel formation in the QPC. The electron heating effect generated at the QPC explains the deviation of the observed Fano factor from the theory.

  18. Tunable strength saddle-point contacts impact on quantum rings transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. J.; Diago-Cisneros, L.

    2016-09-01

    A particular subject of investigation is the role of several sadle-point contact (QPC) parameters on the scattering properties of an Aharonov-Bohm-Aharonov-Casher quantum ring (QR) under Rashba-type spin orbit interaction. We discuss the interplay of the conductance with the confinement strengths and height of the QPC, which yields new and tunable harmonic and non-harmonics patterns, while one manipulates these constriction parameters. This phenomenology may be of utility to implement a novel way to modulate spin interference effects in semiconducting QRs, providing an appealing test-platform for spintronics applications.

  19. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Water at the Triple Point: Using Theory as a Link Between Experiments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bingqing; Behler, Jörg; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-06-16

    One of the most prominent consequences of the quantum nature of light atomic nuclei is that their kinetic energy does not follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) experiments can measure this effect. Thus, the nuclear quantum kinetic energy can be probed directly in both ordered and disordered samples. However, the relation between the quantum kinetic energy and the atomic environment is a very indirect one, and cross-validation with theoretical modeling is therefore urgently needed. Here, we use state of the art path integral molecular dynamics techniques to compute the kinetic energy of hydrogen and oxygen nuclei in liquid, solid, and gas-phase water close to the triple point, comparing three different interatomic potentials and validating our results against equilibrium isotope fractionation measurements. We will then show how accurate simulations can draw a link between extremely precise fractionation experiments and DINS, therefore establishing a reliable benchmark for future measurements and providing key insights to increase further the accuracy of interatomic potentials for water.

  20. Free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory in quantum mechanics: application to entanglement generation.

    PubMed

    Mishima, K; Yamashita, K

    2009-01-21

    We have constructed free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems and applied it to entanglement generation between rotational modes of two polar molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The motivation of the present work is to solve optimal control problems more flexibly by extending the popular fixed time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems to free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory. As a demonstration, the theory that we have constructed in this paper will be applied to entanglement generation in rotational modes of NaCl-NaBr polar molecular systems that are sensitive to the strength of entangling interactions. Our method will significantly be useful for the quantum control of nonlocal interaction such as entangling interaction, which depends crucially on the strength of the interaction or the distance between the two molecules, and other general quantum dynamics, chemical reactions, and so on.

  1. Free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory in quantum mechanics: Application to entanglement generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2009-01-01

    We have constructed free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems and applied it to entanglement generation between rotational modes of two polar molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The motivation of the present work is to solve optimal control problems more flexibly by extending the popular fixed time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems to free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory. As a demonstration, the theory that we have constructed in this paper will be applied to entanglement generation in rotational modes of NaCl-NaBr polar molecular systems that are sensitive to the strength of entangling interactions. Our method will significantly be useful for the quantum control of nonlocal interaction such as entangling interaction, which depends crucially on the strength of the interaction or the distance between the two molecules, and other general quantum dynamics, chemical reactions, and so on.

  2. Singularity of the London penetration depth at quantum critical points in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Debanjan; Swingle, Brian; Berg, Erez; Sachdev, Subir

    2013-10-11

    We present a general theory of the singularity in the London penetration depth at symmetry-breaking and topological quantum critical points within a superconducting phase. While the critical exponents and ratios of amplitudes on the two sides of the transition are universal, an overall sign depends upon the interplay between the critical theory and the underlying Fermi surface. We determine these features for critical points to spin density wave and nematic ordering, and for a topological transition between a superconductor with Z2 fractionalization and a conventional superconductor. We note implications for recent measurements of the London penetration depth in BaFe2(As(1-x)P(x))2 [K. Hashimoto et al., Science 336, 1554 (2012)].

  3. Singularity of the London Penetration Depth at Quantum Critical Points in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debanjan; Swingle, Brian; Berg, Erez; Sachdev, Subir

    2013-10-01

    We present a general theory of the singularity in the London penetration depth at symmetry-breaking and topological quantum critical points within a superconducting phase. While the critical exponents and ratios of amplitudes on the two sides of the transition are universal, an overall sign depends upon the interplay between the critical theory and the underlying Fermi surface. We determine these features for critical points to spin density wave and nematic ordering, and for a topological transition between a superconductor with Z2 fractionalization and a conventional superconductor. We note implications for recent measurements of the London penetration depth in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 [K. Hashimoto , Science 336, 1554 (2012)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1219821].

  4. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  5. Quantum critical point and spin fluctuations in lower-mantle ferropericlase

    PubMed Central

    Lyubutin, Igor S.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Mironovich, A. A.; Gavriliuk, Alexander G.; Naumov, Pavel G.; Lin, Jung-Fu; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Hemley, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] is one of the most abundant minerals of the earth’s lower mantle. The high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition in the Fe2+ ions may dramatically alter the physical and chemical properties of (Mg,Fe)O in the deep mantle. To understand the effects of compression on the ground electronic state of iron, electronic and magnetic states of Fe2+ in (Mg0.75Fe0.25)O have been investigated using transmission and synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at high pressures and low temperatures (down to 5 K). Our results show that the ground electronic state of Fe2+ at the critical pressure Pc of the spin transition close to T = 0 is governed by a quantum critical point (T = 0, P = Pc) at which the energy required for the fluctuation between HS and LS states is zero. Analysis of the data gives Pc = 55 GPa. Thermal excitation within the HS or LS states (T > 0 K) is expected to strongly influence the magnetic as well as physical properties of ferropericlase. Multielectron theoretical calculations show that the existence of the quantum critical point at temperatures approaching zero affects not only physical properties of ferropericlase at low temperatures but also its properties at P-T of the earth’s lower mantle. PMID:23589892

  6. Mapping out spin and particle conductances in a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinner, Sebastian; Lebrat, Martin; Husmann, Dominik; Grenier, Charles; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-07-01

    We study particle and spin transport in a single-mode quantum point contact, using a charge neutral, quantum degenerate Fermi gas with tunable, attractive interactions. This yields the spin and particle conductance of the point contact as a function of chemical potential or confinement. The measurements cover a regime from weak attraction, where quantized conductance is observed, to the resonantly interacting superfluid. Spin conductance exhibits a broad maximum when varying the chemical potential at moderate interactions, which signals the emergence of Cooper pairing. In contrast, the particle conductance is unexpectedly enhanced even before the gas is expected to turn into a superfluid, continuously rising from the plateau at 1/h1/h for weak interactions to plateau-like features at nonuniversal values as high as 4/h4/h for intermediate interactions. For strong interactions, the particle conductance plateaus disappear and the spin conductance gets suppressed, confirming the spin-insulating character of a superfluid. Our observations document the breakdown of universal conductance quantization as many-body correlations appear. The observed anomalous quantization challenges a Fermi liquid description of the normal phase, shedding new light on the nature of the strongly attractive Fermi gas.

  7. Realization of an all-electric spin transistor using quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tse-Ming; Chuang, Pojen; Ho, Sheng-Chin; Smith, Luke; Sfigakis, Francois; Pepper, Michael; Chen, Chin-Hung; Fan, Ju-Chun; Griffiths, Jonathan; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey; Jones, Geb; Ritchie, Dave

    The spin field effect transistor envisioned by Datta and Das opens a gateway to spin information processing. Although the coherent manipulation of electron spins in semiconductors is now possible, the realization of a functional spin field effect transistor for information processing has yet to be achieved, owing to several fundamental challenges such as the low spin-injection efficiency due to resistance mismatch, spin relaxation, and the spread of spin precession angles. Alternative spin transistor designs have therefore been proposed, but these differ from the field effect transistor concept and require the use of optical or magnetic elements, which pose difficulties for the incorporation into integrated circuits. Here, we present an all-electric all-semiconductor spin field effect transistor, in which these obstacles are overcome by employing two quantum point contacts as spin injectors and detectors. Distinct engineering architectures of spin-orbit coupling are exploited for the quantum point contacts and the central semiconductor channel to achieve complete control of the electron spins--spin injection, manipulation, and detection--in a purely electrical manner. Such a device is compatible with large-scale integration and hold promise for future spintronic devices for information processing. Ref: P. Chuang et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 10, 35 (2015).

  8. Mapping out spin and particle conductances in a quantum point contact

    PubMed Central

    Krinner, Sebastian; Lebrat, Martin; Husmann, Dominik; Grenier, Charles; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    We study particle and spin transport in a single-mode quantum point contact, using a charge neutral, quantum degenerate Fermi gas with tunable, attractive interactions. This yields the spin and particle conductance of the point contact as a function of chemical potential or confinement. The measurements cover a regime from weak attraction, where quantized conductance is observed, to the resonantly interacting superfluid. Spin conductance exhibits a broad maximum when varying the chemical potential at moderate interactions, which signals the emergence of Cooper pairing. In contrast, the particle conductance is unexpectedly enhanced even before the gas is expected to turn into a superfluid, continuously rising from the plateau at 1/h for weak interactions to plateau-like features at nonuniversal values as high as 4/h for intermediate interactions. For strong interactions, the particle conductance plateaus disappear and the spin conductance gets suppressed, confirming the spin-insulating character of a superfluid. Our observations document the breakdown of universal conductance quantization as many-body correlations appear. The observed anomalous quantization challenges a Fermi liquid description of the normal phase, shedding new light on the nature of the strongly attractive Fermi gas. PMID:27357668

  9. Quantum critical point and spin fluctuations in lower-mantle ferropericlase.

    PubMed

    Lyubutin, Igor S; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Mironovich, A A; Gavriliuk, Alexander G; Naumov, Pavel G; Lin, Jung-Fu; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Hemley, Russell J

    2013-04-30

    Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] is one of the most abundant minerals of the earth's lower mantle. The high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) transition in the Fe(2+) ions may dramatically alter the physical and chemical properties of (Mg,Fe)O in the deep mantle. To understand the effects of compression on the ground electronic state of iron, electronic and magnetic states of Fe(2+) in (Mg0.75Fe0.25)O have been investigated using transmission and synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at high pressures and low temperatures (down to 5 K). Our results show that the ground electronic state of Fe(2+) at the critical pressure Pc of the spin transition close to T = 0 is governed by a quantum critical point (T = 0, P = P(c)) at which the energy required for the fluctuation between HS and LS states is zero. Analysis of the data gives P(c) = 55 GPa. Thermal excitation within the HS or LS states (T > 0 K) is expected to strongly influence the magnetic as well as physical properties of ferropericlase. Multielectron theoretical calculations show that the existence of the quantum critical point at temperatures approaching zero affects not only physical properties of ferropericlase at low temperatures but also its properties at P-T of the earth's lower mantle.

  10. Microscopic origin of the '0.7-anomaly' in quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Florian; Heyder, Jan; Schubert, Enrico; Borowsky, David; Taubert, Daniela; Bruognolo, Benedikt; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; von Delft, Jan; Ludwig, Stefan

    2013-09-05

    Quantum point contacts are narrow, one-dimensional constrictions usually patterned in a two-dimensional electron system, for example by applying voltages to local gates. The linear conductance of a point contact, when measured as function of its channel width, is quantized in units of GQ = 2e(2)/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck's constant. However, the conductance also has an unexpected shoulder at ∼0.7GQ, known as the '0.7-anomaly', whose origin is still subject to debate. Proposed theoretical explanations have invoked spontaneous spin polarization, ferromagnetic spin coupling, the formation of a quasi-bound state leading to the Kondo effect, Wigner crystallization and various treatments of inelastic scattering. However, explicit calculations that fully reproduce the various experimental observations in the regime of the 0.7-anomaly, including the zero-bias peak that typically accompanies it, are still lacking. Here we offer a detailed microscopic explanation for both the 0.7-anomaly and the zero-bias peak: their common origin is a smeared van Hove singularity in the local density of states at the bottom of the lowest one-dimensional subband of the point contact, which causes an anomalous enhancement in the Hartree potential barrier, the magnetic spin susceptibility and the inelastic scattering rate. We find good qualitative agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental results on the dependence of the conductance on gate voltage, magnetic field, temperature, source-drain voltage (including the zero-bias peak) and interaction strength. We also clarify how the low-energy scale governing the 0.7-anomaly depends on gate voltage and interactions. For low energies, we predict and observe Fermi-liquid behaviour similar to that associated with the Kondo effect in quantum dots. At high energies, however, the similarities between the 0.7-anomaly and the Kondo effect end.

  11. Thermodynamics and renormalized quasiparticles in the vicinity of the dilute Bose gas quantum critical point in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Jan; Strassel, Dominik; Streib, Simon; Eggert, Sebastian; Kopietz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We use the functional renormalization group (FRG) to derive analytical expressions for thermodynamic observables (density, pressure, entropy, and compressibility) as well as for single-particle properties (wave-function renormalization and effective mass) of interacting bosons in two dimensions as a function of temperature T and chemical potential μ . We focus on the quantum disordered and the quantum critical regime close to the dilute Bose gas quantum critical point. Our approach is based on a truncated vertex expansion of the hierarchy of FRG flow equations and the decoupling of the two-body contact interaction in the particle-particle channel using a suitable Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. Our analytic FRG results extend previous analytical renormalization-group calculations for thermodynamic observables at μ =0 to finite values of μ . To confirm the validity of our FRG approach, we have also performed quantum Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the magnetization, susceptibility, and correlation length of the two-dimensional spin-1 /2 quantum X Y model with coupling J in a regime where its quantum critical behavior is controlled by the dilute Bose gas quantum critical point. We find that our analytical results describe the Monte Carlo data for μ ≤0 rather accurately up to relatively high temperatures T ≲0.1 J .

  12. Weak phase stiffness and nature of the quantum critical point in underdoped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Wei; Yildirim, Yucel

    We demonstrate that the zero-temperature superconducting phase diagram of underdoped cuprates can be quantitatively understood in the strong binding limit, using only the experimental spectral function of the ``normal'' pseudo-gap phase without any free parameter. In the prototypical (La1-xSrx)2CuO4, a kinetics-driven d-wave superconductivity is obtained above the critical doping δc ~ 5 . 2 % , below which complete loss of superfluidity results from local quantum fluctuation involving local p-wave pairs. Near the critical doping, a enormous mass enhancement of the local pairs is found responsible for the observed rapid decrease of phase stiffness. Finally, a striking mass divergence is predicted at δc that dictates the occurrence of the observed quantum critical point and the abrupt suppression of the Nernst effects in the nearby region. * Phys. Rev. B 92, 180501(R) (2015); Phys. Rev. X 1, 011011 (2011). Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  13. Weak phase stiffess and nature of the quantum critical point in underdoped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Wei; Yildirim, Yucel

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that the zero-temperature superconducting phase diagram of underdoped cuprates can be quantitatively understood in the strong binding limit, using only the experimental spectral function of the ``normal'' pseudo-gap phase without any free parameter. In the prototypical (La1-xSrx)2CuO4, a kinetics-driven d-wave superconductivity is obtained above the critical doping δc ~ 5 . 2 % , below which complete loss of superfluidity results from local quantum fluctuation involving local p-wave pairs. Near the critical doping, a enormous mass enhancement of the local pairs is found responsible for the observed rapid decrease of phase stiffness. Finally, a striking mass divergence is predicted at δc that dictates the occurrence of the observed quantum critical point and the sudden suppression of the Nernst effects in the nearby region. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  14. Quantum point contacts on two-dimensional electron gases with a strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Pendaharkar, Mihir; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; McFadden, Anthony P.; Palmstrøm, Chris

    Studies of electrical transport in one-dimensional semiconductors in a presence of a strong spin-orbit interaction are crucial not only for exploring the emergent phenomena, such as topological superconductivity, but also for potential spintronic applications by controlling of the electron spins. We investigate the electrical transport properties of one-dimensional confinement defined by electrostatic potentials on large area two-dimensional electron gases of InAs and InSb, which have a strong spin-orbit coupling. The high-quality InAs and InSb quantum wells are grown on antimonide buffers by molecular beam epitaxy, and the gate-tunable regions are created using Al2O3 or HfO2 gate dielectrics by atomic layer deposition. We will discuss the modulation of spin-orbit coupling in the two-dimensional electron gases and the spin-orbit-induced spin splitting by the split-gate quantum point contacts. This work was supported by Microsoft Research.

  15. Universal behavior of repulsive two-dimensional fermions in the vicinity of the quantum freezing point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Skinner, Brian; Fogler, Michael M.; Demler, Eugene

    2013-07-01

    We show by a meta-analysis of the available Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) results that two-dimensional fermions with repulsive interactions exhibit universal behavior in the strongly correlated regime, and that their freezing transition can be described using a quantum generalization of the classical Hansen-Verlet freezing criterion. We calculate the liquid-state energy and the freezing point of the 2D dipolar Fermi gas (2DDFG) using a variational method by taking ground-state wave functions of 2D electron gas (2DEG) as trial states. A comparison with the recent fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo analysis of the 2DDFG shows that our simple variational technique captures more than 95% of the correlation energy, and predicts the freezing transition within the uncertainty bounds of QMC. Finally, we utilize the ground-state wave functions of 2DDFG as trial states and provide a variational account of the effects of finite 2D confinement width. Our results indicate significant beyond mean-field effects. We calculate the frequency of collective monopole oscillations of the quasi-2D dipolar gas as an experimental demonstration of correlation effects.

  16. Zero-Point Energy Leakage in Quantum Thermal Bath Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Brieuc, Fabien; Bronstein, Yael; Dammak, Hichem; Depondt, Philippe; Finocchi, Fabio; Hayoun, Marc

    2016-12-13

    The quantum thermal bath (QTB) has been presented as an alternative to path-integral-based methods to introduce nuclear quantum effects in molecular dynamics simulations. The method has proved to be efficient, yielding accurate results for various systems. However, the QTB method is prone to zero-point energy leakage (ZPEL) in highly anharmonic systems. This is a well-known problem in methods based on classical trajectories where part of the energy of the high-frequency modes is transferred to the low-frequency modes leading to a wrong energy distribution. In some cases, the ZPEL can have dramatic consequences on the properties of the system. Thus, we investigate the ZPEL by testing the QTB method on selected systems with increasing complexity in order to study the conditions and the parameters that influence the leakage. We also analyze the consequences of the ZPEL on the structural and vibrational properties of the system. We find that the leakage is particularly dependent on the damping coefficient and that increasing its value can reduce and, in some cases, completely remove the ZPEL. When using sufficiently high values for the damping coefficient, the expected energy distribution among the vibrational modes is ensured. In this case, the QTB method gives very encouraging results. In particular, the structural properties are well-reproduced. The dynamical properties should be regarded with caution although valuable information can still be extracted from the vibrational spectrum, even for large values of the damping term.

  17. Mapping the current–current correlation function near a quantum critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Prodan, Emil; Bellissard, Jean

    2016-05-15

    The current–current correlation function is a useful concept in the theory of electron transport in homogeneous solids. The finite-temperature conductivity tensor as well as Anderson’s localization length can be computed entirely from this correlation function. Based on the critical behavior of these two physical quantities near the plateau–insulator or plateau–plateau transitions in the integer quantum Hall effect, we derive an asymptotic formula for the current–current correlation function, which enables us to make several theoretical predictions about its generic behavior. For the disordered Hofstadter model, we employ numerical simulations to map the current–current correlation function, obtain its asymptotic form near a critical point and confirm the theoretical predictions.

  18. Direct observation of the quantum critical point in heavy fermion CeRhSi3.

    PubMed

    Egetenmeyer, N; Gavilano, J L; Maisuradze, A; Gerber, S; MacLaughlin, D E; Seyfarth, G; Andreica, D; Desilets-Benoit, A; Bianchi, A D; Baines, Ch; Khasanov, R; Fisk, Z; Kenzelmann, M

    2012-04-27

    We report on muon spin rotation studies of the noncentrosymmetric heavy fermion antiferromagnet CeRhSi3. A drastic and monotonic suppression of the internal fields, at the lowest measured temperature, was observed upon an increase of external pressure. Our data suggest that the ordered moments are gradually quenched with increasing pressure, in a manner different from the pressure dependence of the Néel temperature. At 23.6 kbar, the ordered magnetic moments are fully suppressed via a second-order phase transition, and T(N) is zero. Thus, we directly observed the quantum critical point at 23.6 kbar hidden inside the superconducting phase of CeRhSi3.

  19. Candidate Elastic Quantum Critical Point in LaCu6-xAux

    DOE PAGES

    Poudel, Lekh; May, Andrew F.; Koehler, Michael R.; ...

    2016-11-30

    In this paper, the structural properties of LaCu6-xAux are studied using neutron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and heat capacity measurements. The continuous orthorhombic-monoclinic structural phase transition in LaCu6 is suppressed linearly with Au substitution until a complete suppression of the structural phase transition occurs at the critical composition xc=0.3. Heat capacity measurements at low temperatures indicate residual structural instability at xc. The instability is ferroelastic in nature, with density functional theory calculations showing negligible coupling to electronic states near the Fermi level. Finally, the data and calculations presented here are consistent with the zero temperature termination of a continuous structural phasemore » transition suggesting that the LaCu6-xAux series hosts an elastic quantum critical point.« less

  20. Observation of resonance conductance in a quantum point contact with a tunable channel potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chong-Shian; Hsiao, J. H.; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hong, Tzay-Ming; Chen, J. C.; Ueda, T.; Komiyama, S.

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the resonance conductance of a quantum point contact (QPC), defined in a two-dimensional electron gas of a high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction. The potential profile of the QPC channel can be locally tuned by separately biasing the split gate and a cross gate, electrically isolated on the top of the QPC. The conductance, evolving with the cross-gate voltages exhibits an oscillatory feature superimposed on the quantized plateau in the positive bias voltages and a suppression of the plateau in negative bias voltages. Our investigation suggests that the oscillations on the conductance result from the longitudinal resonance through the channel. The governing parameters of the resonance are the aspect ratio of the channel and the Fermi wavelength of the incident electrons.

  1. Shear viscosity at the Ising-nematic quantum critical point in two-dimensional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlein, Andreas; Patel, Aavishkar A.; Sachdev, Subir

    2017-02-01

    In an isotropic strongly interacting quantum liquid without quasiparticles, general scaling arguments imply that the dimensionless ratio (kB/ℏ )η /s , where η is the shear viscosity and s is the entropy density, is a universal number. We compute the shear viscosity of the Ising-nematic critical point of metals in spatial dimension d =2 by an expansion below d =5 /2 . The anisotropy associated with directions parallel and normal to the Fermi surface leads to a violation of the scaling expectations: η scales in the same manner as a chiral conductivity, and the ratio η /s diverges at low temperature (T ) as T-2 /z, where z is the dynamic critical exponent for fermionic excitations dispersing normal to the Fermi surface.

  2. Evaluation of parameters for particles acceleration by the zero-point field of quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, A.

    1985-01-01

    That particles may be accelerated by vacuum effects in quantum field theory has been repeatedly proposed in the last few years. A natural upshot of this is a mechanism for cosmic rays (CR) primaries acceleration. A mechanism for acceleration by the zero-point field (ZPE) when the ZPE is taken in a realistic sense (in opposition to a virtual field) was considered. Originally the idea was developed within a semiclassical context. The classical Einstein-Hopf model (EHM) was used to show that free isolated electromagnrtically interacting particles performed a random walk in phase space and more importantly in momentum space when submitted to the perennial action of the so called classical electromagnrtic ZPE.

  3. Tunable graphene quantum point contact transistor for DNA detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Girdhar, Anuj; Sathe, Chaitanya; Schulten, Klaus; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    A graphene membrane conductor containing a nanopore in a quantum point contact (QPC) geometry is a promising candidate to sense, and potentially sequence, DNA molecules translocating through the nanopore. Within this geometry, the shape, size, and position of the nanopore as well as the edge configuration influences the membrane conductance caused by the electrostatic interaction between the DNA nucleotides and the nanopore edge. It is shown that the graphene conductance variations resulting from DNA translocation can be enhanced by choosing a particular geometry as well as by modulating the graphene Fermi energy, which demonstrates the ability to detect conformational transformations of a double-stranded DNA, as well as the passage of individual base pairs of a single-stranded DNA molecule through the nanopore. PMID:25765702

  4. Multi-scale quantum point contact model for filamentary conduction in resistive random access memories devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Xiaojuan Cartoixà, Xavier; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi; Perniola, Luca; Rurali, Riccardo; Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming

    2014-06-28

    We depart from first-principle simulations of electron transport along paths of oxygen vacancies in HfO{sub 2} to reformulate the Quantum Point Contact (QPC) model in terms of a bundle of such vacancy paths. By doing this, the number of model parameters is reduced and a much clearer link between the microscopic structure of the conductive filament (CF) and its electrical properties can be provided. The new multi-scale QPC model is applied to two different HfO{sub 2}-based devices operated in the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching (RS) modes. Extraction of the QPC model parameters from a statistically significant number of CFs allows revealing significant structural differences in the CF of these two types of devices and RS modes.

  5. Candidate Elastic Quantum Critical Point in LaCu_{6-x}Au_{x}.

    PubMed

    Poudel, L; May, A F; Koehler, M R; McGuire, M A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Calder, S; Baumbach, R E; Mukherjee, R; Sapkota, D; de la Cruz, C; Singh, D J; Mandrus, D; Christianson, A D

    2016-12-02

    The structural properties of LaCu_{6-x}Au_{x} are studied using neutron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and heat capacity measurements. The continuous orthorhombic-monoclinic structural phase transition in LaCu_{6} is suppressed linearly with Au substitution until a complete suppression of the structural phase transition occurs at the critical composition x_{c}=0.3. Heat capacity measurements at low temperatures indicate residual structural instability at x_{c}. The instability is ferroelastic in nature, with density functional theory calculations showing negligible coupling to electronic states near the Fermi level. The data and calculations presented here are consistent with the zero temperature termination of a continuous structural phase transition suggesting that the LaCu_{6-x}Au_{x} series hosts an elastic quantum critical point.

  6. Charge noise analysis of metal oxide semiconductor dual-gate Si/SiGe quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Kamioka, J.; Oda, S.; Kodera, T.; Takeda, K.; Obata, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-05-28

    The frequency dependence of conductance noise through a gate-defined quantum point contact fabricated on a Si/SiGe modulation doped wafer is characterized. The 1/f{sup 2} noise, which is characteristic of random telegraph noise, is reduced by application of a negative bias on the global top gate to reduce the local gate voltage. Direct leakage from the large global gate voltage also causes random telegraph noise, and therefore, there is a suitable point to operate quantum dot measurement.

  7. Magnification of signatures of a topological phase transition by quantum zero point motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.; Ghaemi, Pouyan

    2015-08-01

    We show that the zero point motion of a vortex in superconducting doped topological insulators leads to significant changes in the electronic spectrum at the topological phase transition in this system. This topological phase transition is tuned by the doping level, and the corresponding effects are manifest in the density of states at energies which are on the order of the vortex fluctuation frequency. Although the electronic energy gap in the spectrum generated by a stationary vortex is but a small fraction of the bulk superconducting gap, the vortex fluctuation frequency may be much larger. As a result, this quantum zero point motion can induce a discontinuous change in the spectral features of the system at the topological vortex phase transition to energies which are well within the resolution of scanning tunneling microscopy. This discontinuous change is exclusive to superconducting systems in which we have a topological phase transition. Moreover, the phenomena studied in this paper present effects of Magnus forces on the vortex spectrum which are not present in the ordinary s -wave superconductors. Finally, we demonstrate explicitly that the vortex in this system is equivalent to a Kitaev chain. This allows for the mapping of the vortex fluctuating scenario in three dimensions into similar one-dimensional situations in which one may search for other novel signatures of topological phase transitions.

  8. Signatures of a quantum Griffiths phase in a d-metal alloy close to its ferromagnetic quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Almut; Ubaid-Kassis, Sara; Vojta, Thomas

    2011-03-09

    We report magnetization measurements close to the ferromagnetic quantum phase transition of the d-metal alloy Ni(1 - x)V(x) at a vanadium concentration of x(c)≈11.4%. In the diluted regime (x > x(c)), the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) dependences of the magnetization are characterized by nonuniversal power laws and display H/T scaling in a wide temperature and field range. The exponents vary strongly with x and follow the predictions of a quantum Griffiths phase. We also discuss the deviations and limits of the quantum Griffiths phase as well as the phase boundaries due to bulk and cluster physics.

  9. Processing time-series point clouds to reveal strain conditions of the Helheim Glacier terminus and its adjacent mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, L. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Gadomski, P. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Flow near the termini of tidewater glaciers varies over short time-scales due to mechanisms that are poorly understood. Repeat observations with high temporal and spatial resolution, recorded around the terminus, are required to better understand the processes that control flow variability. Progress in light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology permit such observations of the near-terminus and the pro-glacial ice mélange, though standard workflows for quantifying deformation from point clouds currently do not exist. Here, we test and develop methods for processing displacements from LiDAR data of complexly deforming bodies. We use data collected at 30-minute intervals over three-days in August 2013 at Helheim Glacier, Greenland by a long-range (6-10 km), 1064 nm wavelength Terrestrial LiDAR Scanner (TLS). The total area of coverage was ~25 km2. Distributed shear in glaciers prevents a simple transformation for aligning repeat point clouds, but within small regions (~100 m2) strain is assumed to be minor between scans. Registering a large number of these individual regions, subset from the full point-cloud, results in reduced alignment errors. By subsetting in a regular grid, rasters of velocities between scans are created. However, using data-dependent properties such as point density causes the generation of unevenly spaced velocity estimations, which can locally improve resolution or decrease registration errors. The choice of subsets therefore controls the output product's resolution and accuracy. We test how the spatial segmentation scheme affects the displacement results and alignment errors, finding that displacements can be quantified with limited assumption of the true value of displacement for the subset, barring great morphological changes. By identifying areas that do not deform over the temporal domain of the dataset, and using these as the subsets to align, it should be possible to deduce which structures are accommodating strain. This allows for

  10. Free-Time and Fixed End-Point Optimal Control Theory in Quantum Mechanics: Application to Entanglement Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Kenji; Yamashita, Koichi

    2009-03-01

    We have constructed free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems and applied it to entanglement generation between rotational modes of two polar molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The motivation of the present work is to solve optimal control problems more flexibly by extending the popular fixed-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory for quantum systems to free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory. Our theory can not only achieve high transition probabilities but also determine exact temporal duration of the laser pulses. As a demonstration, our theory is applied to entanglement generation in rotational modes of NaCl-NaBr polar molecular systems that are sensitive to the strength of entangling interactions. Using the tailored laser pulses, we discuss the fidelity of entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. Our method will significantly be useful for the quantum control of non-local interaction such as entangling interaction, and other time-sensitive general quantum dynamics, chemical reactions.

  11. Selected metal levels of commercially valuable seaweeds adjacent to and distant from point sources of contamination in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.J. ); Samant, H.S.; Vaidya, O.C. )

    1988-06-01

    The harvesting of marine plants on a commercial scale was a significant industry in the Maritime Provinces of Canada by the end of World War II. These seaweeds have been traditionally utilized as foodstuffs either as a processed extract or a semi-processed plant. The Maritime coastline is becoming industrialized; there is also potential for expansion of the marine plant industry beyond traditional harvest areas. Therefore, the quality of material from new areas must be examined prior to exploitation as well as monitoring of traditional areas. The bioaccumulated of metals by marine plants was recognized in early measurements of trace element concentrations which were above ambient water values. Before growth and reproductive inhibition are caused by severe effects of heavy metal pollution, food quality changes may occur. The Food Chemical Code (U.S.A.) limits heavy metals in the extracts of seaweeds. Sediment and water samples taken in connection with the Ocean Dumping Control Act of Canada have identified several sites with elevated heavy metal content in the Maritimes. The purpose of this study was to examine heavy metal levels in commercially important seaweeds from traditional harvest areas and areas near point sources of pollution. The authors wished to provide a baseline for the future and identify existing problem areas.

  12. Effect of arena size on behaviour and mortality of the oriental cockroach Blatta orientalis in arenas with a cypermethrin deposit adjacent to harbourage access points.

    PubMed

    Le Patourel, G N

    1998-01-01

    Activity and survival of adult female Blatta orientalis was investigated using tagged cockroaches in periodically illuminated arenas (LD 12:12 h) with a harbourage at one end. The arenas were rectangular with a width of 50 cm and lengths up to 480 cm. A cypermethrin-treated plywood plate (50 x 11 cm) substrate across the harbourage access points caused cockroaches to be exposed to the insecticide deposit by tarsal contact as they entered or left the harbourage. The effects of varying arena length and cypermethrin concentration were tested at 28 degrees C. The LC50 following 3 days exposure ranged from 5.7 to 11.8 mg/m2 on the plywood plate for arena lengths of 60 to 480 cm, respectively; cypermethrin at 30 mg/m2 produced 100% knockdown of B. orientalis within one 12 h dark period. During darkness, active cockroaches spent most time close to the harbourage or around food and water stations, at the far end of the arena, and made frequent returns into the harbourage. For arena length 120 cm, the mean duration of contact with treated plates during the first hour of the dark period was significantly less than contact time on untreated plates, but during 12 h the cumulative contact times were not significantly different between treated and untreated plates. During the first 4 h of the dark period, mean cockroach numbers on the treated plate declined as arena length increased, but not as rapidly as the mean number/unit area over the rest of the arena. The arena design is considered suitable for comparative testing of fast-acting neuroactive insecticide deposits against cockroaches.

  13. The Occurrence of Anomalous Conductance Plateaus and Spin Textures in Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Cahay, M.; Debray, P.; Newrock, R.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, we used a NEGF formalism [1] to provide a theoretical explanation for the experimentally observed 0.5G0 (G0=2e^2/h) plateau in the conductance of side-gated quantum point contacts (QPCs) in the presence of lateral spin-orbit coupling (LSOC) [2]. We showed that the 0.5G0 plateau appears in the QPCs without any external magnetic field as a result of three ingredients: an asymmetric lateral confinement, a LSOC, and a strong electron-electron (e-e) interaction. In this report, we present the results of simulations for a wide range of QPC dimensions and biasing parameters showing that the same physics predicts the appearance of other anomalous plateaus at non-integer values of G0, including the well-known 0.7G0 anomaly. These features are related to a plethora of spin textures in the QPC that depend sensitively on material, device, biasing parameters, temperature, and the strength of the e-e interaction. [1] J. Wan, M. Cahay, P. Debray, and R.S. Newrock, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155440 (2009). [2] P. Debray, S.M. Rahman, J. Wan, R.S. Newrock, M. Cahay, A.T. Ngo, S.E. Ulloa, S.T. Herbert, M. Muhammad, and M. Johnson, Nature Nanotech. 4, 759 (2009).

  14. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Karadi, Chandu

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlOxNb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic.

  15. Is U3Ni3Sn4 best described as near a quantum critical point?

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Shlyk, L.; Nenkov, K.; Huber, J.G.; De Long, L.E.

    2003-04-08

    Although most known non-Fermi liquid (NFL) materials are structurally or chemically disordered, the role of this disorder remains unclear. In particular, very few systems have been discovered that may be stoichiometric and well ordered. To test whether U{sub 3}Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4} belongs in this latter class, we present measurements of the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) of polycrystalline and single-crystal U{sub 3}Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4} samples that are consistent with no measurable local atomic disorder. We also present temperature-dependent specific heat data in applied magnetic fields as high as 8 T that show features that are inconsistent with the antiferromagnetic Griffiths' phase model, but do support the conclusion that a Fermi liquid/NFL crossover temperature increases with applied field. These results are inconsistent with theoretical explanations that require strong disorder effects, but do support the view that U{sub 3}Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4} is a stoichoiometric, ordered material that exhibits NFL behavior, and is best described as being near an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point.

  16. Nematic quantum critical point without magnetism in FeSe1−xSx superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Hosoi, Suguru; Matsuura, Kohei; Ishida, Kousuke; Wang, Hao; Mizukami, Yuta; Watashige, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yuji; Shibauchi, Takasada

    2016-01-01

    In most unconventional superconductors, the importance of antiferromagnetic fluctuations is widely acknowledged. In addition, cuprate and iron-pnictide high-temperature superconductors often exhibit unidirectional (nematic) electronic correlations, including stripe and orbital orders, whose fluctuations may also play a key role for electron pairing. In these materials, however, such nematic correlations are intertwined with antiferromagnetic or charge orders, preventing the identification of the essential role of nematic fluctuations. This calls for new materials having only nematicity without competing or coexisting orders. Here we report systematic elastoresistance measurements in FeSe1−xSx superconductors, which, unlike other iron-based families, exhibit an electronic nematic order without accompanying antiferromagnetic order. We find that the nematic transition temperature decreases with sulfur content x; whereas, the nematic fluctuations are strongly enhanced. Near x≈0.17, the nematic susceptibility diverges toward absolute zero, revealing a nematic quantum critical point. The obtained phase diagram for the nematic and superconducting states highlights FeSe1−xSx as a unique nonmagnetic system suitable for studying the impact of nematicity on superconductivity. PMID:27382157

  17. Measuring the distance from saddle points and driving to locate them over quantum control landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Riviello, Gregory; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-11-01

    Optimal control of quantum phenomena involves the introduction of a cost functional J to characterize the degree of achieving a physical objective by a chosen shaped electromagnetic field. The cost functional dependence upon the control forms a control landscape. Two theoretically important canonical cases are the landscapes associated with seeking to achieve either a physical observable or a unitary transformation. Upon satisfaction of particular assumptions, both landscapes are analytically known to be trap-free, yet possess saddle points at precise suboptimal J values. The presence of saddles on the landscapes can influence the effort needed to find an optimal field. As a foundation to future algorithm development and analyzes, we define metrics that identify the ‘distance’ from a given saddle based on the sufficient and necessary conditions for the existence of the saddles. Algorithms are introduced utilizing the metrics to find a control such that the dynamics arrive at a targeted saddle. The saddle distance metric and saddle-seeking methodology is tested numerically in several model systems.

  18. Crossover between T and T^2 electrical resistivity near an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Dominic; Kyung, Bumsoo; Hankevych, Vasyl; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2010-03-01

    To understand the ubiquitous linear term in the resistivity observed for the cuprates and other unconventional superconductors, we generalize the Two-Particle-Self-Consistent approach for the Hubbard model to include vertex corrections in the calculation of conductivity. Spin and charge fluctuations are included at all wavelengths. The vertex corrections allow the f-sum rule to be satisfied very accurately and are crucial contributions to the resistivity. Fitting the temperature dependence to a quadratic form, we obtain a linear term that decreases with increasing doping close to the antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. The quadratic term has a much weaker doping dependence. The linear term is also correlated with the Tc predicted by the same approach [1], in which both superconductivity and linear resistivity are caused by antiferromagnetic correlations. Our results agree qualitatively with recent experiments showing that the linear term vanishes concomitantly with the critical temperature Tc in the overdoped regime [2]. [1] Kyung et al. PRB 68, 174502 (2003) [2] Doiron-Leyraud et al. arXiv:0905.0964

  19. Interference features in scanning gate conductance maps of quantum point contacts with disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasiński, K.; Szafran, B.; Brun, B.; Sellier, H.

    2016-08-01

    We consider quantum point contact (QPC) defined within a disordered two-dimensional electron gas as studied by scanning gate microscopy. We evaluate the conductance maps in the Landauer approach with a wave-function picture of electron transport for samples with both low and high electron mobility at finite temperatures. We discuss the spatial distribution of the impurities in the context of the branched electron flow. We reproduce the surprising temperature stability of the experimental interference fringes far from the QPC. Next, we discuss funnel-shaped features that accompany splitting of the branches visible in previous experiments. Finally, we study elliptical interference fringes formed by an interplay of scattering by the pointlike impurities and by the scanning probe. We discuss the details of the elliptical features as functions of the tip voltage and the temperature, showing that the first interference fringe is very robust against the thermal widening of the Fermi level. We present a simple analytical model that allows for extraction of the impurity positions and the electron-gas depletion radius induced by the negatively charged tip of the atomic force microscope, and apply this model on experimental scanning gate images showing such elliptical fringes.

  20. Directed energy transfer in films of CdSe quantum dots: beyond the point dipole approximation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kaibo; Žídek, Karel; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Nan; Chábera, Pavel; Lenngren, Nils; Chi, Qijin; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2014-04-30

    Understanding of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in thin films composed of quantum dots (QDs) is of fundamental and technological significance in optimal design of QD based optoelectronic devices. The separation between QDs in the densely packed films is usually smaller than the size of QDs, so that the simple point-dipole approximation, widely used in the conventional approach, can no longer offer quantitative description of the FRET dynamics in such systems. Here, we report the investigations of the FRET dynamics in densely packed films composed of multisized CdSe QDs using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy and theoretical modeling. Pairwise interdot transfer time was determined in the range of 1.5 to 2 ns by spectral analyses which enable separation of the FRET contribution from intrinsic exciton decay. A rational model is suggested by taking into account the distribution of the electronic transition densities in the dots and using the film morphology revealed by AFM images. The FRET dynamics predicted by the model are in good quantitative agreement with experimental observations without adjustable parameters. Finally, we use our theoretical model to calculate dynamics of directed energy transfer in ordered multilayer QD films, which we also observe experimentally. The Monte Carlo simulations reveal that three ideal QD monolayers can provide exciton funneling efficiency above 80% from the most distant layer. Thereby, utilization of directed energy transfer can significantly improve light harvesting efficiency of QD devices.

  1. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, P. Adamowski, J. Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-07

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  2. Quantum point contacts and resistive switching in Ni/NiO nanowire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Sean M.; Fairfield, Jessamyn A.; Bellew, Allen T.; Lee, Sunghun; Champlain, James G.; Ruppalt, Laura B.; Boland, John J.; Vora, Patrick M.

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide devices that exhibit resistive switching are leading candidates for non-volatile memory applications due to their potential for fast switching, low-power operation, and high device density. It is widely accepted in many systems that two-state resistive behavior arises from the formation and rupture of conductive filaments spanning the oxide layer. However, means for controlling the filament geometry, which critically influences conduction, have largely been unexamined. Here, we explore the connection between filament geometry and conductance in a model resistive switching system based on the junction of two nickel/nickel oxide core/shell nanowires. Variable temperature current-voltage measurements indicate that either wide metallic filaments or narrow semiconducting filaments can be preferentially formed by varying the current compliance during electroformation. Metallic filaments behave as a conventional metallic resistance in series with a small barrier, while semiconducting filaments behave as quantum point contacts. The ability to tune filament geometry and behavior through the electroforming process may open avenues for enhanced functionality in nanoscale memristive systems.

  3. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with field-tunable Chern number near Z2 topological critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Le Quy; Lin, Hsin; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Feng, Yuan Ping

    We study the practicability of achieving quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect with field-tunable Chern number in a magnetically doped, topologically trivial insulating thin film. Specifically in a candidate material, TlBi(S1-δSeδ)2, we demonstrate that the QAH phases with different Chern numbers can be achieved by means of tuning the exchange field strength or the sample thickness near the Z2 topological critical point. Our physics scenario successfully reduces the necessary exchange coupling strength for a targeted Chern number. This QAH mechanism differs from the traditional QAH picture with a magnetic topological insulating thin film, where the ``surface'' states must involve and sometimes complicate the realization issue. Furthermore, we find that a given Chern number can also be tuned by a perpendicular electric field, which naturally occurs when a substrate is present. High-Chern number QAH phase obtained from magnetically doped topological crystalline insulator thin films will also be discussed. Support by the Singapore National Research Foundation under NRF Award No. NRF-NRFF2013-03 is acknowledged.

  4. Nematic quantum critical point without magnetism in FeSe1-xSx superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Suguru; Matsuura, Kohei; Ishida, Kousuke; Wang, Hao; Mizukami, Yuta; Watashige, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yuji; Shibauchi, Takasada

    2016-07-01

    In most unconventional superconductors, the importance of antiferromagnetic fluctuations is widely acknowledged. In addition, cuprate and iron-pnictide high-temperature superconductors often exhibit unidirectional (nematic) electronic correlations, including stripe and orbital orders, whose fluctuations may also play a key role for electron pairing. In these materials, however, such nematic correlations are intertwined with antiferromagnetic or charge orders, preventing the identification of the essential role of nematic fluctuations. This calls for new materials having only nematicity without competing or coexisting orders. Here we report systematic elastoresistance measurements in FeSe1-xSx superconductors, which, unlike other iron-based families, exhibit an electronic nematic order without accompanying antiferromagnetic order. We find that the nematic transition temperature decreases with sulfur content x; whereas, the nematic fluctuations are strongly enhanced. Near ≈0.17, the nematic susceptibility diverges toward absolute zero, revealing a nematic quantum critical point. The obtained phase diagram for the nematic and superconducting states highlights FeSe1-xSx as a unique nonmagnetic system suitable for studying the impact of nematicity on superconductivity.

  5. Nematic quantum critical point without magnetism in FeSe1-xSx superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Suguru; Matsuura, Kohei; Ishida, Kousuke; Wang, Hao; Mizukami, Yuta; Watashige, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yuji; Shibauchi, Takasada

    2016-07-19

    In most unconventional superconductors, the importance of antiferromagnetic fluctuations is widely acknowledged. In addition, cuprate and iron-pnictide high-temperature superconductors often exhibit unidirectional (nematic) electronic correlations, including stripe and orbital orders, whose fluctuations may also play a key role for electron pairing. In these materials, however, such nematic correlations are intertwined with antiferromagnetic or charge orders, preventing the identification of the essential role of nematic fluctuations. This calls for new materials having only nematicity without competing or coexisting orders. Here we report systematic elastoresistance measurements in FeSe1-xSx superconductors, which, unlike other iron-based families, exhibit an electronic nematic order without accompanying antiferromagnetic order. We find that the nematic transition temperature decreases with sulfur content x; whereas, the nematic fluctuations are strongly enhanced. Near [Formula: see text], the nematic susceptibility diverges toward absolute zero, revealing a nematic quantum critical point. The obtained phase diagram for the nematic and superconducting states highlights FeSe1-xSx as a unique nonmagnetic system suitable for studying the impact of nematicity on superconductivity.

  6. Scaling of the decoherence factor of a qubit coupled to a spin chain driven across quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Tanay; Divakaran, Uma; Dutta, Amit

    2012-07-01

    We study the scaling of the decoherence factor of a qubit (spin-1/2) using the central spin model in which the central spin (qubit) is globally coupled to a transverse XY spin chain. The aim here is to study the nonequilibrium generation of decoherence when the spin chain is driven across (along) quantum critical points (lines) and derive the scaling of the decoherence factor in terms of the driving rate and some of the exponents associated with the quantum critical points. Our studies show that the scaling of the logarithm of the decoherence factor is identical to that of the defect density in the final state of the spin chain following a quench across isolated quantum critical points for both linear and nonlinear variations of a parameter, even if the defect density may not satisfy the standard Kibble-Zurek scaling. However, one finds an interesting deviation when the spin chain is driven along a critical line. Our analytical predictions are in complete agreement with numerical results. Our study, though limited to integrable two-level systems, points to the existence of a universality in the scaling of the decoherence factor which is not necessarily identical to the scaling of the defect density.

  7. Quantization and anomalous structures in the conductance of Si/SiGe quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Pock, J. F.; Salloch, D.; Qiao, G.; Wieser, U.; Hackbarth, T.; Kunze, U.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum point contacts (QPCs) are fabricated on modulation-doped Si/SiGe heterostructures and ballistic transport is studied at low temperatures. We observe quantized conductance with subband separations up to 4 meV and anomalies in the first conductance plateau at 4e2/h. At a temperature of T = 22 mK in the linear transport regime, a weak anomalous kink structure arises close to 0.5(4e2/h), which develops into a distinct plateau-like structure as temperature is raised up to T = 4 K. Under magnetic field parallel to the wire up to B = 14 T, the anomaly evolves into the Zeeman spin-split level at 0.5(4e2/h), resembling the "0.7 anomaly" in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Additionally, a zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) is observed in nonlinear transport spectroscopy. At T = 22 mK, a parallel magnetic field splits the ZBA peak up into two peaks. At B = 0, elevated temperatures lead to similar splitting, which differs from the behavior of ZBAs in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Under finite dc bias, the differential resistance exhibits additional plateaus approximately at 0.8(4e2/h) and 0.2(4e2/h) known as "0.85 anomaly" and "0.25 anomaly" in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Unlike the first regular plateau at 4e2/h, the 0.2(4e2/h) plateau is insensitive to dc bias voltage up to at least VDS = 80 mV, in-plane magnetic fields up to B = 15 T, and to elevated temperatures up to T = 25 K. We interpret this effect as due to pinching off one of the reservoirs close to the QPC. We do not see any indication of lifting of the valley degeneracy in our samples.

  8. Privacy-preserving point-inclusion protocol for an arbitrary area based on phase-encoded quantum private query

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2017-01-01

    The point-inclusion problem is an important secure multi-party computation that it involves two parties, where one has a private point and the other has a private area, and they want to determine whether the point is inside the area without revealing their respective private information. All previously proposed point-inclusion protocols are only suitable for a specific area, such as circle, rectangle and convex polygon. In this paper, we present a novel privacy-preserving point-inclusion quantum protocol for an arbitrary area, which is surrounded by any plane geometric figure. Compared to the classical related protocols, our protocol has the advantages of the higher security and the lower communication complexity.

  9. Microscopic analysis of the superconducting quantum critical point: Finite-temperature crossovers in transport near a pair-breaking quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nayana; Lopatin, Andrei

    2007-09-01

    A microscopic analysis of the superconducting quantum critical point realized via a pair-breaking quantum phase transition is presented. Finite-temperature crossovers are derived for the electrical conductivity, which is a key probe of superconducting fluctuations. By using the diagrammatic formalism for disordered systems, we are able to incorporate the interplay between fluctuating Cooper pairs and electrons, that is outside the scope of a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau or effective bosonic action formalism. It is essential to go beyond the standard approximation in order to capture the zero-temperature correction which results purely from the (dynamic) quantum fluctuations and dictates the behavior of the conductivity in an entire low-temperature quantum regime. All dynamic contributions are of the same order and conspire to add up to a negative total, thereby inhibiting the conductivity as a result of superconducting fluctuations. On the contrary, the classical and the intermediate regimes are dominated by the positive bosonic channel. Our theory is applicable in one, two, and three dimensions and is relevant for experiments on superconducting nanowires, doubly connected cylinders, thin films, and bulk in the presence of magnetic impurities, magnetic field, or other pair breakers. A window of nonmonotonic behavior is predicted to exist as either the temperature or the pair-breaking parameter is swept.

  10. Interedge backscattering in buried split-gate-defined graphene quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shaohua; Mreńca-Kolasińska, Alina; Miseikis, Vaidotas; Guiducci, Stefano; Kolasiński, Krzysztof; Coletti, Camilla; Szafran, Bartłomiej; Beltram, Fabio; Roddaro, Stefano; Heun, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Quantum Hall effects offer a formidable playground for the investigation of quantum transport phenomena. Edge modes can be deflected, branched, and mixed by designing a suitable potential landscape in a two-dimensional conducting system subject to a strong magnetic field. In the present work, we demonstrate a buried split-gate architecture and use it to control electron conduction in large-scale single-crystal monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The control of the edge trajectories is demonstrated by the observation of various fractional quantum resistances, as a result of a controllable interedge scattering. Experimental data are successfully modeled both numerically and analytically within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our architecture is particularly promising and unique in view of the investigation of quantum transport via scanning probe microscopy, since graphene constitutes the topmost layer of the device. For this reason, it can be approached and perturbed by a scanning probe down to the limit of mechanical contact.

  11. Ferromagnetic quantum critical point in heavy-fermion iron oxypnictide Ce(Ru(1-x)Fe(x))PO.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, S; Ishida, K; Nakamura, T; Matoba, M; Kamihara, Y

    2012-11-30

    We have performed (31)P-NMR measurements on Ce(Ru(1-x)Fe(x))PO in order to investigate ferromagnetic (FM) quantum criticality, since a heavy-fermion (HF) ferromagnet CeRuPO with a two-dimensional structure turns into a HF paramagnet by an isovalent Fe substitution for Ru. We found that Ce(Ru(0.15)Fe(0.85))PO shows critical fluctuations down to ~0.3 K, as well as the continuous suppression of Curie temperature and the ordered moments by the Fe substitution. These experimental results suggest the presence of a FM quantum critical point (QCP) at x~0.86, which is a rare example among itinerant ferromagnets. In addition, we point out that the critical behaviors in Ce(Ru(0.15)Fe(0.85))PO share a similarity with those in YbRh(2)Si(2), where the local criticality of f electrons has been discussed. We reveal that Ce(Ru(1-x)Fe(x))PO is a new system to study FM quantum criticality in HF compounds.

  12. Finite-temperature scaling at the quantum critical point of the Ising chain in a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haelg, Manuel; Huvonen, Dan; Guidi, Tatiana; Quintero-Castro, Diana Lucia; Boehm, Martin; Regnault, Louis-Pierre; Zheludev, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering is used to study the finite-temperature scaling behavior of spin correlations at the quantum critical point in an experimental realization of the one-dimensional Ising model in a transverse field. The target compound is the well-characterized, anisotropic and bond-alternating Heisenberg spin-1 chain material NTENP. The validity and the limitations of the dynamic structure factor scaling are tested, discussed and compared to theoretical predictions. For this purpose neutron data have been collected on the three-axes spectrometers IN14 at ILL and FLEXX at HZB as well as on the time of flight multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS. In addition to the general statement about quantum criticality and universality, present study also reveals new insight into the properties of the spin chain compound NTENP in particular.

  13. Quantum chromodynamics, antiferromagnets and XY models from a unified point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Christoph P.

    2017-03-01

    Antiferromagnets and quantum XY magnets in three space dimensions are described by an effective Lagrangian that exhibits the same structure as the effective Lagrangian of quantum chromodynamics with two light flavors. These systems all share a spontaneously broken internal symmetry O (N) → O (N - 1). Although the respective scales differ by many orders of magnitude, the general structure of the low-temperature expansion of the partition function is the same. In the nonabelian case (N ≥ 3), logarithmic terms of the form T8 ln ⁡ T emerge at three-loop order, while for N = 2 the series only involves powers of T2. The manifestation of the Goldstone boson interaction in the pressure, order parameter, and susceptibility is explored in presence of an external field.

  14. What is behind small deviations of quantum mechanics theory from experiments? Observer's mathematics point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khots, Boris; Khots, Dmitriy

    2014-12-01

    Certain results that have been predicted by Quantum Mechanics (QM) theory are not always supported by experiments. This defines a deep crisis in contemporary physics and, in particular, quantum mechanics. We believe that, in fact, the mathematical apparatus employed within today's physics is a possible reason. In particular, we consider the concept of infinity that exists in today's mathematics as the root cause of this problem. We have created Observer's Mathematics that offers an alternative to contemporary mathematics. This paper is an attempt to relay how Observer's Mathematics may explain some of the contradictions in QM theory results. We consider the Hamiltonian Mechanics, Newton equation, Schrodinger equation, two slit interference, wave-particle duality for single photons, uncertainty principle, Dirac equations for free electron in a setting of arithmetic, algebra, and topology provided by Observer's Mathematics (see www.mathrelativity.com). Certain results and communications pertaining to solution of these problems are provided.

  15. What is behind small deviations of quantum mechanics theory from experiments? Observer's mathematics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Khots, Boris; Khots, Dmitriy

    2014-12-10

    Certain results that have been predicted by Quantum Mechanics (QM) theory are not always supported by experiments. This defines a deep crisis in contemporary physics and, in particular, quantum mechanics. We believe that, in fact, the mathematical apparatus employed within today's physics is a possible reason. In particular, we consider the concept of infinity that exists in today's mathematics as the root cause of this problem. We have created Observer's Mathematics that offers an alternative to contemporary mathematics. This paper is an attempt to relay how Observer's Mathematics may explain some of the contradictions in QM theory results. We consider the Hamiltonian Mechanics, Newton equation, Schrodinger equation, two slit interference, wave-particle duality for single photons, uncertainty principle, Dirac equations for free electron in a setting of arithmetic, algebra, and topology provided by Observer's Mathematics (see www.mathrelativity.com). Certain results and communications pertaining to solution of these problems are provided.

  16. Quantum quenches in the sinh-Gordon model: steady state and one-point correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Bruno; Piroli, Lorenzo; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-06-01

    We consider quantum quenches to the sinh-Gordon integrable quantum field theory from a particular class of initial states. Our analysis includes the case of mass and interaction quenches starting from a non-interacting theory. By means of the recently developed quench action method, we fully characterize the stationary state reached at long times after the quench in terms of the corresponding rapidity distribution. We also provide exact results for the expectation values of arbitrary vertex operators in the post-quench stationary state by proposing a formula based on the analogy with the standard thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. Finally, we comment on the behavior of the post-quench stationary state under the mapping between the sinh-Gordon field theory and the one-dimensional Lieb-Liniger model.

  17. Influence of the quantum zero-point motion of a vortex on the electronic spectra of s -wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosch, Lorenz; Sachdev, Subir

    2006-10-01

    We compute the influence of the quantum zero-point motion of a vortex on the electronic quasiparticle spectra of s -wave superconductors. The vortex is assumed to be pinned by a harmonic potential, and its coupling to the quasiparticles is computed in the framework of BCS theory. Near the core of the vortex, the motion leads to a shift of spectral weight away from the chemical potential, and thereby reduces the zero bias conductance peak; additional structure at the frequency of the harmonic trap is also observed.

  18. Pairing interaction near a nematic quantum critical point of a three-band CuO2 model

    DOE PAGES

    Maier, Thomas A.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, we calculate the pairing interaction and the k dependence of the gap function associated with the nematic charge fluctuations of a CuO2 model.We find that the nematic pairing interaction is attractive for small momentum transfer and that it gives rise to d-wave pairing. Finally, as the doping p approaches a quantum critical point, the strength of this pairing increases and higher d-wave harmonics contribute to the k dependence of the superconducting gap function, reflecting the longer range nature of the nematic fluctuations.

  19. Pairing interaction near a nematic quantum critical point of a three-band CuO2 model

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Thomas A.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2014-11-21

    In this paper, we calculate the pairing interaction and the k dependence of the gap function associated with the nematic charge fluctuations of a CuO2 model.We find that the nematic pairing interaction is attractive for small momentum transfer and that it gives rise to d-wave pairing. Finally, as the doping p approaches a quantum critical point, the strength of this pairing increases and higher d-wave harmonics contribute to the k dependence of the superconducting gap function, reflecting the longer range nature of the nematic fluctuations.

  20. Quantum critical point of Dirac fermion mass generation without spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuan-Yao; Wu, Han-Qing; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-12-01

    We study a lattice model of interacting Dirac fermions in (2 +1 ) dimensions space-time with an SU(4) symmetry. While increasing the interaction strength, this model undergoes a continuous quantum phase transition from a weakly interacting Dirac semimetal to a fully gapped and nondegenerate phase without condensing any Dirac fermion bilinear mass operator. This unusual mechanism for mass generation is consistent with recent studies of interacting topological insulators/superconductors, and also consistent with recent progress in the lattice QCD community.

  1. Field-induced quantum critical point in the pressure-induced superconductor CeRhIn5

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Eric D; Park, Tuson; Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Ronning, Filip; Lee, Han O; Movshovich, Roman; Thompson, Joe D

    2009-01-01

    When subjected to pressure, the prototypical heavy-fermion antiferromagnet CeRhIn{sub 5} becomes superconducting, forming a broad dome of superconductivity centered around 2.35 GPa (=P2) with maximal T{sub c} of 2.3 K. Above the superconducting dome, the normal state shows strange metallic behaviors, including a divergence in the specific heat and a sub-T-linear electrical resistivity. The discovery of a field-induced magnetic phase that coexists with superconductivity for a range of pressures P {le} P2 has been interpreted as evidence for a quantum phase transition, which could explain the non-Fenni liquid behavior observed in the normal state. Here we report electrical resistivity measurements of CeRhIn{sub 5} under magnetic field at P2, where the resistivity is sub-T-linear for fields less than H{sub c2}(0) and a T{sup 2}-coefficient A found above H{sub c2}(0) diverges as H{sub c2} is approached. These results are similar to the field-induced quantum critical compound Ce-CoIn{sub 5} and confirm the presence of a quantum critical point in the pressure-induced superconductor CeRhIn{sub 5}.

  2. Direct Measurements of Quantum Kinetic Energy Tensor in Stable and Metastable Water near the Triple Point: An Experimental Benchmark.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Carla; Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-06-16

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurement of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point, using deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra, accurate line shapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model-independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, that is, key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establish novel insight into further expand the capacity and accuracy of DINS investigations of the nuclear quantum effects in water and represent reference experimental values for theoretical investigations.

  3. Automating quantum dot barcode assays using microfluidics and magnetism for the development of a point-of-care device.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yali; Lam, Albert W Y; Chan, Warren C W

    2013-04-24

    The impact of detecting multiple infectious diseases simultaneously at point-of-care with good sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility would be enormous for containing the spread of diseases in both resource-limited and rich countries. Many barcoding technologies have been introduced for addressing this need as barcodes can be applied to detecting thousands of genetic and protein biomarkers simultaneously. However, the assay process is not automated and is tedious and requires skilled technicians. Barcoding technology is currently limited to use in resource-rich settings. Here we used magnetism and microfluidics technology to automate the multiple steps in a quantum dot barcode assay. The quantum dot-barcoded microbeads are sequentially (a) introduced into the chip, (b) magnetically moved to a stream containing target molecules, (c) moved back to the original stream containing secondary probes, (d) washed, and (e) finally aligned for detection. The assay requires 20 min, has a limit of detection of 1.2 nM, and can detect genetic targets for HIV, hepatitis B, and syphilis. This study provides a simple strategy to automate the entire barcode assay process and moves barcoding technologies one step closer to point-of-care applications.

  4. Stability of a spin-triplet nematic state near to a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannappel, G.; Pedder, C. J.; Krüger, F.; Green, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze a model of itinerant electrons interacting through a quadrupole density-density repulsion in three dimensions. At the mean-field level, the interaction drives a continuous Pomeranchuk instability towards d -wave, spin-triplet nematic order, which simultaneously breaks the SU(2) spin-rotation and spatial-rotation symmetries. This order is characterized by spin-antisymmetric, elliptical deformations of the Fermi surfaces of up and down spins. We show that the effects of quantum fluctuations are similar to those in metallic ferromagnets, rendering the nematic transition first order at low temperatures. Using the fermionic quantum order-by-disorder approach to self-consistently calculate fluctuations around possible modulated states, we show that the first-order transition is preempted by the formation of a helical spin-triplet d -density wave. Such a state is closely related to d -wave bond density wave order in square-lattice systems. Moreover, we show that it may coexist with a modulated, p -wave superconducting state.

  5. Electronic and Quantum Transport Properties of Atomically Identified Si Point Defects in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Zhou, Wu; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-05-15

    We report high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images displaying a range of inclusions of isolated silicon atoms at the edges and inner zones of graphene layers. Whereas the incorporation of Si atoms to a graphene armchair edge involves no reconstruction of the neighboring carbon atoms, the inclusion of a Si atom to a zigzag graphene edge entails the formation of five-membered carbon rings. In all the observed atomic edge terminations, a Si atom is found bridging two C atoms in a 2-fold coordinated configuration. The atomic-scale observations are underpinned by first-principles calculations of the electronic and quantum transport properties of the structural anomalies. Experimental estimations of Si-doped graphene band gaps realized by means of transport measurements may be affected by a low doping rate of 2-fold coordinated Si atoms at the graphene edges, and 4-fold coordinated at inner zones due to the apparition of mobility gaps.

  6. Colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid Capped Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots in a Low Boiling Point Solvent.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Chase C; Johansson, Erik

    2017-04-10

    Colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) capped lead sulfide quantum dots were prepared in a variety of organic solvents stabilized with a quaternary ammonium halide salt. The stabilized colloids' optical properties were studied through optical absorption and emission spectroscopy and found to be dependent on both the concentration of new ligand and stabilizer, and sample age. Nanocrystal ligand chemistry was studied through a combination of (1)H-NMR and 2-dimensional Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy (NOESY) which revealed full displacement of the original oleate ligand to form a dynamically exchanging ligand shell. The colloids were studied optically and via NMR as they aged and revealed a quantitative conversion of monomeric 3-mercaptopropionic acid to its dimer, dithiodipropionic acid (dTdPA).

  7. Spectral dimension of the universe in quantum gravity at a lifshitz point.

    PubMed

    Horava, Petr

    2009-04-24

    We extend the definition of "spectral dimension" d_{s} (usually defined for fractal and lattice geometries) to theories in spacetimes with anisotropic scaling. We show that in gravity with dynamical critical exponent z in D+1 dimensions, the spectral dimension of spacetime is d_{s}=1+D/z. In the case of gravity in 3+1 dimensions with z=3 in the UV which flows to z=1 in the IR, the spectral dimension changes from d_{s}=4 at large scales to d_{s}=2 at short distances. Remarkably, this is the behavior found numerically by Ambjørn et al. in their causal dynamical triangulations approach to quantum gravity.

  8. Fermi points and topological quantum phase transitions in a multi-band superconductor.

    PubMed

    Puel, T O; Sacramento, P D; Continentino, M A

    2015-10-28

    The importance of models with an exact solution for the study of materials with non-trivial topological properties has been extensively demonstrated. The Kitaev model plays a guiding role in the search for Majorana modes in condensed matter systems. Also, the sp-chain with an anti-symmetric mixing among the s and p bands is a paradigmatic example of a topological insulator with well understood properties. Interestingly, these models share the same universality class for their topological quantum phase transitions. In this work we study a two-band model of spinless fermions with attractive inter-band interactions. We obtain its zero temperature phase diagram, which presents a rich variety of phases including a Weyl superconductor and a topological insulator. The transition from the topological to the trivial superconducting phase has critical exponents different from those of Kitaev's model.

  9. Quantum mechanics in a space with a finite number of points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arik, Metin; Ildes, Medine

    2016-04-01

    We define a deformed kinetic energy operator for a discrete position space with a finite number of points. The structure may be either periodic or nonperiodic with well-defined end points. It is shown that for the nonperiodic case the translation operator becomes nonunitary due to the end points. This uniquely defines an algebra that has the desired unique representation. Energy eigenvalues and energy wave functions for both cases are found. As expected, in the continuum limit the solution for the nonperiodic case becomes the same as the solution of an infinite one-dimensional square well and the periodic case solution becomes the same as the solution of a particle in a box with periodic boundary conditions.

  10. A Genuine Jahn-Teller System with Compressed Geometry and Quantum Effects Originating from Zero-Point Motion.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García-Lastra, Juan María; Moreno, Miguel

    2016-07-18

    First-principle calculations together with analysis of the experimental data found for 3d(9) and 3d(7) ions in cubic oxides proved that the center found in irradiated CaO:Ni(2+) corresponds to Ni(+) under a static Jahn-Teller effect displaying a compressed equilibrium geometry. It was also shown that the anomalous positive g∥ shift (g∥ -g0 =0.065) measured at T=20 K obeys the superposition of the |3 z(2) -r(2) ⟩ and |x(2) -y(2) ⟩ states driven by quantum effects associated with the zero-point motion, a mechanism first put forward by O'Brien for static Jahn-Teller systems and later extended by Ham to the dynamic Jahn-Teller case. To our knowledge, this is the first genuine Jahn-Teller system (i.e. in which exact degeneracy exists at the high-symmetry configuration) exhibiting a compressed equilibrium geometry for which large quantum effects allow experimental observation of the effect predicted by O'Brien. Analysis of the calculated energy barriers for different Jahn-Teller systems allowed us to explain the origin of the compressed geometry observed for CaO:Ni(+) .

  11. Andreev reflection and bound state formation in a ballistic two-dimensional electron gas probed by a quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Hiroshi; Todt, Clemens; Kumada, Norio; Harada, Yuichi; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Muraki, Koji

    2016-10-01

    We study coherent transport and bound state formation of Bogoliubov quasiparticles in a high-mobility I n0.75G a0.25As two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) coupled to a superconducting Nb electrode by means of a quantum point contact (QPC) as a tunable single-mode probe. Below the superconducting critical temperature of Nb, the QPC shows a single-channel conductance greater than the conductance quantum 2 e2/h at zero bias, which indicates the presence of Andreev-reflected quasiparticles, time-reversed states of the injected electron, returning back through the QPC. The marked sensitivity of the conductance enhancement to voltage bias and perpendicular magnetic field suggests a mechanism analogous to reflectionless tunneling—a hallmark of phase-coherent transport, with the boundary of the 2DEG cavity playing the role of scatterers. When the QPC transmission is reduced to the tunneling regime, the differential conductance vs bias voltage probes the single-particle density of states in the proximity area. Measured conductance spectra show a double peak within the superconducting gap of Nb, demonstrating the formation of Andreev bound states in the 2DEG. Both of these results, obtained in the open and closed geometries, underpin the coherent nature of quasiparticles, i.e., phase-coherent Andreev reflection at the InGaAs/Nb interface and coherent propagation in the ballistic 2DEG.

  12. Single-Slit Electron Diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm Phase: Feynman's Thought Experiment with Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  13. Single-slit electron diffraction with Aharonov-Bohm phase: Feynman's thought experiment with quantum point contacts.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Pradip; Bansal, Bhavtosh; Shahar, Dan

    2014-01-10

    In a "thought experiment," now a classic in physics pedagogy, Feynman visualizes Young's double-slit interference experiment with electrons in magnetic field. He shows that the addition of an Aharonov-Bohm phase is equivalent to shifting the zero-field wave interference pattern by an angle expected from the Lorentz force calculation for classical particles. We have performed this experiment with one slit, instead of two, where ballistic electrons within two-dimensional electron gas diffract through a small orifice formed by a quantum point contact (QPC). As the QPC width is comparable to the electron wavelength, the observed intensity profile is further modulated by the transverse waveguide modes present at the injector QPC. Our experiments open the way to realizing diffraction-based ideas in mesoscopic physics.

  14. Generating and moving Dirac points in a two-dimensional deformed honeycomb lattice arrayed by coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Juan Duan, Yifeng; Chen, PeiJian; Peng, Yan

    2015-03-15

    Analysis of the electronic properties of a two-dimensional (2D) deformed honeycomb structure arrayed by semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is conducted theoretically by using tight-binding method in the present paper. Through the compressive or tensile deformation of the honeycomb lattice, the variation of energy spectrum has been explored. We show that, the massless Dirac fermions are generated in this adjustable system and the positions of the Dirac cones as well as slope of the linear dispersions could be manipulated. Furthermore, a clear linear correspondence between the distance of movement d (the distance from the Dirac points to the Brillouin zone corners) and the tunable bond angle α of the lattice are found in this artificial planar QD structure. These results provide the theoretical basis for manipulating Dirac fermions and should be very helpful for the fabrication and application of high-mobility semiconductor QD devices.

  15. Finite-temperature scaling close to Ising-nematic quantum critical points in two-dimensional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punk, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study finite-temperature properties of metals close to an Ising-nematic quantum critical point in two spatial dimensions. In particular we show that at any finite temperature there is a regime where order parameter fluctuations are characterized by a dynamical critical exponent z =2 , in contrast to z =3 found at zero temperature. Our results are based on a simple Eliashberg-type approach, which gives rise to a boson self-energy proportional to Ω /γ (T ) at small momenta, where γ (T ) is the temperature dependent fermion scattering rate. These findings might shed some light on recent Monte Carlo simulations at finite temperature, where results consistent with z =2 were found.

  16. Relation between the 0.7 anomaly and the Kondo effect: Geometric crossover between a quantum point contact and a Kondo quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyder, Jan; Bauer, Florian; Schubert, Enrico; Borowsky, David; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; von Delft, Jan; Ludwig, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Quantum point contacts (QPCs) and quantum dots (QDs), two elementary building blocks of semiconducting nanodevices, both exhibit famously anomalous conductance features: the 0.7 anomaly in the former case, the Kondo effect in the latter. For both the 0.7 anomaly and the Kondo effect, the conductance shows a remarkably similar low-energy dependence on temperature T , source-drain voltage Vsd, and magnetic field B . In a recent publication [F. Bauer et al., Nature (London) 501, 73 (2013), 10.1038/nature12421], we argued that the reason for these similarities is that both a QPC and a Kondo QD (KQD) feature spin fluctuations that are induced by the sample geometry, confined in a small spatial regime, and enhanced by interactions. Here, we further explore this notion experimentally and theoretically by studying the geometric crossover between a QD and a QPC, focusing on the B -field dependence of the conductance. We introduce a one-dimensional model with local interactions that reproduces the essential features of the experiments, including a smooth transition between a KQD and a QPC with 0.7 anomaly. We find that in both cases the anomalously strong negative magnetoconductance goes hand in hand with strongly enhanced local spin fluctuations. Our experimental observations include, in addition to the Kondo effect in a QD and the 0.7 anomaly in a QPC, Fano interference effects in a regime of coexistence between QD and QPC physics, and Fabry-Perot-type resonances on the conductance plateaus of a clean QPC. We argue that Fabry-Perot-type resonances occur generically if the electrostatic potential of the QPC generates a flatter-than-parabolic barrier top.

  17. A quantum mechanical/neural net model for boiling points with error estimation.

    PubMed

    Chalk, A J; Beck, B; Clark, T

    2001-01-01

    We present QSPR models for normal boiling points employing a neural network approach and descriptors calculated using semiempirical MO theory (AM1 and PM3). These models are based on a data set of 6000 compounds with widely varying functionality and should therefore be applicable to a diverse range of systems. We include cross-validation by simultaneously training 10 different networks, each with different training and test sets. The predicted boiling point is given by the mean of the 10 results, and the individual error of each compound is related to the standard deviation of these predictions. For our best model we find that the standard deviation of the training error is 16.5 K for 6000 compounds and the correlation coefficient (R2) between our prediction and experiment is 0.96. We also examine the effect of different conformations and tautomerism on our calculated results. Large deviations between our predictions and experiment can generally be explained by experimental errors or problems with the semiempirical methods.

  18. Spin filtering effect generated by the inter-subband spin-orbit coupling in the bilayer nanowire with the quantum point contact.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Paweł; Adamowski, Janusz

    2017-03-30

    The spin filtering effect in the bilayer nanowire with quantum point contact is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate the new mechanism of the spin filtering based on the lateral inter-subband spin-orbit coupling, which for the bilayer nanowires has been reported to be strong. The proposed spin filtering effect is explained as the joint effect of the Landau-Zener intersubband transitions caused by the hybridization of states with opposite spin (due to the lateral Rashba SO interaction) and the confinement of carriers in the quantum point contact region.

  19. Spin filtering effect generated by the inter-subband spin-orbit coupling in the bilayer nanowire with the quantum point contact

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Paweł; Adamowski, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    The spin filtering effect in the bilayer nanowire with quantum point contact is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate the new mechanism of the spin filtering based on the lateral inter-subband spin-orbit coupling, which for the bilayer nanowires has been reported to be strong. The proposed spin filtering effect is explained as the joint effect of the Landau-Zener intersubband transitions caused by the hybridization of states with opposite spin (due to the lateral Rashba SO interaction) and the confinement of carriers in the quantum point contact region. PMID:28358141

  20. Nonperturbative functional renormalization-group approach to transport in the vicinity of a (2 +1 ) -dimensional O(N )-symmetric quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, F.; Dupuis, N.

    2017-01-01

    Using a nonperturbative functional renormalization-group approach to the two-dimensional quantum O (N ) model, we compute the low-frequency limit ω →0 of the zero-temperature conductivity in the vicinity of the quantum critical point. Our results are obtained from a derivative expansion to second order of a scale-dependent effective action in the presence of an external (i.e., nondynamical) non-Abelian gauge field. While in the disordered phase the conductivity tensor σ (ω ) is diagonal, in the ordered phase it is defined, when N ≥3 , by two independent elements, σA(ω ) and σB(ω ) , respectively associated to SO (N ) rotations which do and do not change the direction of the order parameter. For N =2 , the conductivity in the ordered phase reduces to a single component σA(ω ) . We show that limω→0σ (ω ,δ ) σA(ω ,-δ ) /σq2 is a universal number, which we compute as a function of N (δ measures the distance to the quantum critical point, q is the charge, and σq=q2/h the quantum of conductance). On the other hand we argue that the ratio σB(ω →0 ) /σq is universal in the whole ordered phase, independent of N and, when N →∞ , equal to the universal conductivity σ*/σq at the quantum critical point.

  1. Generic fixed point model for pseudo-spin-1/2 quantum dots in nonequilibrium: Spin-valve systems with compensating spin polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göttel, Stefan; Reininghaus, Frank; Schoeller, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    We study a pseudo-spin-1/2 quantum dot in the cotunneling regime close to the particle-hole symmetric point. For a generic tunneling matrix we find a fixed point with interesting nonequilibrium properties, characterized by effective reservoirs with compensating spin orientation vectors weighted by the polarizations and the tunneling rates. At large bias voltage we study the magnetic field dependence of the dot magnetization and the current. The fixed point can be clearly identified by analyzing the magnetization of the dot. We characterize the universal properties for the case of two reservoirs and discuss deviations from the fixed point model in experimentally realistic situations.

  2. Ambient pressure structural quantum critical point in the phase diagram of (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))(3)Rh(4)Sn(13).

    PubMed

    Goh, S K; Tompsett, D A; Saines, P J; Chang, H C; Matsumoto, T; Imai, M; Yoshimura, K; Grosche, F M

    2015-03-06

    The quasiskutterudite superconductor Sr_{3}Rh_{4}Sn_{13} features a pronounced anomaly in electrical resistivity at T^{*}∼138  K. We show that the anomaly is caused by a second-order structural transition, which can be tuned to 0 K by applying physical pressure and chemical pressure via the substitution of Ca for Sr. A broad superconducting dome is centered around the structural quantum critical point. Detailed analysis of the tuning parameter dependence of T^{*} as well as insights from lattice dynamics calculations strongly support the existence of a structural quantum critical point at ambient pressure when the fraction of Ca is 0.9 (i.e., x_{c}=0.9). This establishes the (Ca_{x}Sr_{1-x})_{3}Rh_{4}Sn_{13} series as an important system for exploring the physics of structural quantum criticality without the need of applying high pressures.

  3. Multiband nodeless superconductivity near the charge-density-wave quantum critical point in ZrTe3-x Se x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Cui; Lan-Po, He; Xiao-Chen, Hong; Xiang-De, Zhu; Cedomir, Petrovic; Shi-Yan, Li

    2016-07-01

    It was found that selenium doping can suppress the charge-density-wave (CDW) order and induce bulk superconductivity in ZrTe3. The observed superconducting dome suggests the existence of a CDW quantum critical point (QCP) in ZrTe3-x Se x near x ≈ 0.04. To elucidate the superconducting state near the CDW QCP, we measure the thermal conductivity of two ZrTe3-x Se x single crystals (x = 0.044 and 0.051) down to 80 mK. For both samples, the residual linear term κ 0/T at zero field is negligible, which is a clear evidence for nodeless superconducting gap. Furthermore, the field dependence of κ 0/T manifests a multigap behavior. These results demonstrate multiple nodeless superconducting gaps in ZrTe3-x Se x , which indicates conventional superconductivity despite of the existence of a CDW QCP. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB821402 and 2015CB921401), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91421101, 11422429, and 11204312), the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning, China, and STCSM of China (Grant No. 15XD1500200). Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was supported by the US DOE under Contract No. DESC00112704.

  4. Control of Nanofilament Structure and Observations of Quantum Point Contact Behavior in Ni/NiO Nanowire Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Sean; Fairfield, Jessamyn; Lee, Sunghun; Bellew, Allen; Stone, Iris; Ruppalt, Laura; Boland, John; Vora, Patrick

    Resistive switching is ideal for use in non-volatile memory where information is stored in a metallic or insulating state. Nanowire junctions formed at the intersection of two Ni/NiO core/shell nanowires have emerged as a leading candidate structure where resistive switching occurs due to the formation and destruction of conducting filaments. However, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the conduction mechanisms as measurements are typically only performed at room temperature. Here, we combine temperature-dependent current-voltage (IV) measurements from 15 - 300 K with magnetoresistance studies and achieve new insight into the nature of the conducting filaments. We identify a novel semiconducting state that behaves as a quantum point contact and find evidence for a possible electric-field driven phase transition. The insulating state exhibits unexpectedly complex IV characteristics that highlight the disordered nature of the ruptured filament while we find clear signs of anisotropic magnetoresistance in the metallic state. Our results expose previously unobserved behaviors in nanowire resistive switching devices and pave the way for future applications where both electrical and magnetic switching can be achieved in a single device. This work was supported by ONR Grant N-00014-15-1-2357.

  5. On the zero-bias anomaly and Kondo physics in quantum point contacts near pinch-off.

    PubMed

    Xiang, S; Xiao, S; Fuji, K; Shibuya, K; Endo, T; Yumoto, N; Morimoto, T; Aoki, N; Bird, J P; Ochiai, Y

    2014-03-26

    We investigate the linear and non-linear conductance of quantum point contacts (QPCs), in the region near pinch-off where Kondo physics has previously been connected to the appearance of the 0.7 feature. In studies of seven different QPCs, fabricated in the same high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction, the linear conductance is widely found to show the presence of the 0.7 feature. The differential conductance, on the other hand, does not generally exhibit the zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) that has been proposed to indicate the Kondo effect. Indeed, even in the small subset of QPCs found to exhibit such an anomaly, the linear conductance does not always follow the universal temperature-dependent scaling behavior expected for the Kondo effect. Taken collectively, our observations demonstrate that, unlike the 0.7 feature, the ZBA is not a generic feature of low-temperature QPC conduction. We furthermore conclude that the mere observation of the ZBA alone is insufficient evidence for concluding that Kondo physics is active. While we do not rule out the possibility that the Kondo effect may occur in QPCs, our results appear to indicate that its observation requires a very strict set of conditions to be satisfied. This should be contrasted with the case of the 0.7 feature, which has been apparent since the earliest experimental investigations of QPC transport.

  6. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca3Ir4Sn13

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; ...

    2015-11-11

    We repormore » t microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca3Ir4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). Our findings show a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈ 1.6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the “Uemura” plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multi-band structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.« less

  7. Thermopower evidence for an abrupt Fermi surface change at the quantum critical point of YbRh2Si2.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefanie; Oeschler, Niels; Krellner, Cornelius; Geibel, Christoph; Paschen, Silke; Steglich, Frank

    2010-03-05

    We present low-temperature thermopower results, S(T), on the heavy-fermion compound YbRh2Si2 in the vicinity of its field-induced quantum critical point (QCP). At B=0, a logarithmic increase of -S(T)/T between 1 and 0.1 K reveals strong non-Fermi-liquid behavior. A pronounced downturn of -S(T)/T below T{max}=0.1 K and a sign change from negative to positive S(T) values at T{0} approximately 30 mK are observed on the low-field side of the Kondo breakdown crossover line T{*}(B). In the field-induced, heavy Landau-Fermi-liquid regime, S(T)/T assumes constant, negative values below T{LFL}. A pronounced crossover in the -S(B)/T isotherms at T{*}(B) sharpens with decreasing T and seems to evolve toward a steplike function for T-->0. This is attributed to an abrupt change of the Fermi volume upon crossing the unconventional QCP of YbRh2Si2.

  8. The ground state tunneling splitting and the zero point energy of malonaldehyde: a quantum Monte Carlo determination.

    PubMed

    Viel, Alexandra; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D; Manthe, Uwe

    2007-01-14

    Quantum dynamics calculations of the ground state tunneling splitting and of the zero point energy of malonaldehyde on the full dimensional potential energy surface proposed by Yagi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 1154, 10647 (2001)] are reported. The exact diffusion Monte Carlo and the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution methods are used to compute accurate benchmark results for this 21-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface. A tunneling splitting of 25.7+/-0.3 cm-1 is obtained, and the vibrational ground state energy is found to be 15 122+/-4 cm-1. Isotopic substitution of the tunneling hydrogen modifies the tunneling splitting down to 3.21+/-0.09 cm-1 and the vibrational ground state energy to 14 385+/-2 cm-1. The computed tunneling splittings are slightly higher than the experimental values as expected from the potential energy surface which slightly underestimates the barrier height, and they are slightly lower than the results from the instanton theory obtained using the same potential energy surface.

  9. Zero point energy leakage in condensed phase dynamics: an assessment of quantum simulation methods for liquid water.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E

    2009-12-28

    The approximate quantum mechanical ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR) methods are compared and contrasted in a study of the dynamics of the flexible q-TIP4P/F water model at room temperature. For this water model, a RPMD simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is only a few percent larger than the classical diffusion coefficient, whereas a LSC-IVR simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is three times larger. We attribute this discrepancy to the unphysical leakage of initially quantized zero point energy (ZPE) from the intramolecular to the intermolecular modes of the liquid as the LSC-IVR simulation progresses. In spite of this problem, which is avoided by construction in RPMD, the LSC-IVR may still provide a useful approximation to certain short-time dynamical properties which are not so strongly affected by the ZPE leakage. We illustrate this with an application to the liquid water dipole absorption spectrum, for which the RPMD approximation breaks down at frequencies in the O-H stretching region owing to contamination from the internal modes of the ring polymer. The LSC-IVR does not suffer from this difficulty and it appears to provide quite a promising way to calculate condensed phase vibrational spectra.

  10. Strong Coupling Superconductivity in the Vicinity of the Structural Quantum Critical Point in (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))₃Rh₄Sn₁₃.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wing Chi; Cheung, Yiu Wing; Saines, Paul J; Imai, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Michioka, Chishiro; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Goh, Swee K

    2015-11-13

    The family of the superconducting quasiskutterudites (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))(3)Rh(4)Sn(13) features a structural quantum critical point at x(c)=0.9, around which a dome-shaped variation of the superconducting transition temperature T(c) is found. Using specific heat, we probe the normal and the superconducting states of the entire series straddling the quantum critical point. Our analysis indicates a significant lowering of the effective Debye temperature on approaching x(c), which we interpret as a result of phonon softening accompanying the structural instability. Furthermore, a remarkably large enhancement of 2Δ/k(B)T(c) and ΔC/γT(c) beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer values is found in the vicinity of the structural quantum critical point. The phase diagram of (Ca(x)Sr(1-x))(3)Rh(4)Sn(13) thus provides a model system to study the interplay between structural quantum criticality and strong electron-phonon coupling superconductivity.

  11. Observation of zero-point quantum fluctuations of a single-molecule magnet through the relaxation of its nuclear spin bath.

    PubMed

    Morello, A; Millán, A; de Jongh, L J

    2014-03-21

    A single-molecule magnet placed in a magnetic field perpendicular to its anisotropy axis can be truncated to an effective two-level system, with easily tunable energy splitting. The quantum coherence of the molecular spin is largely determined by the dynamics of the surrounding nuclear spin bath. Here we report the measurement of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1n in a single crystal of the single-molecule magnet Mn12-ac, at T ≈ 30 mK in perpendicular fields B⊥ up to 9 T. The relaxation channel at B ≈ 0 is dominated by incoherent quantum tunneling of the Mn12-ac spin S, aided by the nuclear bath itself. However for B⊥>5 T we observe an increase of 1/T1n by several orders of magnitude up to the highest field, despite the fact that the molecular spin is in its quantum mechanical ground state. This striking observation is a consequence of the zero-point quantum fluctuations of S, which allow it to mediate the transfer of energy from the excited nuclear spin bath to the crystal lattice at much higher rates. Our experiment highlights the importance of quantum fluctuations in the interaction between an "effective two-level system" and its surrounding spin bath.

  12. Universal Signatures of Quantum Critical Points from Finite-Size Torus Spectra: A Window into the Operator Content of Higher-Dimensional Conformal Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Michael; Whitsitt, Seth; Henry, Louis-Paul; Sachdev, Subir; Läuchli, Andreas M.

    2016-11-01

    The low-energy spectra of many body systems on a torus, of finite size L , are well understood in magnetically ordered and gapped topological phases. However, the spectra at quantum critical points separating such phases are largely unexplored for (2 +1 )D systems. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we accurately calculate and analyze the low-energy torus spectrum at an Ising critical point which provides a universal fingerprint of the underlying quantum field theory, with the energy levels given by universal numbers times 1 /L . We highlight the implications of a neighboring topological phase on the spectrum by studying the Ising* transition (i.e. the transition between a Z2 topological phase and a trivial paramagnet), in the example of the toric code in a longitudinal field, and advocate a phenomenological picture that provides qualitative insight into the operator content of the critical field theory.

  13. Universal Signatures of Quantum Critical Points from Finite-Size Torus Spectra: A Window into the Operator Content of Higher-Dimensional Conformal Field Theories.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Michael; Whitsitt, Seth; Henry, Louis-Paul; Sachdev, Subir; Läuchli, Andreas M

    2016-11-18

    The low-energy spectra of many body systems on a torus, of finite size L, are well understood in magnetically ordered and gapped topological phases. However, the spectra at quantum critical points separating such phases are largely unexplored for (2+1)D systems. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we accurately calculate and analyze the low-energy torus spectrum at an Ising critical point which provides a universal fingerprint of the underlying quantum field theory, with the energy levels given by universal numbers times 1/L. We highlight the implications of a neighboring topological phase on the spectrum by studying the Ising* transition (i.e. the transition between a Z_{2} topological phase and a trivial paramagnet), in the example of the toric code in a longitudinal field, and advocate a phenomenological picture that provides qualitative insight into the operator content of the critical field theory.

  14. Strong Coupling Superconductivity in the Vicinity of the Structural Quantum Critical Point in (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wing Chi; Cheung, Yiu Wing; Saines, Paul J.; Imai, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Michioka, Chishiro; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Goh, Swee K.

    The family of the superconducting quasiskutterudites (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13 features a structural quantum critical point at xc = 0 . 9 , around which a dome-shaped variation of the superconducting transition temperature Tc is found. In this talk, we present the specific heat data for the normal and the superconducting states of the entire series straddling the quantum critical point. Our analysis indicates a significant lowering of the effective Debye temperature on approaching xc, which we interpret as a result of phonon softening accompanying the structural instability. Furthermore, a remarkably large enhancement of 2 Δ /kBTc and ΔC / γTc beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer values is found in the vicinity of the structural quantum critical point. Reference: Wing Chi Yu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press, 2015) This work was supported by the CUHK (Startup Grant, Direct Grant No. 4053071), UGC Hong Kong (ECS/24300214), Grants-in-Aid from MEXT (22350029 and 23550152), and Glasstone Bequest, Oxford.

  15. Creativity and Quantum Physics: a New World View Unifying Current Theories of Creativity and Pointing Toward New Research Methodologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Kimberly Ann

    1990-01-01

    Divisions in definitions of creativity have centered primarily on the working definition of discontinuity and the inclusion of intrinsic features such as unconscious processing and intrinsic motivation and reinforcement. These differences generally result from Cohen's two world views underlying theories of creativity: Organismic, oriented toward holism; or mechanistic, oriented toward cause-effect reductionism. The quantum world view is proposed which theoretically and empirically unifies organismic and mechanistic elements of creativity. Based on Goswami's Idealistic Interpretation of quantum physics, the quantum view postulates the mind -brain as consisting of both classical and quantum structures and functions. The quantum domain accesses the transcendent order through coherent superpositions (a state of potentialities), while the classical domain performs the function of measuring apparatus through amplifying and recording the result of the collapse of the pure mental state. A theoretical experiment, based on the 1980 Marcel study of conscious and unconscious word-sense disambiguation, is conducted which compares the predictions of the quantum model with those of the 1975 Posner and Snyder Facilitation and Inhibition model. Each model agrees that while conscious access to information is limited, unconscious access is unlimited. However, each model differently defines the connection between these states: The Posner model postulates a central processing mechanism while the quantum model postulates a self-referential consciousness. Consequently, the two models predict differently. The strength of the quantum model lies in its ability to distinguish between classical and quantum definitions of discontinuity, as well as clarifying the function of consciousness, without added assumptions or ad-hoc analysis: Consciousness is an essential, valid feature of quantum mechanisms independent of the field of cognitive psychology. According to the quantum model, through a

  16. Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building A, dungeon cell adjacent to northwest cell: granite and brick threshold, poured concrete floors, plastered finished walls, vaulted veiling; northwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  17. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert's Variational Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2008-09-09

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H(3) reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H(2), HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property

  18. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert’s Variational Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert’s variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H3 reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H2, HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property of

  19. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Point Avoided by the Appearance of Another Magnetic Phase in LaCrGe3 under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufour, Valentin; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Khasanov, Rustem; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Guguchia, Zurab; Biswas, Pabitra Kumar; Bonfà, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto; Lin, Xiao; Kim, Stella K.; Mun, Eun Deok; Kim, Hyunsoo; Furukawa, Yuji; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The temperature-pressure phase diagram of the ferromagnet LaCrGe3 is determined for the first time from a combination of magnetization, muon-spin-rotation, and electrical resistivity measurements. The ferromagnetic phase is suppressed near 2.1 GPa, but quantum criticality is avoided by the appearance of a magnetic phase, likely modulated, AFMQ . Our density functional theory total energy calculations suggest a near degeneracy of antiferromagnetic states with small magnetic wave vectors Q allowing for the potential of an ordering wave vector evolving from Q =0 to finite Q , as expected from the most recent theories on ferromagnetic quantum criticality. Our findings show that LaCrGe3 is a very simple example to study this scenario of avoided ferromagnetic quantum criticality and will inspire further study on this material and other itinerant ferromagnets.

  20. Ferromagnetic quantum critical point avoided by the appearance of another magnetic phase in LaCrGe3 under pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Taufour, Valentin; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Khasanov, Rustem; ...

    2016-07-13

    Here, the temperature-pressure phase diagram of the ferromagnet LaCrGe3 is determined for the first time from a combination of magnetization, muon-spin-rotation, and electrical resistivity measurements. The ferromagnetic phase is suppressed near 2.1 GPa, but quantum criticality is avoided by the appearance of a magnetic phase, likely modulated, AFMQ. Our density functional theory total energy calculations suggest a near degeneracy of antiferromagnetic states with small magnetic wave vectors Q allowing for the potential of an ordering wave vector evolving from Q=0 to finite Q, as expected from the most recent theories on ferromagnetic quantum criticality. Our findings show that LaCrGe3 ismore » a very simple example to study this scenario of avoided ferromagnetic quantum criticality and will inspire further study on this material and other itinerant ferromagnets.« less

  1. Ambient Pressure Structural Quantum Critical Point in the Phase Diagram of (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Swee K.; Tompsett, D. A.; Saines, P. J.; Chang, H. C.; Matsumoto, T.; Imai, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Grosche, F. M.

    The quasiskutterudite superconductor Sr3Rh4Sn13 features a pronounced anomaly in electrical resistivity at T* ~ 138 K. The anomaly is caused by a second-order structural transition, which can be tuned to 0 K by applying physical pressure and chemical pressure via the substitution of Ca for Sr. A broad superconducting dome is centered around the structural quantum critical point. Detailed analysis of the tuning parameter dependence of T* as well as insights from lattice dynamics calculations strongly support the existence of a structural quantum critical point at ambient pressure when the fraction of Ca is 0.9 (xc=0.9). This establishes the (CaxSr1-x)3Rh4Sn13 series as an important system for exploring the physics of structural quantum criticality and its interplay with the superconductivity, without the need of applying high pressures. This work was supported by CUHK (Startup Grant, Direct Grant No. 4053071), UGC Hong Kong (ECS/24300214), Trinity College (Cam- bridge), Grants-in-Aid from MEXT (No. 22350029 and 23550152) and Glasstone Bequest (Oxford).

  2. Spin dynamics near a putative antiferromagnetic quantum critical point in Cu-substituted BaFe2As2 and its relation to high-temperature superconductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, M. G.; Wang, M.; Tucker, G. S.; ...

    2015-12-02

    We present the results of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, a composition close to a quantum critical point between antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered and paramagnetic phases. By comparing these results with the spin fluctuations in the low-Cu composition as well as the parent compound BaFe2As2 and superconducting Ba(Fe1–xNix)2As2 compounds, we demonstrate that paramagnon-like spin fluctuations are evident in the antiferromagnetically ordered state of Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, which is distinct from the AFM-like spin fluctuations in the superconducting compounds. Our observations suggest that Cu substitution decouples the interaction between quasiparticles and the spin fluctuations. In addition, we show that themore » spin-spin correlation length ξ(T) increases rapidly as the temperature is lowered and find ω/T scaling behavior, the hallmark of quantum criticality, at an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point.« less

  3. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  4. Ferromagnetic quantum critical point in the heavy-fermion metal YbNi4(P(1-x)As(x))2.

    PubMed

    Steppke, Alexander; Küchler, Robert; Lausberg, Stefan; Lengyel, Edit; Steinke, Lucia; Borth, Robert; Lühmann, Thomas; Krellner, Cornelius; Nicklas, Michael; Geibel, Christoph; Steglich, Frank; Brando, Manuel

    2013-02-22

    Unconventional superconductivity and other previously unknown phases of matter exist in the vicinity of a quantum critical point (QCP): a continuous phase change of matter at absolute zero. Intensive theoretical and experimental investigations on itinerant systems have shown that metallic ferromagnets tend to develop via either a first-order phase transition or through the formation of intermediate superconducting or inhomogeneous magnetic phases. Here, through precision low-temperature measurements, we show that the Grüneisen ratio of the heavy fermion metallic ferromagnet YbNi(4)(P(0.92)As(0.08))(2) diverges upon cooling to T = 0, indicating a ferromagnetic QCP. Our observation that this kind of instability, which is forbidden in d-electron metals, occurs in a heavy fermion system will have a large impact on the studies of quantum critical materials.

  5. Measurements of the electric field of zero-point optical phonons in GaAs quantum wells support the Urbach rule for zero-temperature lifetime broadening.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rupak; Mondal, Richarj; Khatua, Pradip; Rudra, Alok; Kapon, Eli; Malzer, Stefan; Döhler, Gottfried; Pal, Bipul; Bansal, Bhavtosh

    2015-01-30

    We study a specific type of lifetime broadening resulting in the well-known exponential "Urbach tail" density of states within the energy gap of an insulator. After establishing the frequency and temperature dependence of the Urbach edge in GaAs quantum wells, we show that the broadening due to the zero-point optical phonons is the fundamental limit to the Urbach slope in high-quality samples. In rough analogy with Welton's heuristic interpretation of the Lamb shift, the zero-temperature contribution to the Urbach slope can be thought of as arising from the electric field of the zero-point longitudinal-optical phonons. The value of this electric field is experimentally measured to be 3  kV cm-1, in excellent agreement with the theoretical estimate.

  6. Quantum Search and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-02

    solution of certain problems for which the communication needs do not dominate. A similar situation prevails in the quantum world. Quantum teleportation and...REPORT Quantum Search and Beyond 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Ten years ago, the quantum search algorithm was designed to provide a way...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS quantum searching - partial quantum searching, fixed-point quantum

  7. Reconstruction of carbon atoms around a point defect of a graphene: a hybrid quantum/classical molecular-dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Kowaki, Y; Harada, A; Shimojo, F; Hoshino, K

    2009-02-11

    We have investigated the rearrangement of carbon atoms around a point defect of a graphene using a hybrid ab initio/classical molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation method, in which 36 carbon atoms surrounding a point defect are treated by the ab initio MD method and the other 475 carbon atoms relatively far from the point defect are treated by the classical MD method. We have confirmed a formation of a 5-1DB defect (a pentagon and a dangling bond) from the time dependence of atomic configurations and electron density distributions obtained by our simulation. We have found that the pentagon is formed in two different positions around the point defect, and that the two positions appear alternately during the simulation, the frequency of which increases with increasing temperature.

  8. Quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials of a point source due to conformal fields in de Sitter

    SciTech Connect

    Fröb, Markus B.; Verdaguer, Enric E-mail: enric.verdaguer@ub.edu

    2016-03-01

    We derive the leading quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials in a de Sitter background, due to the vacuum polarization from loops of conformal fields. Our results are valid for arbitrary conformal theories, even strongly interacting ones, and are expressed using the coefficients b and b' appearing in the trace anomaly. Apart from the de Sitter generalization of the known flat-space results, we find two additional contributions: one which depends on the finite coefficients of terms quadratic in the curvature appearing in the renormalized effective action, and one which grows logarithmically with physical distance. While the first contribution corresponds to a rescaling of the effective mass, the second contribution leads to a faster fall-off of the Newton potential at large distances, and is potentially measurable.

  9. Electron scattering and mobility in a quantum well heterolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vijay K.; Naeem, Athar

    1984-11-01

    The theory of electron-lattice scattering is analyzed for a quantum-well heterolayer under the conditions that the de Broglie wavelength of an electron is comparable to or larger than the width of the layer, and donor impurities are removed in an adjacent nonconducting layer. The mobility due to isotropic scattering by acoustic phonons, point defects, and alloy scattering is found to increase whereas that due to polar-optic phon scattering is found to decrease with increasing thickness.

  10. Ferromagnetic quantum critical point induced by dimer-breaking in SrCo{sub 2}(Ge{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}.

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, S.; Jiramongkolchai, P.; Suchomel, M. R.; Toby, B. H.; Checkelsky, J. G.; Ong, N. P.; Cava, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to classical phase transitions driven by temperature, a quantum critical point (QCP) defines a transition at zero temperature that is driven by non-thermal parameters. In the known quantum critical d-electron systems, tuning the electronic bandwidth by means of changing the applied pressure or unit-cell dimensions, or tuning the d-state population, is used to drive the criticality. Here we describe how a novel chemical parameter, the breaking of bonds in Ge-Ge dimers that occurs within the intermetallic framework in SrCo{sub 2}(Ge{sub 1-x}P{sub x}){sub 2}, results in the appearance of a ferromagnetic (FM) QCP. Although both SrCo{sub 2}P{sub 2} and SrCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are paramagnetic, weak itinerant ferromagnetism unexpectedly develops during the course of the dimer breaking, and a QCP is observed at the onset of the FM phase. The use of chemical bond breaking as a tuning parameter to induce QCP opens an avenue for designing and studying novel magnetic materials.

  11. Field-induced quantum critical point in planar Heisenberg ferromagnets with long-range interactions: Two-time Green's function framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, L. S.; de Cesare, L.; Esposito, U.; Mercaldo, M. T.; Rabuffo, I.

    2010-07-01

    The two-time Green’s function method is used to study the critical properties and crossover phenomena near the field-induced quantum critical point (QCP) of a d -dimensional spin- S planar Heisenberg ferromagnet with long-range interactions decaying as r-α (with α>d ) with the distance r between spins. We adopt the Callen scheme for spin S and the Tyablikov decoupling procedure which is expected to provide suitable results at low temperatures. Different quantum critical regimes are found in the (α,d) plane and the global structure of the phase diagram is determined showing the typical V-shaped region close to the QCP. Depending on the values of α , we find that also for dimensionalities d⩽2 a finite-temperature critical line, ending in the QCP, exists with asymptotic behaviors and crossovers which can be employed as a useful guide for experimental studies. Moreover, these crossovers are shown to be suitably described in terms of (α,d) -dependent scaling functions and effective critical exponents.

  12. Anomalous behaviour of critical fields near a superconducting quantum critical point in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzke, C.; Carrington, A.; Walmsley, P.; Malone, L.; Fletcher, J. D.; See, P.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; Kasahara, S.; Mazukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.

    2014-03-01

    BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 presents one of the cleanest and clearest systems in which to study the influence of quantum critical fluctuations on high temperature superconductivity. In this material a sharp maximum in the magnetic penetration depth has been found at the quantum critical point (QCP x = 0 . 3) where Tc is maximal1. Specific heat and de Haas-van Alphen effect measurements2 show that this peak is driven by a corresponding increase in the quasiparticle effective mass. Based on these previous results a simple one-band theory would suggest that at the QCP we should expect a large increase in Hc 2 and a corresponding dip in Hc 1 . Actual measurements of these critical fields, which we present here, shows quite different behavior which we suggest is caused by an anomalous enhancement in the vortex core energy close to the QCP. 1 K.Hashimoto et.al., Science 336, 1554 (2012) 2 P.Walmsley, C.Putzke et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 257002 (2013) This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, EuroMagNET II, and KAKENHI from JSPS.

  13. HTSC cuprate phase diagram using a modified Boson-Fermion-Gossamer model describing competing orders, a quantum critical point and possible resonance complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Richard H.; March, Norman H.; Booth, Michael L.

    There has been considerable effort expended toward understanding high temperature superconductors (HTSC), and more specifically the cuprate phase diagram as a function of doping level. Yet, the only agreement seems to be that HTSC is an example of a strongly correlated material where Coulomb repulsion plays a major role. This manuscript proposes a model based on a Feshbach resonance pairing mechanism and competing orders. An initial BCS-type superconductivity at high doping is suppressed in the two particle channel by a localized preformed pair (PP) (Nozieres and Schmitt-Rink, J Low Temp Phys, 1985, 59, 980) (circular density wave) creating a quantum critical point. As doping continues to diminish, the PP then participates in a Feshbach resonance complex that creates a new electron (hole) pair that delocalizes and constitutes HTSC and the characteristic dome (Squire and March, Int J Quantum Chem, 2007, 107, 3013; 2008, 108, 2819). The resonant nature of the new pair contributes to its short coherence length. The model we propose also suggests an explanation (and necessity) for an experimentally observed correlated lattice that could restrict energy dissipation to enable the resonant Cooper pair to move over several correlation lengths, or essentially free. The PP density wave is responsible for the pseudogap as it appears as a "localized superconductor" since its density of states and quasiparticle spectrum are similar to those of a superconductor (Peierls-Fröhlich theory), but with no phase coherence between the PP.

  14. Quantum motion of a point particle in the presence of the Aharonov–Bohm potential in curved space

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Edilberto O.; Ulhoa, Sérgio C.; Andrade, Fabiano M.; Filgueiras, Cleverson; Amorim, R.G.G.

    2015-11-15

    The nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a spinless charged particle in the presence of the Aharonov–Bohm potential in curved space is considered. We chose the surface as being a cone defined by a line element in polar coordinates. The geometry of this line element establishes that the motion of the particle can occur on the surface of a cone or an anti-cone. As a consequence of the nontrivial topology of the cone and also because of two-dimensional confinement, the geometric potential should be taken into account. At first, we establish the conditions for the particle describing a circular path in such a context. Because of the presence of the geometric potential, which contains a singular term, we use the self-adjoint extension method in order to describe the dynamics in all space including the singularity. Expressions are obtained for the bound state energies and wave functions. -- Highlights: •Motion of particle under the influence of magnetic field in curved space. •Bound state for Aharonov–Bohm problem. •Particle describing a circular path. •Determination of the self-adjoint extension parameter.

  15. Change point analysis of matrix dependent photoluminescence intermittency of single CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with intermediate intensity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert; Krasselt, Cornelius; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Blinking dynamics of single CdSe/ZnS quantum dots are analyzed by change point analysis, which gives access to intermediate photoluminescence (PL) intensities observed during PL intermittency. The on-times show systematic deviations from a (truncated) power law. This deviation is manifested in variations of the PL intensity distribution and is related with well defined PL intensity jumps. Varying the matrix from polystyrene (PS) to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) changes the on-time blinking dynamics and reveals coupling of the QDs either to OH-groups of the SiOx interface or to OH-groups of PVA. Analysis of dwell times in respective intensity correlated traps reveals that OH-related traps are strongly stabilized with much longer dwell times as compared to otherwise broadly distributed trap states.

  16. Extremely broadband, on-chip optical nonreciprocity enabled by mimicking nonlinear anti-adiabatic quantum jumps near exceptional points

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngsun; Hahn, Choloong; Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Berini, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Time-asymmetric state-evolution properties while encircling an exceptional point are presently of great interest in search of new principles for controlling atomic and optical systems. Here, we show that encircling-an-exceptional-point interactions that are essentially reciprocal in the linear interaction regime make a plausible nonlinear integrated optical device architecture highly nonreciprocal over an extremely broad spectrum. In the proposed strategy, we describe an experimentally realizable coupled-waveguide structure that supports an encircling-an-exceptional-point parametric evolution under the influence of a gain saturation nonlinearity. Using an intuitive time-dependent Hamiltonian and rigorous numerical computations, we demonstrate strictly nonreciprocal optical transmission with a forward-to-backward transmission ratio exceeding 10 dB and high forward transmission efficiency (∼100%) persisting over an extremely broad bandwidth approaching 100 THz. This predicted performance strongly encourages experimental realization of the proposed concept to establish a practical on-chip optical nonreciprocal element for ultra-short laser pulses and broadband high-density optical signal processing. PMID:28106054

  17. Extremely broadband, on-chip optical nonreciprocity enabled by mimicking nonlinear anti-adiabatic quantum jumps near exceptional points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Youngsun; Hahn, Choloong; Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Berini, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Time-asymmetric state-evolution properties while encircling an exceptional point are presently of great interest in search of new principles for controlling atomic and optical systems. Here, we show that encircling-an-exceptional-point interactions that are essentially reciprocal in the linear interaction regime make a plausible nonlinear integrated optical device architecture highly nonreciprocal over an extremely broad spectrum. In the proposed strategy, we describe an experimentally realizable coupled-waveguide structure that supports an encircling-an-exceptional-point parametric evolution under the influence of a gain saturation nonlinearity. Using an intuitive time-dependent Hamiltonian and rigorous numerical computations, we demonstrate strictly nonreciprocal optical transmission with a forward-to-backward transmission ratio exceeding 10 dB and high forward transmission efficiency (~100%) persisting over an extremely broad bandwidth approaching 100 THz. This predicted performance strongly encourages experimental realization of the proposed concept to establish a practical on-chip optical nonreciprocal element for ultra-short laser pulses and broadband high-density optical signal processing.

  18. A quantum mechanical quantitative structure-property relationship study of the melting point of a variety of organosilicons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Holder, Andrew J

    2011-11-01

    We have developed quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models that correlate the melting points of chain and cyclic silanes and siloxanes with their molecular structures. A comprehensive correlation was derived for a variety of molecules, but the quality of the comprehensive model was modest at best. This provided the impetus for the development of two additional models focused on silanes and siloxanes, respectively. Statistical analyses confirm the robustness of the refined models, and the chemical interpretation of the descriptors was consistent with effects expected for melting.

  19. Quantum-Chemical Calculation and Visualization of the Vibrational Modes of Graphene in Different Points of the Brillouin Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedieva, Tetiana; Gubanov, Victor; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Pidhirnyi, Denys

    2015-07-01

    Different notations of graphene irreducible representations and optical modes could be found in the literature. The goals of this paper are to identify the correspondence between available notations, to calculate the optical modes of graphene in different points of the Brillouin zone, and to compare them with experimental data obtained by Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. The mechanism of the resonance enhancement of vibration modes of the molecules adsorbed on graphene in CARS experiments is proposed. The possibility of appearance of the discrete breathing modes is discussed.

  20. Quantum-Chemical Calculation and Visualization of the Vibrational Modes of Graphene in Different Points of the Brillouin Zone.

    PubMed

    Lebedieva, Tetiana; Gubanov, Victor; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Pidhirnyi, Denys

    2015-12-01

    Different notations of graphene irreducible representations and optical modes could be found in the literature. The goals of this paper are to identify the correspondence between available notations, to calculate the optical modes of graphene in different points of the Brillouin zone, and to compare them with experimental data obtained by Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. The mechanism of the resonance enhancement of vibration modes of the molecules adsorbed on graphene in CARS experiments is proposed. The possibility of appearance of the discrete breathing modes is discussed.

  1. Charge redistribution and a shortening of the Fe--As bond at the quantum critical point of SmO1-xFxFeAs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Dong, Peng; Xu, Wei; Liu, Shengli; Chu, Wangsheng; Chen, Xianhui; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-07-01

    Many researchers have pointed out that there is a quantum critical point (QCP) in the F-doped SmOFeAs system. In this paper, the electronic structure and local structure of the superconductive FeAs layer in SmO(1-x)FxFeAs as a function of the F-doping concentration have been investigated using Fe and As K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Experiments performed on the X-ray absorption near-edge structure showed that in the vicinity of the QCP the intensity of the pre-edge feature at the Fe-edge decreases continuously, while there is a striking rise of the shoulder-peak at the As edge, suggesting the occurrence of charge redistribution near the QCP. Further analysis on the As K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure demonstrated that the charge redistribution originates mostly from a shortening of the Fe-As bond at the QCP. An evident relationship between the mysterious QCP and the fundamental Fe-As bond was established, providing new insights on the interplay between QCP, charge dynamics and the local structural Fe-As bond in Fe-based superconductors.

  2. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2017-03-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics interference experiments as analog signal processing converting quantum signals into experimentally observable quantities such as current averages and correlations. This point of view also gives us a procedure to obtain quantum information quantities from electron quantum optics coherences. We illustrate these ideas by discussing two mode entanglement in electron quantum optics. We also sketch how signal processing ideas may open new perspectives for representing electronic coherences in quantum conductors and understand the properties of the underlying many-body electronic state.

  3. Quantum Optoelectronics. Summaries of the Papers Presented at the Topical Meeting at Dana Point, California on 15-17 March 1995. Technical Digest Series, Volume 14.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-17

    Dimensional Semiconductors QThE Poster, Novel Semiconductor Materials and Structures, and Micro and Vertical Cavity Physics and Applications....Photonic Bandgaps Microcavity Physics and Applications, New Materials for Quantum Optoelectronics, Quantum Dots, Physics and Applications of Low

  4. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G{sub 0} conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-21

    Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G{sub 0}, two additional features at ∼0.4 G{sub 0} and ∼1.3 G{sub 0} have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions. In order to understand such feature, here we investigate the electronic transport and mechanical properties of clean and oxygen-doped silver atomic contacts by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, unlike clean Ag single-atom contacts showing a conductance of 1 G{sub 0}, the low-bias conductance of oxygen-doped Ag atomic contacts depends on the number of oxygen impurities and their binding configuration. When one oxygen atom binds to an Ag monatomic chain sandwiched between two Ag electrodes, the low-bias conductance of the junction always decreases. In contrast, when the number of oxygen impurities is two and the O-O axis is perpendicular to the Ag-Ag axis, the transmission coefficients at the Fermi level are, respectively, calculated to be 1.44 for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes and 1.24 for that with Ag(100) electrodes, both in good agreement with the measured value of ∼1.3 G{sub 0}. The calculated rupture force (1.60 nN for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes) is also consistent with the experimental value (1.66 ± 0.09 nN), confirming that the measured ∼1.3 G{sub 0} conductance should originate from Ag single-atom contacts doped with two oxygen atoms in a perpendicular configuration.

  5. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories.

    PubMed

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode nu(2) with n(2)=0,[ellipsis (horizontal)],6 quanta of vibration) in the A electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTUSD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTUSD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH(2) internal energy distributions obtained for n(2)=0 and n(2)>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n(2)=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n(2) values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH(2) internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n(2)=0 and n(2)=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  6. Three-point correlator and pion form factor in quantum chromodynamics: Methods of calculation for two-loop spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedir, Islam

    The methods are developed of two-loop calculation of spectral density for the 3-point correlation function of an electromagnetic current and two axial currents which are the basis of the pion form factor analysis within the framework of QCD sum rules and local quark-hadron duality approach. The nature of various types of contributions is established which are related to particular regions of momentum integrations inside Feynman integrals. The trace factors accompanying all six two-loop diagrams are calculated and classified. To regularize particular loop integrals, the dimensional regularization technique has been used. The calculation involves such methods as infinite-momentum frame approach, alpha-representation method, Sudakov parametrization of the integration momentum and covariant calculation in momentum space. It is shown that final results of integration are given by logarithms and di-logarithm functions. For the diagram with the gluon correction to the electromagnetic vertex, it is shown that its large momentum transfer behavior is dominated by the Feynman mechanism, in which the active quark carries the bulk of the hadron momentum both before and after collision with virtual photon. For this diagram, the Sudakov double logarithmic terms were obtained that are known to convert into the Sudakov form factor after summation over all orders. Another type of double-logarithmic term was found in the contribution of the diagrams with the gluon correction to the axial-current vertices. This term appears as a power correction to the leading power behavior of this diagram governed by a short-distance re-scattering subprocess in which the exchanged gluon has large virtuality. This subprocess corresponds to the asymptotic perturbative QCD contribution. This observation shows that the two double-logarithmic terms have different nature. The methods developed in this dissertation may be applied to other two-loop calculations within the QCD sum rule method.

  7. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  8. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  9. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  10. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent spaces. 148.445 Section 148.445 Shipping COAST... THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Additional Special Requirements § 148.445 Adjacent spaces. When... following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  11. Hall and transverse even effects in the vicinity of a quantum critical point in Tm{sub 1-x}Yb{sub x}B{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Sluchanko, N. E. Azarevich, A. N.; Bogach, A. V.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Anisimov, M. A.; Levchenko, A. V.; Filipov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.

    2012-09-15

    The angular, temperature, and magnetic field dependences of the resistance recorded in the Hall effect geometry are studied for the rare-earth dodecaboride Tm{sub 1-x}Yb{sub x}B{sub 12} solid solutions where the metal-insulator and antiferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transitions are observed in the vicinity of the quantum critical point x{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 0.3. The measurements performed on high-quality single crystals in the temperature range 1.9-300 K for the first time have revealed the appearance of the second harmonic contribution, a transverse even effect in these fcc compounds near the quantum critical point. This contribution a is found to increase drastically both under the Tm-to-ytterbium substitution in the range x > x{sub c} and with an increase in the external magnetic field. Moreover, as the Yb concentration x increases, a negative peak of a significant amplitude appears on the temperature dependences of the Hall coefficient R{sub H}(T) for the Tm{sup 1-x}Yb{sub x}B{sub 12} compounds, in contrast to the invariable behavior R{sub H}(T) Almost-Equal-To const found for TmB{sub 12}. The complicated activation-type behavior of the Hall coefficient is observed at intermediate temperatures for x {>=} 0.5 with activation energies E{sub g}/k{sub B} Almost-Equal-To 200 K and E{sub a}/k{sub B} 55-75 K, and the sign inversion of R{sub H}(T) is detected at liquid-helium temperatures in the coherent regime. Renormalization effects in the electron density of states induced by variation of the Yb concentration are analyzed. The anomalies of the charge transport in Tm{sub 1-x}Yb{sub x}B{sub 12} solid solutions in various regimes (charge gap formation, intra-gap many-body resonance, and coherent regime) are discussed in detail and the results are interpreted in terms of the electron phase separation effects in combination with the formation of nanosize clusters of rare earth ions in the cage-glass state of the studied dodecaborides. The data obtained allow

  12. Multiband nodeless superconductivity near the charge-density-wave quantum critical point in ZrTe3–xSex

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Shan; He, Lan -Po; Hong, Xiao -Chen; ...

    2016-06-09

    It was found that selenium doping can suppress the charge-density-wave (CDW) order and induce bulk superconductivity in ZrTe3. The observed superconducting dome suggests the existence of a CDW quantum critical point (QCP) in ZrTe3–x Sex near x ≈ 0.04. To elucidate the superconducting state near the CDW QCP, we measure the thermal conductivity of two ZrTe3–x Sex single crystals (x = 0.044 and 0.051) down to 80 mK. For both samples, the residual linear term κ0/T at zero field is negligible, which is a clear evidence for nodeless superconducting gap. Furthermore, the field dependence of κ0/T manifests a multigap behavior.more » Lastly, these results demonstrate multiple nodeless superconducting gaps in ZrTe3–x Sex, which indicates conventional superconductivity despite of the existence of a CDW QCP.« less

  13. Integration of semiconductor quantum dots into nano-bio-chip systems for enumeration of CD4+ T cell counts at the point-of-need†‡

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Floriano, Pierre N.; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Simmons, Glennon W.; McDevitt, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Recent humanitarian efforts have led to the widespread release of antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of the more than 33 million HIV afflicted people living in resource-scarce settings. Here, the enumeration of CD4+ T lymphocytes is required to establish the level at which the immune system has been compromised. The gold standard method used in developed countries, based on flow cytometry, though widely accepted and accurate, is precluded from widespread use in resource-scarce settings due to its high expense, high technical requirements, difficulty in operation-maintenance and the lack of portability for these sophisticated laboratory-confined systems. As part of continuing efforts to develop practical diagnostic instrumentation, the integration of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) into a portable microfluidic-based lymphocyte capture and detection device is completed. This integrated system is capable of isolating and counting selected lymphocyte sub-populations (CD3+CD4+) from whole blood samples. By combining the unique optical properties of the QDs with the sample handling capabilities and cost effectiveness of novel microfluidic systems, a practical, portable lymphocyte measurement modality that correlates nicely with flow cytometry (R2 = 0.97) has been developed. This QD-based system reduces the optical requirements significantly relative to molecular fluorophores and the mini-CD4 counting device is projected to be suitable for use in both point-of-need and resource-scarce settings. PMID:19023471

  14. Indications of a Quantum Critical Point in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Using a Local Kondo Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Eduardo; Dai, Jixia; Arnold, Gerald; Gu, Genda; McElroy, Kyle

    2014-03-01

    A complete understanding of the complex phase diagrams that are present in high temperature superconductors remains elusive. While there is an overwhelming amount of experimental data on the existence and interplay of the phases present in high Tc superconductors from local probes, much of the existing data only looks at the charge degree of freedom of the material. By substituting Fe atoms for Cu atoms in the CuO plane of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212), we gain the ability to access the spin degree of freedom since the Fe atoms retain their magnetization below the superconducting transition temperature. This leads to a local Kondo effect which can be observed using Spectroscopic-Imaging Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SI-STM) and the local Kondo temperature can be extracted from spectra via a theoretical model. We show that the examination of this local Kondo temperature across local and sample average doping leads to the observation of a change in the quasiparticle spin degree of freedom at a quantum critical point (QCP) with a nominal hole doping of roughly 0.22, in agreement with other probes. The observation of the QCP in Bi2212 with this new method to access the spin degree of freedom helps to unravel some of the mystery behind the complex phase diagram of Bi2212.

  15. Testing wetland axioms at a watershed scale: Case studies of the aggregate hydrologic effects of non-adjacent wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands not adjacent to streams (i.e. “non-adjacent wetlands”) are hypothesized to affect downgradient hydrology in a number of ways. Non-adjacent wetlands may, for example, attenuate peak flows, serve as focal points for groundwater recharge, and decrease streamflow...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  17. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  18. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  19. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  20. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  1. Quantum criticality from Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongting; Luo, Shunlong; Fu, Shuangshuang

    2017-04-01

    Quantum phase transition is primarily characterized by a qualitative sudden change in the ground state of a quantum system when an external or internal parameter of the Hamiltonian is continuously varied. Investigating quantum criticality using information-theoretic methods has generated fruitful results. Quantum correlations and fidelity have been exploited to characterize the quantum critical phenomena. In this work, we employ quantum Fisher information to study quantum criticality. The singular or extremal point of the quantum Fisher information is adopted as the estimated thermal critical point. By a significant model constructed in Quan et al. (Phys Rev Lett 96: 140604, 2006), the effectiveness of this method is illustrated explicitly.

  2. Effects of interference in the dynamics of a spin- 1/2 transverse XY chain driven periodically through quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Victor; Dutta, Amit

    2009-05-01

    We study the effects of interference on the quenching dynamics of a one-dimensional spin 1/2 XY model in the presence of a transverse field (h(t)) which varies sinusoidally with time as h = h0cosωt, with |t|<=tf = π/ω. We have explicitly shown that the finite values of tf make the dynamics inherently dependent on the phases of probability amplitudes, which had been hitherto unseen in all cases of linear quenching with large initial and final times. In contrast, we also consider the situation where the magnetic field consists of an oscillatory as well as a linearly varying component, i.e., h(t) = h0cosωt+t/τ, where the interference effects lose importance in the limit of large τ. Our purpose is to estimate the defect density and the local entropy density in the final state if the system is initially prepared in its ground state. For a single crossing through the quantum critical point with h = h0cosωt, the density of defects in the final state is calculated by mapping the dynamics to an equivalent Landau-Zener problem by linearizing near the crossing point, and is found to vary as \\sqrt {\\omega } in the limit of small ω. On the other hand, the local entropy density is found to attain a maximum as a function of ω near a characteristic scale ω0. Extending to the situation of multiple crossings, we show that the role of finite initial and final times of quenching are manifested non-trivially in the interference effects of certain resonance modes which solely contribute to the production of defects. Kink density as well as the diagonal entropy density show oscillatory dependence on the number of full cycles of oscillation. Finally, the inclusion of a linear term in the transverse field on top of the oscillatory component results in a kink density which decreases continuously with τ while it increases monotonically with ω. The entropy density also shows monotonic change with the parameters, increasing with τ and decreasing with ω, in sharp contrast to the

  3. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  4. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  5. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  6. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  7. 43 CFR 420.3 - Adjacent lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adjacent lands. 420.3 Section 420.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFF-ROAD VEHICLE USE § 420.3 Adjacent lands. When administratively feasible, the regulation of...

  8. Using BRDFs for accurate albedo calculations and adjacency effect corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper the authors discuss two uses of BRDFs in remote sensing: (1) in determining the clear sky top of the atmosphere (TOA) albedo, (2) in quantifying the effect of the BRDF on the adjacency point-spread function and on atmospheric corrections. The TOA spectral albedo is an important parameter retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR). Its accuracy depends mainly on how well one can model the surface BRDF for many different situations. The authors present results from an algorithm which matches several semi-empirical functions to the nine MISR measured BRFs that are then numerically integrated to yield the clear sky TOA spectral albedo in four spectral channels. They show that absolute accuracies in the albedo of better than 1% are possible for the visible and better than 2% in the near infrared channels. Using a simplified extensive radiosity model, the authors show that the shape of the adjacency point-spread function (PSF) depends on the underlying surface BRDFs. The adjacency point-spread function at a given offset (x,y) from the center pixel is given by the integral of transmission-weighted products of BRDF and scattering phase function along the line of sight.

  9. The effect of the transformation of point defects under Joule heating on efficiency of LEDs with InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, N. I.; Ivanov, A. M.; Klochkov, A. V.; Tarala, V. A.; Shreter, Yu. G.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that a short-time Joule heating of the active region of light-emitting diodes with InGaN/GaN quantum wells up to 125°C at a current density of 150 A/cm2 stimulates changes in the energy spectrum of defect states in the energy gap of GaN and leads to an increase in the quantum efficiency.

  10. Quantum Correlations Evolution Asymmetry in Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Yun-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-03-01

    It was demonstrated that the entanglement evolution of a specially designed quantum state in the bistochastic channel is asymmetric. In this work, we generalize the study of the quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord, evolution asymmetry to various quantum channels. We found that the asymmetry of entanglement and quantum discord only occurs in some special quantum channels, and the behavior of the entanglement evolution may be quite different from the behavior of the quantum discord evolution. To quantum entanglement, in some channels it decreases monotonously with the increase of the quantum channel intensity. In some other channels, when we increase the intensity of the quantum channel, it decreases at first, then keeps zero for some time, and then rises up. To quantum discord, the evolution becomes more complex and you may find that it evolutes unsmoothly at some points. These results illustrate the strong dependence of the quantum correlations evolution on the property of the quantum channels. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61327901, 61490711, 61225025, 11474268, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant No. WK2470000018

  11. Quantum walks of interacting fermions on a cycle graph

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Fedichkin, Leonid E.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum walks have been employed widely to develop new tools for quantum information processing recently. A natural quantum walk dynamics of interacting particles can be used to implement efficiently the universal quantum computation. In this work quantum walks of electrons on a graph are studied. The graph is composed of semiconductor quantum dots arranged in a circle. Electrons can tunnel between adjacent dots and interact via Coulomb repulsion, which leads to entanglement. Fermionic entanglement dynamics is obtained and evaluated. PMID:27681057

  12. Anti-Kibble-Zurek Behavior in Crossing the Quantum Critical Point of a Thermally Isolated System Driven by a Noisy Control Field.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Rahmani, Armin; Del Campo, Adolfo

    2016-08-19

    We show that a thermally isolated system driven across a quantum phase transition by a noisy control field exhibits anti-Kibble-Zurek behavior, whereby slower driving results in higher excitations. We characterize the density of excitations as a function of the ramping rate and the noise strength. The optimal driving time to minimize excitations is shown to scale as a universal power law of the noise strength. Our findings reveal the limitations of adiabatic protocols such as quantum annealing and demonstrate the universality of the optimal ramping rate.

  13. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    in two-electron atoms R. Blümel and W. P. Reinhardt; Part III. Semiclassical Approximations: 20. Semiclassical theory of spectral rigidity M. V. Berry; 21. Semiclassical structure of trace formulas R. G. Littlejohn; 22. h-Expansion for quantum trace formulas P. Gaspard; 23. Pinball scattering B. Eckhardt, G. Russberg, P. Cvitanovic, P. E. Rosenqvist and P. Scherer; 24. Logarithm breaking time in quantum chaos G. P. Berman and G. M. Zaslavsky; 25. Semiclassical propagation: how long can it last? M. A. Sepulveda, S. Tomsovic and E. J. Heller; 26. The quantized Baker's transformation N. L. Balazs and A. Voros; 27. Classical structures in the quantized baker transformation M. Saraceno; 28. Quantum nodal points as fingerprints of classical chaos P. Leboeuf and A. Voros; 29. Chaology of action billiards A. M. Ozorio de Almeida and M. A. M. de Aguiar; Part IV. Level Statistics and Random Matrix Theory: 30. Characterization of chaotic quantum spectra and universality of level fluctuation laws O. Bohigas, M. J. Giannono, and C. Schmit; 31. Quantum chaos, localization and band random matrices F. M. Izrailev; 32. Structural invariance in channel space: a step toward understanding chaotic scattering in quantum mechanics T. H. Seligman; 33. Spectral properties of a Fermi accelerating disk R. Badrinarayanan and J. J. José; 34. Spectral properties of systems with dynamical localization T. Dittrich and U. Smilansky; 35. Unbound quantum diffusion and fractal spectra T. Geisel, R. Ketzmerick and G. Petschel; 36. Microwave studies in irregularly shaped billiards H.-J. Stöckmann, J. Stein and M. Kollman; Index.

  14. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    in two-electron atoms R. Blümel and W. P. Reinhardt; Part III. Semiclassical Approximations: 20. Semiclassical theory of spectral rigidity M. V. Berry; 21. Semiclassical structure of trace formulas R. G. Littlejohn; 22. h-Expansion for quantum trace formulas P. Gaspard; 23. Pinball scattering B. Eckhardt, G. Russberg, P. Cvitanovic, P. E. Rosenqvist and P. Scherer; 24. Logarithm breaking time in quantum chaos G. P. Berman and G. M. Zaslavsky; 25. Semiclassical propagation: how long can it last? M. A. Sepulveda, S. Tomsovic and E. J. Heller; 26. The quantized Baker's transformation N. L. Balazs and A. Voros; 27. Classical structures in the quantized baker transformation M. Saraceno; 28. Quantum nodal points as fingerprints of classical chaos P. Leboeuf and A. Voros; 29. Chaology of action billiards A. M. Ozorio de Almeida and M. A. M. de Aguiar; Part IV. Level Statistics and Random Matrix Theory: 30. Characterization of chaotic quantum spectra and universality of level fluctuation laws O. Bohigas, M. J. Giannono, and C. Schmit; 31. Quantum chaos, localization and band random matrices F. M. Izrailev; 32. Structural invariance in channel space: a step toward understanding chaotic scattering in quantum mechanics T. H. Seligman; 33. Spectral properties of a Fermi accelerating disk R. Badrinarayanan and J. J. José; 34. Spectral properties of systems with dynamical localization T. Dittrich and U. Smilansky; 35. Unbound quantum diffusion and fractal spectra T. Geisel, R. Ketzmerick and G. Petschel; 36. Microwave studies in irregularly shaped billiards H.-J. Stöckmann, J. Stein and M. Kollman; Index.

  15. Seismic analysis of adjacent buildings subjected to double pounding considering soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, Ahmed Abdelraheem

    2017-02-01

    A 2D model of two adjacent buildings with different heights (6 and 12 floors) and foundation levels without separation distance under seismic load and considering SSI is investigated. A special arrangement of contact elements (gap elements) each 1 m of the low height building in the contact zone is taken into consideration to fulfill all possible deformation contact modes which take place under seismic load (earthquake). Soil is modeled by 2D shell elements in contact with foundations of the two adjacent buildings. This paper focuses on the study of double pounding that takes place between the two adjacent buildings in some upper points at superstructure in the contact zone and also at foundation level. The forces of double pounding between the two adjacent buildings, which increase by softening of the soil, give a valuable assessment of straining actions of the two adjacent buildings and change the behavior of soil under the foundations and around basement floor.

  16. Seismic analysis of adjacent buildings subjected to double pounding considering soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, Ahmed Abdelraheem

    2017-03-01

    A 2D model of two adjacent buildings with different heights (6 and 12 floors) and foundation levels without separation distance under seismic load and considering SSI is investigated. A special arrangement of contact elements (gap elements) each 1 m of the low height building in the contact zone is taken into consideration to fulfill all possible deformation contact modes which take place under seismic load (earthquake). Soil is modeled by 2D shell elements in contact with foundations of the two adjacent buildings. This paper focuses on the study of double pounding that takes place between the two adjacent buildings in some upper points at superstructure in the contact zone and also at foundation level. The forces of double pounding between the two adjacent buildings, which increase by softening of the soil, give a valuable assessment of straining actions of the two adjacent buildings and change the behavior of soil under the foundations and around basement floor.

  17. Quantum oligopoly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. F.; Kiang, D.

    2003-12-01

    Based upon a modification of Li et al.'s "minimal" quantization rules (Phys. Lett. A306(2002) 73), we investigate the quantum version of the Cournot and Bertrand oligopoly. In the Cournot oligopoly, the profit of each of the N firms at the Nash equilibrium point rises monotonically with the measure of the quantum entanglement. Only at maximal entanglement, however, does the Nash equilibrium point coincide with the Pareto optimal point. In the Bertrand case, the Bertrand Paradox remains for finite entanglement (i.e., the perfectly competitive stage is reached for any N>=2), whereas with maximal entanglement each of the N firms will still have a non-zero shared profit. Hence, the Bertrand Paradox is completely resolved. Furthermore, a perfectly competitive market is reached asymptotically for N → ∞ in both the Cournot and Bertrand oligopoly.

  18. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  19. Quantum cohomology and quantum hydrodynamics from supersymmetric quiver gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We study the connection between N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories, quantum cohomology and quantum integrable systems of hydrodynamic type. We consider gauge theories on ALE spaces of A and D-type and discuss how they describe the quantum cohomology of the corresponding Nakajima's quiver varieties. We also discuss how the exact evaluation of local BPS observables in the gauge theory can be used to calculate the spectrum of quantum Hamiltonians of spin Calogero integrable systems and spin Intermediate Long Wave hydrodynamics. This is explicitly obtained by a Bethe Ansatz Equation provided by the quiver gauge theory in terms of its adjacency matrix.

  20. Rescuing a Quantum Phase Transition with Quantum Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gu; Novais, E.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2017-02-01

    We show that placing a quantum system in contact with an environment can enhance non-Fermi-liquid correlations, rather than destroy quantum effects, as is typical. The system consists of two quantum dots in series with two leads; the highly resistive leads couple charge flow through the dots to the electromagnetic environment, the source of quantum noise. While the charge transport inhibits a quantum phase transition, the quantum noise reduces charge transport and restores the transition. We find a non-Fermi-liquid intermediate fixed point for all strengths of the noise. For strong noise, it is similar to the intermediate fixed point of the two-impurity Kondo model.

  1. Work and quantum phase transitions: quantum latency.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, E; Bragança, H; Dorner, R; França Santos, M; Vedral, V; Modi, K; Goold, J

    2014-06-01

    We study the physics of quantum phase transitions from the perspective of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. For first-order quantum phase transitions, we find that the average work done per quench in crossing the critical point is discontinuous. This leads us to introduce the quantum latent work in analogy with the classical latent heat of first order classical phase transitions. For second order quantum phase transitions the irreversible work is closely related to the fidelity susceptibility for weak sudden quenches of the system Hamiltonian. We demonstrate our ideas with numerical simulations of first, second, and infinite order phase transitions in various spin chain models.

  2. Nodal structure and quantum critical point beneath the superconducting dome of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yuji

    2012-02-01

    Among BaFe2As2 based materials , the isovalent pnictogen substituted system BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 appears to be the most suitable system to discuss many physical properties, because BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 can be grown with very clean and homogeneous, as evidenced by the quantum oscillations observed over a wide doping range even in the superconducting dome giving detailed knowledge on the electronic structure. We investigate the structure of the superconducting order parameter in BaFe2(As0.67P0.33)2 (Tc=31,) with line nodes by the angle-resolved thermal conductivity measurements in magnetic field. The experimental results are most consistent with the closed nodal loops located at the flat part of the electron Fermi surface with high Fermi velocity. The doping evolution of the penetration depth indicates that nodal loop is robust against P-doping. Moreover, the magnitude of the zero temperature penetration depth exhibits a sharp peak at x=0.3, indicating the presence of a quantum phase transition deep inside the superconducting dome.[4pt] This work has been done in collaboration with T. Shibauchi, K. Hashimoto, S. Kasahara, M. Yamashita, T. Terashima, H. Ikeda (Kyoto), A. Carrington (Bristol), K. Cho, R. Prozorov, M. Tanatar (Ames), A.B. Vorontsov (Montana) and I.Vekhter (Louisiana).

  3. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  4. Dissipation in a Quantum Wire: Fact and Fantasy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mukunda P.; Green, Frederick

    2008-10-01

    Where, and how, does energy dissipation of electrical energy take place in a ballistic wire? Fully two decades after the advent of the transmissive phenomenology of electrical conductance, this deceptively simple query remains unanswered. We revisit the quantum kinetic basis of dissipation and show its power to give a definitive answer to our query. Dissipation leaves a clear, quantitative trace in the non-equilibrium current noise of a quantum point contact; this signature has already been observed in the laboratory. We then highlight the current state of accepted understandings in the light of well-known yet seemingly contradictory measurements. The physics of mesoscopic transport rests not in coherent carrier transmission through a perfect and dissipationless metallic channel, but explicitly in their dissipative inelastic scattering at the wire's interfaces and adjacent macroscopic leads.

  5. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  6. Interplay of point defects, extended defects, and carrier localization in the efficiency droop of InGaN quantum wells light-emitting diodes investigated using spatially resolved electroluminescence and photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yue; Zhang, Yong Su, Liqin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Wei, Tongbo; Zhang, Jihong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-14

    We perform both spatially resolved electroluminescence (SREL) as a function of injection current and spatially resolved photoluminescence (SRPL) as a function of excitation power on InGaN quantum well blue light-emitting diodes to investigate the underlying physics for the phenomenon of the external quantum efficiency (EQE) droop. SREL allows us to study two most commonly observed but distinctly different droop behaviors on a single device, minimizing the ambiguity trying to compare independently fabricated devices. Two representative devices are studied: one with macroscopic scale material non-uniformity, the other being macroscopically uniform, but both with microscopic scale fluctuations. We suggest that the EQE–current curve reflects the interplay of three effects: nonradiative recombination through point defects, carrier localization due to either In composition or well width fluctuation, and nonradiative recombination of the extended defects, which is common to various optoelectronic devices. By comparing SREL and SRPL, two very different excitation/detection modes, we show that individual singular sites exhibiting either particularly strong or weak emission in SRPL do not usually play any significant and direct role in the EQE droop. We introduce a two-level model that can capture the basic physical processes that dictate the EQE–current dependence and describe the whole operating range of the device from 0.01 to 100 A/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Quantum Annealing via Environment-Mediated Quantum Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Venturelli, Davide; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Knysh, Sergey; Dykman, Mark I.

    2017-02-01

    We show that quantum diffusion near a quantum critical point can provide an efficient mechanism of quantum annealing. It is based on the diffusion-mediated recombination of excitations in open systems far from thermal equilibrium. We find that, for an Ising spin chain coupled to a bosonic bath and driven by a monotonically decreasing transverse field, excitation diffusion sharply slows down below the quantum critical region. This leads to spatial correlations and effective freezing of the excitation density. Still, obtaining an approximate solution of an optimization problem via the diffusion-mediated quantum annealing can be faster than via closed-system quantum annealing or Glauber dynamics.

  8. Stress Wave Interaction Between Two Adjacent Blast Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changping; Johansson, Daniel; Nyberg, Ulf; Beyglou, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Rock fragmentation by blasting is determined by the level and state of stress in the rock mass subjected to blasting. With the application of electronic detonators, some researchers stated that it is possible to achieve improved fragmentation through stress wave superposition with very short delay times. This hypothesis was studied through theoretical analysis in the paper. First, the stress in rock mass induced by a single-hole shot was analyzed with the assumptions of infinite velocity of detonation and infinite charge length. Based on the stress analysis of a single-hole shot, the stress history and tensile stress distribution between two adjacent holes were presented for cases of simultaneous initiation and 1 ms delayed initiation via stress superposition. The results indicated that the stress wave interaction is local around the collision point. Then, the tensile stress distribution at the extended line of two adjacent blast holes was analyzed for a case of 2 ms delay. The analytical results showed that the tensile stress on the extended line increases due to the stress wave superposition under the assumption that the influence of neighboring blast hole on the stress wave propagation can be neglected. However, the numerical results indicated that this assumption is unreasonable and yields contrary results. The feasibility of improving fragmentation via stress wave interaction with precise initiation was also discussed. The analysis in this paper does not support that the interaction of stress waves improves the fragmentation.

  9. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  10. Quorum sensing: a quantum perspective.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sarangam; Pal, Sukla

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing is the efficient mode of communication in the bacterial world. After a lot of advancements in the classical theory of quorum sensing few basic questions of quorum sensing still remain unanswered. The sufficient progresses in quantum biology demands to explain these questions from the quantum perspective as non trivial quantum effects already have manifested in various biological processes like photosynthesis, magneto-reception etc. Therefore, it's the time to review the bacterial communications from the quantum view point. In this article we carefully accumulate the latest results and arguments to strengthen quantum biology through the addition of quorum sensing mechanism in the light of quantum mechanics.

  11. Quantum Noise from Reduced Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-07-01

    We consider the description of quantum noise within the framework of the standard Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics applied to a composite system environment setting. Averaging over the environmental degrees of freedom leads to a stochastic quantum dynamics, described by equations complying with the constraints arising from the statistical structure of quantum mechanics. Simple examples are considered in the framework of open system dynamics described within a master equation approach, pointing in particular to the appearance of the phenomenon of decoherence and to the relevance of quantum correlation functions of the environment in the determination of the action of quantum noise.

  12. Quantum transport in ballistic quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Akis, R. A.; Pivin, D. P., Jr.; Bird, J. P.; Holmberg, N.; Badrieh, F.; Vasileska, D.

    1998-10-01

    Carriers in small 3D quantum boxes take us from unintentional qquantum dots in MOSFETs (arising from the doping fluctuations) tto single-electron quantum dots in semiconductor hheterostructures. In between these two extremes are the realm of oopen, ballistic quantum dots, in which the transport can be quite regular. Several issues must be considered in treating the transport in these dots, among which are: (1) phase coherence within the dot; (2) the transition between semi-classical and fully quantum transport, (3) the role of the contacts, vis-à-vis the fabricated boundaries, and (4) the actual versus internal boundaries. In this paper, we discuss these issues, including the primary observables in experiment, the intrinsic nature of oscillatory behavior in magnetic field and dot size, and the connection to semi-classical transport emphasizing the importance of the filtering by the input (and output) quantum point contacts.

  13. Scheme of thinking quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2009-11-01

    A general approach describing quantum decision procedures is developed. The approach can be applied to quantum information processing, quantum computing, creation of artificial quantum intelligence, as well as to analyzing decision processes of human decision makers. Our basic point is to consider an active quantum system possessing its own strategic state. Processing information by such a system is analogous to the cognitive processes associated to decision making by humans. The algebra of probability operators, associated with the possible options available to the decision maker, plays the role of the algebra of observables in quantum theory of measurements. A scheme is advanced for a practical realization of decision procedures by thinking quantum systems. Such thinking quantum systems can be realized by using spin lattices, systems of magnetic molecules, cold atoms trapped in optical lattices, ensembles of quantum dots, or multilevel atomic systems interacting with electromagnetic field.

  14. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  15. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  16. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  17. 33 CFR 110.140 - Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buzzards Bay, Nantucket Sound..., Nantucket Sound, and adjacent waters, Mass. (a) New Bedford Outer Harbor—(1) Anchorage A. West of Sconticut... Sounds—(1) Anchorage E. South of a line beginning at a point bearing 180° about 3.25 miles from...

  18. Quantum Ice : Experimental Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Nic; Benton, Owen; Sikora, Olga; Penc, Karlo; McClarty, Paul; Pollmann, Frank; Moessner, Roderich; Fulde, Peter

    2012-02-01

    ``Quantum Spin Ice'' materials have attracted considerable attention as three-dimensional examples of quantum spin liquids. Recently, we have used zero-temperature Quantum Monte Carlo simulation to explore one possible scenario for these materials, confirming the possibility of a ``quantum ice'' state driven by quantum tunnelling between an extensive number of different spin-ice configurations [1]. Here we address the simple question : what would such a quantum ice look like in experiment ? We focus in particular on the fate of ``pinch point'' singularities seen in neutron scattering experiments on spin ice materials, showing how these are suppressed and ultimately eliminated as the system is cooled to its ground state [1,2]. [4pt] [1] N. Shannon et al., arXiv:1105.4196[0pt] [2] O. Benton et al., in preparation.

  19. Quantum physics meets biology.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Markus; Juffmann, Thomas; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-12-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the past decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world-view of quantum coherences, entanglement, and other nonclassical effects, has been heading toward systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a "pedestrian guide" to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future "quantum biology," its current status, recent experimental progress, and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena.

  20. Quantum structure and human thought.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    We support the authors' claims, except that we point out that also quantum structure different from quantum probability abundantly plays a role in human cognition. We put forward several elements to illustrate our point, mentioning entanglement, contextuality, interference, and emergence as effects, and states, observables, complex numbers, and Fock space as specific mathematical structures.

  1. Poisoning effect of Mn in LaFe1-xMnxAsO0.89F0.11: Unveiling a quantum critical point in the phase diagram of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerath, F.; Bonfà, P.; Sanna, S.; Prando, G.; De Renzi, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Carretta, P.

    2014-04-01

    A superconducting-to-magnetic transition is reported for LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 where a per-thousand amount of Mn impurities is dispersed. By employing local spectroscopic techniques like muon spin rotation (μSR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) on compounds with Mn contents ranging from x =0.025% to x =0.75%, we find that the electronic properties are extremely sensitive to the Mn impurities. In fact, a small amount of Mn as low as 0.2% suppresses superconductivity completely. Static magnetism, involving the FeAs planes, is observed to arise for x >0.1% and becomes further enhanced upon increasing Mn substitution. Also a progressive increase of low-energy spin fluctuations, leading to an enhancement of the NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1, is observed upon Mn substitution. The analysis of T1-1 for the sample closest to the crossover between superconductivity and magnetism (x =0.2%) points toward the presence of an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point around that doping level.

  2. 30 CFR 56.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 56.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 56.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  3. 30 CFR 57.9103 - Clearance on adjacent tracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clearance on adjacent tracks. 57.9103 Section..., Hauling, and Dumping Traffic Safety § 57.9103 Clearance on adjacent tracks. Railcars shall not be left on side tracks unless clearance is provided for traffic on adjacent tracks....

  4. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  9. Weak point target detection in star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Xiong, Yazhou; Li, Yi; Wang, Li; Li, Chunyan; Yin, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Space weak point targets detection is very useful in non cooperative target detection. Influenced by the chip noise and space environmental noise, weak point targets detection becomes a difficulty. In the paper, firstly the star is extracted from the picture, the background picture is filtered to reduce the noise, and then the moving distance between adjacent pictures is calculated, after picture overlapping between adjacent pictures, the energy of the weak point target is improved, with a appropriate threshold, the weak point target is extracted. The proposed method can be widely utilized in space exploration, space defense etc.

  10. Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Panahi, Behrouz M.

    2006-03-23

    So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

  11. Simplified embedding schemes for the quantum-chemical description of neutral and charged point defects in SiO2 and related dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbetta, Davide; Ricci, Davide; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2000-12-01

    Embedding methods specifically designed to treat large molecules with bulky ligands or in polar solvents are used to describe the electronic structure of point defects in the covalently bonded solids SiO2, Si3N4, and Si2N2O. The mechanical relaxation of the lattice around a given defect, in particular an anion vacancy or interstitial, is described using the ONIOM approach where the system is partitioned in two regions, the local defect treated at the gradient corrected DFT level, and the surrounding matrix treated with a semiempirical Hamiltonian. In this way clusters of 100 atoms and more are used to describe a portion of the solid of 10-15 Å of diameter. The long-range lattice polarization induced by a charged defect, a charged oxygen vacancy or a proton bound to O or N atoms, is estimated by means of the isodensity polarized continuum model, IPCM, and compared with the approximate Born's formula. The two simplified embedding schemes provide a simple way to improve cluster models of neutral and charged defects in covalent materials.

  12. Size-dependent second virial coefficients of quantum dots from quantitative cryogenic electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Rijssel, J; Peters, V F D; Meeldijk, J D; Kortschot, R J; van Dijk-Moes, R J A; Petukhov, A V; Erné, B H; Philipse, A P

    2014-09-18

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is utilized to determine the second virial coefficient of osmotic pressure of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in apolar liquid. Cryo-TEM images from vitrified samples provide snapshots of the equilibrium distribution of the particles. These snapshots yield radial distribution functions from which second virial coefficients are calculated, which agree with second virial coefficients determined with analytical centrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering. The size dependence of the second virial coefficient points to an interparticle interaction that is proportional to the QD surface area. A plausible cause for this attraction is the interaction between the surface ions on adjacent QDs.

  13. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  14. Quantum hyperbolic geometry in loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Maïté; Girelli, Florian

    2013-06-01

    Loop quantum gravity (LQG) is an attempt to describe the quantum gravity regime. Introducing a nonzero cosmological constant Λ in this context has been a standing problem. Other approaches, such as Chern-Simons gravity, suggest that quantum groups can be used to introduce Λ into the game. Not much is known when defining LQG with a quantum group. Tensor operators can be used to construct observables in any type of discrete quantum gauge theory with a classical/quantum gauge group. We illustrate this by constructing explicitly geometric observables for LQG defined with a quantum group and show for the first time that they encode a quantized hyperbolic geometry. This is a novel argument pointing out the usefulness of quantum groups as encoding a nonzero cosmological constant. We conclude by discussing how tensor operators provide the right formalism to unlock the LQG formulation with a nonzero cosmological constant.

  15. Subcycle quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riek, C.; Sulzer, P.; Seeger, M.; Moskalenko, A. S.; Burkard, G.; Seletskiy, D. V.; Leitenstorfer, A.

    2017-01-01

    Squeezed states of electromagnetic radiation have quantum fluctuations below those of the vacuum field. They offer a unique resource for quantum information systems and precision metrology, including gravitational wave detectors, which require unprecedented sensitivity. Since the first experiments on this non-classical form of light, quantum analysis has been based on homodyning techniques and photon correlation measurements. These methods currently function in the visible to near-infrared and microwave spectral ranges. They require a well-defined carrier frequency, and photons contained in a quantum state need to be absorbed or amplified. Quantum non-demolition experiments may be performed to avoid the influence of a measurement in one quadrature, but this procedure comes at the expense of increased uncertainty in another quadrature. Here we generate mid-infrared time-locked patterns of squeezed vacuum noise. After propagation through free space, the quantum fluctuations of the electric field are studied in the time domain using electro-optic sampling with few-femtosecond laser pulses. We directly compare the local noise amplitude to that of bare (that is, unperturbed) vacuum. Our nonlinear approach operates off resonance and, unlike homodyning or photon correlation techniques, without absorption or amplification of the field that is investigated. We find subcycle intervals with noise levels that are substantially less than the amplitude of the vacuum field. As a consequence, there are enhanced fluctuations in adjacent time intervals, owing to Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, which indicate generation of highly correlated quantum radiation. Together with efforts in the far infrared, this work enables the study of elementary quantum dynamics of light and matter in an energy range at the boundary between vacuum and thermal background conditions.

  16. Subcycle quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Riek, C; Sulzer, P; Seeger, M; Moskalenko, A S; Burkard, G; Seletskiy, D V; Leitenstorfer, A

    2017-01-18

    Squeezed states of electromagnetic radiation have quantum fluctuations below those of the vacuum field. They offer a unique resource for quantum information systems and precision metrology, including gravitational wave detectors, which require unprecedented sensitivity. Since the first experiments on this non-classical form of light, quantum analysis has been based on homodyning techniques and photon correlation measurements. These methods currently function in the visible to near-infrared and microwave spectral ranges. They require a well-defined carrier frequency, and photons contained in a quantum state need to be absorbed or amplified. Quantum non-demolition experiments may be performed to avoid the influence of a measurement in one quadrature, but this procedure comes at the expense of increased uncertainty in another quadrature. Here we generate mid-infrared time-locked patterns of squeezed vacuum noise. After propagation through free space, the quantum fluctuations of the electric field are studied in the time domain using electro-optic sampling with few-femtosecond laser pulses. We directly compare the local noise amplitude to that of bare (that is, unperturbed) vacuum. Our nonlinear approach operates off resonance and, unlike homodyning or photon correlation techniques, without absorption or amplification of the field that is investigated. We find subcycle intervals with noise levels that are substantially less than the amplitude of the vacuum field. As a consequence, there are enhanced fluctuations in adjacent time intervals, owing to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, which indicate generation of highly correlated quantum radiation. Together with efforts in the far infrared, this work enables the study of elementary quantum dynamics of light and matter in an energy range at the boundary between vacuum and thermal background conditions.

  17. Geometry of quantum computation with qutrits.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yu, Zu-Huan; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Determining the quantum circuit complexity of a unitary operation is an important problem in quantum computation. By using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry, we investigate the efficient quantum circuits in quantum computation with n qutrits. We show that the optimal quantum circuits are essentially equivalent to the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry of SU(3(n)). As an example, three-qutrit systems are investigated in detail.

  18. Solar cells using quantum funnels.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Illan J; Levina, Larissa; Debnath, Ratan; Zhitomirsky, David; Sargent, Edward H

    2011-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots offer broad tuning of semiconductor bandstructure via the quantum size effect. Devices involving a sequence of layers comprised of quantum dots selected to have different diameters, and therefore bandgaps, offer the possibility of funneling energy toward an acceptor. Here we report a quantum funnel that efficiently conveys photoelectrons from their point of generation toward an intended electron acceptor. Using this concept we build a solar cell that benefits from enhanced fill factor as a result of this quantum funnel. This concept addresses limitations on transport in soft condensed matter systems and leverages their advantages in large-area optoelectronic devices and systems.

  19. Characterization and organization of DNA sequences adjacent to the human telomere associated repeat (TTAGGG)n.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, B; Collins, C; Robbins, C; Magenis, R E; Delaney, A D; Gray, J W; Hayden, M R

    1990-01-01

    We present a strategy for the cloning of DNA sequences adjacent to the tandemly repeated DNA sequence (TTAGGG)n. Sequence analysis of 14 independently isolated clones revealed the presence of non-repetitive sequences immediately adjacent to or flanked by blocks of the simple repeat (TTAGGG)n. In addition, we provide sequence information on two previously undescribed tandemly repeated sequences, including a 9 bp repeat and a modification of the (TTAGGG)n repeat. Using different mapping approaches six sub-clones, free of the TTAGGG repeat, were assigned to a single human chromosome. Moreover, in situ hybridization mapped one of these subclones, G2 - 1H, definitively to the telomeric band on chromosome 4q. However, Bal 31 insensitivity suggests a location in a more subterminal region. All the (TTAGGG)n-adjacent unique sequences tested are highly conserved among primates but are not present in other mammalian species. Identification and mapping of TTAGGG-adjacent sequences will provide a refined insight into the genomic organization of the (TTAGGG)n repeat. The isolation of chromosome specific TTAGGG-adjacent sequences from subtelomeric regions of all human chromosomes will serve as important end points for the genetic maps and will be useful for the molecular characterization of chromosomal rearrangements involving telomeres. Images PMID:2356126

  20. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that withmore » a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.« less

  1. Quantum plasmonic sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wenjiang; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2015-11-04

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors can reach the quantum noise limit of the optical readout field in various configurations. We demonstrate that two-mode intensity squeezed states produce a further enhancement in sensitivity compared with a classical optical readout when the quantum noise is used to transduce an SPR sensor signal in the Kretschmann configuration. The quantum noise reduction between the twin beams when incident at an angle away from the plasmonic resonance, combined with quantum noise resulting from quantum anticorrelations when on resonance, results in an effective SPR-mediated modulation that yields a measured sensitivity 5 dB better than that with a classical optical readout in this configuration. Furthermore, the theoretical potential of this technique points to resolving particle concentrations with more accuracy than is possible via classical approaches to optical transduction.

  2. Symmetric point four-point functions at one loop in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracey, J. A.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the quartic ghost and quark Green's functions as well as the gluon-ghost, gluon-quark and ghost-quark four-point functions of quantum chromodynamics at one loop at the fully symmetric point in a linear covariant gauge. Similar expressions for the analogous Green's functions in quantum electrodynamics are also provided.

  3. The quantum epoché.

    PubMed

    Pylkkänen, Paavo

    2015-12-01

    The theme of phenomenology and quantum physics is here tackled by examining some basic interpretational issues in quantum physics. One key issue in quantum theory from the very beginning has been whether it is possible to provide a quantum ontology of particles in motion in the same way as in classical physics, or whether we are restricted to stay within a more limited view of quantum systems, in terms of complementary but mutually exclusive phenomena. In phenomenological terms we could describe the situation by saying that according to the usual interpretation of quantum theory (especially Niels Bohr's), quantum phenomena require a kind of epoché (i.e. a suspension of assumptions about reality at the quantum level). However, there are other interpretations (especially David Bohm's) that seem to re-establish the possibility of a mind-independent ontology at the quantum level. We will show that even such ontological interpretations contain novel, non-classical features, which require them to give a special role to "phenomena" or "appearances", a role not encountered in classical physics. We will conclude that while ontological interpretations of quantum theory are possible, quantum theory implies the need of a certain kind of epoché even for this type of interpretations. While different from the epoché connected to phenomenological description, the "quantum epoché" nevertheless points to a potentially interesting parallel between phenomenology and quantum philosophy.

  4. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-01

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H5O2+ cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D2d symmetry, instead of the G16 symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  5. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  6. Multiband nodeless superconductivity near the charge-density-wave quantum critical point in ZrTe3–xSex

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shan; He, Lan -Po; Hong, Xiao -Chen; Zhu, Xiang -De; Petrovic, Cedomir; Li, Shi -Yan

    2016-06-09

    It was found that selenium doping can suppress the charge-density-wave (CDW) order and induce bulk superconductivity in ZrTe3. The observed superconducting dome suggests the existence of a CDW quantum critical point (QCP) in ZrTe3–x Sex near x ≈ 0.04. To elucidate the superconducting state near the CDW QCP, we measure the thermal conductivity of two ZrTe3–x Sex single crystals (x = 0.044 and 0.051) down to 80 mK. For both samples, the residual linear term κ0/T at zero field is negligible, which is a clear evidence for nodeless superconducting gap. Furthermore, the field dependence of κ0/T manifests a multigap behavior. Lastly, these results demonstrate multiple nodeless superconducting gaps in ZrTe3–x Sex, which indicates conventional superconductivity despite of the existence of a CDW QCP.

  7. Magneto-transport Spectroscopy of the First and Second Two-dimensional Subbands in Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Fangchao; Tang, Ning; Shang, Liangliang; Guan, Hongming; Xu, Fujun; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic transport spectroscopy is investigated in quantum point contacts (QPCs) fabricated in Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN heterostructures. The magnetic field perpendicular to the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is shown to depopulate the quasi-one-dimensional energy levels in the first two-dimensional (2D) subband faster than those in the second one. In GaN based heterostructures, the energy levels in the second 2D subband is generally concealed in the fast course of depletion and hence rarely detected. The perpendicular magnetic field facilitates the observation of the second 2D subband, and provides a method to study the properties of these energy levels. A careful analysis on the rate of the magnetic depletion with respect to the level index and confinement is carried out, from which the profile of the lateral confinement in GaN based QPCs is found to be triangular. The stability diagram at T shows the energy separation between the first and second 2D subband to be in the range of 32 to 42 meV.

  8. Magneto-transport Spectroscopy of the First and Second Two-dimensional Subbands in Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN Quantum Point Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fangchao; Tang, Ning; Shang, Liangliang; Guan, Hongming; Xu, Fujun; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic transport spectroscopy is investigated in quantum point contacts (QPCs) fabricated in Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN heterostructures. The magnetic field perpendicular to the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is shown to depopulate the quasi-one-dimensional energy levels in the first two-dimensional (2D) subband faster than those in the second one. In GaN based heterostructures, the energy levels in the second 2D subband is generally concealed in the fast course of depletion and hence rarely detected. The perpendicular magnetic field facilitates the observation of the second 2D subband, and provides a method to study the properties of these energy levels. A careful analysis on the rate of the magnetic depletion with respect to the level index and confinement is carried out, from which the profile of the lateral confinement in GaN based QPCs is found to be triangular. The stability diagram at T shows the energy separation between the first and second 2D subband to be in the range of 32 to 42 meV. PMID:28225042

  9. Critically damped quantum search.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari

    2009-04-17

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we find that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum O(sqrt[N]) and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  10. Towards Quantum Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2009-05-01

    The ultimate limit of direct point to point quantum key distribution is around 300-500 km. Longer distances fiber-based quantum communication will require both high-fidelity entanglement swapping and multi-mode quantum memories. A new protocol for an efficient multimode quantum memory based on atomic ensembles has been developed and demonstrated. The rare-earth ions ensemble is ``frozen'' in a crystal inside a cryostat. The protocol, named AFC (Atomic Frequency Comb) is inspired from photon echoes, but avoids any control light pulse after the single-photon(s) is (are) stored in the medium, thus avoiding any noise due to fluorescence. First results on the new protocol for quantum memories in Nd:YVO4 doped crystals demonstrate a quantum light-matter interface at the single-photon level. The coherence of the re-emitted photons is investigated in an interference experiment showing net visibilities above 95%. Further results in Nd:YSO (Geneva), Tm:YAG (Paris) and Pr:YSO (Lund) shall also be presented. Many hundreds of km long quantum communication is a long term objective. Many of the necessary building blocks have been demonstrated, but usually in independent experiments and with insufficient fidelities and specifications to meet the goal. Still, today's the roadmap is relatively clear and a lot of interesting physics shall be found along the journey.

  11. Beyond the Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Mehmani, Bahar; Špička, Václav; Aghdami, Maryam J.; Khrennikov, Andrei Yu

    2007-09-01

    electrodynamics. Some quantum experiments from the point of view of Stochastic electrodynamics / V. Spicka ... [et al.]. On the ergodic behaviour of atomic systems under the action of the zero-point radiation field / L. De La Peña and A. M. Cetto. Inertia and the vacuum-view on the emergence of the inertia reaction force / A. Rueda and H. Sunahata -- pt. F. Models for the electron. Rotating Hopf-Kinks: oscillators in the sense of de Broglie / U. Enz. Kerr-Newman particles: symmetries and other properties / H.I. Arcos and J.G. Pereira. Kerr geometry beyond the quantum theory / Th. M. Nieuwenhuizen -- pt. G. Philosophical considerations. Probability in non-collapse interpretations of a quantum mechanics / D. Dieks. The Schrödinger-Park paradox about the concept of "State" in quantum statistical mechanics and quantum information theory is still open: one more reason to go beyond? / G.P. Beretta. The conjecture that local realism is possible / E. Santos -- pt. H. The round table. Round table discussion / A.M. Cetto ... [et al.].

  12. Hydrocarbon provinces and productive trends in Libya and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Missallati, A.A. Ltd., Tripoli )

    1988-08-01

    According to the age of major reservoirs, hydrocarbon occurrences in Libya and adjacent areas can be grouped into six major systems which, according to their geographic locations, can be classified into two major hydrocarbon provinces: (1) Sirte-Pelagian basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from middle-late Mesozoic to early Tertiary, and (2) Murzog-Ghadames basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from early Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. In the Sirte-Pelagian basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped in structural highs or in stratigraphic wedge-out against structural highs and in carbonate buildups. Here, hydrocarbon generation is characterized by the combined effect of abundant structural relief and reservoir development in the same hydrocarbon systems of the same age, providing an excellent example of hydrocarbon traps in sedimentary basins that have undergone extensive tensional fracturing in a shallow marine environment. In the Murzog-Ghadames basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped mainly in structural highs controlled by paleostructural trends as basement arches which acted as focal points for oil migration and accumulation.

  13. Quantum Locality in Game Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Luna, Carlos A.; Susa, Cristian E.; Ducuara, Andrés F.; Barreiro, Astrid; Reina, John H.

    2017-01-01

    Game theory is a well established branch of mathematics whose formalism has a vast range of applications from the social sciences, biology, to economics. Motivated by quantum information science, there has been a leap in the formulation of novel game strategies that lead to new (quantum Nash) equilibrium points whereby players in some classical games are always outperformed if sharing and processing joint information ruled by the laws of quantum physics is allowed. We show that, for a bipartite non zero-sum game, input local quantum correlations, and separable states in particular, suffice to achieve an advantage over any strategy that uses classical resources, thus dispensing with quantum nonlocality, entanglement, or even discord between the players’ input states. This highlights the remarkable key role played by pure quantum coherence at powering some protocols. Finally, we propose an experiment that uses separable states and basic photon interferometry to demonstrate the locally-correlated quantum advantage. PMID:28327567

  14. Quantum Locality in Game Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo-Luna, Carlos A.; Susa, Cristian E.; Ducuara, Andrés F.; Barreiro, Astrid; Reina, John H.

    2017-03-01

    Game theory is a well established branch of mathematics whose formalism has a vast range of applications from the social sciences, biology, to economics. Motivated by quantum information science, there has been a leap in the formulation of novel game strategies that lead to new (quantum Nash) equilibrium points whereby players in some classical games are always outperformed if sharing and processing joint information ruled by the laws of quantum physics is allowed. We show that, for a bipartite non zero-sum game, input local quantum correlations, and separable states in particular, suffice to achieve an advantage over any strategy that uses classical resources, thus dispensing with quantum nonlocality, entanglement, or even discord between the players’ input states. This highlights the remarkable key role played by pure quantum coherence at powering some protocols. Finally, we propose an experiment that uses separable states and basic photon interferometry to demonstrate the locally-correlated quantum advantage.

  15. Quantum Locality in Game Strategy.

    PubMed

    Melo-Luna, Carlos A; Susa, Cristian E; Ducuara, Andrés F; Barreiro, Astrid; Reina, John H

    2017-03-22

    Game theory is a well established branch of mathematics whose formalism has a vast range of applications from the social sciences, biology, to economics. Motivated by quantum information science, there has been a leap in the formulation of novel game strategies that lead to new (quantum Nash) equilibrium points whereby players in some classical games are always outperformed if sharing and processing joint information ruled by the laws of quantum physics is allowed. We show that, for a bipartite non zero-sum game, input local quantum correlations, and separable states in particular, suffice to achieve an advantage over any strategy that uses classical resources, thus dispensing with quantum nonlocality, entanglement, or even discord between the players' input states. This highlights the remarkable key role played by pure quantum coherence at powering some protocols. Finally, we propose an experiment that uses separable states and basic photon interferometry to demonstrate the locally-correlated quantum advantage.

  16. Relativistic quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, R. B.; Ralph, T. C.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past few years, a new field of high research intensity has emerged that blends together concepts from gravitational physics and quantum computing. Known as relativistic quantum information, or RQI, the field aims to understand the relationship between special and general relativity and quantum information. Since the original discoveries of Hawking radiation and the Unruh effect, it has been known that incorporating the concepts of quantum theory into relativistic settings can produce new and surprising effects. However it is only in recent years that it has become appreciated that the basic concepts involved in quantum information science undergo significant revision in relativistic settings, and that new phenomena arise when quantum entanglement is combined with relativity. A number of examples illustrate that point. Quantum teleportation fidelity is affected between observers in uniform relative acceleration. Entanglement is an observer-dependent property that is degraded from the perspective of accelerated observers moving in flat spacetime. Entanglement can also be extracted from the vacuum of relativistic quantum field theories, and used to distinguish peculiar motion from cosmological expansion. The new quantum information-theoretic framework of quantum channels in terms of completely positive maps and operator algebras now provides powerful tools for studying matters of causality and information flow in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. This focus issue provides a sample of the state of the art in research in RQI. Some of the articles in this issue review the subject while others provide interesting new results that will stimulate further research. What makes the subject all the more exciting is that it is beginning to enter the stage at which actual experiments can be contemplated, and some of the articles appearing in this issue discuss some of these exciting new developments. The subject of RQI pulls together concepts and ideas from

  17. The speciation of marine particulate iron adjacent to active and passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We use synchrotron-based chemical-species mapping techniques to compare the speciation of suspended (1-51 μm) marine particulate iron collected in two open ocean environments adjacent to active and passive continental margins. Chemical-species mapping provides speciation information for heterogeneous environmental samples, and is especially good for detecting spectroscopically distinct trace minerals and species that could not be detectable by other methods. The average oxidation state of marine particulate iron determined by chemical-species mapping is comparable to that determined by standard bulk X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy. Using chemical-species mapping, we find that up to 43% of particulate Fe in the Northwest Pacific at the depth of the adjacent active continental margin is in the Fe(II) state, with the balance Fe(III). In contrast, particulate iron in the eastern tropical North Atlantic, which receives the highest dust deposition on Earth and is adjacent to a passive margin, is dominated by weathered and oxidized Fe compounds, with Fe(III) contributing 90% of total iron. The balance is composed primarily of Fe(II)-containing species, but we detected individual pyrite particles in some samples within an oxygen minimum zone in the upper thermocline. Several lines of evidence point to the adjacent Mauritanian continental shelf as the source of pyrite to the water column. The speciation of suspended marine particulate iron reflects the mineralogy of iron from the adjacent continental margins. Since the solubility of particulate iron has been shown to be a function of its speciation, this may have implications for the bioavailability of particulate iron adjacent to passive compared to active continental margins.

  18. Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topography adjacent to Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5, showing conditions before construction, May 28, 1943, this drawing shows the Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and general conditions at Bonita Ridge before the construction of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  19. Quantum ontologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs.

  20. Learning Non-Adjacent Regularities at Age 0 ; 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Werker, Janet F.

    2013-01-01

    One important mechanism suggested to underlie the acquisition of grammar is rule learning. Indeed, infants aged 0 ; 7 are able to learn rules based on simple identity relations (adjacent repetitions, ABB: "wo fe fe" and non-adjacent repetitions, ABA: "wo fe wo", respectively; Marcus et al., 1999). One unexplored issue is…

  1. View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of north side from exterior stairs of adjacent building, bottom cut off by fringed buildings, view facing south-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Industrial X-Ray Building, Off Sixth Street, adjacent to and south of Facility No. 11, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. A Study of the Pronunciation of Words Containing Adjacent Vowels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greif, Ivo P.

    To determine the usefulness of the commonly taught phonics rule, "only pronounce the first vowel in words that contain adjacent vowels" (the VV rule, with the first "v" pronounced with the long vowel sound), two new studies applied it to words with adjacent vowels in several lists and dictionaries. The first study analyzed words containing…

  3. 47 CFR 90.221 - Adjacent channel power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adjacent channel power limits. 90.221 Section 90.221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.221 Adjacent channel...

  4. 47 CFR 90.221 - Adjacent channel power limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adjacent channel power limits. 90.221 Section 90.221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.221 Adjacent channel...

  5. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  6. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  7. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  8. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  10. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  11. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  12. 30 CFR 56.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Devices and Maintenance Requirements § 56.14109 Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to the travelways shall be equipped with—...

  13. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  14. 30 CFR 57.14109 - Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unguarded conveyors with adjacent travelways... conveyors with adjacent travelways. Unguarded conveyors next to travelways shall be equipped with— (a) Emergency stop devices which are located so that a person falling on or against the conveyor can...

  15. Isostatic gravity map of the Point Sur 30 x 60 quadrangle and adjacent areas, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, J.T.; Morin, R.L.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a regional effort to investigate the tectonics and water resources of the central Coast Range. This map serves as a basis for modeling the shape of basins and for determining the location and geometry of faults in the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after removing variations caused by instrument drift, earth-tides, latitude, elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure), as expressed by the isostatic anomaly, reflect the distribution of densities in the mid- to upper crust, which in turn can be related to rock type. Steep gradients in the isostatic gravity field often indicate lithologic or structural boundaries. Gravity highs reflect the Mesozoic granitic and Franciscan Complex basement rocks that comprise both the northwest-trending Santa Lucia and Gabilan Ranges, whereas gravity lows in Salinas Valley and the offshore basins reflect the thick accumulations of low-density alluvial and marine sediment. Gravity lows also occur where there are thick deposits of low-density Monterey Formation in the hills southeast of Arroyo Seco (>2 km, Marion, 1986). Within the map area, isostatic residual gravity values range from approximately -60 mGal offshore in the northern part of the Sur basin to approximately 22 mGal in the Santa Lucia Range.

  16. A Heuristic Adjacent Extreme Point Algorithm for the Fixed Charge Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-06-01

    r.i*. - •»,-.,„ 4^ e a ’iß"’*M.’U3iuTr csea ■üia Any views expressed in this paper are those of the author. They should not be interpreted as...York, 1961. 4. Clark, R. M., and B. P. Helms, "Decentralized Solid Waste Col- lection Facilities," Journal of the Sanitary Engineering Division

  17. Quantum leaps, bit by bit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabesinger, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The promises of quantum computation are unique -- and so are the challenges. Progress in physics, mathematics, computer science and engineering have brought quantum computers to a point where they start to challenge their classical counterparts. By Andreas Trabesinger; illustration by Visual Science.

  18. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  19. Quantum computation for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Numerically exact simulation of quantum systems on classical computers is in general, an intractable computational problem. Computational chemists have made progress in the development of approximate methods to tackle complex chemical problems. The downside of these approximate methods is that their failure for certain important cases such as long-range charge transfer states in the case of traditional density functional theory. In 1982, Richard Feynman suggested that a quantum device should be able to simulate quantum systems (in our case, molecules) exactly using quantum computers in a tractable fashion. Our group has been working in the development of quantum chemistry algorithms for quantum devices. In this talk, I will describe how quantum computers can be employed to carry out numerically exact quantum chemistry and chemical reaction dynamics calculations, as well as molecular properties. Finally, I will describe our recent experimental quantum computation of the energy of the hydrogen molecule using an optical quantum computer.

  20. Quantum Theory and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, Ted

    2009-07-01

    List of participants; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. The function of the colloquium - editorial; 2. The conceptual problem of quantum theory from the experimentalist's point of view O. R. Frisch; Part II. Niels Bohr and Complementarity: The Place of the Classical Language: 3. The Copenhagen interpretation C. F. von Weizsäcker; 4. On Bohr's views concerning the quantum theory D. Bohm; Part III. The Measurement Problem: 5. Quantal observation in statistical interpretation H. J. Groenewold; 6. Macroscopic physics, quantum mechanics and quantum theory of measurement G. M. Prosperi; 7. Comment on the Daneri-Loinger-Prosperi quantum theory of measurement Jeffrey Bub; 8. The phenomenology of observation and explanation in quantum theory J. H. M. Whiteman; 9. Measurement theory and complex systems M. A. Garstens; Part IV. New Directions within Quantum Theory: What does the Quantum Theoretical Formalism Really Tell Us?: 10. On the role of hidden variables in the fundamental structure of physics D. Bohm; 11. Beyond what? Discussion: space-time order within existing quantum theory C. W. Kilmister; 12. Definability and measurability in quantum theory Yakir Aharonov and Aage Petersen; 13. The bootstrap idea and the foundations of quantum theory Geoffrey F. Chew; Part V. A Fresh Start?: 14. Angular momentum: an approach to combinatorial space-time Roger Penrose; 15. A note on discreteness, phase space and cohomology theory B. J. Hiley; 16. Cohomology of observations R. H. Atkin; 17. The origin of half-integral spin in a discrete physical space Ted Bastin; Part VI. Philosophical Papers: 18. The unity of physics C. F. von Weizsäcker; 19. A philosophical obstacle to the rise of new theories in microphysics Mario Bunge; 20. The incompleteness of quantum mechanics or the emperor's missing clothes H. R. Post; 21. How does a particle get from A to B?; Ted Bastin; 22. Informational generalization of entropy in physics Jerome Rothstein; 23. Can life explain quantum mechanics? H. H

  1. Quantum memristors

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.; Sanz, M.

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  2. Quantum memristors

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  3. 2D quantum gravity from quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F

    2011-01-21

    In quantum systems with many degrees of freedom the replica method is a useful tool to study the entanglement of arbitrary spatial regions. We apply it in a way that allows them to backreact. As a consequence, they become dynamical subsystems whose position, form, and extension are determined by their interaction with the whole system. We analyze, in particular, quantum spin chains described at criticality by a conformal field theory. Its coupling to the Gibbs' ensemble of all possible subsystems is relevant and drives the system into a new fixed point which is argued to be that of the 2D quantum gravity coupled to this system. Numerical experiments on the critical Ising model show that the new critical exponents agree with those predicted by the formula of Knizhnik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov.

  4. Quantum criticality in a double-quantum-dot system.

    PubMed

    Zaránd, Gergely; Chung, Chung-Hou; Simon, Pascal; Vojta, Matthias

    2006-10-20

    We discuss the realization of the quantum-critical non-Fermi-liquid state, originally discovered within the two-impurity Kondo model, in double-quantum-dot systems. Contrary to common belief, the corresponding fixed point is robust against particle-hole and various other asymmetries and is unstable only to charge transfer between the two dots. We propose an experimental setup where such charge transfer processes are suppressed, allowing a controlled approach to the quantum-critical state. We also discuss transport and scaling properties in the vicinity of the critical point.

  5. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  6. Quantum entanglement percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomau, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Quantum communication demands efficient distribution of quantum entanglement across a network of connected partners. The search for efficient strategies for the entanglement distribution may be based on percolation theory, which describes evolution of network connectivity with respect to some network parameters. In this framework, the probability to establish perfect entanglement between two remote partners decays exponentially with the distance between them before the percolation transition point, which unambiguously defines percolation properties of any classical network or lattice. Here we introduce quantum networks created with local operations and classical communication, which exhibit non-classical percolation transition points leading to striking communication advantages over those offered by the corresponding classical networks. We show, in particular, how to establish perfect entanglement between any two nodes in the simplest possible network—the 1D chain—using imperfectly entangled pairs of qubits.

  7. PIXE analysis of elements in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qixin; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Lingnuo; Xu, Yongling; Ye, Simao

    1990-04-01

    The elemental regional distributions in 20 resected human stomach tissues were obtained using PIXE analysis. The samples were pathologically divided into four types: normal, adjacent mucosa A, adjacent mucosa B and cancer. The targets for PIXE analysis were prepared by wet digestion with a pressure bomb system. P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se were measured and statistically analysed. We found significantly higher concentrations of P, K, Cu, Zn and a higher ratio of Cu compared to Zn in cancer tissue as compared with normal tissue, but statistically no significant difference between adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue was found.

  8. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  9. N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid-based lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, magnetism and quantum Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Guilin; Chen Wulin; Zheng Jun; Yu Huiyou; Wang Jianguo

    2012-08-15

    A series of lanthanide coordination polymers have been obtained through the hydrothermal reaction of N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid (H{sub 3}SIDA) and Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln=La, 1; Pr, 2; Nd, 3; Gd, 4). Crystal structure analysis exhibits that lanthanide ions affect the coordination number, bond length and dimension of compounds 1-4, which reveal that their structure diversity can be attributed to the effect of lanthanide contraction. Furthermore, the combination of magnetic measure with quantum Monte Carlo(QMC) studies exhibits that the coupling parameters between two adjacent Gd{sup 3+} ions for anti-anti and syn-anti carboxylate bridges are -1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and -5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}, respectively, which reveals weak antiferromagnetic interaction in 4. - Graphical abstract: Four lanthanide coordination polymers with N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid were obtained under hydrothermal condition and reveal the weak antiferromagnetic coupling between two Gd{sup 3+} ions by Quantum Monte Carlo studies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four lanthanide coordination polymers of H{sub 3}SIDA ligand were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanide ions play an important role in their structural diversity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measure exhibits that compound 4 features antiferromagnetic property. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum Monte Carlo studies reveal the coupling parameters of two Gd{sup 3+} ions.

  10. Why Bohm's Quantum Theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, H. D.

    1999-04-01

    This is a brief reply to S. Goldstein's article "Quantum theory without observers" in Physics Today. It is pointed out that Bohm's pilot wave theory is successful only because it keeps Schrödinger's (exact) wave mechanics unchanged, while the rest of it is observationally meaningless and solely based on classical prejudice.

  11. Network-Centric Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers ``future-proof'' cryptographic security rooted in the laws of physics. Today's quantum-secured communications cannot be compromised by unanticipated future technological advances. But to date, QC has only existed in point-to-point instantiations that have limited ability to address the cyber security challenges of our increasingly networked world. In my talk I will describe a fundamentally new paradigm of network-centric quantum communications (NQC) that leverages the network to bring scalable, QC-based security to user groups that may have no direct user-to-user QC connectivity. With QC links only between each of N users and a trusted network node, NQC brings quantum security to N2 user pairs, and to multi-user groups. I will describe a novel integrated photonics quantum smartcard (``QKarD'') and its operation in a multi-node NQC test bed. The QKarDs are used to implement the quantum cryptographic protocols of quantum identification, quantum key distribution and quantum secret splitting. I will explain how these cryptographic primitives are used to provide key management for encryption, authentication, and non-repudiation for user-to-user communications. My talk will conclude with a description of a recent demonstration that QC can meet both the security and quality-of-service (latency) requirements for electric grid control commands and data. These requirements cannot be met simultaneously with present-day cryptography.

  12. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  13. Quantum guidebooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2012-06-01

    Fresh from his appearance on the latest Physics World podcast, which examined the enduring popularity of books about quantum mechanics, Robert P Crease surveys the many tour guides to the quantum world.

  14. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  15. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; ...

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  16. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    SciTech Connect

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Van Dam, Wim; Farhi, Edward; Gaitan, Frank; Humble, Travis; Jordan, Stephen; Landahl, Andrew J; Love, Peter; Lucas, Robert; Preskill, John; Muller, Richard P.; Svore, Krysta; Wiebe, Nathan; Williams, Carl

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  17. Nonequilibrium quantum mechanics: A "hot quantum soup" of paramagnons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scammell, H. D.; Sushkov, O. P.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by recent measurements of the lifetime (decay width) of paramagnons in quantum antiferromagnet TlCuCl3, we investigate paramagnon decay in a heat bath and formulate an appropriate quantum theory. Our formulation can be split into two regimes: (i) a nonperturbative, "hot quantum soup" regime where the paramagnon width is comparable to its energy; (ii) a usual perturbative regime where the paramagnon width is significantly lower than its energy. Close to the Neel temperature, the paramagnon width becomes comparable to its energy and falls into the hot quantum soup regime. To describe this regime, we develop a new finite frequency, finite temperature technique for a nonlinear quantum field theory; the "golden rule of quantum kinetics." The formulation is generic and applicable to any three-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet in the vicinity of a quantum critical point. Specifically, we apply our results to TlCuCl3 and find agreement with experimental data. Additionally, we show that logarithmic running of the coupling constant in the upper critical dimension changes the commonly accepted picture of the quantum disordered and quantum critical regimes.

  18. Quantum Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-15

    Notre Dame was concerned with a variety of quantum transport in mesoscopic structures. This research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific...Research under Grant No. AFOSR-91-0211. The major issues examined included quantum transport in high magnetic fields and modulated channels, Coulomb...lifetimes in quasi-1D structures, quantum transport experiments in metals, the mesoscopic photovoltaic effect, and new techniques for fabricating quantum structures in semiconductors.

  19. Overall view of tower and adjacent aircraft shelters on flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of tower and adjacent aircraft shelters on flight line. View to east. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Security Guard Tower, Florida Street at Aircraft Shelters Area, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  20. 10. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  1. Lock 4 View east of lock wall and adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Lock 4 - View east of lock wall and adjacent roadway built atop tow path. The gate pocket can be seen at center. - Savannah & Ogeechee Barge Canal, Between Ogeechee & Savannah Rivers, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  2. 1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. A BRICK AND CONCRETE FAN HOUSING ADJACENT TO ONE OF THE ADIT OPENINGS (VIEW TO THE NORTH). - Foster Gulch Mine, Fan Housing, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  3. 1. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING SOUTH. GARAGE TO EXTREME LEFT, BUILDING 1 TO EXTREME RIGHT. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  4. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING SOUTH. GARAGE TO EXTREME LEFT, BUILDING 1 TO EXTREME RIGHT. - Techwood Homes, Building No. 16, 488-514 Techwood Drive, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  5. View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from water showing south facade and adjacent boat slips (Facility Nos. S375 & S376) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat House, Hornet Avenue at Independence Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Cement Leakage into Adjacent Vertebral Body Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoo; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) is a minimally invasive procedure for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures that fail to respond to conventional conservative treatment. It significantly improves intolerable back pain within hours, and has a low complication rate. Although rare, PV is not free of complications, most of which are directly related to cement leakage. Because of its association with new adjacent fracture, the importance of cement leakage into the adjacent disc space is paramount. Here, we report an interesting case of cement leakage into the adjacent upper vertebral body as well as disc space following PV. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of cement leakage into the adjacent vertebral body following PV. This rare case is presented along with a review of the literature.

  7. 15. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of Pier No. 5 and portion of the deck and super-structure. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  8. 7. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of Pier No. 1 and portions of the deck and super-structure. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  9. 8. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of Pier No. 2 and portions of the deck and super-structure. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  10. VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHERN AND EASTERN SIDES FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO BUILDING 199 (POLICE STATION) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Post Office, Avenue A near Eleventh Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement, room 23, looking southwest into two adjacent offices with soundproof walls and pedestal flooring - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  12. 3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of north side of house facing from adjacent vacant property. Original wood lap siding and trim is covered by aluminum siding. Recessed side porch is in middle. - 645 South Eighteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  13. View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of viaduct, looking SE from roof of adjacent parking garage. - Mulberry Street Viaduct, Spanning Paxton Creek & Cameron Street (State Route 230) at Mulberry Street (State Route 3012), Harrisburg, Dauphin County, PA

  14. 1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ninth Street (west) facade. Adjacent on the north is the 9th Street facade of 816 E Street. Both buildings were originally one property. - Riley Building, Rendezvous Adult Magazines & Films, 437 Ninth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel 28, view to southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  16. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. PASSAGE ADJACENT TO ROOM 232, EAST WING, SECOND FLOOR, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST, SHOWING EASTERNMOST ARCH OF FORMER GREAT HALL NORTH ARCADE - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail exterior view looking north showing piping system adjacent to engine house. Gas cooling system is on far right. - Burnsville Natural Gas Pumping Station, Saratoga Avenue between Little Kanawha River & C&O Railroad line, Burnsville, Braxton County, WV

  19. 52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. EASTSIDE PLANT: GENERAL VIEW OF GOVERNOR ADJACENT TO GENERATOR - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  20. OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE OF SOUTHWEST END AND SOUTHEAST SIDE, WITH ADJACENT FACILITY 391 IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Brick incinerator structure located adjacent to "motor courts." This example is located between Buildings 26 and 27. Facing northeast - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  3. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOME, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOME, LOOKING WEST. GEORGIA TECH DORMITORY BUILDING, 581-587 TECHWOOD DRIVE, IN FOREGROUND. - Techwood Homes, Building No. 16, 488-514 Techwood Drive, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  4. 72. View of reservoir adjacent to south wall of blowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. View of reservoir adjacent to south wall of blowing engine house where water from furnaces was allowed to cool. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Quantum groups with invariant integrals

    PubMed Central

    Van Daele, Alfons

    2000-01-01

    Quantum groups have been studied intensively for the last two decades from various points of view. The underlying mathematical structure is that of an algebra with a coproduct. Compact quantum groups admit Haar measures. However, if we want to have a Haar measure also in the noncompact case, we are forced to work with algebras without identity, and the notion of a coproduct has to be adapted. These considerations lead to the theory of multiplier Hopf algebras, which provides the mathematical tool for studying noncompact quantum groups with Haar measures. I will concentrate on the *-algebra case and assume positivity of the invariant integral. Doing so, I create an algebraic framework that serves as a model for the operator algebra approach to quantum groups. Indeed, the theory of locally compact quantum groups can be seen as the topological version of the theory of quantum groups as they are developed here in a purely algebraic context. PMID:10639115

  6. Dynamical quantum phase transitions (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    During recent years the interest to dynamics of quantum systems has grown considerably. Quantum many body systems out of equilibrium often manifest behavior, different from the one predicted by standard statistical mechanics and thermodynamics in equilibrium. Since the dynamics of a many-body quantum system typically involve many excited eigenstates, with a non-thermal distribution, the time evolution of such a system provides an unique way for investigation of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. Last decade such new subjects like quantum quenches, thermalization, pre-thermalization, equilibration, generalized Gibbs ensemble, etc. are among the most attractive topics of investigation in modern quantum physics. One of the most interesting themes in the study of dynamics of quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium is connected with the recently proposed important concept of dynamical quantum phase transitions. During the last few years a great progress has been achieved in studying of those singularities in the time dependence of characteristics of quantum mechanical systems, in particular, in understanding how the quantum critical points of equilibrium thermodynamics affect their dynamical properties. Dynamical quantum phase transitions reveal universality, scaling, connection to the topology, and many other interesting features. Here we review the recent achievements of this quickly developing part of low-temperature quantum physics. The study of dynamical quantum phase transitions is especially important in context of their connection to the problem of the modern theory of quantum information, where namely non-equilibrium dynamics of many-body quantum system plays the major role.

  7. 33 CFR 334.420 - Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations. 334.420 Section 334.420 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.420 Pamlico Sound and adjacent waters, N.C.; danger zones for Marine Corps operations. (a... date. Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point will have a call-in number for public use to...

  8. Quantum graph as a quantum spectral filter

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, Ondrej; Cheon, Taksu

    2013-03-15

    We study the transmission of a quantum particle along a straight input-output line to which a graph {Gamma} is attached at a point. In the point of contact we impose a singularity represented by a certain properly chosen scale-invariant coupling with a coupling parameter {alpha}. We show that the probability of transmission along the line as a function of the particle energy tends to the indicator function of the energy spectrum of {Gamma} as {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. This effect can be used for a spectral analysis of the given graph {Gamma}. Its applications include a control of a transmission along the line and spectral filtering. The result is illustrated with an example where {Gamma} is a loop exposed to a magnetic field. Two more quantum devices are designed using other special scale-invariant vertex couplings. They can serve as a band-stop filter and as a spectral separator, respectively.

  9. Hand vein recognition based on the connection lines of reference point and feature point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-peng, Hu; Zhi-yong, Wang; Xiao-ping, Yang; Yu-ming, Xue

    2014-01-01

    According to the essential characters of the image topology, a new hand vein recognition algorithm based on the connection lines of reference point and feature points is proposed. In this method, the intersection points and the endpoints of the vein image are used as feature points. After the intersection points and the endpoints selected as feature points, the reference point for image matching are extracted from these points. The relative distances between the reference point and the feature points and the angles between the adjacent connections of the reference point and feature points are calculated and used as recognition features. Finally these two features are combined for hand vein recognition. This method can effectively overcome the influence on the recognition results caused by image translation and rotation. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is able to achieve hand vein recognition reliably and quickly.

  10. A Voronoi interior adjacency-based approach for generating a contour tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Qiao, Chaofei; Zhao, Renliang

    2004-05-01

    A contour tree is a good graphical tool for representing the spatial relations of contour lines and has found many applications in map generalization, map annotation, terrain analysis, etc. A new approach for generating contour trees by introducing a Voronoi-based interior adjacency set concept is proposed in this paper. The immediate interior adjacency set is employed to identify all of the children contours of each contour without contour elevations. It has advantages over existing methods such as the point-in-polygon method and the region growing-based method. This new approach can be used for spatial data mining and knowledge discovering, such as the automatic extraction of terrain features and construction of multi-resolution digital elevation model.

  11. Metal content of biopsies adjacent to dental cast alloys.

    PubMed

    Garhammer, Pauline; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K-A; Reitinger, T

    2003-06-01

    Single case reports indicate that components of dental alloys accumulate in the adjacent soft tissue of the oral cavity. However, data on a wider range of dental alloys and patient groups are scarce. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the metal content of oral tissues adjacent to dental alloys showing persisting signs of inflammation or other discoloration (affected sites) and of healthy control sites with no adjacent metal restoration in 28 patients. The composition of the adjacent alloys was analyzed and compared to the alloy components in the affected sites. Tissue analysis was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Alloy analysis was performed with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. In the affected sites, the metals Ag, Au, Cu, and Pd prevailed compared to control sites, reflecting the frequency distribution of single metals in the adjacent alloys. In most cases (84%), at least one of the analyzed metals was a component of the alloy and also detected in the tissue. Metal components from almost all dental cast alloys can be detected in adjacent tissue.

  12. Hydrologic Connection Between Geysers and Adjacent Thermal Pools, Two Examples: El Tatio, Chile and Yellowstone, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Saez, C.; Fauria, K.; Manga, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Namiki, A.

    2014-12-01

    Geyser eruption cycles can be influenced by adjacent and distant thermals sources, suggesting a hydraulic connection through permeable pathways. Diffusion of fluid pressure can be responsible for the communication between geysers. In this study we examine the processes linking two different geysers with adjacent thermal pools. The first was Vega Rinconada, located at El Tatio geyser field, Chile, where we measured temperature inside the conduit between the ground surface and a depth of seven meters, at one-meter intervals. The second was Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, where we measured temperature of the overflow water at the base of the cone. Concurrently, we measured temperature and the water level in pools adjacent to both geysers. We found common elements in both geyser - pool systems: First, water temperature in both adjacent pools was below the boiling point and cooler than water in the geysers. Second, changes in pool water levels were correlated with eruptions of the geysers. During the quiescent period of the geysers, the water level increased in adjacent pools, while water level in the pools deceased during eruptions. Additionally, measurements inside of the conduit in Vega Rinconada Geyser showed that water temperature increased in the deepest part of the conduit during eruptions, while water temperature decreased in the shallow part of the geyser conduit (~1 to 2 m). These drops in temperature in the shallow conduit were coincident with the drop in water level in the adjacent pool. This suggests that after the initiation of an eruption, water may drain from the pool to the geyser. Furthermore, we observed a temperature drop of 3oC in the shallow conduit immediately preceding the end of an eruption. This suggests that flow from the pool to geyser contributes to eruption shut off. Our observations of geyser-pool systems indicate a hydrologic connection between the geysers and their adjacent pools. In the case of Vega Rinconada, cold water

  13. Bridging quantum and classical plasmonics with a quantum-corrected model.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ruben; Borisov, Andrei G; Nordlander, Peter; Aizpurua, Javier

    2012-05-08

    Electromagnetic coupling between plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles allows for engineering of the optical response and generation of strong localized near-fields. Classical electrodynamics fails to describe this coupling across sub-nanometer gaps, where quantum effects become important owing to non-local screening and the spill-out of electrons. However, full quantum simulations are not presently feasible for realistically sized systems. Here we present a novel approach, the quantum-corrected model (QCM), that incorporates quantum-mechanical effects within a classical electrodynamic framework. The QCM approach models the junction between adjacent nanoparticles by means of a local dielectric response that includes electron tunnelling and tunnelling resistivity at the gap and can be integrated within a classical electrodynamical description of large and complex structures. The QCM predicts optical properties in excellent agreement with fully quantum mechanical calculations for small interacting systems, opening a new venue for addressing quantum effects in realistic plasmonic systems.

  14. Quantum Information Science Using Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, D.; Howell, J. C.; Lamas-Linares, A.

    Contents: 1 Introduction 1.1 A Humble Point of View 1.2 Quantum Mystery 1.3 Maxwell's Demon 1.4 Shannon Entropy 1.5 Von Neumann Entropy 2 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox and Bell's Inequalities 3 Producing Entangled Particles 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Parametric Down-Conversion 3.3 Franson's Proposal 3.4 Polarization Entanglement 4 The Beam Splitter Action on a Two-Photon State 4.1 Beamsplitter Transformation 4.2 Bell-State Analyzer 5 No-Cloning Theorem 6 Quantum Cryptography 7 Quantum Dense Coding 7.1 Theoretical Scheme 7.2 Experimental Dense Coding with Qubits 8 Quantum Teleportation 8.1 Theoretical Scheme 8.2 Experimental Quantum Teleportation of Qubits 8.3 Teleportation of Entanglement 8.4 A Two-Particle Scheme for Quantum Teleportation 9 Teleportation of Continuous Quantum Variables 9.1 Theoretical Scheme 9.2 Quantum Optical Implementation 10 Quantum Error Detection and Correction 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Quantum Error Detection 10.3 Avoiding Controlled-NOT Operations 10.4 Post-selection 11 Stimulated Entanglement 11.1 Theory 12 Bohm-Type Spin-s Entanglements

  15. Testing wetland axioms at a watershed scale: Case studies of the aggregate hydrologic effects of non-adjacent wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenson, G.; Golden, H. E.; Lane, C.; D'Amico, E.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands not adjacent to streams (i.e. "non-adjacent wetlands") are hypothesized to affect downgradient hydrology in a number of ways. Non-adjacent wetlands may, for example, attenuate peak flows, serve as focal points for groundwater recharge, and decrease streamflow variability. The lack of spatially and temporally continuous data elucidating these relationships makes hydrological models an important medium for testing these hypotheses at broad spatial scales (e.g., mesoscale watersheds). We present results from two case studies that apply a hydrological model modified to represent non-adjacent wetland hydrological processes and thereby evaluate their watershed-scale aggregate hydrological effects. We focus on non-adjacent wetlands in two North American landscapes: (1) a ~202 km2 watershed in the Coastal Plain with an extensive distribution of Carolina Bay wetlands and (2) a ~1672 km2 watershed in the Great Plains, which is characterized by a dense distribution of landscape depressions (i.e., prairie potholes). Preliminary results suggest that non-adjacent wetlands significantly affect downgradient hydrology in both landscapes - specifically the baseflow and quickflow components of the hydrograph. However, the emergent watershed-scale hydrological effects of non-adjacent wetlands in the two diverse landscapes differ widely, primarily in response to the varying importance of wetland (e.g., discharge, recharge, flow-through) and wetland to stream transport (e.g., surface, shallow subsurface, deep groundwater flows) functions in these systems. We highlight the watershed-scale hydrological effects of non-adjacent wetlands in these two physiographic settings and describe the need for additional analyses of wetlands in disparate landscapes, using alternative conceptual and simulation models.

  16. Quantum spaces are modular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2016-11-01

    At present, our notion of space is a classical concept. Taking the point of view that quantum theory is more fundamental than classical physics, and that space should be given a purely quantum definition, we revisit the notion of Euclidean space from the point of view of quantum mechanics. Since space appears in physics in the form of labels on relativistic fields or Schrödinger wave functionals, we propose to define Euclidean quantum space as a choice of polarization for the Heisenberg algebra of quantum theory. We show, following Mackey, that generically, such polarizations contain a fundamental length scale and that contrary to what is implied by the Schrödinger polarization, they possess topologically distinct spectra. These are the modular spaces. We show that they naturally come equipped with additional geometrical structures usually encountered in the context of string theory or generalized geometry. Moreover, we show how modular space reconciles the presence of a fundamental scale with translation and rotation invariance. We also discuss how the usual classical notion of space comes out as a form of thermodynamical limit of modular space while the Schrödinger space is a singular limit.

  17. Entanglement-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-03-01

    Quantum entanglement, to Erwin Schroedinger the essential feature of quantum mechanics, has become a central resource in various quantum communication protocols including quantum cryptography and quantum teleportation. From a fundamental point of view what is exploited in these experiments is the very fact which led Schroedinger to his statement namely that in entangled states joint properties of the entangled systems may be well defined while the individual subsystems may carry no information at all. In entanglement-based quantum cryptography it leads to the most elegant possible solution of the classic key distribution problem. It implies that the key comes into existence at spatially distant location at the same time and does not need to be transported. A number recent developments include for example highly efficient, robust and stable sources of entangled photons with a broad bandwidth of desired features. Also, entanglement-based quantum cryptography is successfully joining other methods in the work towards demonstrating quantum key distribution networks. Along that line recently decoy-state quantum cryptography over a distance of 144 km between two Canary Islands was demonstrated successfully. Such experiments also open up the possibility of quantum communication on a really large scale using LEO satellites. Another important possible future branch of quantum communication involves quantum repeaters in order to cover larger distances with entangled states. Recently the connection of two fully independent lasers in an entanglement swapping experiment did demonstrate that the timing control of such systems on a femtosecond time scale is possible. A related development includes recent demonstrations of all-optical one-way quantum computation schemes with the extremely short cycle time of only 100 nanoseconds.

  18. Quantum cheques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose the idea of a quantum cheque scheme, a cryptographic protocol in which any legitimate client of a trusted bank can issue a cheque, that cannot be counterfeited or altered in anyway, and can be verified by a bank or any of its branches. We formally define a quantum cheque and present the first unconditionally secure quantum cheque scheme and show it to be secure against any no-signalling adversary. The proposed quantum cheque scheme can been perceived as the quantum analog of Electronic Data Interchange, as an alternate for current e-Payment Gateways.

  19. Quantum frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  20. Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  1. Geometric methods in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    Recent advances in the physical sciences and engineering have created great hopes for new computational paradigms and substrates. One such new approach is the quantum computer, which holds the promise of enhanced computational power. Analogous to the way a classical computer is built from electrical circuits containing wires and logic gates, a quantum computer is built from quantum circuits containing quantum wires and elementary quantum gates to transport and manipulate quantum information. Therefore, design of quantum gates and quantum circuits is a prerequisite for any real application of quantum computation. In this dissertation we apply geometric control methods from differential geometry and Lie group representation theory to analyze the properties of quantum gates and to design optimal quantum circuits. Using the Cartan decomposition and the Weyl group, we show that the geometric structure of nonlocal two-qubit gates is a 3-Torus. After further reducing the symmetry, the geometric representation of nonlocal gates is seen to be conveniently visualized as a tetrahedron. Each point in this tetrahedron except on the base corresponds to a different equivalent class of nonlocal gates. This geometric representation is one of the cornerstones for the discussion on quantum computation in this dissertation. We investigate the properties of those two-qubit operations that can generate maximal entanglement. It is an astonishing finding that if we randomly choose a two-qubit operation, the probability that we obtain a perfect entangler is exactly one half. We prove that given a two-body interaction Hamiltonian, it is always possible to explicitly construct a quantum circuit for exact simulation of any arbitrary nonlocal two-qubit gate by turning on the two-body interaction for at most three times, together with at most four local gates. We also provide an analytic approach to construct a universal quantum circuit from any entangling gate supplemented with local gates

  2. Investigation of the Hosgri Fault, offshore Southern California, Point Sal to Point Conception

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, C.M.; Swanson, O.E.; Schell, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A high-resolution seismic reflection survey of the inner continental shelf between Point Sal and Point Conception has revealed faults that displace post-Wisconsin strata (less than 17,000-20,000 years). These faults are the Hosgri fault, the Offshore Lompoc fault, and smaller unnamed faults. Faults trending offshore from the adjacent shoreline such as the Pezzoni, Lions Head, Honda, and Pacifico faults, do not show post-Wisconsin activity. The Hosgri fault trends directly toward the coastline between Purisima Point and Point Arguello where it appears to merge with folds and smaller faults in the western Transverse Ranges. This trend of offshore structures toward the Point Arguello-Point Conception area is consistent with a hypothesis that the regional structural fabric of the southern California Coast Ranges and its adjacent offshore area merge with the Transverse Ranges.

  3. Quantum physics meets biology

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Markus; Juffmann, Thomas; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-01-01

    Quantum physics and biology have long been regarded as unrelated disciplines, describing nature at the inanimate microlevel on the one hand and living species on the other hand. Over the past decades the life sciences have succeeded in providing ever more and refined explanations of macroscopic phenomena that were based on an improved understanding of molecular structures and mechanisms. Simultaneously, quantum physics, originally rooted in a world-view of quantum coherences, entanglement, and other nonclassical effects, has been heading toward systems of increasing complexity. The present perspective article shall serve as a “pedestrian guide” to the growing interconnections between the two fields. We recapitulate the generic and sometimes unintuitive characteristics of quantum physics and point to a number of applications in the life sciences. We discuss our criteria for a future “quantum biology,” its current status, recent experimental progress, and also the restrictions that nature imposes on bold extrapolations of quantum theory to macroscopic phenomena. PMID:20234806

  4. Quantum Games under Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming; Qiu, Daowen

    2016-02-01

    Quantum systems are easily influenced by ambient environments. Decoherence is generated by system interaction with external environment. In this paper, we analyse the effects of decoherence on quantum games with Eisert-Wilkens-Lewenstein (EWL) (Eisert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83(15), 3077 1999) and Marinatto-Weber (MW) (Marinatto and Weber, Phys. Lett. A 272, 291 2000) schemes. Firstly, referring to the analytical approach that was introduced by Eisert et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 83(15), 3077 1999), we analyse the effects of decoherence on quantum Chicken game by considering different traditional noisy channels. We investigate the Nash equilibria and changes of payoff in specific two-parameter strategy set for maximally entangled initial states. We find that the Nash equilibria are different in different noisy channels. Since Unruh effect produces a decoherence-like effect and can be perceived as a quantum noise channel (Omkar et al., arXiv: 1408.1477v1), with the same two parameter strategy set, we investigate the influences of decoherence generated by the Unruh effect on three-player quantum Prisoners' Dilemma, the non-zero sum symmetric multiplayer quantum game both for unentangled and entangled initial states. We discuss the effect of the acceleration of noninertial frames on the the game's properties such as payoffs, symmetry, Nash equilibrium, Pareto optimal, dominant strategy, etc. Finally, we study the decoherent influences of correlated noise and Unruh effect on quantum Stackelberg duopoly for entangled and unentangled initial states with the depolarizing channel. Our investigations show that under the influence of correlated depolarizing channel and acceleration in noninertial frame, some critical points exist for an unentangled initial state at which firms get equal payoffs and the game becomes a follower advantage game. It is shown that the game is always a leader advantage game for a maximally entangled initial state and there appear some points at which

  5. Ferromagnetic quantum critical point avoided by the appearance of another magnetic phase in LaCrGe3 under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Kaluarachchi, Udhara S.; Khasanov, Rustem; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Guguchia, Zurab; Biswas, Pabitra Kumar; Bonfa, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto; Lin, Xiao; Kim, Stella K.; Mun, Eun Deok; Kim, Hyunsoo; Furukawa, Yuji; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2016-07-13

    Here, the temperature-pressure phase diagram of the ferromagnet LaCrGe3 is determined for the first time from a combination of magnetization, muon-spin-rotation, and electrical resistivity measurements. The ferromagnetic phase is suppressed near 2.1 GPa, but quantum criticality is avoided by the appearance of a magnetic phase, likely modulated, AFMQ. Our density functional theory total energy calculations suggest a near degeneracy of antiferromagnetic states with small magnetic wave vectors Q allowing for the potential of an ordering wave vector evolving from Q=0 to finite Q, as expected from the most recent theories on ferromagnetic quantum criticality. Our findings show that LaCrGe3 is a very simple example to study this scenario of avoided ferromagnetic quantum criticality and will inspire further study on this material and other itinerant ferromagnets.

  6. Spin dynamics near a putative antiferromagnetic quantum critical point in Cu-substituted BaFe2As2 and its relation to high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. G.; Wang, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Valdivia, P. N.; Abernathy, D. L.; Chi, Songxue; Christianson, A. D.; Aczel, A. A.; Hong, T.; Heitmann, T. W.; Ran, S.; Canfield, P. C.; Bourret-Courchesne, E. D.; Kreyssig, A.; Lee, D. H.; Goldman, A. I.; McQueeney, R. J.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2015-12-02

    We present the results of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, a composition close to a quantum critical point between antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered and paramagnetic phases. By comparing these results with the spin fluctuations in the low-Cu composition as well as the parent compound BaFe2As2 and superconducting Ba(Fe1–xNix)2As2 compounds, we demonstrate that paramagnon-like spin fluctuations are evident in the antiferromagnetically ordered state of Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, which is distinct from the AFM-like spin fluctuations in the superconducting compounds. Our observations suggest that Cu substitution decouples the interaction between quasiparticles and the spin fluctuations. In addition, we show that the spin-spin correlation length ξ(T) increases rapidly as the temperature is lowered and find ω/T scaling behavior, the hallmark of quantum criticality, at an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point.

  7. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  8. A quantum laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Treps, Nicolas; Grosse, Nicolai; Bowen, Warwick P; Fabre, Claude; Bachor, Hans-A; Lam, Ping Koy

    2003-08-15

    The measurement sensitivity of the pointing direction of a laser beam is ultimately limited by the quantum nature of light. To reduce this limit, we have experimentally produced a quantum laser pointer, a beam of light whose direction is measured with a precision greater than that possible for a usual laser beam. The laser pointer is generated by combining three different beams in three orthogonal transverse modes, two of them in a squeezed-vacuum state and one in an intense coherent field. The result provides a demonstration of multichannel spatial squeezing, along with its application to the improvement of beam positioning sensitivity and, more generally, to imaging.

  9. All-photonic intercity quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Munro, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent field demonstrations of quantum key distribution (QKD) networks hold promise for unconditionally secure communication. However, owing to loss in optical fibres, the length of point-to-point links is limited to a hundred kilometers, restricting the QKD networks to intracity. A natural way to expand the QKD network in a secure manner is to connect it to another one in a different city with quantum repeaters. But, this solution is overengineered unless such a backbone connection is intercontinental. Here we present a QKD protocol that could supersede even quantum repeaters for connecting QKD networks in different cities below 800 km distant. Nonetheless, in contrast to quantum repeaters, this protocol uses only a single intermediate node with optical devices, requiring neither quantum memories nor quantum error correction. Our all-photonic ‘intercity' QKD protocol bridges large gaps between the conventional intracity QKD networks and the future intercontinental quantum repeaters, conceptually and technologically. PMID:26671044

  10. All-photonic intercity quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Munro, William J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent field demonstrations of quantum key distribution (QKD) networks hold promise for unconditionally secure communication. However, owing to loss in optical fibres, the length of point-to-point links is limited to a hundred kilometers, restricting the QKD networks to intracity. A natural way to expand the QKD network in a secure manner is to connect it to another one in a different city with quantum repeaters. But, this solution is overengineered unless such a backbone connection is intercontinental. Here we present a QKD protocol that could supersede even quantum repeaters for connecting QKD networks in different cities below 800 km distant. Nonetheless, in contrast to quantum repeaters, this protocol uses only a single intermediate node with optical devices, requiring neither quantum memories nor quantum error correction. Our all-photonic `intercity' QKD protocol bridges large gaps between the conventional intracity QKD networks and the future intercontinental quantum repeaters, conceptually and technologically.

  11. Characterization of point defects in nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, Madalina M.

    Thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used to characterize point defects in LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 Crystals. A broad TL emission, peaking at 440 nm, is observed near 94 K from LiNbO3 when the crystal is irradiated at 77 K and then rapidly warmed. From the LiTaO3 crystals two overlapping TL peaks occur at 94 and 98 K, with each showing a 350-nm maximum in spectral emission. These peaks are observed after 77-K exposure of the crystals to x rays or lasers (266, 325, or 355 nm). During excitation of these crystals at 77 K, holes are trapped on oxygen ions adjacent to lithium vacancies and electrons are trapped on niobium and tantalum ions at regular lattice sites. These defects have characteristic EPR spectra, and the trapped electron center has an optical absorption band peaking at 1200 nm in LiNbO3 and 1600 nm in LiTaO3. Upon warming, the electrons become thermally unstable and migrate to the trapped-hole sites where radiative recombination occurs. Optical absorption and EPR were used to characterize the production and thermal decay of point defects in KD2PO4. A crystal was irradiated at 77 K with x rays and then warmed to room temperature. Immediately after the irradiation broad optical absorption bands were formed at 230, 390, and 550 nm. These bands thermally decayed in the 80 to 140 K range. Another absorption band near 450 nm appeared as the three bands disappeared. Correlations with EPR data suggest that the band at 230-nm is associated with interstitial deuterium atoms, the two bands at 390 and 550 nm are associated with self-trapped holes, and the band at 450 nm is associated with holes trapped adjacent to deuterium vacancies. Results from quantum-mechanical calculations performed with Gaussian 98 were correlated with hyperfine data from EPR measurements for several point defects in KH2PO4. The point defects modeled with calculations are: the self-trapped hole, the proton vacancy, the silicon hole, and the

  12. Biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Thein Aung; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Yoshikawa, Takamasa; Inaba, Tadashi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    Various biomechanical investigations have attempted to clarify the aetiology of adjacent segment disease (ASD). However, no biomechanical study has examined in detail the deformation behaviour of the adjacent segments when both pure torque and an angular displacement load are applied to the vertebrae along multiple segments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments. Ten cadaveric lumbar spines (L2-L5) of boars were used. Control and fusion models were prepared by disc damage and pedicle screw fixation of each specimen, and then, bending and rotation tests were performed using a six-axis material tester. In the biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, the range of motion (ROM) of the cranial and caudal adjacent segments in antero-posterior flexion and lateral bending was increased by about 20 % (p < 0.05), and the maximal torque in the fusion model was about threefold (p < 0.05) that in the control model. And in axial rotation, the ROM of cranial and caudal adjacent segments was increased by about 100 % (p < 0.001), and the maximal torque was about sixfold (p < 0.01) that in the control model. The ROM of adjacent segments was significantly increased after pedicle screw fixation as assessed by biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, but not in those regulated by torque. We present the results of biomechanical tests regulated by torque and angular displacement and show that the maximum torque of the fusion model was larger than that of the control model in the biomechanical test regulated by an angular displacement load, suggesting that mechanical stress on the segments adjacent to the fused segment is large. We think that ASD arises after spinal fusion surgery as a mechanism to compensate for the ROM lost due to excessive fusion by pedicle screw fixation, so that a large torque may be applied to adjacent segments within a physiologically

  13. Quantum analysis of plasmonic coupling between quantum dots and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, SalmanOgli

    2016-10-01

    In this study, interaction between core-shells nanoparticles and quantum dots is discussed via the full-quantum-theory method. The electromagnetic field of the nanoparticles is derived by the quasistatic approximation method and the results for different regions of the nanoparticles are quantized from the time-harmonic to the wave equation. Utilizing the optical field quantization, the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' deriving amplitudes contributing to the excitation waves are determined. In the current model, two counterpropagating waves with two different frequencies are applied. We derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations from the Heisenberg-Langevin equations; thus the nanoparticles-quantum dots interaction is perused. Moreover, by full quantum analyzing of the analytical expression, the quantum-plasmonic coupling relation and the Purcell factor are achieved. We show that the spontaneous emission of quantum dots can be dramatically manipulated by engineering the plasmon-plasmon interaction in the core-shells nanoparticles. This issue is a very attractive point for designing a wide variety of quantum-plasmonic sensors. Through the investigation of the nanoparticle plasmonic interaction effects on absorbed power, the results show that the nanoparticles' and quantum dots' absorption saturation state can be switched to each other just by manipulation of their deriving amplitudes. In fact, we manage the interference between the two waves' deriving amplitudes just by the plasmonic interactions effect.

  14. Adjacency graphs and long-range interactions of atoms in quasi-degenerate states: applied graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, C. M.; Debierre, V.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze, in general terms, the evolution of energy levels in quantum mechanics, as a function of a coupling parameter, and demonstrate the possibility of level crossings in systems described by irreducible matrices. In long-range interactions, the coupling parameter is the interatomic distance. We demonstrate the utility of adjacency matrices and adjacency graphs in the analysis of "hidden" symmetries of a problem; these allow us to break reducible matrices into irreducible subcomponents. A possible breakdown of the no-crossing theorem for higher-dimensional irreducible matrices is indicated, and an application to the 2 S-2 S interaction in hydrogen is briefly described. The analysis of interatomic interactions in this system is important for further progress on optical measurements of the 2 S hyperfine splitting.

  15. Quantum games as quantum types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  16. Smeared quantum phase transition in the dissipative random quantum Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the quantum phase transition in the random transverse-field Ising model under the influence of Ohmic dissipation. To this end, we numerically implement a strong-disorder renormalization-group scheme. We find that Ohmic dissipation destroys the quantum critical point and the associated quantum Griffiths phase by smearing. Our results quantitatively confirm a recent theory [J.A. Hoyos, T. Vojta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 (2008) 240601] of smeared quantum phase transitions.

  17. Entanglement negativity in quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Pasquale; Cardy, John; Tonni, Erik

    2012-09-28

    We develop a systematic method to extract the negativity in the ground state of a 1+1 dimensional relativistic quantum field theory, using a path integral formalism to construct the partial transpose ρ(A)(T(2) of the reduced density matrix of a subsystem [formula: see text], and introducing a replica approach to obtain its trace norm which gives the logarithmic negativity E=ln//ρ(A)(T(2))//. This is shown to reproduce standard results for a pure state. We then apply this method to conformal field theories, deriving the result E~(c/4)ln[ℓ(1)ℓ(2)/(ℓ(1)+ℓ(2))] for the case of two adjacent intervals of lengths ℓ(1), ℓ(2) in an infinite system, where c is the central charge. For two disjoint intervals it depends only on the harmonic ratio of the four end points and so is manifestly scale invariant. We check our findings against exact numerical results in the harmonic chain.

  18. fMRI Evidence of Acupoints Specificity in Two Adjacent Acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-Yang; Li, Lin; Shan, Bao-Ci; Nie, Bin-Bin; Xue, Jing-quan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Acupoint specificity is the foundation of acupuncture treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the acupoint specificity exists in two adjacent acupoints. Design and Setting. Two adjacent real acupoints, LR3 (Taichong) and ST44 (Neiting), and a nearby nonacupoint were selected. Thirty-three health volunteers were divided into three groups in random order, and each group only received acupuncture at one of the three points. While they received acupuncture, fMRI scan was performed. Results. The common cerebral activated areas responding to LR3 and ST44 included the contralateral primary somatosensory area (SI) and ipsilateral cerebellum. Acupuncture at LR3 specifically activated contralateral middle occipital gyrus, ipsilateral medial frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobe, middle temporal gyrus, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), lentiform nucleus, insula, and contralateral thalamus. Stimulation at ST44 selectively activated ipsilateral secondary somatosensory area (SII), contralateral middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, lingual gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Conclusions. Acupuncture at adjacent acupoints elicits distinct cerebral activation patterns, and those specific patterns might be involved in the mechanism of the specific therapeutic effects of different acupoints. PMID:23762172

  19. Repelling Point Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    There is a body of conventional wisdom that holds that a solvable quantum problem, by virtue of its solvability, is pathological and thus irrelevant. It has been difficult to refute this view owing to the paucity of theoretical constructs and experimental results. Recent experiments involving equivalent ions trapped in a spatial conformation of extreme anisotropic confinement (longitudinal extension tens, hundreds or even thousands of times transverse extension) have modified the view of relevancy, and it is now possible to consider systems previously thought pathological, in particular point Bosons that repel in one dimension. It has been difficult for the experimentalists to utilize existing theory, mainly due to long-standing theoretical misunderstanding of the relevance of the permutation group, in particular the non-commutativity of translations (periodicity) and transpositions (permutation). This misunderstanding is most easily rectified in the case of repelling Bosons.

  20. Quantum flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Amikam; Diósi, Lajos; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the concept of a quantum flywheel coupled to a quantum heat engine. The flywheel stores useful work in its energy levels, while additional power is extracted continuously from the device. Generally, the energy exchange between a quantum engine and a quantized work repository is accompanied by heat, which degrades the charging efficiency. Specifically when the quantum harmonic oscillator acts as a work repository, quantum and thermal fluctuations dominate the dynamics. Quantum monitoring and feedback control are applied to the flywheel in order to reach steady state and regulate its operation. To maximize the charging efficiency one needs a balance between the information gained by measuring the system and the information fed back to the system. The dynamics of the flywheel are described by a stochastic master equation that accounts for the engine, the external driving, the measurement, and the feedback operations.

  1. Quantifying Quantumness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Daniel; Giraud, Olivier; Braun, Peter A.

    2010-03-01

    We introduce and study a measure of ``quantumness'' of a quantum state based on its Hilbert-Schmidt distance from the set of classical states. ``Classical states'' were defined earlier as states for which a positive P-function exists, i.e. they are mixtures of coherent states [1]. We study invariance properties of the measure, upper bounds, and its relation to entanglement measures. We evaluate the quantumness of a number of physically interesting states and show that for any physical system in thermal equilibrium there is a finite critical temperature above which quantumness vanishes. We then use the measure for identifying the ``most quantum'' states. Such states are expected to be potentially most useful for quantum information theoretical applications. We find these states explicitly for low-dimensional spin-systems, and show that they possess beautiful, highly symmetric Majorana representations. [4pt] [1] Classicality of spin states, Olivier Giraud, Petr Braun, and Daniel Braun, Phys. Rev. A 78, 042112 (2008)

  2. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael C.; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2015-12-14

    Much progress has been made in the field of quantum computing using continuous variables over the last couple of years. This includes the generation of extremely large entangled cluster states (10,000 modes, in fact) as well as a fault tolerant architecture. This has lead to the point that continuous-variable quantum computing can indeed be thought of as a viable alternative for universal quantum computing. With that in mind, we present a new algorithm for continuous-variable quantum computers which gives an exponential speedup over the best known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonic quantum field theory, a problem that is known to be hard using a classical computer. Thus, we give an experimental implementation based on cluster states that is feasible with today's technology.

  3. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael C.; Siopsis, George; ...

    2015-12-14

    Much progress has been made in the field of quantum computing using continuous variables over the last couple of years. This includes the generation of extremely large entangled cluster states (10,000 modes, in fact) as well as a fault tolerant architecture. This has lead to the point that continuous-variable quantum computing can indeed be thought of as a viable alternative for universal quantum computing. With that in mind, we present a new algorithm for continuous-variable quantum computers which gives an exponential speedup over the best known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonicmore » quantum field theory, a problem that is known to be hard using a classical computer. Thus, we give an experimental implementation based on cluster states that is feasible with today's technology.« less

  4. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  5. Quantum Metaphotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    This included optimizing the MBE growth conditions of a near-surface quantum wells with emission around 1500nm and fabrication of arrays of various...antennas and near-surface quantum-confined structures. This included optimizing the molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions of a near-surface quantum...due to the single process epitaxial growth , increases the interaction. Low densities of indium islands have been shown to increase the

  6. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation packages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on tile US Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama.

  7. Management of adjacent segment disease after cervical spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) was described after long-term follow-up of patients treated with cervical fusion. The term describes new-onset radiculopathy or myelopathy referable to a motion segment adjacent to previous arthrodesis and often attributed to alterations in the biomechanical environment after fusion. Evidence suggests that ASD affects between 2% and 3% of patients per year. Although prevention of ASD was one major impetus behind the development of motion-sparing surgery, the literature does not yet clearly distinguish a difference in the rate of ASD between fusion and disk replacement. Surgical techniques during index surgery may reduce the rate of ASD.

  8. Quantum Critical Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, Brando; Csáki, Csaba; Hubisz, Jay; Lee, Seung J.; Serra, Javi; Terning, John

    2016-10-01

    The appearance of the light Higgs boson at the LHC is difficult to explain, particularly in light of naturalness arguments in quantum field theory. However, light scalars can appear in condensed matter systems when parameters (like the amount of doping) are tuned to a critical point. At zero temperature these quantum critical points are directly analogous to the finely tuned standard model. In this paper, we explore a class of models with a Higgs near a quantum critical point that exhibits non-mean-field behavior. We discuss the parametrization of the effects of a Higgs emerging from such a critical point in terms of form factors, and present two simple realistic scenarios based on either generalized free fields or a 5D dual in anti-de Sitter space. For both of these models, we consider the processes g g →Z Z and g g →h h , which can be used to gain information about the Higgs scaling dimension and IR transition scale from the experimental data.

  9. Quantum Ising model coupled with conducting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasufumi; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    The effect of photo-doping on the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 is studied by using the one-dimensional quantum Ising model, where the Ising spin describes the effective lattice polarization of an optical phonon. Two types of electron-phonon couplings are introduced through the modulation of transfer integral via lattice deformations. After the exact diagonalization and the perturbation studies, we find that photo-induced low-density carriers can drastically alter quantum fluctuations when the system locates near the quantum critical point between the quantum para- and ferro-electric phases.

  10. Quantum seismography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    A major scientific thrust from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to increase the performance of a wide variety of information processing devices. In particular, quantum radar has emerged as an intriguing theoretical concept that could revolutionize electromagnetic standoff sensing. In this paper we will discuss how the techniques developed for quantum radar could also be used towards the design of novel seismographs able to detect small ground vibrations., We use a hypothetical earthquake warning system in order to compare quantum seismography with traditional seismographic techniques.

  11. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  12. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  13. Providing nearest neighbor point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Faraj, Ahmad A.; Inglett, Todd A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2012-10-23

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing nearest neighbor point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: identifying each link in the global combining network for each compute node of the operational group; designating one of a plurality of point-to-point class routing identifiers for each link such that no compute node in the operational group is connected to two adjacent compute nodes in the operational group with links designated for the same class routing identifiers; and configuring each compute node of the operational group for point-to-point communications with each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through the link between that compute node and that adjacent compute node using that link's designated class routing identifier.

  14. Quantum pump in quantum spin Hall edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fang

    2016-09-01

    We present a theory for quantum pump in a quantum spin Hall bar with two quantum point contacts (QPCs). The pump currents can be generated by applying harmonically modulating gate voltages at QPCs. The phase difference between the gate voltages introduces an effective gauge field, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry and generates pump currents. The pump currents display very different pump frequency dependence for weak and strong e-e interaction. These unique properties are induced by the helical feature of the edge states, and therefore can be used to detect and control edge state transport.

  15. Karl Popper's Quantum Ghost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, William

    2004-05-01

    Karl Popper, though not trained as a physicist and embarrassed early in his career by a physics error pointed out by Einstein and Bohr, ultimately made substantial contributions to the interpretation of quantum mechanics. As was often the case, Popper initially formulated his position by criticizing the views of others - in this case Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg. Underlying Popper's criticism was his belief that, first, the "standard interpretation" of quantum mechanics, sometimes called the Copenhagen interpretation, abandoned scientific realism and second, the assertion that quantum theory was "complete" (an assertion rejected by Einstein among others) amounted to an unfalsifiable claim. Popper insisted that the most basic predictions of quantum mechanics should continue to be tested, with an eye towards falsification rather than mere adding of decimal places to confirmatory experiments. His persistent attacks on the Copenhagen interpretation were aimed not at the uncertainty principle itself and the formalism from which it was derived, but at the acceptance by physicists of an unclear epistemology and ontology that left critical questions unanswered. In 1999, physicists at the University of Maryland conducted a version of Popper's Experiment, re-igniting the debate over quantum predictions and the role of locality in physics.

  16. Noninvasive detection of charge rearrangement in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, C.; Rogge, M. C.; Harke, B.; Reinwald, M.; Wegscheider, W.; Hohls, F.; Haug, R. J.

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate new results on electron redistribution on a single quantum dot caused by magnetic field. A quantum point contact is used to detect changes in the quantum dot charge. We are able to measure both the change of the quantum dot charge and also changes of the electron configuration at constant number of electrons on the quantum dot. These features are used to exploit the quantum dot in a high magnetic field where transport through the quantum dot displays the effects of Landau shells and spin blockade.

  17. A linearization of quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Tanner

    2015-06-01

    Because the quantum channels form a compact, convex set, we can express any quantum channel as a convex combination of extremal channels. We give a Euclidean representation for the channels whose inverses are also valid channels; these are a subset of the extreme points. They form a compact, connected Lie group, and we calculate its Lie algebra. Lastly, we calculate a maximal torus for the group and provide a constructive approach to decomposing any invertible channel into a product of elementary channels.

  18. LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEHR NO. 2 AND LEHR NO. 3 ADJACENT TO FURNACE ROOM; THE PIPES AT THE BOTTOM ARE PART OF THE RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM USED FOR HEATING THE FACTORY DURING COLD WEATHER. - Westmoreland Glass Company, Seventh & Kier Streets, Grapeville, Westmoreland County, PA

  19. Biogeochemistry of hydrothermally and adjacent non-altered soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a field/lab project, students in the Soil Biogeochemistry class of the University of Nevada, Reno described and characterized seven pedons, developed in hydrothermally and adjacent non-hydrothermally altered andesitic parent material near Reno, NV. Hydrothermally altered soils had considerably lo...

  20. 12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOG FOUNDATION ELEMENTS OF THE SAWMILL ADJACENT TO THE CANAL, LOOKING EAST. BARREN AREA IN FOREGROUND IS DECOMPOSING SAWDUST. DIRT PILE IN BACKGROUND IS THE EDGE OF THE SUMMIT COUNTY LANDFILL. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  1. Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Price, Phillip N.

    2012-09-01

    Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage. In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate interzone leakage.

  2. 1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW SHOWING FIRING CONTROL BLOCKHOUSE 0502 AND ADJACENT OBSERVATION TOWER. WATER BRAKE TROUGH SEGMENT AT LOWER RIGHT. Looking north northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. 1915 CLOTH ROOM ADJACENT TO PICKER ROOM, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH END OF MILL NO. 2, WALL ON LEFT DIVIDING CLOTH ROOM ADDED LATER (PROBABLY C. 1970s). - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  4. 11. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site, including Pier No. 4. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  5. 12. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View north from the adjacent B & O railroad bridge of portion of the Main truss span over the reservoir of the Augustine Paper Mills, National Register Site, including Pier No. 4. - Augustine Bridge, Brandywine River,Augustine Cutoff, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  6. 10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail and contextual view of bridge and adjacent farmstead setting. Note laced vertical compression members, latticed portal strut, decorative strut bracing, and lightness of diagonal and lateral tension members. View to southeast through southeast portal from truss mid-span. - Red Bank Creek Bridge, Spanning Red Bank Creek at Rawson Road, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  7. 47 CFR 73.810 - Third adjacent channel interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.810 Third adjacent channel... power FM, FM translator or FM booster station to such affected station and to the Commission. (ii) A full power FM, FM translator or FM booster station shall review all complaints it receives,...

  8. 47 CFR 73.810 - Third adjacent channel interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.810 Third adjacent channel... power FM, FM translator or FM booster station to such affected station and to the Commission. (ii) A full power FM, FM translator or FM booster station shall review all complaints it receives,...

  9. 8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Exterior view, showing tank and associated piping adjacent to Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking south. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA ON RIGHT, AND HOUSING AREA ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING RECREATION AREA AND ENTRY TO NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  12. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING WESTERN SIDE OF NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. 3. View of side of house facing north from adjacent ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of side of house facing north from adjacent property. Original wood siding and trim is visible. Note: later addition to rear of house is shown in right side of photograph. - 322 South Fifteenth Street (House), Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  15. 22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Float located adjacent to entry stair in filtration bed. The float actuates a valve that maintains water level over the bed. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  16. How subaerial salt extrusions influence water quality in adjacent aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Razieh; Zarei, Mehdi; Raeisi, Ezzat

    2015-12-01

    Brines supplied from salt extrusions cause significant groundwater salinization in arid and semi-arid regions where salt rock is exposed to dissolution by episodic rainfalls. Here we focus on 62 of the 122 diapirs of Hormuz salt emergent in the southern Iran. To consider managing the degradation effect that salt extrusions have on the quality of adjoining aquifers, it is first necessary to understand how they influence adjacent water resources. We evaluate here the impacts that these diapirs have on adjacent aquifers based on investigating their geomorphologies, geologies, hydrologies and hydrogeologies. The results indicate that 28/62 (45%) of our sample of salt diapirs have no significant impact on the quality of groundwater in adjoining aquifers (namely Type N), while the remaining 34/62 (55%) degrade nearby groundwater quality. We offer simple conceptual models that account for how brines flowing from each of these types of salt extrusions contaminate adjacent aquifers. We identify three main mechanisms that lead to contamination: surface impact (Type A), subsurface intrusion (Type B) and indirect infiltration (Type C). A combination of all these mechanisms degrades the water quality in nearby aquifers in 19/62 (31%) of the salt diapirs studied. Having characterized the mechanism(s) by which each diapir affects the adjacent aquifer, we suggest a few possible remediation strategies to be considered. For instance, engineering the surface runoff of diapirs Types A and C into nearby evaporation basins would improve groundwater quality.

  17. MTR COOLING TOWER. BASIN IS ADJACENT TO PUMP HOUSE. CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR COOLING TOWER. BASIN IS ADJACENT TO PUMP HOUSE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST TOWARD NORTH SIDE OF PUMP HOUSE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2690. Unknown Photographer, 6/1951. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION, ADJACENT LOUGHRAN BUILDING (BASSIN'S RESTAURANT) (HABS No. DC-357), 501-511 14TH STREET (THE LOCKER ROOM) HABS No. DC-356) ON CORNER, AND MUNSEY BUILDING (HABS No. DC-358) - William J. Stone Building, 1345 E Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. 2. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW FROM ROOFTOP OF BUILDING (MOTEL) ADJACENT TO TECHWOOD HOMES, LOOKING WEST. GEORGIA TECH DORMITORY BUILDING, 581-587 TECHWOOD DRIVE, IN FOREGROUND. - Techwood Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by North Avenue, Parker Street, William Street & Lovejoy Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  20. 7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT, ADJACENT TO THE COAL CONVEYOR; IN THE DISTANCE IS THE FREQUENCY CHANGER HOUSE, WHICH IS ATTACHED TO SWITCH HOUSE NO. 1; LOOKING WEST. - Commonwealth Electric Company, Fisk Street Electrical Generating Station, 1111 West Cermak Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL